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Sample records for effect hydrogen binding

  1. Hydrogen Effect against Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Yukitaka; Kanezaki, Toshihiko; Mine, Yoji

    2010-10-01

    The well-known term “hydrogen embrittlement” (HE) expresses undesirable effects due to hydrogen such as loss of ductility, decreased fracture toughness, and degradation of fatigue properties of metals. However, this article shows, surprisingly, that hydrogen can have an effect against HE. A dramatic phenomenon was found in which charging a supersaturated level of hydrogen into specimens of austenitic stainless steels of types 304 and 316L drastically improved the fatigue crack growth resistance, rather than accelerating fatigue crack growth rates. Although this mysterious phenomenon has not previously been observed in the history of HE research, its mechanism can be understood as an interaction between hydrogen and dislocations. Hydrogen can play two roles in terms of dislocation mobility: pinning (or dragging) and enhancement of mobility. Competition between these two roles determines whether the resulting phenomenon is damaging or, unexpectedly, desirable. This finding will, not only be the crucial key factor to elucidate the mechanism of HE, but also be a trigger to review all existing theories on HE in which hydrogen is regarded as a dangerous culprit.

  2. The Effects of Endogenous Non-Peptide Molecule Isatin and Hydrogen Peroxide on Proteomic Profiling of Rat Brain Amyloid-β Binding Proteins: Relevance to Alzheimer’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Medvedev, Alexei E.; Buneeva, Olga A.; Kopylov, Arthur T.; Gnedenko, Oksana V.; Medvedeva, Marina V.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Ivanov, Alexis S.; Zgoda, Victor G.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid-β peptide is considered as a key player in the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although good evidence exists that amyloid-β accumulates inside cells, intracellular brain amyloid-binding proteins remain poorly characterized. Proteomic profiling of rat brain homogenates, performed in this study, resulted in identification of 89 individual intracellular amyloid-binding proteins, and approximately 25% of them were proteins that we had previously identified as specifically binding to isatin, an endogenous neuroprotector molecule. A significant proportion of the amyloid-binding proteins (more than 30%) are differentially expressed or altered/oxidatively modified in AD patients. Incubation of brain homogenates with 70 µM hydrogen peroxide significantly influenced the profile of amyloid-β binding proteins and 0.1 mM isatin decreased the number of identified amyloid-β binding proteins both in control and hydrogen peroxide treated brain homogenates. The effects of hydrogen peroxide and isatin have been confirmed in optical biosensor experiments with purified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, one of the known crucial amyloid-β binding proteins (also identified in this study). Data obtained suggest that isatin protects crucial intracellular protein targets against amyloid binding, and possibly favors intracellular degradation of this protein via preventing formation of amyloid-β oligomers described in the literature for some isatin derivatives. PMID:25551598

  3. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented.

  4. Application of Henry's Law for Binding Energies of Adsorbed Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Andrew; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Sweany, Mark; Pfeifer, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The method of isosteres is the simplest method used to calculate the differential enthalpy of adsorption. However, it is incredibly sensitive to the choice of model and respective fitting parameters. For a set of isotherms measured on a specific sample, most models converge upon a similar value at high coverage, but are inconsistent in the low pressure regime. In this talk, we investigate the application of various models for localized and mobile adsorption at low pressures in order to obtain binding energy of hydrogen to the adsorbent surface. Henry's Law analysis of the Langmuir Model of adsorption yield binding energies in excellent agreement with those obtained from the Clausius Clapeyron relation. Work supported by DOE-EERE, Award No. DE-FG36-08GO18142.

  5. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Gao, Minrui; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Jingguang G; Yan, Yushan

    2015-01-08

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum.

  6. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Zhuang, ZB; Gao, MR; Zheng, J; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2015-01-08

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum.

  7. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Gao, Minrui; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Jingguang G; Yan, Yushan

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum. PMID:25569511

  8. Effects of hydrogen on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, C. E.

    1969-01-01

    Several rules to guide choice of materials, and methods of welding, electroplating, and heat treatment will provide a method for minimizing failures in storage tanks and related hardware. Failures are caused by high-pressure hydrogen effects, the formation of hydrides in titanium, and hydrogen absorption through various metals processing techniques.

  9. Unveiling Residual Molecular Binding in Triply Charged Hydrogen Bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Penent, F.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Gamblin, G.; Carniato, S.; Andric, L.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.

    2011-03-11

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of triply charged hydrogen bromide ions formed by photoionization of the inner 3d shell of Br. The experimental results, obtained by detecting the 3d photoelectron in coincidence with the two subsequent Auger electrons, are analyzed using calculated potential energy curves of HBr{sup 3+}. The competition between the short-range chemical binding potential and the Coulomb repulsion in the dissociative process is shown. Two different mechanisms are observed for double Auger decay: one, a direct process with simultaneous ejection of two Auger electrons to final HBr{sup 3+} ionic states and the other, a cascade process involving double Auger decay characterized by the autoionization of Br*{sup +} ion subsequent to the HBr{sup 2+} fragmentation.

  10. Benzene selectivity in competitive arene hydrogenation: effects of single-site catalyst···acidic oxide surface binding geometry.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weixing; Stalzer, Madelyn Marie; Nicholas, Christopher P; Bhattacharyya, Alak; Motta, Alessandro; Gallagher, James R; Zhang, Guanghui; Miller, Jeffrey T; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Delferro, Massimiliano; Marks, Tobin J

    2015-06-01

    Organozirconium complexes are chemisorbed on Brønsted acidic sulfated ZrO2 (ZrS), sulfated Al2O3 (AlS), and ZrO2-WO3 (ZrW). Under mild conditions (25 °C, 1 atm H2), the supported Cp*ZrMe3, Cp*ZrBz3, and Cp*ZrPh3 catalysts are very active for benzene hydrogenation with activities declining with decreasing acidity, ZrS ≫ AlS ≈ ZrW, arguing that more Brønsted acidic oxides (those having weaker corresponding conjugate bases) yield stronger surface organometallic electrophiles and for this reason have higher benzene hydrogenation activity. Benzene selective hydrogenation, a potential approach for carcinogenic benzene removal from gasoline, is probed using benzene/toluene mixtures, and selectivities for benzene hydrogenation vary with catalyst as ZrBz3(+)/ZrS(-), 83% > Cp*ZrMe2(+)/ZrS(-), 80% > Cp*ZrBz2(+)/ZrS(-), 67% > Cp*ZrPh2(+)/ZrS(-), 57%. For Cp*ZrBz2(+)/ZrS(-), which displays the highest benzene hydrogenation activity with moderate selectivity in benzene/toluene mixtures. Other benzene/arene mixtures are examined, and benzene selectivities vary with arene as mesitylene, 99%, > ethylbenzene, 86% > toluene, 67%. Structural and computational studies by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, XAS, and periodic DFT methods applied to supported Cp*ZrMe3 and Cp*ZrBz3 indicate that larger Zr···surface distances are present in more sterically encumbered Cp*ZrBz2(+)/AlS(-) vs Cp*ZrMe2(+)/AlS(-). The combined XAS, solid state NMR, and DFT data argue that the bulky catalyst benzyl groups expand the "cationic" metal center-anionic sulfated oxide surface distances, and this separation/weakened ion-pairing enables the activation/insertion of more sterically encumbered arenes and influences hydrogenation rates and selectivity patterns.

  11. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  12. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  13. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  14. Analytic variational calculation of the ground-state binding energy of hydrogen in intermediate and intense magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    The present work investigates analytically the effect of an intermediate or intense magnetic field, such as probably exist in white dwarfs and near pulsars, on the binding energy of the hydrogen ground state. A wave-function 'prescription' is given for an analytic variational calculation of the binding energy. The calculation still gives a smooth transition between intermediate and intense fields. An explicit calculation of the ground-state binding energy as B goes to infinity is provided for the Yafet et al. (1956) trial function.

  15. Dissection of the binding of hydrogen peroxide to trypsin using spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Yu, Zehua; Hu, Xinxin; Liu, Rutao

    2015-02-01

    Studies on the effects of environmental pollutants to protein in vitro has become a global attention. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is used as an effective food preservative and bleacher in industrial production. The toxicity of H2O2 to trypsin was investigated by multiple spectroscopic techniques and the molecular docking method at the molecular level. The intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin was proved to be quenched in a static process based on the results of fluorescence lifetime experiment. Hydrogen bonds interaction and van der Waals forces were the main force to generate the trypsin-H2O2 complex on account of the negative ΔH0 and ΔS0. The binding of H2O2 changed the conformational structures and internal microenvironment of trypsin illustrated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) results. However, the binding site was far away from the active site of trypsin and the trypsin activity was only slightly affected by H2O2, which was further explained by molecular docking investigations.

  16. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M; Savidge, Tor C

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  17. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  18. Spectroscopic investigations into the binding of hydrogen sulfide to synthetic picket-fence porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Hartle, Matthew D; Prell, James S; Pluth, Michael D

    2016-03-21

    The reversible binding of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to hemeprotein sites has been attributed to several factors, likely working in concert, including the protected binding pocket environment, proximal hydrogen bond interactions, and iron ligation environment. To investigate the importance of a sterically-constrained, protected environment on sulfide reactivity with heme centers, we report here the reactivity of H2S and HS(-) with the picket-fence porphyrin system. Our results indicate that the picket-fence porphyrin does not bind H2S in the ferric or ferrous state. By contrast, reaction of the ferric scaffold with HS(-) results in reduction to the ferrous species, followed by ligation of one equivalent of HS(-), as evidenced by UV-vis, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies. Measurement of the HS(-) binding affinities in the picket-fence or tetraphenyl porphyrin systems revealed identical binding. Taken together, these results suggest that the protected, sterically-constrained binding pocket alone is not the primary contributor for stabilization of ferric H2S/HS(-) species in model systems, but that other interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, must play a critical role in facilitation of reversible interactions in ferric hemes. PMID:26869340

  19. Hydrogen Bond Dynamic Propensity Studies for Protein Binding and Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamic propensity of the backbone hydrogen bonds of the protein MDM2 (the natural regulator of the tumor suppressor p53) in order to determine its binding properties. This approach is fostered by the observation that certain backbone hydrogen bonds at the p53-binding site exhibit a dynamical propensity in simulations that differs markedly form their state-value (that is, formed/not formed) in the PDB structure of the apo protein. To this end, we conduct a series of hydrogen bond propensity calculations in different contexts: 1) computational alanine-scanning studies of the MDM2-p53 interface; 2) the formation of the complex of MDM2 with the disruptive small molecule Nutlin-3a (dissecting the contribution of the different molecular fragments) and 3) the binding of a series of small molecules (drugs) with different affinities for MDM2. Thus, the relevance of the hydrogen bond propensity analysis for protein binding studies and as a useful tool to complement existing methods for drug design and optimization will be made evident. PMID:27792778

  20. Predictive binding geometry of ligands to DNA minor groove: isohelicity and hydrogen-bonding pattern.

    PubMed

    Stockert, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of drugs and dyes with nucleic acids, particularly when binding to DNA minor groove occurs, has increasing importance in biomedical sciences. This is due to the resulting biological activity and to the possibility of recognizing AT and GC base pairs. In such cases, DNA binding can be predicted if appropriate helical and hydrogen-bonding parameters are deduced from DNA models, and a simplified geometrical rule in the form of a stencil is then applied on computer-drawn molecules of interest. Relevant structure parameter values for minor groove binders are the length (4.6 < L < 5.4 Å) and angle (152 < σ < 156.5°) between three consecutive units, measured at the level of hydrogen donor or acceptor groups. Application of the stencil shows that predictive methods can aid in the design of new compounds, by checking the possible binding of isohelical sequence-specific ligands along the DNA minor groove. PMID:24162975

  1. Characterization of hydrogen binding to tungsten and beryllium surfaces using low energy ion beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasinski, Robert; Whaley, Josh

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we use low energy ion beam analysis to determine how hydrogen interacts with tungsten and beryllium surfaces. The goal of this work is to provide insight into processes that contribute to recycling from plasma-facing surfaces in magnetic fusion devices. Here we have applied low energy ion scattering (LEIS) to enable detection of adsorbed hydrogen at sub-monolayer resolution and to provide isotopic sensitivity. We probe the surfaces of interest with He + and Ne + at energies less than 5 keV to determine the structure and composition of the first few atomic layers. This approach enables us to examine how hydrogen surface concentrations evolve in real time, providing insight into adsorption kinetics. In addition, we have developed a means of determining the hydrogen binding configuration at different temperatures by exploiting mechanisms of ion channeling along surfaces. Using these methods, we have been able to identify hydrogen binding configurations for the W(100) +H, W(110) +H, and Be(0001) +H adsorption systems. We also report on our efforts to more accurately and efficiently model atomic collisions during scattering, key steps needed to extract structural information from LEIS signals. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Hydrogen binding energy of halogenated C40 cage: An intermediate between physisorption and chemisorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindi, A. A.; EL-Barbary, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the energetic of non hydrogenated and hydrogenated small mass fullerene cages with the view of assessing hydrogen storage capacity have been investigated. All calculations have been performed with the DFT as implemented within G03W package, using B3LYP exchange-functional and applying basis set 6-31G(d,p). Our calculations show that the C40 fullerene cage possesses high surface reactivity. For the first time, the hydrogen binding energy of halogenated C40 cage is calculated and it is found to be an intermediate between physisorption and chemisorption states. The 1H NMR, 13C NMR chemical shifts, FT-IR spectra and partial atomic charges have been performed for C40 and C60, C40H40 and C60H60 cages. In addition, the hydrogen storage capacity is found to be increased by doping the C40 cage with light elements. Hence halogenated C40 cage is considered to be good candidate for hydrogen storage.

  3. "Chameleonic" backbone hydrogen bonds in protein binding and as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, C A; Accordino, S R; Gerbino, D C; Appignanesi, G A

    2015-10-01

    We carry out a time-averaged contact matrix study to reveal the existence of protein backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs) whose net persistence in time differs markedly form their corresponding PDB-reported state. We term such interactions as "chameleonic" BHBs, CBHBs, precisely to account for their tendency to change the structural prescription of the PDB for the opposite bonding propensity in solution. We also find a significant enrichment of protein binding sites in CBHBs, relate them to local water exposure and analyze their behavior as ligand/drug targets. Thus, the dynamic analysis of hydrogen bond propensity might lay the foundations for new tools of interest in protein binding-site prediction and in lead optimization for drug design. PMID:26486885

  4. Correlating the hydrogen evolution reaction activity in alkaline electrolytes with the hydrogen binding energy on monometallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Myint, M; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2013-05-01

    The slow reaction kinetics of the hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) on platinum in alkaline electrolytes hinders the development of alkaline electrolysers, solar hydrogen cells and alkaline fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of the exchange current density of the HER/HOR in alkaline media is critical for the search and design of highly active electrocatalysts. By studying the HER on a series of monometallic surfaces, we demonstrate that the HER exchange current density in alkaline solutions can be correlated with the calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) on the metal surfaces via a volcano type of relationship. The HER activity varies by several orders of magnitude from Pt at the peak of the plot to W and Au located on the bottom of each side of the plot, similar to the observation in acids. Such a correlation suggests that the HBE can be used as a descriptor for identifying electrocatalysts for HER/HOR in alkaline media, and that the HER exchange current density can be tuned by modifying the surface chemical properties.

  5. Hydrogen Bonding Motifs in MutSaphla and their response to binding damaged DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negureanu, Lacra; Salsbury, Freddie

    2013-03-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing interest in studying the binding of damaged DNA to the MutSalpha protein complex. This protein complex, the Msh2/Msh6 complex in humans, is the initial complex that binds mismatched DNA and other DNA defects that occur during replication. This complex has also been shown to bind at least some types of damaged DNA. As a result of this interest, multiple studies have contrasted the interactions of MutSalpha with its normal mismatched substrate and with the interactions of MutsSalpha to DNA damaged by the chemotherapeutic cisplatin. To complement these studies, we examined the interaction between MutSalpha and DNA damaged by carboplatin via all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations provide evidence for different hydrogen bonding interactions at the protein/DNA and protein/protein interface. The hydrogen bonding motifs found are broadly similar to those found in binding to the adduct from cis-platin, but have distinct differences. These subtle differences may play a role in the way the different damages are signaled by MutS.

  6. Communication: Towards the binding energy and vibrational red shift of the simplest organic hydrogen bond: harmonic constraints for methanol dimer.

    PubMed

    Heger, Matthias; Suhm, Martin A; Mata, Ricardo A

    2014-09-14

    The discrepancy between experimental and harmonically predicted shifts of the OH stretching fundamental of methanol upon hydrogen bonding to a second methanol unit is too large to be blamed mostly on diagonal and off-diagonal anharmonicity corrections. It is shown that a decisive contribution comes from post-MP2 electron correlation effects, which appear not to be captured by any of the popular density functionals. We also identify that the major deficiency is in the description of the donor OH bond. Together with estimates for the electronic and harmonically zero-point corrected dimer binding energies, this work provides essential constraints for a quantitative description of this simple hydrogen bond. The spectroscopic dissociation energy is predicted to be larger than 18 kJ/mol and the harmonic OH-stretching fundamental shifts by about -121 cm(-1) upon dimerization, somewhat more than in the anharmonic experiment (-111 cm(-1)).

  7. Effects of Hydrogen on Tantalum Nitride Resistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, James

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we report on observations of degradation of thin film Tantalum Nitride chip resistors in a hermetically sealed hybrid. The observations have been attributed to the reaction of residual Palladium with desorbed Hydrogen on the surface of the resistor film. Hydrogen gas has been observed to desorb from various sources within the sealed hybrid as a result of temperature elevation. The hydrogen gas has been reported to undergo a reaction with elements such as Platinum and Palladium causing device degradation in Gallium Arsenide Field Effect Transistors. The experimental procedures and data relating to this observation along with a discussion of available risk mitigation techniques will be presented.

  8. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER. PMID:27034988

  9. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER.

  10. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER. PMID:27034988

  11. Hydrogen isotope effect on the Dimits shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogen isotope effect on the Dimits shift in drift wave turbulence (Dimits et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 969) is discussed using the theory of zonal flows, in which the nonlinear damping rate of zonal flows is taken into account. The up-shift of the critical linear growth rate of the drift waves, above which drift wave fluctuations develop, is investigated. The dependence on the mass number of the hydrogen isotope is discussed.

  12. Significant Quantum Effects in Hydrogen Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kyriakou, Georgios; Davidson, Erlend R.; Peng, Guowen; Roling, Luke T.; Singh, Suyash; Boucher, Matthew B.; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2014-03-31

    Dissociation of molecular hydrogen is an important step in a wide variety of chemical, biological, and physical processes. Due to the light mass of hydrogen, it is recognized that quantum effects are often important to its reactivity. However, understanding how quantum effects impact the reactivity of hydrogen is still in its infancy. Here, we examine this issue using a well-defined Pd/Cu(111) alloy that allows the activation of hydrogen and deuterium molecules to be examined at individual Pd atom surface sites over a wide range of temperatures. Experiments comparing the uptake of hydrogen and deuterium as a function of temperature reveal completely different behavior of the two species. The rate of hydrogen activation increases at lower sample temperature, whereas deuterium activation slows as the temperature is lowered. Density functional theory simulations in which quantum nuclear effects are accounted for reveal that tunneling through the dissociation barrier is prevalent for H2 up to 190 K and for D2 up to 140 K. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the effective barrier to H2 dissociation is so low that hydrogen uptake on the surface is limited merely by thermodynamics, whereas the D2 dissociation process is controlled by kinetics. These data illustrate the complexity and inherent quantum nature of this ubiquitous and seemingly simple chemical process. Examining these effects in other systems with a similar range of approaches may uncover temperature regimes where quantum effects can be harnessed, yielding greater control of bond-breaking processes at surfaces and uncovering useful chemistries such as selective bond activation or isotope separation.

  13. Significant Quantum Effects in Hydrogen Activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dissociation of molecular hydrogen is an important step in a wide variety of chemical, biological, and physical processes. Due to the light mass of hydrogen, it is recognized that quantum effects are often important to its reactivity. However, understanding how quantum effects impact the reactivity of hydrogen is still in its infancy. Here, we examine this issue using a well-defined Pd/Cu(111) alloy that allows the activation of hydrogen and deuterium molecules to be examined at individual Pd atom surface sites over a wide range of temperatures. Experiments comparing the uptake of hydrogen and deuterium as a function of temperature reveal completely different behavior of the two species. The rate of hydrogen activation increases at lower sample temperature, whereas deuterium activation slows as the temperature is lowered. Density functional theory simulations in which quantum nuclear effects are accounted for reveal that tunneling through the dissociation barrier is prevalent for H2 up to ∼190 K and for D2 up to ∼140 K. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the effective barrier to H2 dissociation is so low that hydrogen uptake on the surface is limited merely by thermodynamics, whereas the D2 dissociation process is controlled by kinetics. These data illustrate the complexity and inherent quantum nature of this ubiquitous and seemingly simple chemical process. Examining these effects in other systems with a similar range of approaches may uncover temperature regimes where quantum effects can be harnessed, yielding greater control of bond-breaking processes at surfaces and uncovering useful chemistries such as selective bond activation or isotope separation. PMID:24684530

  14. Effects of hydrogen on mechanical properties and fracture mechanism of 8090 Al-Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lian; Chen, Wenxiu; Liu, Zhonghao; Shao, Yuxia; Hu, Zhuangqi

    1993-06-01

    The effects of hydrogen and strain rate on the mechanical properties and fracture mechanism of 8090 Al-Li alloy under electrochemical charging conditions have been studied. Experimental results demonstrate that the tensile strength [ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and yield strength (YS)] and plasticity [reduction of area (RA) and elongation (EL)] drop linearly with the decrease of strain rate. The charged hydrogen increases the tensile strength but markedly impair the plasticity. The susceptibility of hydrogen embrittlement increases with the decreases of strain rate, and the susceptibility of the charged specimens was larger than that of the uncharged ones over the strain-rate range. Observation by scanning electron microscope (SEM) reveals that the charged hydrogen enhances intergranular delamination cracking on the fracture surface. The fracture model of charged specimens at low strain rates(dot \\varepsilon {text{< 3}}{text{.4 X 10}}^{{text{ - 4}}} /s) is grain boundary brittle fracture (GBBF), while that of other conditions is grain boundary ductile fracture (GBDF). Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) study shows that the atomic binding energy of Al and Li in the alloy decreased after hydrogen charging, and the atomic binding energy drop of the former is more than the latter. In this article, the hydrogen transport through the mobile dislocation mechanism of hydrogen-induced fracture and the hydrogen effect on atomic binding energy were also discussed in detail.

  15. Anion Binding in Metal-Organic Frameworks Functionalized with Urea Hydrogen-Bonding Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2006-01-01

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) functionalized with urea hydrogen-bonding groups has been synthesized and structurally analyzed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to evaluate the efficacy of anion coordination by urea within the structural constraints of the MOFs. We found that urea-based functionalities may be used for anion binding within metal-organic frameworks when the tendency for urea{hor_ellipsis}urea self-association is decreased by strengthening the intramolecular CH{hor_ellipsis}O hydrogen bonding of N-phenyl substituents to the carbonyl oxygen atom. Theoretical calculations indicate that N,N'-bis(m-pyridyl)urea (BPU) and N,N'-bis(m-cyanophenyl)urea (BCPU) should have enhanced hydrogen-bonding donor abilities toward anions and decreased tendencies to self-associate into hydrogen-bonded tapes compared to other disubstituted ureas. Accordingly, BPU and BCPU were incorporated in MOFs as linkers through coordination of various Zn, Cu, and Ag transition metal salts, including Zn(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}, ZnSO{sub 4}, Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, Cu(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2}, AgNO{sub 3}, and AgSO{sub 3}CH{sub 3}. Structural analysis by single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed that these linkers are versatile anion binders, capable of chelate hydrogen bonding to all of the oxoanions explored. Anion coordination by the urea functionalities was found to successfully compete with urea self-association in all cases except for that of charge-diffuse perchlorate.

  16. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Li L; Feng, Guo Q; Zhang, Qing G

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  17. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li L.; Feng, Guo Q.; Zhang, Qing G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  18. Insight into hydrogenation of graphene: Effect of hydrogen plasma chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Felten, A.; Nittler, L.; Pireaux, J.-J.; McManus, D.; Rice, C.; Casiraghi, C.

    2014-11-03

    Plasma hydrogenation of graphene has been proposed as a tool to modify the properties of graphene. However, hydrogen plasma is a complex system and controlled hydrogenation of graphene suffers from a lack of understanding of the plasma chemistry. Here, we correlate the modifications induced on monolayer graphene studied by Raman spectroscopy with the hydrogen ions energy distributions obtained by mass spectrometry. We measure the energy distribution of H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, and H{sub 3}{sup +} ions for different plasma conditions showing that their energy strongly depends on the sample position, pressure, and plasma power and can reach values as high as 45 eV. Based on these measurements, we speculate that under specific plasma parameters, protons should possess enough energy to penetrate the graphene sheet. Therefore, a graphene membrane could become, under certain conditions, transparent to both protons and electrons.

  19. Effect Of Water On Permeation By Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomazic, William A.; Hulligan, David

    1988-01-01

    Water vapor in working fluid equilibrates with permeability-reducing oxides in metal parts. Report describes study of effects of water on permeation of heater-head tubes by hydrogen in Stirling engine. Experiments performed to determine minimum concentration of oxygen and/or oxygen-bearing gas maintaining oxide coverage adequate for low permeability. Tests showed 750 ppm or more of water effective in maintaining stable, low permeability.

  20. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, Tania M.

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  1. Polymerization of tobacco mosaic virus protein without and with hydrogen ion binding.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, R A; Lauffer, M A

    1983-05-01

    When tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) protein is polymerized at pH values above 7 in unbuffered solutions, either by raising temperature at constant ionic strength or by increasing ionic strength at constant temperature, a 20 S component is formed having bound only the very small amount of H+ ion supplied by the unpolymerized protein. When hydrogen ion is added by titration during polymerization so as to keep pH constant, as would occur automatically if a buffer were present, a 20 S component is formed with one H+ ion bound each for half of the subunits. Thus, a 20 S form with and a 20 S form without bound H+ ion exist. Furthermore, the 20 S form without bound H+ ion binds H+ ion when supplied by titration to produce a 20 S form with the same amount of bound H+ ion as when H+ ion is supplied during the polymerization.

  2. Binding Energies of Hydrogen-Like Impurities in a Semiconductor in Intense Terahertz Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, J. L.; Xu, W.; Lin, L. B.

    We present a detailed theoretical study of the influence of linearly polarized intense terahertz (THz) laser radiation on energy states of hydrogen-like impurities in semiconductors. The dependence of the binding energy for ground (1s) and first excited (2s) states, E1s and E2s, on the intensity and the frequency of the THz radiation has been examined for a GaAs-based system. It is found that E1s, E2s and E2s-E1s decrease with increasing radiation intensity or with decreasing radiation frequency, which implies that an intense THz field can enhance ionization of dopants in semiconductors. Our analytical and numerical results show that one of the most important results obtained by A. L. A. Fonseca et al. [Phys. Stat. Sol. (b) 186, K57 (1994)] is incorrect.

