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Sample records for effect hydrogen binding

  1. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Zhuang, ZB; Gao, MR; Zheng, J; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2015-01-08

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum.

  2. How are hydrogen bonds modified by metal binding?

    PubMed

    Husberg, Charlotte; Ryde, Ulf

    2013-06-01

    We have used density functional theory calculations to investigate how the hydrogen-bond strength is modified when a ligand is bound to a metal using over 60 model systems involving six metals and eight ligands frequently encountered in metalloproteins. We study how the hydrogen-bond geometry and energy vary with the nature of metal, the oxidation state, the coordination number, the ligand involved in the hydrogen bond, other first-sphere ligands, and different hydrogen-bond probe molecules. The results show that, in general, the hydrogen-bond strength is increased for neutral ligands and decreased for negatively charged ligands. The size of the effect is mainly determined by the net charge of the metal complex, and all effects are typically decreased when the model is solvated. In water solution, the hydrogen-bond strength can increase by up to 37 kJ/mol for neutral ligands, and that of negatively charged ligands can increase (for complexes with a negative net charge) or decrease (for positively charged complexes). If the net charge of the complex does not change, there is normally little difference between different metals or different types of complexes. The only exception is observed for sulphur-containing ligands (Met and Cys) and if the ligand is redox-active (e.g. high-valence Fe-O complexes).

  3. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented.

  4. Unveiling Residual Molecular Binding in Triply Charged Hydrogen Bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Penent, F.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Gamblin, G.; Carniato, S.; Andric, L.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.

    2011-03-11

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of triply charged hydrogen bromide ions formed by photoionization of the inner 3d shell of Br. The experimental results, obtained by detecting the 3d photoelectron in coincidence with the two subsequent Auger electrons, are analyzed using calculated potential energy curves of HBr{sup 3+}. The competition between the short-range chemical binding potential and the Coulomb repulsion in the dissociative process is shown. Two different mechanisms are observed for double Auger decay: one, a direct process with simultaneous ejection of two Auger electrons to final HBr{sup 3+} ionic states and the other, a cascade process involving double Auger decay characterized by the autoionization of Br*{sup +} ion subsequent to the HBr{sup 2+} fragmentation.

  5. Effects of retinoic acid and hydrogen peroxide on sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a activation during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Abd Eldaim, Mabrouk A; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Terao, Akira; Kimura, Kazuhiro

    2010-11-01

    Both retinoic acid (RA) and oxidative stress (H2O2) increased transcription and cleavage of membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1, leading to enhanced transcription of fatty acid synthase (FAS) in hepatoma cells. On the other hand, RA and H2O2 decreased and increased lipogenesis in adipocytes, respectively, although roles of SREBP-1 activation in these effects remain to be elucidated. To elucidate its involvement, we examined the activation of SREBP-la, expression of FAS genes and lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells in the presence of RA and/or H2O2. RA (1 microM) treatment suppressed expression of SREBP-1a and FAS genes and lipid accumulation. H2O2 (2 microM) treatment induced increased cleavage of SREBP-1a, without affecting amounts of SREBP-1a mRNA and precursor protein, and enhanced expression of FAS gene and lipid accumulation. Increased cleavage of SREBP-1a by H2O2 was also observed even in the presence of RA. These results suggest that H2O2, enhances a cleavage of SREBP-1a precursor protein, which independently occurs with the RA suppression of SREBP-1a gene expression, and that RA itself has no role in the SREBP-1a activation in adipocytes.

  6. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  7. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  8. Analytic variational calculation of the ground-state binding energy of hydrogen in intermediate and intense magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    The present work investigates analytically the effect of an intermediate or intense magnetic field, such as probably exist in white dwarfs and near pulsars, on the binding energy of the hydrogen ground state. A wave-function 'prescription' is given for an analytic variational calculation of the binding energy. The calculation still gives a smooth transition between intermediate and intense fields. An explicit calculation of the ground-state binding energy as B goes to infinity is provided for the Yafet et al. (1956) trial function.

  9. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  10. Enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation in a protein-ligand binding reaction.

    PubMed

    Connelly, P R; Aldape, R A; Bruzzese, F J; Chambers, S P; Fitzgibbon, M J; Fleming, M A; Itoh, S; Livingston, D J; Navia, M A; Thomson, J A

    1994-03-01

    Parallel measurements of the thermodynamics (free-energy, enthalpy, entropy and heat-capacity changes) of ligand binding to FK506 binding protein (FKBP-12) in H2O and D2O have been performed in an effort to probe the energetic contributions of single protein-ligand hydrogen bonds formed in the binding reactions. Changing tyrosine-82 to phenylalanine in FKBP-12 abolishes protein-ligand hydrogen bond interactions in the FKBP-12 complexes with tacrolimus or rapamycin and leads to a large apparent enthalpic stabilization of binding in both H2O and D2O. High-resolution crystallographic analysis reveals that two water molecules bound to the tyrosine-82 hydroxyl group in unliganded FKBP-12 are displaced upon formation of the protein-ligand complexes. A thermodynamic analysis is presented that suggests that the removal of polar atoms from water contributes a highly unfavorable enthalpy change to the formation of C=O...HO hydrogen bonds as they occur in the processes of protein folding and ligand binding. Despite the less favorable enthalpy change, the entropic advantage of displacing two water molecules upon binding leads to a slightly more favorable free-energy change of binding in the reactions with wild-type FKBP-12.

  11. Enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation in a protein-ligand binding reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, P R; Aldape, R A; Bruzzese, F J; Chambers, S P; Fitzgibbon, M J; Fleming, M A; Itoh, S; Livingston, D J; Navia, M A; Thomson, J A

    1994-01-01

    Parallel measurements of the thermodynamics (free-energy, enthalpy, entropy and heat-capacity changes) of ligand binding to FK506 binding protein (FKBP-12) in H2O and D2O have been performed in an effort to probe the energetic contributions of single protein-ligand hydrogen bonds formed in the binding reactions. Changing tyrosine-82 to phenylalanine in FKBP-12 abolishes protein-ligand hydrogen bond interactions in the FKBP-12 complexes with tacrolimus or rapamycin and leads to a large apparent enthalpic stabilization of binding in both H2O and D2O. High-resolution crystallographic analysis reveals that two water molecules bound to the tyrosine-82 hydroxyl group in unliganded FKBP-12 are displaced upon formation of the protein-ligand complexes. A thermodynamic analysis is presented that suggests that the removal of polar atoms from water contributes a highly unfavorable enthalpy change to the formation of C=O...HO hydrogen bonds as they occur in the processes of protein folding and ligand binding. Despite the less favorable enthalpy change, the entropic advantage of displacing two water molecules upon binding leads to a slightly more favorable free-energy change of binding in the reactions with wild-type FKBP-12. Images PMID:7510408

  12. Density functional study of hydrogen binding on gold and silver-gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang; Ren, YunLi; Ren, YunLai; Wang, JianJi; Yin, WeiPing

    2010-04-15

    A theoretical study was carried out on the binding of hydrogen on small bimetallic Ag(m)Au(n) (m + n < or = 5) and pure Au(n) (n < or = 5) clusters with neutral, negative, and positive charge state. It is found that the composition and charge state of clusters have strong influence on the most favorable binding site. The adiabatic ionization potentials, electron affinities, and hydrogen binding energies of cluster hydrides increase with the Au content increasing for the given cluster size. The cationic silver-gold cluster hydrides prefer ejection of Au-containing products whereas the anionic silver-gold cluster hydrides prefer ejection of Ag-containing products. The magnitude of metal-H frequency in combination with the metal-H bond length indicates that, with the same type of the binding site, the Au-H interaction is stronger than the Ag-H interaction.

  13. Yeast ribonuclease III uses a network of multiple hydrogen bonds for RNA binding and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Mathieu; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2008-08-19

    Members of the bacterial RNase III family recognize a variety of short structured RNAs with few common features. It is not clear how this group of enzymes supports high cleavage fidelity while maintaining a broad base of substrates. Here we show that the yeast orthologue of RNase III (Rnt1p) uses a network of 2'-OH-dependent interactions to recognize substrates with different structures. We designed a series of bipartite substrates permitting the distinction between binding and cleavage defects. Each substrate was engineered to carry a single or multiple 2'- O-methyl or 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions to prevent the formation of hydrogen bonds with a specific nucleotide or group of nucleotides. Interestingly, introduction of 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides near the cleavage site increased the rate of catalysis, indicating that 2'-OH are not required for cleavage. Substitution of nucleotides in known Rnt1p binding site with 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides inhibited cleavage while single 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions did not. This indicates that while no single 2'-OH is essential for Rnt1p cleavage, small changes in the substrate structure are not tolerated. Strikingly, several nucleotide substitutions greatly increased the substrate dissociation constant with little or no effect on the Michaelis-Menten constant or rate of catalysis. Together, the results indicate that Rnt1p uses a network of nucleotide interactions to identify its substrate and support two distinct modes of binding. One mode is primarily mediated by the dsRNA binding domain and leads to the formation of stable RNA/protein complex, while the other requires the presence of the nuclease and N-terminal domains and leads to RNA cleavage.

  14. Hydrogen Bond Dynamic Propensity Studies for Protein Binding and Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamic propensity of the backbone hydrogen bonds of the protein MDM2 (the natural regulator of the tumor suppressor p53) in order to determine its binding properties. This approach is fostered by the observation that certain backbone hydrogen bonds at the p53-binding site exhibit a dynamical propensity in simulations that differs markedly form their state-value (that is, formed/not formed) in the PDB structure of the apo protein. To this end, we conduct a series of hydrogen bond propensity calculations in different contexts: 1) computational alanine-scanning studies of the MDM2-p53 interface; 2) the formation of the complex of MDM2 with the disruptive small molecule Nutlin-3a (dissecting the contribution of the different molecular fragments) and 3) the binding of a series of small molecules (drugs) with different affinities for MDM2. Thus, the relevance of the hydrogen bond propensity analysis for protein binding studies and as a useful tool to complement existing methods for drug design and optimization will be made evident. PMID:27792778

  15. The hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on hydrogenic impurity binding energies in lattice matched InP/In0.53Ga0.47As/InP square quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başer, P.; Elagoz, S.

    2017-02-01

    The on-center shallow-donor impurity binding energy in lattice matched InP/In0.53Ga0.47As square quantum well structure have been theoretically investigated using effective mass and variational techniques. The effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and well width has been calculated and the results are discussed.

  16. Predictive binding geometry of ligands to DNA minor groove: isohelicity and hydrogen-bonding pattern.

    PubMed

    Stockert, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of drugs and dyes with nucleic acids, particularly when binding to DNA minor groove occurs, has increasing importance in biomedical sciences. This is due to the resulting biological activity and to the possibility of recognizing AT and GC base pairs. In such cases, DNA binding can be predicted if appropriate helical and hydrogen-bonding parameters are deduced from DNA models, and a simplified geometrical rule in the form of a stencil is then applied on computer-drawn molecules of interest. Relevant structure parameter values for minor groove binders are the length (4.6 < L < 5.4 Å) and angle (152 < σ < 156.5°) between three consecutive units, measured at the level of hydrogen donor or acceptor groups. Application of the stencil shows that predictive methods can aid in the design of new compounds, by checking the possible binding of isohelical sequence-specific ligands along the DNA minor groove.

  17. QM/MM (ONIOM) study of glycerol binding and hydrogen abstraction by the coenzyme B12-independent dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuemin; Gallo, August A; Florián, Jan; Liu, Yen-Shan; Mora, Sandeep; Xu, Wu

    2010-04-29

    Glycerol binding and the radical-initiated hydrogen transfer by the coenzyme B(12)-independent glycerol dehydratase from Clostridium butyricum were investigated by using quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations based on the high-resolution crystal structure (PDB code: 1r9d). Our QM/MM calculations of enzyme catalysis considered the electrostatic coupling between the quantum-mechanical and molecular-mechanical subsystems and two alternative mechanisms. In addition to performing QM/MM calculations in the enzyme, we evaluated energetics along the same reaction pathway in aqueous solution modeled by the polarized dielectric and in the virtual enzyme site that included full steric component from the enzyme residues described by molecular mechanics but lacked the electrostatic contribution of these residues. In this way, we established significant enzyme catalytic effect with respect to reference reactions in both an aqueous solution and a nonpolar cavity. Structurally, four hydrogen bonds formed between glycerol and H164, S282, E435, and D447 anchor glycerol for hydrogen abstraction by thiyl radical on C433. These hydrogen-bond partners orient glycerol molecule to facilitate the formation of the transition state for hydrogen abstraction from carbon C1. This reaction then proceeds with the activation free energy of 6.3 kcal/mol and the reaction free energy of 6.1 kcal/mol. The polarization effects imposed by these hydrogen bonds represent a predominant contribution to a 7.5 kcal/mol enzyme catalytic effect. These results demonstrate the importance of electrostatic catalysis and hydrogen-bonding in enzyme-catalyzed radical reactions and advance our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of B(12)-independent glycerol dehydratases.

  18. Hydrogen bonding in the protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate explored by density functional tight binding simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentel, Tobias; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    The applicability of the density functional based tight binding (DFTB) method to the description of hydrogen bond dynamics and infrared (IR) spectroscopy is addressed for the exemplary protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate. Potential energy curves for proton transfer in gas and liquid phases are shown to be comparable to the high level coupled cluster theory in the thermally accessible range of bond lengths. Geometric correlations in the hydrogen bond dynamics are analyzed for a cluster of six ion pairs. Comparing DFTB and DFT data lends further support for the reliability of the DFTB method. Therefore, DFTB bulk simulations are performed to quantify the extent of geometric correlations in terms of Pauling's bond order model. Further, IR absorption spectra are obtained using DFTB and analyzed putting emphasis on the signatures of hydrogen bonding in the NH-stretching and far IR hydrogen bond range.

  19. C-H…O hydrogen bonds in FK506-binding protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Sreekanth; Baek, Kwanghee; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen bonds are important interaction forces observed in protein structures. They can be classified as stronger or weaker depending on their energy, thereby reflecting on the type of donor. The contribution of weak hydrogen bonds is deemed as an important factor toward structure stability along with the stronger bonds. One such bond, the C-H…O type hydrogen bond, is shown to make a contribution in maintaining three dimensional structures of proteins. Apart from their presence within protein structures, the role of these bonds in protein-ligand interactions is also noteworthy. In this study, we present a statistical analysis on the presence of C-H…O hydrogen bonds observed between FKBPs and their cognate ligands. The FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) carry peptidyl cis-trans isomerase activity apart from the immunosuppressive property by binding to the immunosuppressive drugs FK506 or rapamycin. Because the active site of FKBPs is lined up by many hydrophobic residues, we speculated that the prevalence of C-H…O hydrogen bonds will be considerable. In a total of 25 structures analyzed, a higher frequency of C-H…O hydrogen bonds is observed in comparison with the stronger hydrogen bonds. These C-H…O hydrogen bonds are dominated by a highly conserved donor, the C(α/β) of Val55 and an acceptor, the backbone oxygen of Glu54. Both these residues are positioned in the β4-α1 loop, whereas the other residues Tyr26, Phe36 and Phe99 with higher frequencies are lined up at the opposite face of the active site. These preferences could be implicated in FKBP pharmacophore models toward enhancing the ligand affinity. This study could be a prelude to studying other proteins with hydrophobic pockets to gain better insights into ligand recognition.

  20. Characterization of hydrogen binding to tungsten and beryllium surfaces using low energy ion beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, Robert; Whaley, Josh

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we use low energy ion beam analysis to determine how hydrogen interacts with tungsten and beryllium surfaces. The goal of this work is to provide insight into processes that contribute to recycling from plasma-facing surfaces in magnetic fusion devices. Here we have applied low energy ion scattering (LEIS) to enable detection of adsorbed hydrogen at sub-monolayer resolution and to provide isotopic sensitivity. We probe the surfaces of interest with He + and Ne + at energies less than 5 keV to determine the structure and composition of the first few atomic layers. This approach enables us to examine how hydrogen surface concentrations evolve in real time, providing insight into adsorption kinetics. In addition, we have developed a means of determining the hydrogen binding configuration at different temperatures by exploiting mechanisms of ion channeling along surfaces. Using these methods, we have been able to identify hydrogen binding configurations for the W(100) +H, W(110) +H, and Be(0001) +H adsorption systems. We also report on our efforts to more accurately and efficiently model atomic collisions during scattering, key steps needed to extract structural information from LEIS signals. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Catalyst support effects on hydrogen spillover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Waiz; Spreafico, Clelia; Kleibert, Armin; Gobrecht, Jens; Vandevondele, Joost; Ekinci, Yasin; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen spillover is the surface migration of activated hydrogen atoms from a metal catalyst particle, on which they are generated, onto the catalyst support. The phenomenon has been much studied and its occurrence on reducible supports such as titanium oxide is established, yet questions remain about whether hydrogen spillover can take place on nonreducible supports such as aluminium oxide. Here we use the enhanced precision of top-down nanofabrication to prepare controlled and precisely tunable model systems that allow us to quantify the efficiency and spatial extent of hydrogen spillover on both reducible and nonreducible supports. We place multiple pairs of iron oxide and platinum nanoparticles on titanium oxide and aluminium oxide supports, varying the distance between the pairs from zero to 45 nanometres with a precision of one nanometre. We then observe the extent of the reduction of the iron oxide particles by hydrogen atoms generated on the platinum using single-particle in situ X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy applied simultaneously to all particle pairs. The data, in conjunction with density functional theory calculations, reveal fast hydrogen spillover on titanium oxide that reduces remote iron oxide nanoparticles via coupled proton-electron transfer. In contrast, spillover on aluminium oxide is mediated by three-coordinated aluminium centres that also interact with water and that give rise to hydrogen mobility competing with hydrogen desorption; this results in hydrogen spillover about ten orders of magnitude slower than on titanium oxide and restricted to very short distances from the platinum particle. We anticipate that these observations will improve our understanding of hydrogen storage and catalytic reactions involving hydrogen, and that our approach to creating and probing model catalyst systems will provide opportunities for studying the origin of synergistic effects in supported catalysts that combine multiple functionalities.

  2. Membrane adsorption and binding, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone: effects of hydrogen bonding and α-chirality in the β-peptoid residues.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiaona; Yang, Mingjun; Kasimova, Marina R; Malmsten, Martin; Franzyk, Henrik; Jorgensen, Lene; Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2012-11-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a promising approach for enhancing intracellular delivery of therapeutic biomacromolecules by increasing transport through membrane barriers. Here, proteolytically stable cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone were studied to evaluate the effect of α-chirality in the β-peptoid residues and the presence of guanidinium groups in the α-amino acid residues on membrane interaction. The molecular properties of the peptidomimetics in solution (surface and intramolecular hydrogen bonding, aqueous diffusion rate and molecular size) were studied along with their adsorption to lipid bilayers, cellular uptake, and toxicity. The surface hydrogen bonding ability of the peptidomimetics reflected their adsorbed amounts onto lipid bilayers as well as with their cellular uptake, indicating the importance of hydrogen bonding for their membrane interaction and cellular uptake. Ellipsometry studies further demonstrated that the presence of chiral centers in the β-peptoid residues promotes a higher adsorption to anionic lipid bilayers, whereas circular dichroism results showed that α-chirality influences their overall mean residue ellipticity. The presence of guanidinium groups and α-chiral β-peptoid residues was also found to have a significant positive effect on uptake in living cells. Together, the findings provide an improved understanding on the behavior of cell-penetrating peptidomimetics in the presence of lipid bilayers and live cells.

  3. Effective hydrogen storage: a strategic chemistry challenge.

    PubMed

    David, William I F

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the current status and future potential of hydrogen storage from a chemistry perspective and is based on the concluding presentation of the Faraday Discussion 151--Hydrogen Storage Materials. The safe, effective and economical storage of hydrogen is one of the main scientific and technological challenges in the move towards a low-carbon economy. One key sector is transportation where future vehicles will most likely be developed around a balance of battery-electric and hydrogen fuel-cell electric technologies. Although there has been a very significant research effort in solid-state hydrogen storage, high-pressure gas storage combined with conventional metal hydrides is still seen as the current intermediate-term candidate for car manufacturers. Significant issues have arisen in the search for improved solid-state hydrogen storage materials; for example, facile reversibility has been a major challenge for many recently studied complex hydrides while physisorption in porous structures is still restricted to cryogenic temperatures. However, many systems fulfil the majority of necessary criteria for improved hydrogen storage--indeed, the discovery of reversibility in multicomponent hydride systems along with recent chemistry breakthroughs in off-board and solvent-assisted regeneration suggest that the goal of both improved on-board reversible and off-board regenerated hydrogen storage systems can be achieved.

  4. Correlating the hydrogen evolution reaction activity in alkaline electrolytes with the hydrogen binding energy on monometallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Myint, M; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2013-05-01

    The slow reaction kinetics of the hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) on platinum in alkaline electrolytes hinders the development of alkaline electrolysers, solar hydrogen cells and alkaline fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of the exchange current density of the HER/HOR in alkaline media is critical for the search and design of highly active electrocatalysts. By studying the HER on a series of monometallic surfaces, we demonstrate that the HER exchange current density in alkaline solutions can be correlated with the calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) on the metal surfaces via a volcano type of relationship. The HER activity varies by several orders of magnitude from Pt at the peak of the plot to W and Au located on the bottom of each side of the plot, similar to the observation in acids. Such a correlation suggests that the HBE can be used as a descriptor for identifying electrocatalysts for HER/HOR in alkaline media, and that the HER exchange current density can be tuned by modifying the surface chemical properties.

  5. "Chameleonic" backbone hydrogen bonds in protein binding and as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, C A; Accordino, S R; Gerbino, D C; Appignanesi, G A

    2015-10-01

    We carry out a time-averaged contact matrix study to reveal the existence of protein backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs) whose net persistence in time differs markedly form their corresponding PDB-reported state. We term such interactions as "chameleonic" BHBs, CBHBs, precisely to account for their tendency to change the structural prescription of the PDB for the opposite bonding propensity in solution. We also find a significant enrichment of protein binding sites in CBHBs, relate them to local water exposure and analyze their behavior as ligand/drug targets. Thus, the dynamic analysis of hydrogen bond propensity might lay the foundations for new tools of interest in protein binding-site prediction and in lead optimization for drug design.

  6. Effects of Hydrogen on Tantalum Nitride Resistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, James

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we report on observations of degradation of thin film Tantalum Nitride chip resistors in a hermetically sealed hybrid. The observations have been attributed to the reaction of residual Palladium with desorbed Hydrogen on the surface of the resistor film. Hydrogen gas has been observed to desorb from various sources within the sealed hybrid as a result of temperature elevation. The hydrogen gas has been reported to undergo a reaction with elements such as Platinum and Palladium causing device degradation in Gallium Arsenide Field Effect Transistors. The experimental procedures and data relating to this observation along with a discussion of available risk mitigation techniques will be presented.

  7. Communication: Towards the binding energy and vibrational red shift of the simplest organic hydrogen bond: Harmonic constraints for methanol dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Heger, Matthias; Suhm, Martin A.; Mata, Ricardo A.

    2014-09-14

    The discrepancy between experimental and harmonically predicted shifts of the OH stretching fundamental of methanol upon hydrogen bonding to a second methanol unit is too large to be blamed mostly on diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicity corrections. It is shown that a decisive contribution comes from post-MP2 electron correlation effects, which appear not to be captured by any of the popular density functionals. We also identify that the major deficiency is in the description of the donor OH bond. Together with estimates for the electronic and harmonically zero-point corrected dimer binding energies, this work provides essential constraints for a quantitative description of this simple hydrogen bond. The spectroscopic dissociation energy is predicted to be larger than 18 kJ/mol and the harmonic OH-stretching fundamental shifts by about −121 cm{sup −1} upon dimerization, somewhat more than in the anharmonic experiment (−111 cm{sup −1})

  8. Communication: Towards the binding energy and vibrational red shift of the simplest organic hydrogen bond: harmonic constraints for methanol dimer.

    PubMed

    Heger, Matthias; Suhm, Martin A; Mata, Ricardo A

    2014-09-14

    The discrepancy between experimental and harmonically predicted shifts of the OH stretching fundamental of methanol upon hydrogen bonding to a second methanol unit is too large to be blamed mostly on diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicity corrections. It is shown that a decisive contribution comes from post-MP2 electron correlation effects, which appear not to be captured by any of the popular density functionals. We also identify that the major deficiency is in the description of the donor OH bond. Together with estimates for the electronic and harmonically zero-point corrected dimer binding energies, this work provides essential constraints for a quantitative description of this simple hydrogen bond. The spectroscopic dissociation energy is predicted to be larger than 18 kJ/mol and the harmonic OH-stretching fundamental shifts by about -121 cm(-1) upon dimerization, somewhat more than in the anharmonic experiment (-111 cm(-1)).

  9. The Influence of Hydrogen Ion Concentration on Calcium Binding and Release by Skeletal Muscle Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Nakamaru, Yoshiaki; Schwartz, Arnold

    1972-01-01

    Calcium release and binding produced by alterations in pH were investigated in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) from skeletal muscle. When the pH was abruptly increased from 6.46 to 7.82, after calcium loading for 30 sec, 80–90 nanomoles (nmole) of calcium/mg protein were released. When the pH was abruptly decreased from 7.56 to 6.46, after calcium loading for 30 sec, 25–30 nmole of calcium/mg protein were rebound. The calcium release process was shown to be a function of pH change: 57 nmole of calcium were released per 1 pH unit change per mg protein. The amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bound to the SR was not altered by the pH changes. The release phenomenon was not due to alteration of ATP concentration by the increased pH. Native actomyosin was combined with SR in order to study the effectiveness of calcium release from the SR by pH change in inducing super-precipitation of actomyosin. It was found that SR, in an amount high enough to inhibit superprecipitation at pH 6.5, did not prevent the process when the pH was suddenly increased to 7.3, indicating that the affinity of SR for calcium depends specifically on pH. These data suggest the possible participation of hydrogen ion concentration in excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:5007263

  10. Hydrogen Bonding Motifs in MutSaphla and their response to binding damaged DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negureanu, Lacra; Salsbury, Freddie

    2013-03-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing interest in studying the binding of damaged DNA to the MutSalpha protein complex. This protein complex, the Msh2/Msh6 complex in humans, is the initial complex that binds mismatched DNA and other DNA defects that occur during replication. This complex has also been shown to bind at least some types of damaged DNA. As a result of this interest, multiple studies have contrasted the interactions of MutSalpha with its normal mismatched substrate and with the interactions of MutsSalpha to DNA damaged by the chemotherapeutic cisplatin. To complement these studies, we examined the interaction between MutSalpha and DNA damaged by carboplatin via all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations provide evidence for different hydrogen bonding interactions at the protein/DNA and protein/protein interface. The hydrogen bonding motifs found are broadly similar to those found in binding to the adduct from cis-platin, but have distinct differences. These subtle differences may play a role in the way the different damages are signaled by MutS.

  11. Effect of Ion Binding in Palmitoyl-Oleoyl Phosphatidylserine Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckler, Matthew; Matysiak, Silvina

    2013-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylserine (POPS) monolayers at the air-water interface were performed with different ionic strengths with the aim of determining the specific organization and dynamics of counterion binding events. Na + ions penetrated the monolayers into both the ester carbonyl and carboxylate regions of the phospholipids. The binding events increase with the addition of salt. Differences in lipid order parameter, headgroup orientation, and prevalence of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding events between the amine group of the lipid and oxygen groups are observed depending on whether the Na + is binding near the carboxylate or ester region of the lipid. The observed changes are explained in terms of the salting-out effect.

  12. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER.

  13. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER. PMID:27034988

  14. Significant Quantum Effects in Hydrogen Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Georgios; Davidson, Erlend R.; Peng, Guowen; Roling, Luke T.; Singh, Suyash; Boucher, Matthew B.; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2014-03-31

    Dissociation of molecular hydrogen is an important step in a wide variety of chemical, biological, and physical processes. Due to the light mass of hydrogen, it is recognized that quantum effects are often important to its reactivity. However, understanding how quantum effects impact the reactivity of hydrogen is still in its infancy. Here, we examine this issue using a well-defined Pd/Cu(111) alloy that allows the activation of hydrogen and deuterium molecules to be examined at individual Pd atom surface sites over a wide range of temperatures. Experiments comparing the uptake of hydrogen and deuterium as a function of temperature reveal completely different behavior of the two species. The rate of hydrogen activation increases at lower sample temperature, whereas deuterium activation slows as the temperature is lowered. Density functional theory simulations in which quantum nuclear effects are accounted for reveal that tunneling through the dissociation barrier is prevalent for H2 up to 190 K and for D2 up to 140 K. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the effective barrier to H2 dissociation is so low that hydrogen uptake on the surface is limited merely by thermodynamics, whereas the D2 dissociation process is controlled by kinetics. These data illustrate the complexity and inherent quantum nature of this ubiquitous and seemingly simple chemical process. Examining these effects in other systems with a similar range of approaches may uncover temperature regimes where quantum effects can be harnessed, yielding greater control of bond-breaking processes at surfaces and uncovering useful chemistries such as selective bond activation or isotope separation.

  15. Significant Quantum Effects in Hydrogen Activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dissociation of molecular hydrogen is an important step in a wide variety of chemical, biological, and physical processes. Due to the light mass of hydrogen, it is recognized that quantum effects are often important to its reactivity. However, understanding how quantum effects impact the reactivity of hydrogen is still in its infancy. Here, we examine this issue using a well-defined Pd/Cu(111) alloy that allows the activation of hydrogen and deuterium molecules to be examined at individual Pd atom surface sites over a wide range of temperatures. Experiments comparing the uptake of hydrogen and deuterium as a function of temperature reveal completely different behavior of the two species. The rate of hydrogen activation increases at lower sample temperature, whereas deuterium activation slows as the temperature is lowered. Density functional theory simulations in which quantum nuclear effects are accounted for reveal that tunneling through the dissociation barrier is prevalent for H2 up to ∼190 K and for D2 up to ∼140 K. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the effective barrier to H2 dissociation is so low that hydrogen uptake on the surface is limited merely by thermodynamics, whereas the D2 dissociation process is controlled by kinetics. These data illustrate the complexity and inherent quantum nature of this ubiquitous and seemingly simple chemical process. Examining these effects in other systems with a similar range of approaches may uncover temperature regimes where quantum effects can be harnessed, yielding greater control of bond-breaking processes at surfaces and uncovering useful chemistries such as selective bond activation or isotope separation. PMID:24684530

  16. AIScore chemically diverse empirical scoring function employing quantum chemical binding energies of hydrogen-bonded complexes.

    PubMed

    Raub, Stephan; Steffen, Andreas; Kämper, Andreas; Marian, Christel M

    2008-07-01

    In this work we report on a novel scoring function that is based on the LUDI model and focuses on the prediction of binding affinities. AIScore extends the original FlexX scoring function using a chemically diverse set of hydrogen-bonded interactions derived from extensive quantum chemical ab initio calculations. Furthermore, we introduce an algorithmic extension for the treatment of multifurcated hydrogen bonds (XFurcate). Charged and resonance-assisted hydrogen bond energies and hydrophobic interactions as well as a scaling factor for implicit solvation were fitted to experimental data. To this end, we assembled a set of 101 protein-ligand complexes with known experimental binding affinities. Tightly bound water molecules in the active site were considered to be an integral part of the binding pocket. Compared to the original FlexX scoring function, AIScore significantly improves the prediction of the binding free energies of the complexes in their native crystal structures. In combination with XFurcate, AIScore yields a Pearson correlation coefficient of R P = 0.87 on the training set. In a validation run on the PDBbind test set we achieved an R P value of 0.46 for 799 attractively scored complexes, compared to a value of R P = 0.17 and 739 bound complexes obtained with the FlexX original scoring function. The redocking capability of AIScore, on the other hand, does not fully reach the good performance of the original FlexX scoring function. This finding suggests that AIScore should rather be used for postscoring in combination with the standard FlexX incremental ligand construction scheme.

  17. Regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase: conformational changes upon phenylalanine binding detected by hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Dangott, Lawrence J; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2010-04-20

    Phenylalanine acts as an allosteric activator of the tetrahydropterin-dependent enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry has been used to gain insight into local conformational changes accompanying activation of rat phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine. Peptides in the regulatory and catalytic domains that lie in the interface between these two domains show large increases in the extent of deuterium incorporation from solvent in the presence of phenylalanine. In contrast, the effects of phenylalanine on the exchange kinetics of a mutant enzyme lacking the regulatory domain are limited to peptides surrounding the binding site for the amino acid substrate. These results support a model in which the N-terminus of the protein acts as an inhibitory peptide, with phenylalanine binding causing a conformational change in the regulatory domain that alters the interaction between the catalytic and regulatory domains.

  18. Hydrogen effect on the properties of sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilevsky, Radion N.; Sharafutdinova, Liudmila G.; Nedilko, Sergiy; Gavrilov, Valeriy; Verbilo, Dmitriy; Mittl, Scott D.

    2009-05-01

    Sapphire is a widely used material for optical, electronic and semiconductor applications due to its excellent optical properties and very high durability. Optical and mechanical properties of sapphire depend on many factors such as the starting materials that are used to grow crystals, methods to grow sapphire crystals, etc. Demand for highest purity and quality of sapphire crystals increased ten fold for the last several years due to new applications for this material. In this work we studied the effect of starting materials and crystal growth methods on the optical and mechanical properties of sapphire, especially concentrating on the effect of hydrogen on the properties of sapphire. It was found that the infrared (IR) absorption which is traditionally used to measure the hydrogen content in sapphire crystals cannot be reliably used and the data obtained by this method provides a much lower hydrogen concentration than actual. We have shown for the first time that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance techniques can be successfully used to determine hydrogen concentration in sapphire crystals. We have shown that hydrogen concentration in sapphire can reach thousands of ppm if these crystals are grown from Verneuil starting material or aluminum oxide powder. Alternatively, the hydrogen concentration is very low if sapphire crystals are grown from High Purity Densified Alumina (HPDA®) as a starting material. HPDA® is produced by EMT, Inc through their proprietary patented technology. It was found that optical and mechanical properties of sapphire crystals grown using EMT HPDA® starting material are much better than those sapphire crystals grown using a starting material of Verneuil crystals or aluminum oxide powder.

  19. Insights into a highly conserved network of hydrogen bonds in the agonist binding site of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a structural and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Alexandre; Graton, Jérôme; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2014-10-01

    Structural and theoretical studies on the geometrical features of a hydrogen-bond network occurring in the binding site of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and composed of interconnected WxPD (Trp-x-Pro-Asp) and SWyz (Ser-Trp-yz) sequences from loops A and B, respectively, have been carried out. Multiple sequence alignments using as template the sequence of the apoform of Aplysia californica acetylcholine binding protein (Ac-AChBP) show the strict conservation of serine and tryptophan residues of the loop B SWyz sequence. Considering a sample of 19 high resolution AChBP structures, the strong conformational preferences of the key tryptophan residue has been pointing out, whatever the form, free or bounded, of AChBP. The geometry of the motif hydrogen-bond network has been characterized through the analyses of seven distances. The robustness of the various hydrogen-bond interactions is pointed out, the one involving the aspartate carboxylate group and the serine residue being the shortest of the network. The role of a cooperative effect involving a NH(His145)…OH (Ser142) hydrogen bond is highlighted. Density functional theory calculations on several simplified models based on the motif hydrogen-bond network allow probing the importance of the various hydrogen-bond interactions. The removal of the Ser142 hydroxyl group induces strong structural rearrangements, in agreement with the structural observations. Molecular electrostatic potential calculations on model systems highlight the importance of a cooperative effect in the whole hydrogen-bond network. More precisely, the key role of the Ser142 hydroxyl group, involved in several hydrogen bonds, is underlined.

  20. Insight into hydrogenation of graphene: Effect of hydrogen plasma chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Felten, A.; Nittler, L.; Pireaux, J.-J.; McManus, D.; Rice, C.; Casiraghi, C.

    2014-11-03

    Plasma hydrogenation of graphene has been proposed as a tool to modify the properties of graphene. However, hydrogen plasma is a complex system and controlled hydrogenation of graphene suffers from a lack of understanding of the plasma chemistry. Here, we correlate the modifications induced on monolayer graphene studied by Raman spectroscopy with the hydrogen ions energy distributions obtained by mass spectrometry. We measure the energy distribution of H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 3}{sup +} ions for different plasma conditions showing that their energy strongly depends on the sample position, pressure, and plasma power and can reach values as high as 45 eV. Based on these measurements, we speculate that under specific plasma parameters, protons should possess enough energy to penetrate the graphene sheet. Therefore, a graphene membrane could become, under certain conditions, transparent to both protons and electrons.

  1. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, Tania M.

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  2. Effect Of Water On Permeation By Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomazic, William A.; Hulligan, David

    1988-01-01

    Water vapor in working fluid equilibrates with permeability-reducing oxides in metal parts. Report describes study of effects of water on permeation of heater-head tubes by hydrogen in Stirling engine. Experiments performed to determine minimum concentration of oxygen and/or oxygen-bearing gas maintaining oxide coverage adequate for low permeability. Tests showed 750 ppm or more of water effective in maintaining stable, low permeability.

  3. Cooperative enhancement of water binding to crownophane by multiple hydrogen bonds: analysis by high level ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, S; Houjou, H; Nagawa, Y; Goto, M; Hiratani, K

    2001-05-09

    The intermolecular interaction energy of the model system of the water-crownophane complex was analyzed. The water molecule has four hydrogen bonds, with the two hydrogen-donating phenolic hydroxy groups and two hydrogen-accepting oxygen atoms of the poly-oxyethylene chain of the crownophane in the complex. The MP2/6-311G(2d,2p) level calculations of the model system of the complex (hydrogen donating unit + hydrogen accepting unit + water) indicate that the binding energy of the water is 21.85 kcal/mol and that the hydrogen bond cooperativity increases the binding energy as much as 3.67 kcal/mol. The calculated interaction energies depend on the basis set, while the basis set dependence of the cooperative increment is negligible. Most of the cooperative increment is covered by the HF level calculation, which suggests that the major source of the hydrogen bond cooperativity in this system has its origin in induction. The BLYP/6-311G** and PW91/6-311G** level interaction energies of the model system are close to the MP2/6-311G** interaction energies, which suggests that the DFT calculations with these functionals are useful methods to evaluated the interactions of hydrogen bonded systems.

  4. Tunability of the Adsorbate Binding on Bimetallic Alloy Nanoparticles for the Optimization of Catalytic Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Long; Duan, Zhiyao; Li, Hao; Kim, Joohoon; Henkelman, Graeme; Crooks, Richard M

    2017-04-07

    In this paper, we show that PtAu and PdAu random alloy dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles with an average size of ∼1.6 nm have different catalytic activity trends for allyl alcohol hydrogenation. Specifically, PtAu nanoparticles exhibit a linear increase in activity with increasing Pt content, whereas PdAu dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles show a maximum activity at a Pd content of ∼60%. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that this contrasting behavior is caused by differences in the strength of H binding on the PtAu and PdAu alloy surfaces. The results have significant implications for predicting the catalytic performance of bimetallic nanoparticles on the basis of density functional theory calculations.

  5. Hydrogen cyanide health effects. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, B.L.; Baker, L.H.; Herndon, B.L.; Ellis, H.V. III; Horn, E.M.

    1981-09-01

    Health effects literature primarily related to inhalation exposures to hydrogen cyanide was collected, evaluated, tabulated and summarized. Approximately 170 documents were collected from computerized and manual literature searches covering the period 1899-1981. Pharmacologists and an M.D. epidemiologist rated the documents according to their applicability to the study and their methodology. The approximately 20 documents considered useful for deriving a range of concern for human exposure to hydrogen cyanide from automotive emissions were tabulated. The 25 pages of tables detail the results of acute and repeated dose testing of mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, cats, monkeys, dogs, goats, donkeys and humans as well as human occupational studies. Most of the documents evaluated are described in an annotated bibliography.

  6. Nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites exert interdependent effects on the binding affinities of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    We can determine the effects of many possible sequence variations in transcription factor binding sites using microarray binding experiments. Analysis of wild-type and mutant Zif268 (Egr1) zinc fingers bound to microarrays containing all possible central 3 bp triplet binding sites indicates that the nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites cannot be treated independently. This indicates that the current practice of characterizing transcription factor binding sites by mutating individual positions of binding sites one base pair at a time does not provide a true picture of the sequence specificity. Similarly, current bioinformatic practices using either just a consensus sequence, or even mononucleotide frequency weight matrices to provide more complete descriptions of transcription factor binding sites, are not accurate in depicting the true binding site specificities, since these methods rely upon the assumption that the nucleotides of binding sites exert independent effects on binding affinity. Our results stress the importance of complete reference tables of all possible binding sites for comparing protein binding preferences for various DNA sequences. We also show results suggesting that microarray binding data using particular subsets of all possible binding sites can be used to extrapolate the relative binding affinities of all possible full-length binding sites, given a known binding site for use as a starting sequence for site preference refinement. PMID:11861919

  7. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li L.; Feng, Guo Q.; Zhang, Qing G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  8. Isotope effects of hydrogen and atom tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Pliss, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    The abnormally high mass-dependent isotope effects in liquid-phase hydrogen (deuterium) atom transfer reactions, which are customarily regarded as quantum effects, are actually the products of two classical effects, namely, kinetic and thermodynamic ones. The former is determined by the rate constants for atom transfer and the latter is caused by nonbonded (or noncovalent) isotope effects in the solvation of protiated and deuterated reacting molecules. This product can mimic the large isotope effects that are usually attributed to tunnelling. In enzymatic reactions, tunnelling is of particular interest; its existence characterizes an enzyme as a rigid molecular machine in which the residence time of reactants on the reaction coordinate exceeds the waiting time for the tunnelling event. The magnitude of isotope effect becomes a characteristic parameter of the internal dynamics of the enzyme catalytic site. The bibliography includes 61 references.

  9. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.; Grin, Daniel

    2010-12-15

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-{alpha} line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, we compute the impact of some radiative transfer effects that were previously ignored, or for which previous treatments were incomplete. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-{alpha} line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-{alpha} line blueward of the hydrogen line is investigated with an analytic approximation. It is shown that both effects are negligible during cosmological hydrogen recombination. Second, the importance of high-lying, nonoverlapping Lyman transitions is assessed. It is shown that escape from lines above Ly{gamma} and frequency diffusion in Ly{beta} and higher lines can be neglected without loss of accuracy. Third, a formalism generalizing the Sobolev approximation is developed to account for the overlap of the high-lying Lyman lines, which is shown to lead to negligible changes to the recombination history. Finally, the possibility of a cosmological hydrogen recombination maser is investigated. It is shown that there is no such maser in the purely radiative treatment presented here.

  10. Nuclear quantum effects and hydrogen bonding in liquids.

    PubMed

    Raugei, Simone; Klein, Michael L

    2003-07-30

    We have employed ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the role of nuclear quantum effects on the strength of hydrogen bonds in liquid hydrogen fluoride. Nuclear quantum effects are shown to be responsible for a stronger hydrogen bond and an enhanced dipole-dipole interaction, which lead, in turn, to a shortening of the H...F intrachain distance. The simulation results are analyzed in terms of the electronic density shifts with respect to a purely classical treatment of the nuclei. The observed enhanced hydrogen-bond interaction, which arises from a coupling of intra- and intermolecular effects, should be a general phenomenon occurring in all hydrogen-bonded systems.

  11. Effect of Various Factors on Hydrogen Embrittlement of Structural Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanzhin, V. G.; Turilina, V. Yu.; Rogachev, S. O.; Nikitin, A. V.; Belov, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    Results of studies of hydrogen embrittlement of structural steels of different strength are presented. The effect of various factors on delayed hydrogen fracture is analyzed using the results of investigations by the methods of acoustic emission, metallography and fractography of bolts under the conditions of tension with bending after galvanic hydrogen charging.

  12. Hydride-induced amplification of performance and binding enthalpies in chromium hydrazide gels for Kubas-type hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Hamaed, Ahmad; Hoang, Tuan K A; Moula, Golam; Aroca, Ricardo; Trudeau, Michel L; Antonelli, David M

    2011-10-05

    Hydrogen is the ideal fuel because it contains the most energy per gram of any chemical substance and forms water as the only byproduct of consumption. However, storage still remains a formidable challenge because of the thermodynamic and kinetic issues encountered when binding hydrogen to a carrier. In this study, we demonstrate how the principal binding sites in a new class of hydrogen storage materials based on the Kubas interaction can be tuned by variation of the coordination sphere about the metal to dramatically increase the binding enthalpies and performance, while also avoiding the shortcomings of hydrides and physisorpion materials, which have dominated most research to date. This was accomplished through hydrogenation of chromium alkyl hydrazide gels, synthesized from bis(trimethylsilylmethyl) chromium and hydrazine, to form materials with low-coordinate Cr hydride centers as the principal H(2) binding sites, thus exploiting the fact that metal hydrides form stronger Kubas interactions than the corresponding metal alkyls. This led to up to a 6-fold increase in storage capacity at room temperature. The material with the highest capacity has an excess reversible storage of 3.23 wt % at 298 K and 170 bar without saturation, corresponding to 40.8 kg H(2)/m(3), comparable to the 2015 DOE system goal for volumetric density (40 kg/m(3)) at a safe operating pressure. These materials possess linear isotherms and enthalpies that rise on coverage, retain up to 100% of their adsorption capacities on warming from 77 to 298 K, and have no kinetic barrier to adsorption or desorption. In a practical system, these materials would use pressure instead of temperature as a toggle and can thus be used in compressed gas tanks, currently employed in the majority of hydrogen test vehicles, to dramatically increase the amount of hydrogen stored, and therefore range of any vehicle.

  13. Effective field theories for muonic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peset, Clara

    2017-03-01

    Experimental measurements of muonic hydrogen bound states have recently started to take place and provide a powerful setting in which to study the properties of QCD. We profit from the power of effective field theories (EFTs) to provide a theoretical framework in which to study muonic hydrogen in a model independent fashion. In particular, we compute expressions for the Lamb shift and the hyperfine splitting. These expressions include the leading logarithmic O(mμα6) terms, as well as the leading {\\cal O}≤ft( {{m_μ }{α ^5}{{m_μ ^2} \\over {Λ {{QCD}}^2}}} \\right) hadronic effects. Most remarkably, our analyses include the determination of the spin-dependent and spin-independent structure functions of the forward virtualphoton Compton tensor of the proton to O(p3) in HBET and including the Delta particle. Using these results we obtain the leading hadronic contributions to the Wilson coeffcients of the lepton-proton four fermion operators in NRQED. The spin-independent coeffcient yields a pure prediction for the two-photon exchange contribution to the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift, which is the main source of uncertainty in our computation. The spindependent coeffcient yields the prediction of the hyperfine splitting. The use of EFTs crucially helps us organizing the computation, in such a way that we can clearly address the parametric accuracy of our result. Furthermore, we review in the context of NRQED all the contributions to the energy shift of O(mμα5, as well as those that scale like mrα6× logarithms.

  14. Ligation-state hydrogen exchange: coupled binding and folding equilibria in ribonuclease P protein.

    PubMed

    Henkels, Christopher H; Oas, Terrence G

    2006-06-21

    Bacillus subtilis ribonuclease P protein (P protein) is predominantly unfolded (D) at physiological pH and low ionic strength; however, small molecule anionic ligands (e.g., sulfate) directly bind to and stabilize the folded state (NL2). Because the D + 2L <--> NL2 transition is experimentally two-state, high-energy states such as the singly bound, folded species (NL) and the unliganded folded species (N) are generally difficult to detect at equilibrium. To study the conformational properties of these ensembles, NMR-detected amide hydrogen exchange (HX) rates of P protein were measured at four sulfate (i.e., ligand) concentrations, a method we denote "ligation-state hydrogen exchange". The ligand concentration dependence of the HX rate of 47 residues was fit to a model with four possible HX pathways, corresponding to the local and/or global opening reactions from NL2 and NL, the local opening of N, and the global opening of N to D. Data analysis permits the calculation of the residue-specific free energy of opening from each ensemble as well as the fractional amide HX flux through each pathway. Results indicate that the predominant route of HX is through the NL and N states, which represent only 0.45% and 0.0005% of the total protein population in 20 mM sodium sulfate, respectively. Despite the low population of N, a region of protected amides was identified. Therefore, exchange through unliganded forms must be accounted for prior to the interpretation of HX-based protein-interaction studies. We offer a simple test to determine if HX occurs through the liganded or unliganded form.

  15. Causal binding of actions to their effects.

    PubMed

    Buehner, Marc J; Humphreys, Gruffydd R

    2009-10-01

    According to widely held views in cognitive science harking back to David Hume, causality cannot be perceived directly, but instead is inferred from patterns of sensory experience, and the quality of these inferences is determined by perceivable quantities such as contingency and contiguity. We report results that suggest a reversal of Hume's conjecture: People's sense of time is warped by the experience of causality. In a stimulus-anticipation task, participants' response behavior reflected a shortened experience of time in the case of target stimuli participants themselves had generated, relative to equidistant, equally predictable stimuli they had not caused. These findings suggest that causality in the mind leads to temporal binding of cause and effect, and extend and generalize beyond earlier claims of intentional binding between action and outcome.

  16. Magnetic effects of interstitial hydrogen in nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Andrea; Velásquez, E. A.; Mazo-Zuluaga, J.; Mejía-López, J.; Florez, J. M.; Vargas, P.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen storage in materials is among the most relevant fields when thinking about energy conversion and storage. In this work we present a study that responds to a couple of questions concerning induced electronic changes that H produces in ferromagnetic nickel (Ni) host. We calculate and explain the change of magnetic properties of Ni with different concentrations of H. Density functional theory calculations (DFT) were performed for super-cells of fcc Ni with interstitial H in octahedral sites at different concentrations. In order to physically explain the effect of magnetization diminishing as the hydrogen concentration increases, we propose a simple Stoner type of model to describe the influence of the H impurity on the magnetic properties of Ni. The exchange splitting reduction, as shown in first principles calculations, is clearly explained within this physical model. Using a paramagnetic Ni fcc band with variable number of electrons and a Stoner model allow us to obtain the correct trend for the magnetic moment of the system as a function of the H concentration.

  17. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; ...

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, wemore » find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.« less

  18. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1-2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. The H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, we find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. After this point, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.

  19. Ammonium Additives to Dissolve Lithium Sulfide through Hydrogen Binding for High-Energy Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huilin; Han, Kee Sung; Vijayakumar, M; Xiao, Jie; Cao, Ruiguo; Chen, Junzheng; Zhang, Jiguang; Mueller, Karl T; Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun

    2017-02-08

    In rechargeable Li-S batteries, the uncontrollable passivation of electrodes by highly insulating Li2S limits sulfur utilization, increases polarization, and decreases cycling stability. Dissolving Li2S in organic electrolyte is a facile solution to maintain the active reaction interface between electrolyte and sulfur cathode, and thus address the above issues. Herein, ammonium salts are demonstrated as effective additives to promote the dissolution of Li2S to 1.25 M in DMSO solvent at room temperature. NMR measurements show that the strong hydrogen binding effect of N-H groups plays a critical role in dissolving Li2S by forming complex ligands with S(2-) anions coupled with the solvent's solvating surrounding. Ammonium additives in electrolyte can also significantly improve the oxidation kinetics of Li2S, and therefore enable the direct use of Li2S as cathode material in Li-S battery system in the future. This provides a new approach to manage the solubility of lithium sulfides through cation coordination with sulfide anion.

  20. Ammonium Additives to Dissolve Lithium Sulfide through Hydrogen Binding for High-Energy Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Huilin; Han, Kee Sung; Vijayakumar, M.; Xiao, Jie; Cao, Ruiguo; Chen, Junzheng; Zhang, Jiguang; Mueller, Karl T.; Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    In rechargeable Li-S batteries, the uncontrollable passivation of electrodes by highly insulating Li2S limits sulfur utilization, increases polarization and decreases cycling stability. Dissolving Li2S in organic electrolyte is a facile solution to maintain the active reaction interface between electrolyte and sulfur cathode, and thus address the above issues. Herein, ammonium salts are demonstrated as effective additives to promote the dissolution of Li2S to 1.25 M in DMSO solvent at room temperature. NMR measurements show that the strong hydrogen binding effect of N-H groups plays a critical role in dissolving Li2S by forming complex ligands with S2- anions coupled with the solvent’s solvating surrounding. Ammonium additives in electrolyte can also significantly improve the oxidation kinetics of Li2S, therefore enables the direct use of Li2S as cathode material in Li-S battery system in the future. This provides a new approach to manage the solubility of lithium sulfides through cation coordination with sulfide anion.

  1. Effects of Internal and External Hydrogen on Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) and hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) tensile and bend crack growth tests were performed on Inconel 718. For the IHE tests, the specimens were precharged to approximately 90 ppm hydrogen by exposure to 34.5 MPa H2 at 650 C. The HEE tests were performed in 34.5 MPa H2. Parameters evaluated were test temperature, strain rate for smooth and notch specimen geometries. The strain rate effect was very significant at ambient temperature for both IHE and HEE and decreased with increasing temperatures. For IHE, the strain rate effect was neglible at 260'C, and for HEE the strain rate effect was neglible at 400 C. At low temperatures, IHE was more severe than HEE, and at high temperatures HEE was more severe than IHE with a cross over temperature about 350 C. At 350 C, the equilibrium hydrogen concentration in Inconel 718 is about 50% lower than the hydrogen content of the precharged IHE specimens. Dislocation hydrogen sweeping of surface absorbed hydrogen was the likely transport mechanism for increasing the hydrogen concentration in the HEE tests sufficiently to produce the same degree of embrittlement as that of the more highly hydrogen charged IHE specimens. The main IHE fracture characteristic was formation of large, brittle flat facets, which decreased with increasing test temperature. The IHE fracture matrix surrounding the large facets ranged between brittle fine faceted to microvoid ductility depending upon strain rate, specimen geometry as well as temperature. The HEE fractures were characteristically fine featured, transgranular and brittle with a significant portion forming a "saw tooth" crystallographic pattern. Both IHE and HEE fractures were predominantly along the {1 1 1) slip and twin boundaries. With respect to embrittlement mechanism, it was postulated that dislocation hydrogen sweeping and hydrogen enhanced localized plasticity were active in HEE and IHE for concentrating hydrogen along (1 1 1) slip and twin

  2. Optimizing Binding Energies of Key Intermediates for CO 2 Hydrogenation to Methanol over Oxide-Supported Copper

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2016-08-29

    Rational optimization of catalytic performance has been one of the major challenges in catalysis. We report a bottom-up study on the ability of TiO2 and ZrO2 to optimize the CO2 conversion to methanol on Cu, using combined density functional theory (DFT) calculations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) measurements, and steady-state flow reactor tests. Furthermore, the theoretical results from DFT and KMC agree with in situ DRIFTS measurements, showing that both TiO2 and ZrO2 help to promote methanol synthesis on Cu via carboxyl intermediates and the reverse water–gas-shift (RWGS) pathway; the formatemore » intermediates, on the other hand, likely act as a spectator eventually. The origin of the superior promoting effect of ZrO2 is associated with the fine-tuning capability of reduced Zr3+ at the interface, being able to bind the key reaction intermediates, e.g. *CO2, *CO, *HCO, and *H2CO, moderately to facilitate methanol formation. Our study demonstrates the importance of synergy between theory and experiments to elucidate the complex reaction mechanisms of CO2 hydrogenation for the realization of a better catalyst by design.« less

  3. Optimizing Binding Energies of Key Intermediates for CO 2 Hydrogenation to Methanol over Oxide-Supported Copper

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-08-29

    Rational optimization of catalytic performance has been one of the major challenges in catalysis. We report a bottom-up study on the ability of TiO2 and ZrO2 to optimize the CO2 conversion to methanol on Cu, using combined density functional theory (DFT) calculations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) measurements, and steady-state flow reactor tests. Furthermore, the theoretical results from DFT and KMC agree with in situ DRIFTS measurements, showing that both TiO2 and ZrO2 help to promote methanol synthesis on Cu via carboxyl intermediates and the reverse water–gas-shift (RWGS) pathway; the formate intermediates, on the other hand, likely act as a spectator eventually. The origin of the superior promoting effect of ZrO2 is associated with the fine-tuning capability of reduced Zr3+ at the interface, being able to bind the key reaction intermediates, e.g. *CO2, *CO, *HCO, and *H2CO, moderately to facilitate methanol formation. Our study demonstrates the importance of synergy between theory and experiments to elucidate the complex reaction mechanisms of CO2 hydrogenation for the realization of a better catalyst by design.

  4. Effect of water on hydrogen permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulligan, David; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    Doping of hydrogen with CO and CO2 was developed to reduce hydrogen permeation in Stirling engines by forming a low permeability oxide coating on the inner surface of the heater head tubes. Although doping worked well, under certain circumstances the protective oxide could be chemically reduced by the hydrogen in the engine. Some oxygen is required in the hydrogen to prevent reduction. Eventually, all the oxygen in the hydrogen gas - whatever its source - shows up as water. This is the result of hydrogen reducing the CO, CO2, or the protective inner surface oxides. This water can condense in the engine system under the right conditions. If the concentration of water vapor is reduced to a low enough level, the hydrogen can chemically reduce the oxide coating, resulting in an increase in permeability. This work was done to define the minimum water content required to avoid this reduction in the oxide coating. The results of this testing show that a minimum of approximately 750 ppm water is required to prevent an increase in permeability of CG-27, a high temperature metal alloy selected for Stirling engine heater tubes.

  5. Ortho-substituted catechol derivatives: the effect of intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pathways on chloride anion recognition.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, Keith J; Smith, David K

    2007-04-13

    This paper reports a series of chloride anion receptors containing two catechol head groups connected through their ortho-positions via a spacer chain. The linking group chosen to attach the spacer chain to the catechol units has a major impact on the anion-binding potential of the receptor. Linking groups that are capable of forming stable six-membered intramolecular hydrogen-bonded rings with the catechol O-H groups significantly inhibit the ability of the catechol units to hydrogen bond to chloride anions. However, where the linking groups are only capable of forming five- or seven-membered intramolecular hydrogen-bonded rings, then anion binding via hydrogen bonding through the catechol O-H groups becomes a possibility. This process is solvent dependent; the presence of competitive solvent (e.g., DMSO-d6) disrupts the intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern and enhances anion binding relative to simple unfunctionalized catechol. The most effective receptor is that in which the hydrogen-bonding linker (-CH2CONH-) is most distant from the catechol units and can only form a seven-membered intramolecular hydrogen-bonded ring. In this case, the receptor, which contains two catechol units, is a more effective chloride anion binder than simple unfunctionalized catechol, demonstrating that the two head groups, in combination with the N-H groups in the linker, act cooperatively and enhance the degree of anion binding. In summary, this paper provides insight into the hydrogen-bonding patterns in ortho-functionalized catechols and the impact these have on the potential of the catechol O-H groups to hydrogen bond to a chloride anion.

  6. The effects of hydrogen in sealed electrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Rudolf; Gray, Eoin W.

    1985-12-01

    Hydrogen has been an integral atmospheric component of sealed electrical contacts for decades because of its effect on reliability. It is well known that hydrogen is a needed component to prevent high contact resistance due to carbon-spot formation. This hydrogen benefit has been attributed to hydrogenation of hydrocarbons (HC), enhanced volatilization of previously deposited carbon, enhanced catalytic activity, and thermal cooling. By a variety of physical and chemical laboratory techniques, this paper shows that the hydrogen is not itself directly active. However, some of the hydrogen is converted to water during the glass sealing process. It is this water which plays the active role in the process of quenching carbon formation from hydrocarbon impurities and also acts as a diluent of HC's adsorbed on the contact surface and in the arcing volume. This limits the carbon accumulation on the contacts and increases lifetime reliability.

  7. Amide-mediated hydrogen bonding at organic crystal/water interfaces enables selective endotoxin binding with picomolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Thirumoorthi, Navanita; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-05-22

    Since the discovery of endotoxins as the primary toxic component of Gram-negative bacteria, researchers have pursued the quest for molecules that detect, neutralize, and remove endotoxins. Selective removal of endotoxins is particularly challenging for protein solutions and, to this day, no general method is available. Here, we report that crystals of the purine-derived compound allantoin selectively adsorb endotoxins with picomolar affinity through amide-mediated hydrogen bonding in aqueous solutions. Atom force microscopy and chemical inhibition experiments indicate that endotoxin adsorption is largely independent from hydrophobic and ionic interactions with allantoin crystals and is mediated by hydrogen bonding with amide groups at flat crystal surfaces. The small size (500 nm) and large specific surface area of allantoin crystals results in a very high endotoxin-binding capacity (3 × 10(7) EU/g) which compares favorably with known endotoxin-binding materials. These results provide a proof-of-concept for hydrogen bond-based molecular recognition processes in aqueous solutions and establish a practical method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions.

  8. Bactericidal effect of hydrogen peroxide on spacecraft isolates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardle, M. D.; Renninger, G. M.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study designed to assess the effect of hydrogen peroxide on both sporeforming and nonsporeforming spacecraft isolates as an initial step in determining its suitability for microbiological decontamination of certain United States spacecraft. Survivor data were obtained for eight bacterial isolates (six sporeformers and two nonsporeformers) recovered before launch Mariner 9 and exposed to concentrations of 3, 10, and 15% hydrogen peroxide. The effects of various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide on the spores are presented in tabular form, along with the percentage of survival of nonsporeformers exposed to hydrogen peroxide. No viable vegetative cells were recovered after a 10-min exposure time to any of the three concentration of hydrogen peroxide.