  3. Hydrogen Bound Complexes with Tropolone: Binding Motifs, Barrier Heights, and the Search for Bifurcating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchick, Deacon; Chew, Kathryn; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    The potentially frustrated transfer of a proton between the hydroxylic (proton-donating) and ketonic (proton-accepting) oxygen atom centers in tropolone (TrOH) long has served as a model system for the study of coherent (symmetrical) proton-transfer events. A litany of hydrogen-bound complexes [TrOH \\cdot Xn] can be formed in situ by docking amphoteric ligands onto the TrOH substrate under supersonic free-jet expansion conditions. Binary (n = 1) and higher order (n = 2, 3, ldots) complexes formed with formic acid, hydrogen fluoride, acetic acid and propiolic acid (X = FA, HF, AA, and PA) have been synthesized and interrogated using a variety of spectroscopic probes built upon the intense ˜{A1}B2-˜{X1}{A}1 (π *←π) near-ultraviolet absorption system of bare tropolone, thereby providing vibronically resolved information through combined use of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), dispersed fluorescence (DF), fluorescence hole-burning (FHB), and stimulated emission pumping (SEP) methods. Experimental results reveal the propensity for binary complexes to adopt a higher-energy external binding motif (ligand attached to the seven membered aromatic ring) over the energetically preferred internal form (ligand bound to the O-H\\cdotsO reaction center), where the latter cleft-bound species can undergo unique symmetric (coherent) double proton-transfer reactions. These findings will be discussed in light of supporting quantum-chemical calculations.

  4. Causal binding of actions to their effects.

    PubMed

    Buehner, Marc J; Humphreys, Gruffydd R

    2009-10-01

    According to widely held views in cognitive science harking back to David Hume, causality cannot be perceived directly, but instead is inferred from patterns of sensory experience, and the quality of these inferences is determined by perceivable quantities such as contingency and contiguity. We report results that suggest a reversal of Hume's conjecture: People's sense of time is warped by the experience of causality. In a stimulus-anticipation task, participants' response behavior reflected a shortened experience of time in the case of target stimuli participants themselves had generated, relative to equidistant, equally predictable stimuli they had not caused. These findings suggest that causality in the mind leads to temporal binding of cause and effect, and extend and generalize beyond earlier claims of intentional binding between action and outcome.

  5. Lipin 2 binds phosphatidic acid by the electrostatic hydrogen bond switch mechanism independent of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Eaton, James M; Takkellapati, Sankeerth; Lawrence, Robert T; McQueeney, Kelley E; Boroda, Salome; Mullins, Garrett R; Sherwood, Samantha G; Finck, Brian N; Villén, Judit; Harris, Thurl E

    2014-06-27

    Lipin 2 is a phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) responsible for the penultimate step of triglyceride synthesis and dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA) to generate diacylglycerol. The lipin family of PA phosphatases is composed of lipins 1-3, which are members of the conserved haloacid dehalogenase superfamily. Although genetic alteration of LPIN2 in humans is known to cause Majeed syndrome, little is known about the biochemical regulation of its PAP activity. Here, in an attempt to gain a better general understanding of the biochemical nature of lipin 2, we have performed kinetic and phosphorylation analyses. We provide evidence that lipin 2, like lipin 1, binds PA via the electrostatic hydrogen bond switch mechanism but has a lower rate of catalysis. Like lipin 1, lipin 2 is highly phosphorylated, and we identified 15 phosphosites. However, unlike lipin 1, the phosphorylation of lipin 2 is not induced by insulin signaling nor is it sensitive to inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin. Importantly, phosphorylation of lipin 2 does not negatively regulate either membrane binding or PAP activity. This suggests that lipin 2 functions as a constitutively active PA phosphatase in stark contrast to the high degree of phosphorylation-mediated regulation of lipin 1. This knowledge of lipin 2 regulation is important for a deeper understanding of how the lipin family functions with respect to lipid synthesis and, more generally, as an example of how the membrane environment around PA can influence its effector proteins. PMID:24811178

  6. Hydrogen cyanide health effects. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, B.L.; Baker, L.H.; Herndon, B.L.; Ellis, H.V. III; Horn, E.M.

    1981-09-01

    Health effects literature primarily related to inhalation exposures to hydrogen cyanide was collected, evaluated, tabulated and summarized. Approximately 170 documents were collected from computerized and manual literature searches covering the period 1899-1981. Pharmacologists and an M.D. epidemiologist rated the documents according to their applicability to the study and their methodology. The approximately 20 documents considered useful for deriving a range of concern for human exposure to hydrogen cyanide from automotive emissions were tabulated. The 25 pages of tables detail the results of acute and repeated dose testing of mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, cats, monkeys, dogs, goats, donkeys and humans as well as human occupational studies. Most of the documents evaluated are described in an annotated bibliography.

  7. Effect of surface binding on heterogeneous DNA melting equilibria: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Allen, John H; Schoch, Emily T; Stubbs, John M

    2011-02-24

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) microarrays are constructed with a surface-immobilized single-stranded probe sequence that hydrogen bonds with its complementary target strand from solution and is subsequently detected, making their hybridization equilibrium of central importance. Unexpectedly, the effect of surface immobilization is that if the sequences of probe and target are exchanged, the hybridization equilibrium shifts. Here, configurational-bias Monte Carlo simulations using a coarse-grained model for DNA were carried out for an undecamer double helix both in solution and bound to a surface to determine dissociation equilibria. Four possible surface binding orientations were independently investigated. Analysis shows that the effect of surface binding is to destabilize hydrogen-bonding interactions of bases proximal to the binding site and enhance those of distal bases due to the double helix lying flat on the surface. Results have implications for predicting surface-bound DNA hybridization equilibria.

  8. Isotope effects of hydrogen and atom tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Pliss, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    The abnormally high mass-dependent isotope effects in liquid-phase hydrogen (deuterium) atom transfer reactions, which are customarily regarded as quantum effects, are actually the products of two classical effects, namely, kinetic and thermodynamic ones. The former is determined by the rate constants for atom transfer and the latter is caused by nonbonded (or noncovalent) isotope effects in the solvation of protiated and deuterated reacting molecules. This product can mimic the large isotope effects that are usually attributed to tunnelling. In enzymatic reactions, tunnelling is of particular interest; its existence characterizes an enzyme as a rigid molecular machine in which the residence time of reactants on the reaction coordinate exceeds the waiting time for the tunnelling event. The magnitude of isotope effect becomes a characteristic parameter of the internal dynamics of the enzyme catalytic site. The bibliography includes 61 references.

  9. Effect of hydrogenation on interaction force among carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Ahmadreza; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogenation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was achieved with flowing hydrogen gas and heating CNTs up to 800 °C. Electron microcopy images show the etching effect of the hydrogen as well as the appearance of defects after hydrogenation. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of CHx groups on the sidewalls of the functionalized CNTs. Raman spectra of the pristine and hydrogenated samples revealed a transition from graphitic to a disordered and defected structure by increasing the hydrogenation time. We measured the interaction force among CNTs in the pristine and hydrogenated samples. Results showed that the interaction force is reduced sharply upon hydrogenation. After examination of the relation between different experimentally obtained results and the interaction force trend, we discuss how hydrogenation affects the interaction force among CNTs by increasing roughness and formation of repulsive dipoles on the CNT surface.

  10. Hydrogen Bonding of 1,2-Azaborines in the Binding Cavity of T4 Lysozyme Mutants: Structures and Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyelee; Fischer, Marcus; Shoichet, Brian K; Liu, Shih-Yuan

    2016-09-21

    Protein crystallography and calorimetry were used to characterize the binding of 1,2-azaborines to model cavities in T4 lysozyme in direct comparison to their carbonaceous counterparts. In the apolar L99A cavity, affinity for Ab dropped only slightly versus benzene. In the cavity designed to accommodate a single hydrogen bond (L99A/M102Q), Gln102═O···H-N hydrogen bonding for Ab and BEtAb was observed in the crystallographic complexes. The strength of the hydrogen bonding was estimated as 0.94 and 0.64 kcal/mol for Ab and BEtAb, respectively. This work unambiguously demonstrates that 1,2-azaborines can be readily accommodated in classic aryl recognition pockets and establishes one of 1,2-azaborine's distinguishing features from its carbonaceous isostere benzene: its ability to serve as an NH hydrogen bond donor in a biological setting. PMID:27603116

  11. Binding energy of the ground and first few excited states of hydrogenic donor impurity in a rectangular GaAs quantum dot in the presence of electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Kang, Yun; Li, Xian-Li

    2014-12-01

    Within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model and effective mass approximation, we calculate the ground and the first 9 excited-state binding energies of a hydrogenic donor impurity in a rectangular quantum dot (RQD) in the presence of electric field. The analytical form of the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential replacing the three-dimensional Coulomb potential in our model is derived by Fourier transforms. We discuss detailedly dependence of the binding energies on the impurity positions and electric fields. For the ground-state binding energy, our results qualitatively agree with that of Mendoza et al. (2005) in which they only calculated the ground-state binding energies in cubic quantum dots by variational method. However, for first 9 excited-state binding energies, such dependence has complex manner since there are two or three peaks in the electronic probability density distribution curves. The strengths and positions of these peaks in RQD affect the interaction potential between electron and impurity, which appears to be the critical control on the binding energies of impurity. The applied electric field pushes the positions of these peaks downwards, and the strengths of peaks located at the upper half of RQD increase while the strengths of lower peaks firstly decrease, then increase with increasing electric field. The high peak strength can lead to increase of the binding energy while the large distance between the position of peak and impurity center results in reduce of the energy, which is an interesting competition. This competition is more obvious for excited-state binding energies of off-central impurity.

  12. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, we find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.

  13. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, wemore » find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.« less

  14. Effect of inoculum conditioning on hydrogen fermentation and pH effect on bacterial community relevant to hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Kawagoshi, Yasunori; Hino, Naoe; Fujimoto, Aya; Nakao, Masaharu; Fujita, Yukiko; Sugimura, Seiji; Furukawa, Kenji

    2005-11-01

    The effect of conditioning for a variety of inoculums on fermentative hydrogen production was investigated. In addition, the effects of pH condition on hydrogen fermentation and bacterial community were investigated. The effect of conditioning on hydrogen production was different depending on the inoculum types. An appreciable hydrogen production was shown with anaerobic digested sludge and lake sediment without conditioning, however, no hydrogen was produced when refuse compost and kiwi grove soil were used as inoculums without conditioning. The highest hydrogen production was obtained with heat-conditioned anaerobic digested sludge, almost the same production was also obtained with unconditioned digested sludge. The pH condition considerably affected hydrogen fermentation, hydrogen gas was efficiently produced with unconditioned anaerobic sludge when the pH was controlled at 6.0 throughout the culture period and not when only the initial pH was adjusted to 6.0 and 7.0. Hydrogen production decreased when the culture pH was only adjusted at the beginning of each batch in continuous batch culture, and additionally, bacterial community varied with the change in hydrogen production. It was suggested that Clostridium and Coprothermobacter species played important role in hydrogen fermentation, and Lactobacillus species had an adverse effect on hydrogen production.

  15. Effect of hydrogen injection on hydrogen uptake by BWR fuel cladding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.

    1983-06-01

    The hydrogen uptake rates reported for zirconium alloys in BWRs, PWRs, HWRs and various experimental in-reactor loops have been surveyed. The scatter in the data is large and arises from a variety of sources: variability in material properties; variations in temperature, irradiation flux, and water chemistry at different points in the reactor; and a lack of accurate knowledge of the sources of hydrogen which ends up in the zirconium-alloy cladding. An attempt has been made to assess the significance of these sources of variability in order to estimate the baseline for hydrogen uptake from the outside of good-quality cladding under normal BWR operating conditions. The probable effect of continuous hydrogen injection on this baseline has been estimated. It is concluded that severe localized hydrogen uptake, which might lead to hydride blisters is very improbable, but that an increase in the uniform rate of hydrogen absorption at the outside of the cladding may be expected.

  16. Lattice strain effects in graphane and partially-hydrogenated graphene sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James R; Averill, Frank; He, Dr. Haiyan; Pan, Dr. Bicai; Cooper, Valentino R; Peng, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of recent developments in the studies of fully hydrogenated graphene sheets, also known as graphane, and related initial results on partially hydrogenated structures. For the fully hydrogenated case, some important discrepancies, specifically whether or not the graphene sheet expands or contracts upon hydrogenation, exist between published first-principles calculations, and between calculations and experiment. The lattice change has important effects on partially hydrogenated structures. In addition, calculations of the interfacial energy must carefully account for the strain energy in neighboring regions: For sufficiently large regions between interfaces, defects at the interface which relieve the strain may be energetically preferable. Our preliminary first-principles calculations of ribbon structures, with interfaces between graphane and graphene regions, indicate that the interfaces do indeed have substantial misfit strains. Similarly, our tight-binding simulations show that at ambient temperatures, segments of graphene sheets may spontaneously combine with atomic hydrogen to form regions of graphane. Here, small amounts of chemisorbed hydrogen distort the graphene layer, due to the lattice misfit, and may induce the adsorption of more hydrogen atoms.

  17. Optimizing Binding Energies of Key Intermediates for CO2 Hydrogenation to Methanol over Oxide-Supported Copper.

    PubMed

    Kattel, Shyam; Yan, Binhang; Yang, Yixiong; Chen, Jingguang G; Liu, Ping

    2016-09-28

    Rational optimization of catalytic performance has been one of the major challenges in catalysis. Here we report a bottom-up study on the ability of TiO2 and ZrO2 to optimize the CO2 conversion to methanol on Cu, using combined density functional theory (DFT) calculations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) measurements, and steady-state flow reactor tests. The theoretical results from DFT and KMC agree with in situ DRIFTS measurements, showing that both TiO2 and ZrO2 help to promote methanol synthesis on Cu via carboxyl intermediates and the reverse water-gas-shift (RWGS) pathway; the formate intermediates, on the other hand, likely act as a spectator eventually. The origin of the superior promoting effect of ZrO2 is associated with the fine-tuning capability of reduced Zr(3+) at the interface, being able to bind the key reaction intermediates, e.g. *CO2, *CO, *HCO, and *H2CO, moderately to facilitate methanol formation. This study demonstrates the importance of synergy between theory and experiments to elucidate the complex reaction mechanisms of CO2 hydrogenation for the realization of a better catalyst by design. PMID:27571313

  18. Effects of Internal and External Hydrogen on Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) and hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) tensile and bend crack growth tests were performed on Inconel 718. For the IHE tests, the specimens were precharged to approximately 90 ppm hydrogen by exposure to 34.5 MPa H2 at 650 C. The HEE tests were performed in 34.5 MPa H2. Parameters evaluated were test temperature, strain rate for smooth and notch specimen geometries. The strain rate effect was very significant at ambient temperature for both IHE and HEE and decreased with increasing temperatures. For IHE, the strain rate effect was neglible at 260'C, and for HEE the strain rate effect was neglible at 400 C. At low temperatures, IHE was more severe than HEE, and at high temperatures HEE was more severe than IHE with a cross over temperature about 350 C. At 350 C, the equilibrium hydrogen concentration in Inconel 718 is about 50% lower than the hydrogen content of the precharged IHE specimens. Dislocation hydrogen sweeping of surface absorbed hydrogen was the likely transport mechanism for increasing the hydrogen concentration in the HEE tests sufficiently to produce the same degree of embrittlement as that of the more highly hydrogen charged IHE specimens. The main IHE fracture characteristic was formation of large, brittle flat facets, which decreased with increasing test temperature. The IHE fracture matrix surrounding the large facets ranged between brittle fine faceted to microvoid ductility depending upon strain rate, specimen geometry as well as temperature. The HEE fractures were characteristically fine featured, transgranular and brittle with a significant portion forming a "saw tooth" crystallographic pattern. Both IHE and HEE fractures were predominantly along the {1 1 1) slip and twin boundaries. With respect to embrittlement mechanism, it was postulated that dislocation hydrogen sweeping and hydrogen enhanced localized plasticity were active in HEE and IHE for concentrating hydrogen along (1 1 1) slip and twin

  19. Elucidation of Nonadditive Effects in Protein-Ligand Binding Energies: Thrombin as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Gaetano; Woods, Christopher J; Powlesland, Francis; Mey, Antonia S J S; Mulholland, Adrian J; Michel, Julien

    2016-06-23

    Accurate predictions of free energies of binding of ligands to proteins are challenging partly because of the nonadditivity of protein-ligand interactions; i.e., the free energy of binding is the sum of numerous enthalpic and entropic contributions that cannot be separated into functional group contributions. In principle, molecular simulations methodologies that compute free energies of binding do capture nonadditivity of protein-ligand interactions, but efficient protocols are necessary to compute well-converged free energies of binding that clearly resolve nonadditive effects. To this end, an efficient GPU-accelerated implementation of alchemical free energy calculations has been developed and applied to two congeneric series of ligands of the enzyme thrombin. The results show that accurate binding affinities are computed across the two congeneric series and positive coupling between nonpolar R(1) substituents and a X = NH3(+) substituent is reproduced, albeit with a weaker trend than experimentally observed. By contrast, a docking methodology completely fails to capture nonadditive effects. Further analysis shows that the nonadditive effects are partly due to variations in the strength of a hydrogen-bond between the X = NH3(+) ligands family and thrombin residue Gly216. However, other partially compensating interactions occur across the entire binding site, and no single interaction dictates the magnitude of the nonadditive effects for all the analyzed protein-ligand complexes. PMID:27248478

  20. Negligible Isotopic Effect on Dissociation of Hydrogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chuanqi; Shen, Yuneng; Deng, Gang-Hua; Tian, Yuhuan; Yu, Dongqi; Yang, Xueming; Yuan, Kaijun; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-03-31

    Isotopic effects on the formation and dissociation kinetics of hydrogen bonds are studied in real time with ultrafast chemical exchange spectroscopy. The dissociation time of hydrogen bond between phenol-OH and p-xylene (or mesitylene) is found to be identical to that between phenol-OD and p-xylene (or mesitylene) in the same solvents. The experimental results demonstrate that the isotope substitution (D for H) has negligible effects on the hydrogen bond kinetics. DFT calculations show that the isotope substitution does not significantly change the frequencies of vibrational modes that may be along the hydrogen bond formation and dissociation coordinate. The zero point energy differences of these modes between hydrogen bonds with OH and OD are too small to affect the activation energy of the hydrogen bond dissociation in a detectible way at room temperature.

  1. Ortho-substituted catechol derivatives: the effect of intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pathways on chloride anion recognition.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, Keith J; Smith, David K

    2007-04-13

    This paper reports a series of chloride anion receptors containing two catechol head groups connected through their ortho-positions via a spacer chain. The linking group chosen to attach the spacer chain to the catechol units has a major impact on the anion-binding potential of the receptor. Linking groups that are capable of forming stable six-membered intramolecular hydrogen-bonded rings with the catechol O-H groups significantly inhibit the ability of the catechol units to hydrogen bond to chloride anions. However, where the linking groups are only capable of forming five- or seven-membered intramolecular hydrogen-bonded rings, then anion binding via hydrogen bonding through the catechol O-H groups becomes a possibility. This process is solvent dependent; the presence of competitive solvent (e.g., DMSO-d6) disrupts the intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern and enhances anion binding relative to simple unfunctionalized catechol. The most effective receptor is that in which the hydrogen-bonding linker (-CH2CONH-) is most distant from the catechol units and can only form a seven-membered intramolecular hydrogen-bonded ring. In this case, the receptor, which contains two catechol units, is a more effective chloride anion binder than simple unfunctionalized catechol, demonstrating that the two head groups, in combination with the N-H groups in the linker, act cooperatively and enhance the degree of anion binding. In summary, this paper provides insight into the hydrogen-bonding patterns in ortho-functionalized catechols and the impact these have on the potential of the catechol O-H groups to hydrogen bond to a chloride anion.

  2. Effect of water on hydrogen permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulligan, David; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    Doping of hydrogen with CO and CO2 was developed to reduce hydrogen permeation in Stirling engines by forming a low permeability oxide coating on the inner surface of the heater head tubes. Although doping worked well, under certain circumstances the protective oxide could be chemically reduced by the hydrogen in the engine. Some oxygen is required in the hydrogen to prevent reduction. Eventually, all the oxygen in the hydrogen gas - whatever its source - shows up as water. This is the result of hydrogen reducing the CO, CO2, or the protective inner surface oxides. This water can condense in the engine system under the right conditions. If the concentration of water vapor is reduced to a low enough level, the hydrogen can chemically reduce the oxide coating, resulting in an increase in permeability. This work was done to define the minimum water content required to avoid this reduction in the oxide coating. The results of this testing show that a minimum of approximately 750 ppm water is required to prevent an increase in permeability of CG-27, a high temperature metal alloy selected for Stirling engine heater tubes.

  3. Hydrogen in vanadium: Site occupancy and isotope effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xiao; Johansson, Robert; Wolff, Max; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the influence of site occupancy on the absorption of the hydrogen isotopes H and D in thin V(001) layers. By growing V(001) under biaxial compressive strain in Fe/V(001) superlattices, the hydrogen (H as well as D) is forced to reside exclusively in octahedral (Oz) sites, even at the lowest concentrations. A weakening of the isotope effects is observed when hydrogen resides in octahedral as compared to tetrahedral sites.

  4. Amide-mediated hydrogen bonding at organic crystal/water interfaces enables selective endotoxin binding with picomolar affinity.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Thirumoorthi, Navanita; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-05-22

    Since the discovery of endotoxins as the primary toxic component of Gram-negative bacteria, researchers have pursued the quest for molecules that detect, neutralize, and remove endotoxins. Selective removal of endotoxins is particularly challenging for protein solutions and, to this day, no general method is available. Here, we report that crystals of the purine-derived compound allantoin selectively adsorb endotoxins with picomolar affinity through amide-mediated hydrogen bonding in aqueous solutions. Atom force microscopy and chemical inhibition experiments indicate that endotoxin adsorption is largely independent from hydrophobic and ionic interactions with allantoin crystals and is mediated by hydrogen bonding with amide groups at flat crystal surfaces. The small size (500 nm) and large specific surface area of allantoin crystals results in a very high endotoxin-binding capacity (3 × 10(7) EU/g) which compares favorably with known endotoxin-binding materials. These results provide a proof-of-concept for hydrogen bond-based molecular recognition processes in aqueous solutions and establish a practical method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions.

  5. Effect of dietary turmeric on breath hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Shimouchi, Akito; Nose, Kazutoshi; Takaoka, Motoko; Hayashi, Hiroko; Kondo, Takaharu

    2009-08-01

    Turmeric is widely used in Indian cuisine. The main constituents of turmeric are curcumin and its analogues, which are well-known antioxidant compounds. In the present study, we hypothesized that turmeric in curry might increase bowel motility and activate hydrogen-producing bacterial flora in the colon, thereby increasing the concentration of breath hydrogen. Eight healthy subjects fasted for 12 h and ingested curry and rice with or without turmeric (turmeric knockout curry). Breath-hydrogen concentrations were analyzed every 15 min for 6 h by gas chromatography with a semiconductor detector. Curry with turmeric significantly increased the area under the curve of breath hydrogen and shortened small-bowel transit time, compared with curry not containing turmeric. These results suggested that dietary turmeric activated bowel motility and carbohydrate colonic fermentation. PMID:19034660

  6. Production and Physiological Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a physiological mediator with a variety of functions. It regulates synaptic transmission, vascular tone, inflammation, transcription, and angiogenesis; protects cells from oxidative stress and ischemia-reperfusion injury; and promotes healing of ulcers. Recent Advances: In addition to cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase along with cysteine aminotransferase was recently demonstrated to produce H2S. Even in bacteria, H2S produced by these enzymes functions as a defense against antibiotics, suggesting that the cytoprotective effect of H2S is a universal defense mechanism in organisms from bacteria to mammals. Critical Issues: The functional form of H2S—undissociated H2S gas, dissociated HS ion, or some other form of sulfur—has not been identified. Future Directions: The regulation of H2S production by three enzymes may lead to the identification of the physiological signals that are required to release H2S. The identification of the physiological functions of other forms of sulfur may also help understand the biological significance of H2S. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 783–793. PMID:23581969

  7. Hydrogen bonding motifs of protein side chains: descriptions of binding of arginine and amide groups.

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, L.; Glusker, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    The modes of hydrogen bonding of arginine, asparagine, and glutamine side chains and of urea have been examined in small-molecule crystal structures in the Cambridge Structural Database and in crystal structures of protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein complexes. Analysis of the hydrogen bonding patterns of each by graph-set theory shows three patterns of rings (R) with one or two hydrogen bond acceptors and two donors and with eight, nine, or six atoms in the ring, designated R2(2)(8), R2(2)(9), and R1(2)(6). These three patterns are found for arginine-like groups and for urea, whereas only the first two patterns R2(2)(8) and R2(2)(9) are found for asparagine- and glutamine-like groups. In each case, the entire system is planar within 0.7 A or less. On the other hand, in macromolecular crystal structures, the hydrogen bonding patterns in protein-nucleic acid complexes between the nucleic acid base and the protein are all R2(2)(9), whereas hydrogen bonding between Watson-Crick-like pairs of nucleic acid bases is R2(2)(8). These two hydrogen bonding arrangements [R2(2)(9)] and R2(2)(8)] are predetermined by the nature of the groups available for hydrogen bonding. The third motif identified, R1(2)(6), involves hydrogen bonds that are less linear than in the other two motifs and is found in proteins. PMID:7773178

  8. Bactericidal effect of hydrogen peroxide on spacecraft isolates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardle, M. D.; Renninger, G. M.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study designed to assess the effect of hydrogen peroxide on both sporeforming and nonsporeforming spacecraft isolates as an initial step in determining its suitability for microbiological decontamination of certain United States spacecraft. Survivor data were obtained for eight bacterial isolates (six sporeformers and two nonsporeformers) recovered before launch Mariner 9 and exposed to concentrations of 3, 10, and 15% hydrogen peroxide. The effects of various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide on the spores are presented in tabular form, along with the percentage of survival of nonsporeformers exposed to hydrogen peroxide. No viable vegetative cells were recovered after a 10-min exposure time to any of the three concentration of hydrogen peroxide.

  9. Effects of Hydrogen on Tantalum Nitride Resistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, James

    1999-01-01

    This document is a presentation about the investigation of drift reported in static frequency output from the analog circuit of a Multichannel Microwave Integrated circuit hybrid microelectronic filter module for space flight application. Electron Dispersion X-Ray Detector )EDAX) Analysis of the 35k ohm thin film Tantalum Nitride Chip resistors identified Palladium in the film. A catalytic reaction of Palladium and hydrogen produces mono atomic hydrogen. When the filter module cavities were filled with a 4 % hydrogen 96 % Nitrogen gas mixture at 25C and monitored the electrical performance for 24 hours. Some channels drifted in a similar pattern as the channel being investigated. Palladium was found on the resistors. The corrective actions taken are reviewed, which resulted in a stable circuit.

  10. Effect of salts addition on hydrogen production by C. acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Alshiyab, H; Kalil, M S; Hamid, A A; Wan Yusoff, W M

    2008-09-15

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of salts addition to fermentation medium on hydrogen production, under anaerobic batch culture system. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the inhibitory effect of both NaCl and sodium acetate on hydrogen production. The optimum pH and temperature for hydrogen production were at initial pH of 7.0 and 30 degrees C. Enhanced production of hydrogen, using glucose as substrate was achieved. In the absence of Sodium Chloride and Sodium Acetate enhanced hydrogen yield (Y(P/S)) from 350 mL g(-1) glucose utilized to 391 mL g(-1) glucose utilized with maximum hydrogen productivity of 77.5 ml/L/h. Results also show that sodium chloride and sodium acetate in the medium adversely affect growth. Hydrogen yield per biomass (Y(P/X)) of 254 ml/L/g, biomass per substrate utilized (Y(X/S)) of 0.268 and (Y(H2/S) of 0.0349. The results suggested that Sodium at any concentration resulted to inhibit the bacterial productivity of hydrogen.

  11. Effect of process variables on photosynthetic algal hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Hahn, John J; Ghirardi, Maria L; Jacoby, William A

    2004-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green alga that can use the sun's energy to split water into O(2) and H(2). This is accomplished by means of a two-phase cycle, an aerobic growth phase followed by an anaerobic hydrogen production phase. The effects of process variables on hydrogen production are examined here. These variables include cell concentration, light intensity, and reactor design parameters that affect light transport and mixing. An optimum cell concentration and light intensity are identified, and two reactor designs are compared. The maximum hydrogen production observed in this study was 0.29 mL of hydrogen per milliliter of suspension. This was measured at atmospheric pressure during a 96 h production cycle. This corresponds to an average hydrogen production rate of 0.12 mmol/mL.h. PMID:15176910

  12. Effects of hydrogen atoms on surface conductivity of diamond film

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fengbin Cui, Yan; Qu, Min; Di, Jiejian

    2015-04-15

    To investigate the effects of surface chemisorbed hydrogen atoms and hydrogen atoms in the subsurface region of diamond on surface conductivity, models of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on diamond with (100) orientation and various concentrations of hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond were built. By using the first-principles method based on density functional theory, the equilibrium geometries and densities of states of the models were studied. The results showed that the surface chemisorbed hydrogen alone could not induce high surface conductivity. In addition, isolated hydrogen atoms in the subsurface layer of the diamond prefer to exist at the bond centre site of the C-C bond. However, such a structure would induce deep localized states, which could not improve the surface conductivity. When the hydrogen concentration increases, the C-H-C-H structure and C-3H{sub bc}-C structure in the subsurface region are more stable than other configurations. The former is not beneficial to the increase of the surface conductivity. However, the latter would induce strong surface states near the Fermi level, which would give rise to high surface conductivity. Thus, a high concentration of subsurface hydrogen atoms in diamond would make significant contributions to surface conductivity.

  13. NMR study of the phosphoryl binding loop in purine nucleotide proteins: Evidence for strong hydrogen binding in human N-ras p21

    SciTech Connect

    Redfield, A.G.; Papastavros, M.Z. )

    1990-04-10

    The structure of the phosphoryl binding region of human N-ras p21 was probed by using heteronuclear proton-observed NMR methods. Normal protein and a Gly-12 {yields} Asp-12 mutant protein were prepared with two amino acids labeled with {sup 15}N at their amide positions: valine and glycine, aspartic acid and glycine, and lysine and glycine. The authors completed the identification of amide {sup 15}NH resonances from Gly-12 and Asp-12 to the end of the phosphoryl binding domain consensus sequence (Lys-16) in protein complexed with GDP and have made tentative amide identifications from Val-9 to Ser-17. The methods used, together with initial identifications of the Gly-12 and -13 amide resonances, were described previously. The amide resonances of both Gly-13 and Lys-16 are shifted downfield below 10.4 ppm in both the normal and mutant proteins. These downfield shifts are presumed to be due to strong hydrogen bonds with the {beta}-phosphate of GDP.

  14. Phosphorylation- and nucleotide-binding-induced changes to the stability and hydrogen exchange patterns of JNK1β1 provide insight into its mechanisms of activation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Gavin R; Stoychev, Stoyan; Achilonu, Ikechukwu; Dirr, Heini W

    2014-10-23

    Many studies have characterized how changes to the stability and internal motions of a protein during activation can contribute to their catalytic function, even when structural changes cannot be observed. Here, unfolding studies and hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HX) mass spectrometry were used to investigate the changes to the stability and conformation/conformational dynamics of JNK1β1 induced by phosphorylative activation. Equivalent studies were also employed to determine the effects of nucleotide binding on both inactive and active JNK1β1 using the ATP analogue, 5'-adenylyl-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). JNK1β1 phosphorylation alters HX in regions involved in catalysis and substrate binding, changes that can be ascribed to functional modifications in either structure and/or backbone flexibility. Increased HX in the hinge between the N- and C-terminal domains implied that it acquires enhanced flexibility upon phosphorylation that may be a prerequisite for interdomain closure. In combination with the finding that nucleotide binding destabilizes the kinase, the patterns of solvent protection by AMP-PNP were consistent with a novel mode of nucleotide binding to the C-terminal domain of a destabilized and open domain conformation of inactive JNK1β1. Solvent protection by AMP-PNP of both N- and C-terminal domains in active JNK1β1 revealed that the domains close around nucleotide upon phosphorylation, concomitantly stabilizing the kinase. This suggests that phosphorylation activates JNK1β1 in part by increasing hinge flexibility to facilitate interdomain closure and the creation of a functional active site. By uncovering the complex interplay that occurs between nucleotide binding and phosphorylation, we present new insight into the unique mechanisms by which JNK1β1 is regulated.

  15. An adhesin from hydrogen-utilizing rumen methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1 binds a broad range of hydrogen-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ng, Filomena; Kittelmann, Sandra; Patchett, Mark L; Attwood, Graeme T; Janssen, Peter H; Rakonjac, Jasna; Gagic, Dragana

    2016-09-01

    Symbiotic associations are ubiquitous in the microbial world and have a major role in shaping the evolution of both partners. One of the most interesting mutualistic relationships exists between protozoa and methanogenic archaea in the fermentative forestomach (rumen) of ruminant animals. Methanogens reside within and on the surface of protozoa as symbionts, and interspecies hydrogen transfer is speculated to be the main driver for physical associations observed between the two groups. In silico analyses of several rumen methanogen genomes have previously shown that up to 5% of genes encode adhesin-like proteins, which may be central to rumen interspecies attachment. We hypothesized that adhesin-like proteins on methanogen cell surfaces facilitate attachment to protozoal hosts. Using phage display technology, we have identified a protein (Mru_1499) from Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1 as an adhesin that binds to a broad range of rumen protozoa (including the genera Epidinium and Entodinium). This unique adhesin also binds the cell surface of the bacterium Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus, suggesting a broad adhesion spectrum for this protein.

  16. An adhesin from hydrogen-utilizing rumen methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1 binds a broad range of hydrogen-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ng, Filomena; Kittelmann, Sandra; Patchett, Mark L; Attwood, Graeme T; Janssen, Peter H; Rakonjac, Jasna; Gagic, Dragana

    2016-09-01

    Symbiotic associations are ubiquitous in the microbial world and have a major role in shaping the evolution of both partners. One of the most interesting mutualistic relationships exists between protozoa and methanogenic archaea in the fermentative forestomach (rumen) of ruminant animals. Methanogens reside within and on the surface of protozoa as symbionts, and interspecies hydrogen transfer is speculated to be the main driver for physical associations observed between the two groups. In silico analyses of several rumen methanogen genomes have previously shown that up to 5% of genes encode adhesin-like proteins, which may be central to rumen interspecies attachment. We hypothesized that adhesin-like proteins on methanogen cell surfaces facilitate attachment to protozoal hosts. Using phage display technology, we have identified a protein (Mru_1499) from Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1 as an adhesin that binds to a broad range of rumen protozoa (including the genera Epidinium and Entodinium). This unique adhesin also binds the cell surface of the bacterium Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus, suggesting a broad adhesion spectrum for this protein. PMID:26643468

  17. Proton form factor effects in hydrogenic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Daza, F. Garcia; Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2011-10-21

    The proton structure corrections to the hyperfine splittings in electronic and muonic hydrogen are evaluated using the Breit potential with electromagnetic form factors. In contrast to other methods, the Breit equation with q{sup 2} dependent form factors is just an extension of the standard Breit equation which gives the hyperfine splitting Hamiltonian. Precise QED corrections are comparable to the structure corrections which therefore need to be evaluated ab initio.

  18. Effects of Hydrogen on GRCop-84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Hastings, Keith

    2006-01-01

    This report is a section of the final report on the GRCop-84 task of the Constellation Program and incorporates the results obtained between October 2000 and September 2005 when the program ended. GRCop-84 contains approximately 5.5 wt% Nb. Nb can react with H and embrittle easily. Previous work had indicated the thermodynamic possibility that Cr 2 Nb could react with H and form niobium hydrides in the presence of high pressure H such as seen in the Space Shuttle Main Engine. In this study, samples were charged with H and then tested in both high pressure H and He environments to determine if measurable differences existed which indicate that hydrogen embrittlement occurs in GRCop-84. Tensile, notched tensile, stress rupture and low cycle fatigue properties were surveyed. High pressure H environment stress rupture testing resulted in a lower reduction in area than a high pressure He environment, and the LCF lives at high strain ranges fall below the lower 95 percent confidence interval for the baseline data, but in general no significant differences were noted either between H and He environment tests or between hydrogen charged materials and the baseline, uncharged extruded GRCop-84 data sets. There was also no discernable evidence of the formation of hydrides or changes in fracture morphology indicating hydrogen embrittlement occurred.

  19. Selective binding of hydrogen chloride and its trapping through supramolecular gelation.

    PubMed

    Basak, Shibaji; Nandi, Nibedita; Banerjee, Arindam

    2014-07-01

    A pyridine containing amino acid based gelator forms gel in aqueous media in the presence of hydrochloric acid and the chloride ion is found to be very selective for gelation. The gelator is successfully applied for the detection and trapping of hydrogen chloride gas and this indicates its probable application for removing hazardous HCl gas from the environment.

  20. Correlation effects in hydrogen-bonded polymer blends

    SciTech Connect

    Veytsman, B.; Painter, P. )

    1993-12-01

    In hydrogen-bonded polymer blends there are long range correlations that are a result of the combined covalent and hydrogen-bond connections. A mean field description of these mixtures is presented which indicates that there should be an infinite correlation length above some percolation threshold. There are various consequences of the compositional heterogeneities or clustering that results from these effects and these are discussed in this paper.

  1. Calcium Binding to Calmodulin by Molecular Dynamics with Effective Polarization.

    PubMed

    Kohagen, Miriam; Lepšík, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-11-20

    Calcium represents a key biological signaling ion with the EF-hand loops being its most prevalent binding motif in proteins. We show using molecular dynamics simulations with umbrella sampling that including electronic polarization effects via ionic charge rescaling dramatically improves agreements with experiment in terms of the strength of calcium binding and structures of the calmodulin binding sites. The present study thus opens way to accurate calculations of interactions of calcium and other computationally difficult high-charge-density ions in biological contexts.

  2. Light irradiance and spectral distribution effects on cyanobacterial hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatihah Salleh, Siti; Kamaruddin, Azlina; Hekarl Uzir, Mohamad; Rahman Mohamed, Abdul; Halim Shamsuddin, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Light is an essential energy source for photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Changes in both light irradiance and spectral distribution will affect their photosynthetic productivity. Compared to the light irradiance, little investigations have been carried out on the effect of light spectra towards cyanobacterial hydrogen production. Hence, this work aims to investigate the effects of both light quantity and quality on biohydrogen productivity of heterocystous cyanobacterium, A.variabilis. Under white light condition, the highest hydrogen production rate of 31 µmol H2 mg chl a -1 h-1 was achieved at 70 µE m-2 s-1. When the experiment was repeated at the same light irradiance but different light spectra of blue, red and green, the accumulations of hydrogen were significantly lower than the white light except for blue light. As the light irradiance was increased to 350 µE m-2 s-1, the accumulated hydrogen under the blue light doubled that of the white light. Besides that, an unusual prolongation of the hydrogen production up to 120 h was observed. The results obtained suggest that blue light could be the most desirable light spectrum for cyanobacterial hydrogen production.

  3. Effect of Detergents on Galactoside Binding by Melibiose Permeases.

    PubMed

    Amin, Anowarul; Hariharan, Parameswaran; Chae, Pil Seok; Guan, Lan

    2015-09-29

    The effect of various detergents on the stability and function of the melibiose permeases of Escherichia coli (MelBEc) and Salmonella typhimurium (MelBSt) was studied. In n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) or n-undecyl-β-d-maltoside (UDM), WT MelBSt binds melibiose with an affinity similar to that in the membrane. However, with WT MelBEc or MelBSt mutants (Arg141 → Cys, Arg295 → Cys, or Arg363 → Cys), galactoside binding is not detected in these detergents, but binding to the phosphotransferase protein IIA(Glc) is maintained. In the amphiphiles lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (MNG-3) or glyco-diosgenin (GDN), galactoside binding with all of the MelB proteins is observed, with slightly reduced affinities. MelBSt is more thermostable than MelBEc, and the thermostability of either MelB is largely increased in MNG-3 or GDN. Therefore, the functional defect with DDM or UDM likely results from the relative instability of the sensitive MelB proteins, and stability, as well as galactoside binding, is retained in MNG-3 or GDN. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry of melibiose binding with MelBSt shows that the favorable entropic contribution to the binding free energy is decreased in MNG-3, indicating that the conformational dynamics of MelB is restricted in this detergent.

  4. Effect of Detergents on Galactoside Binding by Melibiose Permeases.

    PubMed

    Amin, Anowarul; Hariharan, Parameswaran; Chae, Pil Seok; Guan, Lan

    2015-09-29

    The effect of various detergents on the stability and function of the melibiose permeases of Escherichia coli (MelBEc) and Salmonella typhimurium (MelBSt) was studied. In n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) or n-undecyl-β-d-maltoside (UDM), WT MelBSt binds melibiose with an affinity similar to that in the membrane. However, with WT MelBEc or MelBSt mutants (Arg141 → Cys, Arg295 → Cys, or Arg363 → Cys), galactoside binding is not detected in these detergents, but binding to the phosphotransferase protein IIA(Glc) is maintained. In the amphiphiles lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (MNG-3) or glyco-diosgenin (GDN), galactoside binding with all of the MelB proteins is observed, with slightly reduced affinities. MelBSt is more thermostable than MelBEc, and the thermostability of either MelB is largely increased in MNG-3 or GDN. Therefore, the functional defect with DDM or UDM likely results from the relative instability of the sensitive MelB proteins, and stability, as well as galactoside binding, is retained in MNG-3 or GDN. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry of melibiose binding with MelBSt shows that the favorable entropic contribution to the binding free energy is decreased in MNG-3, indicating that the conformational dynamics of MelB is restricted in this detergent. PMID:26352464

  5. Effect of detergents on galactoside binding by melibiose permeases

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Anowarul; Hariharan, Parameswaran; Chae, Pil Seok; Guan, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of various detergents on the stability and function of melibiose permeases of Escherichia coli (MelBEc) or Salmonella typhimurium (MelBSt) were studied. In n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) or n-undecyl-β-d-maltoside (UDM), WT MelBSt binds melibiose with an affinity similar to that in the membrane. However, with WT MelBEc or MelBSt mutants (Arg141→Cys, Arg295→Cys or Arg363→Cys), galactoside binding is not detected in these detergents, but binding to the phosphotransferase protein IIAGlc is maintained. In the amphiphiles lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (MNG-3) or glyco-diosgenin (GDN), galactoside binding with all the MelB proteins is observed, with slightly reduced affinities. MelBSt is more thermostable than MelBEc, and the thermostability of either MelB is largely increased in MNG-3 or GDN. Therefore, the functional defect with DDM or UDM likely results from relative instability of the sensitive MelB proteins, and stability, as well as galactoside binding, is retained in MNG-3 or GDN. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry of melibiose binding with MelBSt shows that the favorable entropic contribution to the binding free energy is decreased in MNG-3, indicating that the conformational dynamics of MelB is restricted in this detergent. PMID:26352464

  6. Action-effect binding by observational learning.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Markus; van Dam, Wessel; Hunnius, Sabine; Lindemann, Oliver; Bekkering, Harold

    2011-10-01

    The acquisition of bidirectional action-effect associations plays a central role in the ability to intentionally control actions. Humans learn about actions not only through active experience, but also through observing the actions of others. In Experiment 1, we examined whether action-effect associations can be acquired by observational learning. To this end, participants observed how a model repeatedly pressed two buttons during an observation phase. Each of the buttonpresses led to a specific tone (action effect). In a subsequent test phase, the tones served as target stimuli to which the participants had to respond with buttonpresses. Reaction times were shorter if the stimulus-response mapping in the test phase was compatible with the action-effect association in the observation phase. Experiment 2 excluded the possibility that the impact of perceived action effects on own actions was driven merely by an association of spatial features with the particular tones. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the presence of an agent is necessary to acquire novel action-effect associations through observation. Altogether, the study provides evidence for the claim that bidirectional action-effect associations can be acquired by observational learning. Our findings are discussed in the context of the idea that the acquisition of action-effect associations through observation is an important cognitive mechanism subserving the human ability for social learning.

  7. Transport effects on the kinetics of protein-surface binding.

    PubMed Central

    Balgi, G; Leckband, D E; Nitsche, J M

    1995-01-01

    A detailed model is presented for protein binding to active surfaces, with application to the binding of avidin molecules to a biotin-functionalized fiber optic sensor in experiments reported by S. Zhao and W. M. Reichert (American Chemical Society Symposium Series 493, 1992). Kinetic data for binding in solution are used to assign an intrinsic catalytic rate coefficient k to the biotin-avidin pair, deconvoluted from transport and electrostatic factors via application of coagulation theory. This intrinsic chemical constant is built into a reaction-diffusion analysis of surface binding where activity is restricted to localized sites (representing immobilized biotin molecules). The analysis leads to an effective catalytic rate coefficient keff characterizing the active surface. Thereafter, solution of the transport problem describing absorption of avidin molecules by the macroscopic sensor surface leads to predictions of the avidin flux, which are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The analysis suggests the following conclusions. 1) Translational diffusion limitations are negligible for avidin-biotin binding in solution owing to the small (kinetically limiting) value k = 0.00045 m/s. 2) The sparse distribution of biotin molecules and the presence of a repulsive hydration force produce an effective surface-average catalytic rate coefficient keff of order 10(-7) m/s, much smaller than k. 3) Avidin binding to the fiber optic sensor occurs in an intermediate regime where the rate is influenced by both kinetics and diffusion. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:7647232

  8. Water's hydrogen bonds in the hydrophobic effect: a simple model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huafeng; Dill, Ken A

    2005-12-15

    We propose a simple analytical model to account for water's hydrogen bonds in the hydrophobic effect. It is based on computing a mean-field partition function for a water molecule in the first solvation shell around a solute molecule. The model treats the orientational restrictions from hydrogen bonding, and utilizes quantities that can be obtained from bulk water simulations. We illustrate the principles in a 2-dimensional Mercedes-Benz-like model. Our model gives good predictions for the heat capacity of hydrophobic solvation, reproduces the solvation energies and entropies at different temperatures with only one fitting parameter, and accounts for the solute size dependence of the hydrophobic effect. Our model supports the view that water's hydrogen bonding propensity determines the temperature dependence of the hydrophobic effect. It explains the puzzling experimental observation that dissolving a nonpolar solute in hot water has positive entropy.

  9. Water's hydrogen bonds in the hydrophobic effect: a simple model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huafeng; Dill, Ken A

    2005-12-15

    We propose a simple analytical model to account for water's hydrogen bonds in the hydrophobic effect. It is based on computing a mean-field partition function for a water molecule in the first solvation shell around a solute molecule. The model treats the orientational restrictions from hydrogen bonding, and utilizes quantities that can be obtained from bulk water simulations. We illustrate the principles in a 2-dimensional Mercedes-Benz-like model. Our model gives good predictions for the heat capacity of hydrophobic solvation, reproduces the solvation energies and entropies at different temperatures with only one fitting parameter, and accounts for the solute size dependence of the hydrophobic effect. Our model supports the view that water's hydrogen bonding propensity determines the temperature dependence of the hydrophobic effect. It explains the puzzling experimental observation that dissolving a nonpolar solute in hot water has positive entropy. PMID:16375338

  10. Inner reorganization limiting electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding: intra- vs. intermolecular effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Eduardo; Frontana, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    In this work, experimental evidence of the influence of the electron transfer kinetics during electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding between anion radicals of metronidazole and ornidazole, derivatives of 5-nitro-imidazole, and 1,3-diethylurea as the hydrogen bond donor, is presented. Analysis of the variations of voltammetric EpIcvs. log KB[DH], where KB is the binding constant, allowed us to determine the values of the binding constant and also the electron transfer rate k, confirmed by experiments obtained at different scan rates. Electronic structure calculations at the BHandHLYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level for metronidazole, including the solvent effect by the Cramer/Truhlar model, suggested that the minimum energy conformer is stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In this structure, the inner reorganization energy, λi,j, contributes significantly (0.5 eV) to the total reorganization energy of electron transfer, thus leading to a diminishment of the experimental k. PMID:24653999

  11. Cholesterol accelerates the binding of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide to ganglioside GM1 through a universal hydrogen-bond-dependent sterol tuning of glycolipid conformation

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Jacques; Yahi, Nouara; Garmy, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Age-related alterations of membrane lipids in brain cell membranes together with high blood cholesterol are considered as major risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Yet the molecular mechanisms by which these factors increase Alzheimer's risk are mostly unknown. In lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane, neurotoxic Alzheimer's beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides interact with both cholesterol and ganglioside GM1. Recent data also suggested that cholesterol could stimulate the binding of Abeta to GM1 through conformational modulation of the ganglioside headgroup. Here we used a combination of physicochemical and molecular modeling approaches to decipher the mechanisms of cholesterol-assisted binding of Abeta to GM1. With the aim of decoupling the effect of cholesterol on GM1 from direct Abeta-cholesterol interactions, we designed a minimal peptide (Abeta5-16) containing the GM1-binding domain but lacking the amino acid residues involved in cholesterol recognition. Using the Langmuir technique, we showed that cholesterol (but not phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin) significantly accelerates the interaction of Abeta5-16 with GM1. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that Abeta5-16 interacts with a cholesterol-stabilized dimer of GM1. The main structural effect of cholesterol is to establish a hydrogen-bond between its own OH group and the glycosidic-bond linking ceramide to the glycone part of GM1, thereby inducing a tilt in the glycolipid headgroup. This fine conformational tuning stabilizes the active conformation of the GM1 dimer whose headgroups, oriented in two opposite directions, form a chalice-shaped receptacle for Abeta. These data give new mechanistic insights into the stimulatory effect of cholesterol on Abeta/GM1 interactions. They also support the emerging concept that cholesterol is a universal modulator of protein-glycolipid interactions in the broader context of membrane recognition processes. PMID:23772214

  12. Dendritic biomimicry: microenvironmental hydrogen-bonding effects on tryptophan fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Koenig, S; Müller, L; Smith, D K

    2001-03-01

    Two series of dendritically modified tryptophan derivatives have been synthesised and their emission spectra measured in a range of different solvents. This paper presents the syntheses of these novel dendritic structures and discusses their emission spectra in terms of both solvent and dendritic effects. In the first series of dendrimers, the NH group of the indole ring is available for hydrogen bonding, whilst in the second series, the indole NH group has been converted to NMe. Direct comparison of the emission wavelengths of analogous NH and NMe derivatives indicates the importance of the Kamlet-Taft solvent beta3 parameter, which reflects the ability of the solvent to accept a hydrogen bond from the NH group, an effect not possible for the NMe series of dendrimers. For the NH dendrimers, the attachment of a dendritic shell to the tryptophan subunit leads to a red shift in emission wavelength. This dendritic effect only operates in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents. For the NMe dendrimers, however, the attachment of a dendritic shell has no effect on the emission spectra of the indole ring. This proves the importance of hydrogen bonding between the branched shell and the indole NH group in causing the dendritic effect. This is the first time a dendritic effect has been unambiguously assigned to individual hydrogen-bonding interactions and indicates that such intramolecular interactions are important in dendrimers, just as they are in proteins. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the use of tryptophan residues as a probe of the microenvironment within proteins--in particular, it stresses the importance of hydrogen bonds formed by the indole NH group.

  13. The effect of electron induced hydrogenation of graphene on its electrical transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sung Oh; Teizer, Winfried

    2013-07-01

    We report a deterioration of the electrical transport properties of a graphene field effect transistor due to energetic electron irradiation on a stack of Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) on graphene (PMMA/graphene bilayer). Prior to electron irradiation, we observed that the PMMA layer on graphene does not deteriorate the carrier transport of graphene but improves its electrical properties instead. As a result of the electron irradiation on the PMMA/graphene bilayer, the Raman "D" band appears after removal of PMMA. We argue that the degradation of the transport behavior originates from the binding of hydrogen generated during the PMMA backbone secession process.

  14. Relativistic corrections for screening effects on the energies of hydrogen-like atoms embedded in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Poszwa, A.; Bahar, M. K.

    2015-01-15

    The influence of relativistic and plasma screening effects on energies of hydrogen-like atoms embedded in plasmas has been studied. The Dirac equation with a more general exponential cosine screened potential has been solved numerically and perturbatively, by employing the direct perturbation theory. Properties of spectra corresponding to bound states and to different sets of the potential parameters have been studied both in nonrelativistic and relativistic approximations. Binding energies, fine-structure splittings, and relativistic energy shifts have been determined as functions of parameters of the potential. The results have been compared with the ones known from the literature.

  15. Hydrogen-ion binding by tobacco-mosaic-virus protein polymers.

    PubMed

    Durham, A C; Vogel, D; de Marcillac, G D

    1977-09-15

    Hydrogen ion titration curves of tobacco mosaic virus protein have been measured in various conditions of protein concentration, temperature, ionic strength, and rate of pH change. The polymers present at each stage are deduced from turbidity and sedimentation data, plus published information. A simple semi-quantitative analysis of the curves is given, and the pK values of the two abnormal carboxylates in single helix are estimated as 6.4 and about 7.0. Disks, and some faster-forming unknown polymers in the same size range, have been abnormal carboxylate with pK 6.9. These results are most easily interpreted in terms of electrostatic interactions between carboxylates, probably at the axial ends of the protein subunits.