  9. Retroactivity effects dependency on the transcription factors binding mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Hernández, Libertad; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena; Aguilar-Ibáñez, Carlos F; Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; Soria-López, Alberto; Martínez-García, Juan Carlos

    2016-12-07

    Downstream connection effects on transcription are caused by retroactivity. When biomolecular dynamical systems interconnect retroactivity is a property that becomes important. The biological functional meaning of these effects is increasingly becoming an area of interest. Downstream targets, which are operator binding sites in transcriptional networks, may induce behaviors such as ultrasensitive responses or even represent an undesired issue in regulation. To the best of our knowledge, the role of the binding mechanisms of transcription factors in relation to minimizing - or enhancing - retroactivity effects has not been previously addressed. Our aim is to evaluate retroactivity effects considering how the binding mechanism impacts the number of free functional transcription factor (FFTF) molecules using a simple model via deterministic and stochastic simulations. We study four transcription factor binding mechanisms (BM): simple monomer binding (SMB), dimer binding (DB), cooperative sequential binding (CSB) and cooperative sequential binding with dimerization (CSB_D). We consider weak and strong binding regimes for each mechanism, where we contrast the cases when the FFTF is bound or unbound to the downstream loads. Upon interconnection, the number of FFTF molecules changed less for the SMB mechanism while for DB they changed the most. Our results show that for the chosen mechanisms (in terms of the corresponding described dynamics), retroactivity effects depend on transcription binding mechanisms. This contributes to the understanding of how the transcription factor regulatory function-such as decision making-and its dynamic needs for the response, may determine the nature of the selected binding mechanism.

  10. Effects of Hydrogen on Tantalum Nitride Resistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, James

    1999-01-01

    This document is a presentation about the investigation of drift reported in static frequency output from the analog circuit of a Multichannel Microwave Integrated circuit hybrid microelectronic filter module for space flight application. Electron Dispersion X-Ray Detector )EDAX) Analysis of the 35k ohm thin film Tantalum Nitride Chip resistors identified Palladium in the film. A catalytic reaction of Palladium and hydrogen produces mono atomic hydrogen. When the filter module cavities were filled with a 4 % hydrogen 96 % Nitrogen gas mixture at 25C and monitored the electrical performance for 24 hours. Some channels drifted in a similar pattern as the channel being investigated. Palladium was found on the resistors. The corrective actions taken are reviewed, which resulted in a stable circuit.

  11. The effects of hydrogen bonds on metal-mediated O2 activation and related processes

    PubMed Central

    Shook, Ryan L.; Borovik, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds stabilize and direct chemistry performed by metalloenzymes. With inspiration from enzymes, we will utilize an approach that incorporates intramolecular hydrogen bond donors to determine their effects on the stability and reactivity of metal complexes. Our premise is that control of secondary coordination sphere interactions will promote new function in synthetic metal complexes. Multidentate ligands have been developed that create rigid organic structures around metal ions. These ligands place hydrogen bond (H-bond) donors proximal to the metal centers, forming specific microenvironments. One distinguishing attribute of these systems is that site-specific modulations in structure can be readily accomplished, in order to evaluate correlations with reactivity. A focus of this research is consideration of dioxygen binding and activation by metal complexes, including developing structure–function relationships in metal-assisted oxidative catalysis. PMID:19082087

  12. Cosolvent Effects on Solute-Solvent Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics: Ultrafast 2D IR Investigations.

    PubMed

    Kashid, Somnath M; Jin, Geun Young; Bagchi, Sayan; Kim, Yung Sam

    2015-12-10

    Cosolvents strongly influence the solute-solvent interactions of biomolecules in aqueous environments and have profound effects on the stability and activity of several proteins and enzymes. Experimental studies have previously reported on the hydrogen-bond dynamics of water molecules in the presence of a cosolvent, but understanding the effects from a solute's perspective could provide greater insight into protein stability. Because carbonyl groups are abundant in biomolecules, the current study used 2D IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the hydrogen-bond dynamics of the solute's carbonyl group in aqueous solution, with and without the presence of DMSO as a cosolvent. 2D IR spectroscopy was used to quantitatively estimate the time scales of the hydrogen-bond dynamics of the carbonyl group in neat water and 1:1 DMSO/water solution. The 2D IR results show spectral signatures of a chemical exchange process: The presence of the cosolvent was found to lower the hydrogen-bond exchange rate by a factor of 5. The measured exchange rates were 7.50 × 10(11) and 1.48 × 10(11) s(-1) in neat water and 1:1 DMSO/water, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations predict a significantly shorter carbonyl hydrogen-bond lifetime in neat water than in 1:1 DMSO/water and provide molecular insights into the exchange mechanism. The binding of the cosolvent to the solute was found to be accompanied by the release of hydrogen-bonded water molecules to the bulk. The widely different hydrogen-bond lifetimes and exchange rates with and without DMSO indicate a significant change in the ultrafast hydrogen-bond dynamics in the presence of a cosolvent, which, in turn, might play an important role in the stability and activity of biomolecules.

  13. Side-chain rotamer changes upon ligand binding: common, crucial, correlate with entropy and rearrange hydrogen bonding

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreault, Francis; Chartier, Matthieu; Najmanovich, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Protein movements form a continuum from large domain rearrangements (including folding and restructuring) to side-chain rotamer changes and small rearrangements. Understanding side-chain flexibility upon binding is important to understand molecular recognition events and predict ligand binding. Methods: In the present work, we developed a well-curated non-redundant dataset of 188 proteins in pairs of structures in the Apo (unbound) and Holo (bound) forms to study the extent and the factors that guide side-chain rotamer changes upon binding. Results: Our analysis shows that side-chain rotamer changes are widespread with only 10% of binding sites displaying no conformational changes. Overall, at most five rotamer changes account for the observed movements in 90% of the cases. Furthermore, rotamer changes are essential in 32% of flexible binding sites. The different amino acids have a 11-fold difference in their probability to undergo changes. Side-chain flexibility represents an intrinsic property of amino acids as it correlates well with configurational entropy differences. Furthermore, on average b-factors and solvent accessible surface areas can discriminate flexible side-chains in the Apo form. Finally, there is a rearrangement of the hydrogen-bonding network upon binding primarily with a loss of H-bonds with water molecules and a gain of H-bonds with protein residues for flexible residues. Interestingly, only 25% of side chains capable of forming H-bonds do so with the ligand upon binding. In terms of drug design, this last result shows that there is a large number of potential interactions that may be exploited to modulate the specificity and sensitivity of inhibitors. Contact: rafael.najmanovich@usherbrooke.ca PMID:22962462

  14. Hydrogen bonding motifs of protein side chains: descriptions of binding of arginine and amide groups.

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, L.; Glusker, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    The modes of hydrogen bonding of arginine, asparagine, and glutamine side chains and of urea have been examined in small-molecule crystal structures in the Cambridge Structural Database and in crystal structures of protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein complexes. Analysis of the hydrogen bonding patterns of each by graph-set theory shows three patterns of rings (R) with one or two hydrogen bond acceptors and two donors and with eight, nine, or six atoms in the ring, designated R2(2)(8), R2(2)(9), and R1(2)(6). These three patterns are found for arginine-like groups and for urea, whereas only the first two patterns R2(2)(8) and R2(2)(9) are found for asparagine- and glutamine-like groups. In each case, the entire system is planar within 0.7 A or less. On the other hand, in macromolecular crystal structures, the hydrogen bonding patterns in protein-nucleic acid complexes between the nucleic acid base and the protein are all R2(2)(9), whereas hydrogen bonding between Watson-Crick-like pairs of nucleic acid bases is R2(2)(8). These two hydrogen bonding arrangements [R2(2)(9)] and R2(2)(8)] are predetermined by the nature of the groups available for hydrogen bonding. The third motif identified, R1(2)(6), involves hydrogen bonds that are less linear than in the other two motifs and is found in proteins. PMID:7773178

  15. Effects of hydrogen atoms on surface conductivity of diamond film

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fengbin Cui, Yan; Qu, Min; Di, Jiejian

    2015-04-15

    To investigate the effects of surface chemisorbed hydrogen atoms and hydrogen atoms in the subsurface region of diamond on surface conductivity, models of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on diamond with (100) orientation and various concentrations of hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond were built. By using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, the equilibrium geometries and densities of states of the models were studied. The results showed that the surface chemisorbed hydrogen alone could not induce high surface conductivity. In addition, isolated hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond prefer to exist at the bond centre site of the C-C bond. However, such a structure would induce deep localized states, which could not improve the surface conductivity. When the hydrogen concentration increases, the C-H-C-H structure and C-3H{sub bc}-C structure in the subsurface region are more stable than other configurations. The former is not beneficial to the increase of the surface conductivity. However, the latter would induce strong surface states near the Fermi level, which would give rise to high surface conductivity. Thus, a high concentration of subsurface hydrogen atoms in diamond would make significant contributions to surface conductivity.

  16. Ab initio Design of Ca-Decorated Organic Frameworks for High Capacity Molecular Hydrogen Storage with Enhanced Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y. Y.; Lee, K.; Kim, Y. H.; Zhang, S. B.

    2009-01-01

    Ab initio calculations show that Ca can decorate organic linkers of metal-organic framework, MOF-5, with a binding energy of 1.25 eV. The Ca-decorated MOF-5 can store molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in both high gravimetric (4.6 wt %) and high volumetric (36 g/l) capacities. Even higher capacities (5.7 wt % and 45 g/l) can be obtained in a rationally designed covalent organic framework system, COF-{alpha}, with decorated Ca. Both density functional theory and second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation calculations show that the H{sub 2} binding in these systems is significantly stronger than the van der Waals interactions, which is required for H{sub 2} storage at near ambient conditions.

  17. Effects of Hydrogen on GRCop-84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Hastings, Keith

    2006-01-01

    This report is a section of the final report on the GRCop-84 task of the Constellation Program and incorporates the results obtained between October 2000 and September 2005 when the program ended. GRCop-84 contains approximately 5.5 wt% Nb. Nb can react with H and embrittle easily. Previous work had indicated the thermodynamic possibility that Cr 2 Nb could react with H and form niobium hydrides in the presence of high pressure H such as seen in the Space Shuttle Main Engine. In this study, samples were charged with H and then tested in both high pressure H and He environments to determine if measurable differences existed which indicate that hydrogen embrittlement occurs in GRCop-84. Tensile, notched tensile, stress rupture and low cycle fatigue properties were surveyed. High pressure H environment stress rupture testing resulted in a lower reduction in area than a high pressure He environment, and the LCF lives at high strain ranges fall below the lower 95 percent confidence interval for the baseline data, but in general no significant differences were noted either between H and He environment tests or between hydrogen charged materials and the baseline, uncharged extruded GRCop-84 data sets. There was also no discernable evidence of the formation of hydrides or changes in fracture morphology indicating hydrogen embrittlement occurred.

  18. Hydrogen effects on material behavior; Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on the Effect of Hydrogen on the Behavior of Materials, Moran, WY, Sept. 12-15, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, N.R.; Thompson, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses hydrogen permeation, trapping, and transport in metals, hydrogen-induced phase transformations, hydrogen embrittlement studies on stainless steels, hydrogen effects on advanced materials, hydrogen-associated fracture processes, crack growth susceptibility, and hydrogen-resistant engineering alloys and applications. Attention is given to the behavior of hydrogen in evaporated metal films, hydrogen diffusivity in alpha-beta Zr alloys, acoustic emissions from steels containing hydrogen, synergistic effects of He and H isotopes in FCC metals, hydrogen transport by dislocations in Al alloys, the effect of hydrogen precipitation in an Al-{sup 9}Mg alloy, hydrogen effects on Ti oxidation in water vapor, hydrogen effects on the behavior of duplex stainless steels, hydrogen embrittlement of superalloys, hydrogen embrittlement of TiAl alloys, hydrogen-enhanced decohesion in Fe-Si single crystals, cathodic hydrogen embrittlement of a duplex stainless steel, and hydrogen embrittlement in lean uranium alloys.

  19. Selective binding of hydrogen chloride and its trapping through supramolecular gelation.

    PubMed

    Basak, Shibaji; Nandi, Nibedita; Banerjee, Arindam

    2014-07-04

    A pyridine containing amino acid based gelator forms gel in aqueous media in the presence of hydrochloric acid and the chloride ion is found to be very selective for gelation. The gelator is successfully applied for the detection and trapping of hydrogen chloride gas and this indicates its probable application for removing hazardous HCl gas from the environment.

  20. Effects of the central potassium ions on the G-quadruplex and stabilizer binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguo; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Human telomeres undertake the structure of intra-molecular parallel G-quadruplex in the presence of K(+) in eukaryotic cell. Stabilization of the telomere G-quadruplex represents a potential strategy to prevent telomere lengthening by telomerase in cancer therapy. Current work demonstrates that the binding of central K(+) with the parallel G-quadruplex is a coordinated water directed step-wise process. The K(+) above the top G-tetrad is prone to leak into environment and the 5'-adenine quickly flips over the top G-tetrad, leading to the bottom gate of G-tetrads as the only viable pathway of K(+) binding. Present molecular dynamics studies on the two most potent stabilizers RHPS4 and BRACO-19 reveal that the central K(+) has little influence on the binding conformations of the bound stabilizers. But without the central K(+), either RHPS4 or BRACO-19 cannot stabilize the structure of G-quadruplex. The binding strength of stabilizers evaluated by the MM-PBSA method follows the order of BRACO-19> RHPS4, which agrees with the experimental results. The difference in binding affinities between RHPS4 and BRACO-19 is probably related to the ability to form intramolecular hydrogen bonds and favorable van del Waals interactions with G-quadruplex. In the models that have one central K(+) located at the upper/lower binding site, the corresponding top/bottom stacked stabilizers show more favorable binding affinities, indicating the apparent promoting effect of central K(+) on the stabilizer binding. Our findings provide further insights into the regulatory effect of K(+) on the G-quadruplex targeted binding, which is meaningful to the development of G-quadruplex stabilizers.

  1. Probing the C-H⋅⋅⋅π weak hydrogen bond in anesthetic binding: the sevoflurane-benzene cluster.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Nathan A; Zaleski, Daniel P; Pérez, Cristóbal; Neill, Justin L; Pate, Brooks H; Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J; Castaño, Fernando; Kleiner, Isabelle

    2014-03-17

    Cooperativity between weak hydrogen bonds can be revealed in molecular clusters isolated in the gas phase. Here we examine the structure, internal dynamics, and origin of the weak intermolecular forces between sevoflurane and a benzene molecule, using multi-isotopic broadband rotational spectra. This heterodimer is held together by a primary C-H⋅⋅⋅π hydrogen bond, assisted by multiple weak C-H⋅⋅⋅F interactions. The multiple nonbonding forces hinder the internal rotation of benzene around the isopropyl C-H bond in sevoflurane, producing detectable quantum tunneling effects in the rotational spectrum.

  2. Effect of hydrogen bonds on optical nonlinearities of inorganic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Dongfeng; Zhang, Siyuan

    1999-03-01

    This work probes the role of hydrogen bonds (such as O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O) in some inorganic nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals, such as HIO 3, NH 4H 2PO 4 (ADP), K[B 5O 6(OH) 4]·2H 2O (KB 5) and K 2La(NO 3) 5·2H 2O (KLN), from the chemical bond standpoint. Second order NLO behaviors of these four typical inorganic crystals have been quantitatively studied, results show hydrogen bonds play a very important role in NLO contributions to the total nonlinearity. Conclusions derived here concerning the effect of hydrogen bonds on optical nonlinearities of inorganic crystals have important implications with regard to the utilization of hydrogen bonds in the structural design of inorganic NLO crystals.

  3. The Binding And Release of Oxygen And Hydrogen Peroxide are Directed 1 By a Hydrophobic Tunnel in Cholesterol Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Lyubimov, A.Y.; Brammer, L.; Vrielink, A.; Sampson, N.S.

    2009-05-12

    The usage by enzymes of specific binding pathways for gaseous substrates or products is debated. The crystal structure of the redox enzyme cholesterol oxidase, determined at sub-angstrom resolution, revealed a hydrophobic tunnel that may serve as a binding pathway for oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. This tunnel is formed by a cascade of conformational rearrangements and connects the active site with the exterior surface of the protein. To elucidate the relationship between this tunnel and gas binding and release, three mutant enzymes were constructed to block the tunnel or its putative gate. Mutation of the proposed gating residue Asn485 to Asp or tunnel residue Phe359 or Gly347 to Trp or Asn reduces the catalytic efficiency of oxidation. The K mO 2 increases from 300 +/- 35 microM for the wild-type enzyme to 617 +/- 15 microM for the F359W mutant. The k cat for the F359W mutant-catalyzed reaction decreases 13-fold relative to that of the wild-type-catalyzed reaction. The N485D and G347N mutants could not be saturated with oxygen. Transfer of hydride from the sterol to the flavin prosthetic group is no longer rate-limiting for these tunnel mutants. The steady-state kinetics of both wild-type and tunnel mutant enzymes are consistent with formation of a ternary complex of steroid and oxygen during catalysis. Furthermore, kinetic cooperativity with respect to molecular oxygen is observed with the tunnel mutants, but not with the wild-type enzyme. A rate-limiting conformational change for binding and release of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, respectively, is consistent with the cooperative kinetics. In the atomic-resolution structure of F359W, the indole ring of the tryptophan completely fills the tunnel and is observed in only a single conformation. The size of the indole is proposed to limit conformational rearrangement of residue 359 that leads to tunnel opening in the wild-type enzyme. Overall, these results substantiate the functional importance of the tunnel for

  4. The binding and release of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide are directed by a hydrophobic tunnel in cholesterol oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Brammer, Leighanne; Vrielink, Alice; Sampson, Nicole S.

    2008-01-01

    The usage by enzymes of specific binding pathways for gaseous substrates or products is debated. The crystal structure of the redox enzyme cholesterol oxidase, solved at sub-Ångstrom resolution, revealed a hydrophobic tunnel that may serve as a binding pathway for oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. This tunnel is formed by a cascade of conformational rearrangements and connects the active site with the exterior surface of the protein. To understand the relationship between this tunnel and gas binding and release, three mutant enzymes were constructed to block the tunnel or its putative gate. Mutation of the proposed gating residue Asn485 to Asp or the tunnel residues Phe359 or Gly347 to Trp or Asn, reduces the catalytic efficiency of oxidation. The KmO2 increases from 300 ± 35 μM for the wild-type enzyme to 617 ± 15 μM for the F359W mutant. The kcat for the F359W mutant catalyzed reaction decreases 13-fold relative to the wild-type catalyzed reaction. The N485D and G347N mutants could not be saturated with oxygen. Hydride transfer from the sterol to the flavin prosthetic group is no longer rate limiting for these tunnel mutants. The steady-state kinetics of both wild-type and tunnel-mutant enzymes are consistent with formation of a ternary complex of steroid and oxygen during catalysis. Furthermore, kinetic cooperativity with respect to molecular oxygen is observed with the tunnel mutants, but not with the wild-type enzyme. A rate-limiting conformational change for binding and release of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, respectively are consistent with the cooperative kinetics. In the atomic resolution structure of F359W, the indole ring of the tryptophan completely fills the tunnel and is only observed in a single conformation. The size of the indole is proposed to limit conformational rearrangement of residue 359 that leads to tunnel opening in the wild-type enzyme. Overall, these results substantiate the functional importance of the tunnel for substrate binding and

  5. Light irradiance and spectral distribution effects on cyanobacterial hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatihah Salleh, Siti; Kamaruddin, Azlina; Hekarl Uzir, Mohamad; Rahman Mohamed, Abdul; Halim Shamsuddin, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Light is an essential energy source for photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Changes in both light irradiance and spectral distribution will affect their photosynthetic productivity. Compared to the light irradiance, little investigations have been carried out on the effect of light spectra towards cyanobacterial hydrogen production. Hence, this work aims to investigate the effects of both light quantity and quality on biohydrogen productivity of heterocystous cyanobacterium, A.variabilis. Under white light condition, the highest hydrogen production rate of 31 µmol H2 mg chl a -1 h-1 was achieved at 70 µE m-2 s-1. When the experiment was repeated at the same light irradiance but different light spectra of blue, red and green, the accumulations of hydrogen were significantly lower than the white light except for blue light. As the light irradiance was increased to 350 µE m-2 s-1, the accumulated hydrogen under the blue light doubled that of the white light. Besides that, an unusual prolongation of the hydrogen production up to 120 h was observed. The results obtained suggest that blue light could be the most desirable light spectrum for cyanobacterial hydrogen production.

  6. Hydrogen Bonding and Binding of Polybasic Residues with Negatively Charged Mixed Lipid Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, C.; Feraudo, J.; Travesset, A.

    2008-01-23

    Phosphoinositides, phosphorylated products of phosphatidylinositol, are a family of phospholipids present in tiny amounts (1% or less) in the cytosolic surface of cell membranes, yet they play an astonishingly rich regulatory role, particularly in signaling processes. In this letter, we use molecular dynamics simulations on a model system of mixed lipid monolayers to investigate the interaction of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), the most common of the phosphoinositides, with a polybasic peptide consisting of 13 lysines. Our results show that the polybasic peptide sequesters three PIP{sub 2} molecules, forming a complex stabilized by the formation of multiple hydrogen bonds between PIP{sub 2} and the Lys residues. We also show that the polybasic peptide does not sequester other charged phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine because of the inability to form long-lived stable hydrogen bonds.

  7. Effects of heparin on insulin binding and biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kriauciunas, K.M.; Grigorescu, F.; Kahn, C.R.

    1987-02-01

    The effect of heparin, a polyanionic glycosaminoglycan known to alter the function of many proteins, on insulin binding and bioactivity was studied. Cultured human lymphocytes (IM-9) were incubated with varying concentrations of heparin, then extensively washed, and /sup 125/I-labeled insulin binding was measured. Heparin at concentrations used clinically for anticoagulation (1-50 U/ml) inhibited binding in a dose-dependent manner; 50% inhibition of binding occurred with 5-10 U/ml. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding was due to a decrease in both the affinity and the apparent number of available insulin receptors. The effect occurred within 10 min at 22 degrees C and persisted even after the cells were extensively washed. Inhibition of insulin binding also occurred when cells were preincubated with heparinized plasma or heparinized serum but not when cells were incubated with normal serum or plasma from blood anticoagulated with EDTA. By contrast, other polyanions and polycations, e.g., poly-L-glutamic acid, poly-L-lysine, succinylated poly-L-lysine, and histone, did not inhibit binding. Heparin also inhibited insulin binding in Epstein-Barr (EB) virus-transformed lymphocytes but had no effect on insulin binding to isolated adipocytes, human erythrocytes, or intact hepatoma cells. When isolated adipocytes were incubated with heparin, there was a dose-dependent inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation and, to a lesser extent, of basal glucose oxidation. Although heparin has no effect on insulin binding to intact hepatoma cells, heparin inhibited both insulin binding and insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation in receptors solubilized from these cells.

  8. Effects of formate on fermentative hydrogen production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Tatsuo; Tanisho, Shigeharu

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of formate on fermentative hydrogen production by Enterobacter aerogenes by way of batch culture. When 20 mM formate was added to pH 6.3 and pH 5.8 E. aerogenes glucose cultures (formate culture) at the beginning of cultivation, hydrogen evolution through both glucose consumption and decomposition of the extrinsic formate occurred together, while hydrogen evolution occurred only through glucose consumption in the control cultures. The hydrogen evolution rates in the formate cultures were faster than in the control cultures, although cell growth and glucose consumption rates in the formate cultures were slower than the control cultures'. The decomposition rate of the extrinsic formate in the pH 5.8 formate culture was faster than in the pH 6.3 formate culture. The hydrogen yield from glucose in the pH 6.3 formate culture increased due to the increasing amount of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide for hydrogen production.

  9. Poisoning effect on solubility of hydrogen isotopes in getter materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Sato, Yuichi; Ogawa, Hidenori; Shirasu, Yoshirou; Miyake, Masanobu

    1991-03-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium solubilities in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys with various compositions have been measured at pressures below 100 Pa. All of the solubility data were found to follow Sieverts' law. The presence of carbon in Ti increased the solubilities of hydrogen isotopes and reduced the enthalpies of solution. The solubility increased and the enthalpy of solution decreased with addition of nitrogen into Zr. The hydrogen solubility in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys was larger than the deuterium solubility. Partial thermodynamic functions of hydrogen and deuterium in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys were obtained by a dilute solution model and compared with those in Ti-(O, N) and Zr-O alloys. The isotope effect of hydrogen and deuterium solubilities in the Ti-(O, N, C) and Zr-(O, N) alloys was discussed, and the tritium solubility in Ti-C and Zr-N alloys was evaluated from hydrogen and deuterium data.

  10. Dendritic biomimicry: microenvironmental hydrogen-bonding effects on tryptophan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Koenig, S; Müller, L; Smith, D K

    2001-03-02

    Two series of dendritically modified tryptophan derivatives have been synthesised and their emission spectra measured in a range of different solvents. This paper presents the syntheses of these novel dendritic structures and discusses their emission spectra in terms of both solvent and dendritic effects. In the first series of dendrimers, the NH group of the indole ring is available for hydrogen bonding, whilst in the second series, the indole NH group has been converted to NMe. Direct comparison of the emission wavelengths of analogous NH and NMe derivatives indicates the importance of the Kamlet-Taft solvent beta3 parameter, which reflects the ability of the solvent to accept a hydrogen bond from the NH group, an effect not possible for the NMe series of dendrimers. For the NH dendrimers, the attachment of a dendritic shell to the tryptophan subunit leads to a red shift in emission wavelength. This dendritic effect only operates in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents. For the NMe dendrimers, however, the attachment of a dendritic shell has no effect on the emission spectra of the indole ring. This proves the importance of hydrogen bonding between the branched shell and the indole NH group in causing the dendritic effect. This is the first time a dendritic effect has been unambiguously assigned to individual hydrogen-bonding interactions and indicates that such intramolecular interactions are important in dendrimers, just as they are in proteins. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the use of tryptophan residues as a probe of the microenvironment within proteins--in particular, it stresses the importance of hydrogen bonds formed by the indole NH group.

  11. Inner reorganization limiting electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding: intra- vs. intermolecular effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Eduardo; Frontana, Carlos

    2014-05-07

    In this work, experimental evidence of the influence of the electron transfer kinetics during electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding between anion radicals of metronidazole and ornidazole, derivatives of 5-nitro-imidazole, and 1,3-diethylurea as the hydrogen bond donor, is presented. Analysis of the variations of voltammetric EpIcvs. log KB[DH], where KB is the binding constant, allowed us to determine the values of the binding constant and also the electron transfer rate k, confirmed by experiments obtained at different scan rates. Electronic structure calculations at the BHandHLYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level for metronidazole, including the solvent effect by the Cramer/Truhlar model, suggested that the minimum energy conformer is stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In this structure, the inner reorganization energy, λi,j, contributes significantly (0.5 eV) to the total reorganization energy of electron transfer, thus leading to a diminishment of the experimental k.

  12. Synthesis and anion binding studies of tris(3-aminopropyl)amine-based tripodal urea and thiourea receptors: Proton transfer-induced selectivity for hydrogen sulfate over sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Khansari, Maryam Emami; Johnson, Corey R.; Basaran, Ismet; Nafis, Aemal; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Tris(3-aminopropyl)amine-based tripodal urea and thiourea receptors, tris([(4-cyanophenyl)amino]propyl)urea (L1) and tris([(4-cyanophenyl)amino]propyl)thiourea (L2), have been synthesized and their anion binding properties have been investigated for halides and oxoanions. As investigated by 1H NMR titrations, each receptor binds an anion with a 1:1 stoichiometry via hydrogen-bonding interactions (NH⋯anion), showing the binding trend in the order of F− > H2PO4− > HCO3− > HSO4− > CH3COO− > SO42− > Cl− > Br− > I in DMSO-d6. The interactions of the receptors were further studied by 2D NOESY, showing the loss of NOESY contacts of two NH resonances for the complexes of F−, H2PO4−, HCO3−, HSO4− or CH3COO− due to the strong NH⋯anion interactions. The observed higher binding affinity for HSO4− than SO42− is attributed to the proton transfer from HSO4− to the central nitrogen of L1 or L2 which was also supported by the DFT calculations, leading to the secondary acid-base interactions. The thiourea receptor L2 has a general trend to show a higher affinity for an anion as compared to the urea receptor L1 for the corresponding anion in DMSO-d6. In addition, the compound L2 has been exploited for its extraction properties for fluoride in water using a liquid-liquid extraction technique, and the results indicate that the receptor effectively extracts fluoride from water showing ca. 99% efficiency (based on L2). PMID:28184300

  13. Hydrogen Effect on Nanomechanical Properties of the Nitrided Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnoush, Afrooz; Asgari, Masoud; Johnsen, Roy; Hoel, Rune

    2013-02-01

    In situ electrochemical nanoindentation is used to examine the effect of electrochemically charged hydrogen on mechanical properties of the nitride layer on low-alloy 2.25Cr-1Mo martensitic structural steel. By application of this method, we were able to trace the changes in the mechanical properties due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen to different depths within the compound and diffusion layers. The results clearly show that the hydrogen charging of the nitriding layer can soften the layer and reduce the hardness within both the compound and the diffusion layers. The effect is completely reversible and by removal of the hydrogen, the hardness recovers to its original value. The reduction in hardness of the nitride layer does not correlate to the nitrogen concentration, but it seems to be influenced by the microstructure and residual stress within the compound and diffusion layers. Findings show that nitriding can be a promising way to control the hydrogen embrittlement of the tempered martensitic steels.

  14. Kinetic effect of Pd additions on the hydrogen uptake of chemically activated, ultramicroporous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2010-01-01

    The effect of mixing chemically-activated ultramicroporous carbon (UMC) with Pd nanopowder is investigated. Results show that Pd addition doubles the rate of hydrogen uptake, but does not enhance the hydrogen capacity or improve desorption kinetics. The effect of Pd on the rate of hydrogen adsorption supports the occurrence of the hydrogen spillover mechanism in the Pd - UMC system.

  15. Catalytic and ligand binding properties of the FK506 binding protein FKBP12: effects of the single amino acid substitution of Tyr82 to Leu.

    PubMed Central

    Bossard, M J; Bergsma, D J; Brandt, M; Livi, G P; Eng, W K; Johnson, R K; Levy, M A

    1994-01-01

    The binding of FK506 and rapamycin to their cytosolic receptor FKBP12 is an intermediate step in the paths leading to their potent immunosuppressive properties. One of the amino acids defining the hydrophobic binding cleft for the macrocycles is Tyr82, which is thought to form a hydrogen bond with the amide oxygens of the common pipecolyl structural element within the two macrolides. To understand better the influence of this amino acid residue in catalytic activity (cis-trans peptidyl prolyl isomerization) and ligand binding properties, a Tyr82 to Leu site-specific modification of FKBP12 was prepared, purified and characterized. Kinetic experiments have demonstrated that the Tyr82 to Leu modification has a greater effect on catalytic properties than on ligand binding affinities, a result which indicates that these inhibitors may not be binding as true transition-state analogues. In an additional test for cellular function, expression of both wild-type and mutant human FKBP12 in a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae rendered resistant to rapamycin by deletion of the gene encoding a cytosolic rapamycin binding protein (RPB1), the yeast homologue of FKBP12, restored wild-type drug sensitivity. PMID:7507662

  16. The effect of electron induced hydrogenation of graphene on its electrical transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sung Oh; Teizer, Winfried

    2013-07-22

    We report a deterioration of the electrical transport properties of a graphene field effect transistor due to energetic electron irradiation on a stack of Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) on graphene (PMMA/graphene bilayer). Prior to electron irradiation, we observed that the PMMA layer on graphene does not deteriorate the carrier transport of graphene but improves its electrical properties instead. As a result of the electron irradiation on the PMMA/graphene bilayer, the Raman “D” band appears after removal of PMMA. We argue that the degradation of the transport behavior originates from the binding of hydrogen generated during the PMMA backbone secession process.

  17. Effects of hydrogen sulphide in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dunn, William R; Alexander, Stephen P H; Ralevic, Vera; Roberts, Richard E

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that the gaseous pollutant, hydrogen sulphide (H2S) can be synthesised in the body and has a multitude of biological actions. This review summarizes some of the actions of this 'gasotransmitter' in influencing the smooth muscle that is responsible for controlling muscular activity of hollow organs. In the vasculature, while H2S can cause vasoconstriction by complex interactions with other biologically important gases, such as nitric oxide, the prevailing response is vasorelaxation. While most vasorelaxation responses occur by a direct action of H2S on smooth muscle cells, it has recently been proposed to be an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. H2S also promotes relaxation in other smooth muscle preparations including bronchioles, the bladder, gastrointestinal tract and myometrium, opening up the opportunity of exploiting the pharmacology of H2S in the treatment of conditions where smooth muscle tone is excessive. The original concept, that H2S caused smooth muscle relaxation by activating ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, has been supplemented with observations that H2S can also modify the activity of other potassium channels, intracellular pH, phosphodiesterase activity and transient receptor potential channels on sensory nerves. While the enzymes responsible for generating endogenous H2S are widely expressed in smooth muscle preparations, it is much less clear what the physiological role of H2S is in determining smooth muscle contractility. Clarification of this requires the development of potent and selective inhibitors of H2S-generating enzymes.

  18. Polycation binding to glomerular basement membrane. Effect of biochemical modification.

    PubMed

    Bertolatus, J A; Hunsicker, L G

    1987-02-01

    The polycation hexadimethrine (HDM) binds to anionic sites in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and causes heavy proteinuria when infused in vivo. An in vitro assay of 3H-HDM binding to isolated dog GBM was developed, to permit further analysis of the GBM components binding HDM. 3H-HDM binding to isolated GBM was saturable, reversible in dose-dependent fashion by competing polycations, and inhibited by increasing salt concentration and low pH. The pH dependence of binding suggested that most of the HDM binds to carboxyl groups rather than to the sulfate groups of proteoglycans. Removal of heparan sulfate by heparinase or purified heparatinase had no detectable effect on HDM binding. Treatment of GBM with neuraminidase, hyaluronidase, or chondroitinase reduced binding of HDM by a maximum of 20 to 38%. However, substitution of carboxyl anions with nonionizable glycine methyl ester residues resulted in complete elimination of HDM binding. Parallel results were obtained in studies of glomerular localization of cationized ferritin (CatF), pI 8.5. After carboxyl substitution, GBM did not bind CatF; heparinase-treated GBM bound CatF in a distribution not demonstrably different from normal. Cellulose acetate electrophoresis of glycosaminoglycan fractions prepared from treated GBM confirmed that carboxyl modification did not alter the content or charge of the heparan sulfate of GBM, but heparinase treatment removed at least 90% of heparan sulfate. The results indicate that carboxyl groups are quantitatively more important than heparan sulfate for binding of HDM in vitro. Since HDM causes proteinuria in vivo, carboxyl groups may be important for maintenance of normal permselectivity.

  19. Binding of endotoxin to macrophages: distinct effects of serum constituents.

    PubMed

    Tahri-Jouti, M A; Chaby, R

    1991-07-01

    The respective roles of serum lipoproteins, and of the complement component C3, in the binding of endotoxin (LPS) to macrophages were analyzed by an in vitro assay using [3H]LPS. The addition of an anti-C3 serum in the medium induced an apparent abolishment of the specific binding of LPS to mouse macrophages, but this effect appeared to be due to an actual increase of nonspecific binding. Isolated complexes of LPS with lipoproteins of high density (HDL3) and of very high density (VHDL) did not bind to macrophages. Furthermore, addition of HDL3 and VHDL in the incubation medium inhibited the specific binding of LPS to macrophages. These results suggest that C3 reduces nonspecific interactions between LPS and macrophages whereas associations between LPS and HDL3 or VHDL inhibit specific LPS-macrophage interactions.

  20. Cholesterol accelerates the binding of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide to ganglioside GM1 through a universal hydrogen-bond-dependent sterol tuning of glycolipid conformation.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Yahi, Nouara; Garmy, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Age-related alterations of membrane lipids in brain cell membranes together with high blood cholesterol are considered as major risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Yet the molecular mechanisms by which these factors increase Alzheimer's risk are mostly unknown. In lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane, neurotoxic Alzheimer's beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides interact with both cholesterol and ganglioside GM1. Recent data also suggested that cholesterol could stimulate the binding of Abeta to GM1 through conformational modulation of the ganglioside headgroup. Here we used a combination of physicochemical and molecular modeling approaches to decipher the mechanisms of cholesterol-assisted binding of Abeta to GM1. With the aim of decoupling the effect of cholesterol on GM1 from direct Abeta-cholesterol interactions, we designed a minimal peptide (Abeta5-16) containing the GM1-binding domain but lacking the amino acid residues involved in cholesterol recognition. Using the Langmuir technique, we showed that cholesterol (but not phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin) significantly accelerates the interaction of Abeta5-16 with GM1. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that Abeta5-16 interacts with a cholesterol-stabilized dimer of GM1. The main structural effect of cholesterol is to establish a hydrogen-bond between its own OH group and the glycosidic-bond linking ceramide to the glycone part of GM1, thereby inducing a tilt in the glycolipid headgroup. This fine conformational tuning stabilizes the active conformation of the GM1 dimer whose headgroups, oriented in two opposite directions, form a chalice-shaped receptacle for Abeta. These data give new mechanistic insights into the stimulatory effect of cholesterol on Abeta/GM1 interactions. They also support the emerging concept that cholesterol is a universal modulator of protein-glycolipid interactions in the broader context of membrane recognition processes.

  1. Cooperative hydrogen bonds of macromolecules. 2. Two-dimensional cooperativity in the binding of poly(4-vinylpyridine) to poly(4-vinylphenol).

    PubMed

    Kríz, Jaroslav; Dybal, Jirí; Brus, Jirí

    2006-09-21

    The hydrogen bond interaction of poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVF), ligated by a 20 mol/mol excess of pyridine-d(5) (PD) in tetrahydrofuran-d(8), with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) was studied using liquid and solid-state NMR and quantum mechanical calculations. Because of its cooperative interaction, PVP substitutes PD in its hydrogen bond with PVF, thus forming a PVF-PVP complex, which gradually precipitates from solution. On the basis of the 1H/13C NMR spin-diffusion experiments and density functional theory quantum calculations, the complex is shown to have the fairly regular structure of a polymer sheet with intermittent H-bond links between PVF and PVP chains. The cooperativity of PVP interaction with PVF was studied by measuring the dependence of the binding degree alpha of PVP on its polymerization degree (P(n), being 10, 17, 30, 36, 48, 65, and 84) at various PVP/PVF molar ratios. The value of alpha was established indirectly by measuring the fraction of liberated PD using its 2H quadrupolar relaxation and pulsed field-gradient spin-echo measurement of self-diffusion. The cooperativity is shown to be of a higher order and two-dimensional, that is, dependent on both the polymerization degree of PVP and its ratio to PVF. A mathematical model of such two-dimensional cooperativity based chiefly on a proximity effect is suggested.

  2. Investigating the effect of heat treatment on hydrogen permeation behavior of API X-70 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirband, Zeynab; Shishesaz, Mohammad Reza; Ashrafi, Ali

    2012-06-01

    Pipeline steels absorb different amounts of hydrogen during transportation of sour oil and gas. Since hydrogen-related damages such as hydrogen-induced cracking are strongly affected by hydrogen permeation behavior of steels, the purpose of this study determined to investigate hydrogen permeation behavior in API X-70 pipeline steel using electrochemical permeation method. The effect of heat treatment was also considered. It was found that hydrogen diffusivity increased by annealing the X-70 and it was decreased by normalizing. The condition was reverse for hydrogen apparent solubility. Finally, it was concluded that change in hydrogen diffusivity can be attributed to changes in grain size due to heat treatment.

  3. Hydrogen Atoms Cause Long-Range Electronic Effects on Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffieux, P.; Gröning, O.; Schwaller, P.; Schlapbach, L.; Gröning, P.

    2000-05-01

    We report on long-range electronic effects caused by hydrogen-carbon interaction at the graphite surface. Two types of defects could be distinguished with a combined mode of scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy: chemisorption of hydrogen on the basal plane of graphite and atomic vacancy formation. Both types show a \\(3×3\\)R30° superlattice in the local density of states but have a different topographic structure. The range of modifications in the electronic structure, of fundamental importance for electronic devices based on carbon nanostructures, has been found to be of the order of 20-25 lattice constants.

  4. Observation of Binding and Rotation of Methane and Hydrogen within a Functional Metal–Organic Framework

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The key requirement for a portable store of natural gas is to maximize the amount of gas within the smallest possible space. The packing of methane (CH4) in a given storage medium at the highest possible density is, therefore, a highly desirable but challenging target. We report a microporous hydroxyl-decorated material, MFM-300(In) (MFM = Manchester Framework Material, replacing the NOTT designation), which displays a high volumetric uptake of 202 v/v at 298 K and 35 bar for CH4 and 488 v/v at 77 K and 20 bar for H2. Direct observation and quantification of the location, binding, and rotational modes of adsorbed CH4 and H2 molecules within this host have been achieved, using neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering experiments, coupled with density functional theory (DFT) modeling. These complementary techniques reveal a very efficient packing of H2 and CH4 molecules within MFM-300(In), reminiscent of the condensed gas in pure component crystalline solids. We also report here, for the first time, the experimental observation of a direct binding interaction between adsorbed CH4 molecules and the hydroxyl groups within the pore of a material. This is different from the arrangement found in CH4/water clathrates, the CH4 store of nature. PMID:27410670

  5. Observation of Binding and Rotation of Methane and Hydrogen within a Functional Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mathew; da Silva, Ivan; Johnson, Mark; Carter, Joseph H; Newby, Ruth; Suyetin, Mikhail; Besley, Elena; Manuel, Pascal; Rudić, Svemir; Fitch, Andrew N; Murray, Claire; David, William I F; Yang, Sihai; Schröder, Martin

    2016-07-27

    The key requirement for a portable store of natural gas is to maximize the amount of gas within the smallest possible space. The packing of methane (CH4) in a given storage medium at the highest possible density is, therefore, a highly desirable but challenging target. We report a microporous hydroxyl-decorated material, MFM-300(In) (MFM = Manchester Framework Material, replacing the NOTT designation), which displays a high volumetric uptake of 202 v/v at 298 K and 35 bar for CH4 and 488 v/v at 77 K and 20 bar for H2. Direct observation and quantification of the location, binding, and rotational modes of adsorbed CH4 and H2 molecules within this host have been achieved, using neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering experiments, coupled with density functional theory (DFT) modeling. These complementary techniques reveal a very efficient packing of H2 and CH4 molecules within MFM-300(In), reminiscent of the condensed gas in pure component crystalline solids. We also report here, for the first time, the experimental observation of a direct binding interaction between adsorbed CH4 molecules and the hydroxyl groups within the pore of a material. This is different from the arrangement found in CH4/water clathrates, the CH4 store of nature.

  6. Effects of crossover hydrogen on platinum dissolution and agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Tommy T. H.; Rogers, Erin; Young, Alan P.; Ye, Siyu; Colbow, Vesna; Wessel, Silvia

    2011-10-01

    The durability of catalysts in the polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is identified as a critical limiting factor for wide commercialization of fuel cells. Even though much progress has been made in understanding the degradation mechanisms, the phenomena of Pt dissolution and agglomeration and their contributing factors are not fully understood. In the present investigation, the effects of crossover hydrogen on Pt degradation are studied using an accelerated stress test (AST). The end-of-test (EOT) membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEAs) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning-electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The results provided mechanistic understanding of Pt dissolution and agglomeration: Pt growth and agglomeration were found to be less severe with more crossover hydrogen due likely to the chemical reduction of Pt oxides by crossover hydrogen and the subsequently decrease in the amount of Pt ions formed via the oxide pathway.

  7. Hydrogen effects on the age hardening behavior of 2024 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. A.; Louthan, M. R., Jr.; Sisson, R. D., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    It has been found that the fatigue crack growth rate in aluminum alloys increases significantly in the presence of moisture. This phenomenon along with a moisture effect observed in another context has been attributed to 'embrittlement' of the aluminum by absorbed hydrogen generated by the reaction of moisture with freshly exposed aluminum. A description is given of a number of age hardening experiments involving 2024 aluminum. These experiments show that a mechanism related to the segregation of absorbed hydrogen to the coherent theta-double-prime interfaces may account for the observed reduction in fatigue life. It is pointed out that this segregation promotes a loss of coherency in the hydrogen rich region at a fatigue crack tip. Subsequently, the loss of coherency causes local softening and reduces fatigue life.

  8. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-04-29

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  9. Nuclear quantum effect on intramolecular hydrogen bond of hydrogen maleate anion: An ab initio path integral molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yukio; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2013-05-01

    Ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulation was performed to understand the nuclear quantum effect on the hydrogen bond of hydrogen malonate anion. Static calculation predicted the proton transfer barrier as 0.12 kcal/mol. Conventional ab initio molecular dynamics simulation at 300 K found proton distribution with a double peak on the proton transfer coordinate. Inclusion of thermal effect alone elongates the hydrogen bond length, which increases the barrier height. Inclusion of nuclear quantum effect washes out this barrier, and distributes a single broad peak in the center. H/D isotope effect on the proton transfer is also discussed.

  10. Resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-48, Hydrogen control measures and effects of hydrogen burns on safety equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, C.M.; Soffer, L.

    1989-09-01

    Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-48 arose as a result of the large amount of hydrogen generated and burned within containment during the Three Mile Island accident. This issue covers hydrogen control measures for recoverable degraded-core accidents for all boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and those pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) with ice-condenser containments. The Commission and the nuclear industry have sponsored extensive research in this area, which has led to significant revision of the Commission's hydrogen control regulations, given in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 50 (10 CFR 50), Section 50.44. BWRs having Mark I and II containments are presently required to operate with inerted containment atmospheres that effectively prevent hydrogen combustion. BWRs with Mark III containments and PWRs with ice-condenser containments are now required to be equipped with hydrogen control systems to protect containment integrity and safety systems inside containment. Industry has chosen to use hydrogen igniter systems to burn hydrogen produced in a controlled fashion to prevent damage. An independent review by a Committee of the National Research Council concluded that, for most accident scenarios, current regulatory requirements make it highly unlikely that hydrogen detonation would be the cause of containment failure. On the basis of the extensive research effort conducted and current regulatory requirements, including their implementation, the staff concludes that no new regulatory guidance on hydrogen control for recoverable degraded-core accidents for these types of plants is necessary and that USI A-48 is resolved.

  11. Mg NMR in DNA solutions: Dominance of site binding effects.

    PubMed

    Rose, D M; Bleam, M L; Record, M T; Bryant, R G

    1980-11-01

    (25)Mg NMR spectroscopy is applied to a study of magnesium ion interactions with DNA, which is considered as a model for a linear polyelectrolyte. It is demonstrated that the magnesium ion spectrum is complicated by a non-Lorent-zian line shape and is dominated by the effects of chemical exchange with macromolecule binding sites. A distinction is made between specific-site interactions in which the magnesium ion loses a water molecule from the first coordination sphere on binding and those interactions, referred to as territorial binding, in which the ion maintains its first coordination sphere complement of solvent. The first type of site-binding interactions are shown to dominate the magnesium ion NMR spectrum, based on a consideration of the magnitudes of the observed (25)Mg relaxation rates compared with (23)Na relaxation rates, the clear contributions of chemical exchange-limited relaxation, and an ion displacement experiment employing sodium.

  12. Transport effects on the kinetics of protein-surface binding.

    PubMed Central

    Balgi, G; Leckband, D E; Nitsche, J M

    1995-01-01

    A detailed model is presented for protein binding to active surfaces, with application to the binding of avidin molecules to a biotin-functionalized fiber optic sensor in experiments reported by S. Zhao and W. M. Reichert (American Chemical Society Symposium Series 493, 1992). Kinetic data for binding in solution are used to assign an intrinsic catalytic rate coefficient k to the biotin-avidin pair, deconvoluted from transport and electrostatic factors via application of coagulation theory. This intrinsic chemical constant is built into a reaction-diffusion analysis of surface binding where activity is restricted to localized sites (representing immobilized biotin molecules). The analysis leads to an effective catalytic rate coefficient keff characterizing the active surface. Thereafter, solution of the transport problem describing absorption of avidin molecules by the macroscopic sensor surface leads to predictions of the avidin flux, which are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The analysis suggests the following conclusions. 1) Translational diffusion limitations are negligible for avidin-biotin binding in solution owing to the small (kinetically limiting) value k = 0.00045 m/s. 2) The sparse distribution of biotin molecules and the presence of a repulsive hydration force produce an effective surface-average catalytic rate coefficient keff of order 10(-7) m/s, much smaller than k. 3) Avidin binding to the fiber optic sensor occurs in an intermediate regime where the rate is influenced by both kinetics and diffusion. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:7647232

  13. Effects of glycation on meloxicam binding to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trynda-Lemiesz, Lilianna; Wiglusz, Katarzyna

    2011-05-01

    The current study reports a binding of meloxicam a pharmacologically important new generation, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug to glycated form of the human serum albumin (HSA). The interaction of the meloxicam with nonglycated and glycated albumin has been studied at pH 7.4 in 0.05 M sodium phosphate buffer with 0.1 M NaCl, using fluorescence quenching technique and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Results of the present study have shown that the meloxicam could bind both forms of albumin glycated and nonglycated at a site, which was close to the tryptophan residues. Similarly, how for native albumin glycated form has had one high affinity site for the drug with association constants of the order of 10 5 M -1. The glycation process of the HSA significantly has affected the impact of the meloxicam on the binding of other ligands such as warfarin and bilirubin. The affinity of the glycated albumin for bilirubin as for native albumin has been reduced by meloxicam but observed effect was weaker by half (about 20%) compared with nonglycated albumin. In contrast to the native albumin meloxicam binding to glycated form of the protein only slightly affected the binding of warfarin. It seemed possible that the effects on warfarin binding might be entirely attributable to the Lys 199 modification which was in site I.

  14. Thermodynamics of silicon nitridation - Effect of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.; Zeleznik, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Equilibrium compositions for the nitridization of Si were calculated to detect the effectiveness of H2 in removal of the oxide film and in increasing the concentration of SiO and reducing the proportions of O2. Gibbs free energy for the formation of SiN2O was computed above 1685 K, and at lower temperatures. The thermodynamic properties of SiN2O2 were then considered from 1000-3000 K, taking into account the known thermodynamic data for 39 molecular combinations of the Si, Ni, and O. The gases formed were assumed ideal mixtures with pure phase condensed species. The mole fractions were obtained for a system of SiO2 with each Si particle covered with a thin layer of SiO2 before nitridation, and a system in which the nitriding atmosphere had access to the Si. The presence of H2 was determined to enhance the removal of NiO2 in the first system, decrease the partial pressure of O2, increase the partial pressures of SiO, Si, H2O, NH3, and SiH4, while its effects were negligible in the Si system.

  15. Enhancement effect of hematite nanoparticles on fermentative hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongliang; Cui, Maojin; Wei, Liling; Yang, Haijun; Shen, Jianquan

    2011-09-01

    The effects of hematite nanoparticles concentration (0-1600 mg/L) and initial pH (4.0-10.0) on hydrogen production were investigated in batch assays using sucrose-fed anaerobic mixed bacteria at 35°C. The optimum hematite nanoparticles concentration with an initial pH 8.48 was 200mg/L, with the maximum hydrogen yield of 3.21 mol H(2)/mol sucrose which was 32.64% higher than the blank test. At 200mg/L hematite nanoparticles concentration, further initial pH optimization experiments indicated that at pH 6.0 the maximum hydrogen yield reached to 3.57 mol H(2)/mol sucrose and hydrogen content was 66.1%. The slow release of hematite nanoparticles had been recorded by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, TEM analysis indicated that the hematite nanoparticles can affect the shape of bacteria, namely, its length increased from ca. 2.0-3.6 μm to ca. 2.6-5.6 μm, and width became narrower.

  16. Aromaticity, closed-shell effects, and metallization of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Recent theoretical and experimental studies reveal that compressed molecular hydrogen at 200-350 GPa transforms to layered structures consisting of distorted graphene sheets. The discovery of chemical bonding motifs in these phases that are far from close-packed contrasts with the long-held view that hydrogen should form simple, symmetric, ambient alkali-metal-like structures at these pressures. Chemical bonding considerations indicate that the realization of such unexpected structures can be explained by consideration of simple low-dimensional model systems based on H6 rings and graphene-like monolayers. Both molecular quantum chemistry and solid-state physics approaches show that these model systems exhibit a special stability, associated with the completely filled set of bonding orbitals or valence bands. This closed-shell effect persists in the experimentally observed layered structures where it prevents the energy gap from closing, thus delaying the pressure-induced metallization. Metallization occurs upon further compression by destroying the closed shell electronic structure, which is mainly determined by the 1s electrons via lowering of the bonding bands stemming from the unoccupied atomic 2s and 2p orbitals. Because enhanced diamagnetic susceptibility is a fingerprint of aromaticity, magnetic measurements provide a potentially important tool for further characterization of compressed hydrogen. The results indicate that the properties of dense hydrogen are controlled by chemical bonding forces over a much broader range of conditions than previously considered.

  17. Beyond feature binding: interference from episodic context binding creates the bivalency effect in task-switching.

    PubMed

    Meier, Beat; Rey-Mermet, Alodie

    2012-01-01

    When switching between different tasks and bivalent stimuli occur only occasionally on one of them, performance is slowed on subsequent univalent trials even if they have no overlapping features with the bivalent stimulus. This phenomenon has been labeled the "bivalency effect." Recent evidence has revealed that this effect is robust, general, and enduring. Moreover, it challenges current theories of task-switching and cognitive control. Here, we review these theories and propose a new, episodic context binding account. According to this account, binding does not only occur between stimuli, responses, and tasks, but also for the more general context in which the stimuli occur. The result of this binding process is a complex representation that includes each of these components. When bivalent stimuli occur, the resulting conflict is associated with the general context, creating a new conflict-loaded representation. The reactivation of this representation causes interference on subsequent trials, that is, the bivalency effect. We evaluate this account in light of the empirical evidence.

  18. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  19. Polyclonal and monoclonal IgG binding on Protein A resins - Evidence of competitive binding effects.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Justin; Zhang, Shaojie; Crews, Gillian; Healy, Edward; Carta, Giorgio; Przybycien, Todd

    2017-03-14

    Protein A (ProA) chromatography is used extensively in the biopharmaceutical industry for the selective capture of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). This work provides a comparison of the adsorptive behavior of a highly heterogeneous polyclonal hIgG versus that of a mAb as well as the behavior of their mixtures on representative ProA resins. Both pH gradient elution and frontal loading experiments using human polyclonal IgG (hIgG) reveal a distribution of IgG-ProA binding strengths likely associated with multiple IgG subclasses and the heterogeneity of the variable region. pH gradient analysis of fractions collected along the breakthrough curve demonstrate a clear progression from weaker binding (higher pH eluting) to stronger binding (lower pH eluting) IgG species leaving the column suggesting the possibility of stronger binding species displacing the weaker binding ones. Displacement is directly observed by visualizing the adsorption of fluorescently labeled mAb and hIgG using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Here, the displacement of hIgG results in a broad adsorption front compared to the sharp, 'shrinking core' behavior typically observed with mAbs. Sequential CLSM adsorption experiments with a mAb and hIgG confirm that stronger or equivalent-binding hIgG species are able to displace and desorb bound mAb molecules. These phenomena are examined using a variety of ProA resins including CaptivA PriMAB, MabSelect, and MabSelect SuRe to understand the effect of different ligand properties on binding strength and competition among different IgG species. The results of these comparisons suggest that the competition kinetics are slower with ligands that have a single-point covalent attachment to the base matrix compared to a multi-point attachment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal effects in dynamic storage of hydrogen by adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Lamari, M.; Aoufi, A.; Malbrunot, P.

    2000-03-01

    Thermal effects in dynamic hydrogen storage by adsorption at room temperature and high pressure are studied theoretically and experimentally. The system of adsorbate-adsorbent used was hydrogen in granular activated carbon. The theoretical analysis was based on heat- and mass-transfer modeling in a packed-bed adsorber, with particular emphasis on the thermal effects occurring during charge and discharge steps. The influence of gas flow rate and storage pressure (up to 15 MPa) on the total amount stored or delivered was investigated. Operating conditions were compatible with practical application for onboard vehicle storage. The experimental study was carried out in cylindrical 2-L reservoirs filled with granular activated carbon in which the bed temperature was measured at various positions. The temperature changes during both charge and discharge agreed well with the model predictions.

  1. Strong parallel magnetic field effects on the hydrogen molecular ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaoxu; Li, Baiwen; Taylor, K. T.

    2003-09-01

    Equilibrium distances, binding energies and dissociation energies for the ground and low-lying states of the hydrogen molecular ion in a strong magnetic field parallel to the internuclear axis are calculated and refined, by using the two-dimensional pseudospectral method. High-precision results are presented for the binding energies over a wider field regime than already given in the literature (Kravchenko and Liberman 1997 Phys. Rev. A 55 2701). The present work removes a long-standing discrepancy for the Req value in the 1sigmau state at a field strength of 1.0 × 106 T. The dissociation energies of the antibonding 1pig state induced by magnetic fields are determined accurately. We have also observed that the antibonding 1pig potential energy curve develops a minimum if the field is sufficiently strong. Some unreliable results in the literature are pointed out and discussed. A way to efficiently treat vibrational processes and coupling between the nuclear and the electronic motions in magnetic fields is also suggested within a three-dimensional pseudospectral scheme.

  2. Effect of clustered peptide binding on DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Haley, Jennifer; Kabiru, Paul; Geng, Yan

    2010-01-01

    DNA condensation in-vitro has been studied as a model system to reveal common principles underlying gene packaging in biology, and as the critical first step towards the development of non-viral gene delivery vectors. In this study, we use a bio-inspired approach, where small DNA-binding peptides are controllably clustered by an amphiphilic block copolymer scaffold, to reveal the effect of clustered peptide binding on the energetics, size, shape and physical properties of DNA condensation in-vitro. This provides insights into the general architectural effect of gene-binding proteins on DNA condensation process. Moreover, the versatility afforded by regulating the clustering density and composition of peptides may provide a novel design platform for gene delivery applications in the future.

  3. Effect of hydrogen bonding and complexation with metal ions on the fluorescence of luotonin A.

    PubMed

    Miskolczy, Zsombor; Biczók, László

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescence characteristics of a biologically active natural alkaloid, luotonin A (LuA), were studied by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic methods. The rate constant of the radiationless deactivation from the singlet-excited state diminished by more than one order of magnitude when the solvent polarity was changed from toluene to water. Dual emission was found in polyfluorinated alcohols of large hydrogen bond donating ability due to photoinitiated proton displacement along the hydrogen bond. In CH2Cl2, LuA produced both 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 hydrogen-bonded complexes with hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) in the ground state. Photoexcitation of the 1 : 2 complex led to protonated LuA, whose fluorescence appeared at a long wavelength. LuA served as a bidentate ligand forming 1 : 1 complexes with metal ions in acetonitrile. The stability of the complexes diminished in the series of Cd(2+) > Zn(2+) > Ag(+), and upon competitive binding of water to the metal cations. The effect of chelate formation on the fluorescent properties was revealed.

  4. Discriminatory effects in the optical binding of chiral nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Kayn A.; Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L.

    2015-08-01

    The laser-induced intermolecular force that exists between two or more particles subjected to a moderately intense laser beam is termed `optical binding'. Completely distinct from the single-particle forces that give rise to optical trapping, the phenomenon of optical binding is a manifestation of the coupling between optically induced dipole moments in neutral particles. In conjunction with optical trapping, the optomechanical forces in optical binding afford means for the manipulation and fabrication of optically bound matter. The Casimir-Polder potential that is intrinsic to all matter can be overridden by the optical binding force in cases where the laser beam is of sufficient intensity. Chiral discrimination can arise when the laser input has a circular polarization, if the particles are themselves chiral. Then, it emerges that the interaction between particles with a particular handedness is responsive to the left- or right-handedness of the light. The present analysis, which expands upon previous studies of chiral discrimination in optical binding, identifies a novel mechanism that others have previously overlooked, signifying that the discriminatory effect is much more prominent than originally thought. The new theory leads to results for freely-tumbling chiral particles subjected to circularly polarized light. Rigorous conditions are established for the energy shifts to be non-zero and display discriminatory effects with respect to the handedness of the incident beam. Detailed calculations indicate that the energy shift is larger than those previously reported by three orders of magnitude.

  5. Effect of desipramine on dopamine receptor binding in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Suhara, Tetsuya Jikei Univ., Tokyo ); Inoue, Osamu; Kobayasi, Kaoru )

    1990-01-01

    Effect of desipramine on the in vivo binding of {sup 3}H-SCH23390 and {sup 3}H-N-methylspiperone ({sup 3}H-NMSP) in mouse striatum was studied. The ratio of radioactivity in the striatum to that in the cerebellum at 15 min after i.v. injection of {sup 3}H-SCH23390 or 45 min after injection of {sup 3}H-NMSP were used as indices of dopamine D1 or D2 receptor binding in vivo, respectively. In vivo binding of D1 and D2 receptors was decreased in a dose-dependent manner by acute treatment with desipramine (DMI). A saturation experiment suggested that the DMI-induced reduction in the binding was mainly due to the decrease in the affinity of both receptors. No direct interactions between the dopamine receptors and DMI were observed in vitro by the addition of 1 mM of DMI into striatal homogenate. Other antidepressants such as imipramine, clomipramine, maprotiline and mianserin also decreased the binding of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. The results indicated an important role of dopamine receptors in the pharmacological effect of antidepressants.