  16. Observation of Binding and Rotation of Methane and Hydrogen within a Functional Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mathew; da Silva, Ivan; Johnson, Mark; Carter, Joseph H; Newby, Ruth; Suyetin, Mikhail; Besley, Elena; Manuel, Pascal; Rudić, Svemir; Fitch, Andrew N; Murray, Claire; David, William I F; Yang, Sihai; Schröder, Martin

    2016-07-27

    The key requirement for a portable store of natural gas is to maximize the amount of gas within the smallest possible space. The packing of methane (CH4) in a given storage medium at the highest possible density is, therefore, a highly desirable but challenging target. We report a microporous hydroxyl-decorated material, MFM-300(In) (MFM = Manchester Framework Material, replacing the NOTT designation), which displays a high volumetric uptake of 202 v/v at 298 K and 35 bar for CH4 and 488 v/v at 77 K and 20 bar for H2. Direct observation and quantification of the location, binding, and rotational modes of adsorbed CH4 and H2 molecules within this host have been achieved, using neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering experiments, coupled with density functional theory (DFT) modeling. These complementary techniques reveal a very efficient packing of H2 and CH4 molecules within MFM-300(In), reminiscent of the condensed gas in pure component crystalline solids. We also report here, for the first time, the experimental observation of a direct binding interaction between adsorbed CH4 molecules and the hydroxyl groups within the pore of a material. This is different from the arrangement found in CH4/water clathrates, the CH4 store of nature. PMID:27410670

  17. Observation of Binding and Rotation of Methane and Hydrogen within a Functional Metal–Organic Framework

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The key requirement for a portable store of natural gas is to maximize the amount of gas within the smallest possible space. The packing of methane (CH4) in a given storage medium at the highest possible density is, therefore, a highly desirable but challenging target. We report a microporous hydroxyl-decorated material, MFM-300(In) (MFM = Manchester Framework Material, replacing the NOTT designation), which displays a high volumetric uptake of 202 v/v at 298 K and 35 bar for CH4 and 488 v/v at 77 K and 20 bar for H2. Direct observation and quantification of the location, binding, and rotational modes of adsorbed CH4 and H2 molecules within this host have been achieved, using neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering experiments, coupled with density functional theory (DFT) modeling. These complementary techniques reveal a very efficient packing of H2 and CH4 molecules within MFM-300(In), reminiscent of the condensed gas in pure component crystalline solids. We also report here, for the first time, the experimental observation of a direct binding interaction between adsorbed CH4 molecules and the hydroxyl groups within the pore of a material. This is different from the arrangement found in CH4/water clathrates, the CH4 store of nature. PMID:27410670

  18. On the influence of reward on action-effect binding.

    PubMed

    Muhle-Karbe, Paul S; Krebs, Ruth M

    2012-01-01

    Ideomotor theory states that the formation of anticipatory representations about the perceptual consequences of an action [i.e., action-effect (A-E) binding] provides the functional basis of voluntary action control. A host of studies have demonstrated that A-E binding occurs fast and effortlessly, yet little is known about cognitive and affective factors that influence this learning process. In the present study, we sought to test whether the motivational value of an action modulates the acquisition of A-E associations. To this end, we linked specific actions with monetary incentives during the acquisition of novel A-E mappings. In a subsequent test phase, the degree of binding was assessed by presenting the former effect stimuli as task-irrelevant response primes in a forced-choice response task, absent reward. Binding, as indexed by response priming through the former action-effects, was only found for reward-related A-E mappings. Moreover, the degree to which reward associations modulated the binding strength was predicted by individuals' trait sensitivity to reward. These observations indicate that the association of actions and their immediate outcomes depends on the motivational value of the action during learning, as well as on the motivational disposition of the individual. On a larger scale, these findings also highlight the link between ideomotor theories and reinforcement-learning theories, providing an interesting perspective for future research on anticipatory regulation of behavior.

  19. On the influence of reward on action-effect binding.

    PubMed

    Muhle-Karbe, Paul S; Krebs, Ruth M

    2012-01-01

    Ideomotor theory states that the formation of anticipatory representations about the perceptual consequences of an action [i.e., action-effect (A-E) binding] provides the functional basis of voluntary action control. A host of studies have demonstrated that A-E binding occurs fast and effortlessly, yet little is known about cognitive and affective factors that influence this learning process. In the present study, we sought to test whether the motivational value of an action modulates the acquisition of A-E associations. To this end, we linked specific actions with monetary incentives during the acquisition of novel A-E mappings. In a subsequent test phase, the degree of binding was assessed by presenting the former effect stimuli as task-irrelevant response primes in a forced-choice response task, absent reward. Binding, as indexed by response priming through the former action-effects, was only found for reward-related A-E mappings. Moreover, the degree to which reward associations modulated the binding strength was predicted by individuals' trait sensitivity to reward. These observations indicate that the association of actions and their immediate outcomes depends on the motivational value of the action during learning, as well as on the motivational disposition of the individual. On a larger scale, these findings also highlight the link between ideomotor theories and reinforcement-learning theories, providing an interesting perspective for future research on anticipatory regulation of behavior. PMID:23130005

  20. Effect of ozone pretreatment on hydrogen production from barley straw.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiangning; Ein-Mozaffari, Farhad; Upreti, Simant

    2013-09-01

    Application of ozone technology to lignocellulosic biohydrogen production was explored with a barley straw. Ozone pretreatment effectively degraded the straw lignin and increased reducing sugar yield. A simultaneous enzyme hydrolysis and dark fermentation experiment was conducted using a mixed anaerobic consortium together with saccharification enzymes. Both untreated and ozonated samples produced hydrogen. Compared to the untreated group, hydrogen produced by the groups ozonated for 15, 30, 45 and 90 min increased 99%, 133%, 166% and 94%, respectively. Some inhibitory effect on hydrogen production was observed with the samples ozonated for 90 min, and the inhibition was on the fermentative microorganisms, not the saccharification enzymes. These results demonstrate that production of biohydrogen from barley straw, a lignocellulosic biomass, can be significantly enhanced by ozone pretreatment.

  1. Effect of some isothiocyanates on the hydrogenation of canola oil

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, V.; de Man, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    Sulfur compounds were added to refined and bleached canola oil before hydrogenation in the form of allyl, heptyl and 2-phenethyl isothiocyanates, and the effects on hydrogenation rate, solid fat content and percentage trans fatty acids were determined. The poisoning effect was most pronounced with allyl isothiocyanate and least phenethyl isothiocyanate. As the amount of added sulfur increased, the hydrogenation rate decreased. Of the three isothiocyanates used, allyl isothiocyanate caused formation of larger amounts of trans isomers. An increased sulfur level in the oil resulted in increased solid fat content and trans isomer level. Allyl isothiocyanate also caused formation of larger amounts of solid fat than other isothiocyanates at all levels of sulfur addition. (Refs. 24).

  2. Interdependence of coenzyme-induced conformational work and binding potential in yeast alcohol and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenases: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange study.

    PubMed

    De Weck, Z; Pande, J; Kägi, J H

    1987-07-28

    Binding of NAD coenzymes to yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenase (PHLDH) was studied by hydrogen-deuterium exchange with the infrared technique. Conformational changes in the enzymes specific to the coenzymes and their fragments were observed, and the pH dependence of the exchange reaction shows that it conforms to the EX-2 scheme. In both YADH and PHLDH the magnitude of the conformational change of measured by exchange retardation is considerably larger for NAD+ than for NADH. Studies with coenzyme fragments like ADP-ribose, ADP, and AMP also highlight the lack of rigorous correlation between structural features such as charge and size and their influence on exchange behavior. Ternary complexes such as YADH-NAD+-pyrazole, PHLDH-NAD+-oxalate, and PHLDH-NADH-oxamate, which mimic the transition state, have a significantly more pronounced effect on exchange rates than the corresponding binary complexes. The outstanding feature of this study is the demonstration that in the binary enzyme-coenzyme complexes the more loosely bound NAD+ is more effective in retarding exchange than the more firmly bound NADH. These differences are attributed to the unequal structural constraints exerted by the two coenzymes upon the enzymes, which translate to unequal expenditure of transconformational work in the formation of the two complexes. The opposing variation in the free energy of binding and the transconformational work expended can be viewed as an unequal partitioning of the net free energy gain resulting from the protein-ligand interaction into a binding term and that required for conformational change.

  3. Effects of hydrogen sulphide in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dunn, William R; Alexander, Stephen P H; Ralevic, Vera; Roberts, Richard E

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that the gaseous pollutant, hydrogen sulphide (H2S) can be synthesised in the body and has a multitude of biological actions. This review summarizes some of the actions of this 'gasotransmitter' in influencing the smooth muscle that is responsible for controlling muscular activity of hollow organs. In the vasculature, while H2S can cause vasoconstriction by complex interactions with other biologically important gases, such as nitric oxide, the prevailing response is vasorelaxation. While most vasorelaxation responses occur by a direct action of H2S on smooth muscle cells, it has recently been proposed to be an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. H2S also promotes relaxation in other smooth muscle preparations including bronchioles, the bladder, gastrointestinal tract and myometrium, opening up the opportunity of exploiting the pharmacology of H2S in the treatment of conditions where smooth muscle tone is excessive. The original concept, that H2S caused smooth muscle relaxation by activating ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, has been supplemented with observations that H2S can also modify the activity of other potassium channels, intracellular pH, phosphodiesterase activity and transient receptor potential channels on sensory nerves. While the enzymes responsible for generating endogenous H2S are widely expressed in smooth muscle preparations, it is much less clear what the physiological role of H2S is in determining smooth muscle contractility. Clarification of this requires the development of potent and selective inhibitors of H2S-generating enzymes.

  4. Effect of enzymatic deamidation of soy protein by protein-glutaminase on the flavor-binding properties of the protein under aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Suppavorasatit, Inthawoot; Cadwallader, Keith R

    2012-08-15

    The effect of the enzymatic deamidation by protein-glutaminase (PG) on flavor-binding properties of soy protein isolate (SPI) under aqueous conditions was evaluated by a modified equilibrium dialysis (ultrafiltration) technique. Binding parameters, such as number of binding sites (n) and binding constants (K), were derived from Klotz plots. The partial deamidation of SPI by PG (43.7% degree of deamidation) decreased overall flavor-binding affinity (nK) at 25 °C for both vanillin and maltol by approximately 9- and 4-fold, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters of binding indicated that the flavor-protein interactions were spontaneous (negative ΔG°) and that the driving force of the interactions shifted from entropy to enthalpy driven as a result of deamidation. Deamidation of soy protein caused a change in the mechanism of binding from hydrophobic interactions or covalent bonding (Schiff base formation) to weaker van der Waals forces or hydrogen bonding. PMID:22831747

  5. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  6. Effect of desipramine on dopamine receptor binding in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Suhara, Tetsuya Jikei Univ., Tokyo ); Inoue, Osamu; Kobayasi, Kaoru )

    1990-01-01

    Effect of desipramine on the in vivo binding of {sup 3}H-SCH23390 and {sup 3}H-N-methylspiperone ({sup 3}H-NMSP) in mouse striatum was studied. The ratio of radioactivity in the striatum to that in the cerebellum at 15 min after i.v. injection of {sup 3}H-SCH23390 or 45 min after injection of {sup 3}H-NMSP were used as indices of dopamine D1 or D2 receptor binding in vivo, respectively. In vivo binding of D1 and D2 receptors was decreased in a dose-dependent manner by acute treatment with desipramine (DMI). A saturation experiment suggested that the DMI-induced reduction in the binding was mainly due to the decrease in the affinity of both receptors. No direct interactions between the dopamine receptors and DMI were observed in vitro by the addition of 1 mM of DMI into striatal homogenate. Other antidepressants such as imipramine, clomipramine, maprotiline and mianserin also decreased the binding of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. The results indicated an important role of dopamine receptors in the pharmacological effect of antidepressants.

  7. Effects of protein-ligand interactions on hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics: canonical and noncanonical scenarios.

    PubMed

    Sowole, Modupeola A; Konermann, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) methods are widely used for monitoring protein-ligand interactions. This approach relies on the fact that ligand binding can modulate the extent of protein structural fluctuations that transiently disrupt hydrogen bonds and expose backbone amides to the solvent. It is commonly observed that ligand binding causes a reduction of HDX rates. This reduction can be restricted to elements adjacent to the binding site, but other regions can be affected as well. Qualitatively, ligand-induced HDX protection can be rationalized on the basis of two-state models that equate structural dynamics with global unfolding/refolding. Unfortunately, such models tend to be unrealistic because the dynamics of native proteins are dominated by subglobal transitions and local fluctuations. Ligand binding lowers the ground-state free energy. It is not obvious why this should necessarily be accompanied by a depletion of excited-state occupancies, which would be required for a reduction of HDX rates. Here, we propose a framework that implies that ligand binding can either slow or accelerate amide deuteration throughout the protein. These scenarios are referred to as "type 1" and "type 2", respectively. Evidence for type 1 binding is abundant in the literature, whereas the viability of type 2 interactions is less clear. Using HDX mass spectrometry (MS), we demonstrate that the oxygenation of hemoglobin (Hb) provides a dramatic example of a type 2 scenario. The observed behavior is consistent with cooperative T → R switching, where part of the intrinsic O2 binding energy is reinvested for destabilization of the ground state. This destabilization increases the Boltzmann occupancy of unfolded conformers, thereby enhancing HDX rates. Surprisingly, O2 binding to myoglobin (Mb) also induces elevated HDX rates. These Mb data reveal that type 2 behavior is not limited to cooperative multisubunit systems. Although enhanced protection from deuteration is widely

  8. Epitope-distal effects accompany the binding of two distinct antibodies to hepatitis B virus capsids.

    PubMed

    Bereszczak, Jessica Z; Rose, Rebecca J; van Duijn, Esther; Watts, Norman R; Wingfield, Paul T; Steven, Alasdair C; Heck, Albert J R

    2013-05-01

    Infection of humans by hepatitis B virus (HBV) induces the copious production of antibodies directed against the capsid protein (Cp). A large variety of anticapsid antibodies have been identified that differ in their epitopes. These data, and the status of the capsid as a major clinical antigen, motivate studies to achieve a more detailed understanding of their interactions. In this study, we focused on the Fab fragments of two monoclonal antibodies, E1 and 3120. E1 has been shown to bind to the side of outward-protruding spikes whereas 3120 binds to the "floor" region of the capsid, between spikes. We used hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to investigate the effects on HBV capsids of binding these antibodies. Conventionally, capsids loaded with saturating amounts of Fabs would be too massive to be readily amenable to HDX-MS. However, by focusing on the Cp protein, we were able to acquire deuterium uptake profiles covering the entire 149-residue sequence and reveal, in localized detail, changes in H/D exchange rates accompanying antibody binding. We find increased protection of the known E1 and 3120 epitopes on the capsid upon binding and show that regions distant from the epitopes are also affected. In particular, the α2a helix (residues 24-34) and the mobile C-terminus (residues 141-149) become substantially less solvent-exposed. Our data indicate that even at substoichiometric antibody binding an overall increase in the rigidity of the capsid is elicited, as well as a general dampening of its breathing motions. PMID:23597076

  9. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON LASER ENGINEERED NET SHAPE (LENS) REPAIRED WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; Thad Adams, T

    2006-10-06

    New methods of repairing mis-machined components are always of interest. In this study, an innovative method using Laser Engineered Net Shape{trademark} (LENS{reg_sign}) forming was used to repair intentionally mis-machined test articles. The components were repaired and subsequently hydrogen charged and burst tested. The LENS repair did not have an adverse effect on the solid state weld process that was used to repair the components. Hydrogen charged samples failed in a similar manner to the uncharged samples. Overall, the prospects for LENS repairing similar products are favorable and further work is encouraged.

  10. Hydrogen effects on the age hardening behavior of 2024 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, J. A.; Louthan, M. R., Jr.; Sisson, R. D., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    It has been found that the fatigue crack growth rate in aluminum alloys increases significantly in the presence of moisture. This phenomenon along with a moisture effect observed in another context has been attributed to 'embrittlement' of the aluminum by absorbed hydrogen generated by the reaction of moisture with freshly exposed aluminum. A description is given of a number of age hardening experiments involving 2024 aluminum. These experiments show that a mechanism related to the segregation of absorbed hydrogen to the coherent theta-double-prime interfaces may account for the observed reduction in fatigue life. It is pointed out that this segregation promotes a loss of coherency in the hydrogen rich region at a fatigue crack tip. Subsequently, the loss of coherency causes local softening and reduces fatigue life.

  11. A classical examination of the Stark effect in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, Andrew; Greene, Chris H.; Clark, William

    1997-04-01

    The response of a hydrogen atom to a perturbative electric field (the Stark effect) is presented from a classical viewpoint. In previous studies Hezel et al. (T. P. Hezel, C. E. Burkhardt, M. Ciocca, and J. J. Leventhal, Am. J. Phys. 60), 324 (1992). examined the linear Stark effect classically and found that the linear Stark splitting of the degenerate hydrogenic energy levels (n-states) corresponds to a rotation of the plane of the electron orbit about the electric field vector. In the present work we find classical energy shifts (not just precession frequencies) in the hydrogen atom in situations that correspond to both the linear and quadratic Stark effects. We then compare these classical energy shifts to the exact quantum mechanical values for the Stark effect. We find that the linear Stark effect can be accurately reproduced classically (given the correct initial conditions). In contrast, quantum mechanical results for the quadratic Stark effect cannot be accurately reproduced classically, except in the correspondence principle limit of large principal quantum numbers n. A paper based on this work has been recently submitted to Phys. Rev. A(Preprints of this paper are avaliable on the internet at ftp://fermion.colorado.edu/pub/preprints/Sta rk/ .). This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  12. Interaction between Cytochrome c2 and Photosynthetic Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides: Role of Inter- Protein Hydrogen Bonds in Binding and Electron Transfer †

    PubMed Central

    Abresch, Edward C.; Paddock, Mark L.; Villalobos, Miguel; Chang, Charlene; Okamura, Melvin Y.

    2008-01-01

    The role of short-range hydrogen bond interactions at the interface between electron transfer proteins cytochrome c2 (cyt) and reaction center (RC) from Rb. sphaeroides was studied by mutation (to Ala) of RC residues Asn M187, Asn M188 and Gln L258 which form inter-protein hydrogen bonds to cyt in the cyt:RC complex. The largest decrease in binding constant KA (8-fold) for single mutation was observed for Asn M187, which forms an intra-protein hydrogen bond to the key residue Tyr L162 in the center of the contact region having low solvent accessibility. Interaction between Asn M187 and Tyr L162 was also implicated in binding by double mutation of the two residues. The hydrogen bond mutations did not significantly change the second order rate constant, k2 , indicating the mutations did not change the association rate for forming the cyt:RC complex, but increased the dissociation rate. The first order electron transfer rate, ke, for the cyt:RC complex was reduced by up to a factor of 4 (for Asn M187). The changes in ke were correlated with the changes in binding affinity but were not accompanied by increases in activation energy. We conclude that short-range hydrogen bond interactions contribute to the close packing of residues in the central contact region between the cyt and RC near Asn M187 and Tyr L162. The close packing contributes to fast electron transfer by increasing the electronic coupling and contributes to the binding energy holding the cyt in position for times long enough for electron transfer to occur. PMID:19053264

  13. Quantum effects of hydrogen atoms on the dynamical rearrangement of hydrogen-bond networks in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Ando, Koji

    2010-04-28

    Quantum effects such as zero-point energy and delocalization of wave packets (WPs) representing water hydrogen atoms are essential to understand anomalous energetics and dynamics in water. Since quantum calculations of many-body dynamics are highly complicated, no one has yet directly viewed the quantum WP dynamics of hydrogen atoms in liquid water. Our semiquantum molecular dynamics simulation made it possible to observe the hydrogen WP dynamics in liquid water. We demonstrate that the microscopic WP dynamics are closely correlated with and actually play key roles in the dynamical rearrangement in the hydrogen-bond network (HBN) of bulk water. We found the quantum effects of hydrogen atoms on liquid water dynamics such as the rearrangement of HBN and the concomitant fluctuation and relaxation. Our results provide new physical insights on HBN dynamics in water whose significance is not limited to pure liquid dynamics but also a greater understanding of chemical and biological reactions in liquid water.

  14. Effects of nucleoside analog incorporation on DNA binding to the DNA binding domain of the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Foti, M; Omichinski, J G; Stahl, S; Maloney, D; West, J; Schweitzer, B I

    1999-02-01

    We investigate here the effects of the incorporation of the nucleoside analogs araC (1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine) and ganciclovir (9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl] guanine) into the DNA binding recognition sequence for the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor. A 10-fold decrease in binding affinity was observed for the ganciclovir-substituted DNA complex in comparison to an unmodified DNA of the same sequence composition. AraC substitution did not result in any changes in binding affinity. 1H-15N HSQC and NOESY NMR experiments revealed a number of chemical shift changes in both DNA and protein in the ganciclovir-modified DNA-protein complex when compared to the unmodified DNA-protein complex. These changes in chemical shift and binding affinity suggest a change in the binding mode of the complex when ganciclovir is incorporated into the GATA DNA binding site.

  15. Effects of nucleoside analog incorporation on DNA binding to the DNA binding domain of the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Foti, M; Omichinski, J G; Stahl, S; Maloney, D; West, J; Schweitzer, B I

    1999-02-01

    We investigate here the effects of the incorporation of the nucleoside analogs araC (1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine) and ganciclovir (9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl] guanine) into the DNA binding recognition sequence for the GATA-1 erythroid transcription factor. A 10-fold decrease in binding affinity was observed for the ganciclovir-substituted DNA complex in comparison to an unmodified DNA of the same sequence composition. AraC substitution did not result in any changes in binding affinity. 1H-15N HSQC and NOESY NMR experiments revealed a number of chemical shift changes in both DNA and protein in the ganciclovir-modified DNA-protein complex when compared to the unmodified DNA-protein complex. These changes in chemical shift and binding affinity suggest a change in the binding mode of the complex when ganciclovir is incorporated into the GATA DNA binding site. PMID:10037146

  16. Enthalpy/entropy compensation effects from cavity desolvation underpin broad ligand binding selectivity for rat odorant binding protein 3.

    PubMed

    Portman, Katherine L; Long, Jed; Carr, Stephen; Briand, Loïc; Winzor, Donald J; Searle, Mark S; Scott, David J

    2014-04-15

    Evolution has produced proteins with exquisite ligand binding specificity, and manipulating this effect has been the basis for much of modern rational drug design. However, there are general classes of proteins with broader ligand selectivity linked to function, the origin of which is poorly understood. The odorant binding proteins (OBPs) sequester volatile molecules for transportation to the olfactory receptors. Rat OBP3, which we characterize by X-ray crystallography and NMR, binds a homologous series of aliphatic γ-lactones within its aromatic-rich hydrophobic pocket with remarkably little variation in affinity but extensive enthalpy/entropy compensation effects. We show that the binding energetics are modulated by two desolvation processes with quite different thermodynamic signatures. Ligand desolvation follows the classical hydrophobic effect; however, cavity desolvation is consistent with the liberation of "high energy" water molecules back into bulk solvent with a strong, but compensated, enthalpic contribution, which together underpin the origins of broad ligand binding selectivity.

  17. Secondary hydrogen isotope effects on the structure and stability of cation-pi complexes (cation = Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and pi = acetylene, ethylene, benzene).

    PubMed

    Moreno, Diego V; González, Sergio A; Reyes, Andrés

    2010-09-01

    Secondary hydrogen isotope effects on the geometries, electronic wave functions and binding energies of cation-pi complexes (cation = Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and pi = acetylene, ethylene, benzene) are investigated with NEO/HF and NEO/MP2 methods. These methods determine both electronic and nuclear wave functions simultaneously. Our results show that an increase of the hydrogen nuclear mass leads to the elongation of the cation-pi bond distance and the decrease in its binding energy. An explanation to this behavior is given in terms of the changes in the pi-molecule electronic structure and electrostatic potential induced by isotopic substitutions.

  18. The composition of Mars' topside ionosphere: Effects of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, Majd; Withers, Paul; Mendillo, Michael

    2013-05-01

    one-dimensional model of the Martian ionosphere is used to explore the importance of atomic and molecular hydrogen chemistry in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. Neutral and ionized H and H2 undergo chemical reactions that lead to the production of the hydrogenated ions: H+, H2+, H3+, OH+, HCO+, ArH+, N2H+, HCO2+, and HOC+. Simulations are conducted for the cases of photochemistry only and photochemistry coupled with transport in order to asses the separate effects of plasma diffusion in the topside ionosphere. For both of these cases, the sensitivity of the ionosphere is tested for (1) molecular hydrogen abundance and (2) reaction rate, k1, for the charge exchange between H+ and H2. Results are reported for midday solar minimum conditions. We find that the ionospheric composition of Mars is sensitive to H2 abundance, but relatively insensitive to the reaction rate, k1. Depending on the conditions simulated, the topside ionosphere can contain appreciable amounts of hydrogenated species such as H3+, OH+, and HCO+. Comparisons are made with Viking ion density measurements as well as with results of other published Mars ionospheric models. Future comparisons with more extensive ion composition will be available when the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission arrives at Mars.

  19. Quantum Effects in the Diffusion of Hydrogen on Ru(0001).

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Eliza M; Wikfeldt, K Thor; Ellis, John; Michaelides, Angelos; Allison, William

    2013-05-01

    An understanding of hydrogen diffusion on metal surfaces is important not only for its role in heterogeneous catalysis and hydrogen fuel cell technology but also because it provides model systems where tunneling can be studied under well-defined conditions. Here we report helium spin-echo measurements of the atomic-scale motion of hydrogen on the Ru(0001) surface between 75 and 250 K. Quantum effects are evident at temperatures as high as 200 K, while below 120 K we observe a tunneling-dominated temperature-independent jump rate of 1.9 × 10(9) s(-1), many orders of magnitude faster than previously seen. Quantum transition-state theory calculations based on ab initio path-integral simulations reproduce the temperature dependence of the rate at higher temperatures and predict a crossover to tunneling-dominated diffusion at low temperatures. However, the tunneling rate is underestimated, highlighting the need for future experimental and theoretical studies of hydrogen diffusion on this and other well-defined surfaces. PMID:24920996

  20. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  1. Evidence for separate substrate binding sites for hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in the oxidation of ethanol by catalase

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaster, E.G.; Nagasawa,ss H.T.

    1986-03-01

    The oxidation of ethanol by purified bovine liver catalase (Sigma, C-40) can be supported by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or by CHP. The time course of the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported reaction (using glucose/glucose oxidase as the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ source) was linear for at least one hr, whereas the rate of acetaldehyde formation in the CHP (4.2 mM) supported reaction decreased with time. When catalase was exposed o CHP for 5 min before the addition of ethanol, the rate of CHP supported ethanol oxidation was reduced by more than 90% compared to incubations where the addition of ethanol preceded that of CHP. In the CHP inhibited state, the peroxidative activity of catalase was not restored by further addition of CHP or ethanol; however, addition of fresh catalase yielded its expected activity. Significantly, the CHP inhibited enzyme was equally effective as the untreated enzyme in catalyzing (a) the oxidation of ethanol in the presence H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported peroxidative activity as well as catalytic activity by CHP inhibited catalase points to separate binding sites for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and CHP in this reaction. Alternatively, CHP may bind adjacent to a common peroxide active site, thereby sterically impeding the binding of CHP - but not of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ - to this active site.

  2. Origin of reverse annealing effect in hydrogen-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Di, Zengfeng; Nastasi, Michael A; Wang, Yongqiang

    2009-01-01

    In contradiction to conventional damage annealing, thermally annealed H-implanted Si exhibits an increase in damage or reverse annealing behavior, whose mechanism has remained elusive. On the basis of quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy combined with channeling Rutherford backscattering analysis, we conclusively elucidate that the reverse annealing effect is due to the nucleation and growth of hydrogen-induce platelets. Platelets are responsible for an increase in the height and width the channeling damage peak following increased isochronal anneals.