  6. Critical Research for Cost-Effective Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei; Deng, Xunming; Abken, Anka; Cao, Xinmin; Du, Wenhui; Vijh, Aarohi; Ingler, William; Chen, Changyong; Fan, Qihua; Collins, Robert; Compaan, Alvin; Yan, Yanfa; Giolando, Dean; Turner, John

    2014-10-29

    The objective of this project is to develop critical technologies required for cost-effective production of hydrogen from sunlight and water using a-Si triple junction solar cell based photo-electrodes. In this project, Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE) and its collaborating organizations utilize triple junction a-Si thin film solar cells as the core element to fabricate photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. Triple junction a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe solar cell is an ideal material for making cost-effective PEC system which uses sun light to split water and generate hydrogen. It has the following key features: 1) It has an open circuit voltage (Voc ) of ~ 2.3V and has an operating voltage around 1.6V. This is ideal for water splitting. There is no need to add a bias voltage or to inter-connect more than one solar cell. 2) It is made by depositing a-Si/a-SiGe/aSi-Ge thin films on a conducting stainless steel substrate which can serve as an electrode. When we immerse the triple junction solar cells in an electrolyte and illuminate it under sunlight, the voltage is large enough to split the water, generating oxygen at the Si solar cell side (for SS/n-i-p/sunlight structure) and hydrogen at the back, which is stainless steel side. There is no need to use a counter electrode or to make any wire connection. 3) It is being produced in large rolls of 3ft wide and up to 5000 ft long stainless steel web in a 25MW roll-to-roll production machine. Therefore it can be produced at a very low cost. After several years of research with many different kinds of material, we have developed promising transparent, conducting and corrosion resistant (TCCR) coating material; we carried out extensive research on oxygen and hydrogen generation catalysts, developed methods to make PEC electrode from production-grade a-Si solar cells; we have designed and tested various PEC module cases and carried out extensive outdoor testing; we were able to obtain a solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH

  7. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide in the Ageing Kidney.

    PubMed

    Hou, Cui-Lan; Wang, Ming-Jie; Sun, Chen; Huang, Yong; Jin, Sheng; Mu, Xue-Pan; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The study aimed to examine whether hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation changed in the kidney of the ageing mouse and its relationship with impaired kidney function. Results. H2S levels in the plasma, urine, and kidney decreased significantly in ageing mice. The expression of two known H2S-producing enzymes in kidney, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), decreased significantly during ageing. Chronic H2S donor (NaHS, 50 μmol/kg/day, 10 weeks) treatment could alleviate oxidative stress levels and renal tubular interstitial collagen deposition. These protective effects may relate to transcription factor Nrf2 activation and antioxidant proteins such as HO-1, SIRT1, SOD1, and SOD2 expression upregulation in the ageing kidney after NaHS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of H2S-producing enzymes changed with exogenous H2S administration and contributed to elevated H2S levels in the ageing kidney. Conclusions. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in the ageing kidney is insufficient. Exogenous H2S can partially rescue ageing-related kidney dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress, decreasing collagen deposition, and enhancing Nrf2 nuclear translocation. Recovery of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production may also contribute to the beneficial effects of NaHS treatment.

  8. Nuclear quantum effects and hydrogen bond fluctuations in water.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Cuny, Jérôme; Parrinello, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E

    2013-09-24

    The hydrogen bond (HB) is central to our understanding of the properties of water. However, despite intense theoretical and experimental study, it continues to hold some surprises. Here, we show from an analysis of ab initio simulations that take proper account of nuclear quantum effects that the hydrogen-bonded protons in liquid water experience significant excursions in the direction of the acceptor oxygen atoms. This generates a small but nonnegligible fraction of transient autoprotolysis events that are not seen in simulations with classical nuclei. These events are associated with major rearrangements of the electronic density, as revealed by an analysis of the computed Wannier centers and (1)H chemical shifts. We also show that the quantum fluctuations exhibit significant correlations across neighboring HBs, consistent with an ephemeral shuttling of protons along water wires. We end by suggesting possible implications for our understanding of how perturbations (solvated ions, interfaces, and confinement) might affect the HB network in water.

  9. Evidence for separate substrate binding sites for hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in the oxidation of ethanol by catalase

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaster, E.G.; Nagasawa,ss H.T.

    1986-03-01

    The oxidation of ethanol by purified bovine liver catalase (Sigma, C-40) can be supported by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or by CHP. The time course of the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported reaction (using glucose/glucose oxidase as the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ source) was linear for at least one hr, whereas the rate of acetaldehyde formation in the CHP (4.2 mM) supported reaction decreased with time. When catalase was exposed o CHP for 5 min before the addition of ethanol, the rate of CHP supported ethanol oxidation was reduced by more than 90% compared to incubations where the addition of ethanol preceded that of CHP. In the CHP inhibited state, the peroxidative activity of catalase was not restored by further addition of CHP or ethanol; however, addition of fresh catalase yielded its expected activity. Significantly, the CHP inhibited enzyme was equally effective as the untreated enzyme in catalyzing (a) the oxidation of ethanol in the presence H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported peroxidative activity as well as catalytic activity by CHP inhibited catalase points to separate binding sites for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and CHP in this reaction. Alternatively, CHP may bind adjacent to a common peroxide active site, thereby sterically impeding the binding of CHP - but not of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ - to this active site.

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide as an Effective Disinfectant for Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Jung, In-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Won-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) infections vary widely, from local infections resulting from animal bites and scratches to general infections. As of yet, no vaccine against P. multocida has been developed, and the most effective way to prevent pathogenic transmission is to clean the host environment using disinfectants. In this study, we identified which disinfectants most effectively inhibited environmental isolates of P. multocida. Three readily available disinfectants were compared: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HP), 70% isopropyl alcohol, and synthetic phenol. In suspension tests and zone inhibition tests, 3% HP was the most promising disinfectant against P. multocida. PMID:24954350

  11. Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-{kappa}B in H1299 human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Mi Ran; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Kim, So-Young; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-04-03

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (G{alpha}i1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of G{alpha}i1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of G{alpha}i1QL. G{alpha}i1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-{kappa}B, which resulted from an increase in NF-{kappa}B p50 protein. We conclude that G{alpha}i1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-{kappa}B activation.

  12. Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-kappaB in H1299 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Miran; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Kim, So-Young; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-04-03

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (Galphai1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of Galphai1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of Galphai1QL. Galphai1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-kappaB, which resulted from an increase in NF-kappaB p50 protein. We conclude that Galphai1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-kappaB activation.

  13. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON STRAIN-INDUCED MARTENSITE FORMATION IN TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Ps Lam, P

    2008-12-11

    Unstable austenitic stainless steels undergo a strain-induced martensite transformation. The effect of hydrogen on this transformation is not well understood. Some researchers believe that hydrogen makes the transformation to martensite more difficult because hydrogen is an austenite stabilizer. Others believe that hydrogen has little or no effect at all on the transformation and claim that the transformation is simply a function of strain and temperature. Still other researchers believe that hydrogen should increase the ability of the metal to transform due to hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and slip planarity. While the role of hydrogen on the martensite transformation is still debated, it has been experimentally verified that this transformation does occur in hydrogen-charged materials. What is the effect of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen embrittlement? Martensite near crack-tips or other highly strained regions could provide much higher hydrogen diffusivity and allow for quicker hydrogen concentration. Martensite may be more intrinsically brittle than austenite and has been shown to be severely embrittled by hydrogen. However, it does not appear to be a necessary condition for embrittlement since Type 21-6-9 stainless steel is more stable than Type 304L stainless steel but susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. In this study, the effect of hydrogen on strain-induced martensite formation in Type 304L stainless steel was investigated by monitoring the formation of martensite during tensile tests of as-received and hydrogen-charged samples and metallographically examining specimens from interrupted tensile tests after increasing levels of strain. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture mechanisms was also studied by examining the fracture features of as-received and hydrogen-charged specimens and relating them to the stress-strain behavior.

  14. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  15. Binding characteristics of homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers for acyclovir using an (acceptor-donor-donor)-(donor-acceptor-acceptor) hydrogen-bond strategy, and analytical applications for serum samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suqin; Tan, Lei; Wang, Ganquan; Peng, Guiming; Kang, Chengcheng; Tang, Youwen

    2013-04-12

    This paper demonstrates a novel approach to assembling homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) based on mimicking multiple hydrogen bonds between nucleotide bases by preparing acyclovir (ACV) as a template and using coatings grafted on silica supports. (1)H NMR studies confirmed the AAD-DDA (A for acceptor, D for donor) hydrogen-bond array between template and functional monomer, while the resultant monodisperse molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIMs) were evaluated using a binding experiment, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and solid phase extraction. The Langmuir isothermal model and the Langmuir-Freundlich isothermal model suggest that ACV-MIMs have more homogeneous binding sites than MIPs prepared through normal imprinting. In contrast to previous MIP-HPLC columns, there were no apparent tailings for the ACV peaks, and ACV-MIMs had excellent specific binding properties with a Ka peak of 3.44 × 10(5)M(-1). A complete baseline separation is obtained for ACV and structurally similar compounds. This work also successfully used MIMs as a specific sorbent for capturing ACV from serum samples. The detection limit and mean recovery of ACV was 1.8 ng/mL(-1) and 95.6%, respectively, for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction coupled with HPLC. To our knowledge, this was the first example of MIPs using AAD-DDA hydrogen bonds.

  16. Feasibility and induced effects of subsurface porous media hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann Pfeiffer, Wolf; Li, Dedong; Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Fluctuations in energy production from renewable sources like wind or solar power can lead to shortages in energy supply which can be mitigated using energy storage concepts. Underground storage of hydrogen in porous sandstone formations could be a storage option for large amounts of energy over long storage cycles. However, this use of the subsurface requires an analysis of possible interactions with other uses of the subsurface such as geothermal energy storage or groundwater abstraction. This study aims at quantifying the feasibility of porous media hydrogen storage to provide stored energy on a timescale of several days to weeks as well as possible impacts on the subsurface. The hypothetical storage site is based on an anticlinal structure located in Schleswig-Holstein, northern Germany. The storage is injected and extracted using five wells completed in a partially eroded, heterogeneous sandstone layer in the top of the structure at a depth of about 500 m. The storage formation was parameterized based on a local facies model with intrinsic permeabilities of 250-2500 mD and porosities of 35-40%. Storage initialization and subsequent storage cycles, each consisting of a hydrogen injection and extraction, were numerically simulated. The simulation results indicate the general feasibility of this hydrogen storage concept. The simulated sandstone formation is able to provide an average of around 1480 t of hydrogen per week (1830 TJ) which is about 5% of the total weekly energy production or about 10% of the weekly energy consumption of Schleswig-Holstein with the hydrogen production rate being the limiting factor of the overall performance. Induced hydraulic effects are a result of the induced overpressure within the storage formation. Propagation of the pressure signal does not strongly depend on the formation heterogeneity and thus shows approximately radial characteristics with one bar pressure change in distances of about 5 km from the injection wells. Thermal

  17. Effect of methane concentration in hydrogen plasma on hydrogen impurity incorporation in thick large-grained polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. J.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Jiang, X. F.; Pinto, J. L.; Ye, H.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the impact of methane concentration in hydrogen plasma on the growth of large-grained polycrystalline diamond (PCD) films and its hydrogen impurity incorporation. The diamond samples were produced using high CH4 concentration in H2 plasma and high power up to 4350 W and high pressure (either 105 or 110 Torr) in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) system. The thickness of the free-standing diamond films varies from 165 μm to 430 μm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the morphology, crystalline and optical quality of the diamond samples, and bonded hydrogen impurity in the diamond films, respectively. Under the conditions employed here, when methane concentration in the gas phase increases from 3.75% to 7.5%, the growth rate of the PCD films rises from around 3.0 μm/h up to 8.5 μm/h, and the optical active bonded hydrogen impurity content also increases more than one times, especially the two CVD diamond specific H related infrared absorption peaks at 2818 and 2828 cm-1 rise strongly; while the crystalline and optical quality of the MCD films decreases significantly, namely structural defects and non-diamond carbon phase content also increases a lot with increasing of methane concentration. Based on the results, the relationship between methane concentration and diamond growth rate and hydrogen impurity incorporation including the form of bonded infrared active hydrogen impurity in CVD diamonds was analyzed and discussed. The effect of substrate temperature on diamond growth was also briefly discussed. The experimental findings indicate that bonded hydrogen impurity in CVD diamond films mainly comes from methane rather than hydrogen in the gas source, and thus can provide experimental evidence for the theoretical study of the standard methyl species dominated growth mechanism of CVD diamonds grown with methane/hydrogen mixtures.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of effect of hydrogen atoms on crack propagation behavior of α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. Y.; Zhang, L.; Xiao, M. X.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of the hydrogen concentration and hydrogen distribution on the mechanical properties of α-Fe with a pre-existing unilateral crack under tensile loading is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The results reveal that the models present good ductility when the front region of crack tip has high local hydrogen concentration. The peak stress of α-Fe decreases with increasing hydrogen concentration. The studies also indicate that for the samples with hydrogen atoms, the crack propagation behavior is independent of the model size and boundaries. In addition, the crack propagation behavior is significantly influenced by the distribution of hydrogen atoms.

  19. SIRT3 Mediates the Antioxidant Effect of Hydrogen Sulfide in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Liping; Feng, Haihua; Li, Sha; Meng, Guoliang; Liu, Shangmin; Tang, Xin; Ma, Yan; Han, Yi; Xiao, Yujiao; Gu, Yue; Shao, Yongfeng; Park, Chung-Min; Xian, Ming; Huang, Yu; Ferro, Albert; Wang, Rui; Moore, Philip K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Oxidative stress is a key contributor to endothelial dysfunction and associated cardiovascular pathogenesis. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an antioxidant gasotransmitter that protects endothelial cells against oxidative stress. Sirtuin3 (SIRT3), which belongs to the silent information regulator 2 (SIR2) family, is an important deacetylase under oxidative stress. H2S is able to regulate the activity of several sirtuins. The present study aims to investigate the role of SIRT3 in the antioxidant effect of H2S in endothelial cells. Results: Cultured EA.hy926 endothelial cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a model of oxidative stress-induced cell injury. GYY4137, a slow-releasing H2S donor, improved cell viability, reduced oxidative stress and apoptosis, and improved mitochondrial function following H2O2 treatment. H2S reversed the stimulation of MAPK phosphorylation, downregulation of SIRT3 mRNA and reduction of the superoxide dismutase 2 and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 expression which were induced by H2O2. H2S also increased activator protein 1 (AP-1) binding activity with SIRT3 promoter and this effect was absent in the presence of the specific AP-1 inhibitor, SR11302 or curcumin. Paraquat administration to mice induced a defected endothelium-dependent aortic vasodilatation and increased oxidative stress in both mouse aorta and small mesenteric artery, which were alleviated by GYY4137 treatment. This vasoprotective effect of H2S was absent in SIRT3 knockout mice. Innovation: The present results highlight a novel role for SIRT3 in the protective effect of H2S against oxidant damage in the endothelium both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: H2S enhances AP-1 binding activity with the SIRT3 promoter, thereby upregulating SIRT3 expression and ultimately reducing oxidant-provoked vascular endothelial dysfunction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 329–343. PMID:26422756

  20. Nitrendipine: effects on vascular responses and myocardial binding.

    PubMed

    McBride, W; Mukherjee, A; Haghani, Z; Wheeler-Clark, E; Brady, J; Gandler, T; Bush, L; Buja, L M; Willerson, J T

    1984-11-01

    We have further defined the binding characteristics of [3H]nitrendipine to myocardial microsomal membranes of cats, dogs, rats, and rabbits and to canine coronary vasculature (1.5-3.0 mm OD), and we have studied nitrendipine's effect on contractile responses in isolated feline cardiac muscle and canine coronary arteries. [3H]nitrendipine binding is rapid, saturable, and reversible in all four species and in all of these tissues. Feline myocardium has a single binding site with a dissociation constant (KD) of 1.94 nM. Canine myocardium may have two classes of binding sites, with the high-affinity site having a KD of 0.17 nM. Nitrendipine depresses contractility in isolated feline cardiac muscle and canine coronary arteries in a dose-dependent manner [half-maximal dose (ED50) 0.20 microM in isolated feline cardiac muscle and 1.6-6.3 nM for potential dependent contractile responses in isolated canine coronary arteries] and severely blunts the contractile response to increases in extracellular calcium concentration in isolated feline papillary muscles. In contrast to verapamil and D 600, nitrendipine does not prevent the treppe phenomenon. In isolated feline cardiac muscle and large canine coronary arteries, the minimal nitrendipine concentration required for specific binding and for depression of contractile responses is similar. However, only in large canine coronary arteries is the ED50 for nifedipine's depression of contractility similar to the KD for [3H]nitrendipine binding in the respective tissue.

  1. Ionic association of hydroperoxide anion HO2- in the binding mean spherical approximation. Spectroscopic study of hydrogen peroxide in concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Chlistunoff, Jerzy; Simonin, Jean-Pierre

    2006-12-28

    The ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy of hydrogen peroxide in concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions was studied. The peroxide band in the UV range shifts from approximately 214 nm to approximately 236 nm as the NaOH concentration increases from 0.338 mol dm-3 to 13.1 mol dm-3. The band originates from an intramolecular electronic transition of the hydroperoxide anion HO2-, as indicated by the negligible temperature effect on the band position and confirmed by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. It is postulated that the bathochromic shift of the peroxide band that accompanies the increase in NaOH concentration originates from the formation of the ion pair (Na+HO2-). The equilibrium constant for the ion association reaction (0.048 mol-1 dm3) and the characteristics of the individual absorption bands of the hydroperoxide anion and its associate with Na+ were determined from the numerical modeling of the absorbance data, using the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA).

  2. Human recombinant [C22A] FK506-binding protein amide hydrogen exchange rates from mass spectrometry match and extend those from NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z.; Li, W.; Logan, T. M.; Li, M.; Marshall, A. G.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange behavior of human recombinant [C22A] FK506 binding protein (C22A FKBP) has been determined by protein fragmentation, combined with electrospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MS). After a specified period of H/D exchange in solution, C22A FKBP was digested by pepsin under slow exchange conditions (pH 2.4, 0 degree C), and then subjected to on-line HPLC/MS for deuterium analysis of each proteolytic peptide. The hydrogen exchange rate of each individual amide hydrogen was then determined independently by heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR on 15N-enriched C22A FKBP. A maximum entropy method (MEM) algorithm makes it possible to derive the distributions of hydrogen exchange rate constants from the MS-determined deuterium exchange-in curves in either the holoprotein or its proteolytic segments. The MEM-derived rate constant distributions of C22A FKBP and different segments of C22A FKBP are compared to the rate constants determined by NMR for individual amide protons. The rate constant distributions determined by both methods are consistent and complementary, thereby validating protein fragmentation/mass spectrometry as a reliable measure of hydrogen exchange in proteins. PMID:9336843

  3. Effect of VGs on a turbulent hydrogen jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senouci, M.; Hibbo, H.; Hammoudi, B.; Kadi, M.; Imine, B.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate numerically the effects of four vortices on the dynamic, scalar, and turbulent fields of the hydrogen jet. These vortices, which appear in the vicinities of the nozzle, are created by the vortex generators (VGs), and they are assembled with periodicity or symmetry in order, respectively, to give four vortices of the same or opposite direction. A second-order Reynolds stress model is used to investigate asymmetric turbulent jet. The results indicate that the presence of the vortex near the emission jet section noticeably enhances mixing to ensure a good combustion.

  4. Energetics of hydrogen storage in organolithium nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Namilae, Sirish; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Nicholson, Don M

    2007-01-01

    Ab-initio calculations based on the second order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) were used to investigate the interaction of molecular hydrogen with alkyl lithium organometallic compounds. It is found that lithium in organolithium structures attracts two hydrogen molecules with a binding energy of about 0.14 eV. The calculations also show that organolithium compounds bind strongly with graphitic nanostructures. Therefore, these carbon based nanostructures functionalized with organolithium compounds can be effectively used for storage of molecular hydrogen. Energetics and mechanisms for achieving high weight percent hydrogen storage in organolithium based nanostructures are discussed.

  5. Binding Energy of Hydrogen-Like Impurities in Quantum Well Wires of InSb/GaAs in a Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The binding energy of a hydrogen-like impurity in a thin size-quantized wire of the InSb/GaAs semiconductors with Kane’s dispersion law in a magnetic fieldBparallel to the wire axis has been calculated as a function of the radius of the wire and magnitude ofB, using a variational approach. It is shown that when wire radius is less than the Bohr radius of the impurity, the nonparabolicity of dispersion law of charge carriers leads to a considerable increase of the binding energy in the magnetic field, as well as to a more rapid growth of binding energy with growth ofB.

  6. Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide on the Antibacterial Substantivity of Chlorhexidine

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Shahriar; Mohammadi, Zahed; Mokhtari, Mohammadi Mehdi; Yousefi, Rasoul

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the antibacterial substantivity of chlorhexidine (CHX). Seventy-five dentine tubes prepared from human maxillary central and lateral incisor teeth were used. After contamination with Enterococcus faecalis for 14 days, the specimens were divided into five groups as follows: CHX, H2O2, CHX + H2O2, infected dentine tubes (positive control), and sterile dentine tubes (negative control). Dentine chips were collected with round burs into tryptic soy broth, and after culturing, the number of colony-forming units (CFU) was counted. The number of CFU was minimum in the first cultures in all experimental groups, and the results obtained were significantly different from each other at any time period (P < .05). At the first culture, the number of CFU in the CHX + H2O2 group was lower than other two groups. At the other experimental periods, the CHX group showed the most effective antibacterial action (P < .05). Hydrogen peroxide group showed the worst result at all periods. In each group, the number of CFU increased significantly by time lapse (P < .05). In conclusion, H2O2 had no additive effect on the residual antibacterial activity of CHX. PMID:21318180

  7. Effects of OLRs and HRTs on hydrogen production from high salinity substrate by halophilic hydrogen producing bacterium (HHPB).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shan; Lee, Yunhee; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Hwang, Sun-Jin

    2013-08-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR) on hydrogen production were investigated with glucose medium containing 2% NaCl. Halophilic hydrogen producing bacterium (HHPB) Clostridium bifermentans 3AT-ma, which can survive under high salt conditions, was used. Sponge media were used as 20% of working volume. The OLR and HRT were varied in 10-60 g-glucose/L-reactor/day and 24-6h. With OLR of 20 g-glucose/L/day, shorter HRT resulted in higher hydrogen producing rate and yield. When the OLR was increased from 20 to 60 g-glucose/L-reactor/day at HRT 6h, the hydrogen production rate increased, while the hydrogen production yield decreased due to the increase and accumulation of volatile fatty acids. Biohydrogen production was possible from the salinity substrate using HHPB, and the maximum hydrogen production yield was 1.1 mol-H₂/mol-glucose with optimal conditions of OLR of 20 g-glucose/L/day and HRT of 12h.

  8. Probing the binding sites and the effect of berbamine on the structure of bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiao-Xia; Lui, Yi; Zhou, Bo; Xiao, Xiao-He; Liu, Yi

    2009-06-01

    Berbamine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from Berberis sp., is the active constituent of some Chinese herbal medicines and exhibits a variety of pharmacological activities. The effects of berbamine on the structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated by circular dichroism, fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy under physiological conditions. Berbamine caused a static quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA, and the quenching data were analyzed by application of the Stern-Volmer equation. There was a single primary berbamine-binding site on BSA with a binding constant of 2.577 × 10 4 L mol -1 at 298 K. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (Δ H0) and entropy change (Δ S0) for the reaction were -76.5 kJ mol -1 and -173.4 J mol -1 K -1 according to the van't Hoff equation. The results showed that the hydrogen bond and van der Waals interaction were the predominant forces in the binding process. Competitive experiments revealed a displacement of warfarin by berbamine, indicating that the binding site was located at Drug sites I. The distance r between the donor (BSA) and the acceptor (berbamine) was obtained according to the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory. The results of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, UV-vis absorption difference spectra and circular dichroism of BSA in the presence of berbamine showed that the conformation of BSA was changed. The results provide a quantitative understanding of the effect of berbamine on the structure of bovine serum albumin, providing a useful guideline for further drug design.

  9. Effects of hydrogen bond on 2-aminopyridine and its derivatives complexes in methanol solvent.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Song, Peng; Cui, Yanling; Liu, Xuemei; Sun, Shaowu; Hou, Siyao; Ma, Fengcai

    2014-10-15

    In the present work, the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method was adopted to investigate the excited state hydrogen-bond dynamics of 2-aminopyridine monomer (2AP) and its derivatives in hydrogen donating methanol solvent. The calculated steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra agree well with the experimental results. Theoretical results state that the bond lengths of both O-H and N-H bands are lengthened, while the intermolecular hydrogen bond lengths are shortened in the excited state. Further, the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are proved to be strengthened according to the calculated binding energy. As a reasonable explanation, the hydrogen bonds binding energy increases with multiple hydrogen-bonding interactions in the electronically excited state. In addition, the hydrogen bonding dynamics in the excited state were visualized by the spectral shifts of vibrational modes. The calculated infrared spectra of both O-H and N-H stretching vibrational regions revealed that the O-H and N-H stretching bands red-shift.

  10. A new polymorph of triphenylmethylamine: the effect of hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, Victor N; Borisova, Irina V; Zemlyansky, Nikolai N; Antipin, M Yu

    2009-02-01

    Crystallization of the hexane reaction mixture after treatment of LiGe(OCH(2)CH(2)NMe(2))(3) with Ph(3)CN(3) gives rise to a new triclinic (space group P\\overline{1}) polymorph of triphenylmethylamine, C(19)H(17)N, (I), containing dimers formed by N-H...N hydrogen bonds, whereas the structure of the known orthorhombic (space group P2(1)2(1)2(1)) polymorph of this compound, (II), consists of isolated molecules. While the dimers in (I) lie across crystallographic inversion centres, the molecules are not truly related by them. The centrosymmetric structure is due to the statistical disordering of the amino H atoms participating in the N-H...N hydrogen-bonding interactions, and thus the inversion centre is superpositional. The conformations and geometric parameters of the molecules in (I) and (II) are very similar. It was found that the polarity of the solvent does not affect the capability of triphenylmethylamine to crystallize in the different polymorphic modifications. The orthorhombic polymorph, (II), is more thermodynamically stable under normal conditions than the triclinic polymorph, (I). The experimental data indicate the absence of a phase transition in the temperature interval 120-293 K. The densities of (I) (1.235 Mg m(-3)) and (II) (1.231 Mg m(-3)) at 120 K are practically equal. It would seem that either the kinetic factors or the effects of the other products of the reaction facilitating the hydrogen-bonded dimerization of triphenylmethylamine molecules are the determining factor for the isolation of the triclinic polymorph (I) of triphenylmethylamine.

  11. Effect of chloride ions on adsorption and permeation of hydrogen in iron

    SciTech Connect

    Allam, A.M.; Pickering, H.W.; Ateya, B.G.

    1997-04-01

    Effects of chloride ions on hydrogen absorption into iron and on the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on an iron surface were studied in acid and alkaline solutions at 23 C using the permeation method of Devanathan and Stachurski. Cl{sup {minus}} ions reduced the overpotential ({eta}) for HER and, in turn, reduced hydrogen coverage and permeation.Effects on hydrogen permeation were more pronounced in alkaline than in acid solutions. Permeation transients at constant electrode potential of he charging surface and subsequent surface analyses of the uppermost atom layers of the hydrogen-charged iron surface indicated a reversible or low coverage with Cl{sup {minus}} ions, a low hydrogen coverage that was not influenced significantly by Cl{sup {minus}} ion concentration at low {eta}, and a marked effect of Cl{sup {minus}} ions in reducing hydrogen coverage of the surface and permeability in alkaline solutions at high cathodic polarizations.

  12. β-sheet-like hydrogen bonds interlock the helical turns of a photoswitchable foldamer to enhance the binding and release of chloride.

    PubMed

    Lee, Semin; Hua, Yuran; Flood, Amar H

    2014-09-05

    Inspired by halorhodopsin's use of photoisomerization to regulate chloride, aryltriazole-based foldamers have been created to "catch and release" chloride ions upon light irradiation of end-appended azobenzenes. The proposed mode of stabilization exploits a β-sheet-like hydrogen-bonding array to cooperatively interlock the ends of a foldamer together with its helical core. We find that the hydrogen-bonding array has a greater influence on stabilizing the helix than the π-stacked seam under the conditions examined (50:50 MeCN/THF). Thus, we show how it is possible to enhance the difference between Cl(-) binding and release using light-dependent control over the foldamer's degree of helix stabilization. Making and breaking three π-π contacts with light caused an 8-fold change in chloride affinity (40 300 M(-1) ⇄ 5000 M(-1)), five π-π contacts produced a 17-fold change (126 000 M(-1) ⇄ 7400 M(-1)), and strategically located hydrogen-bonding units enabled a greater 84-fold differential (970 000 M(-1) ⇄ 11 600 M(-1)). The improved performances were attributed to stepwise increases in the preorganization of the binding pocket that catches chloride while leaving the cis states with just one π-π contact relatively unchanged.

  13. Highly effective recognition of carbohydrates by phenanthroline-based receptors: alpha- versus beta-anomer binding preference.

    PubMed

    Mazik, Monika; Hartmann, Andrè; Jones, Peter G

    2009-09-14

    (1)H NMR spectroscopic titrations in competitive and non-competitive media, as well as binding studies in two-phase systems, such as phase transfer of sugars from aqueous into organic solvents and dissolution of solid carbohydrates in apolar media revealed both highly effective recognition of neutral carbohydrates and interesting binding preferences of an acyclic phenanthroline-based receptor 1. Compared to the previously described acyclic receptors, compound 1 displays significantly higher binding affinities, the rare capability to extract sugars from water into non-polar organic solutions and alpha- versus beta-anomer binding preference in the recognition of glycosides, which differs from those observed for other receptor systems. X-ray crystallographic investigations revealed the presence of water molecules in the binding pocket of 1 that are engaged in the formation of hydrogen-bonding motifs similar to those suggested by molecular modelling for the sugar OH groups in the receptor-sugar complexes. The molecular modelling calculations, synthesis, crystal structure and binding properties of 1 are described and compared with those of the previously described receptors.

  14. Effect of fullerenol surface chemistry on nanoparticle binding-induced protein misfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radic, Slaven; Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Chen, Ran; Salonen, Emppu; Brown, Jared M.; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2014-06-01

    Fullerene and its derivatives with different surface chemistry have great potential in biomedical applications. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the impact of these carbon-based nanoparticles on protein structure, dynamics, and subsequently function. Here, we focused on the effect of hydroxylation -- a common strategy for solubilizing and functionalizing fullerene -- on protein-nanoparticle interactions using a model protein, ubiquitin. We applied a set of complementary computational modeling methods, including docking and molecular dynamics simulations with both explicit and implicit solvent, to illustrate the impact of hydroxylated fullerenes on the structure and dynamics of ubiquitin. We found that all derivatives bound to the model protein. Specifically, the more hydrophilic nanoparticles with a higher number of hydroxyl groups bound to the surface of the protein via hydrogen bonds, which stabilized the protein without inducing large conformational changes in the protein structure. In contrast, fullerene derivatives with a smaller number of hydroxyl groups buried their hydrophobic surface inside the protein, thereby causing protein denaturation. Overall, our results revealed a distinct role of surface chemistry on nanoparticle-protein binding and binding-induced protein misfolding.Fullerene and its derivatives with different surface chemistry have great potential in biomedical applications. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the impact of these carbon-based nanoparticles on protein structure, dynamics, and subsequently function. Here, we focused on the effect of hydroxylation -- a common strategy for solubilizing and functionalizing fullerene -- on protein-nanoparticle interactions using a model protein, ubiquitin. We applied a set of complementary computational modeling methods, including docking and molecular dynamics simulations with both explicit and implicit solvent, to illustrate the impact of hydroxylated fullerenes on the structure and

  15. Isotope Effects in Collisional VT Relaxation of Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieniek, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    A simple exponential-potential model of molecular collisions leads to a two-parameter analytic expression for rates of collisionally induced vibrational-translation (VT) energy exchange that has been shown to be accurate over variations of orders of magnitude as a function of temperature in a variety of systems. This includes excellent agreement with reported experimental and theoretical results for the fundamental self-relaxation rate of molecular hydrogen H2(v = 1) + H2 yields H2(v = 0) + H2. The analytic rate successfully follows the five-orders-of-magnitude change in experimental values for the temperature range 50-2000 K. This approach is now applied to isotope effects in the vibrational relaxation rates of excited HD and D2 in collision with H2: HD(v = 1)+H2 yields HD(v = 0)+H2 and D2(v = 1)+H2 yields D2(v = 0)+H2. The simplicity of the analytic expression for the thermal rate lends itself to convenient application in modeling the evolving vibrational populations of molecular hydrogen in shocked astrophysical environments.

  16. Effect of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of titanium and its alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    Occluded hydrogen resulting from cathodic charging of commercially pure titanium and titanium alloys, Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V and Ti-6Al-4V, was shown to cause embrittlement of the alloys. Embrittlement was a function of the interstitial hydrogen content rather than the amount of precipitated titanium hydride. The effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain for plastic instability along pure shear directions was determined for alloys Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn. Hydrogen, in concentrations below that necessary for spontaneous hydride precipitation, increased the strain necessary for instability formation or instability failure. The strain rate sensitivity also increased with increasing hydrogen concentration. The effect of hydrogen on slip and twinning was determined for titanium single crystals. The critical resolved shear stress for prism slip was increased and the critical resolved shear stress for twinning was decreased with increasing hydrogen concentration.

  17. The effects of hydrogen peroxide promoted by homocysteine and inherited catalase deficiency on human hypocatalasemic patients.

    PubMed

    Góth, László; Vitai, Márta

    2003-10-15

    Elevated plasma homocysteine can generate oxygen free radicals and hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme catalase is involved in the protection against hydrogen peroxide. We examined the effect of oxidative stress promoted by homocysteine on erythrocyte metabolism (blood hemoglobin, MCV, folate, B12, serum LDH, LDH isoenzymes, haptoglobin) in the oxidative stress sensitive Hungarian patients with inherited catalase deficiency. The plasma homocysteine (HPLC method, Bio-Rad), folate, B12 (capture binding assay, Abbott), blood hemoglobin concentrations, blood catalase activity (spectrophotometric assay of hydrogen peroxide), and MCV values were determined in 7 hypocatalasemic families including hypocatalasemic (male:12, female:18) patients and their results were compared to those of the normocatalasemic (male:17 female: 12) family members. We found decreased (p <.036) folate (ng/ml) concentrations (male hypocatalasemic 5.44 +/- 2.81 vs. normocatalasemic 7.56 +/- 1.97, female 5.01 +/- 1.93 vs. 6.61 +/- 1.91), blood hemoglobin (p <.010, male:140.2 +/- 11.0 vs. 153.6 +/- 11.6 g/l, female: 128.4 +/- 10.9 vs. 139.6 +/- 9.2 g/l). Increased levels of MCV (p <.001) were detected in hypocatalasemic patients (male: 98.6 +/- 3.4 vs. 90.1 +/- 7.5 fl, female: 95.9 +/- 3.9 vs. 90.1 +/- 2.5 fl), plasma homocysteine (p <.049, male: 9.72 +/- 3.61 vs. 7.36 +/- 2.10 umol/l, female: 9.06 +/- 3.10 vs. 6.84 +/- 2.50 umol/l) and not significant (p >.401) plasma B12 (male: 336 +/- 108 vs. 307 +/- 76 pg/ml, female: 373 +/- 180 vs. 342 +/- 75 pg/ml). The serum markers of hemolysis (LDH, LDH isoenzymes, haptoglobin) did not show significant (p >.228) signs of oxidative erythrocyte damage. We report firstly on increased plasma homocysteine concentrations in inherited catalase deficiency. The increased plasma homocysteine and inherited catalase deficiency together could promote oxidative stress via hydrogen peroxide. The patients with inherited catalase deficiency are more sensitive to oxidative stress

  18. Effects of N-acetylimidazole on oxytocin binding in bovine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X.; Gorewit, R.C.; Currie, W.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of N-acetylimidazole on specific binding of oxytocin to microsomal fractions of bovine mammary gland were studied. N-acetylimidazole suppressed oxytocin binding, with time and concentration dependence. Decreased oxytocin binding activity appeared to be due to decreased affinity of the hormone for its receptor. Acetylation of oxytocin, rather than of oxytocin receptors, seemed to be responsible for the decreased binding.

  19. Nuclear Bound States of Molecular Hydrogen Physisorbed on Graphene: An Effective Two-Dimensional Model.

    PubMed

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O

    2015-11-05

    The interaction potential of molecular hydrogen physisorbed on a graphene sheet is evaluated using the ab initio-based periodic dlDF+Das scheme and its accuracy is assessed by comparing the nuclear bound-state energies supported by the H2(D2/HD)/graphite potentials with the experimental energies. The periodic dlDF+Das treatment uses DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory on surface cluster models to extract the dispersion contribution to the interaction whereas periodic dispersionless density functional (dlDF) calculations are performed to determine the dispersion-free counterpart. It is shown that the H2/graphene interaction is effectively two-dimensional (2D), with the distance from the molecule center-of-mass to the surface plane and the angle between the diatomic axis and the surface normal as the relevant degrees of freedom. The global potential minimum is found at the orthogonal orientation of the molecule with respect to the surface plane, with an equilibrium distance of 3.17 Å and a binding energy of -51.9 meV. The comparison of the binding energies shows an important improvement of our approach over the vdW-corrected DFT schemes when we are dealing with the very weak H2/surface interaction. Next, the 2D nuclear bound-state energies are calculated numerically. As a cross-validation of the interaction potential, the bound states are also determined for molecular hydrogen on the graphite surface (represented as an assembly of graphene sheets). With the largest absolute deviation being 1.7 meV, the theoretical and experimental energy levels compare very favorably.

  20. Effect of edge structure on the activity for hydrogen evolution reaction in MoS2 nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lili; Li, Xiuyan; Xu, Li-Chun; Liu, Ruiping; Yang, Zhi

    2017-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was carried out to investigate the effect of edge structure on the catalytic activity and electronic properties of MoS2 nanoribbons for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). There are two stable configurations of MoS2 nanoribbons, MoS2NR-L and MoS2NR-R, with an energy barrier of 0.035 eV. Four hydrogen adsorbed configurations are obtained by adsorbing the hydrogen atom at the different adsorption sites of two configurations. By calculating the Gibbs free energy and exchange current densities, it is found that these four adsorbed configurations have varied catalytic activity for HER, which demonstrates that location of edge atoms has significantly effect on the catalytic activity for HER. The optimization in HER activities originates from the suitable binding between hydrogen atom and S atom, corresponding to that Gibbs free energy is close to zero. Our results signify that the edge structures play a key role on the HER activity in MoS2 nanoribbons.

  1. Chemical Binding Effects in Neutron Resonance Scattering and Absorption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamaoun, Adib Iskandar

    The Doppler broadening of neutron absorption and scattering resonances is an effect of considerable importance in calculating reactor parameters. This broadening is known to depend upon the state of the atom from which the scattering of the neutron occurs. This dependence is called the chemical binding effect. A key assumption in the usual computations of Doppler broadening is to ignore the dependence of the total resonance width on the chemical binding state of the compound nucleus. This is an excellent approximation for the gamma line. We derive an expression for the neutron line width as a function of the energy of the compound nucleus for an ideal gas. The influence of energy on the width with energy is examined at two different temperatures 4K and 1000K. It is found that these effects are very small, of the order of 10^{4-} . The assumption of constancy of the resonance width is thus shown to be a good approximation for the neutron line width. Also we examine the influence of the crystalline binding on the 6.67 eV resonance energy of U-238 line shape in uranium carbide and uranium dioxide. This model treats the crystal as a gas with an effective temperature and an effective mass determined by harmonic crystal phonon spectrum developed by Koppel and Houston. Based on this model, the line shape of U-238 is Gaussian plus a recoilless part. We also compute the broadening using a harmonic crystal model. As the temperature of U-238 target is decreased, disagreement between the two models becomes pronounced. However the results agree in the limiting case of high temperature. As the nucleus becomes more tightly bound, shifts in the resonance peak to lower energies are also observed. A general formula for the differential scattering cross section is developed starting from the transition probability (T-matrix). The formalism is applied to the gas and harmonic crystal models to determine the chemical binding effect. Although the resonance broadening is determined in

  2. Angiotensin receptor binding and pressor effects in cat subretrofacial nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A.M.; Dampney, R.A.L.; Mendelsohn, F.A.O. Univ. of Sydney )

    1988-11-01

    Central administration of angiotensin II (ANG II) increases arterial blood pressure via increased sympathetic activity. The authors have examined the possibility that one site of action of ANG II is the subretrofacial (SRF) nucleus in the rostral ventrolateral medulla, since this nucleus is known to play a critical role in the tonic and phasic control of arterial pressure. In vitro autoradiography, employing {sup 125}I-labeled (Sar{sup 1}, Ile{sup 8})ANG II as radioligand, was used to localize binding sites for ANG-II in the cat ventrolateral medulla. A high density of ANG II-receptor binding sites was found confined to the SRF nucleus. In a second group of experiments in anesthetized cats, microinjections of ANG II, in doses ranging from 10 to 50 pmol, were made into histologically identified sites within and outside the SRF nucleus. Microinjections into the nucleus resulted in a dose-dependent increase in arterial pressure, which was abolished by systemic administration of the ganglion-blocking drug hexamethonium bromide. In contrast, microinjections just outside the SRF nucleus had no effect on arterial pressure. It is concluded that activation of ANG II-receptor binding sites within the SRF nucleus leads to an increase in arterial pressure via increased sympathetic efferent activity.

  3. Anisotropy of hydrogen diffusion in nickel single crystals: the effects of self-stress and hydrogen concentration on diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, J.; Oudriss, A.; Metsue, A.; Bouhattate, J.; Feaugas, X.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion has an important role in solute-dependent hydrogen embrittlement in metals and metallic alloys. In spite of extensive studies, the complexity of hydrogen diffusion in solids remains a phenomenon that needs to be clarified. In this paper, we investigate the anisotropy of hydrogen diffusion in pure nickel single crystals using both an experimental approach and a thermodynamic development. As a first approximation, experimental data from electrochemical permeation and thermal desorption spectroscopy are described using the classical Fick’s laws and an apparent diffusion tensor. Within a thermodynamic framework, the diffusion equation can be derived from Fick’s laws with an apparent diffusion coefficient which contains an added solute content dependent term β. This term is due to the elastic strain field associated with the insertion of solute atoms. For nickel crystals, the dependence of β on the crystallographic orientation arises from the elastic anisotropy. Additionally, our results elucidate the discrepancies between the thermodynamic model and experimental observations of the effect of the solute concentration on the diffusion process. Moreover, this highlights the importance of the impact of hydrogen on vacancy formation and the subsequent consequences on the anisotropy of the apparent diffusion coefficient. PMID:28327592

  4. Anisotropy of hydrogen diffusion in nickel single crystals: the effects of self-stress and hydrogen concentration on diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Oudriss, A.; Metsue, A.; Bouhattate, J.; Feaugas, X.

    2017-03-01

    Hydrogen diffusion has an important role in solute-dependent hydrogen embrittlement in metals and metallic alloys. In spite of extensive studies, the complexity of hydrogen diffusion in solids remains a phenomenon that needs to be clarified. In this paper, we investigate the anisotropy of hydrogen diffusion in pure nickel single crystals using both an experimental approach and a thermodynamic development. As a first approximation, experimental data from electrochemical permeation and thermal desorption spectroscopy are described using the classical Fick’s laws and an apparent diffusion tensor. Within a thermodynamic framework, the diffusion equation can be derived from Fick’s laws with an apparent diffusion coefficient which contains an added solute content dependent term β. This term is due to the elastic strain field associated with the insertion of solute atoms. For nickel crystals, the dependence of β on the crystallographic orientation arises from the elastic anisotropy. Additionally, our results elucidate the discrepancies between the thermodynamic model and experimental observations of the effect of the solute concentration on the diffusion process. Moreover, this highlights the importance of the impact of hydrogen on vacancy formation and the subsequent consequences on the anisotropy of the apparent diffusion coefficient.

  5. Effect of polarization on HIV-1protease and fluoro-substituted inhibitors binding energies by large scale molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li L.; Zhu, T.; Li, Yu C.; Zhang, Qing G.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water are carried out to study the binding of six inhibitors to HIV-1 protease (PR) for up to 700 ns using the standard AMBER force field and polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). PPC is derived from quantum mechanical calculation for protein in solution and therefore it includes electronic polarization effect. Our results show that in all six systems, the bridging water W301 drifts away from the binding pocket in AMBER simulation. However, it is very stable in all six complexes systems using PPC. Especially, intra-protease, protease-inhibitor hydrogen bonds are dynamic stabilized in MD simulation. The computed binding free energies of six complexes have a significantly linear correlation with those experiment values and the correlation coefficient is found to be 0.91 in PPC simulation. However, the result from AMBER simulation shows a weaker correlation with the correlation coefficient of −0.51 due to the lack of polarization effect. Detailed binding interactions of W301, inhibitors with PR are further analyzed and discussed. The present study provides important information to quantitative understanding the interaction mechanism of PR-inhibitor and PR-W301 and these data also emphasizes the importance of both the electronic polarization and the bridging water molecule in predicting precisely binding affinities. PMID:28155907

  6. Geometric phase effects in ultracold hydrogen exchange reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Jisha; Kendrick, Brian K.; Balakrishnan, Naduvalath

    2016-10-14

    The role of the geometric phase effect on chemical reaction dynamics is explored by examining the hydrogen exchange process in the fundamental H+HD reaction. Results are presented for vibrationally excited HD molecules in the v = 4 vibrational level and for collision energies ranging from 1 μK to 100 K. It is found that, for collision energies below 3 K, inclusion of the geometric phase leads to dramatic enhancement or suppression of the reaction rates depending on the final quantum state of the HD molecule. The effect was found to be the most prominent for rotationally resolved integral and differential cross sections but it persists to a lesser extent in the vibrationally resolved and total reaction rate coefficients. However, no significant GP effect is present in the reactive channel leading to the D+H2 product or in the D+H2 $(v=4,j=0)\\,\\to $ HD+H reaction. A simple interference mechanism involving inelastic (nonreactive) and exchange scattering amplitudes is invoked to account for the observed GP effects. The computed results also reveal a shape resonance in the H+HD reaction near 1 K and the GP effect is found to influence the magnitude of the resonant part of the cross section. In conclusion, experimental detection of the resonance may allow a sensitive probe of the GP effect in the H+HD reaction.

  7. Geometric phase effects in ultracold hydrogen exchange reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Hazra, Jisha; Kendrick, Brian K.; Balakrishnan, Naduvalath

    2016-10-14

    The role of the geometric phase effect on chemical reaction dynamics is explored by examining the hydrogen exchange process in the fundamental H+HD reaction. Results are presented for vibrationally excited HD molecules in the v = 4 vibrational level and for collision energies ranging from 1 μK to 100 K. It is found that, for collision energies below 3 K, inclusion of the geometric phase leads to dramatic enhancement or suppression of the reaction rates depending on the final quantum state of the HD molecule. The effect was found to be the most prominent for rotationally resolved integral and differential cross sections but it persists to a lesser extent in the vibrationally resolved and total reaction rate coefficients. However, no significant GP effect is present in the reactive channel leading to the D+H2 product or in the D+H2more » $$(v=4,j=0)\\,\\to $$ HD+H reaction. A simple interference mechanism involving inelastic (nonreactive) and exchange scattering amplitudes is invoked to account for the observed GP effects. The computed results also reveal a shape resonance in the H+HD reaction near 1 K and the GP effect is found to influence the magnitude of the resonant part of the cross section. In conclusion, experimental detection of the resonance may allow a sensitive probe of the GP effect in the H+HD reaction.« less

  8. Geometric phase effects in ultracold hydrogen exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Jisha; Kendrick, Brian K.; Balakrishnan, N.

    2016-10-01

    The role of the geometric phase effect on chemical reaction dynamics is explored by examining the hydrogen exchange process in the fundamental H+HD reaction. Results are presented for vibrationally excited HD molecules in the v = 4 vibrational level and for collision energies ranging from 1 μK to 100 K. It is found that, for collision energies below 3 K, inclusion of the geometric phase leads to dramatic enhancement or suppression of the reaction rates depending on the final quantum state of the HD molecule. The effect was found to be the most prominent for rotationally resolved integral and differential cross sections but it persists to a lesser extent in the vibrationally resolved and total reaction rate coefficients. However, no significant GP effect is present in the reactive channel leading to the D+H2 product or in the D+H2 (v=4,j=0) \\to HD+H reaction. A simple interference mechanism involving inelastic (nonreactive) and exchange scattering amplitudes is invoked to account for the observed GP effects. The computed results also reveal a shape resonance in the H+HD reaction near 1 K and the GP effect is found to influence the magnitude of the resonant part of the cross section. Experimental detection of the resonance may allow a sensitive probe of the GP effect in the H+HD reaction.

  9. Bioconversion of wheat stalk to hydrogen by dark fermentation: effect of different mixed microflora on hydrogen yield and cellulose solubilisation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yueli; Yuan, Xianzheng; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Chu, Yongbao; Guo, Rongbo

    2011-02-01

    This study determined hydrogen production, volatile fatty acids (VFAs) generation and cellulose solubilisation from anaerobic dark fermentation of wheat stalk and showed the effect of different mixed microflora. The cumulative hydrogen yields of anaerobic digested activated sludge (AS)-inoculated and anaerobic digested dairy manure (DM)-inoculated system were 23.3 and 37.0 mL/g VS at 204 h, respectively. A modified Gompertz equation was able to adequately describe the production of hydrogen from the batch fermentation by both mixed microflora. During the process, acetate and butyrate accounted for more than 76.1% of total VFAs for both fermentations. The extent of cellulose solubilisation approached 46.6% and 75.2% for AS- and DM-inoculated fermentation, respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the crystallinities of both fermented stalks were partly disrupted by the mixed microflora, and DM-inoculated fermentation had more disruption than AS-inoculated one.

  10. Hydrogen environment effects on beryllium and titanium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzemeier, L. G.; Jacinto, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    The NASP program has intensively studied the hydrogen-environment embrittlement (HEE) susceptibility of Be, alpha(2)-Ti3Al, and gamma-TiAl. Tensile tests are being conducted on candidate aerospace structure and propulsion candidate materials from each of the three groups, at temperatures in the -130 to +204 C range, in both 0.1 MPa and 13.8 MPa He and H2 environments, using SEM and TEM to discern the details of environmental effects. It has been established that while alpha(2) Ti3Al is HEE-susceptible even in the room-temperature and 13.8 MPa environment, neither Be nor gamma-TiAl are susceptible, even at the highest temperature tested.

  11. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Xu, H.; Atia-Tul-Noor, A.; Hu, B. T.; Kielpinski, D.; Sang, R. T.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2 . The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  12. Analytical chemical kinetic investigation of the effects of oxygen, hydrogen, and hydroxyl radicals on hydrogen-air combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, G. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Quantitative values were computed which show the effects of the presence of small amounts of oxygen, hydrogen, and hydroxyl radicals on the finite-rate chemical kinetics of premixed hydrogen-air mixtures undergoing isobaric autoignition and combustion. The free radicals were considered to be initially present in hydrogen-air mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.2, 0.6, 1.0, and 1.2. Initial mixture temperatures were 1100 K, 1200 K, and 1500 K, and pressures were 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 atm. Of the radicals investigated, atomic oxygen was found to be the most effective for reducing induction time, defined as the time to 5 percent of the total combustion temperature rise. The reaction time, the time between 5 percent and 95 percent of the temperature rise, is not decreased by the presence of free radicals in the initial hydrogen-air mixture. Fuel additives which yield free radicals might be used to effect a compact supersonic combustor design for efficient operation in an otherwise reaction-limited combustion regime.

  13. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-03-28

    The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness properties of Types 304L, 316L and 21-6-9 forged stainless steels was investigated. Fracture toughness samples were fabricated from forward-extruded forgings. Samples were uniformly saturated with hydrogen after exposure to hydrogen gas at 34 MPa or 69 and 623 K prior to testing. The fracture toughness properties were characterized by measuring the J-R behavior at ambient temperature in air. The results show that the hydrogen-charged steels have fracture toughness values that were about 50-60% of the values measured for the unexposed steels. The reduction in fracture toughness was accompanied by a change in fracture appearance. Both uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples failed by microvoid nucleation and coalescence, but the fracture surfaces of the hydrogen-charged steels had smaller microvoids. Type 316L stainless steel had the highest fracture toughness properties and the greatest resistance to hydrogen degradation.

  14. Unconventional ionic hydrogen bonds: CH +⋯π (C tbnd C) binding energies and structures of benzene + rad (acetylene) 1-4 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Abdel-Rahman; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Abrash, Samuel A.; El-Shall, M. Samy

    2012-01-01

    Rapid condensation of acetylene onto the benzene cation with the addition of up to eight acetylene molecules is observed in the gas phase at 120-140 K forming the C6D6rad +(C2H2)n clusters. The binding energies and entropy changes of the stepwise condensation of the first four acetylene molecules onto the benzene cation have been measured and correlated with the calculated lowest energy isomers. The measured binding energies (3-4 kcal/mol) reflect weak charge-induced dipole and (benzene) Csbnd Hδ+⋯π Ctbnd C (acetylene) hydrogen bonding interactions. Associative charge transfer is suggested to activate the cyclization of three acetylene molecules to form a benzene molecule (C6H6).

  15. Performance of the MM/GBSA scoring using a binding site hydrogen bond network-based frame selection: the protein kinase case.

    PubMed

    Adasme-Carreño, Francisco; Muñoz-Gutierrez, Camila; Caballero, Julio; Alzate-Morales, Jans H

    2014-07-21

    A conformational selection method, based on hydrogen bond (Hbond) network analysis, has been designed in order to rationalize the configurations sampled using molecular dynamics (MD), which are commonly used in the estimation of the relative binding free energy of ligands to macromolecules through the MM/GBSA or MM/PBSA method. This approach makes use of protein-ligand complexes obtained from X-ray crystallographic data, as well as from molecular docking calculations. The combination of several computational approaches, like long MD simulations on protein-ligand complexes, Hbond network-based selection by scripting techniques and finally MM/GBSA, provides better statistical correlations against experimental binding data than previous similar reported studies. This approach has been successfully applied in the ranking of several protein kinase inhibitors (CDK2, Aurora A and p38), which present both diverse and related chemical structures.

  16. Effect of hydrogen-switchable mirrors on the Casimir force

    PubMed Central

    Iannuzzi, Davide; Lisanti, Mariangela; Capasso, Federico

    2004-01-01

    We present systematic measurements of the Casimir force between a gold-coated plate and a sphere coated with a hydrogen-switchable mirror. Hydrogen-switchable mirrors are shiny metals that can become transparent upon hydrogenation. Despite such a dramatic change of the optical properties of the sphere, we did not observe any significant decrease of the Casimir force after filling the experimental apparatus with hydrogen. This counterintuitive result can be explained by the Lifshitz theory that describes the Casimir attraction between metallic and dielectric materials. PMID:15024111

  17. Effects of Flux and Energy of Neutral Beam on Hydrogenation of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Takeru; Samukawa, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen modification, hydrogenation, of graphene, has attracted due to the possibility of hydrogen storage. Chemisorbed hydrogen has strong interaction with graphene surface and sp3 bond forms. Surprisingly, ideal structure of graphene shows reversible absorption of hydrogen and it leads to effective designing of hydrogen storage material. In this paper, we have demonstrated neutral beam (NB) technique for hydrogenation of graphene instead of conventional plasma method. NB system consists of a plasma generation chamber and a process chamber, which are separated by a carbon plate with many apertures. The charged particles can be effectively neutralized by collision with the sidewall of the apertures when passing through them to the process chamber. Development of the D-band and blue shift of G-band were observed after hydrogen NB irradiation by Raman spectroscopy. FTIR analysis reveals CH bending mode was appeared and it depends on beam energy, thus CH formation has reaction threshold and potential to control it. In addition, it is shown that beam flux affects hydrogenation and additional effect is also included in reaction process. We believe our investigation will provide development of hydrogenated graphene applications.

  18. Effect of hydrogen on superelasticity of the titanium nickelide-based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lotkov, Aleksandr; Baturin, Anatolii; Grishkov, Victor Rodionov, Ivan; Kudiyarov, Victor Lider, Andrei

    2015-10-27

    The hydrogen effect on the inelastic properties and plastic strain development after electrolythical hydrogenation in physiological solution was investigated. This effect virtually results in a failure under torsion of Ti{sub 49.1}Ni{sub 50.9} (atom per cent) alloy specimens with coarse-grained (CG) and submicrocrystalline (SMC) structures. It is shown that hydrogen embrittlement (HE) phenomenon occurs irrespective of the grain size in the studied specimens at approximately equal strain values. However, compared to the specimens with CG structure, those with SMC structure accumulate two to three times more hydrogen for the same hydrogenation time. It is found that hydrogen has a much smaller effect on the inelastic properties of specimens with SMC structure as compared to those with CG structure.

  19. Effective Hamiltonians for fastly driven tight-binding chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itin, A. P.; Neishtadt, A. I.

    2014-02-01

    We consider a single particle tunnelling in a tight-binding model with nearest-neighbour couplings, in the presence of a periodic high-frequency force. An effective Hamiltonian for the particle is derived using an averaging method resembling classical canonical perturbation theory. Three cases are considered: uniform lattice with periodic and open boundary conditions, and lattice with a parabolic potential. We find that in the latter case, interplay of the potential and driving leads to appearance of the effective next-nearest neighbour couplings. In the uniform case with periodic boundary conditions the second- and third-order corrections to the averaged Hamiltonian are completely absent, while in the case with open boundary conditions they have a very simple form, found before in some particular cases by S. Longhi (2008) [10]. These general results may found applications in designing effective Hamiltonian models in experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices, e.g. for simulating solid-state phenomena.

  20. Elucidation of the binding sites of sodium dodecyl sulfate to β-lactoglobulin using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry combined with docking simulation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenbing; Liu, Jianan; Luo, Qun; Han, Yumiao; Wu, Kui; Lv, Shuang; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Wang, Fuyi

    2011-05-30

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (H/DX MS) has become a powerful tool to investigate protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, but it is still challenging to localize the interaction regions/sites of ligands with pepsin-resistant proteins such as lipocalins. β-Lactoglobulin (BLG), a member of the lipocalin family, can bind a variety of small hydrophobic molecules including retinols, retinoic acids, and long linear fatty acids. However, whether the binding site of linear molecules locates in the external groove or internal cavity of BLG is controversial. In this study we used H/DX MS combined with docking simulation to localize the interaction sites of a tested ligand, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), binding to BLG. H/DX MS results indicated that SDS can bind to both the external and the internal sites in BLG. However, neither of the sites is saturated with SDS, allowing a dynamic ligand exchange to occur between the sites at equilibrium state. Docking studies revealed that SDS forms H-bonds with Lys69 in the internal site and Lys138 and Lys141 in the external site in BLG via the sulfate group, and interacts with the hydrophobic residues valine, leucine, isoleucine and methionine within both of the sites via its hydrocarbon tail, stabilizing the BLG-SDS complex.

  1. Analysis of Copper-Binding Proteins in Rice Radicles Exposed to Excess Copper and Hydrogen Peroxide Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxiao; Xia, Yan; Chen, Chen; Zhuang, Kai; Song, Yufeng; Shen, Zhenguo

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plants, but excess Cu can inactivate and disturb the protein function due to unavoidable binding to proteins at the cellular level. As a redox-active metal, Cu toxicity is mediated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cu-binding structural motifs may alleviate Cu-induced damage by decreasing free Cu(2+) activity in cytoplasm or scavenging ROS. The identification of Cu-binding proteins involved in the response of plants to Cu or ROS toxicity may increase our understanding the mechanisms of metal toxicity and tolerance in plants. This study investigated change of Cu-binding proteins in radicles of germinating rice seeds under excess Cu and oxidative stress using immobilized Cu(2+) affinity chromatography, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and mass spectra analysis. Quantitative image analysis revealed that 26 protein spots showed more than a 1.5-fold difference in abundances under Cu or H2O2 treatment compared to the control. The identified Cu-binding proteins were involved in anti-oxidative defense, stress response and detoxification, protein synthesis, protein modification, and metabolism regulation. The present results revealed that 17 out of 24 identified Cu-binding proteins have a similar response to low concentration Cu (20 μM Cu) and H2O2 stress, and 5 out of 24 were increased under low and high concentration Cu (100 μM Cu) but unaffected under H2O2 stress, which hint Cu ions can regulate Cu-binding proteins accumulation by H2O2 or no H2O2 pathway to cope with excess Cu in cell. The change pattern of these Cu-binding proteins and their function analysis warrant to further study the roles of Cu ions in these Cu-binding proteins of plant cells.

  2. Analysis of Copper-Binding Proteins in Rice Radicles Exposed to Excess Copper and Hydrogen Peroxide Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongxiao; Xia, Yan; Chen, Chen; Zhuang, Kai; Song, Yufeng; Shen, Zhenguo

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plants, but excess Cu can inactivate and disturb the protein function due to unavoidable binding to proteins at the cellular level. As a redox-active metal, Cu toxicity is mediated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cu-binding structural motifs may alleviate Cu-induced damage by decreasing free Cu2+ activity in cytoplasm or scavenging ROS. The identification of Cu-binding proteins involved in the response of plants to Cu or ROS toxicity may increase our understanding the mechanisms of metal toxicity and tolerance in plants. This study investigated change of Cu-binding proteins in radicles of germinating rice seeds under excess Cu and oxidative stress using immobilized Cu2+ affinity chromatography, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and mass spectra analysis. Quantitative image analysis revealed that 26 protein spots showed more than a 1.5-fold difference in abundances under Cu or H2O2 treatment compared to the control. The identified Cu-binding proteins were involved in anti-oxidative defense, stress response and detoxification, protein synthesis, protein modification, and metabolism regulation. The present results revealed that 17 out of 24 identified Cu-binding proteins have a similar response to low concentration Cu (20 μM Cu) and H2O2 stress, and 5 out of 24 were increased under low and high concentration Cu (100 μM Cu) but unaffected under H2O2 stress, which hint Cu ions can regulate Cu-binding proteins accumulation by H2O2 or no H2O2 pathway to cope with excess Cu in cell. The change pattern of these Cu-binding proteins and their function analysis warrant to further study the roles of Cu ions in these Cu-binding proteins of plant cells. PMID:27582750

  3. Effect ofHydrogen Use on Diesel Engine Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceraat, A.; Pana, C.; Negurescu, N.; Nutu, C.; Mirica, I.; Fuiorescu, D.