  3. Substituent Effects in CH Hydrogen Bond Interactions: Linear Free Energy Relationships and Influence of Anions.

    PubMed

    Tresca, Blakely W; Hansen, Ryan J; Chau, Calvin V; Hay, Benjamin P; Zakharov, Lev N; Haley, Michael M; Johnson, Darren W

    2015-12-01

    Aryl CH hydrogen bonds (HBs) are now commonly recognized as important factors in a number of fields, including molecular biology, stereoselective catalysis, and anion supramolecular chemistry. As the utility of CH HBs has grown, so to has the need to understand the structure-activity relationship for tuning both their strength and selectivity. Although there has been significant computational effort in this area, an experimental study of the substituent effects on CH HBs has not been previously undertaken. Herein we disclose a systematic study of a single CH HB by using traditional urea donors as directing groups in a supramolecular binding cavity. Experimentally determined association constants are examined by a combination of computational (electrostatic potential) and empirical (σm and σp) values for substituent effects. The dominance of electrostatic parameters, as observed in a computational DFT study, is consistent with current CH HB theory; however, a novel anion dependence of the substituent effects is revealed in solution.

  4. Fate of methanol molecule sandwiched between hydrogen-terminated diamond-like carbon films by tribochemical reactions: tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Sato, Seiichiro; Bai, Shandan; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Shimazaki, Tomomi; Adachi, Koshi; Martin, Jean-Michel; Kubo, Momoji

    2012-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to diamond-like carbon (DLC) as a solid-state lubricant, because it exhibits high resistance to wear, low friction and low abrasion. Experimentally it is reported that gas environments are very important for improving the tribological characteristics of DLC films. Recently one of the authors in the present paper, J.-M. Martin, experimentally observed that the low friction of DLC films is realized under alcohol environments. In the present paper, we aim to clarify the low-friction mechanism of the DLC films under methanol environments by using our tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics method. We constructed the simulation model in which one methanol molecule is sandwiched between two hydrogen-terminated DLC films. Then, we performed sliding simulations of the DLC films. We observed the chemical reaction of the methanol molecule under sliding conditions. The methanol molecule decomposed and then OH-termination of the DLC was realized and the CH3 species was incorporated into the DLC film. We already reported that the OH-terminated DLC film is very effective to achieve good low-friction properties under high pressure conditions, compared to H-terminated DLC films. Here, we suggest that methanol environments are very effective to realize the OH-termination of DLC films which leads to the good low-friction properties. PMID:23285626

  5. Conformational states of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica induced by the binding of agonists, antagonists, and local anesthetics. Equilibrium measurements using tritium-hydrogen exchange

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M.P.; Stroud, R.M.

    1989-01-10

    The tritium-hydrogen exchange kinetics of Torpedo californica AChR, in native membrane vesicles at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, have been analyzed in the presence of agonists, partial agonists, local anesthetics, and competitive antagonists. The agonists carbamylcholine (10 microM-1 mM) and suberyldicholine (10 microM) and the partial agonists decamethonium (25 microM and 1 mM) and hexamethonium (1 mM) have no effect on the exchange kinetics, although at lower concentration carbamylcholine may slightly accelerate exchange. Nondesensitizing local anesthetics do affect the exchange behavior, dependent on concentration. Procaine at 500 microM moderately retards exchange while procaine at 10 mM and tetracaine at 5 mM slightly accelerate exchange. The competitive antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin retards exchange significantly, as does d-tubocurarine although to a lesser extent. These results suggest that the resting and desensitized conformations of the AChR are very similar in overall solvent accessibility and that at lower concentrations noncompetitive blockers such as procaine may stabilize a less solvent-accessible state of the AChR. The competitive antagonists alpha-bungarotoxin and d-tubocurare also stabilize a dynamically restricted, less solvent-accessible conformation of the acetylcholine receptor, demonstrating that a large conformational change accompanies binding of these toxins. Any change in conformation which may accompany desensitization is very different from these effects.

  6. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon formation by flux control and hydrogen effects on the growth mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, H.; Sugai, H.; Kato, K.; Yoshida, A.; Okuda, T.

    1986-06-01

    The composition of particle flux to deposit hydrogenated amorphous silicon films in a glow discharge is controlled by a combined electrostatic-magnetic deflection technique. As a result, the films are formed firstly without hydrogen ion flux, secondly by neutral flux only, and thirdly by all species fluxes. Comparison of these films reveals the significant role of hydrogen in the surface reactions. Hydrogen breaks the Si-Si bond, decreases the sticking probability of the Si atom, and replaces the SiH bond by a SiH2 bond to increase the hydrogen content of the films.

  7. Probing the binding sites and the effect of berbamine on the structure of bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiao-Xia; Lui, Yi; Zhou, Bo; Xiao, Xiao-He; Liu, Yi

    2009-06-01

    Berbamine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from Berberis sp., is the active constituent of some Chinese herbal medicines and exhibits a variety of pharmacological activities. The effects of berbamine on the structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated by circular dichroism, fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy under physiological conditions. Berbamine caused a static quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA, and the quenching data were analyzed by application of the Stern-Volmer equation. There was a single primary berbamine-binding site on BSA with a binding constant of 2.577 × 10 4 L mol -1 at 298 K. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (Δ H0) and entropy change (Δ S0) for the reaction were -76.5 kJ mol -1 and -173.4 J mol -1 K -1 according to the van't Hoff equation. The results showed that the hydrogen bond and van der Waals interaction were the predominant forces in the binding process. Competitive experiments revealed a displacement of warfarin by berbamine, indicating that the binding site was located at Drug sites I. The distance r between the donor (BSA) and the acceptor (berbamine) was obtained according to the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory. The results of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, UV-vis absorption difference spectra and circular dichroism of BSA in the presence of berbamine showed that the conformation of BSA was changed. The results provide a quantitative understanding of the effect of berbamine on the structure of bovine serum albumin, providing a useful guideline for further drug design.

  8. Critical Research for Cost-Effective Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei; Deng, Xunming; Abken, Anka; Cao, Xinmin; Du, Wenhui; Vijh, Aarohi; Ingler, William; Chen, Changyong; Fan, Qihua; Collins, Robert; Compaan, Alvin; Yan, Yanfa; Giolando, Dean; Turner, John

    2014-10-29

    The objective of this project is to develop critical technologies required for cost-effective production of hydrogen from sunlight and water using a-Si triple junction solar cell based photo-electrodes. In this project, Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE) and its collaborating organizations utilize triple junction a-Si thin film solar cells as the core element to fabricate photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. Triple junction a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe solar cell is an ideal material for making cost-effective PEC system which uses sun light to split water and generate hydrogen. It has the following key features: 1) It has an open circuit voltage (Voc ) of ~ 2.3V and has an operating voltage around 1.6V. This is ideal for water splitting. There is no need to add a bias voltage or to inter-connect more than one solar cell. 2) It is made by depositing a-Si/a-SiGe/aSi-Ge thin films on a conducting stainless steel substrate which can serve as an electrode. When we immerse the triple junction solar cells in an electrolyte and illuminate it under sunlight, the voltage is large enough to split the water, generating oxygen at the Si solar cell side (for SS/n-i-p/sunlight structure) and hydrogen at the back, which is stainless steel side. There is no need to use a counter electrode or to make any wire connection. 3) It is being produced in large rolls of 3ft wide and up to 5000 ft long stainless steel web in a 25MW roll-to-roll production machine. Therefore it can be produced at a very low cost. After several years of research with many different kinds of material, we have developed promising transparent, conducting and corrosion resistant (TCCR) coating material; we carried out extensive research on oxygen and hydrogen generation catalysts, developed methods to make PEC electrode from production-grade a-Si solar cells; we have designed and tested various PEC module cases and carried out extensive outdoor testing; we were able to obtain a solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency (STH

  9. Fully quantum mechanical calculation of the diffusivity of hydrogen in iron using the tight-binding approximation and path integral theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzarov, Ivaylo H.; Pashov, Dimitar L.; Paxton, Anthony T.

    2013-08-01

    We present calculations of free energy barriers and diffusivities as functions of temperature for the diffusion of hydrogen in α-Fe. This is a fully quantum mechanical approach since the total energy landscape is computed using a self-consistent, transferable tight binding model for interstitial impurities in magnetic iron. Also the hydrogen nucleus is treated quantum mechanically and we compare here two approaches in the literature both based in the Feynman path integral formulation of statistical mechanics. We find that the quantum transition state theory which admits greater freedom for the proton to explore phase space gives result in better agreement with experiment than the alternative which is based on fixed centroid calculations of the free energy barrier. This will have an impact on future modeling and the simulation of hydrogen trapping and diffusion.

  10. Binding characteristics of homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers for acyclovir using an (acceptor-donor-donor)-(donor-acceptor-acceptor) hydrogen-bond strategy, and analytical applications for serum samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Suqin; Tan, Lei; Wang, Ganquan; Peng, Guiming; Kang, Chengcheng; Tang, Youwen

    2013-04-12

    This paper demonstrates a novel approach to assembling homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) based on mimicking multiple hydrogen bonds between nucleotide bases by preparing acyclovir (ACV) as a template and using coatings grafted on silica supports. (1)H NMR studies confirmed the AAD-DDA (A for acceptor, D for donor) hydrogen-bond array between template and functional monomer, while the resultant monodisperse molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIMs) were evaluated using a binding experiment, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and solid phase extraction. The Langmuir isothermal model and the Langmuir-Freundlich isothermal model suggest that ACV-MIMs have more homogeneous binding sites than MIPs prepared through normal imprinting. In contrast to previous MIP-HPLC columns, there were no apparent tailings for the ACV peaks, and ACV-MIMs had excellent specific binding properties with a Ka peak of 3.44 × 10(5)M(-1). A complete baseline separation is obtained for ACV and structurally similar compounds. This work also successfully used MIMs as a specific sorbent for capturing ACV from serum samples. The detection limit and mean recovery of ACV was 1.8 ng/mL(-1) and 95.6%, respectively, for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction coupled with HPLC. To our knowledge, this was the first example of MIPs using AAD-DDA hydrogen bonds.

  11. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on ligand binding to hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Carey, F G; Knowles, F; Gibson, Q H

    1977-06-25

    Increase in hydrostatic pressure to 1000 atm increased the affinity of human and menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) hemoglobins for oxygen. With necessary assumptions about the form of the equilibrium curve, and after correction for changes in pH and volume due to pressure, the increase in affinity is about 2-fold for both hemoglobins. At pH 6.5, Hill's n for menhaden hemoglobin is near 1, and it is believed to remain in the T state, whereas human hemoglobin undergoes a T to R transition. This suggests that the R-T equilibrium is not disturbed by pressure. In direct experiments the binding of a fluorescent effector (8 hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrene (trisulfonic acid) to deoxyhemoglobin was not changed by pressure. The binding of n-butylisocyanide to hemoglobin and to myoglobin is also greater at high pressures, similarly suggesting that the R-T transition is not involved in the pressure effect. PMID:16924

  12. Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-{kappa}B in H1299 human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Mi Ran; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Kim, So-Young; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-04-03

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (G{alpha}i1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of G{alpha}i1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of G{alpha}i1QL. G{alpha}i1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-{kappa}B, which resulted from an increase in NF-{kappa}B p50 protein. We conclude that G{alpha}i1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-{kappa}B activation.

  13. Changes in the hydrogen exchange kinetics of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamylase produced by effector binding and subunit association.

    PubMed Central

    Lennick, M; Allewell, N M

    1981-01-01

    Large changes in solvent accessibility to aspartate transcarbamylase (aspartate carbamoyltransferase, carbamoylphosphate:L-aspartate carbamoyltransferase, EC 2.1.3.2), as monitored by tritium exchange, result from binding of substrates and substrate analogs to the catalytic subunit (c3), binding of nucleoside triphosphates to the regulatory subunit (r2), and subunit association. Rates of exchange are reduced in each of these cases, although to different degrees. Succinate, in the presence of carbamoyl phosphate, retards exchange from c3 no more than carbamoyl phosphate alone, and less than N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate, a bisubstrate analog. Larger changes in rates of exchange from r2 are produced by CTP than by ATP; however, both CTP and ATP accelerate exchange from c3 to the same extent. The changes in the kinetics of exchange that result from binding of both substrate analogs and nucleoside triphosphates to the native enzyme (c6r6) are much smaller. Carbamoyl phosphate, with or without succinate, retards exchange only slightly, while the bisubstrate analog has a somewhat larger effect. Experiments with reconstituted enzyme, in which only c3 is tritium labeled, indicate that changes in solvent accessibility produced by active site ligands are largely confined to c3. Neither CTP nor ATP alters the overall rate of exchange from c6r6 significantly. The possibility of opposing changes in the two types of subunits was ruled out in experiments in which only one subunit was labeled. The nonadditive effects of ligation and subunit association imply a set of responsive protons common to both processes and suggest that they are linked not only thermodynamically and functionally but also dynamically. PMID:7031660

  14. Effects of N-acetylimidazole on oxytocin binding in bovine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X.; Gorewit, R.C.; Currie, W.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of N-acetylimidazole on specific binding of oxytocin to microsomal fractions of bovine mammary gland were studied. N-acetylimidazole suppressed oxytocin binding, with time and concentration dependence. Decreased oxytocin binding activity appeared to be due to decreased affinity of the hormone for its receptor. Acetylation of oxytocin, rather than of oxytocin receptors, seemed to be responsible for the decreased binding.

  15. Bound-state field-theory approach to proton-structure effects in muonic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Peter J.; Griffith, J.; Sapirstein, J.

    2013-05-01

    A bound-state field-theory approach to muonic hydrogen is set up using a variant of the Furry representation in which the lowest-order Hamiltonian describes a muon in the presence of a point Coulomb field, but the origin of the binding field is taken to be three charged quarks in the proton, which are modeled as Dirac particles that move freely within a spherical well. Bound-state field-theory techniques are used to evaluate one- and two-photon effects. Particular attention is paid to two-photon-exchange diagrams, which include the effect of proton polarizability. In addition, the modification of the electromagnetic self energy of the proton by the electric field of the muon is examined. Finally, the model is used to carry out a calculation of the static electric polarizability of the proton.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide as an effective disinfectant for Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Jung, In-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Won-Yong; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2014-07-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) infections vary widely, from local infections resulting from animal bites and scratches to general infections. As of yet, no vaccine against P. multocida has been developed, and the most effective way to prevent pathogenic transmission is to clean the host environment using disinfectants. In this study, we identified which disinfectants most effectively inhibited environmental isolates of P. multocida. Three readily available disinfectants were compared: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HP), 70% isopropyl alcohol, and synthetic phenol. In suspension tests and zone inhibition tests, 3% HP was the most promising disinfectant against P. multocida.

  17. Ionic association of hydroperoxide anion HO2- in the binding mean spherical approximation. Spectroscopic study of hydrogen peroxide in concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Chlistunoff, Jerzy; Simonin, Jean-Pierre

    2006-12-28

    The ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy of hydrogen peroxide in concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions was studied. The peroxide band in the UV range shifts from approximately 214 nm to approximately 236 nm as the NaOH concentration increases from 0.338 mol dm-3 to 13.1 mol dm-3. The band originates from an intramolecular electronic transition of the hydroperoxide anion HO2-, as indicated by the negligible temperature effect on the band position and confirmed by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. It is postulated that the bathochromic shift of the peroxide band that accompanies the increase in NaOH concentration originates from the formation of the ion pair (Na+HO2-). The equilibrium constant for the ion association reaction (0.048 mol-1 dm3) and the characteristics of the individual absorption bands of the hydroperoxide anion and its associate with Na+ were determined from the numerical modeling of the absorbance data, using the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA).

  18. Angiotensin receptor binding and pressor effects in cat subretrofacial nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A.M.; Dampney, R.A.L.; Mendelsohn, F.A.O. Univ. of Sydney )

    1988-11-01

    Central administration of angiotensin II (ANG II) increases arterial blood pressure via increased sympathetic activity. The authors have examined the possibility that one site of action of ANG II is the subretrofacial (SRF) nucleus in the rostral ventrolateral medulla, since this nucleus is known to play a critical role in the tonic and phasic control of arterial pressure. In vitro autoradiography, employing {sup 125}I-labeled (Sar{sup 1}, Ile{sup 8})ANG II as radioligand, was used to localize binding sites for ANG-II in the cat ventrolateral medulla. A high density of ANG II-receptor binding sites was found confined to the SRF nucleus. In a second group of experiments in anesthetized cats, microinjections of ANG II, in doses ranging from 10 to 50 pmol, were made into histologically identified sites within and outside the SRF nucleus. Microinjections into the nucleus resulted in a dose-dependent increase in arterial pressure, which was abolished by systemic administration of the ganglion-blocking drug hexamethonium bromide. In contrast, microinjections just outside the SRF nucleus had no effect on arterial pressure. It is concluded that activation of ANG II-receptor binding sites within the SRF nucleus leads to an increase in arterial pressure via increased sympathetic efferent activity.

  19. Effect of temperature on layer separation by plasma hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Di, Z. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Nastasi, M.; Rossi, F.; Shao, L.; Thompson, P. E.

    2008-12-22

    We have studied hydrogen diffusion in plasma hydrogenated Si/SiGe/Si heterostructure at different temperatures. At low temperature, intrinsic point defects in the molecular beam epitaxy grown Si capping layer are found to compete with the buried strain SiGe layer for hydrogen trapping. The interaction of hydrogen with point defects affects the hydrogen long-range diffusion, and restricts the amount of hydrogen available for trapping by the SiGe layer. However, hydrogen trapping by the capping layer is attenuated with increasing hydrogenation temperature allowing more hydrogen to be trapped in the strain SiGe layer with subsequent surface blister formation. A potential temperature window for plasma hydrogenation induced layer separation is identified based on the combined considerations of trap-limited diffusion at low temperature and outdiffusion of H{sub 2} molecule together with the dissociation of Si-H bonds inside of H platelet at high temperature.

  20. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  1. Feasibility and induced effects of subsurface porous media hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann Pfeiffer, Wolf; Li, Dedong; Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    Fluctuations in energy production from renewable sources like wind or solar power can lead to shortages in energy supply which can be mitigated using energy storage concepts. Underground storage of hydrogen in porous sandstone formations could be a storage option for large amounts of energy over long storage cycles. However, this use of the subsurface requires an analysis of possible interactions with other uses of the subsurface such as geothermal energy storage or groundwater abstraction. This study aims at quantifying the feasibility of porous media hydrogen storage to provide stored energy on a timescale of several days to weeks as well as possible impacts on the subsurface. The hypothetical storage site is based on an anticlinal structure located in Schleswig-Holstein, northern Germany. The storage is injected and extracted using five wells completed in a partially eroded, heterogeneous sandstone layer in the top of the structure at a depth of about 500 m. The storage formation was parameterized based on a local facies model with intrinsic permeabilities of 250-2500 mD and porosities of 35-40%. Storage initialization and subsequent storage cycles, each consisting of a hydrogen injection and extraction, were numerically simulated. The simulation results indicate the general feasibility of this hydrogen storage concept. The simulated sandstone formation is able to provide an average of around 1480 t of hydrogen per week (1830 TJ) which is about 5% of the total weekly energy production or about 10% of the weekly energy consumption of Schleswig-Holstein with the hydrogen production rate being the limiting factor of the overall performance. Induced hydraulic effects are a result of the induced overpressure within the storage formation. Propagation of the pressure signal does not strongly depend on the formation heterogeneity and thus shows approximately radial characteristics with one bar pressure change in distances of about 5 km from the injection wells. Thermal

  2. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON STRAIN-INDUCED MARTENSITE FORMATION IN TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Ps Lam, P

    2008-12-11

    Unstable austenitic stainless steels undergo a strain-induced martensite transformation. The effect of hydrogen on this transformation is not well understood. Some researchers believe that hydrogen makes the transformation to martensite more difficult because hydrogen is an austenite stabilizer. Others believe that hydrogen has little or no effect at all on the transformation and claim that the transformation is simply a function of strain and temperature. Still other researchers believe that hydrogen should increase the ability of the metal to transform due to hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and slip planarity. While the role of hydrogen on the martensite transformation is still debated, it has been experimentally verified that this transformation does occur in hydrogen-charged materials. What is the effect of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen embrittlement? Martensite near crack-tips or other highly strained regions could provide much higher hydrogen diffusivity and allow for quicker hydrogen concentration. Martensite may be more intrinsically brittle than austenite and has been shown to be severely embrittled by hydrogen. However, it does not appear to be a necessary condition for embrittlement since Type 21-6-9 stainless steel is more stable than Type 304L stainless steel but susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. In this study, the effect of hydrogen on strain-induced martensite formation in Type 304L stainless steel was investigated by monitoring the formation of martensite during tensile tests of as-received and hydrogen-charged samples and metallographically examining specimens from interrupted tensile tests after increasing levels of strain. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture mechanisms was also studied by examining the fracture features of as-received and hydrogen-charged specimens and relating them to the stress-strain behavior.

  3. Plasma Effects on the Metastable Neutral HYDROGEN(2S) Atom.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, John Ferns, Jr.

    Atomic radiative processes which occur in plasmas have long been of interest of plasma physicists. The process we are investigating is atomic dipole transitions, specifically transitions from the metastable 2s to the 2p in hydrogen, which are induced by processes which occur in the plasma. An experiment was done to measure the rate of transitions from 2s to 2p in hydrogen. This experiment was divided into two sections. The first was to measure the transition rate in a near equilibrium plasma. The second section measured the transition rate when RF oscillations were imposed on the plasma. The results of the first part of the experiment show that microscopic fluctuating electric fields which are produced by the motions of the charged particles induce transitions from 2s to 2p in hydrogen. The magnitude of this effect is compared to predicted transition rates due to collisions with electrons and ions and to rates predicted for an equilibrium plasma. In the second part of the experiment, the plasma was shown to act as a filter, preventing transitions from being caused by the RF unless the RF was in the range where plasma waves could be launched. The interpretation we give for this effect is that when the oscillations are inducing transitions, it is because plasma waves are being launched in the plasma and it is these waves which are inducing the transitions. These results have a couple of important applications. The results for the equilibrium part of the experiment can be used to explain a limit in the current which is produced by the Lamb-shift polarized ion source. The other important application is the possible use of the effect seen in the RF case as a non-perturbing diagnostic for plasma waves. Since dipole transition rates are proportional to E('2) and very sensitive near resonance, this effect could prove to be more accurate and more sensitive than methods currently used.

  4. Effect of methane concentration in hydrogen plasma on hydrogen impurity incorporation in thick large-grained polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. J.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Jiang, X. F.; Pinto, J. L.; Ye, H.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the impact of methane concentration in hydrogen plasma on the growth of large-grained polycrystalline diamond (PCD) films and its hydrogen impurity incorporation. The diamond samples were produced using high CH4 concentration in H2 plasma and high power up to 4350 W and high pressure (either 105 or 110 Torr) in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) system. The thickness of the free-standing diamond films varies from 165 μm to 430 μm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the morphology, crystalline and optical quality of the diamond samples, and bonded hydrogen impurity in the diamond films, respectively. Under the conditions employed here, when methane concentration in the gas phase increases from 3.75% to 7.5%, the growth rate of the PCD films rises from around 3.0 μm/h up to 8.5 μm/h, and the optical active bonded hydrogen impurity content also increases more than one times, especially the two CVD diamond specific H related infrared absorption peaks at 2818 and 2828 cm-1 rise strongly; while the crystalline and optical quality of the MCD films decreases significantly, namely structural defects and non-diamond carbon phase content also increases a lot with increasing of methane concentration. Based on the results, the relationship between methane concentration and diamond growth rate and hydrogen impurity incorporation including the form of bonded infrared active hydrogen impurity in CVD diamonds was analyzed and discussed. The effect of substrate temperature on diamond growth was also briefly discussed. The experimental findings indicate that bonded hydrogen impurity in CVD diamond films mainly comes from methane rather than hydrogen in the gas source, and thus can provide experimental evidence for the theoretical study of the standard methyl species dominated growth mechanism of CVD diamonds grown with methane/hydrogen mixtures.

  5. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-05-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X-H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 - 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X-H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  6. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Ross H; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G

    2014-05-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X-H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4-3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X-H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  7. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Ross H. Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-05-07

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X–H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O–H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 − 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X–H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  8. Hydrogen bonding plays a significant role in the binding of coomassie brilliant blue-R to hemoglobin: FT-IR, fluorescence and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Maity, Mritunjoy; Dolui, Sandip; Maiti, Nakul C

    2015-12-14

    An analog of coomassie brilliant blue-R (CBB-R) was recently found to act as an antagonist to ATP-sensitive purinergic receptors (P2X7R) and has potential to be used in medicine. With the aim of understanding its transportation and distribution through blood, in this investigation, we measured the binding parameters of CBB-R with bovine hemoglobin (BHG). The molecule specifically bound to a single binding site of the protein with a stoichiometric ratio of 1 : 1 and the observed binding constant Ka was 3.5, 2.5, 2.0 and 1.5 × 10(5) M(-1) at 20 °C, 27 °C, 37 °C and 45 °C, respectively. The measured respective ΔG(0) values of the binding at four temperatures were -30.45, -22.44, -18.04 and -11.95 kJ mol(-1). The ΔH(0) (change in enthalpy) and ΔS(0) (change in entropy) values were -23.6 kJ mol(-1) and -70.66 J mol(-1) respectively in the binding process. The negative value of ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) indicated that the binding of the molecule was thermodynamically favorable. The best energy structure in the molecular docking analysis revealed that CBB-R preferred to be intercalated in the cavity among the α2, β1 and β2 subunits and the binding location was 7.4 Å away from Trp37 in the β2 subunit. The binding of the molecule with the protein was stabilized by hydrogen bonds involving the side chain of two amino acid residues. The residues were Lys104 and Glu101 in the β2 subunit. The binding was further stabilized via hydrogen bond formation between the amide group of the peptide backbone (residue Tyr145 of the β1 subunit) and CBB-R. A shift of the amide I (-C=O stretching) band frequency of ∼8 cm(-1) to low energy was ascribed to the hydrogen bond interaction involving the polypeptide carbonyl of the protein and the CBB-R molecule. In addition, two π-cation interactions between Lys99 of the α2 subunit and Lys104 of the β2 subunit and CBB-R contributed favorably in the binding processes. No substantial change in the soret and Q absorption bands of BHG

  9. Platinum nanoparticle shape effects on benzene hydrogenation selectivity.

    PubMed

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M; Lee, Hyunjoo; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2007-10-01

    Benzene hydrogenation was investigated in the presence of a surface monolayer consisting of Pt nanoparticles of different shapes (cubic and cuboctahedral) and tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB). Infrared spectroscopy indicated that TTAB binds to the Pt surface through a weak C-H...Pt bond of the alkyl chain. The catalytic selectivity was found to be strongly affected by the nanoparticle shape. Both cyclohexane and cyclohexene product molecules were formed on cuboctahedral nanoparticles, whereas only cyclohexane was produced on cubic nanoparticles. These results are the same as the product selectivities obtained on Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals in earlier studies. The apparent activation energy for cyclohexane production on cubic nanoparticles is 10.9 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol, while for cuboctahedral nanoparticles, the apparent activation energies for cyclohexane and cyclohexene production are 8.3 +/- 0.2 and 12.2 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol, respectively. These activation energies are lower, and corresponding turnover rates are three times higher than those obtained with single-crystal Pt surfaces.