    2016-11-01

    Necessity of pollutant emissions decreasing, a great interest aspect discussed at 2015 Paris Climate Conference, highlights the necessity of alternative fuels use at diesel engines. Hydrogen is considered a future fuel for the automotive industry due to its properties which define it as the cleanest fuel and due to the production unlimited sources. The use of hydrogen as fuel for diesel engines has a higher degree of complexity because of some hydrogen particularities which lead to specific issues of the hydrogen use at diesel engine: tendency of uncontrolled ignition with inlet backfire, in-cylinder combustion with higher heat release rates and with high NOx level, storage difficulties. Because hydrogen storing on vehicle board implies important difficulties in terms of safety and automotive range, the partial substitution of diesel fuel by hydrogen injected into the inlet manifold represents the most efficient method. The paper presents the results of the experimental researches carried on a truck diesel engine fuelled with diesel fuel and hydrogen, in-cylinder phenomena's study showing the influence of some parameters on combustion, engine performance and pollutant emissions. The paper novelty is defined by the hydrogen fuelling method applied to diesel engine and the efficient control of the engine running.

  4. Design and Development of New Carbon-Based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-03

    This is a summary for work performed under cooperative agreement DE FC36 04GO14006 (Design and Development of New Carbon-based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen). The project was directed to discover new solid and liquid materials that use reversible catalytic hydrogenation as the mechanism for hydrogen capture and storage. After a short period of investigation of solid materials, the inherent advantages of storing and transporting hydrogen using liquid-phase materials focused our attention exclusively on organic liquid hydrogen carriers (liquid carriers). While liquid carriers such as decalin and methylcyclohexane were known in the literature, these carriers suffer from practical disadvantages such as the need for very high temperatures to release hydrogen from the carriers and difficult separation of the carriers from the hydrogen. In this project, we were successful in using the prediction of reaction thermodynamics to discover liquid carriers that operate at temperatures up to 150 C lower than the previously known carriers. The means for modifying the thermodynamics of liquid carriers involved the use of certain molecular structures and incorporation of elements other than carbon into the carrier structure. The temperature decrease due to the more favorable reaction thermodynamics results in less energy input to release hydrogen from the carriers. For the first time, the catalytic reaction required to release hydrogen from the carriers could be conducted with the carrier remaining in the liquid phase. This has the beneficial effect of providing a simple means to separate the hydrogen from the carrier.

  5. An investigation into the effects of hydrogen on the fracture and deformation of Alloy X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, Douglas M.

    1994-11-01

    this study investigated the effect of hydrogen on the fracture of a nickel-base superalloy, Alloy X-750 in the solution treated and aged (HTH) condition. The effect of hydrogen was examined through tensile testing and fracture toughness testing incorporating observations from scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy.

  6. Sperm in poor quality semen from bulls during heat stress have a lower affinity for binding hydrogen-3 heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Ax, R.L.; Gilbert, G.R.; Shook, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Binding assays with (/sup 3/H) heparin were performed using spermatozoa collected prior to, during, and following summer heat stress to dairy bulls. Ejaculates collected in August 1983 after a period of ambient temperatures exceeding 29.4/sup 0/C exhibited a high frequency of abnormal sperm, and motility was reduced in some samples. Sperm in samples collected during heat stress possessed dissociation constants for binding (/sup 3/H) heparin ranging from 134.5 to 163.2 nmol. In contrast, sperm in semen collected prior to and after heat stress had significantly lower dissociation constants (higher affinity) for (/sup 3/H)heparin, 12.9 to 56.4 nmol. The number of binding sites for (/sup 3/H) heparin on sperm did not change among collection periods. It was concluded that the binding affinity for (/sup 3/H) heparin may reflect membrane integrity of bull sperm.

  7. Magnesium ion is an effective inhibitor of the binding of Escherichia coli to heparin

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jonghoon; Lee, Myung Soog; Gorenstein, David G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ions and temperature on the binding of E. coli to heparin using a chemiluminescence electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We found that magnesium ion is an effective inhibitor of the binding. The method can be readily applied to discover agents that can block the binding. PMID:17967492

  8. Effect of hydrogen defects on nanocrystallite layers of Si solar cells by hydrogen implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palei, Srikanta; Lim, Gyoungho; Parida, Bhaskar; Choi, Jaeho; Kim, Keunjoo

    2015-11-01

    The Si solar cells were irradiated with high energy hydrogen ions of 10, 30, 60 and 120 keV at the dose rate of 1017 H+ ions (proton)/cm2. The structural, optical and electrical properties of the implanted samples and fabricated cells were studied. The implantation induced defects bringing structural changes before and after annealing was evidenced by the transmission electron microscopy. The Raman spectrum showed a change of crystalline to amorphous state at 480 cm-1 when the sample was implanted by hydrogen ion of 30 keV energy. Formation of nanocrystallite layers were observed after annealing. The electroluminescence images showed that hydrogen-related defect centers were involved in the emission mechanism. The photoluminescence emission from the implanted cells was attributed to nanocrystallite layers. From current-voltage measurements, the conversion efficiencies of implanted Si solar cells were found lower than the un-implanted reference cell. The ion implantation did not passivate the defects rather acted as recombination centers.

  9. Effect of thermal nonequilibrium on reactions in hydrogen combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, S.; Raman, V.; Varghese, P. L.

    2016-09-01

    The presence of shocks in scramjet internal flows introduces nonequilibrium of internal energy modes of the molecules. Here, the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on key reactions of hydrogen-air combustion is studied. A quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) approach is used to derive reaction probability for nonequilibrium conditions using ab initio-derived potential energy surfaces. The reaction rates under nonequilibrium are studied using a two-temperature description, where the vibrational modes are assumed to be distributed according to a Boltzmann distribution at a characteristic vibrational temperature, in addition to a translational temperature describing the translational and rotational population distribution. At scramjet-relevant conditions, it is found that the nonequilibrium reaction rate depends not only on the level of vibrational excitation, but also on the reactants involved. Conventional two-temperature models for reaction rates, often derived using empirical means, were found to be inaccurate under these conditions, and modified parameters are proposed based on the QCT calculations. It is also found that models that include details of the reaction process through dissociation energy, for instance, provide a better description of nonequilibrium effects.

  10. Sensory and Cognitive Effects of Acute Exposure to Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Nancy; Kipen, Howard; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Zhang, Junfeng; Weisel, Clifford; Laumbach, Robert; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Olejeme, Kelechi; Lioy, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background Some epidemiologic studies have reported compromised cognitive and sensory performance among individuals exposed to low concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Objectives We hypothesized a dose–response increase in symptom severity and reduction in sensory and cognitive performance in response to controlled H2S exposures. Methods In separate exposure sessions administered in random order over three consecutive weeks, 74 healthy subjects [35 females, 39 males; mean age (± SD) = 24.7 ± 4.2; mean years of education = 16.5 ± 2.4], were exposed to 0.05, 0.5, and 5 ppm H2S. During each exposure session, subjects completed ratings and tests before H2S exposure (baseline) and during the final hour of the 2-hr exposure period. Results Dose–response reduction in air quality and increases in ratings of odor intensity, irritation, and unpleasantness were observed. Total symptom severity was not significantly elevated across any exposure condition, but anxiety symptoms were significantly greater in the 5-ppm than in the 0.05-ppm condition. No dose–response effect was observed for sensory or cognitive measures. Verbal learning was compromised during each exposure condition. Conclusions Although some symptoms increased with exposure, the magnitude of these changes was relatively minor. Increased anxiety was significantly related to ratings of irritation due to odor. Whether the effect on verbal learning represents a threshold effect of H2S or an effect due to fatigue across exposure requires further investigation. These acute effects in a healthy sample cannot be directly generalized to communities where individuals have other health conditions and concomitant exposures. PMID:18197303

  11. Effects of nitrogen on hydrogen retention in tungsten: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Wu, Xuebang; Fang, Q. F.; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.; Liu, C. S.

    2015-04-01

    While the use of nitrogen seeding to reduce the edge plasma temperature has been successfully applied in many tokamak experiments, questions remain as to effects of the nitrogen-enriched layer on hydrogen retention in tungsten. In this paper, we investigate the influence of nitrogen on hydrogen dissolution and diffusion behavior in tungsten using the first-principles. The nitrogen has little effect on the dissolution of hydrogen in the interstitial site but significantly impedes the accumulation of hydrogen in the vacancy, leading to the decrease of hydrogen retention in nitrogen-enriched layer. Meanwhile, both the interstitial nitrogen and the vacancy-nitrogen complex can significantly reduce the hydrogen effective diffusivity. This suggests that the nitrogen-enriched layer forming on the tungsten surface can act as a diffusion barrier for the re-emission of implanted hydrogen, enhancing hydrogen diffusion into the bulk, and consequently, increasing of hydrogen retention in bulk. These results provide a sound explanation for the recent experimental results.

  12. The effect of the cellulose-binding domain from Clostridium cellulovorans on the supramolecular structure of cellulose fibers.

    PubMed

    Ciolacu, Diana; Kovac, Janez; Kokol, Vanja

    2010-03-30

    The cellulose-binding domain (CBD) is the second important and the most wide-spread element of cellulase structure involved in cellulose transformation with a great structural diversity and a range of adsorption behavior toward different types of cellulosic materials. The effect of the CBD from Clostridium cellulovorans on the supramolecular structure of three different sources of cellulose (cotton cellulose, spruce dissolving pulp, and cellulose linters) was studied. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to record amides I and II absorption bands of cotton cellulose treated with CBD. Structural changes as weakening and splitting of the hydrogen bonds within the cellulose chains after CBD adsorption were observed. The decrease of relative crystallinity index of the treated celluloses was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to confirm the binding of the CBD on the cellulose surface and the changing of the cellulose morphology.

  13. The study of synergistic effects of alcohols on the catalytic hydrogenation of brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, P.N.; Kuznetsova, L.I.; Kartseva, N.V.

    1998-12-31

    The hydrogenation of brown coal in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol containing medium in the presence of catalysts was studied. The effects of different catalysts, alcohols, the proportion between the quantity of hydrogen, alcohols and tetralin on the conversion of coal, product yields, composition and molecular weight of solubles were analyzed. The synergistic effects of the mixtures of methanol and ethanol with tetralin and with hydrogen on the conversion of brown coal were observed at 380 C and 430 C in the presence of supported Fe, Fe-Mo, Ni, and Co hydroxide catalysts. Small amounts of methanol and ethanol additives induced the improved coal swelling and conversion into soluble products with diminished molecular weight. Synergistic effect was found to depend on the catalyst concentration, hydrogen pressure and alcohol structure. Coal swelling, hydrogenation and alkylation reactions were evaluated. The nature of the promoting effect of alcohols on coal liquefaction is discussed.

  14. Host Plant Cultivar Effects on Hydrogen Evolution by Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Edie, S A; Phillips, D A

    1983-08-01

    The effect of host plant cultivar on H(2) evolution by root nodules was examined in symbioses between Pisum sativum L. and selected strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum. Hydrogen evolution from root nodules containing Rhizobium represents the sum of H(2) produced by the nitrogenase enzyme complex and H(2) oxidized by any uptake hydrogenase present in those bacterial cells. Relative efficiency (RE) calculated as RE = 1 - (H(2) evolved in air/C(2) H(2) reduced) did not vary significantly among ;Feltham First,' ;Alaska,' and ;JI1205' peas inoculated with R. leguminosarum strain 300, which lacks uptake hydrogenase activity (Hup(-)). That observation suggests that the three host cultivars had no effect on H(2) production by nitrogenase. However, RE of strain 128C53 was significantly (P effects on H(2) uptake capacity of both strain 128C53 and the genetically related strain 3960. The (3)H(2) incorporation assay showed that strains 128C53 and 3960 in symbiosis with Feltham First had about 10% of the uptake hydrogenase activity measured in root nodules of Alaska or JI1205. These data are the first demonstration of significant host plant effects on rhizobial uptake hydrogenase in a single plant species.

  15. Effects due to adsorbed atoms upon angular and energy distributions of surface produced negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, M.; Bacal, M.; Kasuya, T.; Kato, S.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2013-02-01

    Exposure to Cs added hydrogen discharge makes surface of plasma grid of a negative hydrogen ion source covered with Cs and hydrogen. A Monte-Carlo particle simulation code ACAT was run to evaluate the effects due to adsorbed Cs and H atoms upon the angular and energy distributions of H atoms leaving the surface. Accumulation of H atoms on the surface reduces particle reflection coefficients and the mean energy of backscattered H atoms. Angular distributions of H atoms reflected from the hydrogen covered surface tend to be under-cosine at lower energies. Desorption of adsorbed H atoms is more efficient for hydrogen positive ions than for Cs positive ions at lower incident energy. At higher energy more than 100 eV, Cs ions desorb adsorbed H atoms more efficiently than hydrogen ions.

  16. Alterations of the colonic flora and their effect on the hydrogen breath test.

    PubMed

    Gilat, T; Ben Hur, H; Gelman-Malachi, E; Terdiman, R; Peled, Y

    1978-07-01

    The hydrogen breath test was performed by ingestion of 20 g lactulose and analysis of end-expiratory air. Eighteen patients undergoing colonoscopy, 17 receiving antibiotics, 12 prepared for colon surgery, and 15 controls were examined. The test was repeated under control conditions in the treated patients. Eleven of 55 subjects failed to produce significant amounts of hydrogen under control conditions. This 20% proportion of non-hydrogen producers is much higher than that reported by other investigators. The hydrogen production was very markedly depressed after preparation for colonscopy and antibiotic therapy. The effect of neomycin and enemata as used in preparation for colon surgery was less marked. Hydrogen production by the colonic flora is thus subject to individual variations and may be affected by various therapeutic regimens. All these may cause false negative results when using the hydrogen breath test to evaluate carbohydrate absorption. The test should therefore not be performed for a considerable time after therapeutic manipulation of the colonic flora.

  17. Regulatory effect of hydrogen on nitrogenase activity of the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Nostoc muscorum.

    PubMed

    Scherer, S; Kerfin, W; Böger, P

    1980-03-01

    Preincubation of the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Nostoc muscorum under an atmosphere of argon plus acetylene in the light led to a greater than fourfold increase of light-induced hydrogen evolution and to a 50% increase of acetylene reduction, as compared to cells that had not been preconditioned. The basic and the increased hydrogen evolution were both due to nitrogenase activity. Furthermore, after preincubation the hydrogen uptake, usually observed with unconditional cells, was abolished. Nostoc preincubated under acetylene evolved hydrogen in the light even in the presence of nitrogen for at least 2 h, with a 15-fold increase as compared to the unconditioned cells. These acetylene effects could be completely abolished by the presence of hydrogen during acetylene preincubation. These findings indicate that the hydrogen concentration in N. muscorum cells plays a role in regulation of nitrogenase activity.

  18. Effects of hydrogen isotopes in the irradiation damage of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M. Z.; Liu, P. P.; Zhu, Y. M.; Wan, F. R.; He, Z. B.; Zhan, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The isotope effect of hydrogen in irradiation damage plays an important role in the development of reduced activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels in nuclear reactors. The evolutions of microstructures and mechanical properties of China low active martensitic (CLAM) steel subjected to hydrogen and deuterium ions irradiation are studied comparatively. Under the same irradiation conditions, larger size and smaller density of dislocation loops are generated by deuterium ion than by hydrogen ion. Irradiation hardening occurs under the ion irradiation and the hardening induced by hydrogen ion is higher than by deuterium ion. Moreover, the coarsening of M23C6 precipitates is observed, which can be explained by the solute drag mechanisms. It turns out that the coarsening induced by deuterium ion irradiation is more distinct than by hydrogen ion irradiation. No distinct variations for the compositions of M23C6 precipitates are found by a large number of statistical data after hydrogen isotopes irradiation.

  19. Effects of microstructure banding on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth in X65 pipeline steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ronevich, Joseph A.; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Chris W.

    2015-09-10

    Banded ferrite-pearlite X65 pipeline steel was tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to evaluate the effects of oriented pearlite on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth. Test specimens were oriented in the steel pipe such that cracks propagated either parallel or perpendicular to the banded pearlite. The ferrite-pearlite microstructure exhibited orientation dependent behavior in which fatigue crack growth rates were significantly lower for cracks oriented perpendicular to the banded pearlite compared to cracks oriented parallel to the bands. Thus the reduction of hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth across the banded pearlite is attributed to a combination of crack-tip branching and impeded hydrogen diffusion across the banded pearlite.

  20. Microcavity effects in the photoluminescence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpenguzel, Ali; Aydinli, Atilla; Bek, Alpan

    1998-07-01

    Fabry-Perot microcavities are used for the alteration of photoluminescence in hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride grown with and without ammonia. The photoluminescence is red-near-infrared for the samples grown without ammonia, and blue-green for the samples grown with ammonia. In the Fabry- Perot microcavities, the amplitude of the photoluminescence is enhanced, while its linewidth is reduced with respect to the bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride. The microcavity was realized by a metallic back mirror and a hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride--air or a metallic front mirror. The transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance spectra were also measured and calculated. The calculated spectra agree well with the experimental spectra. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride microcavity has potential for becoming a versatile silicon based optoelectronic device such as a color flat panel display, a resonant cavity enhanced light emitting diode, or a laser.

  1. Effect of oxide films on hydrogen permeability of candidate Stirling heater head tube alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schuon, S R; Misencik, J A

    1981-01-01

    High pressure hydrogen has been selected as the working fluid for the developmental automotive Stirling engine. Containment of the working fluid during operation of the engine at high temperatures and at high hydrogen gas pressures is essential for the acceptance of the Stirling engine as an alternative to the internal combustion engine. Most commercial alloys are extremely permeable to pure hydrogen at high temperatures. A program was undertaken at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) to reduce hydrogen permeability in the Stirling engine heater head tubes by doping the hydrogen working fluid with CO or CO/sub 2/. Small additions of these gases were shown to form an oxide on the inside tube wall and thus reduce hydrogen permeability. A study of the effects of dopant concentration, alloy composition, and effects of surface oxides on hydrogen permeability in candidate heater head tube alloys is summarized. Results showed that hydrogen permeability was similar for iron-base alloys (N-155, A286, IN800, 19-9DL, and Nitronic 40), cobalt-base alloys (HS-188) and nickel-base alloys (IN718). In general, the permeability of the alloys decreased with increasing concentration of CO or CO/sub 2/ dopant, with increasing oxide thickness, and decreasing oxide porosity. At high levels of dopants, highly permeable liquid oxides formed on those alloys with greater than 50% Fe content. Furthermore, highly reactive minor alloying elements (Ti, Al, Nb, and La) had a strong influence on reducing hydrogen permeability.

  2. Synergetic effects in novel hydrogenated F-doped TiO2 photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee; Juan, Joon Ching; Basirun, Wan Jefrey; Centi, Gabriele

    2016-05-01

    The synergistic effect between fluorine and hydrogen in hydrogenated F-doped TiO2 photocatalysts is evaluated for the photocatalytic degradation of atrazine. The interaction between fluorine and hydrogen species in hydrogenated F-doped TiO2 overcomes the limitations of individual F-doped TiO2 and hydrogenated TiO2 photocatalyst properties. Hydrogenated F-doped TiO2 is photo-active under UV, visible and infrared light illumination with efficient electrons and holes separations. The optimized concentration of surface vacancies and Ti3+ centers coupled with enhanced surface hydrophilicity facilitates the production of surface-bound and free hydroxyl radicals. The surface of the catalyst contains dbnd Tisbnd F, dbnd Tisbnd OH, dbnd Tisbnd Ovacancy and dbnd Tisbnd H bonds as evidenced by XPS, Raman, FTIR and HR-TEM analysis. This combination also triggers the formation of new Ti3+ occupied states under the conduction band of hydrogenated F-doped TiO2. Moreover, the change in the pore structure from cylindrical to slits and larger surface area facilitates surface charge interactions. The thermal stability is also enhanced and a single anatase phase is obtained. The size of the particles of hydrogenated F-doped TiO2 is also uniform with defined and homogeneous crystal structure. This synergetic effect between fluorine and hydrogen opens up new alternatives in improving the properties of TiO2 and its photocatalytic activity.

  3. Quantum effects in a simple ring with hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Kariev, Alisher M; Green, Michael E

    2015-05-14

    Complexes containing multiple arginines are common in proteins. The arginines are typically salt-bridged or hydrogen-bonded, so that their charges do not repel. Here we present a quantum calculation of a ring in which the components of a salt bridge composed of a guanidinium, the arginine side chain, and a carboxylic acid are separated by water molecules. When one water molecule is displaced from the ring, atomic charges of the other water molecule, as well as other properties, are significantly affected. The exchange and correlation energy differences between optimized and displaced rings are larger than thermal energy at room temperature, and larger than the sum of other energy differences. This suggests that calculations on proteins and other systems where such a ring may occur must take quantum effects into account; charges on certain atoms shift as substituents are added to the system: another water molecule, an -OH, or -CN bonded to either moiety. Also, charge shifts accompany proton shifts from the acid to guanidinium to ionize the salt bridge. The consequences of moving one water out of the ring give evidence for electron delocalization. Bond order and atomic charges are determined using natural bond orbital calculations. The geometry of the complex changes with ionization as well as the -OH and -CN additions but not in a simple manner. These results help in understanding the role of groups of arginines in salt-bridged clusters in proteins.

  4. Anharmonic effects in atomic hydrogen: Superconductivity and lattice dynamical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinaga, Miguel; Errea, Ion; Calandra, Matteo; Mauri, Francesco; Bergara, Aitor

    2016-05-01

    We present first-principles calculations of metallic atomic hydrogen in the 400-600 GPa pressure range in a tetragonal structure with space group I 41/a m d , which is predicted to be its first atomic phase. Our calculations show a band structure close to the free-electron-like limit due to the high electronic kinetic energy induced by pressure. Bands are properly described even in the independent electron approximation fully neglecting the electron-electron interaction. Linear-response harmonic calculations show a dynamically stable phonon spectrum with marked Kohn anomalies. Even if the electron-electron interaction has a minor role in the electronic bands, the inclusion of electronic exchange and correlation in the density response is essential to obtain a dynamically stable structure. Anharmonic effects, which are calculated within the stochastic self-consistent harmonic approximation, harden high-energy optical modes and soften transverse acoustic modes up to a 20% in energy. Despite a large impact of anharmonicity has been predicted in several high-pressure hydrides, here the superconducting critical temperature is barely affected by anharmonicity, as it is lowered from its harmonic 318 K value only to 300 K at 500 GPa. We attribute the small impact of anharmonicity on superconductivity to the absence of softened optical modes and the fairly uniform distribution of the electron-phonon coupling among the vibrational modes.

  5. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao-xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP. PMID:27115738

  6. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao-Xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP.

  7. BINDING OF THE RESPIRATORY CHAIN INHIBITOR ANTIMYCIN TO THE MITOCHONDRIAL bc1 COMPLEX: A NEW CRYSTAL STRUCTURE REVEALS AN ALTERED INTRAMOLECULAR HYDROGEN-BONDING PATTERN.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2006-01-01

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex. Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicylamide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28 Å resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the αA helix. PMID:16024040

  8. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  9. The effectiveness of ski bindings and their professional adjustment for preventing alpine skiing injuries.

    PubMed

    Finch, C F; Kelsall, H L

    1998-06-01

    This article presents a critical review of the extent to which alpine ski bindings and their adjustment have been formally demonstrated to prevent injuries. It considers a range of evidence, from anecdotal evidence and informed opinion to biomechanical studies, testing of equipment, epidemiological studies and controlled field evaluations. A total of 15 published studies examining the effectiveness of bindings and their adjustment were identified. All of these included anecdotal or informed opinion, and all but one focused on equipment design. Seven studies involved the testing of bindings or binding prototypes, 2 studies presented biomechanical models of the forces involved in binding operation, 6 reported an epidemiological evaluation of ski bindings and 2 considered skiers' behaviours towards binding adjustment. Some of the reviewed articles relate to the study of the biomechanics of ski bindings and their release in response to various loads and loading patterns. Other studies examined the contribution of bindings and binding-release to lower extremity, equipment-related injuries, the effect of various methods of binding adjustment on injury risk and the determinants of skiers' behaviour relating to professional binding adjustment. Most of the evidence suggests that currently used bindings are insufficient for the multidirectional release required to reduce the risk of injury to the lower limb, especially at the knee. This evidence suggests that further technical developments and innovations are required. The standard of the manufacture of bindings and boots also needs to be considered. The optimal adjustment of bindings using a testing device has been shown to be associated with a reduced risk of lower extremity injury. Generally, however, the adjustment of bindings has been shown to be inadequate, especially for children's bindings. Recommendations for further research, development and implementation with respect to ski binding and their adjustment are given

  10. Hydrogenation effects in metalloporphycenes: synthesis and redox behavior of Ni(II)-tetra(n-propyl)dihydroporphycene.

    PubMed

    Okawara, Toru; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Masaaki; Shimakoshi, Hisashi; Hisaeda, Yoshio

    2012-06-04

    Hydrogenated tetrapropylporphycenes, 2,3-dihydro-2,7,12,17-tetrapropylporphycene 1 and its Ni(II) complex 2, have been prepared and the hydrogenation effects on their electronic structure characterized. A one-electron reduction of 2 promotes dehalogenation of organic halides whose observation is unprecedented for the porphycene compounds.

  11. Numerical study of influence of hydrogen backflow on krypton Hall effect thruster plasma focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shilin; Ding, Yongjie; Wei, Liqiu; Hu, Yanlin; Li, Jie; Ning, Zhongxi; Yu, Daren

    2017-03-01

    The influence of backflow hydrogen on plasma plume focusing of a krypton Hall effect thruster is studied via a numerical simulation method. Theoretical analysis indicates that hydrogen participates in the plasma discharge process, changes the potential and ionization distribution in the thruster discharge cavity, and finally affects the plume focusing within a vacuum vessel.

  12. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND GLYCEROL ON THE HYDROGEN-BOND DYNAMICS OF WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    The effect of glycerol, water and glycerol-water binary mixtures on the structure and dynamics of biomolecules has been well studied. However, the effect of varying glycerol concentration and temperature on the dynamics of water has not received due attention. We have studied the effect of concentration and temperature on the hydrogen bonded network formed by water molecules. A strong correlation between the relaxation time of the network and average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecules was found. The radial distribution function of water oxygens and hydrogens clarifies the effect of concentration on the structure and clustering of water.

  13. Can Silicon Carbide Nanotubes Be Effective Storage Medium for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Souptik; Ray, Asok

    2009-03-01

    A systematic study of molecular hydrogen adsorption on three different atomic configurations of armchair SICNTs has been performed. In the first stage of our study, first principles calculations using both density functional theory (DFT) and hybrid density functional theory (HDFT) as well as the finite cluster approximation have been performed to study the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on three types of armchair (9, 9) silicon carbide nanotubes. The distances of molecular hydrogen from the outer wall of the nanotubes have been optimized manually using the B3LYP and PW91 functionals and results have been compared in detail with published literature results. In the second part of our study, hydrogen molecule has been adsorbed from both inside as well as from the outer wall of nanotubes ranging from (3, 3) to (6, 6) for all three types. A detailed comparison of the binding energies, equilibrium positions and Mulliken charges has been performed for all three types of nanotubes and for all possible sites in those nanotubes. In the third phase, co-adsorption of two hydrogen molecules has been carried out. Possibilities of hydrogen storage have been explored in detail.

  14. Effect of species, life stage, and water temperature on the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, J.J.; Schreier, T.M.; Howe, G.E.; Redman, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a drug of low regulatory priority status that is effective in treating fish and fish eggs infected by fungi. However, only limited information is available to guide fish culturists in administering hydrogen peroxide to diseased fish. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine (1) the sensitivity of brown trout Salmo trutta, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, walleye Stizostedion vitreum, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, and bluegill Lepomis, machrochirus to hydrogen peroxide treatments; (2) the sensitivity of various life stages of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to hydrogen peroxide treatments; and (3) the effect of water temperature on the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to three fish species. Fish were exposed to hydrogen peroxide concentrations ranging from 100 to 5,000 mu L/L (ppm) for 15-min or 45-min treatments every other day for four consecutive treatments to determine the sensitivity of various species and life stages of fish. Except for walleye, most species of fish tested (less than or equal to 2 g) tolerated hydrogen peroxide of 1,000 mu L/L or greater. Walleyes were sensitive to hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 100 mu L/L. A correlation was found between the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide and the life stages of rainbow trout; larger fish were more sensitive. Generally, the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide increased for all species as water temperature increased. The results of these experiments demonstrate that it is important to consider the effects of species, life stage, and water temperature when conducting hydrogen peroxide treatments.

  15. Small chemicals with inhibitory effects on PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 binding of Btk PH domain.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Youngdae

    2014-05-15

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4-5-triphosphates (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) formed by phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) had been known as a signaling molecule that plays important roles in diverse cellular processes such as cell signaling, metabolism, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 regulates diverse cellular processes by recruiting effector proteins to the specific cellular locations for correct functions. In this study, we reported the inhibitory effect of small chemicals on the interaction between PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-Btk PH domain. Small chemicals were synthesized based on structural similarity of PtdInsP head-groups, and tested the inhibitory effects in vitro via surface plasmon resonance (SPR). As a result, the chemical 8 showed highest inhibitory effect with 17μM of IC50 value. To elucidate diverse inhibitory effects of different small chemicals we employed in silico docking experiment using molecular modeling and simulation. The result of docking experiments showed chemical 8 has more hydrogen bonding with the residues in PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 binding site of Btk PH domain than others. Overall, our studies demonstrate the efficient approach to develop lipid binding inhibitors, and further we can use these chemicals to regulate effector proteins. In addition, our study would provide new insight that lipid binding domain may be the attractive therapeutic targets to treat severe human diseases.

  16. Effects of internal hydrogen on the vacancy loop formation probability in Al

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, T.X.; Sirois, E.; Robertson, I.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Kirk, M.A. )

    1990-04-01

    The effect of internal hydrogen on the formation of vacancy dislocation loops from heavy-ion generated displacement cascades in Al has been investigated. Samples of high-purity aluminum and aluminum containing 900 and 1300 appM of hydrogen were irradiated at room temperature with 50 keV Kr+ ions. The ion dose rate was typically 2 {times} 10{sup 10}ions cm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1} and the ion dose was between 10{sup 11} and 10{sup 13} ion cm{sup {minus}2}. Under these irradiation conditions, dislocation loops were observed in all compositions, although the formation probability was relatively low (less than 10 percent of the displacement cascades produced a vacancy loop). The loop formation probability was further reduced by the presence of hydrogen. No difference in the geometry or the size of the loops created in the hydrogen free and hydrogen charged samples was found. These results are difficult to interpret, and the explanation may lie in the distribution and form of the hydrogen. To account for the large hydrogen concentrations and from calculations of the energy associated with hydrogen entry into aluminum, it has been suggested that the hydrogen enters the aluminum lattice with an accompanying vacancy. This will create hydrogen-vacancy complexes in the material; two dimensional complexes have been detected in the hydrogen-charged, but unirradiated, samples by the small-angle x-ray scattering technique. The possibility of these complexes trapping the vacancies produced by the cascade process exists thus lowering the formation probability. However, such a mechanism must occur within the lifetime of the cascade. Alternatively, if a displacement cascade overlaps with the hydrogen-vacancy complexes, the lower atomic density of the region will result in an increase in the cascade volume (decrease in the local vacancy concentration) which will also reduce the loop formation probability.

  17. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness of alloy X-750 at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Douglas M.

    Ni-Cr-Fe alloys are widely used in pressurized water nuclear reactors (PWR). These alloys are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in PWR environments. There have been numerous mechanisms of crack advance proposed to describe the SCC of the nickel-base alloys in a PWR environment including slip/film rupture/oxidation and hydrogen embrittlement. It has also been suggested that there is not sufficient evidence to implicate hydrogen in the PWR SCC of nickel-base alloys. This program evaluated the effect of hydrogen on the embrittlement of a nickel-base alloy, alloy X-750, at elevated temperatures with a hydrogen concentration typical of what may be developed from the corrosion reaction. Fracture toughness values and the tearing resistance of alloy X-750 were evaluated in hydrogen gas and in air 260°C and 338°C. It was shown that at 260°C and 338°C alloy X-750 was severely embrittled in high pressure hydrogen gas. Further, the fracture morphology changed from predominantly transgranular ductile dimple fracture in air to predominantly intergranular fracture in hydrogen. The fracture morphology in hydrogen was similar to that found for PWR SCC of this material. This work supports a hydrogen-enhanced fracture mechanism contributing to the SCC of nickel-base alloys at elevated temperatures.

  18. Hydrogen Effects in Prestrained Transformation Induced Plasticity Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronevich, J. A.; De Cooman, B. C.; Speer, J. G.; De Moor, E.; Matlock, D. K.

    2012-07-01

    Thermal desorption analysis (TDA) was performed on laboratory heat-treated transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with 14.5 pct retained austenite (RA), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 880 MPa, and elongation to failure of 33 pct. Samples were tensile prestrained 5 pct at 253 K (-20 °C), 296 K (23 °C), and 375 K (102 °C) to generate different amounts of deformation-induced martensite, 10.5, 5.5, and 0.5 pct, respectively, prior to cathodically charging to a hydrogen content of 1 to 2 ppm. TDA was performed on charged samples to determine the location and strength of hydrogen trapping sites. TDA results suggest that dislocations were the main trapping sites in prestrained TRIP steel. The TDA peak intensity increased with prestrain, suggesting that the quantity of hydrogen trap sites increased with deformation. Tensile tests were performed on the four hydrogen-charged TRIP steel conditions. As confirmed with transmission electron microscope images, samples with more homogeneous dislocation distributions ( i.e., prestrained at 375 K (102 °C)) exhibited greater resistance to hydrogen embrittlement than samples that included a high dislocation density adjacent to the formations of strain-induced martensite ( i.e., samples prestrained at 253 K (-20 °C) and 296 K (23 °C)).

  19. Effective hydrogen generation and resource circulation based on sulfur cycle system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Mabuchi, Takashi; Hayashi, Tsugumi; Yokoyama, Shun; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2013-12-10

    For the effective hydrogen generation from H{sub 2}S, it should be compatible that the increscent of the photocatalytic (or electrochemical) activities and the development of effective utilization method of by-products (poly sulfide ion). In this study, “system integration” to construct the sulfur cycle system, which is compatible with the increscent of the hydrogen and or electron energy generation ratio and resource circulation, is investigated. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation rate can be enhanced by using stratified photocatalysts. Photo excited electron can be transpired to electrode to convert the electron energy to hydrogen energy. Poly sulfide ion as the by-products can be transferred into elemental sulfur and/or industrial materials such as rubber. Moreover, elemental sulfur can be transferred into H{sub 2}S which is the original materials for hydrogen generation. By using this “system integration”, the sulfur cycle system for the new energy generation can be constructed.

  20. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness of oxygen-strengthened titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasz, M. L.; Ko, C. C.; Brotzen, F. R.; Mclellan, R. B.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of oxygen-strengthened titanium alloys have indicated that while hydrogen has little effect on tensile properties, it causes a marked decrease in impact strength. It is presently established experimentally that the presence of hydrogen has essentially no effect on the fracture-toughness factor at the onset of crack propagation, in commercial-grade titanium alloys containing either low or high concentrations of oxygen. These findings are congruent with other study results on the tensile properties of these alloys, but contrast with the previously noted pronounced effect of hydrogen on impact resistance.

  1. The Effect of Hydrogen on the Solid Solution Strengthening and Softening of Nickel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Afl-A108 654e ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA DEPT OF METALLURGY AND MININS--ETC F/6 11/6 THE EFFECT OF HYDROGEN ON THE SOLID SOLUTION STRFNSTNFNING ANfl...RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL HUR[AU OF STANDARDS 1963 A, " , ..... . .... .. i ....... .. .. . t , LEVEL THE EFFECT OF HYDROGEN ON THE SOLID SOLUTION STRENGTHENING...Availability Codes IIAvail and/or Dist Special THE EFFECT OF HYDROGEN ON THE SOLID SOLUTION STRENGTHENING AND SOFTENING OF NICKEL J. Eastman, F. Heuhaum, T

  2. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, L.A.; Mead, K.E.; Smith, H.M.

    1983-09-20

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (1) a solid acetylenic compound and (2) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  3. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, Larry A.; Mead, Keith E.; Smith, Henry M.

    1983-01-01

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  4. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-04-29

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the reusltant hydrogen.

  5. Paraquat toxicity and effect of hydrogen peroxide on thermophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Allgood, G S; Perry, J J

    1985-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ++) increased cyanide-resistant univalent respiration in cell suspensions of five strains of obligately thermophilic bacteria. PQ++ was reduced by an NADH: or NADPH:paraquat diaphorase and selectivity for NADH, NADPH, or both electron donors varied among the thermophiles. Superoxide anion production that was dependent on the presence of PQ++ was shown by following the superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of cytochrome c. In addition, the PQ++-dependent formation of hydrogen peroxide from superoxide anion was evident in two of the thermophilic strains. Catalase synthesis was induced by adding hydrogen peroxide to the growth medium of the thermophiles. The induction of catalase to eliminate hydrogen peroxide appears to be an important response of these thermophilic bacteria to oxygen toxicity.

  6. Molecular hydrogen: An inert gas turns clinically effective.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2015-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) appeared as an experimental agent in biomedicine approximately 40 years ago, yet the past 5 years seem to confirm its medicinal value in the clinical environment. H2 improves clinical end-points and surrogate markers in several clinical trials, from metabolic diseases to chronic systemic inflammatory disorders to cancer. However, less information is available concerning its medicinal properties, such as dosage and administration, or adverse reactions and use in specific populations. The present paper overviews the clinical relevance of molecular hydrogen, and summarizes data from clinical trials on this innovative medical agent. Clinical profiles of H2 provide evidence-based direction for practical application and future research on molecular hydrogen for the wider health care community.

  7. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Coral Photosynthesis and Calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, T.; Fujimura, H.; Arakaki, T.; Oomori, T.

    2007-12-01

    The widely-observed decline of coral reefs is considered to be caused by changes in the environment by natural and anthropogenic activities. As one important factor, the run-off of various matters from human activities to the coastal seawater poses stresses to the corals by degrading the quality of the seawater. In Okinawa, Japan, red- soil running off from the developed land has been a major environmental issue since 1980s. Hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), a strong active oxygen species, is one of the photochemically formed chemicals in the red-soil-polluted seawater. Recent photochemical studies of seawater showed that HOOH photo-formation was faster in the red- soil-polluted seawater than clean seawater. We studied the effects of HOOH on corals by studying the changes in coral carbon metabolisms such as photosynthesis and calcification, which are indicators of the physiological state of a coral colony. The corals were exposed to various concentrations of HOOH (0, 0.3, 3 μM). Two massive coral species of Porites sp. and Goniastrea aspera and one branch coral of Galaxea facicularis were used for the exposure experiments. The control experiments showed that when no HOOH was added, metabolisms of each coral colony were relatively stable. On the other hand, when HOOH was added to the seawater, we observed obvious changes in the coral metabolisms in all the coral species. When 0.3 μM HOOH was added, photosynthesis decreased by 14% and calcification decreased by 17% within 3 days, compared with the control. When 3 μM HOOH was added, photosynthesis decreased by 21% and calcification decreased by 41% within 3 days, compared with the control. Our study showed that higher concentrations of HOOH posed more stress to the coral colonies.

  8. Binding and photocleavage of a neutral nickel(II) bis(hydrogen pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato) complex to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingxiang; Li, Wenqi; Liu, Aifeng; Zhang, Bin; Gao, Feng; Li, Shunxing; Liao, Xiaolei

    2011-01-01

    A neutral nickel(II) bis(pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato) complex, [Ni(Hdipic -) 2] (Hdipic - = monohydricsalt of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid) was synthesized and its interaction with DNA were comprehensively investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity, fluorescence, melting temperature and gel electrophoresis measurements in this paper. Spectrophotometric titration suggested that the nickel(II) complex could intercalatively bind to DNA via the planar dipicolinic acid moiety with a moderate binding strength of 1.6 × 10 4 M -1, and these results were further proved by the systematic studies of viscosity, ethidium bromide (EB) displacement and melting temperature experiments. Moreover, agarose gel electrophoresis assays showed that [Ni(Hdipic -) 2] had obvious photocleavage property for the supercoiled plasmid pBR322 DNA under 302 nm irradiation for 30 min, which allow us to postulate the studied complex as a proper candidate for photocleavage reagent.

  9. Factors influencing rumen fermentation: effect of hydrogen on formation of propionate.

    PubMed

    Schulman, M D; Valentino, D

    1976-08-01

    The effect of hydrogen on fermentation of lactate, pyruvate, fumarate, and succinate by resting rumen microorganisms has been investigated. Under an atmosphere of nitrogen, lactate was fermented to yield acetate as the major product (85 to 100 mole %) and propionate (0 to 17 mole %) and butyrate (0 to 3%) as secondary products. Under hydrogen, there was increased formation of both propionate and total volatile fatty acids. The amount of propionate increased 4 to 8 times and total volatile fatty acids 2.5 to 3.2 times. Propionate formation was proportional to the hydrogen concentration and reached a maximum at a partial pressure of hydrogen of .2 N/m2. With [2-carbon-14] lactate, propionate was formed via the dicarboxylic acid pathway under both nitrogen or hydrogen. Hydrogen did not affect significantly the fermentation of pyruvate or succinate. With fumarate under hydrogen, propionate and total volatile fatty acids increased 6.8 and 2 times while acetate was unchanged. The mechanism by which hydrogen exerts these effects is discussed in relation to the role of methanogenesis in the rumen.

  10. Effects of heat treatment on microbial communities of granular sludge for biological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Luca; Favaro, Lorenzo; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Basaglia, Marina; Casella, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Dark fermentation shares many features with anaerobic digestion with the exception that to maximize hydrogen production, methanogens and hydrogen-consuming bacteria should be inhibited. Heat treatment is widely applied as an inoculum pre-treatment due to its effectiveness in inhibiting methanogenic microflora but it may not exclusively select for hydrogen-producing bacteria. This work evaluated the effects of heat treatment on microbial viability and structure of anaerobic granular sludge. Heat treatment was carried out on granular sludge at 100 °C with four residence times (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 h). Hydrogen production of treated sludges was studied from glucose by means of batch test at different pH values. Results indicated that each heat treatment strongly influenced the granular sludge resulting in microbial communities having different hydrogen productions. The highest hydrogen yields (2.14 moles of hydrogen per mole of glucose) were obtained at pH 5.5 using the sludge treated for 4 h characterized by the lowest CFU concentration (2.3 × 10(3)CFU/g sludge). This study demonstrated that heat treatment should be carefully defined according to the structure of the sludge microbial community, allowing the selection of highly efficient hydrogen-producing microbes.

  11. Binding Energies, Effective Masses and Screenings Effects of Fröhlich Bipolarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataudella, V.; Iadonisi, G.; Ninno, D.

    1991-01-01

    The bipolaron ground state binding energy and the effective masses are calculated self-consistently in a scheme where the electron-phonon interaction is described by the Fröhlich interaction. We explicitly use the total linear momentum conservation and both two-and three-dimensional systems are considered. We review results for binding energies and show that the bipolaron effective mass increases with the electron-phonon coupling constant α more rapidly than two free polaron masses. As expected, the increase is greater in two than in three dimensions. We estimate the screening effects due to an electronic or hole density n in a range of values such that nR2b ll 1 (here Rb is the bipolaron radius). We find that the bipolaron binding energy decreases with n and eventually becomes positive indicating the existence of a metastable bipolaron state. Finally we discuss the possible connections between our results and high Tc superconductivity.

  12. The Effect of Atmospheric Hydrogen on the Albedo and Surface Temperature of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallack, Nicole Lisa; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Ramirez, Ramses

    2016-01-01

    The presence of hydrogen in planetary atmospheres has been shown to have the potential to dramatically effect the temperatures of planets. The collision-induced absorption (CIA) of hydrogen with carbon dioxide or nitrogen has been shown to have a substantial effect on the atmospheric temperature and albedo of a planet, possibly to the point at which life could exist on a planet where without such CIA the planet would be too cold. Using a single-column radiative-convective climate model, we investigated the effect of the presence of hydrogen on planetary temperatures and albedos across different amounts of hydrogen and across host stars of different temperatures using present-day Mars-like planets. We found that the addition of hydrogen in a planet's atmosphere increased the surface temperature of the planet. This effect was stronger for the planets orbiting hotter stars. The water vapor profiles showed that this was the case due to the presence of more water vapor in the atmospheres of planets orbiting hotter stars across all percentages of hydrogen. The water vapor concentrations also varied more with the addition of more hydrogen for the planets orbiting hotter stars.

  13. Effects of hydrogen-rich water on depressive-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Su, Wen-Jun; Chen, Ying; Wu, Teng-Yun; Gong, Hong; Shen, Xiao-Liang; Wang, Yun-Xia; Sun, Xue-Jun; Jiang, Chun-Lei

    2016-03-30

    Emerging evidence suggests that neuroinflammation and oxidative stress may be major contributors to major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients or animal models of depression show significant increase of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and oxidative stress biomarkers in the periphery or central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies show that hydrogen selectively reduces cytotoxic oxygen radicals, and hydrogen-rich saline potentially suppresses the production of several proinflammatory mediators. Since current depression medications are accompanied by a wide spectrum of side effects, novel preventative or therapeutic measures with fewer side effects might have a promising future. We investigated the effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on the depressive-like behavior in mice and its underlying mechanisms. Our study show that hydrogen-rich water treatment prevents chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) induced depressive-like behavior. CUMS induced elevation in IL-1β protein levels in the hippocampus, and the cortex was significantly attenuated after 4 weeks of feeding the mice hydrogen-rich water. Over-expression of caspase-1 (the IL-1β converting enzyme) and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) was successfully suppressed by hydrogen-rich water treatment. Our data suggest that the beneficial effects of hydrogen-rich water on depressive-like behavior may be mediated by suppression of the inflammasome activation resulting in attenuated protein IL-1β and ROS production.

  14. Effect of water on hydrogen permeability. [Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulligan, D. D.; Tomazic, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    Doping of hydrogen with CO or CO2 was developed to reduce hydrogen permeation in Stirling engines by forming low permeability oxide coatings in the heater tubes. An end product of this process is water - which can condense in the cold parts of the engine system. If the water vapor is reduced to a low enough level, the hydrogen can reduce the oxide coating resulting in increased permeability. The equilibrium level of water (oxygen bearing gas) required to avoid reduction of the oxide coating was investigated. Results at 720 C and 13.8 MPa have shown that: (1) pure hydrogen will reduce the coating; (2) 500 ppm CO (500 ppm water equivalent) does not prevent the reduction; and (3) 500 ppm CO2 (1000 ppm water) appears to be close to the equilibrium level. Further tests are planned to define the equilibrium level more precisely and to extend the data to 820 C and 3.4, 6.9, and 13.8 MPa.

  15. The effect of hydrogen on the parameters of plastic deformation localization in low carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lunev, Aleksey G. E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru; Nadezhkin, Mikhail V. E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru; Shlyakhova, Galina V.; Barannikova, Svetlana A.; Zuev, Lev B.

    2014-11-14

    In the present study, the effect of interstitial hydrogen atoms on the mechanical properties and plastic strain localization patterns in tensile tested polycrystals of low-carbon steel Fe-0.07%C has been studied using double exposure speckle photography technique. The main parameters of plastic flow localization at various stages of deformation hardening have been determined in polycrystals of steel electrolytically saturated with hydrogen in a three-electrode electrochemical cell at a controlled constant cathode potential. Also, the effect of hydrogen on changing of microstructure by using optical microscopy has been demonstrated.

  16. The effect of melanin on iron associated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Pilas, B; Sarna, T; Kalyanaraman, B; Swartz, H M

    1988-01-01

    The effects of melanin on the iron-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to hydroxyl radicals and hydroxyl ions have been studied using electron spin resonance, spin trapping and visible light spectrophotometry. Melanin altered these reactions by several different mechanisms and consequently, depending on conditions, can significantly increase or decrease the yield of reactive products, including hydroxyl radicals. For low concentrations of ferrous ions, melanin decreased the yield of hydroxyl radicals due to binding of ferrous ions by melanin; ferrous ions bound to melanin did not decompose H2O2 efficiently. Melanins increased the rate of hydroxyl radical production if the predominant form of iron was ferric, due to the ability of melanin to reduce ferric to ferrous iron. Hydroxyl radical production in the presence of a strong chelator (e.g. EDTA) and melanin was greater than in the presence of a weak chelator (e.g. ADP) and melanin. Melanin also increased the rate of destruction of the DMPO-OH adduct.

  17. Hydrogenated monolayer graphene with reversible and tunable wide band gap and its field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jangyup; Lee, Soogil; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Byung Cheol; Lee, Han-Koo; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Hong, Jongill

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is currently at the forefront of cutting-edge science and technology due to exceptional electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. However, the absence of a sizeable band gap in graphene has been a major obstacle for application. To open and control a band gap in functionalized graphene, several gapping strategies have been developed. In particular, hydrogen plasma treatment has triggered a great scientific interest, because it has been known to be an efficient way to modify the surface of single-layered graphene and to apply for standard wafer-scale fabrication. Here we show a monolayer chemical-vapour-deposited graphene hydrogenated by indirect hydrogen plasma without structural defect and we demonstrate that a band gap can be tuned as wide as 3.9 eV by varying hydrogen coverage. We also show a hydrogenated graphene field-effect transistor, showing that on/off ratio changes over three orders of magnitude at room temperature. PMID:27830748

  18. Hydrogenated monolayer graphene with reversible and tunable wide band gap and its field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jangyup; Lee, Soogil; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Byung Cheol; Lee, Han-Koo; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Hong, Jongill

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is currently at the forefront of cutting-edge science and technology due to exceptional electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. However, the absence of a sizeable band gap in graphene has been a major obstacle for application. To open and control a band gap in functionalized graphene, several gapping strategies have been developed. In particular, hydrogen plasma treatment has triggered a great scientific interest, because it has been known to be an efficient way to modify the surface of single-layered graphene and to apply for standard wafer-scale fabrication. Here we show a monolayer chemical-vapour-deposited graphene hydrogenated by indirect hydrogen plasma without structural defect and we demonstrate that a band gap can be tuned as wide as 3.9 eV by varying hydrogen coverage. We also show a hydrogenated graphene field-effect transistor, showing that on/off ratio changes over three orders of magnitude at room temperature.

  19. Pressure effect on hydrogen tunneling and vibrational spectrum in α-Mn

    DOE PAGES

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Sadykov, Ravil A.; ...

    2016-10-03

    Here in this paper, the pressure effect on the tunneling mode and vibrational spectra of hydrogen in α-MnH0.07 has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. Applying hydrostatic pressure of up to 30 kbar is shown to shift both the hydrogen optical modes and the tunneling peak to higher energies. First-principles calculations show that the potential for hydrogen in α-Mn becomes overall steeper with increasing pressure. At the same time, the barrier height and its extent in the direction of tunneling decrease and the calculations predict significant changes of the dynamics of hydrogen in α-Mn at 100 kbar, when the estimatedmore » tunneling splitting of the hydrogen ground state exceeds the barrier height.« less

  20. Pressure effect on hydrogen tunneling and vibrational spectrum in α-Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Sadykov, Ravil A.; Antonov, Vladimir E.; Kuzovnikov, Michael; Ehlers, Georg; Granroth, Garrett E

    2016-10-03

    Here in this paper, the pressure effect on the tunneling mode and vibrational spectra of hydrogen in α-MnH0.07 has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. Applying hydrostatic pressure of up to 30 kbar is shown to shift both the hydrogen optical modes and the tunneling peak to higher energies. First-principles calculations show that the potential for hydrogen in α-Mn becomes overall steeper with increasing pressure. At the same time, the barrier height and its extent in the direction of tunneling decrease and the calculations predict significant changes of the dynamics of hydrogen in α-Mn at 100 kbar, when the estimated tunneling splitting of the hydrogen ground state exceeds the barrier height.

  1. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  2. Strength of effective Coulomb interactions and origin of ferromagnetism in hydrogenated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şaşıoǧlu, E.; Hadipour, H.; Friedrich, C.; Blügel, S.; Mertig, I.

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogenation provides a novel way to tune the electronic properties of graphene. Recent scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have demonstrated that local graphene magnetism can be selectively switched on and off by hydrogen (H) dimers. Employing first-principles calculations in conjunction with the constrained random-phase approximation we determine the strength of the effective Coulomb interaction U in hydrogenated graphene. We find that the calculated U parameters are smaller than the ones in graphene and depend on the H concentration. Moreover, the U parameters are very sensitive to the position of H atoms adsorbed on the graphene lattice. We discuss the instability of the paramagnetic state of the hydrogenated graphene towards the ferromagnetic one on the basis of calculated U parameters within the Stoner model. Spin-polarized calculations reveal that the itinerant ferromagnetism in hydrogenated graphene can be well accounted for by the Stoner model.

  3. Hydrogenation-induced edge magnetization in armchair MoS2 nanoribbon and electric field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Fangping; Yang, Zhixiong; Ni, Xiang; Wu, Nannan; Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xiang

    2014-02-01

    We performed density functional theory study on the electronic and magnetic properties of armchair MoS2 nanoribbons (AMoS2NR) with different edge hydrogenation. Although bare and fully passivated AMoS2NRs are nonmagnetic semiconductors, it was found that hydrogenation in certain patterns can induce localized ferromagnetic edge state in AMoS2NRs and make AMoS2NRs become antiferromagnetic semiconductors or ferromagnetic semiconductors. Electric field effects on the bandgap and magnetic moment of AMoS2NRs were investigated. Partial edge hydrogenation can change a small-sized AMoS2NR from semiconductor to metal or semimetal under a moderate transverse electric field. Since the rate of edge hydrogenation can be controlled experimentally via the temperature, pressure and concentration of H2, our results suggest edge hydrogenation is a useful method to engineer the band structure of AMoS2NRs.

  4. Nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya I.

    2015-12-31

    The present work summarizes recent progress in the investigation of nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys foils produced at exceptionally high cooling rates. We focus here on the potential of modification of hydrogen desorption kinetics in respect to weak and strong trapping sites that could serve as hydrogen sinks in Al materials. It is shown that it is important to elucidate the surface microstructure of the Al alloy foils at the submicrometer scale because rapidly solidified microstructural features affect hydrogen trapping at nanostructured defects. We discuss the profound influence of solute atoms on hydrogen−lattice defect interactions in the alloys. with emphasis on role of vacancies in hydrogen evolution; both rapidly solidified pure Al and conventionally processed aluminum samples are considered.

  5. Hydrogen effects in dilute III-N-V alloys: From defect engineering to nanostructuring

    SciTech Connect

    Pettinari, G.; Felici, M.; Capizzi, M.; Polimeni, A.; Trotta, R.

    2014-01-07

    The variation of the band gap energy of III-N-V semiconductors induced by hydrogen incorporation is the most striking effect that H produces in these materials. A special emphasis is given here to the combination of N-activity passivation by hydrogen with H diffusion kinetics in dilute nitrides. Secondary ion mass spectrometry shows an extremely steep (smaller than 5 nm/decade) forefront of the H diffusion profile in Ga(AsN) under appropriate hydrogenation conditions. This discovery prompts the opportunity for an in-plane nanostructuring of hydrogen incorporation and, hence, for a modulation of the material band gap energy at the nanoscale. The properties of quantum dots fabricated by a lithographically defined hydrogenation are presented, showing the zero-dimensional character of these novel nanostructures. Applicative prospects of this nanofabrication method are finally outlined.

  6. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Spectrum and Binding Energy of an Off-Center Hydrogenic Donor in a Spherical Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jian-Hui; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Yin, Miao; Zeng, Qi-Jun; Zhang, Jun-Pei

    2010-08-01

    Off-center impurity effects in a spherical quantum dot are theoretically studied by degenerate perturbation method in strong confinement. The energy levels and binding energies are computed for the typical GaAs material as function of the donor position. The numerical results show the quantum size effect. We note that the energy levels and binding energies are not only related to the position of donor and the strength of confinement, but also related to the fold of degenerate states. We can see obviously that gaps will appear among the degenerate states and the splitting of energy levels and binding energies will appear as the position of the impurity is shifted away off the center.

  7. Autoradiographic analysis of tritiated imipramine binding in the human brain post mortem: effects of suicide

    SciTech Connect

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Israeli, M.; Biegon, A.

    1989-03-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of high-affinity tritiated imipramine binding sites was performed on brains of 12 suicide victims and 12 matched controls. Region-specific differences in imipramine binding were found between the two groups. Thus, the pyramidal and molecular layers of the cornu ammoni hippocampal fields and the hilus of the dentate gyrus exhibited 80%, 60%, and 90% increases in binding in the suicide group, respectively. The postcentral cortical gyrus, insular cortex, and claustrum had 45%, 28%, and 75% decreases in binding in the suicide group, respectively. No difference in imipramine binding was observed in prefrontal cortical regions, in the basal ganglia, and in mesencephalic nuclei. No sex and postmortem delay effects on imipramine binding were found. Imipramine binding was positively correlated with age, the effect of age being most pronounced in portions of the basal ganglia and temporal cortex.

  8. Effects of copper catalytic reactions on the development of supersonic hydrogen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Berry, G.F.

    1992-10-01

    Copper species are present in hydrogen flames in arc heated supersonic ramjet testing facilities. Homogeneous and heterogeneous copper catalytic reactions may affect the flame development by enhancing the recombination of hydrogen atoms. Computer simulation is used to investigate the effects of the catalytic reactions on the reaction and ignition times of the flames. The simulation uses a modified general chemical kinetics computer program to simulate the development of copper-contaminated hydrogen flames under scramjet testing conditions. Reaction times of hydrogen flames are found to be reduced due to the copper catalytic effects, but ignition times are much less sensitive to such effects. The reduction of reaction time depends on copper concentration, particle size (if copper is in the condensed phase), and Mach number (or initial temperature and pressure). As copper concentration increases or the particle size decreases, reaction time decreases. As Mach number increases (or pressure and temperature decrease), the copper catalytic effects are greater.

  9. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-30

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between "static" and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N-. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles.

  10. Effect of surface modification, microstructure, and trapping on hydrogen diffusion coefficients in high strength alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebaraj Johnley Muthuraj, Josiah

    Cathodic protection is widely used for corrosion prevention. However, this process generates hydrogen at the protected metal surface, and diffusion of hydrogen through the metal may cause hydrogen embrittlement or hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking. Thus the choice of a metal for use as fasteners depends upon its hydrogen uptake, permeation, diffusivity and trapping. The diffusivity of hydrogen through four high strength alloys (AISI 4340, alloy 718, alloy 686, and alloy 59) was analyzed by an electrochemical method developed by Devanathan and Stachurski. The effect of plasma nitriding and microstructure on hydrogen permeation through AISI 4340 was studied on six different specimens: as-received (AR) AISI 4340, nitrided samples with and without compound layer, samples quenched and tempered (Q&T) at 320° and 520°C, and nitrided samples Q&T 520°C. Studies on various nitrided specimens demonstrate that both the gamma'-Fe 4N rich compound surface layer and the deeper N diffusion layer that forms during plasma nitriding reduce the effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient, although the gamma'-Fe4N rich compound layer has a larger effect. Multiple permeation transients yield evidence for the presence of only reversible trap sites in as-received, Q&T 320 and 520 AISI 4340 specimens, and the presence of both reversible and irreversible trap sites in nitrided specimens. Moreover, the changes in microstructure during the quenching and tempering process result in a significant decrease in the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen compared to as-received specimens. In addition, density functional theory-based molecular dynamics simulations yield hydrogen diffusion coefficients through gamma'- Fe4N one order of magnitude lower than through α-Fe, which supports the experimental measurements of hydrogen permeation. The effect of microstructure and trapping was also studied in cold rolled, solutionized, and precipitation hardened Inconel 718 foils. The effective hydrogen

  11. Effects of Hydrogen on the Critical Conditions for Dynamic Recrystallization of Titanium Alloy During Hot Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingwei; Ding, Hua; Jiang, Zhengyi; Wei, Dongbin; Linghu, Kezhi

    2014-10-01

    Hot deformation tests were performed to study the flow behavior and microstructural evolution of a Ti600 titanium alloy with different hydrogen contents. The effects of hydrogen on the critical conditions for the initiation of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) were investigated. The DRX kinetics models of hydrogenated Ti600 alloy were developed, and the DRX volume fractions were quantified under different deformation conditions. The results indicate that the addition of proper hydrogen (no greater than 0.3 pct) benefits the decrease of both the critical stress and critical strain for the initiation of DRX. The critical stress and critical strain are dependent linearly on the peak stress and the strain to peak stress, respectively. The strain range from the initiation to the completion of DRX increases gradually with hydrogen in the hydrogen range of 0 to 0.3 pct, and a slightly decreased strain range is observed at the hydrogen content of 0.5 pct relative to that of 0.3 pct. The addition of large amounts of hydrogen (0.3 pct or greater) in Ti600 alloy induces incomplete DRX during hot deformation.

  12. An actin-binding protein, LlLIM1, mediates calcium and hydrogen regulation of actin dynamics in pollen tubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huei-Jing; Wan, Ai-Ru; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2008-08-01

    Actin microfilaments are crucial for polar cell tip growth, and their configurations and dynamics are regulated by the actions of various actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We explored the function of a lily (Lilium longiflorum) pollen-enriched LIM domain-containing protein, LlLIM1, in regulating the actin dynamics in elongating pollen tube. Cytological and biochemical assays verified LlLIM1 functioning as an ABP, promoting filamentous actin (F-actin) bundle assembly and protecting F-actin against latrunculin B-mediated depolymerization. Overexpressed LlLIM1 significantly disturbed pollen tube growth and morphology, with multiple tubes protruding from one pollen grain and coaggregation of FM4-64-labeled vesicles and Golgi apparatuses at the subapex of the tube tip. Moderate expression of LlLIM1 induced an oscillatory formation of asterisk-shaped F-actin aggregates that oscillated with growth period but in different phases at the subapical region. These results suggest that the formation of LlLIM1-mediated overstabilized F-actin bundles interfered with endomembrane trafficking to result in growth retardation. Cosedimentation assays revealed that the binding affinity of LlLIM1 to F-actin was simultaneously regulated by both pH and Ca(2+): LlLIM1 showed a preference for F-actin binding under low pH and low Ca(2+) concentration. The potential functions of LlLIM1 as an ABP sensitive to pH and calcium in integrating endomembrane trafficking, oscillatory pH, and calcium circumstances to regulate tip-focused pollen tube growth are discussed.

  13. Kinetic solvent effects on hydrogen abstraction reactions from carbon by the cumyloxyl radical. The role of hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Salamone, Michela

    2010-08-20

    A kinetic study of the H-atom abstraction reactions from 1,4-cyclohexadiene and triethylamine by the cumyloxyl radical has been carried out in different solvents. Negligible effects are observed with 1,4-cyclohexadiene, whereas with triethylamine a significant decrease in rate constant (k(H)) is observed on going from benzene to MeOH. A good correlation between log k(H) and the solvent hydrogen bond donor parameter alpha is observed, indicative of an H-bonding interaction between the amine lone pair and the solvent.

  14. Computational Investigation of Glycosylation Effects on a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. B.; Talib, M. F.; McCabe, C.; Bu, L.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-27

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are ubiquitous components of glycoside hydrolases, which degrade polysaccharides in nature. CBMs target specific polysaccharides, and CBM binding affinity to cellulose is known to be proportional to cellulase activity, such that increasing binding affinity is an important component of performance improvement. To ascertain the impact of protein and glycan engineering on CBM binding, we use molecular simulation to quantify cellulose binding of a natively glycosylated Family 1 CBM. To validate our approach, we first examine aromatic-carbohydrate interactions on binding, and our predictions are consistent with previous experiments, showing that a tyrosine to tryptophan mutation yields a 2-fold improvement in binding affinity. We then demonstrate that enhanced binding of 3-6-fold over a nonglycosylated CBM is achieved by the addition of a single, native mannose or a mannose dimer, respectively, which has not been considered previously. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a single, artificial glycan on the anterior of the CBM, with the native, posterior glycans also present, can have a dramatic impact on binding affinity in our model, increasing it up to 140-fold relative to the nonglycosylated CBM. These results suggest new directions in protein engineering, in that modifying glycosylation patterns via heterologous expression, manipulation of culture conditions, or introduction of artificial glycosylation sites, can alter CBM binding affinity to carbohydrates and may thus be a general strategy to enhance cellulase performance. Our results also suggest that CBM binding studies should consider the effects of glycosylation on binding and function.

  15. Binding isotope effects as a tool for distinguishing hydrophobic and hydrophilic binding sites of HIV-1 RT.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Agnieszka; Paneth, Piotr; Moliner, Vicent; Świderek, Katarzyna

    2015-01-22

    The current treatment for HIV-1 infected patients consists of a cocktail of inhibitors, in an attempt to improve the potency of the drugs by adding the possible effects of each supplied compound. In this contribution, nine different inhibitors of HIV-1 RT, one of the three key proteins responsible for the virus replication, have been selected to develop and test a computational protocol that allows getting a deep insight into the inhibitors' binding mechanism. The interaction between the inhibitors and the protein have been quantified by computing binding free energies through FEP calculations, while a more detailed characterization of the kind of inhibitor-protein interactions is based on frequency analysis of the ligands in the initial and final state, i.e. in solution and binding the protein. QM/MM calculation of heavy atoms ((13)C, (15)N, and (18)O) binding isotope effects (BIE) have been used to identify the binding sites of the different inhibitors. Specific interactions between the isotopically labeled atoms of the inhibitors and polar residues and magnesium cations on the hydrophilic pocket of the protein are responsible for the frequencies shifting that can be detected when comparing the IR spectra of the compounds in solution and in the protein. On the contrary, it seems that changes in vdW interactions from solution to the final state when the ligand is interacting with residues of the hydrophobic cavity, does not influence frequency modes and then no BIE are observed. Our results suggest that a proper computational protocol can be a valuable tool which in turn can be used to increase the efficiency of anti AIDS drugs.

  16. Effect of pH on the Structure and DNA Binding of the FOXP2 Forkhead Domain.

    PubMed

    Blane, Ashleigh; Fanucchi, Sylvia

    2015-06-30

    Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) is a transcription factor expressed in cardiovascular, intestinal, and neural tissues during embryonic development and is implicated in language development. FOXP2 like other FOX proteins contains a DNA binding domain known as the forkhead domain (FHD). The FHD interacts with DNA by inserting helix 3 into the major groove. One of these DNA-protein interactions is a direct hydrogen bond that is formed with His554. FOXP2 is localized in the nuclear compartment that has a pH of 7.5. Histidine contains an imidazole side chain in which the amino group typically has a pKa of ~6.5. It seems possible that pH fluctuations around 6.5 may result in changes in the protonation state of His554 and thus the ability of the FOXP2 FHD to bind DNA. To investigate the effect of pH on the FHD, both the structure and the binding affinity were studied in the pH range of 5-9. This was done in the presence and absence of DNA. The structure was assessed using size exclusion chromatography, far-UV circular dichroism, and intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence. The results indicated that while pH did not affect the secondary structure in the presence or absence of DNA, the tertiary structure was pH sensitive and the protein was less compact at low pH. Furthermore, the presence of DNA caused the protein to become more compact at low pH and also had the potential to increase the dimerization propensity. Fluorescence anisotropy was used to investigate the effect of pH on the FOXP2 FHD DNA binding affinity. It was found that pH had a direct effect on binding affinity. This was attributed to the altered hydrogen bonding patterns upon protonation or deprotonation of His554. These results could implicate pH as a means of regulating transcription by the FOXP2 FHD, which may also have repercussions for the behavior of this protein in cancer cells.

  17. Chelate effects in sulfate binding by amide/urea-based ligands.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuandong; Wang, Qi-Qiang; Begum, Rowshan Ara; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2015-07-07

    The influence of chelate and mini-chelate effects on sulfate binding was explored for six amide-, amide/amine-, urea-, and urea/amine-based ligands. Two of the urea-based hosts were selective for SO4(2-) in water-mixed DMSO-d6 systems. Results indicated that the mini-chelate effect provided by a single urea group with two NH binding sites appears to provide enhanced binding over two amide groups. Furthermore, additional urea binding sites incorporated into the host framework appeared to overcome to some extent competing hydration effects with increasing water content.

  18. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin Binding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Exprnmantal Trherpeutics Ped in I.SA. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin Binding1 MICHAEL J. MULLIN 2 and... sodium channels. This indirect allosteric mechanism for inhibition of [H]BTX-B binding. effect orethanol was concentration-dependent and was affected...ethanol increased the equilibrium binding constant without af- that ethanol can affect the voltage-sensitive sodium channels in fecting the apparent

  19. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress disrupts calcium binding on calmodulin: More evidence for oxidative stress in vitiligo

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, K.U. . E-mail: k.schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, N.C.J.; Zothner, C.; Abou Elloof, M.M.; Wood, J.M.

    2007-08-17

    Patients with acute vitiligo have low epidermal catalase expression/activities and accumulate 10{sup -3} M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. One consequence of this severe oxidative stress is an altered calcium homeostasis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Here, we show decreased epidermal calmodulin expression in acute vitiligo. Since 10{sup -3}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidises methionine and tryptophan residues in proteins, we examined calcium binding to calmodulin in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} utilising {sup 45}calcium. The results showed that all four calcium atoms exchanged per molecule of calmodulin. Since oxidised calmodulin looses its ability to activate calcium ATPase, enzyme activities were followed in full skin biopsies from lesional skin of patients with acute vitiligo (n = 6) and healthy controls (n = 6). The results yielded a 4-fold decrease of ATPase activities in the patients. Computer simulation of native and oxidised calmodulin confirmed the loss of all four calcium ions from their specific EF-hand domains. Taken together H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation affects calcium binding in calmodulin leading to perturbed calcium homeostasis and perturbed L-phenylalanine-uptake in the epidermis of acute vitiligo.

  20. Hydrogen effects on low-cycle fatigue of the single-crystal nickel-base superalloy CMSX-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollar, M.; Bernstein, I. M.; Kromp, W.; Domnanovitch, A.; Pinczolits, H.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on the low-cycle fatigue behavior of CMSX-2 (001)-oriented single crystals were examined. Fatigue tests were conducted under constant plastic strain amplitude control. Cyclic stress-strain curves and fatigue life data at different plastic strain amplitudes were determined for hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged specimens. Two charging procedures, leading to different hydrogen concentrations, were applied. Hydrogen was found to decrease significantly the number of cycles to failure under the various experimental conditions. The increasing hydrogen concentration and ratio of the hydrogen to nonhydrogen-containing volume were found to shorten fatigue life in hydrogen-charged specimens. Based on the analysis of cyclic stress-strain curves and optical and transmission electron microscopy, it was established that hydrogen enhanced strain localization and promoted crystallographic stage I cracking, leading to embrittlement.

  1. Effect of Hydrogen Plasma on Model Corrosion Layers of Bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fojtíková, P.; Sázavská, V.; Mika, F.; Krčma, F.

    2016-05-01

    Our work is about plasmachemical reduction of model corrosion layers. The model corrosion layers were produced on bronze samples with size of 10 × 10 × 5 mm3, containing Cu and Sn. Concentrated hydrochloric acid was used as a corrosive environment. The application of reduction process in low-pressure low-temperature hydrogen plasma followed. A quartz cylindrical reactor with two outer copper electrodes was used. Plasma discharge was generated in pure hydrogen by a RF generator. Each corroded sample was treated in different conditions (supplied power and a continual or pulsed regime with a variable duty cycle mode). Process monitoring was ensured by optical emission spectroscopy. After treatment, samples were analyzed by SEM and EDX.

  2. Hydrogen effect on remaining life of hydroprocessing reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Iwadate, T.; Nomura, T.; Watanabe, J.

    1988-02-01

    Old vintage 2.25Cr-1Mo steels used for high-temperature/pressure hydroprocessing reactors have a high potential for temper embrittlement. The cracks caused by hydrogen embrittlement (HE) have been experienced in a stainless steel overlay and base metal of hydroprocessing reactors. In this paper, the temper embrittlement behavior during long-term service is discussed using the results of isothermal temper embrittlement tests up to 30,000 h of exposure. HE susceptibility of base metals, i.e., the threshold stress intensity factor K/sub IH/ and hydrogen-assisted crack growth rate behavior are also discussed. Based on the experimental data obtained, the remaining life assessment of a 2.25Cr-1Mo steel hydroprocessing reactor is analyzed from knowledge of HE.

  3. Enthalpy and entropy effects in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Efremenko, Irena; Sheintuch, Moshe

    2005-07-05

    Interaction energies and entropies associated with hydrogen adsorption on the inner and outer surfaces of zigzag single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) of various diameters are analyzed by means of molecular mechanics, density functional theory, and ab initio calculations. For a single molecule the strongest interaction, which is 3.5 greater than that with the planar graphite sheet, is found inside a (8,0) nanotube. Adsorption on the outer surfaces is weaker than that on graphite. Due to the steric considerations, both processes are accompanied by an extremely strong decline in entropy. Absence of specific adsorption sites and weak attractive interaction between hydrogen molecules within carbon nanotubes results in their close packing at low temperatures. Using the calculated geometric and thermodynamic parameters in Langmuir isotherms we predict the adsorption capacity of SWCNTs at room temperature to be smaller than 1 wt % even at 100 bar.

  4. Effect of FGF-binding Protein 3 on Vascular Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wentao; Chen, Yifan; Swift, Matthew R.; Tassi, Elena; Stylianou, Dora C.; Gibby, Krissa A.; Riegel, Anna T.; Wellstein, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-binding protein 1 (FGF-BP1 is BP1) is involved in the regulation of embryonic development, tumor growth, and angiogenesis by mobilizing endogenous FGFs from their extracellular matrix storage. Here we describe a new member of the FGF-BP family, human BP3. We show that the hBP3 protein is secreted from cells, binds to FGF2 in vitro and in intact cells, and inhibits FGF2 binding to heparin. To determine the function of hBP3 in vivo, hBP3 was transiently expressed in chicken embryos and resulted in >50% lethality within 24 h because of vascular leakage. The onset of vascular permeability was monitored by recording the extravasation kinetics of FITC-labeled 40-kDa dextran microperfused into the vitelline vein of 3-day-old embryos. Vascular permeability increased as early as 8 h after expression of hBP3. The increased vascular permeability caused by hBP3 was prevented by treatment of embryos with PD173074, a selective FGFR kinase inhibitor. Interestingly, a C-terminal 66-amino acid fragment (C66) of hBP3, which contains the predicted FGF binding domain, still inhibited binding of FGF2 to heparin similar to full-length hBP3. However, expression of the C66 fragment did not increase vascular permeability on its own, but required the administration of exogenous FGF2 protein. We conclude that the FGF binding domain and the heparin binding domain are necessary for the hBP3 interaction with endogenous FGF and the activation of FGFR signaling in vivo. PMID:18669637

  5. Substituent effects on hydrogen bonding of aromatic amide-carboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ibrahim; Kara, Hulya; Azizoglu, Akın

    2016-10-01

    N-(p-benzoyl)-anthranilic acid (BAA) derivatives have been synthesized with different substituents (X: Br, Cl, OCH3, CH3), and their crystal structures have been analyzed in order to understand the variations in their molecular geometries with respect to the substituents by using 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in a centrosymmetric R22(8) ring motifs for BAA-Br and BAA-Cl. However, no carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in BAA-OCH3 and BAA-CH3. The asymmetric unit consists of two crystallographically independent molecules in BAA-OCH3. DFT computations show that the interaction energies between monomer and dimer are in the range of 0.5-3.8 kcal/mol with the B3LYP/6-31 + G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G**, and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The presence of different hydrogen bond patterns is also governed by the substrate. For monomeric compounds studied herein, theoretical calculations lead to two low-energy conformers; trans (a) and cis (b). Former one is more stable than latter by about 4 kcal/mol.

  6. Substituent effects on hydrogen bonding of aromatic amide-carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ibrahim; Kara, Hulya; Azizoglu, Akın

    2016-10-05

    N-(p-benzoyl)-anthranilic acid (BAA) derivatives have been synthesized with different substituents (X: Br, Cl, OCH3, CH3), and their crystal structures have been analyzed in order to understand the variations in their molecular geometries with respect to the substituents by using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The carboxylic acid group forms classic OH⋯O hydrogen bonded dimers in a centrosymmetric R2(2)(8) ring motifs for BAA-Br and BAA-Cl. However, no carboxylic acid group forms classic OH⋯O hydrogen bonded dimers in BAA-OCH3 and BAA-CH3. The asymmetric unit consists of two crystallographically independent molecules in BAA-OCH3. DFT computations show that the interaction energies between monomer and dimer are in the range of 0.5-3.8kcal/mol with the B3LYP/6-31+G*, B3LYP/6-31++G*, B3LYP/6-31++G**, and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The presence of different hydrogen bond patterns is also governed by the substrate. For monomeric compounds studied herein, theoretical calculations lead to two low-energy conformers; trans (a) and cis (b). Former one is more stable than latter by about 4kcal/mol.

  7. The self limiting effect of hydrogen cluster in gas jet under liquid nitrogen temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Han Jifeng; Yang Chaowen; Miao Jingwei; Fu Pengtao; Luo Xiaobing; Shi Miangong

    2010-09-15

    The generation of hydrogen clusters in gas jet is tested using the Rayleigh scattering method under liquid nitrogen temperature of 79 K. The self limiting effect of hydrogen cluster is studied and it is found that the cluster formation is greatly affected by the number of expanded molecules. The well designed liquid nitrogen cold trap ensured that the hydrogen cluster would keep maximum size for maximum 15 ms during one gas jet. The scattered light intensity exhibits a power scaling on the backing pressure ranging from 5 to 48 bar with the power value of 4.1.

  8. Effects of helium and hydrogen on radiation-induced microstructural changes in austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Ko, Eunsol; Lim, Sangyeop; Kwon, Junhyun

    2015-09-01

    Microstructural changes in austenitic stainless steel by helium, hydrogen, and iron ion irradiation were investigated with transmission electron microscopy. Typical radiation-induced changes, such as the formation of Frank loops in the matrix and radiation-induced segregation (RIS) or depletion at grain boundaries, were observed after ion irradiation. The helium ion irradiation led to the formation of cavities both at grain boundaries and in the matrix, as well as the development of smaller Frank loops. The hydrogen ion irradiation generated stronger RIS behavior at the grain boundaries compared to irradiation with helium and iron ions. The effects of helium and hydrogen on radiation-induced microstructural changes were discussed.

  9. Hydrogen therapy may be an effective and specific novel treatment for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Cui, Jianguo; Sun, Quan; Cai, Jianming

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant chemical element in the universe, however, it is seldom regarded as a therapeutic gas. Recent studies show that inhaled hydrogen gas (H(2)) has antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities that protect the brain against ischemia-reperfusion injury and stroke by selectively reducing hydroxyl and peroxynitrite radicals. It is also well known that more than a half of the ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage is caused by hydroxyl radicals. Studies have show that reducing hydroxyl radicals can significantly improve the protection of cells from radiation damage. In like manner, we hypothesize that hydrogen therapy may be an effective, specific and unique treatment for acute radiation syndrome.

  10. Binding energy effects in cascade evolution and sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    The MARLOWE model was extended to include a binding energy dependent on the local crystalline order, so that atoms are bound less strongly to their lattice sites near surfaces or associated damage. Sputtering and cascade evolution were studied on the examples of self-ion irradiations of Cu and Au monocrystals. In cascades, the mean binding energy is reduced {approximately}8% in Cu with little dependence on the initial recoil energy; in Au, it is reduced {approximately}9% at 1 keV and {approximately}15% at 100 keV. In sputtering, the mean binding energy is reduced {approximately}8% in Cu and {approximately}15% in Au with little energy dependence; the yields are increased about half as much. Most sites from which sputtered atoms originate are isolated in both metals. Small clusters of such sites occur in Cu, but there are some large clusters in Au, especially in [111] targets. There are always more large clusters with damage-dependent binding than with a constant binding energy, but only a few clusters are compact enough to be regarded as pits.

  11. 43 CFR 1810.3 - Effect of laches; authority to bind government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Effect of laches; authority to bind... GUIDANCE General Rules § 1810.3 Effect of laches; authority to bind government. (a) The authority of the... agents when they enter into an arrangement or agreement to do or cause to be done what the law does...

  12. Quasiparticle energies and excitonic effects in dense solid hydrogen near metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Marc; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Wu, Zhigang

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the crucial metallization pressure of the Cmca-12 phase of solid hydrogen (H) using many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation. We consider the effects of self-consistency, plasmon-pole models, and the vertex correction on the quasiparticle band gap (Eg). Our calculations show that self-consistency leads to an increase in Eg by 0.33 eV over the one-shot G0W0 approach. Because of error cancellation between the effects of self-consistency and the vertex correction, the simplest G0W0 method underestimates Eg by only 0.16 eV compared with the prediction of the more accurate GWΓ approach. Employing the plasmon-pole models underestimates Eg by 0.1-0.2 eV compared to the full-frequency numerical integration results. We thus predict a metallization pressure around 280 GPa, instead of 260 GPa predicted previously. Furthermore, we compute the optical absorption including the electron-hole interaction by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). The resulting absorption spectra demonstrate substantial redshifts and enhancement of absorption peaks compared to the calculated spectra neglecting excitonic effects. We find that the exciton binding energy decreases with increasing pressure from 66 meV at 100 GPa to 12 meV at 200 GPa due to the enhanced electronic screening as solid H approaches metallization. Because optical measurements are so important in identifying the structure of solid H, our BSE results should improve agreement between theory and experiment.

  13. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effect of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed. Additional research is required to determine whether hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement are similar or distinct types of embrittlement.

  14. An atomistic study of the effects of stress and hydrogen on a dislocation lock in nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Hoagland, R.G.; Baskes, M.I.

    1998-03-19

    Even though austenitic alloys are commonly used in a hydrogen environment, hydrogen-induced fracture of these alloys has been reported. Most recently it has been shown that the failure of these alloys in hydrogen is initiated by void formation at slip band intersections. It is the object of this work to investigate the atomistic mechanisms that occur at these slip band intersections in the presence of hydrogen. Specifically it has been suggested that dislocation-dislocation interactions may play a large role in the initiation of voids or cracks. Hirth has summarized the various forms of dislocation interactions, traditionally called Lomer-Cottrell Locks (LCLs), that can occur. Baskes et al. have investigated the effects of stress on a LCL using an Embedded Atom Method (EAM) model for nickel developed previously by Angelo et al. The EAM is a well-established semi-empirical method of atomistic calculation that has been successfully used for over a decade to calculate the energetics and structure of defects in transition metals. The work by Angelo et al. established that the trapping of hydrogen to single dislocations had a maximum energy of ca. 0.1 eV while the trapping to a LCL was significantly greater, {approximately}0.33 eV, thus the authors expect that a LCL could be important in explaining the fracture behavior of a fcc material in a hydrogen environment. Baskes et al. found that under uniaxial stress a LCL in the absence of hydrogen underwent a number of transitions, but it did not dissociate or form a crack nucleus. In this work the authors extend the previous work to include the effects of hydrogen. Specifically they will simulate the experiments of Moody et al. for the case of room temperature exposure of Inconel to 190 atm of hydrogen.

  15. On the effect of nuclear motion on chemical binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnert, A.

    1985-05-01

    The surfaces defined by Berlin (1951) to characterize the role of intramolecular forces in chemical binding are obtained analytically for the case in which the atomic nuclei are in motion. The generalized equation for the force function is derived from the hypervirial theorem rather than by the method of coordinate scaling as reported by Garcia-Sucre et al. (1984). Numerical results for the lowest vibrational level of the ground state of the H2 molecule are presented in a graph, and the inclusion of nuclear motion is shown to reduce the volume of the spatial 'binding region' and hence to localize the bond and reduce the degree of binding (relative to the fixed-nucleus model).

  16. Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Tolley, George S.; Jones, Donald W. Mintz, Marianne M.; Smith, Barton A.; Carlson, Eric; Unnasch, Stefan; Lawrence, Michael; Chmelynski, Harry

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy report, Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States Report to Congress, estimates the effects on employment of a U.S. economy transformation to hydrogen between 2020 and 2050. The report includes study results on employment impacts from hydrogen market expansion in the transportation, stationary, and portable power sectors and highlights possible skill and education needs. This study is in response to Section 1820 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) (EPACT). Section 1820, “Overall Employment in a Hydrogen Economy,” requires the Secretary of Energy to carry out a study of the effects of a transition to a hydrogen economy on several employment [types] in the United States. As required by Section 1820, the present report considers: • Replacement effects of new goods and services • International competition • Workforce training requirements • Multiple possible fuel cycles, including usage of raw materials • Rates of market penetration of technologies • Regional variations based on geography • Specific recommendations of the study Both the Administration’s National Energy Policy and the Department’s Strategic Plan call for reducing U.S. reliance on imported oil and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The National Energy Policy also acknowledges the need to increase energy supplies and use more energy-efficient technologies and practices. President Bush proposed in his January 2003 State of the Union Address to advance research on hydrogen so that it has the potential to play a major role in America’s future energy system. Consistent with these aims, EPACT 2005 authorizes a research, development, and demonstration program for hydrogen and fuel cell technology. Projected results for the national employment impacts, projections of the job creation and job replacement underlying the total employment changes, training implications, regional employment impacts and the

  17. A Preorganized Hydrogen Bond Network and Its Effect on Anion Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, Masoud; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2014-08-07

    Rigid tricyclic locked in all axial 1,3,5-cyclohexanetriol derivatives with 0–3 trifluoromethyl groups were synthesized and photoelectron spectra of their conjugate bases and chloride anion clusters are reported along with density functional computations. The resulting vertical and adiabatic detachment energies provide measures of the anion stabilization due to the hydrogen bond network and inductive effects. The latter mechanism is found to be transmitted through space via hydrogen bonds

  18. Effect of mutational alteration of Asn-128 in the putative GTP-binding domain of tetracycline resistance determinant Tet(O) from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, J; Manavathu, E K; Taylor, D E

    1993-01-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence of Campylobacter jejuni Tet(O), cloned in Escherichia coli, has shown that it contains the five highly conserved sequences of the GTP-binding domain found in other GTPases. Asn-128 belongs to the G4 motif of such a domain and is involved in hydrogen bonding with the guanine ring of the nucleotide. Substitution of Asn-128 by 11 other amino acids resulted in a decrease in tetracycline resistance, indicating that tetracycline resistance conferred by Tet(O) is related to GTP binding. The effect of the mutations on the GTP-binding domain is discussed with the EF-Tu-GDP complex as a model. PMID:8109930

  19. Effect of acceptor heteroatoms on π-hydrogen bonding interactions: A study of indoleṡṡṡthiophene heterodimer in a supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumit; Das, Aloke

    2012-09-01

    Resonant two photon ionization (R2PI), IR-UV, and UV-UV double resonance spectroscopic techniques combined with quantum chemistry calculations have been used to determine the structure of indoleṡṡṡthiophene dimer observed in a supersonic jet. With the help of combined experimental and theoretical IR spectra it has been found that the observed dimer has a N-Hṡṡṡπ hydrogen bonded slanted T-shaped structure. The present study demonstrates the effect of heteroatoms present in the acceptors on the strength of the π-hydrogen bonding interactions. It was concluded by Sherrill and co-workers from their theoretical study of benzeneṡṡṡpyridine dimer that aromatic rings containing heteroatoms are poorest π-hydrogen bond acceptors [E. G. Hohenstein and C. D. Sherrill, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 878 (2009), 10.1021/jp809062x]. But the current spectroscopic investigation exhibits that five membered aromatic heterocycles are favorable π-hydrogen bond acceptors. In this study, it has also been shown that thiophene is a better π-hydrogen bond acceptor than furan. The present work has immense biological significance as indole is the chromophore of tryptophan residue in the proteins and thiophene derivatives have potential therapeutic applications. Thus, understanding the binding motif between indole and thiophene in the heterodimer studied in this work may help in designing efficient drugs.

  20. Effect of acceptor heteroatoms on π-hydrogen bonding interactions: a study of indole···thiophene heterodimer in a supersonic jet.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Das, Aloke

    2012-09-07

    Resonant two photon ionization (R2PI), IR-UV, and UV-UV double resonance spectroscopic techniques combined with quantum chemistry calculations have been used to determine the structure of indole···thiophene dimer observed in a supersonic jet. With the help of combined experimental and theoretical IR spectra it has been found that the observed dimer has a N-H···π hydrogen bonded slanted T-shaped structure. The present study demonstrates the effect of heteroatoms present in the acceptors on the strength of the π-hydrogen bonding interactions. It was concluded by Sherrill and co-workers from their theoretical study of benzene···pyridine dimer that aromatic rings containing heteroatoms are poorest π-hydrogen bond acceptors [E. G. Hohenstein and C. D. Sherrill, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 878 (2009)]. But the current spectroscopic investigation exhibits that five membered aromatic heterocycles are favorable π-hydrogen bond acceptors. In this study, it has also been shown that thiophene is a better π-hydrogen bond acceptor than furan. The present work has immense biological significance as indole is the chromophore of tryptophan residue in the proteins and thiophene derivatives have potential therapeutic applications. Thus, understanding the binding motif between indole and thiophene in the heterodimer studied in this work may help in designing efficient drugs.

  1. Effects of edge hydrogenation on structural stability, electronic, and magnetic properties of WS2 nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Fangping; Ni, Xiang; Yang, Zhixiong; Chen, Yu; Zheng, Xiaojuan; Xiong, Xiang

    2013-12-01

    Using density functional theory based first-principles, we have investigated the structural stability, electronic, and magnetic properties of tungsten disulfide nanoribbons (WS2NRs). When the edges are bare, Zigzag-edge WS2 nanoribbons (ZWS2NRs) and Armchair-edge WS2 nanoribbons (AWS2NRs) are ferromagnetic metal and nonmagnetic semiconductor, respectively. After edge hydrogenation, WS2NRs exhibit different structural stabilities and electronic structures according the patterns of edge hydrogenation. Hydrogenated ZWS2NRs keep ferromagnetic and metallic while AWS2NRs convert from nonmagnetic to magnetic when at least one edge is partially hydrogenated. The transition of AWS2NRs is contributed to the unpaired valence electrons. With the change of nanoribbon width n, magnetic moment of edge fully hydrogenated ZWS2NRs shows nearly periodical variation, the band gap of bare AWS2NRs oscillates like three distinct families and owing to the ever-present edge effect it converges to 0.5 eV as n increases. Compared with bare AWS2NRs, edge fully hydrogenated AWS2NRs have the same scaling rule of band-gap variation when n ≤12, while the band gap oscillates up and down when n > 12 because of the more obvious edge asymmetric effect than quantum confinement effect. These findings are essential for applications of WS2NRs in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  2. Effect of hydrogen on cathodic corrosion of titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, K.W.; Jin, J.W.; Qiao, L.J.; Chu, W.Y.; Hsiao, C.M.

    1996-01-01

    Cathodic corrosion of titanium aluminide (TiAl) during hydrogen charging in various acidic aqueous solutions and in molten salt at 160 C was studied. At constant potential, the rate of cathodic corrosion (V) was much higher than during anodic dissolution, and V increased linearly with increasing current. V was 10 times higher in the acid solution than in the salt solution under the same current. Disruption of the surface film by local hydride formation during cathodic polarization was shown to be the key step.

  3. Electronic and Steric Effects in Binding of Deep Cavitands

    PubMed Central

    Hooley, Richard J.; Shenoy, Siddhartha R.; Rebek, Julius

    2009-01-01

    A deep, self-folding cavitand responds to minor electronic differences between suitably sized adamantane guests. Binding constants range from <0.5 to 4000 M-1 for guests as similar as 1-bromoadamantane and 1-cyanoadamantane. The barriers to guest exchange also vary up to 3 kcal mol-1. PMID:18989966

  4. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture of alloy x-750

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Douglas M.; Thompson, Anthony W.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the fracture of a nickel-base superalloy, alloy X-750, was investigated in the HTH condition. The effect of hydrogen was examined through tensile testing incorporating observations from scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. The ductility at 25 °C, as measured by elongation to failure for tensile specimens, was reduced from 21 pct for noncharged specimens to 7.3 pct for 5.7 ppm hydrogen and to 3.5 pct for 65 ppm hydrogen. The elongation to failure was a function of the strain rate and test temperature. For hydrogen-charged specimens, the elongation decreased as the strain rate decreased at a constant temperature, while for a constant strain rate and varying temperature, there was a maximum in embrittlement near 25 °C and no embrittlement at -196 °C. For the noncharged specimens, the elongation monotonically increased as temperature increased, while there was no noticeable effect of strain rate. Prestraining prior to charging dramatically decreased elongation after hydrogen charging. When the strain rate was increased on the prestrained specimens, more plastic deformation was observed prior to failure. Failure did not occur until the flow stress was reached, supporting the proposition that plasticity is required for failure. The intergranular failure mechanism in alloy X-750 was a microvoid initiation process at grain boundary carbides followed by void growth and coalescence. The void initiation strain, as determined from tensile data and from sectioning unfractured specimens, was observed to be much lower in the hydrogen-charged specimens as compared to noncharged specimens. The reduced ductility may be explained by either a reduction of the interfacial strength of the carbide-matrix interface or a local hydrogen pressure at the carbide-matrix interface.

  5. Prooxidative effect of copper--metallothionein in the acute cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Suntres, Zacharias E; Lui, Edmund M K

    2006-01-16

    This study was concerned with the role of copper (Cu) and Cu-metallothionein (Cu-MT) in oxidative stress. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced oxidative injury was examined in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells isolated from host mice pretreated with 0, 1 or 2mg of CuSO(4) (ip) 24h earlier. Control Ehrlich cells contained low levels of Cu and Cu treatment produced dose-related increases in cellular Cu and Cu-MT levels and corresponding increases in sensitivity to oxidative toxicity of H(2)O(2) (LC(50), cell blebbing, lipid peroxidation, GSH depletion, and increase in intracellular free [Ca(2+)](i)). Hydrogen peroxide treatment also resulted in the oxidation of MT thiolates, reduction in the binding of Cu to MT resulting in translocation of Cu to other subcellular sites. d-penicillamine, a Cu-chelating agent, obliterated the sensitization effect of Cu-pretreatment and reduced the redistribution of MT-bound Cu, suggesting the participation of Cu ions derived from MT in promoting oxidant stress. Additional experiments with desferoxamine and mannitol have revealed the involvement of a Cu-dependent Fenton reaction in the mediation of the prooxidative effect of Cu-MT. These data suggest that cells with high levels of Cu-MT may be particularly susceptible to oxidative stress.

  6. Effects of Varying the Three-Body Molecular Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, Matthew J.; Clark, Paul; Glover, S.C.O.; Greif, T.H.; Abel, Tom; Klessen, Ralf; Bromm, Volker; /Texas U., Astron. Dept.

    2011-03-03

    The transformation of atomic hydrogen to molecular hydrogen through three-body reactions is a crucial stage in the collapse of primordial, metal-free halos, where the first generation of stars (Population III stars) in the Universe are formed. However, in the published literature, the rate coefficient for this reaction is uncertain by nearly an order of magnitude. We report on the results of both adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the collapse of metal-free halos as a function of the value of this rate coefficient. For each simulation method, we have simulated a single halo three times, using three different values of the rate coefficient. We find that while variation between halo realizations may be greater than that caused by the three-body rate coefficient being used, both the accretion physics onto Population III protostars as well as the long-term stability of the disk and any potential fragmentation may depend strongly on this rate coefficient.

  7. Pressure and size effects in endohedrally confined hydrogen clusters.

    PubMed

    Soullard, Jacques; Santamaria, Ruben; Jellinek, Julius

    2008-02-14

    Density functional theory is used to carry out a systematic study of zero-temperature structural and energy properties of endohedrally confined hydrogen clusters as a function of pressure and the cluster size. At low pressures, the most stable structural forms of (H(2))(n) possess rotational symmetry that changes from C(4) through C(5) to C(6) as the cluster grows in size from n=8 through n=12 to n=15. The equilibrium configurational energy of the clusters increases with an increase of the pressure. The rate of this increase, however, as gauged on the per atom basis is different for different clusters sizes. As a consequence, the size dependencies of the configurational energies per atom at different fixed values of pressure are nonmonotonic functions. At high pressures, the molecular (H(2))(n) clusters gradually become atomic or dominantly atomic. The pressure-induced changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap of the clusters indicate a finite-size analog of the pressure-driven metallization of the bulk hydrogen. The ionization potentials of the clusters decrease with the increase of pressure on them.

  8. The effect of structural and energetic parameters of MOFs and COFs towards the improvement of their hydrogen storage properties.

    PubMed

    Tylianakis, Emmanuel; Klontzas, Emmanouel; Froudakis, George E

    2009-05-20

    Open-framework materials have been proposed as potential materials for hydrogen storage. Metal-organic framework (MOF) and covalent-organic framework (COF) materials are under extensive study to discover their storage abilities. In particular the IRMOF family of materials have been considered as ideal to study the effect of different factors that affect the hydrogen storage capacity. In this paper, we analyse the effect of different factors such as surface area, pore volume and the interaction of hydrogen with the molecular framework on the hydrogen uptake of such materials. Through this analysis we propose guidelines to enhance hydrogen storage capacity of already synthesized materials and recommend advanced materials for this application.

  9. The effect of tensile stress on hydrogen diffusion in metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of tensile stress on hydrogen diffusion has been determined for Type 303 stainless steel, A286 CRES, and Waspaloy and IN100 nickel-base alloys. It was found that hydrogen diffusion coefficients are not significantly affected by stress, while the hydrogen permeabilities are greatly affected in Type 303 stainless steel and A286 CRES (iron-based alloys), but are affected little in Waspaloy (nickel-base) and not affected in all in IN100 (nickel base). These observations might be taken as an indication that hydrogen permeabilities are affected by stress in iron-based alloys, but only slightly affected in nickel-based alloys. However, it is too early to make such a generalization based on the study of only these four alloys.

  10. Effects of microstructure banding on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth in X65 pipeline steels

    DOE PAGES

    Ronevich, Joseph A.; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Chris W.

    2015-09-10

    Banded ferrite-pearlite X65 pipeline steel was tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to evaluate the effects of oriented pearlite on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth. Test specimens were oriented in the steel pipe such that cracks propagated either parallel or perpendicular to the banded pearlite. The ferrite-pearlite microstructure exhibited orientation dependent behavior in which fatigue crack growth rates were significantly lower for cracks oriented perpendicular to the banded pearlite compared to cracks oriented parallel to the bands. Thus the reduction of hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth across the banded pearlite is attributed to a combination of crack-tip branching and impededmore » hydrogen diffusion across the banded pearlite.« less

  11. Effect of hydrogen peroxide treatment on the properties of wool fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Shen, Xiaolin; Xu, Weilin

    2012-10-01

    In this study, hydrogen peroxide treatment was applied to improve the surface wettability, moisture transfer properties and other related properties of wool fabric. SEM images showed the tip of wool scale was smoothened and parts of the scale were peeled off after hydrogen peroxide treatment. The time for a water droplet to sink into the fabric could decrease to less than 1 s and the wicking properties of wool fabrics were dramatically improved after hydrogen peroxide treatment. Shrinkage and whiteness of the fabric were improved due to the modification of scale and the bleaching effect of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The fabrics became weaker and ductile with less than 4% weight loss. This study would benefit further application of wool fiber in summer clothing in which the surface wettability and moisture transfer properties are essential and determinative.

  12. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B. Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-28

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  13. Effect of cashew nut shell liquid on metabolic hydrogen flow on bovine rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Enishi, Osamu; Shinkai, Takumi; Higuchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Takenaka, Akio; Nagashima, Kyo; Mochizuki, Masami; Kobayashi, Yasuo

    2014-03-01

    Effect of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), a methane inhibitor, on bovine rumen fermentation was investigated through analysis of the metabolic hydrogen flow estimated from concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and methane. Three cows were fed a concentrate and hay diet without or with a CNSL-containing pellet. Two trials were conducted using CNSL pellets blended with only silica (trial 1) or with several other ingredients (trial 2). Methane production was measured in a respiration chamber system, and energy balance and nutrient digestibility were monitored. The estimated flow of metabolic hydrogen demonstrated that a part of metabolic hydrogen was used for hydrogen gas production, and a large amount of it flowed into production of methane and SCFA in both trial 1 and 2, when CNSL was administered to the bovine rumen. The results obtained by regression analyses showed that the effect of CNSL supply on methane reduction was coupled with a significant (P < 0.01) decrease of acetate and a significant (P < 0.01) increase of propionate and hydrogen gas. These findings reveal that CNSL is able to reduce methane and acetate production, and to increase hydrogen gas and propionate production in vivo.

  14. Modeling of hydrogen effect on the superelastic behavior of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachiguer, Amani; Bouby, Céline; Gamaoun, Fehmi; Bouraoui, Tarak; Ben Zineb, Tarak

    2016-11-01

    Superelastic NiTi wires are widely used in orthodontic treatments, but sometimes fracture can be observed after few months of use in buccal cavity and attributed to the degradation of NiTi mechanical properties due to hydrogen absorption. In this paper, a modeling approach is proposed in order to describe the effect of hydrogen diffusion on the transformation properties of NiTi SMAs. In order to experimentally predict such effects, cathodic hydrogen charging was performed at a current density of 10 A/{m}2 for 6h, 24h, 48h and 72h in 0.9% NaCl aqueous solution at room temperature. Tensile tests were carried out shortly after hydrogen charging. The obtained stress-strain curves showed an increase of yield transformation stresses for forward and reverse martensitic transformations and a decrease of maximum transformation strain. Using Fick’s second law, the transformation temperatures variation can be expressed as a function of the mean concentration of absorbed hydrogen and then taked into account in the SMA constitutive model developed by Chemisky et al (2011). The numerical results are compared to the experimental ones to calibrate the proposed method. Simulations showed that hydrogen diffusion induces a shifting of transfomation temperatures, a decreasing of maximum transformation strain and an increasing of yield transfomation stresses.

  15. Analysis of Agonist and Antagonist Effects on Thyroid Hormone Receptor Conformation by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, A. C. M.; Saidemberg, D. M.; Souza, P. C. T.; Martínez, L.; Scanlan, T. S.; Baxter, J. D.; Skaf, M. S.; Palma, M. S.; Webb, P.; Polikarpov, I.

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are ligand-gated transcription factors with critical roles in development and metabolism. Although x-ray structures of TR ligand-binding domains (LBDs) with agonists are available, comparable structures without ligand (apo-TR) or with antagonists are not. It remains important to understand apo-LBD conformation and the way that it rearranges with ligands to develop better TR pharmaceuticals. In this study, we conducted hydrogen/deuterium exchange on TR LBDs with or without agonist (T3) or antagonist (NH3). Both ligands reduce deuterium incorporation into LBD amide hydrogens, implying tighter overall folding of the domain. As predicted, mass spectroscopic analysis of individual proteolytic peptides after hydrogen/deuterium exchange reveals that ligand increases the degree of solvent protection of regions close to the buried ligand-binding pocket. However, there is also extensive ligand protection of other regions, including the dimer surface at H10–H11, providing evidence for allosteric communication between the ligand-binding pocket and distant interaction surfaces. Surprisingly, C-terminal activation helix H12, which is known to alter position with ligand, remains relatively protected from solvent in all conditions suggesting that it is packed against the LBD irrespective of the presence or type of ligand. T3, but not NH3, increases accessibility of the upper part of H3–H5 to solvent, and we propose that TR H12 interacts with this region in apo-TR and that this interaction is blocked by T3 but not NH3. We present data from site-directed mutagenesis experiments and molecular dynamics simulations that lend support to this structural model of apo-TR and its ligand-dependent conformational changes. PMID:21106879

  16. The effect of chronic ethanol on glutamate binding in human and rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, J.T.; Sack, M.; von Hungen, K. Univ. of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles )

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic techniques demonstrate that chronic alcohol administration causes a decrease in ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding to hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. A 14% decrease in ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding in the hippocampal CA{sub 1} region is seen both in the rat after five days of ethanol administration and in postmortem hippocampal tissues from alcoholics. In the rat, 24 hr ethanol withdrawal values are intermediate between control and alcohol binding levels. There was no significant effect of ethanol on ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding in the cortex or caudate.

  17. Effect of halide and acid additives on the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide using supported gold-palladium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ntainjua N, Edwin; Piccinini, Marco; Pritchard, James C; Edwards, Jennifer K; Carley, Albert F; Moulijn, Jacob A; Hutchings, Graham J

    2009-01-01

    The effect of halide and acid addition on the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide is studied for magnesium oxide- and carbon-supported bimetallic gold-palladium catalysts. The addition of acids decreases the hydrogenation/decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, and the effect is particularly pronounced for the magnesium oxide-supported catalysts whilst for carbon-supported catalysts the pH requires close control to optimize hydrogen peroxide synthesis. The addition of bromide leads to a marked decrease in the hydrogenation/decomposition of hydrogen peroxide with either catalyst. These effects are discussed in terms of the structure of the gold-palladium alloy nanoparticles and the isoelectric point of the support. We conclude that with the highly active carbon-supported gold-palladium catalysts these additives are not required and that therefore this system presents the potential for the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide to be operated using green process technology.

  18. Hydrogen abstraction from cyclic amines by the cumyloxyl and benzyloxyl radicals. The role of stereoelectronic effects and of substrate/radical hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Martella, Roberto; Bietti, Massimo

    2012-10-05

    A kinetic study on the hydrogen abstraction reactions from cyclic amines and diamines (pyrrolidines, piperidines, morpholines, and piperazines) by the cumyloxyl (CumO(•)) and benzyloxyl (BnO(•)) radicals was carried out. The reactions with CumO(•) were described in all cases as direct hydrogen abstractions. The differences in the hydrogen abstraction rate constant (k(H)) were explained in terms of the different number of abstractable hydrogen atoms, the operation of stereoelectronic effects, and, with the morpholines, on the basis of polar effects. Significantly higher k(H) values were measured for the reactions of the amines with BnO(•). This behavior was explained on the basis of a mechanism that proceeds through the rate-determining formation of a hydrogen bonded pre-reaction complex between the radical α-C-H and the nitrogen lone pair followed by hydrogen abstraction within the complex. A decrease in k(H) was observed going from secondary to tertiary amines and, with tertiary amines, on increasing steric hindrance at nitrogen, pointing toward the important role of steric and electronic effects on pre-reaction complex formation. These results expand previous findings contributing to a detailed mechanistic description of the reactions of alkoxyl radicals with amines, showing that structural effects in both the substrate and the radical can play a dramatic role and providing new information on the role of substrate/radical interactions on these processes.

  19. Excitonic Effects and the Optical Absorption Spectrum of Hydrogenated Si Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, M.; Louie, S.G. |

    1998-04-01

    We calculate the optical absorption spectrum of hydrogen-terminated silicon clusters by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the two-particle Green{close_quote}s function using an {ital ab initio} approach. The one-particle Green{close_quote}s function and the electron-hole interaction kernel are calculated within the GW approximation for the electron self-energy operator. Very large exciton binding energies are observed. Our results for the one-particle properties and the optical absorption spectra of the clusters are in very good agreement with available experimental data. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Hydrogen bonding and vapor pressure isotope effect of deuterioisomeric methanethiols

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, H.; Szydlowski, J.; Dill-Staffenberger, L.

    1981-04-16

    Wilson parameters, activity coefficients, association constants, and other thermodynamic functions which are derived from isothermal vapor pressure measurements between 223 and 293 K for binary mixtures of CH/sub 3/SH, CH/sub 3/SD, CS/sub 3/SH, and CD/sub 3/SD with n-hexane show the weakness of the hydrogen and the deuterium bonds of methanethiol. As far as these functions depend on the association model used for the calculation, the relation of their values to those obtained for the corresponding amines and alcohols under the same conditions attests the weak methanethiol association. While for the more strongly associated methylamines and methanols a greater energy of the deuterium bond compared to the hydrogen bond has clearly been observed, the differences between the thermodynamic functions of the systems with the SH compounds and of those with the SD compounds are insignificant. This observation as well as the fact that the vapor pressure ratios P-(CH/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH) are only slightly greater than unity, that the ratios P(CD/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH) are even greater than P(CD/sub 3/SH)/P(CH/sub 3/SH), and that the changes of these ratios with temperature and dilution are small in comparison to the strong increase of the corresponding quotients of the methylamines and the methanols are the consequence of the weak methanethiol association. P(CH/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH), P(CD/sub 3/SH)/P(CH/sub 3/SH), and P(CD/sub 3/SD)/P(CH/sub 3/SH) are represented by equations of the type ln P/sub D/ P/sub H/ = -A/T/sup 2/ + B/T where A and B are nearly additive. The low values of A and B for CH/sub 3/SD/CH/sub 3/SH in comparison to the high values for CH/sub 3/ND/sub 2//CH/sub 3/NH/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/OD/CH/sub 3/OH reflect the weakness of the methanethiol hydrogen bonds. The constants can be related to the thermochemical and the spectroscopic data reported in the literature.

  1. Bose polaron problem: Effect of mass imbalance on binding energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardila, L. A. Peña; Giorgini, S.

    2016-12-01

    By means of quantum Monte Carlo methods we calculate the binding energy of an impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate at T =0 . The focus is on the attractive branch of the Bose polaron and on the role played by the mass imbalance between the impurity and the surrounding particles. For an impurity resonantly coupled to the bath, we investigate the dependence of the binding energy on the mass ratio and on the interaction strength within the medium. In particular, we determine the equation of state in the case of a static (infinite mass) impurity, where three-body correlations are irrelevant and the result is expected to be a universal function of the gas parameter. For the mass ratio corresponding to 40K impurities in a gas of 87Rb atoms, we provide an explicit comparison with the experimental findings of a recent study carried out at JILA.

  2. Intra- and Interdomain Effects Due to Mutation of Calcium-binding Sites in Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liang-Wen; Kleerekoper, Quinn K.; Wang, Xu; Putkey, John A.

    2010-01-01

    The IQ-motif protein PEP-19, binds to the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM) with significantly different kon and koff rates in the presence and absence of Ca2+, which could play a role in defining the levels of free CaM during Ca2+ transients. The initial goal of the current study was to determine whether Ca2+ binding to sites III or IV in the C-domain of CaM was responsible for affecting the kinetics of binding PEP-19. EF-hand Ca2+-binding sites were selectively inactivated by the common strategy of changing Asp to Ala at the X-coordination position. Although Ca2+ binding to both sites III and IV appeared necessary for native-like interactions with PEP-19, the data also indicated that the mutations caused undesirable structural alterations as evidenced by significant changes in amide chemical shifts for apoCaM. Mutations in the C-domain also affected chemical shifts in the unmodified N-domain, and altered the Ca2+ binding properties of the N-domain. Conversion of Asp93 to Ala caused the greatest structural perturbations, possibly due to the loss of stabilizing hydrogen bonds between the side chain of Asp93 and backbone amides in apo loop III. Thus, although these mutations inhibit binding of Ca2+, the mutated CaM may not be able to support potentially important native-like activity of the apoprotein. This should be taken into account when designing CaM mutants for expression in cell culture. PMID:20048169

  3. Binding of Polycarboxylic Acids to Cationic Mixed Micelles: Effects of Polymer Counterion Binding and Polyion Charge Distribution.

    PubMed

    Yoshida; Sokhakian; Dubin

    1998-09-15

    Mixed micelles of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) and n-dodecyl hexaoxyethylene glycol monoether (C12E8) bind to polyanions when the mole fraction of the cationic surfactant exceeds a critical value (Yc). Yc corresponds to a critical micelle surface charge density at which polyelectrolyte will bind to this colloidal particle. Turbidimetric titrations were used to determine Yc for such cationic-nonionic micelles in the presence of acrylic acid and acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonate homopolymers (PAA and PAMPS, respectively) and their copolymers with acrylamide, as function of pH, ionic strength, and polyelectrolyte counterion. In 0.20 M NaCl, Yc for PAA is found to be remarkably insensitive to pH, i.e., virtually independent of the apparent polymer charge density xiapp. On the other hand, the expected inverse relationship between Yc and xiapp is observed either for PAA when NaCl is replaced by TMACl (tetramethylammonium chloride), or when xiapp is manipulated using acrylic acid/acrylamide copolymers at high pH. The effective charge density of PAA is thus seen to be suppressed by specific sodium ion binding, indicating that the influence of salts on the interaction of polycarboxylic acids with colloidal particles may differ qualitatively from their effect on the analogous behavior of strong polyanions. Comparisons between homo- and copolymers of acrylic acid were carried out also to test the hypothesis that the "mobility" of charges on PAA at moderate pH (degree of ionization less than unity) could make this "annealed" polymer exhibit the behavior of a more highly charged one. The results, while consistent with this expectation, were obscured by the likely effect of copolymer sequence distributions. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  4. Fundamental Kinetics of Supercritical Coal Liquefaction: Effect of Catalysts and Hydrogen-Donor Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Ben J; Madras, Girodhar; Smith, J M; Kodera, Yoichi

    1997-04-16

    This is the quarterly report on our recent progress toward the overall objective to understand the supercritical fluid extraction of hydrocarbons from coal. Our strategy is to simulate coal as a high molecular-weight polymeric material by studying the degradation of polymers under various conditions. The hypothesis we are testing is that degradation of such macromolecules is applicable to the decomposition (depolymerization) of the coal network. Polymer degradation and coal liquefaction are influenced strongly by the solvent in the reaction. This motivated our investigation of the effect of hydrogen donor solvents on polymer degradation. In particular, we obtained new experimental data to show how a hydrogen donor, 6-hydroxy tetralin, influences the degradation rate of polystyrene. We also developed a detailed radical mechanism for hydrogen donation based on the Rice-Herzfeld chain reaction concept with the elementary steps of initiation, depropagation, hydrogen abstraction, and termination. Expressions for the degradation rate parameters were obtained by applying continuous distribution kinetics to the MWD of the reacting polymer. The theory explains the different influences of the hydrogen donor solvent on the degradation rate coefficients for different polymers. Though developed for the degradation of polymers, the mechanism and the theory are potentially applicable for chain scission and addition reactions among distributions of paraffins, olefins, and radicals of all chain lengths. The concepts can, in principle, be extended to examine the effect of hydrogen donors on coal liquefaction and on the complex mixture of liquefaction compounds. Based on this work, a research paper titled "Effect of Hydrogen Donors on Polymer Degradation", has been submitted for publication. Our research paper entitled, "Molecular weight effect on the dynamics of polystyrene degradation", has been accepted for publication by the journal, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research.

  5. Synergistic effect of microwave heating and hydrogen peroxide on inactivation of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kuchma, T

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 isogenous strains and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 102 were used to study the synergistic effects of combined microwave heating at short-time processing with low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. The effect of microwave heating to temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 degrees C, as well as the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (0.05, 0.08 and 0.1%), the sequence of the agents' use, the nature of microorganisms on the survival of cells, DNA damages and interaction factors were studied. A method of anomalous viscosity time dependencies (AVTD) was used for measurement of the changes of genome conformational state (GCS) simultaneously with bacterial survival determination. The synergistic effect of microwave heating and low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide was observed under combined application, and reached a maximum when the cells were exposed to microwave heating to 50 degrees C and 0.08% hydrogen peroxide simultaneously. Both maxima of cell destruction and DNA injuries have been achieved by successive exposure to (MW + 10 min H2O2) to 60 degrees C and 0.08% hydrogen peroxide. The mechanisms of synergistic effects, the role of a disturbance of DNA repair and the interaction of sublethal injuries caused by different agents are discussed.

  6. A molecular dynamics study of nuclear quantum effect on the diffusion of hydrogen in condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Tsuda, Shin-ichi; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki; Koshi, Mitsuo; Hayashie, A. Koichi; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule on its diffusivity is analyzed using Molecular Dynamics (MD) method. The path integral centroid MD (CMD) method is applied for the reproduction method of time evolution of the molecules. The diffusion coefficient of liquid hydrogen is calculated using the Green-Kubo method. The simulation is performed at wide temperature region and the temperature dependence of the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule is addressed. The calculation results are compared with those of classical MD results. As a result, it is confirmed that the diffusivity of hydrogen molecule is changed depending on temperature by the quantum effect. It is clarified that this result can be explained that the dominant factor by quantum effect on the diffusivity of hydrogen changes from the swollening the potential to the shallowing the potential well around 30 K. Moreover, it is found that this tendency is related to the temperature dependency of the ratio of the quantum kinetic energy and classical kinetic energy.

  7. A molecular dynamics study of nuclear quantum effect on the diffusion of hydrogen in condensed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Tokumasu, Takashi; Tsuda, Shin-ichi; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki; Koshi, Mitsuo; Hayashie, A. Koichi

    2014-10-06

    In this paper, the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule on its diffusivity is analyzed using Molecular Dynamics (MD) method. The path integral centroid MD (CMD) method is applied for the reproduction method of time evolution of the molecules. The diffusion coefficient of liquid hydrogen is calculated using the Green-Kubo method. The simulation is performed at wide temperature region and the temperature dependence of the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule is addressed. The calculation results are compared with those of classical MD results. As a result, it is confirmed that the diffusivity of hydrogen molecule is changed depending on temperature by the quantum effect. It is clarified that this result can be explained that the dominant factor by quantum effect on the diffusivity of hydrogen changes from the swollening the potential to the shallowing the potential well around 30 K. Moreover, it is found that this tendency is related to the temperature dependency of the ratio of the quantum kinetic energy and classical kinetic energy.

  8. Effects of cavities at the nicotinamide binding site of liver alcohol dehydrogenase on structure, dynamics and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yahashiri, Atsushi; Rubach, Jon K; Plapp, Bryce V

    2014-02-11

    A role for protein dynamics in enzymatic catalysis of hydrogen transfer has received substantial scientific support, but the connections between protein structure and catalysis remain to be established. Valine residues 203 and 207 are at the binding site for the nicotinamide ring of the coenzyme in liver alcohol dehydrogenase and have been suggested to facilitate catalysis with "protein-promoting vibrations" (PPV). We find that the V207A substitution has small effects on steady-state kinetic constants and the rate of hydrogen transfer; the introduced cavity is empty and is tolerated with minimal effects on structure (determined at 1.2 Å for the complex with NAD(+) and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol). Thus, no evidence is found to support a role for Val-207 in the dynamics of catalysis. The protein structures and ligand geometries (including donor-acceptor distances) in the V203A enzyme complexed with NAD(+) and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol or 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (determined at 1.1 Å) are very similar to those for the wild-type enzyme, except that the introduced cavity accommodates a new water molecule that contacts the nicotinamide ring. The structures of the V203A enzyme complexes suggest, in contrast to previous studies, that the diminished tunneling and decreased rate of hydride transfer (16-fold, relative to that of the wild-type enzyme) are not due to differences in ground-state ligand geometries. The V203A substitution may alter the PPV and the reorganization energy for hydrogen transfer, but the protein scaffold and equilibrium thermal motions within the Michaelis complex may be more significant for enzyme catalysis.

  9. Effect of expanded graphite lattice in exfoliated graphite nanofibers on hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Lueking, Angela D; Pan, Ling; Narayanan, Deepa L; Clifford, Caroline E B

    2005-07-07

    A graphite exfoliation technique, using intercalation of a concentrated sulfuric/nitric acid mixture followed by a thermal shock, has successfully exfoliated a herringbone graphite nanofiber (GNF). The exfoliated GNF retains the overall nanosized dimensions of the original GNF, with the exfoliation temperature determining the degree of induced defects, lattice expansion, and resulting microstructure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicated that the fibers treated at an intermediate temperature of 700 degrees C for 2 min had dislocations in the graphitic structure and a 4% increase in graphitic lattice spacing to 3.5 A. The fibers treated at 1000 degrees C for 36 h were expanded along the fiber axis, with regular intervals of graphitic and amorphous regions ranging from 0.5 to >50 nm in width. The surface area of the starting material was increased from 47 m(2)/g to 67 m(2)/g for the 700- degrees C treatment and to 555 m(2)/g for the 1000- degrees C treatment. Hydrogen uptake measurements at 20 bar indicate that the overall hydrogen uptake and operative adsorption temperature are sensitive to the structural variations and graphitic spacing. The increased surface area after the 1000- degrees C treatment led to a 1.2% hydrogen uptake at 77 K and 20 bar, a 3-fold increase in hydrogen physisorption of the starting material. The uptake of the 700- degrees C-treated material had a 0.29% uptake at 300 K and 20 bar; although low, this was a 14-fold uptake over the starting material and higher than other commonly used pretreatment methods that were tested in parallel. These results suggest that selective exfoliation of a nanofiber is a means by which to control the relative binding energy of the hydrogen interaction with the carbon structure and thus vary the operative adsorption temperature.

  10. [Effect of nitrogen-containing compounds on hydrogen light emission and nitrogen fixation by purple bacteria].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'eva, E N; Gogotov, I N; Gruzinskiĭ, I V

    1979-01-01

    The cells of Rhodospirillum rubrum and Thiocapsa roseopersicina grown in media containing glutamate and arginine, respectively, as well as under conditions of nitrogen fixation evolve H2 in the light. If the cultures were grown in media with NH4+, NO3-, urea, glutamine or asparagine, hydrogen photoevolution by the cells and acetylene reduction started after the lag-phase and proceeded at a low rate. Extracts of such cells did not display the activity of nitrogenase which could be assayed by the ATP-dependent evolution of H2 from dithionite. The data obtained confirm the fact that hydrogen photoevolution by purple bacteria involves nitrogenase whose synthesis is regulated (according to the action of glutamine) with the participation of glutamine synthetase. NH4+, glutamine and asparagine inhibit also hydrogen photoproduction by purple bacteria and acetylene photoreduction. However, they have no effect on hydrogen evolution in the dark by the cells of R. rubrum and T. roseopersicina in the presence of formiate or pyruvate, respectively, whereas carbon monoxide inhibits hydrogen production. Therefore, hydrogen production by purple bacteria in the dark must be catalyzed by hydrogenase.