  10. Effect of VGs on a turbulent hydrogen jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senouci, M.; Hibbo, H.; Hammoudi, B.; Kadi, M.; Imine, B.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate numerically the effects of four vortices on the dynamic, scalar, and turbulent fields of the hydrogen jet. These vortices, which appear in the vicinities of the nozzle, are created by the vortex generators (VGs), and they are assembled with periodicity or symmetry in order, respectively, to give four vortices of the same or opposite direction. A second-order Reynolds stress model is used to investigate asymmetric turbulent jet. The results indicate that the presence of the vortex near the emission jet section noticeably enhances mixing to ensure a good combustion.

  11. Energetics of hydrogen storage in organolithium nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Namilae, Sirish; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Nicholson, Don M

    2007-01-01

    Ab-initio calculations based on the second order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) were used to investigate the interaction of molecular hydrogen with alkyl lithium organometallic compounds. It is found that lithium in organolithium structures attracts two hydrogen molecules with a binding energy of about 0.14 eV. The calculations also show that organolithium compounds bind strongly with graphitic nanostructures. Therefore, these carbon based nanostructures functionalized with organolithium compounds can be effectively used for storage of molecular hydrogen. Energetics and mechanisms for achieving high weight percent hydrogen storage in organolithium based nanostructures are discussed.

  12. Reactions of atomic hydrogen in water : solvent and isotope effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, D. M.

    1999-06-10

    It has been known for many years that hydrogen atoms can be easily created and studied in water using radiolytic techniques [1]. The use of CW EPR detection coupled with electron radiolysis proved extremely useful in estimating many reaction rates, and revealed the interesting phenomenon of chemically induced dynamic electron polarization (CIDEP) [2]. In recent years, we have made use of pulsed EPR detection to make precision reaction rate measurements which avoid the complications of CIDEP [3]. Activation energies and H/D isotope effects measured in these studies [4-14] will be described below. An interesting aspect of the hydrogen atom reactions is the effect of hydrophobic solvation. EPR evidence--an almost gas-phase hyperfine coupling and extremely narrow linewidth--is quite convincing to show that the H atom is just a minimally perturbed gas phase atom inside a small ''bubble''. In several systems we have found that the hydrophobic free energy of solvation dominates the solvent effect on reaction rates.

  13. Binding profiles and cytokine-inducing effects of fish rhamnose-binding lectins on Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Masahiro; Sugawara, Shigeki; Matsuda, Atsushi; Tatsuta, Takeo; Koide, Yasuhiro; Hasan, Imtiaj; Hasan, Imtiaji; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Nitta, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    Rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) is one of the animal lectin categories which take part in the innate immune responses of fish. Osmerus lanceolatus lectin (OLL) from shishamo smelt eggs is an RBL composed of two tandem-repeated domains, both of which are considered to be a carbohydrate-recognition domain. SAL, catfish (Silurus asotus) egg RBL composed of three domains, binds to Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells through globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) carbohydrate chain and to reduce cell size and growth by altering membrane composition without causing cell death. In this experiment, we tried to compare the binding effects of these two RBLs on Raji cells. Flow cytometric and fluorescence microscopic analyses revealed that OLL also directly bound to and shrunk Raji cells with ten times less reactivity than SAL but reduced cell growth with decreasing cell viability. Anti-Gb3 antibody completely blocked the binding of SAL to Raji cells but not that of OLL. In addition, the direct bindings of OLL and SAL to Raji cells were comparably inhibited by melibiose, but lactose was more effective inhibitor for the binding of OLL than that of SAL. These results suggest that OLL has slightly different cell-binding property compared with SAL and binds not only to Gb3 but also to the other carbohydrate receptor-bearing β-galactoside chains. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that SAL induced the expression of TNF-α but not of IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-10. Thus, SAL-induced cytostatic effect on Raji cells might be partially caused by TNF-α-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:24861899

  14. β-sheet-like hydrogen bonds interlock the helical turns of a photoswitchable foldamer to enhance the binding and release of chloride.

    PubMed

    Lee, Semin; Hua, Yuran; Flood, Amar H

    2014-09-01

    Inspired by halorhodopsin's use of photoisomerization to regulate chloride, aryltriazole-based foldamers have been created to "catch and release" chloride ions upon light irradiation of end-appended azobenzenes. The proposed mode of stabilization exploits a β-sheet-like hydrogen-bonding array to cooperatively interlock the ends of a foldamer together with its helical core. We find that the hydrogen-bonding array has a greater influence on stabilizing the helix than the π-stacked seam under the conditions examined (50:50 MeCN/THF). Thus, we show how it is possible to enhance the difference between Cl(-) binding and release using light-dependent control over the foldamer's degree of helix stabilization. Making and breaking three π-π contacts with light caused an 8-fold change in chloride affinity (40 300 M(-1) ⇄ 5000 M(-1)), five π-π contacts produced a 17-fold change (126 000 M(-1) ⇄ 7400 M(-1)), and strategically located hydrogen-bonding units enabled a greater 84-fold differential (970 000 M(-1) ⇄ 11 600 M(-1)). The improved performances were attributed to stepwise increases in the preorganization of the binding pocket that catches chloride while leaving the cis states with just one π-π contact relatively unchanged.

  15. Strain effects on hydrogen storage capability of metal-decorated graphene: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Miao; Lu, Yunhao; Zhang, Chun; Feng, Yuan Ping

    2010-09-01

    We report an investigation on strain-engineered adsorption of metal atoms on graphene and hydrogen storage capabilities of metal-decorated graphene by using first-principles approach based on density functional theory. We show that an applied strain not only stabilizes the supported metal atoms and prevents them from clustering but further increases the hydrogen storage capacity. Specifically, a tensile strain of 10% in graphene increases the adsorption energy of Li (Ti) atom by around 75% (71%) and the gravimetric density of hydrogen storage up to 15.4 wt % (9.5 wt %), with a binding energy of ˜0.2 eV/H2.

  16. Substituent Effects on the Binding of Halides by Neutral and Dicationic Bis(triazolium) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Binod; Scheiner, Steve

    2015-12-31

    The effects of substituent and overall charge upon the binding of a halide anion by a bis(triazolium) receptor are studied by M06-2X DFT calculations, with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. Comparison is also made between a receptor that engages in H-bonds, with a halogen-bonding species. Fluoride is clearly most strongly bound, followed by Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-) in that order. The dicationic receptor engages in stronger complexes, but not by a very wide margin compared to its neutral counterpart. The binding is enhanced as the substituent on the two triazolium rings becomes progressively more electron-withdrawing. Halogen-substituted receptors, whether neutral or cationic, display a greater sensitivity to substituent than do their H-bonding counterparts. Both Coulombic and charge transfer factors obey the latter trends but do not correctly reproduce the stronger halogen vs hydrogen bonding. Both H-bonds and halogen bonds are nearly linear within the complexes, due in part to bond rotations within the receptor that bring the two triazole rings closer to coplanarity with the central benzene ring. PMID:26645536

  17. Effects of OLRs and HRTs on hydrogen production from high salinity substrate by halophilic hydrogen producing bacterium (HHPB).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shan; Lee, Yunhee; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Hwang, Sun-Jin

    2013-08-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR) on hydrogen production were investigated with glucose medium containing 2% NaCl. Halophilic hydrogen producing bacterium (HHPB) Clostridium bifermentans 3AT-ma, which can survive under high salt conditions, was used. Sponge media were used as 20% of working volume. The OLR and HRT were varied in 10-60 g-glucose/L-reactor/day and 24-6h. With OLR of 20 g-glucose/L/day, shorter HRT resulted in higher hydrogen producing rate and yield. When the OLR was increased from 20 to 60 g-glucose/L-reactor/day at HRT 6h, the hydrogen production rate increased, while the hydrogen production yield decreased due to the increase and accumulation of volatile fatty acids. Biohydrogen production was possible from the salinity substrate using HHPB, and the maximum hydrogen production yield was 1.1 mol-H₂/mol-glucose with optimal conditions of OLR of 20 g-glucose/L/day and HRT of 12h.

  18. The effect of strain on the trapping of hydrogen at grain-boundary carbides in Ni-Cr-Fe alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, D. M.; Young, G. A.; Scully, J. R.

    2001-02-01

    The present work quantifies the role of plastic deformation on the hydrogen-trapping behavior within the material and at the carbides. Isothermal desorption spectroscopy and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) were performed on unstrained and strained alloy 600 (Ni-15Cr-8Fe) and alloy 690 (Ni-30Cr-8Fe), in order to quantify the effect of strain on the trapping energy. The results show that the M23C8 carbides in alloy 690 were stronger traps than the M7C3 carbides in alloy 600. It was further shown that cold work tended to increase the binding energy of hydrogen to the trap sites associated with grain-boundary carbides, although this effect was small.

  19. Effect of shot peening on hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-feng; Zhang, Jin; Ma, Ming-ming; Song, Xiao-long

    2016-06-01

    The effect of shot peening (SP) on hydrogen embrittlement of high strength steel was investigated by electrochemical hydrogen charging, slow strain rate tensile tests, and hydrogen permeation tests. Microstructure observation, microhardness, and X-ray diffraction residual stress studies were also conducted on the steel. The results show that the shot peening specimens exhibit a higher resistance to hydrogen embrittlement in comparison with the no shot peening (NSP) specimens under the same hydrogen-charging current density. In addition, SP treatment sharply decreases the apparent hydrogen diffusivity and increases the subsurface hydrogen concentration. These findings are attributed to the changes in microstructure and compressive residual stress in the surface layer by SP. Scanning electron microscope fractographs reveal that the fracture surface of the NSP specimen exhibits the intergranular and quasi-cleavage mixed fracture modes, whereas the SP specimen shows only the quasi-cleavage fractures under the same hydrogen charging conditions, implying that the SP treatment delays the onset of intergranular fracture.

  20. Effect of the Hydrogen Bond on Photochemical Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-jiao; Liu, Lei; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Rui-ling; Ren, Guang-hua; Xu, Da-li; Zhou, Pan-wang; Han, Ke-li

    2015-12-17

    The effect of a hydrogen bond on the photochemical synthesis of silver nanoparticles has been investigated via experimental and theoretical methods. In a benzophenone system, the photochemical synthesis process includes two steps, which are that hydrogen abstraction reaction and the following reduction reaction. We found that for the first step, an intermolecular hydrogen bond enhances the proton transfer. The efficiency of hydrogen abstraction increases with the hydrogen bond strength. For the second step, the hydrogen-bonded ketyl radical complex shows higher reducibility than the ketyl radical. The inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) measurement exhibits a 2.49 times higher yield of silver nanoparticles in the hydrogen bond ketyl radical complex system than that for the ketyl radical system. Theoretical calculations show that the hydrogen bond accelerates electron transfer from the ketyl radical to the silver ion by raising the SOMO energy of the ketyl radical; thus, the SOMO-LUMO interaction is more favorable. PMID:26562362

  1. Inhibitory Effect of Bridged Nucleosides on Thermus aquaticus DNA Polymerase and Insight into the Binding Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Kun; Castro, Aaron; Kim, Edward S.; Dinkel, Austin P.; Liu, Xiaoyun; Castro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Modified nucleosides have the potential to inhibit DNA polymerases for the treatment of viral infections and cancer. With the hope of developing potent drug candidates by the modification of the 2’,4’-position of the ribose with the inclusion of a bridge, efforts were focused on the inhibition of Taq DNA polymerase using quantitative real time PCR, and the results revealed the significant inhibitory effects of 2’,4’-bridged thymidine nucleoside on the polymerase. Study on the mode of inhibition revealed the competitive mechanism with which the 2’,4’-bridged thymidine operates. With a Ki value of 9.7 ± 1.1 μM, the 2’,4’-bridged thymidine proved to be a very promising inhibitor. Additionally, docking analysis showed that all the nucleosides including 2’,4’-bridged thymidine were able to dock in the active site, indicating that the substrate analogs reflect a structural complementarity to the enzyme active site. The analysis also provided evidence that Asp610 was a key binding site for 2’,4’-bridged thymidine. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to further understand the conformational variations of the binding. The root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) values for the peptide backbone of the enzyme and the nitrogenous base of the inhibitor stabilized within 0.8 and 0.2 ns, respectively. Furthermore, the MD analysis indicates substantial conformational change in the ligand (inhibitor) as the nitrogenous base rotated anticlockwise with respect to the sugar moiety, complemented by the formation of several new hydrogen bonds where Arg587 served as a pivot axis for binding formation. In conclusion, the active site inhibition of Taq DNA polymerase by 2’,4’-bridged thymidine suggests the potential of bridged nucleosides as drug candidates. PMID:26820310

  2. Nuclear Bound States of Molecular Hydrogen Physisorbed on Graphene: An Effective Two-Dimensional Model.

    PubMed

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O

    2015-11-01

    The interaction potential of molecular hydrogen physisorbed on a graphene sheet is evaluated using the ab initio-based periodic dlDF+Das scheme and its accuracy is assessed by comparing the nuclear bound-state energies supported by the H2(D2/HD)/graphite potentials with the experimental energies. The periodic dlDF+Das treatment uses DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory on surface cluster models to extract the dispersion contribution to the interaction whereas periodic dispersionless density functional (dlDF) calculations are performed to determine the dispersion-free counterpart. It is shown that the H2/graphene interaction is effectively two-dimensional (2D), with the distance from the molecule center-of-mass to the surface plane and the angle between the diatomic axis and the surface normal as the relevant degrees of freedom. The global potential minimum is found at the orthogonal orientation of the molecule with respect to the surface plane, with an equilibrium distance of 3.17 Å and a binding energy of -51.9 meV. The comparison of the binding energies shows an important improvement of our approach over the vdW-corrected DFT schemes when we are dealing with the very weak H2/surface interaction. Next, the 2D nuclear bound-state energies are calculated numerically. As a cross-validation of the interaction potential, the bound states are also determined for molecular hydrogen on the graphite surface (represented as an assembly of graphene sheets). With the largest absolute deviation being 1.7 meV, the theoretical and experimental energy levels compare very favorably.

  3. Nanometer-Size Effect on Hydrogen Sites in Palladium Lattice.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroshi; Kofu, Maiko; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2016-08-17

    Nanometer-sized materials attract much attention because their physical and chemical properties are substantially different from those of bulk materials owing to their size and surface effects. In this work, neutron powder diffraction experiments on the nanoparticles of palladium hydride, which is the most popular metal hydride, have been performed at 300, 150, and 44 K to investigate the positions of the hydrogen atoms in the face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice of palladium. We used high-quality PdD0.363 nanocrystals with a diameter of 8.0 ± 0.9 nm. The Rietveld analysis revealed that 30% of D atoms are located at the tetrahedral (T) sites and 70% at the octahedral (O) sites. In contrast, only the O sites are occupied in bulk palladium hydride and in most fcc metal hydrides. The temperature dependence of the T-site occupancy suggested that the T-sites are occupied only in a limited part, probably in the subsurface region, of the nanoparticles. This is the first study to determine the hydrogen sites in metal nanoparticles. PMID:27462875

  4. Performance of the MM/GBSA scoring using a binding site hydrogen bond network-based frame selection: the protein kinase case.

    PubMed

    Adasme-Carreño, Francisco; Muñoz-Gutierrez, Camila; Caballero, Julio; Alzate-Morales, Jans H

    2014-07-21

    A conformational selection method, based on hydrogen bond (Hbond) network analysis, has been designed in order to rationalize the configurations sampled using molecular dynamics (MD), which are commonly used in the estimation of the relative binding free energy of ligands to macromolecules through the MM/GBSA or MM/PBSA method. This approach makes use of protein-ligand complexes obtained from X-ray crystallographic data, as well as from molecular docking calculations. The combination of several computational approaches, like long MD simulations on protein-ligand complexes, Hbond network-based selection by scripting techniques and finally MM/GBSA, provides better statistical correlations against experimental binding data than previous similar reported studies. This approach has been successfully applied in the ranking of several protein kinase inhibitors (CDK2, Aurora A and p38), which present both diverse and related chemical structures. PMID:24901037

  5. Hydrogen storage in a potassium-ion-bound metal-organic framework incorporating crown ether struts as specific cation binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dae-Woon; Chyun, Seung An; Suh, Myunghyun Paik

    2014-07-21

    To develop a metal-organic framework (MOF) for hydrogen storage, SNU-200 incorporating a 18-crown-6 ether moiety as a specific binding site for selected cations has been synthesized. SNU-200 binds K(+), NH4(+), and methyl viologen (MV(2+)) through single-crystal to single-crystal transformations. It exhibits characteristic gas-sorption properties depending on the bound cation. SNU-200 activated with supercritical CO2 shows a higher isosteric heat (Qst) of H2 adsorption (7.70 kJ mol(-1)) than other zinc-based MOFs. Among the cation inclusions, K(+) is the best for enhancing the isosteric heat of the H2 adsorption (9.92 kJ mol(-1)) as a result of the accessible open metal sites on the K(+) ion. PMID:24939240

  6. The effect of posture and abdominal binding on respiratory pressures.

    PubMed

    Koulouris, N; Mulvey, D A; Laroche, C M; Goldstone, J; Moxham, J; Green, M

    1989-11-01

    We examined the effect of posture on the generation of respiratory pressures in 6 highly trained subjects. Transdiaphragmatic pressure was measured at FRC during bilateral percutaneous phrenic nerve stimulation (twitch Pdi) and maximal sniffs (sniff Pdi), with the abdomen bound and unbound. Maximum static inspiratory (PImax) and expiratory (PEmax) mouth pressures were measured with the abdomen unbound. Three postures were examined: seated (Se), semi-supine (30s), and supine (Su). Changes of posture did not significantly alter twitch Pdi. By contrast, sniff Pdi and static mouth pressures were significantly reduced in the Su posture. Abdominal binding significantly increased twitch Pdi only. We conclude that voluntary respiratory manoeuvres requiring activation, recruitment and coordination of different muscle groups are performed better in the Se position. We suggest that posture be standardised for serial comparative measurements of voluntary respiratory pressures in a given subject.

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide Up-Regulates the Expression of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 via Promoting Nuclear Translocation of PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Xiong, Qinghui; Peng, Jin; Hu, Bin; Li, Wanzhen; Zhu, Yizhun; Shen, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) plays a key role in atherogenesis. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter, has been reported to play an anti-atherosclerotic role. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study we examined whether and how H2S regulates ABCA1 expression. The effect of H2S on ABCA1 expression and lipid metabolism were assessed in vitro by cultured human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and in vivo by ApoE−/− mice with a high-cholesterol diet. NaHS (an exogenous H2S donor) treatment significantly increased the expression of ABCA1, ApoA1, and ApoA2 and ameliorated intracellular lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. Depletion of the endogenous H2S generator cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) by small RNA interference (siRNA) significantly decreased the expression of ABCA1 and resulted in the accumulation of lipids in HepG2 cells. In vivo NaHS treatment significantly reduced the serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoproteins (LDL), diminished atherosclerotic plaque size, and increased hepatic ABCA1 expression in fat-fed ApoE−/− mice. Further study revealed that NaHS upregulated ABCA1 expression by promoting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) nuclear translocation. H2S up-regulates the expression of ABCA1 by promoting the nuclear translocation of PPARα, providing a fundamental mechanism for the anti-atherogenic activity of H2S. H2S may be a promising potential drug candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27136542

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Up-Regulates the Expression of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 via Promoting Nuclear Translocation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Xiong, Qinghui; Peng, Jin; Hu, Bin; Li, Wanzhen; Zhu, Yizhun; Shen, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-29

    ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) plays a key role in atherogenesis. Hydrogen sulfide (H₂S), a gasotransmitter, has been reported to play an anti-atherosclerotic role. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study we examined whether and how H₂S regulates ABCA1 expression. The effect of H₂S on ABCA1 expression and lipid metabolism were assessed in vitro by cultured human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and in vivo by ApoE(-/-) mice with a high-cholesterol diet. NaHS (an exogenous H₂S donor) treatment significantly increased the expression of ABCA1, ApoA1, and ApoA2 and ameliorated intracellular lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. Depletion of the endogenous H₂S generator cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) by small RNA interference (siRNA) significantly decreased the expression of ABCA1 and resulted in the accumulation of lipids in HepG2 cells. In vivo NaHS treatment significantly reduced the serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoproteins (LDL), diminished atherosclerotic plaque size, and increased hepatic ABCA1 expression in fat-fed ApoE(-/-) mice. Further study revealed that NaHS upregulated ABCA1 expression by promoting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) nuclear translocation. H₂S up-regulates the expression of ABCA1 by promoting the nuclear translocation of PPARα, providing a fundamental mechanism for the anti-atherogenic activity of H₂S. H₂S may be a promising potential drug candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  9. Ultrafast effective multilevel atom method for primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2010-09-15

    Cosmological hydrogen recombination has recently been the subject of renewed attention because of its importance for predicting the power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. It has become clear that it is necessary to account for a large number n > or approx. 100 of energy shells of the hydrogen atom, separately following the angular momentum substates in order to obtain sufficiently accurate recombination histories. However, the multilevel atom codes that follow the populations of all these levels are computationally expensive, limiting recent analyses to only a few points in parameter space. In this paper, we present a new method for solving the multilevel atom recombination problem, which splits the problem into a computationally expensive atomic physics component that is independent of the cosmology and an ultrafast cosmological evolution component. The atomic physics component follows the network of bound-bound and bound-free transitions among excited states and computes the resulting effective transition rates for the small set of 'interface' states radiatively connected to the ground state. The cosmological evolution component only follows the populations of the interface states. By pretabulating the effective rates, we can reduce the recurring cost of multilevel atom calculations by more than 5 orders of magnitude. The resulting code is fast enough for inclusion in Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation algorithms. It does not yet include the radiative transfer or high-n two-photon processes considered in some recent papers. Further work on analytic treatments for these effects will be required in order to produce a recombination code usable for Planck data analysis.

  10. Biomolecular interaction study of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin and effect of β-cyclodextrin on binding by fluorescence, 3D, synchronous, CD, and Raman spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Bolattin, Mallavva B; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A

    2016-07-01

    Spectrofluoremetric technique was employed to study the binding behavior of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at different temperatures. Binding study of bovine serum albumin with hydralazine has been studied by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and confirmed by three-dimensional, synchronous, circular dichroism, and Raman spectroscopic methods. Effect of β-cyclodextrin on binding was studied. The experimental results showed a static quenching mechanism in the interaction of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin. The binding constant and the number of binding sites are calculated according to Stern-Volmer equation. The thermodynamic parameters ∆H(o) , ∆G(o) , ∆S(o) at different temperatures were calculated. These indicated that the hydrogen bonding and weak van der Waals forces played an important role in the interaction. Based on the Förster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding average distance, r, between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (hydralazine) was evaluated and found to be 3.95 nm. Spectral results showed that the binding of hydralazine to BSA induced conformational changes in BSA. The effect of common ions on the binding of hydralazine to BSA was also examined. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Effect of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of titanium and its alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    Occluded hydrogen resulting from cathodic charging of commercially pure titanium and titanium alloys, Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V and Ti-6Al-4V, was shown to cause embrittlement of the alloys. Embrittlement was a function of the interstitial hydrogen content rather than the amount of precipitated titanium hydride. The effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain for plastic instability along pure shear directions was determined for alloys Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn. Hydrogen, in concentrations below that necessary for spontaneous hydride precipitation, increased the strain necessary for instability formation or instability failure. The strain rate sensitivity also increased with increasing hydrogen concentration. The effect of hydrogen on slip and twinning was determined for titanium single crystals. The critical resolved shear stress for prism slip was increased and the critical resolved shear stress for twinning was decreased with increasing hydrogen concentration.

  12. Geometric phase effects in ultracold hydrogen exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Jisha; Kendrick, Brian K.; Balakrishnan, N.

    2016-10-01

    The role of the geometric phase effect on chemical reaction dynamics is explored by examining the hydrogen exchange process in the fundamental H+HD reaction. Results are presented for vibrationally excited HD molecules in the v = 4 vibrational level and for collision energies ranging from 1 μK to 100 K. It is found that, for collision energies below 3 K, inclusion of the geometric phase leads to dramatic enhancement or suppression of the reaction rates depending on the final quantum state of the HD molecule. The effect was found to be the most prominent for rotationally resolved integral and differential cross sections but it persists to a lesser extent in the vibrationally resolved and total reaction rate coefficients. However, no significant GP effect is present in the reactive channel leading to the D+H2 product or in the D+H2 (v=4,j=0) \\to HD+H reaction. A simple interference mechanism involving inelastic (nonreactive) and exchange scattering amplitudes is invoked to account for the observed GP effects. The computed results also reveal a shape resonance in the H+HD reaction near 1 K and the GP effect is found to influence the magnitude of the resonant part of the cross section. Experimental detection of the resonance may allow a sensitive probe of the GP effect in the H+HD reaction.

  13. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide–protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide–protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, nonbinding control peptides, and statistical analysis of replicate data. We show that HDX-MS can identify regions in the two epigenetic regulator proteins KDM4C and KDM1A that are perturbed through weak interactions with PD-identified peptides. Two peptides cause reduced HDX on opposite sides of the active site of KDM4C, indicating distinct binding modes. In contrast, the perturbation site of another PD-selected peptide inhibiting the function of KDM1A maps to a GST-tag. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS can validate and map weak peptide–protein interactions and pave the way for understanding and optimizing the binding of peptide scaffolds identified through PD and similar ligand discovery approaches. PMID:25325890

  14. Effect of nitrogen doping and external electric field on the adsorption of hydrogen on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shiyun; Fan, Kaimin; Wu, Minpin; Yin, Guangqiang

    2016-07-01

    Effect of doping and external electric field on the adsorption of hydrogen on graphene was studied by using density functional theory. Substitutional nitrogen, pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen doping has been considered. It was found that hydrogen prefers to be physically adsorbed on the pristine and substitutional nitrogen doped graphene, whereas hydrogen prefers to be chemically adsorbed on the pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen doped graphene. An external electric field can enhance the chemical adsorption of hydrogen on the pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped graphene. These demonstrate nitrogen doping combined with external electric field can increase the capacity of hydrogen storage in graphene.

  15. [Effects of La3+ on calcium binding to erythrocyte cytoskeleton].

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, G M; Postnov, Iu V

    1992-02-01

    When the whole erythrocytes were exposed to LaCl3, A--23187, ionomycin, orthovanadate and saponin, there was Ca2+ binding only following La3+ treatment of the cells. The binding was evident at a wide range (0.1 microM--1.OmM) of La3+ concentrations. Iodoacetamide-induced (incubation for 3 hours, 37 degrees C) decrease in erythrocyte ATP levels was found to result in a 3-fold reduction in Ca2+ binding to the cytoskeleton. La(3+)-induced Ca2+ binding enhanced the incorporation of 14C-glucose and/or its metabolites into the red cell skeleton. Thus, the detected new type of Ca2+ binding to the cytoskeleton of human and rat erythrocytes is likely to be due to the cumulative process: direct binding of La3+ to the outer surface of a membrane and the metal-induced trigger of nucleotide--dependent intracellular process.