  11. Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline on Taurocholate-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, De-qing; Feng, Huang; Chen, Wei-chang

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP). As an ideal exterminator of poisonous free radicals, hydrogen can clearly reduce the degree of oxidative damage caused by severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and lessen the presence of inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of hydrogen-rich saline on SAP in rats. Serum TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-18 and histopathological score in the pancreas were reduced after hydrogen-rich saline treatment. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) contents were obviously reduced, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) contents were increased after hydrogen-rich saline treatment. The expression of mRNA of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the pancreas was reduced in hydrogen-rich saline treated group. In conclusion, intravenous hydrogen-rich saline injections could attenuate the severity of AP, probably via inhibiting the oxidative stress and reducing the presence of inflammatory mediators. PMID:23983797

  12. Inhibitory effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on dark hydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory effects of furan derivatives [i.e. furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF)] and phenolic compounds (i.e. vanillin and syringaldehyde) on dark hydrogen fermentation from glucose were comparatively evaluated. Phenolic compounds exhibited stronger inhibition on hydrogen production and glucose consumption than furan derivatives under the same 15mM concentration. Furan derivatives were completely degraded after 72h fermentation, while over 55% of phenolic compounds remained unconverted after 108h fermentation. The inhibition coefficients of vanillin (14.05) and syringaldehyde (11.21) were higher than those of 5-HMF (4.35) and furfural (0.64). Vanillin exhibited the maximum decrease of hydrogen yield (17%). The consumed reducing power by inhibitors reduction from R-CHO to RCH2OH was a possible reason contributed to the decreased hydrogen yield. Vanillin exhibited the maximum delay of peak times of hydrogen production rate and glucose consumption. Soluble metabolites and carbon conversion efficiency decreased with inhibitors addition, which were consistent with hydrogen production.

  13. Copper contamination effects on hydrogen-air combustion under SCRAMJET (supersonic combustion ramjet) testing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Berry, G.F.

    1990-01-01

    Two forms of copper catalytic reactions (homogeneous and heterogeneous) in hydrogen flames were found in a literature survey. Hydrogen atoms in flames recombine into hydrogen molecules through catalytic reactions, and these reactions which affect the timing of the combustion process. Simulations of hydrogen flames with copper contamination were conducted by using a modified general chemical kinetics program (GCKP). Results show that reaction times of hydrogen flames are shortened by copper catalytic reactions, but ignition times are relatively insensitive to the reactions. The reduction of reaction time depends on the copper concentration, copper phase, particle size (if copper is in the condensed phase), and initial temperature and pressure. The higher the copper concentration of the smaller the particle, the larger the reduction in reaction time. For a supersonic hydrogen flame (Mach number = 4.4) contaminated with 200 ppm of gaseous copper species, the calculated reaction times are reduced by about 9%. Similar reductions in reaction time are also computed for heterogeneous copper contamination. Under scramjet testing conditions, the change of combustion timing appears to be tolerable (less than 5%) if the Mach number is lower than 3 or the copper contamination is less than 100 ppm. The higher rate the Mach number, the longer the reaction time and the larger the copper catalytic effects. 7 tabs., 8 figs., 34 refs.

  14. Critical assessment of hydrogen effects on the slip transmission across grain boundaries in α-Fe

    PubMed Central

    Adlakha, I.; Solanki, K. N.

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundaries (GBs) play a fundamental role in the strengthening mechanism of crystalline structures by acting as an impediment to dislocation motion. However, the presence of an aggressive environment such as hydrogen increases the susceptibility to intergranular fracture. Further, there is a lack of systematic investigations exploring the role of hydrogen on the dislocation–grain-boundary (DGB) interactions. Thus, in this work, the effect of hydrogen on the interactions between a screw dislocation and 〈111〉 tilt GBs in α-Fe were examined. Our simulations reveal that the outcome of the DGB interaction strongly depends on the underlying GB dislocation network. Further, there exists a strong correlation between the GB energy and the energy barrier for slip transmission. In other words, GBs with lower interfacial energy demonstrate a higher barrier for slip transmission. The introduction of hydrogen along the GB causes the energy barrier for slip transmission to increase consistently for all of the GBs examined. The energy balance for a crack initiation in the presence of hydrogen was examined with the help of our observations and previous findings. It was found that the presence of hydrogen increases the strain energy stored within the GB which could lead to a transgranular-to-intergranular fracture mode transition. PMID:26997895

  15. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yunyan; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Dai, Jinxing; Katz, Barry; Zhang, Shuichang; Tang, Yongchun

    2011-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2 cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using δD values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the δ 13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that δD values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that δD values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane.

  16. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The relationship between the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) structure and the effectiveness of homogeneous and heterogeneous solar hydrogen-generating systems as well as DSSCs.

    PubMed

    Luo, Geng-Geng; Lu, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Dai, Jing-Cao; Wu, Ji-Huai; Wu, Jia-Jia

    2015-04-21

    effective surface binding mode is allowed with this structure. This is also in contrast with the case of dye-sensitized solar H2 generation, in which B3 was the most efficient chromophore. The differences between dye-sensitized hydrogen-generating systems and DSSCs may be due to rates of electron transfer and the dye aggregation tendency.

  18. A Quantitative Study of the Effects of Guest Flexibility on Binding Inside a Coordination Cage Host.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher G P; Cullen, William; Collier, Olivia M; Ward, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    We have performed a systematic investigation of the effects of guest flexibility on their ability to bind in the cavity of a coordination cage host in water, using two sets of isomeric aliphatic ketones that differ only in the branching patterns of their alkyl chains. Apart from the expected increase in binding strength for C9 over C7 ketones associated with their greater hydrophobic surface area, within each isomeric set there is a clear inverse correlation between binding free energy and guest flexibility, associated with loss of conformational entropy. This can be parameterized by the number of rotatable C-C bonds in the guest, with each additional rotatable bond resulting in a penalty of around 2 kJ mol(-1) in the binding free energy, in good agreement with values obtained from protein/ligand binding studies. We used the binding data for the new flexible guests to improve the scoring function that we had previously developed that allowed us to predict binding constants of relatively rigid guests in the cage cavity using the molecular docking programme GOLD (Genetic Optimisation of Ligand Docking). This improved scoring function resulted in a significant improvement in the ability of GOLD to predict binding constants for flexible guests, without any detriment to its ability to predict binding for more rigid guests.

  19. Immobilized algal cells used for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, John J.; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Jacoby, William A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper explores the use of the photosynthetic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii bound to solid support particles to produce hydrogen in a two-step cycle. Bound cells are more easily cycled between growth mode and hydrogen production mode. The data indicate that the presence of silica particles does not inhibit the growth of the algae in the sulfur rich growth media. Filtration experiments reveal that the algae effectively bind to the silica particles, as high removal efficiencies are observed. The silica particles appear to approach saturation algae at a mass-loading ratio of about 0.035. In hydrogen production mode, the bound algae perform about as well as free-floating algae in terms of cumulative hydrogen production. A full-factorial experiment is described in which algae concentration was deemed to have a significant effect on cumulative hydrogen production.

  20. Effect of gravity on the stability and structure of lean hydrogen-air flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, G.; Kailasanath, K.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed, time-dependent, 2D numerical simulations with full hydrogen-oxygen chemistry are used to investigate the effects of gravity on the stability and structure of laminar flames in lean, premixed hydrogen-air mixtures. The calculations show that the effects of gravity becomes more important as the lean flammability limit is approached. In a 12 percent hydrogen-air mixture, gravity plays only a secondary role in determining the multidimensional structure of the flame with the stability and structure of the flame controlled primarily by the thermo-diffusive instability mechanism. However, in leaner hydrogen-air mixtures gravity becomes more important. Upward-propagating flames are highly curved and evolve into a bubble rising upwards in the tube. Downward-propagating flames are flat or even oscillate between structures with concave and convex curvatures. The zero-gravity flame shows only cellular structures. Cellular structures which are present in zero gravity can be suppressed by the effect of buoyancy for mixtures leaner than 11 percent hydrogen. These observations are explained on the basis of an interaction between the processes leading to buoyancy-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the thermo-diffusive instability.

  1. Hydrogen sulphide.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, T L

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is the primary chemical hazard in natural gas production in 'sour' gas fields. It is also a hazard in sewage treatment and manure-containment operations, construction in wetlands, pelt processing, certain types of pulp and paper production, and any situation in which organic material decays or inorganic sulphides exist under reducing conditions. H2S dissociates into free sulphide in the circulation. Sulphide binds to many macromolecules, among them cytochrome oxidase. Although this is undoubtedly an important mechanism of toxicity due to H2S, there may be others H2S provides little opportunity for escape at high concentrations because of the olfactory paralysis it causes, the steep exposure-response relationships, and the characteristically sudden loss of consciousness it can cause which is colloquially termed 'knockdown.' Other effects may include mucosal irritation, which is associated at lower concentrations with a keratoconjunctivitis called 'gas eye' and at higher concentrations with risk of pulmonary oedema. Chronic central nervous system sequelae may possibly follow repeated knockdowns: this is controversial and the primary effects of H2S may be confounded by anoxia or head trauma. Treatment is currently empirical, with a combination of nitrite and hyperbaric oxygen preferred. The treatment regimen is not ideal and carries some risk.

  2. Effects of water models on binding affinity: evidence from all-atom simulation of binding of tamiflu to A/H5N1 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔG(bind) of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔG(bind) is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔG(bind) decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM.

  3. Effect of Hydrogen on the Mechnical Properties and Fracture Behavior of High Purity Aluminum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    RD-0171 214 EFFECT OF HYDROGEN ON THE NECHNICAL PROPERTIES AND 1/2 FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF H.. (U) ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA DEPT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE F...University of Illinois at Urbana -Champaign, 1986 Accesion For NTIS CRA&I DTIC TAB 3 UWanno~r-ced 1 JAificatioil Urbana , Illinois Ditb jtion I orc...and should eventually 2 I RD-0171 214 EFFECT OF HYDROGEN ON THE NECHNXCAL PROPERTIES AND 2/2 FRACTURE BEHAYIOR OF H..(U) ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA DEPT

  4. Effect of Li Adsorption on the Electronic and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Acenes: A Dispersion-Corrected TAO-DFT Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seenithurai, Sonai; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2016-09-01

    Due to the presence of strong static correlation effects and noncovalent interactions, accurate prediction of the electronic and hydrogen storage properties of Li-adsorbed acenes with n linearly fused benzene rings (n = 3–8) has been very challenging for conventional electronic structure methods. To meet the challenge, we study these properties using our recently developed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) with dispersion corrections. In contrast to pure acenes, the binding energies of H2 molecules on Li-adsorbed acenes are in the ideal binding energy range (about 20 to 40 kJ/mol per H2). Besides, the H2 gravimetric storage capacities of Li-adsorbed acenes are in the range of 9.9 to 10.7 wt%, satisfying the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) ultimate target of 7.5 wt%. On the basis of our results, Li-adsorbed acenes can be high-capacity hydrogen storage materials for reversible hydrogen uptake and release at ambient conditions.

  5. Effect of Li Adsorption on the Electronic and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Acenes: A Dispersion-Corrected TAO-DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Seenithurai, Sonai; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2016-01-01

    Due to the presence of strong static correlation effects and noncovalent interactions, accurate prediction of the electronic and hydrogen storage properties of Li-adsorbed acenes with n linearly fused benzene rings (n = 3–8) has been very challenging for conventional electronic structure methods. To meet the challenge, we study these properties using our recently developed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) with dispersion corrections. In contrast to pure acenes, the binding energies of H2 molecules on Li-adsorbed acenes are in the ideal binding energy range (about 20 to 40 kJ/mol per H2). Besides, the H2 gravimetric storage capacities of Li-adsorbed acenes are in the range of 9.9 to 10.7 wt%, satisfying the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) ultimate target of 7.5 wt%. On the basis of our results, Li-adsorbed acenes can be high-capacity hydrogen storage materials for reversible hydrogen uptake and release at ambient conditions. PMID:27609626

  6. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness of alloy X-750

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Douglas M.; Thompson, Anthony W.

    1997-03-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness behavior of a nickel-base superalloy, Alloy X-750, in the solutionized and aged condition was investigated. Notched bend specimens were tested to determine if the fracture process was stress or strain controlled. The fracture was observed to initiate at a distance between the location of maximum stress and maximum strain, suggesting that fracture required both a critical stress and strain. The effect of hydrogen was further investigated and modeled using fracture toughness testing and fractographic examination. The fracture toughness of the non-charged specimen was 147 MPasqrt m . Charging with hydrogen decreased the fracture toughness, K lc, to 52 MPasqrt m at a rapid loading rate and further decreased the toughness to 42 MPasqrt m for a slow loading rate. This is consistent with the rate-limiting step forthe embrittlement process being hydrogen diffusion. The fracture morphology for the hydrogen-charged specimens was intergranular ductile dimple, while the fracture morphology of noncharged specimens was a mixture of large transgranular dimples and fine intergranular dimples. The intergranular failure mechanism in Alloy X-750 was a microvoid initiation process at grain boundary carbides followed by void growth and coalescence. One role of hydrogen was to reduce the void initiation strain for the fine intergranular carbides. Hydrogen may have also increased the rate of void growth. The conditions ahead of a crack satisfy the critical stress criterion at a much lower applied stress intensity factor than for the critical fracture strain criterion. A model based on a critical fracture strain criterion is shown to predict the fracture behavior.

  7. Quantum Calculations On Hydrogen Bonds In Certain Water Clusters Show Cooperative Effects

    PubMed Central

    ZNAMENSKIY, VASILIY S.; GREEN, MICHAEL E.

    2008-01-01

    Water molecules in clefts and small clusters are in a significantly different environment than in bulk water. We have carried out ab initio calculations that demonstrate this in a series of clusters, showing that cooperative effects must be taken into account in the treatment of hydrogen bonds and water clusters in such bounded systems. Hydrogen bonds between water molecules in simulations are treated most frequently by using point charge water potentials, such as TIP3P or SPC, sometimes with a polarizable extension. These produce excellent results in bulk water, for which they are calibrated. Clefts are different from bulk; it is necessary to look at smaller systems, and investigate the effect of limited numbers of neighbors. We start with a study of isolated clusters of water with varying numbers of neighbors of a hydrogen bonded pair of water molecules. The cluster as a whole is in vacuum. The clusters are defined so as to provide the possible arrangements of nearest neighbors of a central hydrogen bonded pair of water molecules. We then scan the length and angles of the central hydrogen bond of the clusters, using density functional theory, for each possible arrangement of donor and acceptor hydrogen bonds on the central hydrogen bonding pair; the potential of interaction of two water molecules varies with the number of donor and of acceptor neighbors. This also involves changes in charge on the water molecules as a function of bond length, and changes in energy and length as a function of number of neighboring donor and acceptor molecules. Energy varies by approximately 6 kBT near room temperature from the highest to the lowest energy when bond length alone is varied, enough to seriously affect simulations. PMID:19169381

  8. Quantum effects and anharmonicity in the H2-Li+-benzene complex: A model for hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmann, Stephen J.; D'Arcy, Jordan H.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.

    2013-12-01

    Quantum and anharmonic effects are investigated in H2-Li+-benzene, a model for hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks and carbon-based materials. Three- and 8-dimensional quantum diffusion Monte Carlo (QDMC) and rigid-body diffusion Monte Carlo (RBDMC) simulations are performed on potential energy surfaces interpolated from electronic structure calculations at the M05-2X/6-31+G(d,p) and M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) levels of theory using a three-dimensional spline or a modified Shepard interpolation. These calculations investigate the intermolecular interactions in this system, with three- and 8-dimensional 0 K H2 binding enthalpy estimates, ΔHbind (0 K), being 16.5 kJ mol-1 and 12.4 kJ mol-1, respectively: 0.1 and 0.6 kJ mol-1 higher than harmonic values. Zero-point energy effects are 35% of the value of ΔHbind (0 K) at M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) and cannot be neglected; uncorrected electronic binding energies overestimate ΔHbind (0 K) by at least 6 kJ mol-1. Harmonic intermolecular binding enthalpies can be corrected by treating the H2 "helicopter" and "ferris wheel" rotations as free and hindered rotations, respectively. These simple corrections yield results within 2% of the 8-dimensional anharmonic calculations. Nuclear ground state probability density histograms obtained from the QDMC and RBDMC simulations indicate the H2 molecule is delocalized above the Li+-benzene system at 0 K.

  9. Stepwise association of hydrogen cyanide and acetonitrile with the benzene radical cation: structures and binding energies of (C6H6•+)(HCN)n, n = 1-6, and (C6H6•+)(CH3CN)n, n = 1-4, clusters.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed M; Soliman, Abdel-Rahman; El-Shall, M Samy

    2013-02-14

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using the ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes associated with the stepwise association of HCN and CH(3)CN molecules with the benzene radical cation in the C(6)H(6)(•+)(HCN)(n) and C(6)H(6)(•+)(CH(3)CN)(n) clusters with n = 1-6 and 1-4, respectively. The binding energy of CH(3)CN to the benzene cation (14 kcal/mol) is stronger than that of HCN (9 kcal/mol) mostly due to a stronger ion-dipole interaction because of the large dipole moment of acetonitrile (3.9 D). However, HCN can form hydrogen bonds with the hydrogen atoms of the benzene cation (CH(δ+)···NCH) and linear hydrogen bonding chains involving HCN···HCN interaction. HCN molecules tend to form externally solvated structures with the benzene cation where the ion is hydrogen bonded to the exterior of HCN chains. For the C(6)H(6)(•+)(CH(3)CN)(n) clusters, internally solvated structures are formed where the acetonitrile molecules are directly interacting with the benzene cation through ion-dipole and hydrogen bonding interactions. The lack of formation of higher clusters with n > 4, in contrast to HCN, suggests the formation of a solvent shell at n = 4, which is attributed to steric interactions among the acetonitrile molecules attached to the benzene cation and to the presence of the blocking CH(3) groups, both effects make the addition of more than four acetonitrile molecules less favorable.

  10. The Effect of Hydrogen Annealing on the Impurity Content of Alumina-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2000-01-01

    Previously, the effect of hydrogen annealing on increasing the adhesion of Al2O3 scales had been related to the effective desulfurization that occurred during this process. The simultaneous reduction of other impurities has now been re-examined for up to 20 impurity elements in the case of five different alloys (NiCrAl, FeCrAl, PWA 1480, Rene'142, and Rene'N5). Hydrogen annealing produced measurable reductions in elemental concentration for B, C, Na, Mg, P, K, Sr, or Sn in varying degrees for at least one and up to three of these alloys. No single element was reduced by hydrogen annealing for all the alloys except sulfur. In many cases spalling occurred at low levels of these other impurities, while in other cases the scales were adherent at high levels of the impurities. No impurity besides sulfur was strongly correlated with adhesion.

  11. Effect of oxide films on hydrogen permeability of candidate Stirling engine heater head tube alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S. R.; Misencik, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of oxide films developed in situ from CO/CO2 doped hydrogen on high pressure hydrogen permeability at 820 C was studied on N-155, A-286, IN 800, 19-9DL, Nitronic 40, HS-188, and IN 718 tubing in a Stirling materials simulator. The hydrogen permeability decreased with increasing dopant levels of CO or CO2 and corresponding decreases in oxide porosity. Minor reactive alloying elements strongly influenced permeability. At high levels of CO or CO2, a liquid oxide formed on alloys with greater than 50 percent Fe. This caused increased permeability. The oxides formed on the inside tube walls were analyzed and their effective permeabilities were calculated.

  12. Binding to Redox-Inactive Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Ions Strongly Deactivates the C-H Bonds of Tertiary Amides toward Hydrogen Atom Transfer to Reactive Oxygen Centered Radicals.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-09-18

    The effect of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) was studied by laser flash photolysis. In acetonitrile, a >2 order of magnitude decrease in the rate constant for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of these substrates (kH) was measured after addition of Li(+). This behavior was explained in terms of a strong interaction between Li(+) and the oxygen atom of both DMF and DMA that increases the extent of positive charge on the amide, leading to C-H bond deactivation toward HAT to the electrophilic radical CumO(•). Similar effects were observed after addition of Ca(2+), which was shown to strongly bind up to four equivalents of the amide substrates. With Mg(2+), weak C-H deactivation was observed for the first two substrate equivalents followed by stronger deactivation for two additional equivalents. No C-H deactivation was observed in DMSO after addition of Li(+) and Mg(2+). These results point toward the important role played by metal ion Lewis acidity and solvent Lewis basicity, indicating that C-H deactivation can be modulated by varying the nature of the metal cation and solvent and allowing for careful control over the HAT reactivity of amide substrates.

  13. Protective Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline on Rats with Smoke Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Liu, Qi; Wang, Dawei; Feng, Shihai; Zhao, Yongjian; Shi, Yun; Liu, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on rats with smoke inhalation injury. Methods. 36 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 12 per group): sham group (S), inhalation injury plus normal saline treatment group (I+NS), and inhalation injury plus hydrogen-rich saline treatment group (I+HS). 30 min after injury, normal saline and hydrogen-rich saline were injected intraperitoneally (5 mL/kg) in I+NS group and I+HS group, respectively. All rats were euthanized and blood and organ specimens were collected for determination 24 h after inhalation injury. Results. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 expression, and apoptosis index (AI) in I+HS group were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), while superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were increased compared with those in I+NS group; and a marked improvement in alveolar structure was also found after hydrogen-rich saline treatment. Conclusions. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment exerts protective effects in acute lung injury induced by inhalation injury, at least in part through the activation of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant pathways and inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:26090070

  14. Magnetocaloric properties of distilled gadolinium: Effects of structural inhomogeneity and hydrogen impurity

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhanov, G. S.; Kolchugina, N. B.; Chzhan, V. B.; Chistyakov, O. D.; Tereshina, E. A.; Tereshina, I. S.; Politova, G. A.; Badurski, D.; Drulis, H.; Paukov, M.; Havela, L.

    2014-06-16

    High-purity Gd prepared by distillation is a structurally inhomogeneous system consisting of needle-shaped crystals of cross section 0.5–2.5 μm with near-c-axis orientation embedded in a matrix of nanosized (30–100 nm) grains. By measuring the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) directly, we find that the MCE values differ markedly for the plate-shaped samples cut out of a distillate along and perpendicular to the crystals. The effect of small controlled amounts of impurity (hydrogen) on the properties of distilled Gd is further studied. We observe opposite trends in the MCE response to hydrogen charging with respect to the crystal's orientation within the samples and discuss mechanisms interrelating the unique structural morphology with the impurity behavior. As an overall assessment, the Curie temperatures of α-GdH{sub x} solid solutions increase from 291 K up to 294 K when increasing hydrogen concentration x from 0 to 0.15. Hydrogenation is found to broaden the ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic phase transition. Hydrogen-containing specimens demonstrate reversibility of MCE at these temperatures.

  15. Effect of hydrogen on the elastic modulus and hardness of gamma titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, P.A.; Basu, D.; Steinbrech, R.W.; Ennis, P.J.; Quadakkers, W.J.; Singheiser, L.

    1999-09-10

    Gamma titanium aluminides or gammalloys are emerging as one of the potential candidate materials to be used in advanced power plants, aerospace and automobile industries particularly because of their high specific strength, elastic modulus and oxidation resistance at temperatures up to 700 C. Poor toughness and limited ductility of these materials have however restricted their usage in similar applications. In addition, it has been widely reported in literature that these materials also exhibit environmental embrittlement in the presence of hydrogen. Although there is no universal agreement about the effect of hydrogen on gammalloys, some general conclusions are that the solubility of hydrogen is greater in the {alpha}{sub 2} phase compared to the gamma phase and the formation of hydrides results in a decrease in the ductility of gamma titanium aluminides. In the present investigation, the effect of hydrogen on a first generation cast Ti-48Al-2Cr alloy and a second generation Ti-46.5Al-4(CR,Nb,Ta,B) gamma titanium aluminide-based sheet material was studied. The paper focuses on the influence of hydrogen on the elastic modulus and hardness of these materials.

  16. The effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the fluorescence of a bimetallic platinum complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guang-Jiu; Northrop, Brian H; Han, Ke-Li; Stang, Peter J

    2010-09-02

    The bimetallic platinum complexes are known as unique building blocks and arewidely utilized in the coordination-driven self-assembly of functionalized supramolecular metallacycles. Hence, photophysical study of the bimetallic platinum complexes will be very helpful for the understanding on the optical properties and further applications of coordination-driven self-assembled supramolecular metallacycles. Herein, we report steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic experiments as well as quantum chemistry calculations to investigate the significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding effects on the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) fluorescence of a bimetallic platinum compound 4,4'-bis(trans-Pt(PEt(3))(2)OTf)benzophenone 3 in solution. We demonstrated that the fluorescent state of compound 3 can be assigned as a metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) state. Moreover, it was observed that the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds can effectively lengthen the fluorescence lifetime of 3 in alcoholic solvents compared with that in hexane solvent. At the same time, the electronically excited states of 3 in solution are definitely changed by intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. As a consequence, we propose a new fluorescence modulation mechanism by hydrogen bonding to explain different fluorescence emissions of 3 in hydrogen-bonding solvents and nonhydrogen-bonding solvents.

  17. Destructive effect of anticancer oxali-palladium on heme degradation through the generation of endogenous hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Abbasi-Tajarag, K; Divsalar, A; Saboury, A A; Ghalandari, B; Ghourchian, H

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between human hemoglobin (Hb) and oxali-palladium was studied using different spectroscopic methods of UV-vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and chemiluminescence at two temperatures of 25 and 37°C. The experimental results showed that both dynamic and static quenching is occurred simultaneously when oxali-palladium quenches the fluorescence of Hb. According to the fluorescence quenching method, the binding site number, apparent binding constant, and corresponding thermodynamic parameters were measured at two temperatures. The values of ΔH°, ΔS°, and ΔG° indicate that process of the formation of oxali-palladium-Hb complex is a spontaneous interaction procedure in which electrostatic interaction plays a major role. In addition, UV-vis and CD results showed that the addition of oxali-palladium changes the conformation of Hb. To evaluate the functional changes of Hb via destruction of the heme structure, fluorescence studies were performed. The results demonstrated that two fluorescent heme degradation products are found during the interaction of oxali-palladium with Hb. Also, the amount of hydrogen peroxide produced in the solution of Hb due to the interaction of oxali-palladium with Hb using chemiluminescence method indicated heme degradation in the protein is occurred. Structural and functional changes induced in Hb via heme degradation are considered as side effects of this synthesized anticancer drug.

  18. Alternative hydrogen bond implementations produce opposite effects on collapse cooperativity of lattice homopolypeptide models.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Gustavo M N; Barbosa, Marco A A; Pereira de Araújo, Antônio F

    2007-11-01

    We use complete enumeration of self-avoiding chains of up to N=26 monomers in two-dimensional lattices to investigate the effect of alternative implementations of backbone hydrogen bonds on the cooperativity of homopolypeptide collapse. Following a recent study on protein folding models, we use the square lattice with z=3 local conformations per monomer and lattice extensions containing diagonal steps which result in z=5 or z=7 and assume that only a subset of zhhydrogen bond formation. As previously observed in heteropolymeric folding, a significant increase in cooperativity, as measured by kappa2 values, results from the coupling between hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, in such a way that hydrophobic contacts are favorable only when contacting monomers are involved in hydrogen bond formation. For some z/zh combinations the energy distribution is bimodal at the collapse transition temperature. The situation can be regarded as if all hydrophobic contacts actually decrease the energy by the same amount, 2h , with the addition of an energetic increase, epsilon2=h, as a penalty for each contacting monomer not satisfying the hydrogen bond condition. Cooperativity is little affected and might even decrease, however, when hydrogen bonds produce a decrease in energy by the same amount, epsilon1=h, for each bonding monomer. For the more general situation when the hydrogen bond effect is not equal, in modulus, to the hydrophobic interaction, i.e., epsilon2 not equalh or epsilon1 not equal h, we observe a pronounced increase in kappa2 for small epsilon2, with a maximum around epsilon2/h approximately 1.5, followed by a gradual decrease to a limiting value at large epsilon2. The opposite behavior is observed when epsilon1 is varied. The observed qualitative difference is shown to arise from opposite effects on the convexity of the total density of states of the system when subdensities corresponding to different numbers of

  19. Excellent catalytic effects of highly crumpled graphene nanosheets on hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of magnesium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guang; Wang, Yijing; Xu, Changchang; Qiu, Fangyuan; An, Cuihua; Li, Li; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2013-01-01

    Highly crumpled graphene nanosheets (GNS) with a BET surface area as high as 1159 m2 g-1 was fabricated by a thermal exfoliation method. A systematic investigation was performed on the hydrogen sorption properties of MgH2-5 wt% GNS nanocomposites acquired by ball-milling. It was found that the as-synthesized GNS exhibited a superior catalytic effect on hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of MgH2. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal hydrogenation/dehydrogenation measurements indicated that both hydrogen sorption capacity and dehydrogenation/hydrogenation kinetics of the composites improved with increasing milling time. The composites MgH2-GNS milled for 20 h can absorb 6.6 wt% H2 within 1 min at 300 °C and 6.3 wt% within 40 min at 200 °C, even at 150 °C, it can also absorb 6.0 wt% H2 within 180 min. It was also demonstrated that MgH2-GNS-20 h could release 6.1 wt% H2 at 300 °C within 40 min. In addition, microstructure measurements based on XRD, SEM, TEM as well as Raman spectra revealed that the grain size of thus-prepared MgH2-GNS nanocomposites decreased with increasing milling time, moreover, the graphene layers were broken into smaller graphene nanosheets in a disordered and irregular manner during milling. It was confirmed that these smaller graphene nanosheets on the composite surface, providing more edge sites and hydrogen diffusion channels, prevented the nanograins from sintering and agglomerating, thus, leading to promotion of the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics of MgH2.Highly crumpled graphene nanosheets (GNS) with a BET surface area as high as 1159 m2 g-1 was fabricated by a thermal exfoliation method. A systematic investigation was performed on the hydrogen sorption properties of MgH2-5 wt% GNS nanocomposites acquired by ball-milling. It was found that the as-synthesized GNS exhibited a superior catalytic effect on hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of MgH2. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal hydrogenation

  20. Effects of heterocyclic aromatic substituents on binding affinities at two distinct sites of somatostatin receptors. Correlation with the electrostatic potential of the substituents.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vidya; Birzin, Elizabeth T; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Van Rijn, Rachel D; Rohrer, Susan P; Chicchi, Gary; Underwood, Dennis J; Thornton, Edward R; Smith, Amos B; Hirschmann, Ralph

    2003-05-08

    In our continuing program exploring glucose-based peptidomimetics of somatostatin (SRIF-14), we sought to improve the water solubility of our glycosides. This led to insights into the nature of the ligand binding sites at the SRIF receptor. Replacement of the C4 benzyl substituent in glucoside (+)-2 with pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners increased water solubility and enhanced affinity for the human SRIF subtype receptor 4 (sst4). We attribute this effect to hydrogen bond formation. The pyridin-3-ylmethyl substituent at C4, when combined with the imidazol-4-ylmethyl group at C2, generated (-)-19, which has the highest affinity of a glucose-based peptidomimetic at a human SRIF receptor to date (K(i) 53 +/- 23 nM, n = 6 at sst4). The C4 heterocyclic congeners of glucosides bearing a 1-methoxy substituent rather than an indole side chain at the anomeric carbon, such as (+)-16, also provided information about the Trp(8) binding pocket. We correlated the SARs at both the C4 and the Trp(8) binding pockets with calculations of the electrostatic potentials of the diverse C4 aromatic substituents using Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis. These calculations provide an approximate analysis of a molecule's ability to interact within a receptor binding site. Our binding studies show that benzene and indole rings, but not pyridinylmethyl nor pyrazin-2-ylmethyl rings, can bind the hydrophobic Trp(8) binding pocket of sst4. The Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis reveals significant negative electrostatic potential in the region of the pi-clouds for the benzene and indole rings but not for the pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners. Our data further demonstrate that the replacement of benzene or indole side chains by heterocyclic aromatic rings typified by pyridine and pyrazine not only enhances water solubility and hydrogen bonding capacity as expected, but can also profoundly diminish the ability of the pi-cloud of the aromatic substituent to interact with side chains

  1. Effects of vitamin B-6 nutrition on benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor binding in the developing rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, J.P.; Guilarte, T.R. )

    1990-02-26

    A dietary deficiency of vitamin B-6 promotes seizure activity in neonatal animals and human infants. Previous studied have shown that neonatal vitamin B-6 deprivation results in reduced levels of brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and increased binding at the GABA site of the GABA/BDZ receptor complex. Since the GABA and BDZ receptors are allosterically linked, this study was undertaken to determine if vitamin B-6 deprivation had an effect on BDZ receptor binding. Benzodiazepine receptor binding isotherms using {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam as ligand were performed in the presence and absence of 10 {mu}M GABA. The results indicate a significant increase in the binding affinity (Kd) in the presence of GABA in cerebellar membranes from deficient rat pups at 14 days of age with no effect on receptor number (Bmax). By 28 days of age, the increase in Kd was no longer present. No change in Kd or Bmax was observed in cortical tissue from deficient animals at 14 or 28 days of age. Preliminary studies of GABA-enhancement of {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam binding indicate that vitamin B-6 deficiency also induces alterations in the ability of GABA to enhance BZD receptor binding. In summary, these results indicate that the effects of vitamin B-6 deprivation on BDZ receptor binding are region specific and age related.

  2. Concentration-dependent effect of fibrinogen on IgG-specific antigen binding and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Tobias Konrad; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Denardin, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to characterize fibrinogen-IgG interactions, and explore how fibrinogen alters IgG-mediated phagocytosis. Using enzyme-linked binding assays, we found that fibrinogen binding to IgG is optimized for surfaces coated with high levels of IgG. Using a similar method, we have shown that for an antigen unable to specifically bind fibrinogen, fibrinogen enhances binding of antibodies towards that antigen. For binding of IgG antibodies to cells expressing Fc receptors, we found a bimodal binding response, where low levels of fibrinogen enhance binding of antibody to Fc receptors and high levels reduce it. This corresponds to a bimodal effect on phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles, which is inhibited in the presence of excess IgG during coating of the particles with antibodies and fibrinogen. We conclude that fibrinogen can modulate phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles in vitro by changing IgG binding behavior, and that high fibrinogen levels could negatively affect phagocytosis.

  3. Identification of procollagen promoter DNA-binding proteins: effects of dexamethasone

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, C.; Cutroneo, K.R.

    1987-05-01

    Glucocorticoids selectively decrease procollagen synthesis by decreasing procollagen mRNA transcription. Dexamethasone coordinately decreased total cellular type I and type III procollagen mRNAs in mouse embryonic skin fibroblasts. Since sequence specific DNA-binding proteins are known to modulate eukaryotic gene expression the authors identified in mouse fibroblasts nuclear proteins which bind to types I and III procollagen promoter DNAs. Nuclear proteins were electrophoresed, blotted onto nitrocellulose and probed with /sup 32/P-end-labeled type I and type III procollagen promoter DNAs in the presence of equimolar amounts of /sup 32/P-end-labeled vector DNA. Differences in total DNA binding were noted by the densitometric scans of the nuclear proteins. Dexamethasone treatment enhanced total DNA binding. Increasing the NaCl concentration decreased the number of promoter DNA-binding proteins without altering the relative specificity for the promoter DNAs. Promoter DNA binding to nuclear proteins was also inhibited by increasing concentrations of E. coli DNA. The number of DNA-binding proteins was greater for type III procollagen promoter DNA. The effect of dexamethasone treatment on promoter DNA binding to nuclear proteins was determined.

  4. Manganese rescues adverse effects on lifespan and development in Podospora anserina challenged by excess hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Carolin; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2015-03-01

    For biological systems, balancing cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is of great importance because ROS are both, essential for cellular signaling and dangerous in causing molecular damage. Cellular ROS abundance is controlled by a delicate network of molecular pathways. Within this network, superoxide dismutases (SODs) are active in disproportion of the superoxide anion leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. The fungal aging model Podospora anserina encodes at least three SODs. One of these is the mitochondrial PaSOD3 isoform containing manganese as a cofactor. Previous work resulted in the selection of strains in which PaSod3 is strongly overexpressed. These strains display impairments in growth and lifespan. A computational model suggests a series of events to occur in Sod3 overexpressing strains leading to adverse effects due to elevated hydrogen peroxide levels. In an attempt to validate this model and to obtain more detailed information about the cellular responses involved in ROS balancing, we further investigated the PaSod3 overexpressing strains. Here we show that hydrogen peroxide levels are indeed strongly increased in the mutant strain. Surprisingly, this phenotype can be rescued by the addition of manganese to the growth medium. Strikingly, while we obtained no evidence for an antioxidant effect of manganese, we found that the metal is required for induction of components of the ROS scavenging network and lowers the hydrogen peroxide level of the mutant. A similar effect of manganese on lifespan reversion was obtained in wild-type strains challenged with exogenous hydrogen peroxide. It appears that manganese is limited under high hydrogen peroxide and suggests that a manganese-dependent activity leads to the induction of ROS scavenging components.

  5. Inactivation of aflatoxin B1 by using the synergistic effect of hydrogen peroxide and gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, U.D.; Govindarajan, P.; Dave, P.J. )

    1989-02-01

    Inactivation of aflatoxin B1 was studied by using gamma radiation and hydrogen peroxide. A 100-krad dose of gamma radiation was sufficient to inactivate 50 micrograms of aflatoxin B1 in the presence of 5% hydrogen peroxide, and 400 krad was required for total degradation of 100 micrograms of aflatoxin in the same system. Degradation of aflatoxin B1 was confirmed by high-pressure liquid chromatographic and thin-layer chromatographic analysis. Ames microsomal mutagenicity test showed loss of aflatoxin activity. This method of detoxification also reduces the toxin levels effectively in artificially contaminated groundnuts.

  6. Process for the production of hydrogen utilizing a photogalvanic effect of a polyacid ion

    SciTech Connect

    Ikawa, T.; Yamase, T.

    1982-08-24

    A process for the production of hydrogen is disclosed. This process utilizes a photogalvanic effect of a polyacid ion and comprises immersing an anode into an aqueous solution of an alkylammonium salt of polytungstic acid or polyvanadic acid as an anode electrolyte, immersing a cathode into an aqueous solution of an acid as a cathode electrolyte, isolating both said aqueous solutions to each other, electrically connecting both said electrodes to each other, and irradiating a light onto said anode electrolyte, whereby hydrogen is evoluted at said cathode.

  7. Effects of hydrogen peroxide-containing bleaching agents on the morphology of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Ernst, C P; Marroquín, B B; Willershausen-Zönnchen, B

    1996-01-01

    The effects of four bleaching agents (Opalescence, HiLite, 30% hydrogen peroxide, and 30% hydrogen peroxide mixed with sodium perborate) and 37% phosphoric acid on the external surface of human enamel were examined with the scanning electron microscope. The materials were applied to the enamel surfaces of 60 specimens obtained from 10 teeth. Each test agent was applied to one specimen from each tooth. One specimen of each tooth was left untreated. Comparison to the untreated control surfaces revealed that enamel exposed to the bleaching agents underwent slight morphologic surface alterations. The enamel surfaces treated with phosphoric acid, in contrast, showed severe morphologic alterations.

  8. The effect of hydrogen embrittlement on the localized plastic deformation of aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bochkareva, Anna Lunev, Aleksey; Barannikova, Svetlana; Gorbatenko, Vadim; Shlyakhova, Galina; Zuev, Lev

    2015-10-27

    The effect of hydrogen embrittlement on the localized plastic deformation of aluminum alloy D1 was investigated. The studies were performed for the test samples of aluminum alloy subjected to electrolytic hydrogenation. It is found that the mechanical properties and localized plastic deformation parameters of aluminum alloy are affected adversely by hydrogen embrittlement. The hydrogenated counterpart of alloy has a lower degree of ductility relative to the original alloy; however, the plastic flow behavior of material remains virtually unaffected. Using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy methods, the changes in the fracture surface were investigated. The deformation diagrams were examined for the deformed samples of aluminum alloy. These are found to show all the plastic flow stages: the linear, parabolic and pre-failure stages would occur for the respective values of the exponent n from the Ludwik-Holomon equation. Using digital speckle image technique, the local strain patterns were being registered for the original alloy D1 and the counterpart subjected to electrolytic hydrogenation for 100 h.

  9. Effect of hydrogen uptake on the electrochemical corrosion of N18 zircaloy under gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Z. Y.; Ling, Y. H.; Bai, Y. K.; Zeng, C.; Wang, S.; Clara, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    It has been well recognized that dramatic hydrogen uptake occurred in zircaloy after kinetic transition and porous structure was observed subsequently due to phase transformation of tetragonal to monoclinic zirconia. Therefore, how hydrogen solute and gamma-induced capillary-embedded hydrolysis influence the corrosion of zircaloy is an intriguing issue. In this work, the effect of hydrogen uptake and gamma irradiation on corrosion of N18 zircaloy was studied. Raman spectra and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to analyse phase structure and surface morphology. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were utilized to qualitatively evaluate the electron transfer properties of the oxide film formed on the zircaloy surface after corrosion. The depth profile and surface chemical states of involving elements were analysed by auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. It was found that hydrogen permeation can decline the integrity and impedance semicircle of the oxide films, the more the hydrogen uptake is; the smaller magnitude of impedance will be. In view of the gamma irradiation, it is demonstrated that it promotes the corrosion rate slightly. Based on the irradiation theory and existing phenomena, the underlying mechanism is proposed.

  10. Crystal Properties and Radiation Effects in Solid Molecular Hydrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioiziemski, B

    2000-09-01

    The crystal lattice structure, growth shapes and helium generated by beta-decay of solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures have been studied. Understanding of these D-T properties is important for predicting and optimizing the target design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Raman spectroscopy showed the D-T crystal structure is hexagonal close packed, common to the non-tritiated isotopes. The isotopic mixtures of both tritiated and non-tritiated species broadens the rotational transitions, especially of the lighter species in the mixture. The vibrational frequencies of each isotope is shifted to higher energy in the mixture than the pure components. The J = 1-0 population decreases exponentially with a 1/e time constant which rapidly increases above 10.5 K for both D{sub 2} and T{sub 2} in D-T. The conversion rate is nearly constant from 5 K to 10 K for both D{sub 2} and T{sub 2} at 7.1 hours and 2.1 hours, respectively. The smoothing of D-T layers by beta decay heating is limited by the crystal surface energy. Deuterium and hydrogen-deuteride crystals were grown at a number of temperatures below the triple point to determine the surface energy and roughening transition. Several distinct crystal shapes were observed on a number of different substrates. The a facet roughens between 0.9 T{sub TP} and T{sub TP}, while the c facet persists up to the melting temperature. This is very different from the behavior of the other rare gas crystals which grow completely rounded above 0.8 T{sub TP}. Helium bubbles formed as a product of the beta decay were observed using optical microscopy and the diffusion of smaller bubbles measured with dynamic light scattering. Bubble diffusion coefficients as high as 2.0 x 10{sup -16} m{sup 2}/s were measured for 10-50 nm bubbles. The bubbles move in response to a thermal gradient, with speeds between 1 {micro}m/hour and 100 {micro}m/hour for thermal gradients and temperatures appropriate to NIF targets.

  11. Modification of bactericidal effects of microwave heating and hyperthermia by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kuchma, T

    1997-01-01

    Two different approaches for studying of bactericidal effects of microwave heating and hyperthermia were introduced. Low concentration of hydrogen peroxide (0.05%) was used to modify the sensitivity of isogenous strains of Escherichia coli K-12 to microwave heating and hyperthermia with the following assessment of their combined action. This was carried out simulataneously and successively under equal conditions of temperature rise at 50 degrees C. A method of anomalous viscosity time dependencies (AVTD) was used for measurement of the changes in genome conformational state simultaneously with bacterial survival determination. Experiments were performed to study isolated effects of hyperthermia and microwave heating over a range of temperatures from 40 to 80 degrees C and hydrogen peroxide concentrations from 0.05 to 0.3% during 10-minute exposures and their combined action. No difference was found between isolated effects of microwave heating and hyperthermia when survival of E. coli AB 1157 cells was determined. It was shown by the AVTD method that microwave heating at a temperature increase of 6 degrees C per second caused greater damage to cell genome than hyperthermia. The synergistic interaction of microwave heating and low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide was found in simulataneous and successive exposures. The essential distinctions observed in recognition of the action of microwave heating and hyperthermia combined with hydrogen peroxide in various sequences on cellular and molecular levels were attributed to the different effects of microwave and conventional heating on the systems of DNA repair.

  12. Effects of hydrogen bonding on current-voltage characteristics of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kula, Mathias; Jiang, Jun; Lu, Wei; Luo, Yi

    2006-11-01

    We present a first-principles study of hydrogen bonding effect on current-voltage characteristics of molecular junctions. Three model charge-transfer molecules, 2'-amino-4,4'-di(ethynylphenyl)-1-benzenethiolate (DEPBT-D), 4,4'-di(ethynylphenyl)-2'-nitro-1-benzenethiolate (DEPBT-A), and 2'-amino-4,4'-di(ethynylphenyl)-5'-nitro-1-benzenethiolate (DEPBT-DA), have been examined and compared with the corresponding hydrogen bonded complexes formed with different water molecules. Large differences in current-voltage characteristics are observed for DEPBT-D and DEPBT-A molecules with or without hydrogen bonded waters, while relatively small differences are found for DEPBT-DA. It is predicted that the presence of water clusters can drastically reduce the conductivities of the charge-transfer molecules. The underlying microscopic mechanism has been discussed.

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide as a "Double-Faced" Compound: One with Pro- and Antioxidant Effect.

    PubMed

    Olas, B

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), like other gasotransmitters such as nitric oxide (NO(•)) and carbon monoxide (CO), acts as a signaling molecule in various biological systems. It may also regulate the oxidative stress observed in several diseases sometimes associated with changes of H2S concentration. This chapter describes the "double face" of hydrogen sulfide as both an antioxidant and a prooxidant in biological systems. One proposed mechanism by which H2S exerts its antioxidative effects is its ability to modulate the concentration of glutathione, which is a very important physiological antioxidant. This chapter discusses the interactions of H2S with various reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, including the superoxide radical anion [Formula: see text] , hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and peroxynitrite anion (ONOO(-)), which is produced in a rapid reaction between [Formula: see text] and NO(•).

  14. Compressed hydrogen-bond effects in the pressure-frozen chloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Roman; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    The competing effects of squeezed OH...O bonds, destabilizing the H-atom position, and of displaced hydrogen donor and acceptor groups, favouring the ordered H-atom sites, have been tuned by pressure in the pressure-frozen dichloroacetic acid. Its structure has been determined at 0.1, 0.7, 0.9 and 1.4 GPa: in this pressure range the crystals are stable in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n. The molecules are O-H...O hydrogen bonded into dimers, which in turn interact via a unique pattern of halogen...halogen contacts. Between 0.1 and 1.4 GPa the OH...O bond is squeezed from 2.674 (13) to 2.632 (9) A. Within the pressure range investigated the hydrogen bonds are squeezed and the shear displacement of the molecules compensate, and the H atoms remain ordered.

  15. Effect of electrolytical hydrogenation on the thermal stability and crystallization kinetics of METGLASS MBF-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górecki, Cz; Górecki, T.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of electrolytical hydrogenation on both the surface and volume crystallization kinetics and thermal stability of amorphous alloy METGLASS MBF-50 has been investigated. The surface crystallization has been investigated by the exoelectron emission (EEE) technique, whereas the volume crystallization has been followed by differential thermal analysis (DTA). It has been found that both the surface and volume crystallization of investigated material occur in two stages. The surface crystallization occurs at temperature lower and with activation energy distinctly smaller than the volume crystallization. Hydrogenation of the investigated metallic glass enhances its thermal stability by increasing the activation energies for both the surface and volume crystallization. The results of DTA measurements indicate that hydrogenation causes an increase in the enthalpy of both stages of volume crystallization.

  16. Effect of Cadmium Plating Thickness on the Charpy Impact Energy of Hydrogen-Charged 4340 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-Said, O. S.; Alcisto, J.; Guerra, J.; Jones, E.; Dominguez, A.; Hahn, M.; Ula, N.; Zeng, L.; Ramsey, B.; Mulazimoglu, H.; Li, Yong-Jun; Miller, M.; Alrashid, J.; Papakyriakou, M.; Kalnaus, S.; Lee, E. W.; Frazier, W. E.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen was intentionally introduced into ultra-high strength steel by cadmium plating. The purpose was to examine the effect of cadmium plate thickness and hence hydrogen on the impact energy of the steel. The AISI 4340 steel was austenitized at 1000 °C for 1 h, water quenched, and tempered at temperatures between 257 and 593 °C in order to achieve a range of targeted strength levels. The specimens were cadmium plated with 0.00508 mm (0.2 mils), 0.00762 mm (0.3 mils), and 0.0127 mm (0.5 mils). Results demonstrated that the uncharged specimens exhibited higher impact energy values when compared to the plated specimens at all tempering temperatures. The cadmium-plated specimens had very low Charpy impact values irrespective of their ultimate tensile strength values. The model of hydrogen transport by mobile dislocations to the fracture site appears to provide the most suitable explanation of the results.

  17. Solubility of hydrogen in metals and its effect of pore-formation and embrittlement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahani, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of alloying elements on hydrogen solubility were determined by evaluating solubility equations and interaction coefficients. The solubility of dry hydrogen at one atmosphere was investigated in liquid aluminum, Al-Ti, Al-Si, Al-Fe, liquid gold, Au-Cu, and Au-Pd. The design of rapid heating and high pressure casting furnaces used in meta foam experiments is discussed as well as the mechanism of precipitation of pores in melts, and the effect of hydrogen on the shrinkage porosity of Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys. Hydrogen embrittlement in iron base alloys is also examined.

  18. Effects of Low Temperature on Hydrogen-Assisted Crack Growth in Forged 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Heather; San Marchi, Chris; Balch, Dorian; Somerday, Brian; Michael, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of low temperature on hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in forged 304L austenitic stainless steel. Fracture initiation toughness and crack-growth resistance curves were measured using fracture mechanics specimens that were thermally precharged with 140 wppm hydrogen and tested at 293 K or 223 K (20 °C or -50 °C). Fracture initiation toughness for hydrogen-precharged forgings decreased by at least 50 to 80 pct relative to non-charged forgings. With hydrogen, low-temperature fracture initiation toughness decreased by 35 to 50 pct relative to room-temperature toughness. Crack growth without hydrogen at both temperatures was microstructure-independent and indistinguishable from blunting, while with hydrogen microcracks formed by growth and coalescence of microvoids. Initiation of microvoids in the presence of hydrogen occurred where localized deformation bands intersected grain boundaries and other deformation bands. Low temperature additionally promoted fracture initiation at annealing twin boundaries in the presence of hydrogen, which competed with deformation band intersections and grain boundaries as sites of microvoid formation and fracture initiation. A common ingredient for fracture initiation was stress concentration that arose from the intersection of deformation bands with these microstructural obstacles. The localized deformation responsible for producing stress concentrations at obstacles was intensified by low temperature and hydrogen. Crack orientation and forging strength were found to have a minor effect on fracture initiation toughness of hydrogen-supersaturated 304L forgings.

  19. Effects of a transition to a hydrogen economy on employment in the United States Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-07-01

    DOE's Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States Report to Congress estimates the employment effects of a transformation of the U.S. economy to the use of hydrogen in the 2020 to 2050 timeframe. This report fulfills requirements of section 1820 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  20. The effect of vesicle shape, line tension, and lateral tension on membrane-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Jaime B.

    Model membranes allow for the exploration of complex biological phenomena with simple, controllable components. In this thesis we employ model membranes to determine the effect of vesicle properties such as line tension, lateral tension, and shape on membrane-binding proteins. We find that line tension at the boundary between domains in a phase separated vesicle can accumulate model membrane-binding proteins (green fluorescent protein with a histidine tag), and that those proteins can, in turn, alter vesicle shape. These results suggest that domains in biological membranes may enhance the local concentration of membrane-bound proteins and thus alter protein function. We also explore how membrane mechanical and chemical properties alter the function of the N-BAR domain of amphiphysin, a membrane-binding protein implicated in endocytosis. We find that negatively charged lipids are necessary for N-BAR binding to membranes at detectable levels, and that, at least for some lipid species, binding may be cooperative. Measurements of N-BAR binding as a function of vesicle tension reveal that modest membrane tension of around 2 mN/m, corresponding to a strain of around 1%, strongly increases N-BAR binding. We attribute this increase in binding with tension to the insertion of N-BAR's N-terminal amphipathic helix into the membrane which increases the membrane area. We propose that N-BAR, which was previously described as being able to sense membrane curvature, may be sensing strain instead. Measurements of membrane deformation by N-BAR as a function of membrane tension reveal that tension can hinder membrane deformation. Thus, tension may favor N-BAR binding yet suppress membrane deformation/tubulation, which requires work against tension. These results suggest that membrane tension, a parameter that is often not controlled in model membranes but is tightly controlled in biological cells, may be important in regulating protein binding and assembly and, hence, protein

  1. Review on the effects of hydrogen at extreme pressures and temperatures on the mechanical behavior of polymers.

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, Ethan S.

    2013-03-01

    The effects of hydrogen on the mechanics (e.g. strength, ductility, and fatigue resistance) of polymer materials are outlined in this report. There are a small number of studies reported in the literature on this topic, and even fewer at the extreme temperatures to which hydrogen service materials will be exposed. Several studies found little evidence that hydrogen affects the static tensile properties, long term creep, or ductile fracture of high density polyethylene or polyamide. However, there has been a report that a recoverable drop in the modulus of high density polyethylene is observable under high hydrogen pressure. A research need exists on the mechanical effects of hydrogen on the wide range of polymers used or considered for use in the hydrogen economy, due to the lack of data in the literature.

  2. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular TH-naloxone binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, A.E.; Wooten, G.F.

    1987-07-27

    The binding of the opiate antagonist TH-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, TH-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables.

  3. The effect of saturation of ACE binding sites on the pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat in man.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, J R; Meredith, P A; Hughes, D M; Elliott, H L

    1992-01-01

    1. Eight healthy male volunteers received oral enalapril, 10 mg, in the presence and absence of pretreatment with captopril, 50 mg, twice daily for 5 days. 2. Enalaprilat pharmacokinetics were characterised after both doses of enalapril to investigate the effect of saturating ACE binding sites by pretreatment with captopril. 3. The pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat were best described by a one compartment model with zero order input incorporating saturable binding to plasma and tissue ACE. 4. Values of AUC (0.72 h) for enalaprilat were 419 +/- 97 and 450 +/- 87 ng ml-1 h in the presence and absence of captopril, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant nor were there any other differences in model parameters. 5. Induction of ACE by captopril resulting in an increase in the number of ACE binding sites, may have obscured any effect of captopril on the occupancy of ACE binding sites by enalapril. PMID:1312853

  4. Deformation and fracture of aluminum-lithium alloys: The effect of dissolved hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivet, F. C.; Swanson, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of dissolved hydrogen on the mechanical properties of 2090 and 2219 alloys are studied. The work done during this semi-annual period consists of the hydrogen charging study and some preliminary mechanical tests. Prior to SIMS analysis, several potentiostatic and galvanostatic experiments were performed for various times (going from 10 minutes to several hours) in the cathodic zone, and for the two aqueous solutions: 0.04N of HCl and 0.1N NaOH both combined with a small amount of As2O3. A study of the surface damage was conducted in parallel with the charging experiments. Those tests were performed to choose the best charging conditions without surface damage. Disk rupture tests and tensile tests are part of the study designed to investigate the effect of temperature, surface roughness, strain rate, and environment on the fracture behavior. The importance of the roughness and environment were shown using the disk rupture test as well as the importance of the strain rate under hydrogen environment. The tensile tests, without hydrogen effects, have not shown significant differences between low and room temperature.

  5. One-pion-exchange effect in the energy spectrum of muonic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai-Qing; Pang, Hou-Rong

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the effects from one-pion exchange in e p and μ p bound states by two-photon coupling are discussed. We at first calculate the effective couplings of a pion with a lepton (electron or muon) by two-photon coupling and the corresponding effective nonrelativistic potential. Then we calculate its corrections to the hyperfine structure of 2 S and 2 P states. We find that the corrections to the hyperfine structures of electronic hydrogen's 2 S and 2 P states and muonic hydrogen's 2 P state are small and can be neglected, while the correction to the hyperfine structure of muonic hydrogen's 2 S state Δ EHFS2S(F =1 ,μ p ) is about 0.0028 meV. And after some further discussion we suggest that the similar exchange of a scalar meson such as σ between μ p by two-photon coupling may give a much larger contribution to the Lamb shift of muonic hydrogen.

  6. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states.

  7. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states.

  8. Leukotriene C4 binds to receptors and has positive inotropic effects in bullfrog heart.

    PubMed

    Chiono, M; Heller, R S; Andazola, J J; Herman, C A

    1991-03-01

    Leukotriene (LT) C4, LTD4 and LTE4 have positive inotropic effects on contractility of the isolated perfused bullfrog heart. The effects of LTD4 and LTE4 but not LTC4 can be blocked by the mammalian antagonist L-649,923. Characterization of specific binding sites for [3H]LTC4 on membrane preparations from American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) ventricle was carried out. Binding assays were done in the presence of serine (5 mM) and borate (10 mM) for 30 min at 23 degrees C. Under these conditions, no metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4 occurred. Specific binding of [3H]LTC4 reached steady state within 10 min, remained constant for 60 min, and was reversible with the addition of 1000-fold excess unlabeled LTC4. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated a single class of binding sites with a Kd of 33.9 nM and maximal binding capacity of 51.6 pmol/mg of protein. Competition binding studies revealed an order of potency of LTC4 greater than LTD4 greater than LTE4 with Ki values of 47, 11766 and 32248 nM, respectively. Glutathione and hematin had Ki values of 50566 and 6014 nM, respectively, suggesting that the LTC4 receptor is not a site on glutathione transferase. Two mammalian LTD4 antagonists, L-649,923 and LY171883 failed to inhibit specific binding of [3H]LTC4, suggesting that the LTC4 receptor is distinct from the LTD4 receptor. Guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate did not affect specific binding of [3H]LTC4 indicating that, like mammalian LTC4 receptors, a Gi protein is not involved in the transduction mechanism. LTC4 acts on bullfrog hearts through specific membrane receptors and is similar to its mammalian counterpart.

  9. Collective vibrational effects in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins studied by isotopic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Johansson, C.; Christensen, D. H.; Hvidt, S.; Flink, J.; Høime Hansen, S.; Poulsen, F.

    2000-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the fast dynamics of simple liquid amides and proteins. Raman spectra in the visible region of liquid amides are obtained with a triple additive scanning monochromator, whereas FT-Raman technique is used in the near-IR region in order to avoid fluorescence from impurities in the proteins. Raman spectra are shown in the amide-I region of HCONHCH 3 ( N-methylformamide with all isotopes in their natural abundance), H 13CONHCH 3, HC 18ONHCH 3, human growth hormone, frog tropomyosin and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 including C-13 and N-15 enriched samples of the latter. Resonance energy transfer (RET) between amide molecules gives rise to a non-coincidence effect of the anisotropic and the isotropic components of the amide-I band. This effect influences the band position in mixtures of liquid amide isotopomers. A further spectral feature caused by collective vibrational modes in the hydrogen bonded liquid amides is named coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). The result of this effect is that only one band is found in mixtures of isotopomers where bands at different frequencies are observed for each of the isotopomers. A similar effect may account for the observation of protein amide-I bands with frequencies dependent only on the secondary structure of the protein and not on the amino acid residues. RET and CBMI are due to a collectivity of vibrational modes in different amide molecules. This collectivity may be related to a cooperativity of hydrogen bonds. A low-frequency band around 100 cm -1 is observed in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins. Isotopic substitution shows that the mode corresponding to this band involves displacements of atoms in hydrogen bonds. This mode may drive a breaking of the hydrogen bond.

  10. Effective interface state effects in hydrogenated amorphous-crystalline silicon heterostructures using ultraviolet laser photocarrier radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, A.; Mandelis, A.; Halliop, B.; Kherani, N. P.

    2013-12-28

    Ultraviolet photocarrier radiometry (UV-PCR) was used for the characterization of thin-film (nanolayer) intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (i-a-Si:H) on c-Si. The small absorption depth (approximately 10 nm at 355 nm laser excitation) leads to strong influence of the nanolayer parameters on the propagation and recombination of the photocarrier density wave (CDW) within the layer and the substrate. A theoretical PCR model including the presence of effective interface carrier traps was developed and used to evaluate the transport parameters of the substrate c-Si as well as those of the i-a-Si:H nanolayer. Unlike conventional optoelectronic characterization methods such as photoconductance, photovoltage, and photoluminescence, UV-PCR can be applied to more complete quantitative characterization of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells, including transport properties and defect structures. The quantitative results elucidate the strong effect of a front-surface passivating nanolayer on the transport properties of the entire structure as the result of effective a-Si:H/c-Si interface trap neutralization through occupation. A further dramatic improvement of those properties with the addition of a back-surface passivating nanolayer is observed and interpreted as the result of the interaction of the increased excess bulk CDW with, and more complete occupation and neutralization of, effective front interface traps.

  11. Modulatory effects of unsaturated fatty acids on the binding of glucocorticoids to rat liver glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Vallette, G; Vanet, A; Sumida, C; Nunez, E A

    1991-09-01

    Binding of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone to the rat liver cytosol glucocorticoid receptor was inhibited by physiological concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids as a function of increasing dose, degree of unsaturation, and chain length of the fatty acid. Polyunsaturated fatty acids were the most potent inhibitors. Scatchard analysis and Line-weaver-Burk plots of the binding data revealed that both the association constants and number of binding sites decreased and that polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibition was of a mixed non-competitive type. The dissociation rate constant of [3H]dexamethasone from glucocorticoid receptors was increased by up to 10 times in the presence of docosahexaenoic acid, whereas a competitive inhibitor like the glucocorticoid antagonist RU 38486 had no effect. Moreover, sucrose density gradient analysis showed that docosahexaenoic acid inhibited the binding of [3H] dexamethasone to both the 8.8S and 4S forms. The results strongly suggest that unsaturated fatty acids are interacting at a site on the receptor different from the hormone binding site and the heat shock protein and that by binding to a second site unsaturated fatty acids greatly change the conformation of the hormone binding site to reduce its affinity for the hormone, either partially or completely depending on the concentration and the class of the fatty acid.

  12. Disconfirming (Double Bind) Effects of Incongruent Multi-Channel Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummel, Lynda; And Others

    In an experiment designed to explore the immediate disconfirming effects of strong and mild incongruent messages and the impact of certain contextual constraints on disconfirming effects, 192 male undergraduates evaluated videotaped examples of strong and mild sarcasm and joking and the complementary congruent forms of straightforward positive and…

  13. Effect of low-energy hydrogen ion implantation on dendritic web silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D. L.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Fonash, S. J.; Singh, R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of a low-energy (0.4 keV), short-time (2-min), heavy-dose (10 to the 18th/sq cm) hydrogen ion implant on dendritic web silicon solar cells and material was investigated. Such an implant was observed to improve the cell open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current appreciably for a number of cells. In spite of the low implant energy, measurements of internal quantum efficiency indicate that it is the base of the cell, rather than the emitter, which benefits from the hydrogen implant. This is supported by the observation that the measured minority-carrier diffusion length in the base did not change when the emitter was removed. In some cases, a threefold increase of the base diffusion length was observed after implantation. The effects of the hydrogen implantation were not changed by a thermal stress test at 250 C for 111 h in nitrogen. It is speculated that hydrogen enters the bulk by traveling along dislocations, as proposed recently for edge-defined film-fed growth silicon ribbon.

  14. Start Up of Biohydrogen Production System and Effect of Metal Ions on Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, An-ying; Li, Yong-feng; Yue, Li-ran; Yang, Chuan-ping

    2010-11-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production is a promising biochemical route to produce renewable H2. The effect of organic loading rate on the biohydrogen production during the start-up phase and effect of Fe2+ and Mg2+ concentration on biohydrogen production of a continuous stirred tank reactor using molasses wastewater as substrate were investigated. It was found that an initial biomass of 14.07 gVSS/L and an organic loading rate of 6.0 kgCOD/m3ṡd, an equilibrial microbial community in the butyric-type fermentation could be established with in 30 days. It was demonstrated that both Fe2+ and Mg2+ were able to enhance the hydrogen production capacity of microorganism flora. Different concentration of Fe2+ was added to the biohydrogen producing system (50 mg/L, 100 mg/L, 200 mg/L and 500 mg/L), the maximum biogas production yield of 6.78 L/d and the maximum specific hydrogen production rate of 10.1 ml/gVSSṡh were obtained at Fe2+ concentration of 500 mg/L and 200 mg/L, respectively. The maximum biogas production yield of 6.84 L/d and the maximum specific hydrogen production rate of 10.2 ml/gVSSṡh were obtained at Mg2+ concentration of 100 mg/L and 50 mg/L, respectively.

  15. Effect of temperature and temperature shock on the stability of continuous cellulosic-hydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gadow, Samir I; Jiang, Hongyu; Watanabe, Ryoya; Li, Yu-You

    2013-08-01

    Three continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were operated under mesophilic (37 ± 1°C), thermophilic (55 ± 1°C) and hyper-thermophilic (80 ± 1°C) temperatures for 164 days to investigate the effect of temperature and temperature shock on the cellulosic-dark hydrogen fermentation by mixed microflora. During steady state condition, the sudden decreases in the fermentation temperature occurred twice in each condition for 24h. The results show that the 55 ± 1 and 80 ± 1°C presented stable hydrogen yields of 12.28 and 9.72 mmol/g cellulose, respectively. However, the 37 ± 1°C presented low hydrogen yield of 3.56 mmol/g cellulose and methane yield of 5.4 mmol/g cellulose. The reactor performance under 55 ± 1 or 80 ± 1°C appeared to be more resilient to the sudden decreases in the fermentation temperature than 37 ± 1°C. The experimental analysis results indicated that the changing in soluble by-products could explain the effect of temperature and temperature shock, and the thermophilic temperature is expected having a better economic performance for cellulosic-hydrogen fermentation.

  16. Effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment of thermomechanical pulp on hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranger, E.; Charles, A.; Daneault, C.

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasound pre-treatments of softwood TMP had been carried to evaluate its impact on the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The trials were performed after a factorial design of experiment using frequency, power and time as variables. The experiments were conducted in an ultrasonic bath and then bleached with hydrogen peroxide. Measurements such as brightness, L*A*B* color system coordinate, residual hydrogen peroxide and metal content were evaluated on bleached pulp. The results indicate that the effect of ultrasonic treatment on brightness was dependent on the ultrasound frequency used; the brightness increased slightly at 68 kHz and decreased at 40 and 170 kHz. These results were correlated to the ultrasound effect on the generation of transition metals (copper, iron and manganese) which are responsible for catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The influence of metal interference was minimized by using a chelating agent such as diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). With the results obtained in this study we have identified a set of option conditions, e.g. 1000 W, 40 kHz, 1.5 % consistency and 0.2% addition of DTPA prior to the bleaching stage (after ultrasonic pre-treatment) who improve brightness by 2.5 %ISO.

  17. Effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen production and fermentation products.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Organic waste from municipalities, food waste and agro-industrial residues are ideal feedstocks for use in biological conversion processes in biorefinery chains, representing biodegradable materials containing a series of substances belonging to the three main groups of the organic matter: carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation may assume a central role in the biorefinery concept, representing an up-front treatment for organic waste capable of hydrolysing complex organics and producing biohydrogen. This research study was aimed at evaluating the effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen yields, volatile fatty acid production and carbon-fate. Biogas and hydrogen productions were linearly correlated to carbohydrate content of substrates while proteins and lipids failed to produce significant contributions. Chemical composition also produced effects on the final products of dark fermentation. Acetic and butyric acids were the main fermentation products, with their ratio proving to correlate with carbohydrate and protein content. The results obtained in this research study enhance the understanding of data variability on hydrogen yields from organic waste. Detailed information on waste composition and chemical characterisation are essential to clearly identify the potential performances of the dark fermentation process.

  18. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on antioxidant enzyme activities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is strain-specific.

    PubMed

    Bayliak, M; Semchyshyn, H; Lushchak, V

    2006-09-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the survival and activity of antioxidant and associated enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. A difference found in the response of wild-type yeast strains treated with hydrogen peroxide was probably related to the different protective effects of antioxidant enzymes in these strains. Exposure of wild-type YPH250 cells to 0.25 mM H(2)O(2) for 30 min increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 3.4- and 2-fold, respectively. However, no activation of catalase in the EG103 strain, as well as of SOD in the YPH98 and EG103 wild strains was detected, which was in parallel to lower survival of these strains under oxidative stress. There is a strong positive correlation (R(2) = 0.95) between activities of catalase and SOD in YPH250 cells treated with different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. It is conceivable that catalase would protect SOD against inactivation caused by oxidative stress and vice versa. Finally, yeast cell treatment with hydrogen peroxide can lead to either a H(2)O(2)-induced increase in activities of antioxidant and associated enzymes or their decrease depending on the H(2)O(20 concentration used or the yeast strain specificity.

  19. Novel catalytic effects of fullerene for LiBH4 hydrogen uptake and release.

    PubMed

    Wellons, Matthew S; Berseth, Polly A; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2009-05-20

    The addition of catalysts to complex hydrides is aimed at enhancing the hydrogen absorption desorption properties. Here we show that the addition of carbon nanostructure C60 to LiBH4 has a remarkable catalytic effect, enhancing the uptake and release of hydrogen. A fullerene-LiBH4 composite demonstrates catalytic properties with not only lowered hydrogen desorption temperatures but also regenerative rehydrogenation at a relatively low temperature of 350 degrees C. This catalytic effect probably originates from C60 interfering with the charge transfer from Li to the BH4 moiety, resulting in a minimized ionic bond between Li+ and BH4(-), and a weakened covalent bond between B and H. Interaction of LiBH4 with an electronegative substrate such as carbon fullerene affects the ability of Li to donate its charge to BH4, consequently weakening the B-H bond and causing hydrogen to desorb at lower temperatures as well as facilitating the absorption of H2. Degradation of cycling capacity is observed and is probably due to the formation of diboranes or other irreversible intermediates.

  20. Effect of titanium dioxide crystalline structure on the photocatalytic production of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Chiarello, Gian Luca; Di Paola, Agatino; Palmisano, Leonardo; Selli, Elena

    2011-03-02

    The effect of the crystalline phase of TiO(2) (anatase, rutile and brookite) on its photocatalytic activity in hydrogen production from methanol-water vapours has been investigated by testing a series of both home-made and commercial TiO(2) photocatalysts, either bare or surface-modified by deposition of a fixed amount, i.e. 1 wt%, of platinum as co-catalyst. For all of the TiO(2) samples the rate of hydrogen production increased by one order of magnitude upon Pt deposition, because of the ability of Pt to enhance the separation of photoproduced electron-hole pairs. Under irradiation in the 350-450 nm wavelength range, brookite and anatase showed similar photoactivities, both superior to that of rutile. By contrast, rutile, possessing a narrower band gap, was active also under visible light (λ > 400 nm), whereas no hydrogen evolution was observed with anatase and brookite under such conditions. Surface area proved to be a key parameter, strongly influencing photoactivity. However, as the particle size became ultra-small, the semiconductor absorption edge was blue-shifted because of size quantisation effects, with a consequent decrease in hydrogen production rate due to the smaller portion of incident photons absorbed by the photocatalyst.

  1. Investigations of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in three types of Schiff bases by 2H and 3H NMR isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Schilf, Wojciech; Bloxsidge, James P; Jones, John R; Lu, Shui-Yu

    2004-06-01

    Hydrogen bonding within the structures of three Schiff bases (1-3), obtained by condensation of 4-methoxy-, 5-methoxy- and 4,6-dimethoxysalicylaldehyde with methylamine, was investigated by measuring deuterium and tritium NMR isotope effects. The primary deuterium and tritium isotope effects (delta(XH)-delta(XD/T)) and secondary one-bond nitrogen deuterium effect appear to be very useful parameters for defining the character of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The tritium isotope effects were also determined for nitrogen-hydrogen one-bond coupling constants for both 4-methoxy and 4,6-dimethoxy derivatives. These parameters are seen to be highly sensitive to hydrogen bond characteristics and can be used to distinguish localized and tautomeric hydrogen bonds.

  2. The Effects of Temperature and Carbon Tetrachloride on Polymer Based Hydrogen Getters

    SciTech Connect

    George M. Buffleben; Timothy J. Shepod

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes hydrogen pumping by organic getters in the presence of carbon tetrachloride, and how the reduction of pumping in the presence of this catalyst poison can be minimized through the choice of catalyst. Catalyst A is shown to be preferred in a clean environment, and catalyst B for a poisoned environment. Additional, we examine the effects of temperature on pumping rates, and show that this getter is effective over a large temperature range from -23 to 107 degrees Celsius.

  3. Integration of Photothermal Effect and Heat Insulation to Efficiently Reduce Reaction Temperature of CO2 Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbo; Wang, Liangbing; Wang, Kaiwen; Khan, Munir Ullah; Wang, Menglin; Li, Hongliang; Zeng, Jie

    2017-02-01

    The photothermal effect is applied in CO2 hydrogenation to reduce the reaction temperature under illumination by encapsulating Pt nanocubes and Au nanocages into a zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8). Under illumination, the heat generated by the photothermal effect of Au nanocages is mainly insulated in the ZIF-8 to form a localized high-temperature region, thereby improving the catalytic activity of Pt nanocubes.

  4. Quantum effects and anharmonicity in the H{sub 2}-Li{sup +}-benzene complex: A model for hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kolmann, Stephen J.; D'Arcy, Jordan H.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.

    2013-12-21

    Quantum and anharmonic effects are investigated in H{sub 2}-Li{sup +}-benzene, a model for hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks and carbon-based materials. Three- and 8-dimensional quantum diffusion Monte Carlo (QDMC) and rigid-body diffusion Monte Carlo (RBDMC) simulations are performed on potential energy surfaces interpolated from electronic structure calculations at the M05-2X/6-31+G(d,p) and M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) levels of theory using a three-dimensional spline or a modified Shepard interpolation. These calculations investigate the intermolecular interactions in this system, with three- and 8-dimensional 0 K H{sub 2} binding enthalpy estimates, ΔH{sub bind} (0 K), being 16.5 kJ mol{sup −1} and 12.4 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively: 0.1 and 0.6 kJ mol{sup −1} higher than harmonic values. Zero-point energy effects are 35% of the value of ΔH{sub bind} (0 K) at M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) and cannot be neglected; uncorrected electronic binding energies overestimate ΔH{sub bind} (0 K) by at least 6 kJ mol{sup −1}. Harmonic intermolecular binding enthalpies can be corrected by treating the H{sub 2} “helicopter” and “ferris wheel” rotations as free and hindered rotations, respectively. These simple corrections yield results within 2% of the 8-dimensional anharmonic calculations. Nuclear ground state probability density histograms obtained from the QDMC and RBDMC simulations indicate the H{sub 2} molecule is delocalized above the Li{sup +}-benzene system at 0 K.

  5. The effect of gamma-enhancing binaural beats on the control of feature bindings.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta

    2017-04-13

    Binaural beats represent the auditory experience of an oscillating sound that occurs when two sounds with neighboring frequencies are presented to one's left and right ear separately. Binaural beats have been shown to impact information processing via their putative role in increasing neural synchronization. Recent studies of feature-repetition effects demonstrated interactions between perceptual features and action-related features: repeating only some, but not all features of a perception-action episode hinders performance. These partial-repetition (or binding) costs point to the existence of temporary episodic bindings (event files) that are automatically retrieved by repeating at least one of their features. Given that neural synchronization in the gamma band has been associated with visual feature bindings, we investigated whether the impact of binaural beats extends to the top-down control of feature bindings. Healthy adults listened to gamma-frequency (40 Hz) binaural beats or to a constant tone of 340 Hz (control condition) for ten minutes before and during a feature-repetition task. While the size of visuomotor binding costs (indicating the binding of visual and action features) was unaffected by the binaural beats, the size of visual feature binding costs (which refer to the binding between the two visual features) was considerably smaller during gamma-frequency binaural beats exposure than during the control condition. Our results suggest that binaural beats enhance selectivity in updating episodic memory traces and further strengthen the hypothesis that neural activity in the gamma band is critically associated with the control of feature binding.

  6. Large effect of irradiance on hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones in Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Benthien, Albert; French, Katherine L.; Epping, Eric; Zondervan, Ingrid; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bijma, Jelle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen isotopic (δD) composition of long-chain alkenones produced by certain haptophyte algae has been suggested as a potential proxy for reconstructing paleo sea surface salinity. However, environmental parameters other than salinity may also affect the δD of alkenones. We investigated the impact of the level of irradiance on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of alkenones versus growth water by cultivating two strains of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi at different light intensities. The hydrogen isotope fractionation decreased by approximately 40‰ when irradiance was increased from 15 to 200 μmol photons m-2 s-1 above which it was relatively constant. The response is likely a direct effect of photosystem I and II activity as the relationship of the fractionation factor α versus light intensity can be described by an Eilers-Peeters photosynthesis model. This irradiance effect is in agreement with published δD data of alkenones derived from suspended particulate matter collected from different depths in the photic zone of the Gulf of California and the eastern tropical North Pacific. However, haptophyte algae tend to bloom at relatively high light intensities (>500 μmol photons m-2 s-1) occurring at the sea surface, at which hydrogen isotope fractionation is relatively constant and not affected by changes in light intensity. Alkenones accumulating in the sediment are likely mostly derived from these surface water haptophyte blooms, when the largest amount of biomass is produced. Therefore, the observed irradiance effect is unlikely to affect the applicability of the hydrogen isotopic composition of sedimentary long chain alkenones as a proxy for paleosalinity.

  7. Effects of hydrogen adsorption on the properties of double wall BN and (BN)xCy nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A.; Azevedo, S.; Kaschny, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    In the present contribution, we apply first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory, to study the effects of hydrogen adsorption on the structural and electronic properties of boron nitride and hybrid carbon-boron nitride double wall nanotubes. The results demonstrate that the hydrogen decoration induces significant structural deformation and an appreciable reduction in the gap energy. When the number of hydrogen atoms introduced on the outer wall is increased, desorption of hydrogen pairs are observed. The calculations indicate that each adsorbed hydrogen atom induces a structural deformation with an energetic cost of about 68 meV/atom. It is also found that the introduction of hydrogen atoms can be applied as an efficient tool for tuning the electronic properties of such structures.

  8. Effects of the additions of B, P, Sn, and Sb on oxygen assisted hydrogen embrittlement of nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Y.; Yamasaki, T.

    1984-03-01

    Effects of additions of B, P, Sn, and Sb on hydrogen embrittlement of nickel were examined on specimens cathodically charged with hydrogen. Tensile specimens were annealed either in vacuum or in a dry hydrogen gas. Undoped, Sn-doped, and Sb-doped materials annealed in vacuum revealed high susceptibility to intergranular hydrogen embrittlement, while the susceptibility was greatly reduced when the materials were annealed in hydrogen. The deleterious effect of vacuum annealing was proposed to result from grain boundary penetration of oxygen from the annealing environment. Additions of a small amount of B and P almost completely suppressed the IGHE of specimens annealed in vacuum. It is suggested that the effect of these elements on grain boundary penetration of oxygen is an important factor for their beneficial effects on IGHE. Addition of Sn somewhat increased the ductility of hydrogen charged specimens annealed both in vacuum and in hydrogen, indicating that this element is not deleterious. Addition of Sb increased the embrittlement susceptibility of specimens annealed in hydrogen. However, the deleterious effect of Sb was not serious in spite of the high concentration of Sb that was examined.

  9. The existence of memory effect on hydrogen ordering in ice: The effect makes ice attractive

    SciTech Connect

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C

    2011-01-01

    The existence of ferroelectric ice XI with ordered hydrogen in space becomes of interest in astronomy and physical chemistry because of the strong electrostatic force. However, the influence was believed to be limited because it forms in a narrow temperature range. From neutron diffraction experiments, we found that small hydrogen-ordered domains exist at significantly higher temperature and the domains induce the growth of 'bulk' ice XI. The small ordered domain is named 'memory' of hydrogen ordered ice because it is the residual structure of ice XI. Since the memory exists up to at least 111 K, most of ices in the solar system are hydrogen ordered and may have ferroelectricity. The small hydrogen-ordered domains govern the cosmochemical properties of ice and evolution of icy grains in the universe.

  10. Quantum Electrodynamics Effects in Rovibrational Spectra of Molecular Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Komasa, Jacek; Piszczatowski, Konrad; Łach, Grzegorz; Przybytek, Michał; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2011-10-11

    The dissociation energies from all rovibrational levels of H2 and D2 in the ground electronic state are calculated with high accuracy by including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects in the nonadiabatic treatment of the nuclear motion. For D2, the obtained energies have theoretical uncertainties of 0.001 cm(-1). For H2, similar uncertainties are for the lowest levels, while for the higher ones the uncertainty increases to 0.005 cm(-1). Very good agreement with recent high-resolution measurements of the rotational v = 0 levels of H2, including states with large angular momentum J, is achieved. This agreement would not have been possible without accurate evaluation of the relativistic and QED contributions and may be viewed as the first observation of the QED effects, mainly the electron self-energy, in a molecular spectrum. For several electric quadrupole transitions, we still observe certain disagreement with experimental results, which remains to be explained.

  11. Assessment of shock effects on amphibole water contents and hydrogen isotope compositions: 1. Amphibolite experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minitti, Michelle E.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Taylor, Bruce E.; Dyar, M. Darby; Schultz, Peter H.

    2008-02-01

    ). Extrapolating the shock signature of the regrouped data to grains that experienced Martian meteorite-like shock pressures suggests that shock-induced water losses and hydrogen isotope enrichments could approach 1 wt.% H 2O and Δ D = + 100‰, respectively. If these values are valid, then impact shock effects could explain a substantial fraction of the low water contents and variable hydrogen isotope compositions of the Martian meteorite kaersutites.

  12. Effects of Defects on Hydrogen Diffusion in NbC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehinia, Iman; Mastorakos, Ioannis; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2017-04-01

    Exceptional mechanical and physical properties of transition metal carbides and nitrides make them good coating-material candidates for extreme corrosive environments such as oil and natural gas wells. However, existence of small pores, pinholes and columnar structures of these ceramics significantly affect their resistance to corrosion, as pore sites would accelerate the diffusion of corrosive media into the substrate. In this research, molecular dynamics atomistic simulations are employed to investigate the effects of the isolated vacancies and the columnar structure on the diffusion rate of H atoms in NbC single crystal at various temperatures. Diffusion coefficient (D) of H atoms in NbC increased with C vacancy concentration. At elevated temperatures, the trapping effect of Nb vacancies is less effective when C vacancies are also present, as H atoms gain enough energy to jump back and forth between the C vacancies. Atomistic simulations also showed a jump in diffusion coefficient for cylindrical pore size of larger than 3 Å radius. Furthermore, D increased monotonically with temperature up to 1000 K in the presence of cylindrical pores. Further increase in temperature resulted in a drop in the diffusion coefficient for small pores while the large pores only showed a lower increasing trend in diffusion coefficient with the temperature.

  13. Stability of Surface and Subsurface Hydrogen on and in Au/Ni Near-Surface Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Celik, Fuat E.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2015-10-01

    Periodic, self-consistent DFT-GGA (PW91) calculations were used to study the interaction of hydrogen atoms with the (111) surfaces of substitutional near-surface alloys (NSAs) of Au and Ni with different surface layer compositions and different arrangements of Au atoms in the surface layer. The effect of hydrogen adsorption on the surface and in the first and second subsurface layers of the NSAs was studied. Increasing the Au content in the surface layer weakens hydrogen binding on the surface, but strengthens subsurface binding, suggesting that the distribution of surface and subsurface hydrogen will be different than that on pure Ni(111). While the metal composition of the surface layer has an effect on the binding energy of hydrogen on NSA surfaces, the local composition of the binding site has a stronger effect. For example, fcc hollow sites consisting of three Ni atoms bind H nearly as strongly as on Ni(111), and fcc sites consisting of three Au atoms bind H nearly as weakly as on Au(111). Sites with one or two Au atoms show intermediate binding energies. The preference of hydrogen for three-fold Ni hollow sites alters the relative stabilities of different surface metal atom arrangements, and may provide a driving force for adsorbate-induced surface rearrangement.

  14. Inversion of the Bohr effect upon oxygen binding to 24-meric tarantula hemocyanin.

    PubMed Central

    Sterner, R; Decker, H

    1994-01-01

    The Bohr effect describes the usually negative coupling between the binding of oxygen and the binding of protons to respiratory proteins. It was first described for hemoglobin and provides for an optimal oxygen supply of the organism under changing physiological conditions. Our measurements of both oxygen and proton binding to the 24-meric tarantula hemocyanin establish the unusual case where a respiratory protein binds protons at low degrees of oxygenation but releases protons at high degrees of oxygenation. In contrast to what is observed with hemoglobin and other respiratory proteins, this phenomenon amounts to the inversion of the Bohr effect in the course of an oxygen-binding curve at a given pH value. Therefore, protons in spider blood can act either as allosteric activators or as allosteric inhibitors of oxygen binding, depending on the degree of oxygenation of hemocyanin. These functional properties of tarantula hemocyanin, which cannot be explained by classical allosteric models, require at least four different conformational states of the subunits. Inspection of the known x-ray structures of closely related hemocyanins suggests that salt bridges between completely conserved histidine and glutamate residues located at particular intersubunit interfaces are responsible for the observed phenomena. Images PMID:8197143

  15. Probing the Functional Heterogeneity of Surface Binding Sites by Analysis of Experimental Binding Traces and the Effect of Mass Transport Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Svitel, Juraj; Boukari, Hacène; Van Ryk, Donald; Willson, Richard C.; Schuck, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Many techniques rely on the binding activity of surface-immobilized proteins, including antibody-based affinity biosensors for the detection of analytes, immunoassays, protein arrays, and surface plasmon resonance biosensors for the study of thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of protein interactions. To study the functional homogeneity of the surface sites and to characterize their binding properties, we have recently proposed a computational tool to determine the distribution of affinity and kinetic rate constants from surface binding progress curves. It is based on modeling the experimentally measured binding signal as a superposition of signals from binding to sites spanning a range of rate and equilibrium constants, with regularization providing the most parsimonious distribution consistent with the data. In the present work, we have expanded the scope of this approach to include a compartment-like transport step, which can describe competitive binding to different surface sites in a zone of depleted analyte close to the sensor surface. This approach addresses a major difficulty in the analysis of surface binding where both transport limitation as well as unknown surface site heterogeneity may be present. In addition to the kinetic binding parameters of the ensemble of surface sites, it can provide estimates for effective transport rate constants. Using antibody-antigen interactions as experimental model systems, we studied the effects of the immobilization matrix and of the analyte flow-rate on the effective transport rate constant. Both were experimentally observed to influence mass transport. The approximate description of mass transport by a compartment model becomes critical when applied to strongly transport-controlled data, and we examined the limitations of this model. In the presence of only moderate mass transport limitation the compartment model provides a good description, but this approximation breaks down for strongly transport-limited surface

  16. A kinetic model for quantitative evaluation of the effect of hydrogen and osmolarity on hydrogen production by Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus has attracted increased interest as an industrial hydrogen (H2) producer. The aim of the present study was to develop a kinetic growth model for this extreme thermophile. The model is based on Monod kinetics supplemented with the inhibitory effects of H2 and osmotic pressure, as well as the liquid-to-gas mass transfer of H2. Results Mathematical expressions were developed to enable the simulation of microbial growth, substrate consumption and product formation. The model parameters were determined by fitting them to experimental data. The derived model corresponded well with experimental data from batch fermentations in which the stripping rates and substrate concentrations were varied. The model was used to simulate the inhibition of growth by H2 and solute concentrations, giving a critical dissolved H2 concentration of 2.2 mmol/L and an osmolarity of 0.27 to 29 mol/L. The inhibition by H2, being a function of the dissolved H2 concentration, was demonstrated to be mainly dependent on H2 productivity and mass transfer rate. The latter can be improved by increasing the stripping rate, thereby allowing higher H2 productivity. The experimentally determined degree of oversaturation of dissolved H2 was 12 to 34 times the equilibrium concentration and was comparable to the values given by the model. Conclusions The derived model is the first mechanistically based model for fermentative H2 production and provides useful information to improve the understanding of the growth behavior of C. saccharolyticus. The model can be used to determine optimal operating conditions for H2 production regarding the substrate concentration and the stripping rate. PMID:21914204

  17. Alpha-Amylase Starch Binding Domains: Cooperative Effects of Binding to Starch Granules of Multiple Tandemly Arranged Domains▿

    PubMed Central

    Guillén, D.; Santiago, M.; Linares, L.; Pérez, R.; Morlon, J.; Ruiz, B.; Sánchez, S.; Rodríguez-Sanoja, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase starch binding domain (SBD) is a functional domain responsible for binding to insoluble starch. Structurally, this domain is dissimilar from other reported SBDs because it is composed of five identical tandem modules of 91 amino acids each. To understand adsorption phenomena specific to this SBD, the importance of their modular arrangement in relationship to binding ability was investigated. Peptides corresponding to one, two, three, four, or five modules were expressed as His-tagged proteins. Protein binding assays showed an increased capacity of adsorption as a function of the number of modules, suggesting that each unit of the SBD may act in an additive or synergic way to optimize binding to raw starch. PMID:17468268

  18. Alpha-amylase starch binding domains: cooperative effects of binding to starch granules of multiple tandemly arranged domains.

    PubMed

    Guillén, D; Santiago, M; Linares, L; Pérez, R; Morlon, J; Ruiz, B; Sánchez, S; Rodríguez-Sanoja, R

    2007-06-01

    The Lactobacillus amylovorus alpha-amylase starch binding domain (SBD) is a functional domain responsible for binding to insoluble starch. Structurally, this domain is dissimilar from other reported SBDs because it is composed of five identical tandem modules of 91 amino acids each. To understand adsorption phenomena specific to this SBD, the importance of their modular arrangement in relationship to binding ability was investigated. Peptides corresponding to one, two, three, four, or five modules were expressed as His-tagged proteins. Protein binding assays showed an increased capacity of adsorption as a function of the number of modules, suggesting that each unit of the SBD may act in an additive or synergic way to optimize binding to raw starch.

  19. Postantibiotic effect of disinfection treatment by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Odashima, Yu; Nakamura, Keisuke; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kanno, Taro; Meirelles, Luiz; Sasaki, Keiichi; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the postantibiotic effect (PAE) of the disinfection treatment by photolysis of H2O2. Postantibiotic effect was induced in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus salivarius by exposing the bacteria to H2O2 at concentrations of 250-1000 mmol/l, laser irradiation at a wavelength of 405 nm, and the combination of both (photolysis of H2O2) for 10-30 seconds. The photolysis of H2O2 induced significantly longer PAE than other treatments. The PAE was augmented dependently on not only the concentration of H2O2 but the laser irradiation time. Electron spin resonance analysis showed that the hydroxyl radical was also generated dependently on both the concentration of H2O2 and the laser irradiation time, suggesting that the hydroxyl radicals contribute to the PAE. These results suggest that the disinfection treatment by photolysis of H2O2 induces PAE in S. aureus and S. salivarius even though they were treated for only 10-30 seconds.

  20. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms.

  1. Nuclear quantum effect and temperature dependency on the hydrogen-bonded structure of base pairs.

    PubMed

    Daido, Masashi; Kawashima, Yukio; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2013-10-30

    The structure of Watson-Crick-type adenine-thymine and guanine-cytosine pairs has been studied by hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) and path integral hybrid Monte Carlo (PIHMC) simulations with the use of semiempirical PM6-DH+ method in the gas phase. We elucidated the nuclear quantum effect and temperature dependency on the hydrogen-bonded moiety of base pairs. It was shown that the contribution of nuclear quantum effect on the hydrogen-bonded structure is significant not only at low temperature 150 K but also at temperature as high as 450 K. The relative position of hydrogen-bonded proton between two heavy atoms and the nuclear quantum nature of the proton are also shown. Furthermore, we have applied principal component analysis to HMC and PIHMC simulations to analyze the nuclear quantum effect on intermolecular motions. We found that the ratio of Buckle mode (lowest vibrational mode from normal mode analysis) decreases due to the nuclear quantum effect, whereas that of Propeller mode (second lowest vibrational mode) increases. In addition, nonplanar structures of base pairs were found to become stable due to the nuclear quantum effect from two-dimensional free energy landscape along Buckle and Propeller modes.

  2. Protective effect and mechanism of hydrogen treatment on lung epithelial barrier dysfunction in rats with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, L-D; Wu, X-Y; Tao, B-D; Wang, N; Zhang, J

    2016-01-26

    This study aimed to explore the protective effect of hydrogen and to investigate the underlying mechanism of its preliminary effect on the alveolar epithelial barrier function in septic rats. Forty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into three groups (N = 15): control [saline injection (intraperitoneal, ip), air drawing; SA], acute lung injury group [lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection (ip, 15 mg/kg), air drawing; LA], and acute lung injury combined with hydrogen drawing group [LPS injection (ip, 15 mg/kg), 2% hydrogen drawing; LH]. The rats were euthanized after 6 h of treatment, and the extravascular lung water (EVLW), pulmonary alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure (A-aDO2), and respiratory index (RI) of each group were measured. The aquaporin-1 (AQP-1) protein expression in the lung tissues was detected using immunohistochemistry and western blotting, and the correlation between the EVLW and AQP-1 was analyzed. The lung morphology was observed with light and electron microscopy. In the LA group, EVLW (0.87 ± 0.17), A-aDO2 (113.21 ± 13.92), RI (0.65 ± 0.26), and AQP-1 expression increased. Additionally, thickened alveolar walls, significant invasion of inflammatory cells around the vessels, capillary ectasia, hyperemia/hemorrhage in the alveolar space, significantly swollen mitochondria, and increased vacuolar degeneration were observed. A significant negative correlation between AQP-1 expression and EVLW was observed (R2 = 0.8806). Compared with the LA group, EVLW (0.71 ± 0.19), A-aDO2 (132.42 ± 17.39), RI (0.75 ± 0.24), and inflammatory reaction decreased and AQP-1 expression increased in the LH group. The damage to pulmonary epithelial cells improved after hydrogen treatment in rats with sepsis; hydrogen could protect the pulmonary epithelial barrier function by acting on AQP-1.

  3. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS TO THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the effects of flexibility on the binding of environmental estrogens to the estrogen receptor
    There are many reports of environmental endocrine disruption in the literature, yet it has been difficult to identify the specific chemicals responsible for these effects. ...

  4. Effects of Buoyancy in Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Al-Ammar, K.; Gollahalli, S. R.; Griffin, D. W.

    1999-01-01

    This project was carried out to understand the effects of heat release and buoyancy on the flame structure of diffusion flames. Experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure in both normal gravity and microgravity conditions in the NASA LeRC 2.2 s drop tower. Experiments were also conducted in a variable pressure combustion facility in normal gravity to scale buoyancy and thus, to supplement the drop tower experiments. Pure H2 or H2 mixed with He was used as the jet fluid to avoid the complexities associated with soot formation. Fuel jet burning in quiescent air was visualized and quantified by the Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry (RSD) to obtain scalar profiles (temperature, oxygen concentration) within the flame. Burner tube diameter (d) was varied from 0.3 to 1.19 mm producing jet exit Reynolds numbers ranging from 40 to 1900, and generating flames encompassing laminar and transitional (laminar to turbulent) flow structure. Some experiments were also complemented with the CFD analysis. In a previous paper, we have presented details of the RSD technique, comparison of computed and measured scalar distributions, and effects of buoyancy on laminar and transitional H2 gas-jet diffusion flames. Results obtained from the RSD technique, variable pressure combustion chamber, and theoretical models have been published. Subsequently, we have developed a new drop rig with improved optical and image acquisition. In this set up, the schlieren images are acquired in real time and stored digitally in RAM of an onboard computer. This paper deals with laminar diffusion flames of pure H2 in normal and microgravity.

  5. Effect of reaction pressure on octane number and reformate and hydrogen yields in catalytic reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Moljord, K.; Hellenes, H.G.; Hoff, A.; Tanem, I.; Grande, K.; Holmen, A.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of reaction pressure in catalytic reforming was studied in a pilot reactor with a commercial Pt-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reforming catalyst and a hydrotreated naphtha from a North Sea crude. Reformate and hydrogen yields, research octane numbers (RON), and reformate composition at reactor pressures in the range of 12--25 bar were measured as a function of temperature in the range of 95--105 RON. Reformate and hydrogen yields increased as the pressure range. For the lower reaction pressures the hydrogen yields increased with increasing severity, but for the higher pressures the hydrogen yields started to decline above certain severities. RON was linearly dependent on the concentration of aromatics in the reformate, although the selectivity toward aromatics depends on both pressure and temperature. Less hydro dealkylation of C{sub 8} and heavier aromatics to benzene and toluene resulted in a shift toward xylenes and heavier aromatic components when pressure was lowered. Variations in the degree of paraffin isomerization did not influence RON significantly at those severities.

  6. Fracture toughness of the F-82H steel-effect of loading modes, hydrogen, and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.-X.; Jones, R. H.; Hirth, J. P.; Gelles, D. S.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of loading mode, hydrogen, and temperature on fracture toughness and tearing modulus were examined for a ferritic/martensitic steel (F-82H). The introduction of a shear load component, mode III, significantly decreased the initiation and propagation resistance of cracks compared to the opening load, mode I, behavior. Mode I crack initiation and propagation exhibited the highest resistance. A minimum resistance occurred when the mode I and mode III loads were nearly equal. The presence of 4 wppm hydrogen decreased the cracking resistance compared to behavior without H regardless of the loading mode. The minimum mixed-mode fracture toughness with the presence of hydrogen was about 30% of the hydrogen-free mode I fracture toughness. The mixed-mode toughness exhibited a lesser sensitivity to temperature than the mode I toughness. The JIC value was 284 kJ/m 2 at room temperature, but only 60 kJ/m 2 at -55°C and 30 kJ/m 2 at -90°C. The ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was apparently higher than -55°C.

  7. Calcium effect on fermentative hydrogen production in an anaerobic up-flow sludge blanket system.

    PubMed

    Chang, F Y; Lin, C Y

    2006-01-01

    The effects of calcium ions on a granular fermentative hydrogen production system were investigated in four lab-scale UASB reactors that fed on sucrose (20 g COD/L). The reactors were seeded with anaerobic sewage sludge microflora and operated at a temperature of 35 +/- 1 degrees, pH of 6.7 with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 24-6h. The experimental results indicated that calcium ion addition (75 - 150 mg/L) could enhance the granulation and elevate hydrogen production efficiency. However, an overly-high calcium concentration (300 mg-Ca(+2)/L) deteriorated the hydrogen productivity. A calcium concentration of 150 mg-Ca(+2)/L resulted in a peak HP of 3.6 mol H2/mol-sucrose and HPR of 807 mmol-H2/L-d at HRTs of 8 and 6 h, respectively. The EPS concentration of biohydrogenic biomass was higher than that of the aerobic or methanogenic biomass. The protein/carbon-ratio ranged from 0.17 to 0.26%. The multinomial regression analysis shows that the 75 - 150 mg-Ca(+2)/L calcium concentrations and HRT of 6 h were the optimal operating conditions to efficiently produce hydrogen.

  8. The effects of cations and anions on hydrogen chemisorption at Pt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. C.; Ogrady, W. E.; Yeager, E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence based on linear sweep voltammetry is presented to substantiate the view that ionic adsorption substantially shifts electrode potentials in addition to the relative heights of the hydrogen adsorption peaks. HClO4 and HF are chosen as better reference electrolytes for anion studies. The voltammetry curves for 0.1M HF and 0.1M HClO4 as well as the effect of adding successively increasing amounts of H2SO4 to these electrolytes are discussed. The measurements are also extended to alkaline solutions. Mechanisms whereby the addition of various cations and anions to electrolytes such as HF and HClO4 can induce changes in the structure of the hydrogen adsorption region in the voltammetry curves are identified: (1) blocking of sites by anion adsorption and coupling of hydrogen adsorption and anion desorption, (2) modification in the hydrogen adsorption energies for sites adjacent to adsorbed anions, (3) changes in the potential distribution across the interface, and (4) surface restructuring.

  9. Bactericidal effect of plasma jet with helium flowing through 3% hydrogen peroxide against Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin-Cai; Li, Yu-Lan; Liu, De-Xi; Cao, Ying-Guang; Lu, Xin-Pei

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of plasma jet with helium (He) flowing through 3% hydrogen peroxide in root canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis. A total of 42 single-rooted anterior teeth were prepared, sterilized, inoculated with an E. faecalis suspension and incubated for 7 days. Next, the teeth were randomly divided into six experimental groups (including groups treated by plasma jet with or without He for different time durations) and one control group treated without plasma. The number of surviving bacteria in each canal was determined by counting the colony forming units (CFU)/ml on nutrient agar plates. The results indicated that statistically significant reduction in CFU/ml (P<0.005) existed for all treatment groups relative to the control group. The greatest reductions in CFU/ml were observed for Group 3 (7.027 log unit reduction) and Group 2 (6.237 log unit reduction), which were treated by plasma jet sterilization with He flowing through 3% hydrogen peroxide for 4 min or for 2 min, respectively. In addition, the reduction in Group 3 was significantly greater compared with that in Group 2 or in the groups treated by plasma jet sterilization without He flowing through 3% hydrogen peroxide for 1, 2 or 4 min. In conclusion, plasma jet with or without He flowing through 3% hydrogen peroxide can effectively sterilized root canals infected with E. faecalis and should be considered as an alternative method for root canal disinfection in endodontic treatments.

  10. Coal pyrolysis to acetylene using dc hydrogen plasma torch: effects of system variables on acetylene concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Longwei; Meng, Yuedong; Shen, Jie; Shu, Xingsheng; Fang, Shidong; Xiong, Xinyang

    2009-03-01

    In order to unveil the inner mechanisms that determine acetylene concentration, experimental studies on the effect of several parameters such as plasma torch power, hydrogen flux and coal flux were carried out from coal pyrolysis in a dc plasma torch. Xinjiang long flame coals including volatile constituents at a level of about 42% were used in the experiment. Under the following experimental conditions, namely plasma torch power, hydrogen flow rate and pulverized coal feed speed of 2.12 MW, 32 kg h-1 and 900 kg h-1, respectively, acetylene volume concentration of about 9.4% was achieved. The experimental results indicate that parameters such as plasma torch power and coal flux play important roles in the formation of acetylene. Acetylene concentration increases inconspicuously with hydrogen flux. A chemical thermodynamic equilibrium model using the free energy method is introduced in this paper to numerically simulate each experimental condition. The numerical results are qualitatively consistent with the experimental results. Two parameters, i.e. the gas temperature and the ratio of hydrogen/carbon, are considered to be the dominant and independent factors that determine acetylene concentration.

  11. Isotopic effect of parametric instabilities during lower hybrid waves injection into hydrogen/deuterium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Aihui; Gao, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Based on the local dispersion relation, the parametric instability (PI) was numerically investigated for the injection of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) into hydrogen and deuterium plasmas separately. Numerical calculations under typical scrape-off layer parameters in tokamak plasmas show that both the unstable regions of the PI and the values of growth rates are close for two cases, in spite of the decaying channel of the ion sound quasimode or ion cyclotron quasimode (ICQM). These numerical results could be understood by the analyses based on the fluid model. Parameter dependences are also similar for hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. For example, the ICQM growth rate increases with an increasing density, a decreasing temperature, and a decreasing magnetic field in deuterium plasmas as it does in hydrogen plasmas. The isotopic effect of the PI during the LHW injection is weak. As a result, the lower hybrid current drive efficiency at a high density in deuterium plasmas cannot be much improved over hydrogen plasmas if the PI process dominates the behavior of LHWs at the plasma edge.

  12. Maltose-binding protein effectively stabilizes the partially closed conformation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter MalFGK2.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jingwei; Gu, Shuo; Gao, Xin; Huang, Xuhui; Wang, Wenning

    2017-04-05

    Maltose transporter MalFGK2 is a type-I importer in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Upon the binding of its periplasmic binding protein, MalE, the ATPase activity of MalFGK2 can be greatly enhanced. Crystal structures of the MalFGK2-MalE-maltose complex in a so-called "pretranslocation" ("pre-T") state with a partially closed conformation suggest that the formation of this MalE-stabilized intermediate state is a key step leading to the outward-facing catalytic state. On the contrary, crosslinking and fluorescence studies suggest that ATP binding alone is sufficient to promote the outward-facing catalytic state, thereby doubting the role of MalE binding. To clarify the role of MalE binding and to gain deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of MalFGK2, we calculated the free energy surfaces (FESs) related to the lateral motion in the presence and absence of MalE using atomistic metadynamics simulations. The results showed that, in the absence of MalE, laterally closing motion was energetically forbidden but, upon MalE binding, more closed conformations similar to the pre-T state become more stable. The significant effect of MalE binding on the free energy landscapes was in agreement with crystallographic studies and confirmed the important role of MalE in stabilizing the pre-T state. Our simulations also revealed that the allosteric effect of MalE stimulation originates from the MalE-binding-promoted vertical motion between MalF and MalG cores, which was further supported by MD simulation of the MalE-independent mutant MalF500.

  13. Use of H/D isotope effects to gather information about hydrogen bonding and hydrogen exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Miyanoiri, Yohei; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Yang, Chun-Jiun; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2014-04-01

    Polar side-chains in proteins play important roles in forming and maintaining three-dimensional structures, and thus participate in various biological functions. Until recently, most protein NMR studies have focused on the non-exchangeable protons of amino acid residues. The exchangeable protons attached to polar groups, such as hydroxyl (OH), sulfhydryl (SH), and amino (NH2) groups, have mostly been ignored, because in many cases these hydrogen atoms exchange too quickly with water protons, making NMR observations impractical. However, in certain environments, such as deep within the hydrophobic interior of a protein, or in a strong hydrogen bond to other polar groups or interacting ligands, the protons attached to polar groups may exhibit slow hydrogen exchange rates and thus become NMR accessible. To explore the structural and biological implications of the interactions involving polar side-chains, we have developed versatile NMR methods to detect such cases by observing the line shapes of (13)C NMR signals near the polar groups, which are affected by deuterium-proton isotope shifts in a mixture of H2O and D2O. These methods allow the detection of polar side-chains with slow hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates, and therefore provide opportunities to retrieve information about the polar side-chains, which might otherwise be overlooked by conventional NMR experiments. Future prospects of applications using deuterium-proton isotope shifts to retrieve missing structural and dynamic information of proteins are discussed.

  14. A double mutation of Escherichia coli 2C-methyl-d-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase disrupts six hydrogen bonds with, yet fails to prevent binding of, an isoprenoid diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Sgraja, Tanja; Kemp, Lauris E.; Ramsden, Nicola; Hunter, William N.

    2005-01-01

    The essential enzyme 2C-methyl-d-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate (MECP) synthase, found in most eubacteria and the apicomplexan parasites, participates in isoprenoid-precursor biosynthesis and is a validated target for the development of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. The structure and mechanism of the enzyme have been elucidated and the recent exciting finding that the enzyme actually binds diphosphate-containing isoprenoids at the interface formed by the three subunits that constitute the active protein suggests the possibility of feedback regulation of MECP synthase. To investigate such a possibility, a form of the enzyme was sought that did not bind these ligands but which would retain the quaternary structure necessary to create the active site. Two amino acids, Arg142 and Glu144, in Escherichia coli MECP synthase were identified as contributing to ligand binding. Glu144 interacts directly with Arg142 and positions the basic residue to form two hydrogen bonds with the terminal phosphate group of the isoprenoid diphosphate ligand. This association occurs at the trimer interface and three of these arginines interact with the ligand phosphate group. A dual mutation was designed (Arg142 to methionine and Glu144 to leucine) to disrupt the electrostatic attractions between the enzyme and the phosphate group to investigate whether an enzyme without isoprenoid diphosphate could be obtained. A low-resolution crystal structure of the mutated MECP synthase Met142/Leu144 revealed that geranyl diphosphate was retained despite the removal of six hydrogen bonds normally formed with the enzyme. This indicates that these two hydrophilic residues on the surface of the enzyme are not major determinants of isoprenoid binding at the trimer interface but rather that hydrophobic interactions between the hydrocarbon tail and the core of the enzyme trimer dominate ligand binding. PMID:16511114

  15. Effect of hydrogen injected subcutaneously on testicular tissues of rats exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is one of the most common reasons inducing reactive oxygen species in semen. High concentration of active oxygen will cause decrease of sperm density and viability and induce oxidative injury of sperm DNA which has become the hot spot in male infertility. Although hydrogen was found to be an effective remover of active oxygen in liver, heart, kidney and brain, the same effect has not been discussed in reproductive system. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of hydrogen against cigarette smoke-induced damage in rat reproductive system. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups to conduct this experiment, results showed that rats in SK+HSI group (passive smoking and hydrogen subcutaneous injection group) exhibited larger amount of sperm count, smaller sperm deformation rate, higher levels of testosterone and SOD in serum and testis, lower levels of MDA in testis and less morphologic abnormalities compared to SK+NSI group (passive smoking and nitrogen subcutaneous injection group). As a consequence, we concluded that injected subcutaneously exerted protective effects on reproductive system injury of male rats exposed to cigarette smoke through inhibiting oxidative damage. PMID:26131139

  16. Theoretical exploration of the cooperative effect in NMF-NMF-amino acid residue hydrogen bonding system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xichen; Liu, Wenlan; Sun, Kening; Wang, Yan; Tan, Hongwei; Chen, Guangju

    2008-09-28

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the cooperative effect in sixteen linearly-arranged trimer systems consisting of N-methylformamide dimer and an extra amino acid residue. These trimer systems, NMF-NMF-AAR, in short, have been systematically investigated by full optimization at B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level and subsequent electronic energy calculations at PBE1PBE/cc-pVTZ, HF/cc-pVTZ and MP2/cc-pVTZ, respectively. Obvious spatial transformation due to energetic factors has been found in almost all the trimers. Systematic analysis in weak interaction energy components has shown that: (1) in these trimer systems, the bonding structure and the cooperative effect combine to determine the stability of both HB1 and HB2. For HB2, the structure of the constituent amino acid residue also plays a crucial role by interfering with the neighboring moieties; (2) the large contribution of the cooperative effect to the overall hydrogen bonding energy has claimed the importance of cooperativity in our systems; (3) the non-hydrogen bonding weak interaction components are found to be non-negligible in these trimer systems; (4) moreover, the cooperative effect between these non-hydrogen bonding components is always found to be positive. The good performances of PBE1PBE and PM6 have been established by comparisons between these methods.

  17. Effect of micro cooling channels on a hydrogen peroxide monopropellant microthruster performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jeongmoo; Kwon, Sejin

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a hydrogen peroxide monopropellant microthrusters with and without regenerative micro cooling channels were fabricated and performance test results were compared to determine cooling effect of the regenerative micro cooling channels. Photosensitive glass was used as microfabrication material, which is cost-effective for MEMS fabrication process. Nine photosensitive glasses was integrated using UV and thermal bonding and composed the microthrusters. 90wt% hydrogen peroxide was used both as monopropellant and cooling fluid. For hydrogen peroxide decomposition, catalyst was fabricated and inserted into the microchamber. Platinum was used as the catalyst active material and γ-alumina was used as catalyst support. Experimental testing was conducted to determine effect of the cooling channels and the chamber pressure, temperature and surface temperature were measured. The performance test results showed that it was possible to relieve the thermal shock of the micro thruster structure by as much as 64% by adding regenerative micro cooling channels on both sides of the microthruster chamber. However, the chamber pressure and temperature decreased by regenerative cooling channels due to excessive cooling effects.

  18. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  19. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  20. Mapping the Effect of Gly Mutations in Collagen on α2β1 Integrin Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Sezin; Yu, Hongtao; An, Bo; Hamaia, Samir; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of one Gly in the essential repeating tripeptide sequence of the type I collagen triple helix results in the dominant hereditary bone disorder osteogenesis imperfecta. The mechanism leading to pathology likely involves misfolding and autophagy, although it has been hypothesized that some mutations interfere with known collagen interactions. Here, the effect of Gly replacements within and nearby the integrin binding GFPGER sequence was investigated using a recombinant bacterial collagen system. When a six-triplet human type I collagen sequence containing GFPGER was introduced into a bacterial collagen-like protein, this chimeric protein bound to integrin. Constructs with Gly to Ser substitutions within and nearby the inserted human sequence still formed a trypsin-resistant triple helix, suggesting a small local conformational perturbation. Gly to Ser mutations within the two Gly residues in the essential GFPGER sequence prevented integrin binding and cell attachment as predicted from molecular dynamics studies of the complex. Replacement of Gly residues C-terminal to GFPGER did not affect integrin binding. In contrast, Gly replacements N-terminal to the GFPGER sequence, up to four triplets away, decreased integrin binding and cell adhesion. This pattern suggests either an involvement of the triplets N-terminal to GFPGER in initial binding or a propagation of the perturbation of the triple helix C-terminal to a mutation site. The asymmetry in biological consequences relative to the mutation site may relate to the observed pattern of osteogenesis imperfecta mutations near the integrin binding site. PMID:27432884

  1. Effect of DNA binding on geminate CO recombination kinetics in CooA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Youn, Hwan; Poulos, Thomas; Champion, Paul

    2012-02-01

    CooA proteins are heme-based CO-sensing transcription factors. Here we study the ultrafast dynamics of geminate CO rebinding to RrCooA. The effects of DNA binding and the truncation of the DNA binding domain on the CO geminate recombination kinetics were investigated. The CO rebinding kinetics in these CooA complexes takes place on ultrafast timescales but remains non-exponential over many decades in time. We show that this non-exponential kinetic response is due to a quenched enthalpic barrier distribution resulting from a distribution of heme geometries that is frozen or slowly evolving on the timescale of CO rebinding. We also show that, upon CO binding, the distal pocket of the heme in RrCooA relaxes to form a very efficient hydrophobic trap for CO. DNA binding further tightens the narrow distal pocket and slightly weakens the iron-proximal histidine bond. Analysis of our data reveals that the uncomplexed and inherently flexible DNA binding domain adds additional structural heterogeneity to the heme doming coordinate. When CooA forms a complex with DNA, the flexibility of the DNA-binding domain decreases and the distribution of the conformations available in the heme domain becomes restricted.

  2. Protein-protein recognition: an experimental and computational study of the R89K mutation in Raf and its effect on Ras binding.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, J.; Fridman, M.; Maruta, H.; Treutlein, H. R.; Simonson, T.

    1999-01-01

    Binding of the protein Raf to the active form of Ras promotes activation of the MAP kinase signaling pathway, triggering cell growth and differentiation. Raf/Arg89 in the center of the binding interface plays an important role determining Ras-Raf binding affinity. We have investigated experimentally and computationally the Raf-R89K mutation, which abolishes signaling in vivo. The binding to [gamma-35S]GTP-Ras of a fusion protein between the Raf-binding domain (RBD) of Raf and GST was reduced at least 175-fold by the mutation, corresponding to a standard binding free energy decrease of at least 3.0 kcal/mol. To compute this free energy and obtain insights into the microscopic interactions favoring binding, we performed alchemical simulations of the RBD, both complexed to Ras and free in solution, in which residue 89 is gradually mutated from Arg into Lys. The simulations give a standard binding free energy decrease of 2.9+/-1.9 kcal/mol, in agreement with experiment. The use of numerous runs with three different force fields allows insights into the sources of uncertainty in the free energy and its components. The binding decreases partly because of a 7 kcal/mol higher cost to desolvate Lys upon binding, compared to Arg, due to better solvent interactions with the more concentrated Lys charge in the unbound state. This effect is expected to be general, contributing to the lower propensity of Lys to participate in protein-protein interfaces. Large contributions to the free energy change also arise from electrostatic interactions with groups up to 8 A away, namely residues 37-41 in the conserved effector domain of Ras (including 4 kcal/mol from Ser39 which loses a bifurcated hydrogen bond to Arg89), the conserved Lys84 and Lys87 of Raf, and 2-3 specific water molecules. This analysis will provide insights into the large experimental database of Ras-Raf mutations. PMID:10210183

  3. Studies of Evaluation of Hydrogen Embrittlement Property of High-Strength Steels with Consideration of the Effect of Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Eiji; Wang, Maoqiu; Li, Songjie; Zhang, Zuogui; Kimura, Yuuji; Uno, Nobuyoshi; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength steels was investigated by using slow strain rate test (SSRT) of circumferentially notched round bar specimens after hydrogen precharging. On top of that, cyclic corrosion tests (CCT) and outdoor exposure tests were conducted prior to SSRT to take into account the effect of hydrogen uptake under atmospheric corrosion for the evaluation of the susceptibility of high-strength steels. Our studies of hydrogen embrittle properties of high-strength steels with 1100 to 1500 MPa of tensile strength and a prototype ultrahigh-strength steel with 1760 MPa containing hydrogen traps using those methods are reviewed in this article. A power law relationship between notch tensile strength of hydrogen-precharged specimens and diffusible hydrogen content has been found. It has also been found that the local stress and the local hydrogen concentration are controlling factors of fracture. The results obtained by using SSRT after CCT and outdoor exposure test were in good agreement with the hydrogen embrittlement fracture property obtained by means of long-term exposure tests of bolts made of the high-strength steels.

  4. Effect of platinum nanoparticle deposition parameters on hydrogen peroxide transduction for applications in wearable electrochemical glucose biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargill, Allison A.; Neil, Kathrine M.; Hondred, John A.; McLamore, Eric S.; Claussen, Jonathan C.

    2016-05-01

    Enhanced interest in wearable biosensor technology over the past decade is directly related to the increasing prevalence of diabetes and the associated requirement of daily blood glucose monitoring. In this work we investigate the platinum-carbon transduction element used in traditional first-generation glucose biosensors which rely on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide produced by the glucose-glucose oxidase binding scheme. We electrodeposit platinum nanoparticles on a commercially-available screen printed carbon electrode by stepping an applied current between 0 and 7.12 mA/cm2 for a varying number of cycles. Next, we examine the trends in deposition and the effect that the number of deposition cycles has on the sensitivity of electrochemical glucose sensing. Results from this work indicate that applying platinum nanoparticles to screen printed carbon via electrodeposition from a metal salt solution improves overall biosensor sensitivity. This work also pinpoints the amount of platinum (i.e., number of deposition cycles) that maximizes biosensor sensitivity in an effort to minimize the use of the precious metals, viz., platinum, in electrode fabrication. In summary, this work quantifies the relationship between platinum electrodeposition and sensor performance, which is crucial in designing and producing cost-effective sensors.

  5. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  6. Effect of protein aggregates on characterization of FcRn binding of Fc-fusion therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bajardi-Taccioli, Adriana; Blum, Andrew; Xu, Chongfeng; Sosic, Zoran; Bergelson, Svetlana; Feschenko, Marina

    2015-10-01

    Recycling of antibodies and Fc containing therapeutic proteins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is known to prolong their persistence in the bloodstream. Fusion of Fc fragment of IgG1 to other proteins is one of the strategies to improve their pharmacokinetic properties. Accurate measurement of Fc-FcRn binding provides information about the strength of this interaction, which in most cases correlates with serum half-life of the protein. It can also offer insight into functional integrity of Fc region. We investigated FcRn binding activity of a large set of Fc-fusion samples after thermal stress by the method based on AlphaScreen technology. An unexpected significant increase in FcR binding was found to correlate with formation of aggregates in these samples. Monomer purified from a thermally-stressed sample had normal FcRn binding, confirming that its Fc portion was intact. Experiments with aggregates spiked into a sample with low initial aggregation level, demonstrated strong correlation between the level of aggregates and FcRn binding. This correlation varied significantly in different methods. By introducing modifications to the assay format we were able to minimize the effects of aggregated species on FcRn binding, which should prevent masking functional changes of Fc-fusion protein. Biolayer interferometry (BLI) was used as an alternative method to measure FcRn binding. Both optimized AlphaScreen- and BLI-based assays were sensitive to structural changes in Fc portion of the molecule, such as oxidation of methionines 252 and 428, and therefore suitable for characterization of FcRn binding.

  7. Recombination line intensities for hydrogenic ions. III - Effects of finite optical depth and dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummer, D. G.; Storey, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect on the recombination spectrum of hydrogen arising from: (1) finite optical thickness in the Lyman lines; (2) the overlapping of Lyman lines near the series limit; (3) the absorption of Lyman lines by dust or photoionization, and (4) the long-wave radiation emitted by dust is examined. Full account is taken of electron and heavy particle collisions in redistributing energy and angular momentum. It is seen that each of these deviations from the classical Case B leads to observable effects, and that dust influences the recombination spectrum in characteristic ways that may make possible new observational constraints on dust properties in nebulosities. On the basis of these calculations it is believed that the uncertainty in the determination of the helium-to-hydrogen abundance ratio in the universe may be larger than currently claimed.

  8. Effect of hydrogen passivation on the photoluminescence of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatryb, G.; Klak, M. M.; Wojcik, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Mascher, P.; Podhorodecki, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, silicon-rich silicon oxide films containing terbium were prepared by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The influence of hydrogen passivation on defects-mediated non-radiative recombination of excited Tb3+ ions was investigated by photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation, and photoluminescence decay measurements. Passivation was found to have no effect on shape and spectral position of the excitation spectra. In contrast, a gradual increase in photoluminescence intensity and photoluminescence decay time was observed upon passivation for the main 5D4-7F5 transition of Tb3+ ions. This observation was attributed to passivation of non-radiative recombination defects centers with hydrogen. It was found that the number of emitted photons increases upon passivation as a result of two effects: (1) longer Tb3+ lifetime in the 5D4 excited state and (2) optical activation of new Tb3+ emitters. The obtained results were discussed and compared with other experimental reports.

  9. Solar wind heating beyond 1 AU. [interplanetary atomic hydrogen gas effect on protons and electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, T. E.; Leer, E.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of an interplanetary atomic hydrogen gas on solar wind proton, electron and alpha-particle temperatures beyond 1 AU is considered. It is shown that the proton temperature (and probably also the alpha-particle temperature) reaches a minimum between 2 AU and 4 AU, depending on values chosen for solar wind and interstellar gas parameters. Heating of the electron gas depends primarily on the thermal coupling of the protons and electrons. For strong coupling, the electron temperature reaches a minimum between 4 AU and 8 AU, but for weak coupling (Coulomb collisions only), the electron temperature continues to decrease throughout the inner solar system. A spacecraft travelling to Jupiter should be able to observe the heating effect of the solar wind-interplanetary hydrogen interaction, and from such observations it may be possible of infer some properties of the interstellar neutral gas.

  10. The effects of blending hydrogen with methane on engine operation, efficiency, and emissions.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, T.; Ng, H. K.; Peters, R.W.; Energy Systems; Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham

    2007-04-01

    Hydrogen is considered one of the most promising future energy carriers and transportation fuels. Because of the lack of a hydrogen infrastructure and refueling stations, widespread introduction of vehicles powered by pure hydrogen is not likely in the near future. Blending hydrogen with methane could be one solution. Such blends take advantage of the unique combustion properties of hydrogen and, at the same time, reduce the demand for pure hydrogen. In this paper, the authors analyze the combustion properties of hydrogen/methane blends (5% and 20% methane [by volume] in hydrogen equal to 30% and 65% methane [by mass] in hydrogen) and compare them to those of pure hydrogen as a reference. The study confirms that only minor adjustments in spark timing and injection duration are necessary for an engine calibrated and tuned for operation on pure hydrogen to run on hydrogen/methane blends.

  11. A hydrogen curing effect on surface plasmon resonance fiber optic hydrogen sensors using an annealed Au/Ta₂O₅/Pd multi-layers film.