  16. Analysis of Copper-Binding Proteins in Rice Radicles Exposed to Excess Copper and Hydrogen Peroxide Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxiao; Xia, Yan; Chen, Chen; Zhuang, Kai; Song, Yufeng; Shen, Zhenguo

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plants, but excess Cu can inactivate and disturb the protein function due to unavoidable binding to proteins at the cellular level. As a redox-active metal, Cu toxicity is mediated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cu-binding structural motifs may alleviate Cu-induced damage by decreasing free Cu(2+) activity in cytoplasm or scavenging ROS. The identification of Cu-binding proteins involved in the response of plants to Cu or ROS toxicity may increase our understanding the mechanisms of metal toxicity and tolerance in plants. This study investigated change of Cu-binding proteins in radicles of germinating rice seeds under excess Cu and oxidative stress using immobilized Cu(2+) affinity chromatography, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and mass spectra analysis. Quantitative image analysis revealed that 26 protein spots showed more than a 1.5-fold difference in abundances under Cu or H2O2 treatment compared to the control. The identified Cu-binding proteins were involved in anti-oxidative defense, stress response and detoxification, protein synthesis, protein modification, and metabolism regulation. The present results revealed that 17 out of 24 identified Cu-binding proteins have a similar response to low concentration Cu (20 μM Cu) and H2O2 stress, and 5 out of 24 were increased under low and high concentration Cu (100 μM Cu) but unaffected under H2O2 stress, which hint Cu ions can regulate Cu-binding proteins accumulation by H2O2 or no H2O2 pathway to cope with excess Cu in cell. The change pattern of these Cu-binding proteins and their function analysis warrant to further study the roles of Cu ions in these Cu-binding proteins of plant cells. PMID:27582750

  17. Analysis of Copper-Binding Proteins in Rice Radicles Exposed to Excess Copper and Hydrogen Peroxide Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongxiao; Xia, Yan; Chen, Chen; Zhuang, Kai; Song, Yufeng; Shen, Zhenguo

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plants, but excess Cu can inactivate and disturb the protein function due to unavoidable binding to proteins at the cellular level. As a redox-active metal, Cu toxicity is mediated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cu-binding structural motifs may alleviate Cu-induced damage by decreasing free Cu2+ activity in cytoplasm or scavenging ROS. The identification of Cu-binding proteins involved in the response of plants to Cu or ROS toxicity may increase our understanding the mechanisms of metal toxicity and tolerance in plants. This study investigated change of Cu-binding proteins in radicles of germinating rice seeds under excess Cu and oxidative stress using immobilized Cu2+ affinity chromatography, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and mass spectra analysis. Quantitative image analysis revealed that 26 protein spots showed more than a 1.5-fold difference in abundances under Cu or H2O2 treatment compared to the control. The identified Cu-binding proteins were involved in anti-oxidative defense, stress response and detoxification, protein synthesis, protein modification, and metabolism regulation. The present results revealed that 17 out of 24 identified Cu-binding proteins have a similar response to low concentration Cu (20 μM Cu) and H2O2 stress, and 5 out of 24 were increased under low and high concentration Cu (100 μM Cu) but unaffected under H2O2 stress, which hint Cu ions can regulate Cu-binding proteins accumulation by H2O2 or no H2O2 pathway to cope with excess Cu in cell. The change pattern of these Cu-binding proteins and their function analysis warrant to further study the roles of Cu ions in these Cu-binding proteins of plant cells. PMID:27582750

  18. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Xu, H.; Atia-Tul-Noor, A.; Hu, B. T.; Kielpinski, D.; Sang, R. T.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2 . The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  19. LiBr passivation effect of porous nanocrystalline hydrogenated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Sana Ben; Haddadi, Ikbel; Seif, El Whibi; Daik, Ridha; Bousbih, Rabaa; Dimassi, Wissem; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2015-12-01

    Nanocrystalline hydrogenated silicon (nc-Si:H) films were deposited on a p-type silicon substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), using SiH4 and H2 as reactive gases. Porous (nc-Si:H) layers were afterward obtained and immersed in a lithium bromide (LiBr) aqueous solution in order to enhance their optical and electrical properties for a potential solar cells application. A decrease in the reflectivity to about 9% for Li/porous nc-Si:H layer deposited at 75 sccm against an increase in the minority carrier lifetime were obtained. We correlate these results to the change in crystalline characteristics and chemical composition of the layers in order to understand the effect of LiBr coating on nc-Si:H Through optical and electrical characterization we have demonstrated the possibility of using such LiBr treatment to improve the properties of porous nc-Si:H.

  20. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression.

  1. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Xu, H; Atia-Tul-Noor, A; Hu, B T; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T; Litvinyuk, I V

    2016-08-19

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H_{2}/D_{2} gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H_{2} and D_{2}. The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation. PMID:27588855

  2. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression. PMID:22565543

  3. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Xu, H; Atia-Tul-Noor, A; Hu, B T; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T; Litvinyuk, I V

    2016-08-19

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H_{2}/D_{2} gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H_{2} and D_{2}. The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  4. Hydrogen environment effects on beryllium and titanium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzemeier, L. G.; Jacinto, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    The NASP program has intensively studied the hydrogen-environment embrittlement (HEE) susceptibility of Be, alpha(2)-Ti3Al, and gamma-TiAl. Tensile tests are being conducted on candidate aerospace structure and propulsion candidate materials from each of the three groups, at temperatures in the -130 to +204 C range, in both 0.1 MPa and 13.8 MPa He and H2 environments, using SEM and TEM to discern the details of environmental effects. It has been established that while alpha(2) Ti3Al is HEE-susceptible even in the room-temperature and 13.8 MPa environment, neither Be nor gamma-TiAl are susceptible, even at the highest temperature tested.

  5. Hydrogen effects in duplex stainless steel welded joints - electrochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.; Łabanowski, J.; Ćwiek, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this work results on the influence of hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded joints are described. The results were discussed by taking into account three different areas on the welded joint: weld metal (WM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and parent metal. The corrosion resistance was qualified with the polarization curves registered in a synthetic sea water. The conclusion is that, hydrogen may seriously deteriorate the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 DSS welded joints. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen degradation was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions. WM region has been revealed as the most sensitive to hydrogen action.

  6. Sperm in poor quality semen from bulls during heat stress have a lower affinity for binding hydrogen-3 heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Ax, R.L.; Gilbert, G.R.; Shook, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Binding assays with (/sup 3/H) heparin were performed using spermatozoa collected prior to, during, and following summer heat stress to dairy bulls. Ejaculates collected in August 1983 after a period of ambient temperatures exceeding 29.4/sup 0/C exhibited a high frequency of abnormal sperm, and motility was reduced in some samples. Sperm in samples collected during heat stress possessed dissociation constants for binding (/sup 3/H) heparin ranging from 134.5 to 163.2 nmol. In contrast, sperm in semen collected prior to and after heat stress had significantly lower dissociation constants (higher affinity) for (/sup 3/H)heparin, 12.9 to 56.4 nmol. The number of binding sites for (/sup 3/H) heparin on sperm did not change among collection periods. It was concluded that the binding affinity for (/sup 3/H) heparin may reflect membrane integrity of bull sperm.

  7. A van der Waals density functional theory comparison of metal decorated graphene systems for hydrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Janet; Yadav, Shwetank; Tam, Jasmine; Veer Singh, Chandra

    2014-06-01

    Previous Density Functional Theory (DFT) studies on metal decorated graphene generally use local density approximation (LDA) or generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals which can cause inaccuracies in hydrogen binding energies as they neglect van der Waals (vdW) interactions and are difficult to compare due to their widely varying simulation parameters. We investigated the hydrogen binding ability of several metals with a consistent set of simulations using the GGA functional and incorporated vdW forces through the vdW-DF2 functional. Metal adatom anchoring on graphene and hydrogen adsorption ability for both single and double sided decoration were studied for eight metals (Al, Li, Na, Ca, Cu, Ni, Pd, and Pt). It was found that the vdW correction can have a significant impact on both metal and hydrogen binding energies. The vdW-DF2 functional led to stronger metal adatom and hydrogen binding for light metals in comparison to GGA results, while heavier transition metals displayed the opposite behaviour but still produced stronger hydrogen binding energies than light metals. Nickel was found to be the best balance between hydrogen binding ability for reversible storage and low weight. The effects on hydrogen binding energy and maximum achievable hydrogen gravimetric density were analyzed for Ni-graphene systems with varying metal coverage. Lower metal coverage was found to improve hydrogen binding but decrease hydrogen gravimetric density. The highest achieved Ni-graphene system gravimetric density was 6.12 wt. %.

  8. Analytical chemical kinetic investigation of the effects of oxygen, hydrogen, and hydroxyl radicals on hydrogen-air combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, G. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Quantitative values were computed which show the effects of the presence of small amounts of oxygen, hydrogen, and hydroxyl radicals on the finite-rate chemical kinetics of premixed hydrogen-air mixtures undergoing isobaric autoignition and combustion. The free radicals were considered to be initially present in hydrogen-air mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.2, 0.6, 1.0, and 1.2. Initial mixture temperatures were 1100 K, 1200 K, and 1500 K, and pressures were 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 atm. Of the radicals investigated, atomic oxygen was found to be the most effective for reducing induction time, defined as the time to 5 percent of the total combustion temperature rise. The reaction time, the time between 5 percent and 95 percent of the temperature rise, is not decreased by the presence of free radicals in the initial hydrogen-air mixture. Fuel additives which yield free radicals might be used to effect a compact supersonic combustor design for efficient operation in an otherwise reaction-limited combustion regime.

  9. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-03-28

    The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness properties of Types 304L, 316L and 21-6-9 forged stainless steels was investigated. Fracture toughness samples were fabricated from forward-extruded forgings. Samples were uniformly saturated with hydrogen after exposure to hydrogen gas at 34 MPa or 69 and 623 K prior to testing. The fracture toughness properties were characterized by measuring the J-R behavior at ambient temperature in air. The results show that the hydrogen-charged steels have fracture toughness values that were about 50-60% of the values measured for the unexposed steels. The reduction in fracture toughness was accompanied by a change in fracture appearance. Both uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples failed by microvoid nucleation and coalescence, but the fracture surfaces of the hydrogen-charged steels had smaller microvoids. Type 316L stainless steel had the highest fracture toughness properties and the greatest resistance to hydrogen degradation.

  10. Effect of hydrogen on superelasticity of the titanium nickelide-based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lotkov, Aleksandr; Baturin, Anatolii; Grishkov, Victor Rodionov, Ivan; Kudiyarov, Victor Lider, Andrei

    2015-10-27

    The hydrogen effect on the inelastic properties and plastic strain development after electrolythical hydrogenation in physiological solution was investigated. This effect virtually results in a failure under torsion of Ti{sub 49.1}Ni{sub 50.9} (atom per cent) alloy specimens with coarse-grained (CG) and submicrocrystalline (SMC) structures. It is shown that hydrogen embrittlement (HE) phenomenon occurs irrespective of the grain size in the studied specimens at approximately equal strain values. However, compared to the specimens with CG structure, those with SMC structure accumulate two to three times more hydrogen for the same hydrogenation time. It is found that hydrogen has a much smaller effect on the inelastic properties of specimens with SMC structure as compared to those with CG structure.

  11. Effect of hydrogen on superelasticity of the titanium nickelide-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr; Baturin, Anatolii; Grishkov, Victor; Rodionov, Ivan; Kudiyarov, Victor; Lider, Andrei

    2015-10-01

    The hydrogen effect on the inelastic properties and plastic strain development after electrolythical hydrogenation in physiological solution was investigated. This effect virtually results in a failure under torsion of Ti49.1Ni50.9 (atom per cent) alloy specimens with coarse-grained (CG) and submicrocrystalline (SMC) structures. It is shown that hydrogen embrittlement (HE) phenomenon occurs irrespective of the grain size in the studied specimens at approximately equal strain values. However, compared to the specimens with CG structure, those with SMC structure accumulate two to three times more hydrogen for the same hydrogenation time. It is found that hydrogen has a much smaller effect on the inelastic properties of specimens with SMC structure as compared to those with CG structure.

  12. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Andreas; Nordlund, Paer; Jansson, Anna; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower). Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM) and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD). PMID:27253209

  13. Plasma electron temperature and the entropy effect on hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakartnarodom, Parinya

    The thesis is that the interaction between the microwave induced electric field and a conductive material will produce plasma with high effective temperature such that it is thermodynamically and kinetically possible to produce small molecules from large molecules. The high effective temperature increases the potency of the entropy term such that small molecules are produced from large molecules even though the enthalpy for the process is positive. This hypothesis will be tested in several reactions for which the entropy change is positive. The plasma enhanced chemical reactions examined here may also be important in the practical application of alternative fuel production. The specific reactions of interest to this thesis are: (1) H 2O→H2 + 1/2 O2; DeltaGo ( kJ) = 247.5--0.056T, (2) 1/2 N2 + H2O→ H2 + NO; DeltaGo (kJ) = 338.45--0.069T, (3) C + H2O →Fe H2 + CO; Delta Go(kJ) = 135.8--0.143 T, (4) C6H 10O5 → 5H2 + C + 5CO; DeltaGo( kJ) = 711.3--2.48T. Experiments are carried out to examine the chemical species present within the plasma by the optical emission spectrometer (OES) and in the resultant gas outflow by the flue gas analyzer as a function of incoming gas composition and composition of the solid materials at the point of plasma initiation. The chemical and plasma reactions observed experimentally will be compared to thermodynamic calculations as a method to test the hypothesis. In addition, hydrogen production from water and from water and nitrogen at elevated effective temperature produces products, which recombine with negative free energy change at lower temperatures. Based on our initial results, it is also necessary to hypothesize that spatiotemporal plasma discharges can produce molecular hydrogen and an associated oxidant at an elevated effective temperature such that the mixture is 'quenched' to a lower temperature where said mixture is kinetically stabilized against spontaneous recombination. In all experiments, the results from OES show

  14. Intentional binding effect in children: insights from a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana, Annachiara; Begliomini, Chiara; Bisiacchi, Patrizia S

    2014-01-01

    Intentional binding (IB) refers to the temporal attraction between a voluntary action and its sensory consequence. Since its discovery in 2002, it has been considered to be a valid implicit measure of sense of agency (SoA), since it only occurs in the context of voluntary actions. The vast majority of studies considering IB have recruited young adults as participants, while neglecting possible age-related differences. The aim of the present work is to study the development of IB in 10-year-old children. In place of Libet's classical clock method, we decided to implement a new and more suitable paradigm in order to study IB, since children could have some difficulties in dealing with reading clocks. A stream of unpredictable letters was therefore used: participants had to remember which letter was on the screen when they made a voluntary action, heard a sound, or felt their right index finger moved down passively. In Experiment I, a group of young adults was tested in order to replicate the IB effect with this new paradigm. In Experiment II, the same paradigm was then administered to children in order to investigate whether such an effect has already emerged at this age. The data from Experiment I showed the presence of the IB effect in adults. However, Experiment II demonstrated a clear reduction of IB. The comparison of the two groups revealed that the young adult group differed from the children, showing a significantly stronger linkage between actions and their consequences. The results indicate a developmental trend in the IB effect. This finding is discussed in light of the maturation process of the frontal cortical network. PMID:25202256

  15. Salt effects on polyelectrolyte-ligand binding: comparison of Poisson-Boltzmann, and limiting law/counterion binding models.

    PubMed

    Sharp, K A; Friedman, R A; Misra, V; Hecht, J; Honig, B

    1995-08-01

    The theory for salt dependence of the free energy, entropy, and enthalpy of a polyelectrolyte in the PB (PB) model is extended to treat the nonspecific salt dependence of polyelectrolyte-ligand binding reactions. The salt dependence of the binding constant (K) is given by the difference in osmotic pressure terms between the reactants and products. For simple 1-1 salts it is shown that this treatment is equivalent to the general preferential interaction model for the salt dependence of binding [C. Anderson and M. Record (1993) Journal of Physical Chemistry, Vol. 97, pp. 7116-7126]. The salt dependence, entropy, and enthalpy are compared for the PB model and one specific form of the preferential interaction coefficient model that uses counterion condensation/limiting law (LL) behavior. The PB and LL models are applied to three ligand-polyelectrolyte systems with the same net ligand charge: a model sphere-cylinder binding reaction, a drug-DNA binding reaction, and a protein-DNA binding reaction. For the small ligands both the PB and limiting law models give (In K vs. In[salt]) slopes close in magnitude to the net ligand charge. However, the enthalpy/entropy breakdown of the salt dependence is quite different. In the PB model there are considerable contributions from electrostatic enthalpy and dielectric (water reorientation) entropy, compared to the predominant ion cratic (release) entropy in the limiting law model. The relative contributions of these three terms in the PB model depends on the ligand: For the protein, ion release entropy is the smallest contribution to the salt dependence of binding. The effect of three approximations made in the LL model is examined: These approximations are (1) the ligand behaves ideally, (2) the preferential interaction coefficient of the polyelectrolyte is unchanged upon ligand binding, and (3) the polyelectrolyte preferential interaction coefficient is given by the limiting law/counterion-condensation value. Analysis of the PB

  16. Progress in the study of biological effects of hydrogen on higher plants and its promising application in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jiqing; Ye, Zhouheng; Sun, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    While the medical effects of hydrogen have been broadly analyzed, research into the effects of hydrogen on higher plants has often been of lesser concern. Recent studies on the botanical effects of hydrogen have shown that it is involved in signal transduction pathways of plant hormones and can improve the resistance of plants to stressors, such as drought, salinity, cold and heavy metals. In addition, hydrogen could delay postharvest ripening and senescence of fruits. Observational evidence has also shown that hydrogen can regulate the flowering time of plants. These results indicate that hydrogen may have great potential applications within agricultural production, indicating that there may be a new 'hydrogen agricultural era' to come.

  17. Autoradiographic analysis of tritiated imipramine binding in the human brain post mortem: effects of suicide

    SciTech Connect

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Israeli, M.; Biegon, A.

    1989-03-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of high-affinity tritiated imipramine binding sites was performed on brains of 12 suicide victims and 12 matched controls. Region-specific differences in imipramine binding were found between the two groups. Thus, the pyramidal and molecular layers of the cornu ammoni hippocampal fields and the hilus of the dentate gyrus exhibited 80%, 60%, and 90% increases in binding in the suicide group, respectively. The postcentral cortical gyrus, insular cortex, and claustrum had 45%, 28%, and 75% decreases in binding in the suicide group, respectively. No difference in imipramine binding was observed in prefrontal cortical regions, in the basal ganglia, and in mesencephalic nuclei. No sex and postmortem delay effects on imipramine binding were found. Imipramine binding was positively correlated with age, the effect of age being most pronounced in portions of the basal ganglia and temporal cortex.

  18. Design and Development of New Carbon-Based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-03

    This is a summary for work performed under cooperative agreement DE FC36 04GO14006 (Design and Development of New Carbon-based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen). The project was directed to discover new solid and liquid materials that use reversible catalytic hydrogenation as the mechanism for hydrogen capture and storage. After a short period of investigation of solid materials, the inherent advantages of storing and transporting hydrogen using liquid-phase materials focused our attention exclusively on organic liquid hydrogen carriers (liquid carriers). While liquid carriers such as decalin and methylcyclohexane were known in the literature, these carriers suffer from practical disadvantages such as the need for very high temperatures to release hydrogen from the carriers and difficult separation of the carriers from the hydrogen. In this project, we were successful in using the prediction of reaction thermodynamics to discover liquid carriers that operate at temperatures up to 150 C lower than the previously known carriers. The means for modifying the thermodynamics of liquid carriers involved the use of certain molecular structures and incorporation of elements other than carbon into the carrier structure. The temperature decrease due to the more favorable reaction thermodynamics results in less energy input to release hydrogen from the carriers. For the first time, the catalytic reaction required to release hydrogen from the carriers could be conducted with the carrier remaining in the liquid phase. This has the beneficial effect of providing a simple means to separate the hydrogen from the carrier.

  19. Quantifying the Lunar Hydrogen Cycle: A Fast, Effective, and Economical CubeSat Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, M.; Adams, M. L.; Barabash, S.; Calhoun, P. C.; Clark, P. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Folta, D. C.; Halekas, J.; Haque, S. E.; Hurley, D. M.; Keidar, M.; Keller, J. W.; Killen, R. M.; Kletzing, C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Malphrus, B. K.; McNeil, R. R.; Vondrak, R. R.; Wieser, M.

    2015-10-01

    The Moon breathes hydrogen: solar wind protons and micro-meteoroids deliver hydrogen to the lunar surface at local rates that depend on surface composition, local topography, and the presence of structures such as magnetic anomalies. Because the lunar surface is generally saturated with hydrogen, the implanted hydrogen escapes the surface and forms the hydrogen exosphere through a variety of processes including sputtering, recoil, and diffusion - giving the surface an effective hydrogen "albedo." These processes can lead to hydrogen deposition into cold traps and the formation of OH, and possibly water, through chemical alteration of oxygen-bearing minerals. Exospheric hydrogen is reclaimed by the solar wind as picked-up photoions and chargeexchange products. The exact pathway for each of these processes remains unknown, especially at regional scales, and quantifying each of these processes in this "lunar hydrogen cycle" as a function of solar zenith angle and plasma and space environment will lead to a unified understanding of the plasma, exospheric, and geologic Moon. CubeSats provide a fast, effective, and economical approach to quantifying the currently unknown parameters in the lunar hydrogen cycle.

  20. Effect of cathodic hydrogen charging on mechanical properties of Al 8090

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, W.K.; Kim, S.S.; Shin, K.S.

    1999-01-22

    It has been well established that precipitation hardened, high-strength Al alloys are often susceptible to external hydrogen embrittlement. Al 8090 has been developed to reduce the mechanical anisotropy and improve the toughness by introducing S{prime} (Al{sub 2}CuMg) precipitates. Recently, Chen et al. studied the effects of cathodic hydrogen charging on tensile properties of Al 8090 sheet, and observed that hydrogen embrittlement affects the tensile properties of Al 8090 significantly, suggesting that hydrogen embrittlement may play an important role in SCC of Al 8090. It has often been demonstrated that the presence of notch greatly alters the hydrogen-assisted mechanical behavior of metals. Therefore, the main objective of the present study was to examine the effects of cathodic hydrogen charging on tensile and fracture behaviors of Al 8090.

  1. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on polishing removal rate in CMP with various abrasives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivannan, R.; Ramanathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide in chemical mechanical planarization slurries for shallow trench isolation was investigated. The various abrasives used in this study were ceria, silica, alumina, zirconia, titania, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride. Hydrogen peroxide suppresses the polishing of silicon dioxide and silicon nitride surfaces by ceria abrasives. The polishing performances of other abrasives were either unaffected or enhanced slightly with the addition of hydrogen peroxide. The ceria abrasives were treated with hydrogen peroxide, and the polishing of the work surfaces with the treated abrasive shows that the inhibiting action of hydrogen peroxide is reversible. It was found that the effect of hydrogen peroxide as an additive is a strong function of the nature of the abrasive particle.

  2. The effect of post-exposure heat treatment on the hydrogen embrittlement of high carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.J.; Sharp, R.M.

    1985-10-01

    High carbon steel wires were loaded in tension to 79% ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and cathodically charged with hydrogen. The times to failure by hydrogen embrittlement (HE) were statistically analyzed to obtain the minimum incubation time and the mean time to failure. Electrochemical measurements of the mobile hydrogen content showed that baking the wires for 2 h at 200 C was effective in reducing the lattice hydrogen concentration to the same level as in uncharged material. Baking dramatically increased the embrittlement susceptibility of the high carbon wire, however, reducing both the minimum incubation time and the mean time to failure. These unexpected findings are explained by the effect of temperature on reversible and irreversible hydrogen trapping. Baking this material is believed to release hydrogen from relatively low energy innocuous traps and allow it to concentrate in traps with higher interaction energies. Upon reloading, these sites act as significant stress concentrators, leading to more rapid failure.

  3. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on phosphorus lability in lake sediments amended with drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Liu, Juanfeng; Pei, Yuansheng

    2013-05-01

    The use of drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) to immobilize P in sediments is a novel approach for lake restoration. However, the lability of P in WTRs-amended sediments may vary with many factors, e.g., hydrogen sulfide content. Earlier works in our laboratory have demonstrated that WTRs are effective sorbents for hydrogen sulfide in water. Thus, we hypothesized that the lability of P in WTRs-amended sediments would not be increased by hydrogen sulfide. The results of this work suggested that this hypothesis was tenable. Compared to the raw sediments, the amended sediments had significantly lower P desorption potential in the presence of hydrogen sulfide at different times, pH and concentrations. Moreover, the amended sediments were also better able to adsorb hydrogen sulfide. In the amended sediments, the P, which was easily desorbed due to the effect of hydrogen sulfide, was transformed into the Fe/Al bound P.

  4. BINDING OF THE RESPIRATORY CHAIN INHIBITOR ANTIMYCIN TO THE MITOCHONDRIAL bc1 COMPLEX: A NEW CRYSTAL STRUCTURE REVEALS AN ALTERED INTRAMOLECULAR HYDROGEN-BONDING PATTERN.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2006-01-01

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex. Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicylamide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28 Å resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the αA helix. PMID:16024040

  5. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  6. Binding of hydrocarbons and other extremely weak ligands to transition metal complexes that coordinate hydrogen: Investigation of cis-interactions and delocalized bonding involving sigma bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J.; Luo, X.L.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the forefront of chemistry are efforts to catalytically transform the inert C-H bonds in alkanes to more useful products using metal compounds. The goal is to observe binding and cleavage of alkane C-H bonds on metals or to use related silane Si-H bonding as models, analogous to the discovery of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) binding to metals. Studies of these unique sigma complexes (M{hor_ellipsis}H-Y; Y{double_bond}H, Si, C) will aid in developing new catalysts or technologies relevant to DOE interest, e.g., new methods for tritium isotope separation. Several transition metals (Mo, W, Mn, and Pt) were found to reversibly bind and cleave H{sub 2}, silanes, and halocarbons. The first metal-SiH{sub 4} complexes, thus serving as a model for methane reactions. A second goal is to study the dynamics and energetics of H-Y bonds on metals by neutron scattering, and evidence for interactions between bound H-Y and nearby H atoms on metal complexes has been found.