    PubMed

    Hosoki, Ai; Nishiyama, Michiko; Igawa, Hirotaka; Seki, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-07-28

    In this paper, a response time of the surface plasmon resonance fiber optic hydrogen sensor has successfully improved with keeping sensor sensitivity high by means of hydrogen curing (immersing) process of annealed Au/Ta2O5/ Pd multi-layers film. The hydrogen curing effect on the response time and sensitivity has been experimentally revealed by changing the annealing temperatures of 400, 600, 800°C and through observing the optical loss change in the H2 curing process. When the 25-nm Au/60-nm Ta2O5/10-nm Pd multi-layers film annealed at 600°C is cured with 4% H2/N2 mixture, it is found that a lot of nano-sized cracks were produced on the Pd surface. After H2 curing process, the response time is improved to be 8 s, which is two times faster than previous reported one in the case of the 25-nm Au/60-nm Ta2O5/3-nm Pd multi-layers film with keeping the sensor sensitivity of 0.27 dB for 4% hydrogen adding. Discussions most likely responsible for this effect are given by introducing the α-β transition Pd structure in the H2 curing process.

  12. Effects of pressure, temperature, and hydrogen during graphene growth on SiC(0001) using propane-hydrogen chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Michon, A.; Vezian, S.; Roudon, E.; Lefebvre, D.; Portail, M.; Zielinski, M.; Chassagne, T.

    2013-05-28

    Graphene growth from a propane flow in a hydrogen environment (propane-hydrogen chemical vapor deposition (CVD)) on SiC differentiates from other growth methods in that it offers the possibility to obtain various graphene structures on the Si-face depending on growth conditions. The different structures include the (6{radical}3 Multiplication-Sign 6{radical}3)-R30 Degree-Sign reconstruction of the graphene/SiC interface, which is commonly observed on the Si-face, but also the rotational disorder which is generally observed on the C-face. In this work, growth mechanisms leading to the formation of the different structures are studied and discussed. For that purpose, we have grown graphene on SiC(0001) (Si-face) using propane-hydrogen CVD at various pressure and temperature and studied these samples extensively by means of low energy electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Pressure and temperature conditions leading to the formation of the different structures are identified and plotted in a pressure-temperature diagram. This diagram, together with other characterizations (X-ray photoemission and scanning tunneling microscopy), is the basis of further discussions on the carbon supply mechanisms and on the kinetics effects. The entire work underlines the important role of hydrogen during growth and its effects on the final graphene structure.

  13. Uncoupling of gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptors from GTP-binding proteins by N-ethylmaleimide: effect of N-ethylmaleimide on purified GTP-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, T.; Ogasawara, N.

    1986-03-01

    Treatment of membranes from bovine cerebral cortex with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) resulted in inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAB receptors. The binding curve for increasing concentrations of agonist was shifted to the right by NEM treatment. Guanine nucleotide had little effect on the binding of GABA to NEM-treated membranes. The addition of purified GTP-binding proteins, which were the substrates of islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, to the NEM-treated membranes caused a shift of the binding curve to the left, suggesting modification of GTP-binding proteins rather than receptors by NEM. The effect of NEM on two purified GTP-binding proteins, Gi (composed of three subunits with molecular weight of alpha, 41,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) and Go (alpha, 39,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) was studied. NEM did not significantly change guanosine 5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) binding and GTPase activity of these two proteins. NEM-treated Gi and Go were not ADP-ribosylated by IAP and did not increase GABA binding to NEM-treated membranes. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed with nontreated alpha and beta gamma to form Gi or Go, respectively, both oligomers with NEM-treated alpha-subunits lost their abilities to be IAP substrates and to couple to receptors. Results indicate that NEM uncoupled GTP-binding proteins from receptors by modifying alpha-subunits of GTP-binding proteins, and the site seemed to be on or near the site of ADP-ribosylation by IAP. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed to form Gi or Go, GTP gamma S binding in the absence of Mg2+ and GTPase activity were changed, although they were not affected when oligomers were treated with NEM. Results suggest the existence of another sulfhydryl group which is protected from NEM by the association of subunits.

  14. Hydrogen in the upper mantle: Diffusion and effects on olivine transformation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Frane, Wyatt Louis

    Olivine is the most abundant mineral in Earth's upper mantle and can host significant amounts of hydrogen within its crystal structure. The presence of hydrogen affects many of olivine's physical properties such as electrical conductivity, viscosity, sound speed, transformation kinetics, phase equilibrium, and generally speaking the physics governing the interior of the earth. Understanding how hydrogen affects olivine is integral to understanding the Earth's interior. In this work olivine was experimentally hydrated and reacted at high pressure and temperature, to simulate upper mantle conditions. The physical properties measured in this work are used to understand seismic and magnetotelluric observations of the Earth. In the first project the effects of hydrogen on olivine transformation kinetics were examined. Growth rates for olivine's high pressure polymorphs, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, to determine if olivine can persist metastably inside cold subducting slabs in the mantle transition zone. Hydrogen significantly enhances the growth rates of olivine into ringwoodite. For olivine containing ˜75 (or higher) ppmw H2O At 18 GPa and 900°C the growth rate for ringwoodite rims is 1.0x10-9 m/s with activation enthalpy of 235 +/- 30 kJ/mol, which is too high for persistence of metastable olivine into the transition zone. Confirmation of the existence of metastable olivine by seismologists would constrain H2O contents at such locations to be < 75 ppmw H2O. In the second project deuterium-hydrogen interdiffusion coefficients were measured to help understand electrical conductivity, point defect populations, chemical transport, and defect dominated properties in olivine. For the fastest H-diffusing [100] orientation DD-H, [100] = 10(-5.04 +/- 1.43)*e(-137 +/- 31 kJ/mol)/(RT) m²/s at 2 GPa and 750--900°C. Comparison of DD-H to chemical diffusion coefficients allows us to calculate diffusivity of intrinsic defects. Olivine electrical conductivity is calculated from DD

  15. Effects of neutron irradiation and hydrogen on ductile-brittle transition temperatures of V-Cr-Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, B.A.; Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.J.; Smith, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation and hydrogen on the ductile- brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) of unalloyed vanadium and V-Cr-Ti alloys were determined from Charpy-impact tests on 1/3 ASTM standard size specimens and from impact tests on 3-mm diameter discs. The tests were conducted on specimens containing <30 appm hydrogen and 600-1200 appm hydrogen and on specimens after neutron irradiation to 28-46 dpa at 420, 520, and 600C. The DBTTs were minimum (< {minus}220{degree}C) for V-(105)Ti alloys under for V-4-Cr-4Ti alloy with <30 appm hydrogen. The effect of 600-1200 appm hydrogen in the specimens was to raise the DBTTs by 100--150{degree}C. The DBTTs were minimum (< {minus}220{degree}C) for V-(1-5)Ti alloys and V-4-Cr-4Ti alloys after neutron irradiation.

  16. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-han; Wang, Chun-mei; Tang, Hua-xin; Zuo, Cheng-ji; Xu, Hong-ming

    2009-06-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition timing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its application, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NOx while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NOx is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  17. The effect of hydrogen isotopes and helium on the tensile properties of 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.J.; Lohmeier, D.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy-rate-forged (HERF) stainless steels are used as the materials of construction for pressure vessels designed for the containment of hydrogen and its isotopes. Hydrogen and helium, the decay product of tritium, are known to embrittle these materials. HERF stainless steels have a relatively good resistance to hydrogen-and-helium-induced embrittlement when compared to annealed stainless steels due to their high number density of dislocations, which act as traps for hydrogen and helium. However, the degree of embrittlement in these materials can vary considerably because of microstructure and yield strength variations introduced during the forging process. In this study the effect of hydrogen and tritium on the tensile properties of 21-6-9 stainless steel was measured as a function of HERF yield strength in the range of 660 to 930 MPa. The effect of microstructure was studied also be conducting tensile tests with HERF and annealed samples.

  18. Relativistic effects on the bonding of heavy and superheavy hydrogen halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saue, Trond; Faegri, Knut; Gropen, Odd

    1996-12-01

    The bonding in the hydrogen halides HI, HAt and HUus (Uus = element 117) has been studied using four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations and finite basis sets. The calculations show that the effect of spin-orbit splitting on the valence p-orbital dominates the bonding for the compound of the superheavy element, and even for the sixth row the spin-orbit interaction should be treated self-consistently for an accurate description of the electronic structure.

  19. Distortion effects in electron excitation of hydrogen atoms by impact of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, C.A.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    Electron excitation from the fundamental state of hydrogen atoms by impact of bare ions is studied at intermediate and high collision velocities. Total cross sections for final {ital np} states by impact of protons, alpha particles, and He{sup +} ions are calculated using the symmetric eikonal approximation and compared with experimental data. This comparison supports the existence of distortion effects recently predicted by Bugacov and co-workers [Phys. Rev. A {bold 47}, 1052 (1993)]. The validity of scaling laws is analyzed.

  20. 35Cl NQR study of geometric isotope effect in hydrogen bonded chlorooctanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanowska-Fraçzek, M.

    1994-05-01

    35Cl NQR spectroscopy was applied to study the geometric isotope effect in a wide range of 2 : 1 salts of chloroacetic, trichloroacetic and difluorochloroacetic acids. The NQR results were correlated with IR spectroscopic studies, which provided information on the potential shape for proton motion. The NQR results were discussed on the basis of a variational correlated ground state wave function theory of a single hydrogen bond.

  1. Effect of Cleanliness on Hydrogen Tolerance in High-Strength Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Effect of Cleanliness on Hydrogen Tolerance in High-Strength Steel by Scott M. Grendahl, Franklyn Kellogg, and Hoang Nguyen ARL-TR...Directorate, ARL Franklyn Kellogg and Hoang Nguyen Bowhead Technical Services Approved for public...in High-Strength Steel 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Scott M. Grendahl, Franklyn Kellogg,* and

  2. High electric field effects on the thermal generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ilie, A.; Equer, B.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the electric field dependence of the electron-hole thermal generation process in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. A model was developed which takes into account the Poole-Frenkel effect and the thermally assisted tunneling. In order to explain the experimental results it was necessary to consider a strong electron-lattice interaction describing the carrier tunneling mechanism. Deep defects relaxation is also discussed.

  3. Bivalent cation binding effect on formation of the peptide bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Rode, Bernd Michael

    2000-01-01

    The reactions between formic acid (or glycine) and ammonia, without and with Mg 2+, Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ cations as catalysts, have been studied as model reactions for peptide bond formation using the Becke3LYP functional and 6-311+G(d,p) basis set of DFT theory. Enthalpies and free energies for the stationary points of each reaction have been calculated to determine the thermodynamics of reactions investigated. A substantial decrease in reaction enthalpies and free energies was found for formic acid-ammonia and glycine-ammonia reactions catalysed by Mg 2+, Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ ions compared with those of the uncatalysed amide bond formation. The catalytic effect of the transition metal ions Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ is of similar strength and more pronounced than that of the Mg 2+ cation.

  4. Effects of van der Waals density functional corrections on trends in furfural adsorption and hydrogenation on close-packed transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry; Greeley, Jeffrey

    2014-04-01

    The hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol on Pd(111), Cu(111) and Pt(111) is studied with both standard Density Functional Theory (DFT)-GGA functionals and with van der Waals-corrected density functionals. VdW-DF functionals, including optPBE, optB88, optB86b, and Grimme's method, are used to optimize the adsorption configurations of furfural, furfuryl alcohol, and related intermediates resulting from hydrogenation of furfural, and the results are compared to corresponding values determined with GGA functionals, including PW91 and PBE. On Pd(111) and Pt(111), the adsorption geometries of the intermediates are not noticeably different between the two classes of functionals, while on Cu(111), modest changes are seen in both the perpendicular distance and the orientation of the aromatic ring with respect to the planar surface. In general, the binding energies increase substantially in magnitude as a result of van der Waals contributions on all metals. In contrast, however, dispersion effects on the kinetics of hydrogenation are relatively small. It is found that activation barriers are not significantly affected by the inclusion of dispersion effects, and a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationship developed solely from PW91 calculations on Pd(111) is capable of describing corresponding results on Cu(111) and Pt(111), even when the dispersion effects are included. Finally, the reaction energies and barriers derived from the dispersion-corrected and pure GGA calculations are used to plot simple potential energy profiles for furfural hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol on the three considered metals, and an approximately constant downshift of the energetics due to the dispersion corrections is observed.

  5. Effects of van der Waals Density Functional Corrections on Trends in Furfural Adsorption and Hydrogenation on Close-Packed Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.

    2014-04-01

    The hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol on Pd(111), Cu(111) and Pt(111) is studied with both standard Density Functional Theory (DFT)-GGA functionals and with van der Waals-corrected density functionals. VdWDF functionals, including optPBE, optB88, optB86b, and Grimme's method, are used to optimize the adsorption configurations of furfural, furfuryl alcohol, and related intermediates resulting from hydrogenation of furfural, and the results are compared to corresponding values determined with GGA functionals, including PW91 and PBE. On Pd(111) and Pt(111), the adsorption geometries of the intermediates are not noticeably different between the two classes of functionals, while on Cu(111), modest changes are seen in both the erpendicular distance and the orientation of the aromatic ringwith respect to the planar surface. In general, the binding energies increase substantially in magnitude as a result of van derWaals contributions on all metals. In contrast, however, dispersion effects on the kinetics of hydrogenation are relatively small. It is found that activation barriers are not significantly affected by the inclusion of dispersion effects, and a Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi relationship developed solely fromPW91 calculations on Pd(111) is capable of describing corresponding results on Cu(111) and Pt(111), even when the dispersion effects are included. Finally, the reaction energies and barriers derived from the dispersion-corrected and pure GGA calculations are used to plot simple potential energy profiles for furfural hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol on the three considered metals, and an approximately constant downshift of the energetics due to the dispersion corrections is observed.

  6. The effects of polaronic mass and conduction band non-parabolicity on a donor binding energy under the simultaneous effect of pressure and temperature basing on the numerical FEM in a spherical quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sali, A.; Kharbach, J.; Rezzouk, A.; Ouazzani Jamil, M.

    2017-04-01

    Basing on the numerical Finite Element Method (FEM), we have investigated the influences of polaronic mass and conduction band non-parabolicity on the binding energy of the ground state of an on-center hydrogenic donor impurity in a spherical GaAs / Ga1 - x AlxAs quantum dot structure. The calculations have been made with a realistic potential barrier height in the framework of the effective mass approximation including the combined effect of hydrostatic pressure and temperature. The donor binding energy is computed as a function of dot size, Al concentration x , hydrostatic pressure and temperature both in the absence and presence of polaronic mass and conduction band non-parabolicity effects. We have taken into account the electronic effective mass, dielectric constant, and conduction band offset between the dot and barriers varying with pressure and temperature. It has been found that the binding energy is strongly affected by the effect of polaronic mass and conduction band non-parabolicity for narrow quantum dot and large Al concentration x. The results show again that the donor binding energy increases linearly with the pressure in direct gap regime and its variation is larger for narrower dots only and drops slightly with the temperature. A good agreement is obtained with the existing literature values.

  7. Effect of chain length on binding of fatty acids to Pluronics in microemulsions.

    PubMed

    James-Smith, Monica A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Cheung, Sally; Moudgil, Brij M; Shah, Dinesh O

    2008-03-15

    We investigated the effect of fatty acid chain length on the binding capacity of drug and fatty acid to Pluronic F127-based microemulsions. This was accomplished by using turbidity experiments. Pluronic-based oil-in-water microemulsions of various compositions were synthesized and titrated to turbidity with concentrated Amitriptyline, an antidepressant drug. Sodium salts of C(8), C(10), or C(12) fatty acid were used in preparation of the microemulsion and the corresponding binding capacities were observed. It has been previously determined that, for microemulsions prepared with sodium caprylate (C(8) fatty acid soap), a maximum of 11 fatty acid molecules bind to the microemulsion per 1 molecule of Pluronic F127 and a maximum of 12 molecules of Amitriptyline bind per molecule of F127. We have found that with increasing the chain length of the fatty acid salt component of the microemulsion, the binding capacity of both the fatty acid and the Amitriptyline to the microemulsion decreases. For sodium salts of C(8), C(10) and C(12) fatty acids, respectively, a maximum of approximately 11, 8.4 and 8.3 molecules of fatty acid molecules bind to 1 Pluronic F127 molecule. We propose that this is due to the decreasing number of free monomers with increasing chain length. As chain length increases, the critical micelle concentration (cmc) decreases, thus leading to fewer monomers. Pluronics are symmetric tri-block copolymers consisting of propylene oxide (PO) and ethylene oxide (EO). The polypropylene oxide block, PPO is sandwiched between two polyethylene oxide (PEO) blocks. The PEO blocks are hydrophilic while PPO is hydrophobic portion in the Pluronic molecule. Due to this structure, we propose that the fatty acid molecules that are in monomeric form most effectively diffuse between the PEO "tails" and bind to the hydrophobic PPO groups.

  8. Effects of the binding of a dextran derivative on fibroblast growth factor 2: secondary structure and receptor-binding studies.

    PubMed

    Bittoun, P; Bagheri-Yarmand, R; Chaubet, F; Crépin, M; Jozefonvicz, J; Fermandjian, S

    1999-06-15

    CMDB (carboxymethyldextran-benzylamide) are dextrans statistically substituted with carboxymethyl and benzylamide groups which can mimick some of the biological properties of heparin. It has previously been shown that CMDB inhibit autocrine growth of breast tumor cells (Bagheri-Yarmand et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 239: 424-428, 1997) and selectively displace fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) from its receptor. Here, we used circular dichroism and fluorescence anisotropy measurements to show that the conformation of FGF-2 was significantly altered upon its binding to CMDB and to short CMDB fragments prepared within this study. CMDB and fragments formed a stable 1:1 complex with FGF-2, with affinities being estimated as 20+/-10 nM from fluorescence anisotropy analysis. No such a complex was formed with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) or epidermal growth factor (EGF). CMDB competed with the FGF-2 receptor for binding to FGF-2 but did not disturb the binding of IGF-1 and EGF to their receptors. Thus, our results highlight the selectivity of CMDB and their fragments towards FGF-2. Heparin, however, competes with CMDB and their fragments for binding to FGF-2. The carboxymethyl and benzylamide groups of these molecules likely interact directly with a heparin-binding region of FGF-2. The resulting change in conformation disturbs the binding of FGF-2 to its receptor and consecutively its mitogenic activity.

  9. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  10. Effect of volatile fatty acids mixtures on the simultaneous photofermentative production of hydrogen and polyhydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Cardeña, René; Valdez-Vazquez, Idania; Buitrón, Germán

    2017-02-01

    Purple non-sulfur bacteria generate hydrogen and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) as a mechanism for disposing of reducing equivalents generated during substrate consumption. However, both pathways compete for the reducing equivalents released from bacteria growing under certain substrates, thus the formation of hydrogen or PHB is detrimental to the formation of each other. The effect of mixtures of acetic, propionic and butyric acids on the formation of H2 and PHB was evaluated using Box-Behnken design. A bacterial community mainly constituted by Rhodopseudomonas palustris was used as inoculum. It was observed that the three volatile fatty acids had a significant effect on the specific PHB production. However, only the propionic acid had a significant effect on the specific H2 production activity and the highest value was observed when acetate was the main component in the mixture. The maximum values for the specific PHB and hydrogen production rates were 16.4 mg-PHB/g-TSS/day and 391 mL-H2/g-TSS/day, respectively.

  11. Quantum interference effects in laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen, deuterium, and helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, Pedro; Franke, Beatrice; Krauth, Julian J.; Diepold, Marc; Fratini, Filippo; Safari, Laleh; Machado, Jorge; Antognini, Aldo; Kottmann, Franz; Indelicato, Paul; Pohl, Randolf; Santos, José Paulo

    2015-08-01

    Quantum interference between energetically close states is theoretically investigated, with the state structure being observed via laser spectroscopy. In this work, we focus on hyperfine states of selected hydrogenic muonic isotopes, and on how quantum interference affects the measured Lamb shift. The process of photon excitation and subsequent photon decay is implemented within the framework of nonrelativistic second-order perturbation theory. Due to its experimental interest, calculations are performed for muonic hydrogen, deuterium, and helium-3. We restrict our analysis to the case of photon scattering by incident linear polarized photons and the polarization of the scattered photons not being observed. We conclude that while quantum interference effects can be safely neglected in muonic hydrogen and helium-3, in the case of muonic deuterium there are resonances with close proximity, where quantum interference effects can induce shifts up to a few percent of the linewidth, assuming a pointlike detector. However, by taking into account the geometry of the setup used by the CREMA collaboration, this effect is reduced to less than 0.2% of the linewidth in all possible cases, which makes it irrelevant at the present level of accuracy.

  12. Lomofungin and dilomofungin: inhibitors of MBNL1-CUG RNA binding with distinct cellular effects

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Jason W.; Ofori, Leslie O.; Chen, Catherine Z.; Kumar, Amit; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Nakamori, Masayuki; Southall, Noel; Patnaik, Samarjit; Marugan, Juan J.; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Christopher P.; Disney, Matthew D.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Thornton, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorder resulting from expression of RNA containing an expanded CUG repeat (CUGexp). The pathogenic RNA is retained in nuclear foci. Poly-(CUG) binding proteins in the Muscleblind-like (MBNL) family are sequestered in foci, causing misregulated alternative splicing of specific pre-mRNAs. Inhibitors of MBNL1-CUGexp binding have been shown to restore splicing regulation and correct phenotypes in DM1 models. We therefore conducted a high-throughput screen to identify novel inhibitors of MBNL1-(CUG)12 binding. The most active compound was lomofungin, a natural antimicrobial agent. We found that lomofungin undergoes spontaneous dimerization in DMSO, producing dilomofungin, whose inhibition of MBNL1–(CUG)12 binding was 17-fold more potent than lomofungin itself. However, while dilomofungin displayed the desired binding characteristics in vitro, when applied to cells it produced a large increase of CUGexp RNA in nuclear foci, owing to reduced turnover of the CUGexp transcript. By comparison, the monomer did not induce CUGexp accumulation in cells and was more effective at rescuing a CUGexp-induced splicing defect. These results support the feasibility of high-throughput screens to identify compounds targeting toxic RNA, but also demonstrate that ligands for repetitive sequences may have unexpected effects on RNA decay. PMID:24799433

  13. The effect of amorphous silicon surface hydrogenation on morphology, wettability and its implication on the adsorption of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filali, Larbi; Brahmi, Yamina; Sib, Jamal Dine; Bouhekka, Ahmed; Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of amorphous silicon (a-Si) surface hydrogenation on Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption. A set of (a-Si) films was prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS) and after deposition; they were treated in molecular hydrogen ambient at different pressures (1-3 Pa). Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used to study the hydrogenation effect and BSA adsorption. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate morphological changes caused by hydrogenation. The wettability of the films was measured using contact angle measurement, and in the case of the hydrogenated surfaces, it was found to be driven by surface roughness. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy and SE measurements show that proteins had the strongest affinity toward the surfaces with the highest hydrogen content and their secondary structure was affected by a significant decrease of the α-helix component (-27%) compared with the proteins adsorbed on the un-treated surface, which had a predominantly α-helix (45%) structure. The adsorbed protein layer was found to be densely packed with a large thickness (30.9 nm) on the hydrogen-rich surfaces. The most important result is that the surface hydrogen content was the dominant factor, compared to wettability and morphology, for protein adsorption.

  14. Effects of Hydrogen Pressure during Growth and Effects of Pregrowth with Hydrogen on Acetate Degradation by Methanosarcina Species.

    PubMed

    Boone, D R; Menaia, J A; Boone, J E; Mah, R A

    1987-01-01

    Methanosarcina barkeri 227 and Methanosarcina mazei S-6 grew with acetate as the substrate; we found little effect of H(2) on the rate of aceticlastic growth in the presence of various H(2) pressures between 2 and 810 Pa. We used physical (H(2) addition or flushing the headspace to remove H(2)) and biological (H(2)-producing or -utilizing bacteria in cocultures) methods for controlling H(2) pressure in Methanosarcina cultures growing on acetate. Added H(2) (ca. 100 Pa) was removed rapidly (a few hours) by M. barkeri and slowly (within a day) by M. mazei. When the H(2) produced by the aceticlastic methanogens was removed by coculturing with an H(2)-using Desulfovibrio sp., the H(2) pressure was about 2.2 Pa. Under these conditions the stoichiometry of aceticlastic methanogenesis did not change. H(2)-grown inocula of M. barkeri grew with acetate as the sole catabolic substrate if the inoculum culture was transferred during logarithmic growth to acetate-containing medium or if the transfer was accomplished within 1 or 2 days after exhaustion of H(2). H(2)-grown cultures incubated for 4 or more days after exhaustion of H(2) were able to grow with H(2) but not with acetate as the sole catabolic substrate. Addition of small quantities of H(2) to acetate-containing medium permitted these cultures to initiate growth on acetate.

  15. Elimination of spin diffusion effects in saturation transfer experiments: application to hydrogen exchange in proteins.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Kristensen, Søren M; Led, Jens J

    2007-03-01

    The NMR saturation transfer experiment is widely used to characterize exchange processes in proteins that take place on the ms-s timescale. However, spin diffusion effects are inherently associated with the saturation transfer experiment and may overshadow the effect of the exchange processes of interest. As shown here, the effects from spin diffusion and exchange processes can be separated by varying the field strength of the saturation pulse, thereby allowing correct exchange rates to be obtained. The method is demonstrated using the hydrogen exchange process in the protein Escherichia coli thioredoxin as an example.

  16. Lactoperoxidase binding to streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, K M; Adamson, M; Arnold, R

    1979-01-01

    There have been conflicting reports regarding the binding of lactoperoxidase to bacterial cell surfaces. We describe here the effects of cell-bound lactoperoxidase on acid production by suspensions of Streptococcus mutans (NCTC 10449) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and thiocyanate. Saline suspensions of log-phase bacteria were treated with 0.1 mg of lactoperoxidase per ml and were then washed thoroughly. The addition of hydrogen peroxide and thiocyanate markedly reduced the acid production of these lactoperoxidase-treated bacteria but had no effect on the acid production of untreated controls. After a 3-h incubation in saline, the lactoperoxidase-treated bacteria produced acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and thiocyanate at the same rate as untreated bacteria. These observations suggest that lactoperoxidase is initially bound to the cell surface in an enzymatically active form at a concentration sufficient to inhibit acid production. The lactoperoxidase is slowly degraded or desorbed as the bacteria stand in saline suspension. PMID:39032

  17. The vitamin B12 analog cobinamide is an effective hydrogen sulfide antidote in a lethal rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    BRENNER, M.; BENAVIDES, S.; MAHON, S. B.; LEE, J.; YOON, D.; MUKAI, D.; VISEROI, M.; CHAN, A.; JIANG, J.; NARULA, N.; AZER, S. M.; ALEXANDER, C.; BOSS, G. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a highly toxic gas for which no effective antidotes exist. It acts, at least in part, by binding to cytochrome c oxidase, causing cellular asphyxiation and anoxia. We investigated the effects of three different ligand forms of cobinamide, a vitamin B12 analog, to reverse sulfide (NaHS) toxicity. Methods New Zealand white rabbits received a continuous intravenous (IV) infusion of NaHS (3 mg/min) until expiration or a maximum 270 mg dose. Animals received six different treatments, administered at the time when they developed signs of severe toxicity: Group 1—saline (placebo group, N = 9); Group 2—IV hydroxocobalamin (N = 7); Group 3—IV aquohydroxocobinamide (N = 6); Group 4—IV sulfitocobinamide (N = 6); Group 5—intramuscular (IM) sulfitocobinamide (N = 6); and Group 6—IM dinitrocobinamide (N = 8). Blood was sampled intermittently, and systemic blood pressure and deoxygenated and oxygenated hemoglobin were measured continuously in peripheral muscle and over the brain region; the latter were measured by diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS). Results Compared with the saline controls, all cobinamide derivatives significantly increased survival time and the amount of NaHS that was tolerated. Aquohydroxocobinamide was most effective (261.5 ± 2.4 mg NaHS tolerated vs. 93.8 ± 6.2 mg in controls, p < 0.0001). Dinitrocobinamide was more effective than sulfitocobinamide. Hydroxocobalamin was not significantly more effective than the saline control. Conclusions Cobinamide is an effective agent for inhibiting lethal sulfide exposure in this rabbit model. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal dose and form of cobinamide and route of administration. PMID:24716792

  18. Effects of cerium on the hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of rare earth-Mg-Ni hydrogen-absorbing alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Shigekazu; Ishida, Jun; Kishida, Kyosuke; Inui, Haruyuki

    2017-04-01

    The influence of Ce addition on the phase constitution, microstructure, hydrogen absorption/desorption properties and battery performances of newly developed rare earth (RE)-Mg-Ni hydrogen-absorbing superlattice alloys for negative electrode materials in Ni-metal hydride (MH) batteries were investigated. The partial substitution of RE (La and Nd) with Ce results in a higher discharge performance and a lower cycle life in the battery. The Ce addition greatly affects the phase constitution, which is mainly characterized by increased formation of the AB2 phase (A = RE or Mg and B = Ni or Al). The existence of the AB2 phase is found to accelerate alloy pulverization and oxidation when the alloys are used as negative electrode materials in Ni-MH model cells. The accelerated pulverization and oxidation are considered to be responsible for the observed higher discharge performance and lower cycle life in the batteries, respectively.

  19. Sliding discharges in steam: effects of dielectric surface and hydrocarbon additives on hydrogen, oxygen and hydrogen peroxide generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Malik, Muhammad; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2013-04-01

    A sliding surface discharge was formed on a dielectric layer in steam at ˜100 °C and atmospheric pressure. The material properties and the thickness of the dielectric layer were found to strongly affect the energy deposition into the plasma. With a 0.32 cm thick dielectric the energy deposition was 1.4 times greater than with a 0.48 cm thick dielectric, and with window glass it was 1.3 times greater than with Macor of the same thickness. Product gases were H2 (73 ± 4%) and O2 (27 ± 1%), and H2O2 accumulated in the condensed water up to 0.4 g l-1. The energy yield for hydrogen was 1.2 ± 0.1 g H2 kWh-1 and independent of the input power and thickness or material of the dielectric. However, for hydrogen peroxide the energy yield, which varied between 0.61 and 3.2 g H2O2 kWh-1, was found to depend strongly on the thickness and material of the dielectric. The addition of benzene to the steam increased the energy efficiency of hydrogen to 2.3 g kWh-1, and decreased oxygen and hydrogen peroxide by about 3 and 6 times, respectively. It also caused the deposition of phenol and polymer-like layers on the dielectric. The results are explained on the basis of reactions of H and OH radicals adsorbed on the surface and/or in gas phase.

  20. Trimer Enhancement Mutation Effects on HIV-1 Matrix Protein Binding Activities

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhli, Ayna; Mack, Andrew; Ritchie, Christopher; Cylinder, Isabel; Harper, Logan; Tedbury, Philip R.; Freed, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein is the amino-terminal domain of the HIV-1 precursor Gag (Pr55Gag) protein. MA binds to membranes and RNAs, helps transport Pr55Gag proteins to virus assembly sites at the plasma membranes of infected cells, and facilitates the incorporation of HIV-1 envelope (Env) proteins into virions by virtue of an interaction with the Env protein cytoplasmic tails (CTs). MA has been shown to crystallize as a trimer and to organize on membranes in hexamer lattices. MA mutations that localize to residues near the ends of trimer spokes have been observed to impair Env protein assembly into virus particles, and several of these are suppressed by the 62QR mutation at the hubs of trimer interfaces. We have examined the binding activities of wild-type (WT) MA and 62QR MA variants and found that the 62QR mutation stabilized MA trimers but did not alter the way MA proteins organized on membranes. Relative to WT MA, the 62QR protein showed small effects on membrane and RNA binding. However, 62QR proteins bound significantly better to Env CTs than their WT counterparts, and CT binding efficiencies correlated with trimerization efficiencies. Our data suggest a model in which multivalent binding of trimeric HIV-1 Env proteins to MA trimers contributes to the process of Env virion incorporation. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 Env proteins assemble as trimers, and incorporation of the proteins into virus particles requires an interaction of Env CT domains with the MA domains of the viral precursor Gag proteins. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the mechanisms by which MA facilitates the virion incorporation of Env proteins. To help elucidate this process, we examined the binding activities of an MA mutant that stabilizes MA trimers. We found that the mutant proteins organized similarly to WT proteins on membranes, and that mutant and WT proteins revealed only slight differences in their binding to RNAs or lipids. However, the mutant proteins showed

  1. Self-assembly of thiophene derivatives on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: hydrogen bond effect.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ping; Liu, Yibiao; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Shuqi; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Wen, Yongqiang; Du, Hongwu; Zhang, Xueji

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, to elucidate the hydrogen bond effect on the assembly behavior, we studied the assembly structures of two carboxylic substituted thiophene derivatives on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by scanning tunneling microscopy. Here thiophene-2-carboxylic acid (TCA) and thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (TDA) were employed. TDA molecules spontaneously adsorb on the HOPG surface and self-organize into a two-dimensional (2D) assembly with well-defined structure. Two types of domain could be observed. Each TDA molecule appears as a round circle with two small faint dots and forms hydrogen bonds with neighbours. Besides monolayer structure, a bilayer structure of TDA adlayer on HOPG was also observed in this research. Remnant TDA molecules adsorb on the monolayer of TDA and bilayer structure is formed. In contrast to TDA, no ordered structure of TCA on HOPG can be observed. TCA molecules have high propensity to form dimers through H-bond between carboxylic groups. But TCA dimer is not stable enough for either adsorption or imaging. Our result provides a new example for understanding hydrogen effect on stabilizing and controlling two-dimensional assembly structure and is helpful for surface nanofabrication and development of electric nanodevices.

  2. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwu; Liu, Kehuan; Ma, Chunqing; Yu, Jiangang; Peng, Zhaoyun; Huang, Guoyang; Cai, Zhiyu; Li, Runping; Xu, Weigang; Sun, Xuejun; Liu, Kan; Zheng, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is one of the most widely used clinical interventions to counteract insufficient pulmonary oxygen delivery in patients with severe lung injury. However, prolonged exposure to hyperoxia leads to inflammation and acute lung injury. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Rats were intraperitoneally treated with sodium hydrosulphide (NaHS) at 28 μmol/kg immediately before hyperoxia exposure and then exposed to pure oxygen at 2.5 atmospheres absolute (atm abs) with continuous ventilation for six hours, Immediately after hyperoxia exposure, rats were sacrificed via anesthesia. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was harvested for the detection of protein concentration and IL-1 content, and the lungs were collected for HE staining, TUNEL staining and detection of wet/dry weight ratio. Our results showed hyperbaric hyperoixa exposure could significantly damage the lung (HE staining), increase the protein and IL-13 in the BALF, elevate the wet/dry Weight ratio and raise the TUNEL positive cells. However, pre-treatment with hydrogen sulfide improved the lung morphology, reduced the TUNEL positive cells and attenuated the lung inflammation (reduction in IL-13 of BALF and HE staining). Taken together, our findings indicate that hydrogen sulfide pretreatment may exert protective effects on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

  3. Tunneling and delocalization effects in hydrogen bonded systems: a study in position and momentum space.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Joseph A; Lin, Lin; Car, Roberto

    2009-05-28

    Novel experimental and computational studies have uncovered the proton momentum distribution in hydrogen bonded systems. In this work, we utilize recently developed open path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics methodology in order to study the momentum distribution in phases of high pressure ice. Some of these phases exhibit symmetric hydrogen bonds and quantum tunneling. We find that the symmetric hydrogen bonded phase possesses a narrowed momentum distribution as compared with a covalently bonded phase, in agreement with recent experimental findings. The signatures of tunneling that we observe are a narrowed distribution in the low-to-intermediate momentum region, with a tail that extends to match the result of the covalently bonded state. The transition to tunneling behavior shows similarity to features observed in recent experiments performed on confined water. We corroborate our ice simulations with a study of a particle in a model one-dimensional double well potential that mimics some of the effects observed in bulk simulations. The temperature dependence of the momentum distribution in the one-dimensional model allows for the differentiation between ground state and mixed state tunneling effects.

  4. Theoretical Study of Proton Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions: The Effect of Hydrogen Bond Bending Motion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Hao; Song, Kai; Xu, Yang; Shi, Qiang

    2015-06-25

    We investigate theoretically the effect of hydrogen bond bending motion on the proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction, using a model system where an intramolecular hydrogen-bonded phenol group is the proton donor. It is shown that, in a two-dimensional (2D) model of the PCET reaction, the bending and stretching vibrational motions are separated, and due to the hydrogen bond configuration and anharmonicity of the potential energy surface, the bending vibration can play a role in the PCET reaction. The results are also compared with two different sets of one-dimensional models (1D-linear and 1D-curved). Due to contributions of the bending motion, the rate constants in the 2D model are larger than those in the 1D-linear model, although the differences between the total rate constants and KIEs for 2D and 1D models are not major. Results from the 1D-curved model lie between the 2D- and 1D-linear models, indicating that it can include some effect of bending motion in reducing the potential energies along the reaction path.

  5. Divergence of allosteric effects of rapacuronium on binding and function of muscarinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Many neuromuscular blockers act as negative allosteric modulators of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by decreasing affinity and potency of acetylcholine. The neuromuscular blocker rapacuronium has been shown to have facilitatory effects at muscarinic receptors leading to bronchospasm. We examined the influence of rapacuronium on acetylcholine (ACh) binding to and activation of individual subtypes of muscarinic receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells to determine its receptor selectivity. Results At equilibrium rapacuronium bound to all subtypes of muscarinic receptors with micromolar affinity (2.7-17 μM) and displayed negative cooperativity with both high- and low-affinity ACh binding states. Rapacuronium accelerated [3H]ACh association with and dissociation from odd-numbered receptor subtypes. With respect to [35S]GTPγS binding rapacuronium alone behaved as an inverse agonist at all subtypes. Rapacuronium concentration-dependently decreased the potency of ACh-induced [35S]GTPγS binding at M2 and M4 receptors. In contrast, 0.1 μM rapacuronium significantly increased ACh potency at M1, M3, and M5 receptors. Kinetic measurements at M3 receptors showed acceleration of the rate of ACh-induced [35S]GTPγS binding by rapacuronium. Conclusions Our data demonstrate a novel dichotomy in rapacuronium effects at odd-numbered muscarinic receptors. Rapacuronium accelerates the rate of ACh binding but decreases its affinity under equilibrium conditions. This results in potentiation of receptor activation at low concentrations of rapacuronium (1 μM) but not at high concentrations (10 μM). These observations highlight the relevance and necessity of performing physiological tests under non-equilibrium conditions in evaluating the functional effects of allosteric modulators at muscarinic receptors. They also provide molecular basis for potentiating M3 receptor-mediated bronchoconstriction. PMID:20038295

  6. Combined effect of Debye plasma environment and external electric field on hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, S.; Ho, Y. K.

    2010-08-15

    We consider weakly coupled plasmas, characterized by Debye-Huckel model potential, and an external electric field along z-axis. Due to plasma environment the energy levels of atom are shifted up, bound states are merged to continuum. For external electric field the excited energy levels also split up; degenerate energy eigenvalues become nondegenerate. In the presence of external electric field, energy levels are shifted up and down, except ground state. The ground state energy value is shifted only down. Therefore, it is very interesting to study the combined effect of plasmas and external electric field on a simple atom (hydrogen). To calculate the energy levels and the corresponding states, we expand the wave function in terms of linear combination of the basis functions. The basis is generated by hydrogenic wave functions. Here, we estimate various plasma surroundings and electric field strengths. We observe converged results for the basis size 45, with angular momentum states up to eight.

  7. Effect of nitrogen doping of graphene oxide on hydrogen and hydroxyl adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byeong June; Jeong, Hae Kyung

    2014-05-01

    We investigate how nitrogen-doping affects the hydrogen (H) and the hydroxyl (OH) adsorption on graphene oxide (GO) and on nitrogen-doped GO (NGO) via pseudopotential plane wave density functional calculations within the local spin density approximation. We find that the nitrogendoping brings about drastic changes in the hydrogen and the hydroxyl adsorption energetics, but its effects depend sensitively on the nitrogen configuration in NGO. The H and the OH adsorption energies are comparable only for pyrrolic NGO. In GO and quarternary NGO, the H adsorption energy is greater than the OH adsorption energy while the trend is reversed in pyridinic NGO. Also, the OH adsorption process is less affected by nitrogen-doping than the H adsorption is.

  8. Synergistic effect of hydrogen and impurity segregations on the grain boundary embrittlement in Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. M.; Shestakov, V. P.; Tazhibaeva, I. L.

    2000-12-01

    Niobium and its alloys are the candidate materials for fusion reactors and can be used at high-temperatures. This paper was intended to study embrittlement of niobium by high-concentrations of hydrogen and impurity segregation at grain boundaries. Specimens of commercial Nb were subjected to heat treatment at 1100°C and 500°C and subsequently charged with deuterium in an electrolytic cell. The charged specimens were placed into the high-vacuum chamber of a special self-made Auger electron spectrometer. They were then fractured under high-vacuum conditions and the chemistry of grain boundaries was analysed. Carbon and oxygen were found as the main impurities on the grain boundaries and effective energies for hydrogen-impurity-grain boundary interaction have been estimated. It was found that there is a noticeable reduction of fracture strength corresponding to the grain boundary oxygen and carbon segregation levels.

  9. Effects of hydrogen on diamond single crystal synthesized under high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Jia, Xiaopeng; Song, Mousheng; Ma, Hong-An; Zhou, Zhenxiang; Fang, Chao; Wang, Fangbiao; Chen, Ning; Wang, Ying

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, diamond single crystals doped with LiH and boron additives were synthesized in Fe64Ni36-C system under high pressure and high temperature. Under the fixed pressure condition, we found that the synthesis temperature increased slightly after the addition of LiH in the synthesis system. The {100}-orientated surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nitrogen concentration in the obtained diamond was analyzed and evaluated using Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Furthermore, the electrical properties of Ib-type and boron-doped diamond before and after hydrogenation using Hall effect measurement, which suggested that the conductivity of diamond co-doped with hydrogen and boron was obviously enhanced than that of boron-doped diamond.

  10. Quantum confined Stark effect in Gaussian quantum wells: A tight-binding study

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Morales, A.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I.

    2014-05-15

    The main characteristics of the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) are studied theoretically in quantum wells of Gaussian profile. The semi-empirical tight-binding model and the Green function formalism are applied in the numerical calculations. A comparison of the QCSE in quantum wells with different kinds of confining potential is presented.

  11. Effect of d-amino acids on IgE binding to peanut allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-amino acids are formed when L-amino acids are exposed to heat. The objective was to determine the existence of D-amino acids in roasted peanut and their effect on IgE binding. Raw and roasted peanut protein extracts were hydrolyzed in 6 N HCL under vacuum. The hydrolysates were then analyzed for D...

  12. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Stark Effect Dependence on Hydrogenic Impurities in GaAs Parabolic Quantum-Well Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Wei, Guo-Zhu; Han, Yu

    2009-11-01

    The ground-state and lowest excited-state binding energies of a hydrogenic impurity in GaAs parabolic quantum-well wires (QWWs) subjected to external electric and magnetic fields are investigated using the finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model. We define an effective radius ρeff of a cylindrical QWW, which can describe the strength of the lateral confinement. For the ground state, the position of the largest probability density of electron in x-y plane is located at a point, while for the lowest excited state, is located on a circularity whose radius is ρeff. The point and circularity are pushed along the left half of the center axis of the quantum-well wire by the electric field directed along the right half. When an impurity is located at the point or within the circularity, the ground-state or lowest excited-state binding energies are the largest; when the impurity is apart from the point or circularity, the ground-state or lowest excited-state binding energies start to decrease.

  13. Effects of reducing temperatures on the hydrogen storage capacity of double-walled carbon nanotubes with Pd loading.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qu; Wu, Huimin; Wexler, David; Liu, Huakun

    2014-06-01

    The effects of different temperatures on the hydrogen sorption characteristics of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with palladium loading have been investigated. When we use different temperatures, the particle sizes and specific surface areas of the samples are different, which affects the hydrogen storage capacity of the DWCNTs. In this work, the amount of hydrogen storage capacity was determined (by AMC Gas Reactor Controller) to be 1.70, 1.85, 2.00, and 1.93 wt% for pristine DWCNTS and for 2%Pd/DWCNTs-300 degrees C, 2%Pd/DWCNTs-400 degrees C, and 2%Pd/DWCNTs-500 degrees C, respectively. We found that the hydrogen storage capacity can be enhanced by loading with 2% Pd nanoparticles and selecting a suitable temperature. Furthermore, the sorption can be attributed to the chemical reaction between atomic hydrogen and the dangling bonds of the DWCNTs.

  14. Theoretical investigation of the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct current argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, P.; Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. K.

    2014-03-01

    In this study the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct-current (DC) argon plasma is theoretically investigated. By coupling fluid equations with Poisons equation for such multi-component plasma, the Mach number and amplitude of the soliton are determined following pseudo potential method. Addition of hydrogen in argon discharge leads to the decrease of electron, Ar+ ion density while a reverse trend was observed for ArH+ and hydrogen like ions. It was found that presence of hydrogen like ions in argon plasma affects the formation of soliton with its amplitude significantly decreases as concentration of hydrogen increases. On the other hand, increase in ion to electron temperature ratios of the lighter ions in the discharge also has a significant influence on the amplitude and formation of soliton. The inverse relation between solitons width and amplitude is found to be consistent for the entire range of study.

  15. Theoretical investigation of the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct current argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, P. Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. K.

    2014-03-15

    In this study the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct-current (DC) argon plasma is theoretically investigated. By coupling fluid equations with Poisons equation for such multi-component plasma, the Mach number and amplitude of the soliton are determined following pseudo potential method. Addition of hydrogen in argon discharge leads to the decrease of electron, Ar{sup +} ion density while a reverse trend was observed for ArH{sup +} and hydrogen like ions. It was found that presence of hydrogen like ions in argon plasma affects the formation of soliton with its amplitude significantly decreases as concentration of hydrogen increases. On the other hand, increase in ion to electron temperature ratios of the lighter ions in the discharge also has a significant influence on the amplitude and formation of soliton. The inverse relation between solitons width and amplitude is found to be consistent for the entire range of study.

  16. The effect of hypobaric hypoxia on misonidazole binding in normal and tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed Central

    MacManus, M. P.; Maxwell, A. P.; Abram, W. P.; Bridges, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of hypobaric hypoxia on the in vivo binding of misonidazole was investigated in normal mice and mice bearing T50/80 or CA NT mammary carcinomas. After the intraperitoneal injection of radiolabelled misonidazole, mice were randomised to breathe either room air or air at 0.5 atmospheres. The distribution of misonidazole in liver, kidney, heart, spleen and tumour tissue, 24 h later, was studied by scintillation counting and by autoradiography. Significantly higher misonidazole binding occurred in the livers (x2.5), kidneys (x2.4), spleens (x2.9) and hearts (x1.8) of hypoxic mice compared to controls. Hypobaric hypoxia was associated with a greater than four-fold increase in misonidazole binding within T50/80 tumours. However, significantly higher binding was not demonstrated within CA NT tumours after exposure of tumour-bearing animals to hypoxic conditions. In autoradiographs of hypoxic liver, labelling was intense in regions near to hepatic veins but sparse in areas surrounding portal tracts. This pattern was striking and consistent. In hypoxic kidney, labelling was most intense over tubular cells, less intense over glomeruli and sparse in the renal medulla. It is likely that the hepatic and renal cortical distributions of misonidazole binding reflect local oxygen gradients. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2930698

  17. Effect of terbium(III) on the binding of aromatic guests with sodium taurocholate aggregates.

    PubMed

    Pace, Tamara C S; Souza, Sergio P; Zhang, Hui Ting; Bohne, Cornelia

    2011-10-01

    The effect of binding Tb(3+) to sodium taurocholate aggregates containing polyaromatic hydrocarbon guests was examined using pyrene and 1-ethylnaphthalene as guests that bind to the primary aggregate, and 1-naphthyl-1-ethanol as a secondary aggregate guest. Time-resolved fluorescence quenching studies were used to study the binding site properties, while laser flash photolysis quenching studies provided information on the dynamics of the guest-aggregate system. Both the primary and secondary aggregate binding sites became more compact in the presence of bound Tb(3+), while only the primary aggregate became more accessible to anionic molecules. The binding dynamics for the guest-primary aggregate system became faster when Tb(3+) was bound to the aggregate. In contrast, for the guest-secondary aggregate the presence of Tb(3+) resulted in a small decrease in the dissociation rate constant. The influence of bound Tb(3+) on the primary and secondary bile salt aggregates is significantly different, which affects how these aggregates can be used as supramolecular host systems to modify guest reactivity.

  18. Beyond the detergent effect: a binding site for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in mammalian apoferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Renyu Bu, Weiming; Xi, Jin; Mortazavi, Shirin R.; Cheung-Lau, Jasmina C.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.; Loll, Patrick J.

    2012-05-01

    Using X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) binds specifically to a pre-formed internal cavity in horse-spleen apoferritin. Although sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is widely used as an anionic detergent, it can also exert specific pharmacological effects that are independent of the surfactant properties of the molecule. However, structural details of how proteins recognize SDS are scarce. Here, it is demonstrated that SDS binds specifically to a naturally occurring four-helix bundle protein: horse apoferritin. The X-ray crystal structure of the apoferritin–SDS complex was determined at a resolution of 1.9 Å and revealed that the SDS binds in an internal cavity that has previously been shown to recognize various general anesthetics. A dissociation constant of 24 ± 9 µM at 293 K was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. SDS binds in this cavity by bending its alkyl tail into a horseshoe shape; the charged SDS head group lies in the opening of the cavity at the protein surface. This crystal structure provides insights into the protein–SDS interactions that give rise to binding and may prove useful in the design of novel SDS-like ligands for some proteins.

  19. Effect of limited enzymatic hydrolysis on linoleic acid binding properties of β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Sponton, Osvaldo E; Perez, Adrián A; Carrara, Carlos; Santiago, Liliana G

    2014-03-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) is a member of lipocalin family, proteins with ability to bind small hydrophobic ligands, such as retinol, vitamins and fatty acids. Moreover, BLG is susceptible to protease action producing a wide range of polypeptides depending on the hydrolysis degree (HD). In the present work, the effect of limited enzymatic hydrolysis on fatty acid binding properties of BLG was studied. Linoleic acid (LA) was used as a model fatty acid. Limited enzymatic hydrolysis was performed using α-chymotrypsin immobilised on agarose microparticles. BLG hydrolysates were produced at HD: 1%, 3% and 5%. In order to determine the influence of HD on BLG molecular weight SDS-PAGE was used. BLG structural modification and LA binding properties were monitored by means of fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The increase in HD produced: (i) a BLG degradation and a molecular weight distribution of BLG hydrolysates and (ii) an increased exposition of buried hydrophobic residues, however it was observed a decrease in surface hydrophobicity possibly due to a deterioration of hydrophobic protein domains. It was observed that enzymatic hydrolysis treatment produced a decrease in BLG ability for binding LA. It was concluded that limited enzymatic hydrolysis could deteriorate the specific site on BLG structure necessary for binding LA.

  20. Effects of oxymorphazone in frogs: long lasting antinociception in vivo, and apparently irreversible binding in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Benyhe, S.; Hoffman, G.; Varga, E.; Hosztafi, S.; Toth, G.; Borsodi, A.; Wollemann, M.

    1989-01-01

    Oxymorphazone was found to be a relatively weak antinociceptive drug in intact frog (Rana esculenta) when acetic acid was used as pain stimulus. Frogs remained analgesic for at least 48 hrs following oxymorphazone administration. The ligand increased the latency of wiping reflex in spinal frogs too. There effects were blocked by naloxone. In equilibrium binding studies (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone had high affinity to the opioid receptors of frog brain and spinal cord as well. Kinetic experiments show that only 25% of the bound (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone is readily dissociable. Preincubation of the membranes with labeled oxymorphazone results in a washing resistant inhibition of the opioid binding sites. At least 70% of the (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone specific binding is apparently irreversible after reaction at 5 nM ligand concentration, and this can be enhanced by a higher concentration of tritiated ligand.

  1. Bactericidal effect of hydroxyl radicals generated from a low concentration hydrogen peroxide with ultrasound in endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshimi; Hayashi, Makoto; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Tamura, Muneaki; Yoshida, Ayaka; Ibi, Haruna; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2014-05-01

    One approach to enhance the disinfection of root canals in endodontic treatment is ultrasonic irrigation with sodium hypochlorite. Reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl radical, are generated by biological defense systems to kill invading bacteria. Ultrasonic irrigation with hydrogen peroxide may be a promising option to increase hydroxyl radical generation. We examined the bactericidal effects of hydroxyl radical generated from low concentration hydrogen peroxide with ultrasound in vitro. An ultrasonic tip was submerged in 0.5 or 1.0 M hydrogen peroxide in a microfuge tube. hydrogen peroxide was irradiated with the ultrasound, the tip of which was maintained centered in the tube to mimic ultrasonic irrigation. Hydroxyl radical generation was assessed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Subsequently, Enterococcus faecalis suspension in hydrogen peroxide was prepared and irradiated as described above. Bactericidal effects were assessed by viable counting. Electron spin resonance measurements showed that hydroxyl radical generation increased significantly in a time- and dose-dependent manner (two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test, p<0.05). Moreover, the bactericidal effects of hydrogen peroxide against Enterococcus faecalis were enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that ultrasonic irrigation in the presence of low concentration hydrogen peroxide can serve as a disinfection strategy in endodontic treatment.

  2. Kinetic solvent effects on hydrogen abstraction reactions from carbon by the cumyloxyl radical. The importance of solvent hydrogen-bond interactions with the substrate and the abstracting radical.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Giammarioli, Ilaria; Bietti, Massimo

    2011-06-03

    A kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from propanal (PA) and 2,2-dimethylpropanal (DMPA) by the cumyloxyl radical (CumO•) has been carried out in different solvents (benzene, PhCl, MeCN, t-BuOH, MeOH, and TFE). The corresponding reactions of the benzyloxyl radical (BnO•) have been studied in MeCN. The reaction of CumO• with 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD) also has been investigated in TFE solution. With CHD a 3-fold increase in rate constant (k(H)) has been observed on going from benzene, PhCl, and MeCN to TFE. This represents the first observation of a sizable kinetic solvent effect for hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from hydrocarbons by alkoxyl radicals and indicates that strong HBD solvents influence the hydrogen abstraction reactivity of CumO•. With PA and DMPA a significant decrease in k(H) has been observed on going from benzene and PhCl to MeOH and TFE, indicative of hydrogen-bond interactions between the carbonyl lone pair and the solvent in the transition state. The similar k(H) values observed for the reactions of the aldehydes in MeOH and TFE point toward differential hydrogen bond interactions of the latter solvent with the substrate and the radical in the transition state. The small reactivity ratios observed for the reactions of CumO• and BnO• with PA and DMPA (k(H)(BnO•)/k(H)(CumO•) = 1.2 and 1.6, respectively) indicate that with these substrates alkoxyl radical sterics play a minor role.

  3. Hydrogen bonding effects on infrared and Raman spectra of drug molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondesson, Laban; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Luo, Yi; Garberg, Per; Ågren, Hans

    2007-02-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra of three drug molecules, aspirin, caffeine and ibuprofen, in gas phase and in aqueous solution have been simulated using hybrid density functional theory. The long range solvent effect is modelled by the polarizable continuum model, while the short range hydrogen bonding effects are taken care of by the super-molecular approach with explicit inclusion of water molecules. The calculated spectra are found to compare well with available experimental results. The agreement obtained make grounds for proposing theoretical modeling as a tool for characterizing changes in the bonding environments of drug molecules in terms of particular variations in their IR and Raman spectra.

  4. Short-term effects of hydrogen fluoride on Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Döğeroğlu, Tuncay; Ciçek, Arzu; Kara, Serap

    2003-09-01

    Data on the short-term effects of fumigation with hydrogen fluoride (HF) on the response behavior of the Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. St. Karabalar 6265 are being presented. Growth rate, fluoride accumulation in leaves and soils, and degradation in chlorophyll and nicotine contents of the plant species against the variations in two experimental factors, namely the exposure concentration and exposure time parameters, were investigated. Resulting data reveals that the variety selected for this study is not so tolerant to fluoride as generally reported in the literature, if only the individual effects of the pollutant is considered.

  5. Phase effect in the energy loss of hydrogen projectiles in zinc targets

    SciTech Connect

    Arnau, A.; Bauer, P.; Kastner, F.; Salin, A.; Ponce, V.H.; Fainstein, P.D.; Echenique, P.M.

    1994-03-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the phase effect in the energy loss of fast hydrogen beams colliding with gas and solid zinc targets. The experiments show a maximum phase effect of 50% around 50 keV/u, the energy loss per atom in the solid target being smaller than in the gas target. An extensive theoretical study of all the processes contributing to the energy loss in the two phases shows that the experimental findings can be explained primarily by the screening of the projectile field by the valence electrons in the solid.

  6. Metal loading effect on rare earth element binding to humic acid: Experimental and modelling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Davranche, Mélanie; Gruau, Gérard; Dia, Aline

    2010-03-01

    The effect of metal loading on the binding of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) was studied by combining ultrafiltration and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry techniques. REE-HA complexation experiments were performed at pH 3 for REE/C molar ratios ranging from ca 4 × 10 -4 to 2.7 × 10 -2. Results show that the relative amount of REE bound to HA strongly increases with decreasing REE/C. A middle-REE (MREE) downward concavity is shown by patterns at high metal loading, whereas patterns at low metal loading display a regular increase from La to Lu. Humic Ion Model VI modelling are close to the experimental data variations, provided that (i) the ΔLK 2 parameter (i.e. the Model VI parameter taken into account the presence of strong but low density binding sites) is allowed to increase regularly from La to Lu (from 1.1 to 2.1) and (ii) the published log KMA values (i.e. the REE-HA binding constants specific to Model VI) are slightly modified, in particular with respect to heavy REE. Modelling approach provided evidence that logKdREE patterns with varying REE/C likely arises because REE binding to HA occurs through two types of binding sites in different density: (i) a few strong sites that preferentially complex the heavy REE and thus control the logKdREE atterns at low REE/C; (ii) a larger amount of weaker binding sites that preferentially complex the middle-REE and thus control the logKdREE pattern at high REE/C. Hence, metal loading exerts a major effect on HA-mediated REE binding, which could explain the diversity of published conditional constants for REE binding with HA. A literature survey suggests that the few strong sites activated at low REE/C could be multidentate carboxylic sites, or perhaps N-, or P-functional groups. Finally, an examination of the literature field data proposed that the described loading effect could account for much of the variation in REE patterns observed in natural organic-rich waters (DOC > 5 mg L -1 and 4

  7. Effects of gene carrier polyethyleneimines on the structure and binding capability of bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiyong; Kong, Zhijie; Wei, Yanshan; Li, Hua; Wang, Yajing; Huang, Aimin; Ma, Lin

    2017-02-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI), one of the most effective non-viral gene carriers, is also cytotoxic, however the molecular basis is poorly understood. Little is known about the effects of PEI on the structure and functions of the biomacromolecules. In this work, fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and zeta-potential measurement were conducted to reveal the interaction between PEIs (average molecular weight 25, 10 and 1.8 kDa) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), and to evaluate the effects on the conformation of BSA as long as its binding capability to the model compounds, 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) and quercetin. PEIs were found to complex with BSA and induced a conformational change of the protein by a major reduction of α-helix at PEI concentration < 0.2 mg·mL- 1 and an increase at higher PEI concentration. The binding efficacy of ANS and quercetin to BSA was greatly reduced by the competitive binding by PEI and influenced by the conformational change of BSA, which was found to display a similar trend to the change of the α-helix content of the protein. The polymer size played an important role in PEI-BSA interaction. PEI of higher molecular weight was more favorable to interact with BSA and more efficient to perturb the conformation and binding capability of the protein.

  8. Effects of gene carrier polyethyleneimines on the structure and binding capability of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyong; Kong, Zhijie; Wei, Yanshan; Li, Hua; Wang, Yajing; Huang, Aimin; Ma, Lin

    2017-02-15

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI), one of the most effective non-viral gene carriers, is also cytotoxic, however the molecular basis is poorly understood. Little is known about the effects of PEI on the structure and functions of the biomacromolecules. In this work, fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and zeta-potential measurement were conducted to reveal the interaction between PEIs (average molecular weight 25, 10 and 1.8kDa) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), and to evaluate the effects on the conformation of BSA as long as its binding capability to the model compounds, 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) and quercetin. PEIs were found to complex with BSA and induced a conformational change of the protein by a major reduction of α-helix at PEI concentration <0.2mg·mL(-1) and an increase at higher PEI concentration. The binding efficacy of ANS and quercetin to BSA was greatly reduced by the competitive binding by PEI and influenced by the conformational change of BSA, which was found to display a similar trend to the change of the α-helix content of the protein. The polymer size played an important role in PEI-BSA interaction. PEI of higher molecular weight was more favorable to interact with BSA and more efficient to perturb the conformation and binding capability of the protein.

  9. Glucocorticoid interactions with ethanol effects on synaptic plasma membranes: influence on [125I]calmodulin binding.

    PubMed

    Sze, P Y

    1996-02-01

    Ca(++)-dependent binding of calmodulin (CaM) to brain synaptic plasma membranes is known to be inhibited by ethanol and stimulated by glucocorticoids. These opposite neurochemical actions between ethanol and the steroids in vitro are consistent with glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol-induced sedation reported to occur in vivo. The present study was undertaken to characterize the interactions of corticosterone with ethanol effects on [125I]CaM binding in synaptic plasma membranes. From the shift of concentration-response curves when corticosterone and ethanol were present in combination, the interaction between steroid stimulation and ethanol inhibition occurred in an additive relationship over the range of their effective concentrations. From Scatchard analyses, ethanol-induced decrease in membrane affinity for [125I]CaM was antagonized by steroi