  7. Sensory and Cognitive Effects of Acute Exposure to Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Nancy; Kipen, Howard; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Zhang, Junfeng; Weisel, Clifford; Laumbach, Robert; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Olejeme, Kelechi; Lioy, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background Some epidemiologic studies have reported compromised cognitive and sensory performance among individuals exposed to low concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Objectives We hypothesized a dose–response increase in symptom severity and reduction in sensory and cognitive performance in response to controlled H2S exposures. Methods In separate exposure sessions administered in random order over three consecutive weeks, 74 healthy subjects [35 females, 39 males; mean age (± SD) = 24.7 ± 4.2; mean years of education = 16.5 ± 2.4], were exposed to 0.05, 0.5, and 5 ppm H2S. During each exposure session, subjects completed ratings and tests before H2S exposure (baseline) and during the final hour of the 2-hr exposure period. Results Dose–response reduction in air quality and increases in ratings of odor intensity, irritation, and unpleasantness were observed. Total symptom severity was not significantly elevated across any exposure condition, but anxiety symptoms were significantly greater in the 5-ppm than in the 0.05-ppm condition. No dose–response effect was observed for sensory or cognitive measures. Verbal learning was compromised during each exposure condition. Conclusions Although some symptoms increased with exposure, the magnitude of these changes was relatively minor. Increased anxiety was significantly related to ratings of irritation due to odor. Whether the effect on verbal learning represents a threshold effect of H2S or an effect due to fatigue across exposure requires further investigation. These acute effects in a healthy sample cannot be directly generalized to communities where individuals have other health conditions and concomitant exposures. PMID:18197303

  8. EFFECTS OF SOG ON DPP-RECEPTOR BINDING*

    PubMed Central

    LOU, YUAN; NIE, QING; WAN, FREDERIC Y. M.

    2007-01-01

    Concentration gradients of morphogens are known to be instrumental in cell signaling and tissue patterning. Of interest here is how the presence of a competitor of BMP ligands affects cell signaling. The effects of Sog on the binding of Dpp with cell receptors are analyzed for dorsal-ventral morphogen gradient formation in vertebrate and Drosophila embryos. This prototype system includes diffusing ligands, degradation of morphogens, and cleavage of Dpp-Sog complexes by Tolloid to free up Dpp. Simple and biologically meaningful necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a steady state gradient configuration are established, and existence theorems are proved. For high Sog production rates (relative to the Dpp production rate), it is found that the steady state configuration exhibits a more intense Dpp-receptor concentration near the dorsal midline. Numerical simulations of the evolution of the system show that, beyond some threshold Sog production rate, the transient Dpp-receptor concentration at the dorsal midline would become more intense than that of the steady state, before subsiding and approaching a nonuniform steady state of lower magnitude. The magnitude of the transient concentration has been found to increase by several fold with increasing Sog production rate. The highly intense Dpp activity at and around the dorsal midline is consistent with available experimental observations and other analytical studies. PMID:17377624

  9. Effect of thermal nonequilibrium on reactions in hydrogen combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, S.; Raman, V.; Varghese, P. L.

    2016-09-01

    The presence of shocks in scramjet internal flows introduces nonequilibrium of internal energy modes of the molecules. Here, the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on key reactions of hydrogen-air combustion is studied. A quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) approach is used to derive reaction probability for nonequilibrium conditions using ab initio-derived potential energy surfaces. The reaction rates under nonequilibrium are studied using a two-temperature description, where the vibrational modes are assumed to be distributed according to a Boltzmann distribution at a characteristic vibrational temperature, in addition to a translational temperature describing the translational and rotational population distribution. At scramjet-relevant conditions, it is found that the nonequilibrium reaction rate depends not only on the level of vibrational excitation, but also on the reactants involved. Conventional two-temperature models for reaction rates, often derived using empirical means, were found to be inaccurate under these conditions, and modified parameters are proposed based on the QCT calculations. It is also found that models that include details of the reaction process through dissociation energy, for instance, provide a better description of nonequilibrium effects.

  10. Computational Investigation of Glycosylation Effects on a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. B.; Talib, M. F.; McCabe, C.; Bu, L.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-27

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are ubiquitous components of glycoside hydrolases, which degrade polysaccharides in nature. CBMs target specific polysaccharides, and CBM binding affinity to cellulose is known to be proportional to cellulase activity, such that increasing binding affinity is an important component of performance improvement. To ascertain the impact of protein and glycan engineering on CBM binding, we use molecular simulation to quantify cellulose binding of a natively glycosylated Family 1 CBM. To validate our approach, we first examine aromatic-carbohydrate interactions on binding, and our predictions are consistent with previous experiments, showing that a tyrosine to tryptophan mutation yields a 2-fold improvement in binding affinity. We then demonstrate that enhanced binding of 3-6-fold over a nonglycosylated CBM is achieved by the addition of a single, native mannose or a mannose dimer, respectively, which has not been considered previously. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a single, artificial glycan on the anterior of the CBM, with the native, posterior glycans also present, can have a dramatic impact on binding affinity in our model, increasing it up to 140-fold relative to the nonglycosylated CBM. These results suggest new directions in protein engineering, in that modifying glycosylation patterns via heterologous expression, manipulation of culture conditions, or introduction of artificial glycosylation sites, can alter CBM binding affinity to carbohydrates and may thus be a general strategy to enhance cellulase performance. Our results also suggest that CBM binding studies should consider the effects of glycosylation on binding and function.

  11. Computational Investigation of Glycosylation Effects on a Family 1 Carbohydrate-binding Module*

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Courtney B.; Talib, M. Faiz; McCabe, Clare; Bu, Lintao; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are ubiquitous components of glycoside hydrolases, which degrade polysaccharides in nature. CBMs target specific polysaccharides, and CBM binding affinity to cellulose is known to be proportional to cellulase activity, such that increasing binding affinity is an important component of performance improvement. To ascertain the impact of protein and glycan engineering on CBM binding, we use molecular simulation to quantify cellulose binding of a natively glycosylated Family 1 CBM. To validate our approach, we first examine aromatic-carbohydrate interactions on binding, and our predictions are consistent with previous experiments, showing that a tyrosine to tryptophan mutation yields a 2-fold improvement in binding affinity. We then demonstrate that enhanced binding of 3–6-fold over a nonglycosylated CBM is achieved by the addition of a single, native mannose or a mannose dimer, respectively, which has not been considered previously. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a single, artificial glycan on the anterior of the CBM, with the native, posterior glycans also present, can have a dramatic impact on binding affinity in our model, increasing it up to 140-fold relative to the nonglycosylated CBM. These results suggest new directions in protein engineering, in that modifying glycosylation patterns via heterologous expression, manipulation of culture conditions, or introduction of artificial glycosylation sites, can alter CBM binding affinity to carbohydrates and may thus be a general strategy to enhance cellulase performance. Our results also suggest that CBM binding studies should consider the effects of glycosylation on binding and function. PMID:22147693

  12. Chelate effects in sulfate binding by amide/urea-based ligands.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuandong; Wang, Qi-Qiang; Begum, Rowshan Ara; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2015-07-01

    The influence of chelate and mini-chelate effects on sulfate binding was explored for six amide-, amide/amine-, urea-, and urea/amine-based ligands. Two of the urea-based hosts were selective for SO4(2-) in water-mixed DMSO-d6 systems. Results indicated that the mini-chelate effect provided by a single urea group with two NH binding sites appears to provide enhanced binding over two amide groups. Furthermore, additional urea binding sites incorporated into the host framework appeared to overcome to some extent competing hydration effects with increasing water content.

  13. The effect of ammonia upon the electrocatalysis of hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction on polycrystalline platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaguer-Casadevall, Arnau; Hernandez-Fernandez, Patricia; Stephens, Ifan E. L.; Chorkendorff, Ib; Dahl, Søren

    2012-12-01

    The influence of ammonium ions on the catalysis of hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction is studied by means of rotating ring-disk electrode experiments on polycrystalline platinum in perchloric acid. While ammonium does not affect the hydrogen oxidation reaction, the oxygen reduction reaction is severely poisoned. Poisoning at the cathode explains the majority of the losses observed in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells contaminated with ammonia. Voltammetry in deaerated solution suggest that the poisoning can be attributed to either ammonium oxidation or increased binding to OH species.

  14. Binding isotope effects as a tool for distinguishing hydrophobic and hydrophilic binding sites of HIV-1 RT.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Agnieszka; Paneth, Piotr; Moliner, Vicent; Świderek, Katarzyna

    2015-01-22

    The current treatment for HIV-1 infected patients consists of a cocktail of inhibitors, in an attempt to improve the potency of the drugs by adding the possible effects of each supplied compound. In this contribution, nine different inhibitors of HIV-1 RT, one of the three key proteins responsible for the virus replication, have been selected to develop and test a computational protocol that allows getting a deep insight into the inhibitors' binding mechanism. The interaction between the inhibitors and the protein have been quantified by computing binding free energies through FEP calculations, while a more detailed characterization of the kind of inhibitor-protein interactions is based on frequency analysis of the ligands in the initial and final state, i.e. in solution and binding the protein. QM/MM calculation of heavy atoms ((13)C, (15)N, and (18)O) binding isotope effects (BIE) have been used to identify the binding sites of the different inhibitors. Specific interactions between the isotopically labeled atoms of the inhibitors and polar residues and magnesium cations on the hydrophilic pocket of the protein are responsible for the frequencies shifting that can be detected when comparing the IR spectra of the compounds in solution and in the protein. On the contrary, it seems that changes in vdW interactions from solution to the final state when the ligand is interacting with residues of the hydrophobic cavity, does not influence frequency modes and then no BIE are observed. Our results suggest that a proper computational protocol can be a valuable tool which in turn can be used to increase the efficiency of anti AIDS drugs.

  15. Hydrogen Effects on GaAs Device Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayali, Sammy A.

    1996-01-01

    GaAs and InP devices in hermetically sealed packages have been observed to exhibit unacceptable degradation in both RF and DC characteristics. This degradation has been observed to occur at temperatures as low as 125oC. The source of the degradation has been linked to hydrogen gas that has been absorbed in the package's metals (Kovar, plating, etc.) and converted into atomic hydrogen within the Pt or Pd metallization of the gate structure. Subsequently, atomic hydrogen diffuses into the channel region of the FET structure and neutralizes the Si donors, resulting in a degradation of the device characteristics.

  16. Effect of microsolvation on hydrogen trapping potential of metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ranjita; Bandaru, Sateesh; D'mello, Viola Caroline; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2013-03-01

    A thorough analysis is carried out to understand how the microsolvation affects the hydrogen adsorbing capacity of metal ions in the presence as well as absence of the counter ions. Calculations are done at different levels of theory by using different functionals and basis sets and also by using the BSSE correction. The Be2+ ion doped systems exhibit stronger interaction with the hydrogen molecule than the other metal doped systems. The extent of interaction is less affected by the method of computation. The reaction free energy values imply that adsorption on alkaline earth metal doped systems is spontaneous at room temperature. Interaction energies are favorable for hydrogen adsorption on the systems containing alkaline earth metal ions and the gravimetric density of adsorbed hydrogen molecule is more in those containing the alkali metal ions.

  17. Effect of ethanol administration and withdrawal on GABA receptor binding in rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Volicer, L.; Biagioni, T.M.

    1982-01-01

    Sodium independent GABA receptor binding was measured in synaptosomes prepared from cerebral cortex of rats made ethanol dependent by three daily ethanol administrations. In rats sacrificed 1 hour after the last ethanol dose there was a lower number of low affinity binding sites and lower affinity of the high affinity binding than in controls. The decreased affinity was present only in rats who showed symptoms of ethanol withdrawal during the course of ethanol administration. In rats sacrificed during ethanol withdrawal the affinity of the high affinity binding was lower than in controls and other binding characteristics were unchanged. This decreased binding was normalized by repeated Triton X-100 incubations indicating involvement of an endogenous inhibitor in this ethanol effect. Acute ethanol administration did not change GABA receptor binding.

  18. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao-xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP. PMID:27115738

  19. Effects of hydrogen isotopes in the irradiation damage of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M. Z.; Liu, P. P.; Zhu, Y. M.; Wan, F. R.; He, Z. B.; Zhan, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The isotope effect of hydrogen in irradiation damage plays an important role in the development of reduced activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels in nuclear reactors. The evolutions of microstructures and mechanical properties of China low active martensitic (CLAM) steel subjected to hydrogen and deuterium ions irradiation are studied comparatively. Under the same irradiation conditions, larger size and smaller density of dislocation loops are generated by deuterium ion than by hydrogen ion. Irradiation hardening occurs under the ion irradiation and the hardening induced by hydrogen ion is higher than by deuterium ion. Moreover, the coarsening of M23C6 precipitates is observed, which can be explained by the solute drag mechanisms. It turns out that the coarsening induced by deuterium ion irradiation is more distinct than by hydrogen ion irradiation. No distinct variations for the compositions of M23C6 precipitates are found by a large number of statistical data after hydrogen isotopes irradiation.

  20. Effects of microstructure banding on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth in X65 pipeline steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ronevich, Joseph A.; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Chris W.

    2015-09-10

    Banded ferrite-pearlite X65 pipeline steel was tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to evaluate the effects of oriented pearlite on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth. Test specimens were oriented in the steel pipe such that cracks propagated either parallel or perpendicular to the banded pearlite. The ferrite-pearlite microstructure exhibited orientation dependent behavior in which fatigue crack growth rates were significantly lower for cracks oriented perpendicular to the banded pearlite compared to cracks oriented parallel to the bands. Thus the reduction of hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth across the banded pearlite is attributed to a combination of crack-tip branching and impeded hydrogen diffusion across the banded pearlite.

  1. Effect of pH on the Structure and DNA Binding of the FOXP2 Forkhead Domain.

    PubMed

    Blane, Ashleigh; Fanucchi, Sylvia

    2015-06-30

    Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) is a transcription factor expressed in cardiovascular, intestinal, and neural tissues during embryonic development and is implicated in language development. FOXP2 like other FOX proteins contains a DNA binding domain known as the forkhead domain (FHD). The FHD interacts with DNA by inserting helix 3 into the major groove. One of these DNA-protein interactions is a direct hydrogen bond that is formed with His554. FOXP2 is localized in the nuclear compartment that has a pH of 7.5. Histidine contains an imidazole side chain in which the amino group typically has a pKa of ~6.5. It seems possible that pH fluctuations around 6.5 may result in changes in the protonation state of His554 and thus the ability of the FOXP2 FHD to bind DNA. To investigate the effect of pH on the FHD, both the structure and the binding affinity were studied in the pH range of 5-9. This was done in the presence and absence of DNA. The structure was assessed using size exclusion chromatography, far-UV circular dichroism, and intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence. The results indicated that while pH did not affect the secondary structure in the presence or absence of DNA, the tertiary structure was pH sensitive and the protein was less compact at low pH. Furthermore, the presence of DNA caused the protein to become more compact at low pH and also had the potential to increase the dimerization propensity. Fluorescence anisotropy was used to investigate the effect of pH on the FOXP2 FHD DNA binding affinity. It was found that pH had a direct effect on binding affinity. This was attributed to the altered hydrogen bonding patterns upon protonation or deprotonation of His554. These results could implicate pH as a means of regulating transcription by the FOXP2 FHD, which may also have repercussions for the behavior of this protein in cancer cells.

  2. Effects of volatile fatty acids on a thermophilic anaerobic hydrogen fermentation process degrading peptone.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S S; Chang, S M; Chen, S T

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen fermentation using glucose as a single substrate caused abrupt pH drops and the gradual losses of hydrogen producers, which in turn led to system failure. In this study the use of a proteinaceous substrate, peptone, avoided the abrupt pH drops in the reactive system and allowed for further exploration of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and pH effects on the hydrogen fermentation process. Our results showed that: (1) during the hydrogen fermentation tests, the abrupt pH drops were avoided thus system stability increased due to the production of ammonia from the peptone fermented, (2) pH control was not necessary and the addition of acetate to the process had little effect on the hydrogen fermentation process, (3) at the extreme pHs the addition of acetate either lengthened the lag phase (pH < or = 6) or slowed the hydrogen production rate (pH > or = 8), and both situations were not desired, and (4) high VFA content in the system sped up the consumption of hydrogen gas. Results of this study suggested that the hydrogen fermentation using the protein-containing substances as substrate was beneficial in maintaining the system pH. As long as the pH was maintained around 6-8, system inhibition due to VFAs accumulation was minimized. Thus, the optimal operation of a hydrogen fermentation process would be achievable via the control of substrate composition at a certain carbohydrate-to-protein ratio.

  3. Synergetic effects in novel hydrogenated F-doped TiO2 photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsudin, Emy Marlina; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee; Juan, Joon Ching; Basirun, Wan Jefrey; Centi, Gabriele

    2016-05-01

    The synergistic effect between fluorine and hydrogen in hydrogenated F-doped TiO2 photocatalysts is evaluated for the photocatalytic degradation of atrazine. The interaction between fluorine and hydrogen species in hydrogenated F-doped TiO2 overcomes the limitations of individual F-doped TiO2 and hydrogenated TiO2 photocatalyst properties. Hydrogenated F-doped TiO2 is photo-active under UV, visible and infrared light illumination with efficient electrons and holes separations. The optimized concentration of surface vacancies and Ti3+ centers coupled with enhanced surface hydrophilicity facilitates the production of surface-bound and free hydroxyl radicals. The surface of the catalyst contains dbnd Tisbnd F, dbnd Tisbnd OH, dbnd Tisbnd Ovacancy and dbnd Tisbnd H bonds as evidenced by XPS, Raman, FTIR and HR-TEM analysis. This combination also triggers the formation of new Ti3+ occupied states under the conduction band of hydrogenated F-doped TiO2. Moreover, the change in the pore structure from cylindrical to slits and larger surface area facilitates surface charge interactions. The thermal stability is also enhanced and a single anatase phase is obtained. The size of the particles of hydrogenated F-doped TiO2 is also uniform with defined and homogeneous crystal structure. This synergetic effect between fluorine and hydrogen opens up new alternatives in improving the properties of TiO2 and its photocatalytic activity.

  4. Binding energy effects in cascade evolution and sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    The MARLOWE model was extended to include a binding energy dependent on the local crystalline order, so that atoms are bound less strongly to their lattice sites near surfaces or associated damage. Sputtering and cascade evolution were studied on the examples of self-ion irradiations of Cu and Au monocrystals. In cascades, the mean binding energy is reduced {approximately}8% in Cu with little dependence on the initial recoil energy; in Au, it is reduced {approximately}9% at 1 keV and {approximately}15% at 100 keV. In sputtering, the mean binding energy is reduced {approximately}8% in Cu and {approximately}15% in Au with little energy dependence; the yields are increased about half as much. Most sites from which sputtered atoms originate are isolated in both metals. Small clusters of such sites occur in Cu, but there are some large clusters in Au, especially in [111] targets. There are always more large clusters with damage-dependent binding than with a constant binding energy, but only a few clusters are compact enough to be regarded as pits.

  5. Lysozyme binding ability toward psychoactive stimulant drugs: Modulatory effect of colloidal metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sonu, Vikash K; Islam, Mullah Muhaiminul; Rohman, Mostofa Ataur; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2016-10-01

    The interaction and binding behavior of the well-known psychoactive stimulant drugs theophylline (THP) and theobromine (THB) with lysozyme (LYS) was monitored by in-vitro fluorescence titration and molecular docking calculations under physiological condition. The quenching of protein fluorescence on addition of the drugs is due to the formation of protein-drug complex in the ground state in both the cases. However, the binding interaction is almost three orders of magnitude stronger in THP, which involves mostly hydrogen bonding interaction in comparison with THB where hydrophobic binding plays the predominant role. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching (static type) remains same also in presence of gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs); however, the binding capacity of LYS with the drugs changes drastically in comparison with that in aqueous buffer medium. While the binding affinity of LYS to THB increases ca. 100 times in presence of both the NPs, it is seen to decrease drastically (by almost 1000 fold) for THP. This significant modulation in binding behavior indicates that the drug transportation capacity of LYS can be controlled significantly with the formation protein-NP noncovalent assembly system as an efficient delivery channel. PMID:27419646

  6. MP2 Study of Physisorption of Molecular Hydrogen onto Defective Nanotubes: Cooperative Effect in Stone-Wales Defects.

    PubMed

    Lugo, G; Cuesta, I G; Sánchez Marín, J; Sánchez de Merás, A

    2016-07-14

    We use large-scale MP2 calculations to investigate the physisorption of molecular hydrogen on (9,0) defective carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of C72H18. These large (supra)molecular systems are typically studied using conventional DFT methods, which do not describe well the van der Waals interactions responsible for this process. Here we use CCSD(T)-calibrated MP2 calculations to estimate binding energies by considering four defective structures (hydrogenated divacancy, octagon-pentagon, and two Stone-Wales defects). The largest physisorption energies for the nondefective CNT are for configurations in which H2 points toward the center of one ring. The computed interaction energies for defect-free CNT are in the range 5.7 to 5.9 kJ/mol, in good agreement with the experimental value of 5.98 kJ/mol. The defects introduced in the (9,0)-CNT increase the surface area of the nanotube, such that the largest surface in found in the 55-77 Stone-Wales defective CNT that furthermore is the most aromatic. Only that defect enlarges the physisorption binding energy, which can become >25% larger. Moreover, a cooperative effect in the adsorption of H2 not appearing in the regular structure is found. PMID:27045203

  7. Specificity of acceptor binding to Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512F dextransucrase: binding and acceptor-product structure of alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside analogs modified at C-2, C-3, and C-4 by inversion of the hydroxyl and by replacement of the hydroxyl with hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Fu, D T; Slodki, M E; Robyt, J F

    1990-02-01

    The specificity of acceptor binding to the active site of dextransucrase was studied by using alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside analogs modified at C-2, C-3, and C-4 positions by (a) inversion of the hydroxyl group and (b) replacement of the hydroxyl group with hydrogen. 2-Deoxy-alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside was synthesized from 2-deoxyglucose; 3- and 4-deoxy-alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranosides were synthesized from alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside; and alpha-methyl-D-allopyranoside was synthesized from D-glucose. The analogs were incubated with [14C]sucrose and dextransucrase, and the products were separated by thin-layer chromatography and quantitated by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Structures of the acceptor products were determined by methylation analyses and optical rotation. The relative effectiveness of the acceptor analogs in decreasing order were 2-deoxy, 2-inverted, 3-deoxy, 3-inverted, 4-inverted, and 4-deoxy. The enzyme transfers D-glucopyranose to the C-6 hydroxyl of analogs modified at C-2 and C-3, to the C-4 hydroxyl of 4-inverted, and to the C-3 hydroxyl of 4-deoxy analogs of alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside. The data indicate that the hydroxyl group at C-2 is not as important for acceptor binding as the hydroxyl groups at C-3 and C-4. The hydroxyl group at C-4 is particularly important as it determines the binding orientation of the alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside ring.

  8. Quantum effects and anharmonicity in the H2-Li(+)-benzene complex: a model for hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Kolmann, Stephen J; D'Arcy, Jordan H; Jordan, Meredith J T

    2013-12-21

    Quantum and anharmonic effects are investigated in H2-Li(+)-benzene, a model for hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks and carbon-based materials. Three- and 8-dimensional quantum diffusion Monte Carlo (QDMC) and rigid-body diffusion Monte Carlo (RBDMC) simulations are performed on potential energy surfaces interpolated from electronic structure calculations at the M05-2X/6-31+G(d,p) and M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) levels of theory using a three-dimensional spline or a modified Shepard interpolation. These calculations investigate the intermolecular interactions in this system, with three- and 8-dimensional 0 K H2 binding enthalpy estimates, ΔH(bind) (0 K), being 16.5 kJ mol(-1) and 12.4 kJ mol(-1), respectively: 0.1 and 0.6 kJ mol(-1) higher than harmonic values. Zero-point energy effects are 35% of the value of ΔH(bind) (0 K) at M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) and cannot be neglected; uncorrected electronic binding energies overestimate ΔHbind (0 K) by at least 6 kJ mol(-1). Harmonic intermolecular binding enthalpies can be corrected by treating the H2 "helicopter" and "ferris wheel" rotations as free and hindered rotations, respectively. These simple corrections yield results within 2% of the 8-dimensional anharmonic calculations. Nuclear ground state probability density histograms obtained from the QDMC and RBDMC simulations indicate the H2 molecule is delocalized above the Li(+)-benzene system at 0 K.

  9. Effect of species, life stage, and water temperature on the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, J.J.; Schreier, T.M.; Howe, G.E.; Redman, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a drug of low regulatory priority status that is effective in treating fish and fish eggs infected by fungi. However, only limited information is available to guide fish culturists in administering hydrogen peroxide to diseased fish. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine (1) the sensitivity of brown trout Salmo trutta, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, walleye Stizostedion vitreum, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, and bluegill Lepomis, machrochirus to hydrogen peroxide treatments; (2) the sensitivity of various life stages of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to hydrogen peroxide treatments; and (3) the effect of water temperature on the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to three fish species. Fish were exposed to hydrogen peroxide concentrations ranging from 100 to 5,000 mu L/L (ppm) for 15-min or 45-min treatments every other day for four consecutive treatments to determine the sensitivity of various species and life stages of fish. Except for walleye, most species of fish tested (less than or equal to 2 g) tolerated hydrogen peroxide of 1,000 mu L/L or greater. Walleyes were sensitive to hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 100 mu L/L. A correlation was found between the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide and the life stages of rainbow trout; larger fish were more sensitive. Generally, the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide increased for all species as water temperature increased. The results of these experiments demonstrate that it is important to consider the effects of species, life stage, and water temperature when conducting hydrogen peroxide treatments.

  10. A density functional tight binding model with an extended basis set and three-body repulsion for hydrogen under extreme thermodynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sriram Goverapet; Goldman, Nir; Tamblyn, Isaac; Hamel, Sebastien; Gaus, Michael

    2014-07-24

    We present a new DFTB-p3b density functional tight binding model for hydrogen at extremely high pressures and temperatures, which includes a polarizable basis set (p) and a three-body environmentally dependent repulsive potential (3b). We find that use of an extended basis set is necessary under dissociated liquid conditions to account for the substantial p-orbital character of the electronic states around the Fermi energy. The repulsive energy is determined through comparison to cold curve pressures computed from density functional theory (DFT) for the hexagonal close-packed solid, as well as pressures from thermally equilibrated DFT-MD simulations of the liquid phase. In particular, we observe improved agreement in our DFTB-p3b model with previous theoretical and experimental results for the shock Hugoniot of hydrogen up to 100 GPa and 25000 K, compared to a standard DFTB model using pairwise interactions and an s-orbital basis set, only. The DFTB-p3b approach discussed here provides a general method to extend the DFTB method for a wide variety of materials over a significantly larger range of thermodynamic conditions than previously possible. PMID:24960065

  11. Hydrogen Effects in Prestrained Transformation Induced Plasticity Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronevich, J. A.; De Cooman, B. C.; Speer, J. G.; De Moor, E.; Matlock, D. K.

    2012-07-01

    Thermal desorption analysis (TDA) was performed on laboratory heat-treated transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with 14.5 pct retained austenite (RA), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 880 MPa, and elongation to failure of 33 pct. Samples were tensile prestrained 5 pct at 253 K (-20 °C), 296 K (23 °C), and 375 K (102 °C) to generate different amounts of deformation-induced martensite, 10.5, 5.5, and 0.5 pct, respectively, prior to cathodically charging to a hydrogen content of 1 to 2 ppm. TDA was performed on charged samples to determine the location and strength of hydrogen trapping sites. TDA results suggest that dislocations were the main trapping sites in prestrained TRIP steel. The TDA peak intensity increased with prestrain, suggesting that the quantity of hydrogen trap sites increased with deformation. Tensile tests were performed on the four hydrogen-charged TRIP steel conditions. As confirmed with transmission electron microscope images, samples with more homogeneous dislocation distributions ( i.e., prestrained at 375 K (102 °C)) exhibited greater resistance to hydrogen embrittlement than samples that included a high dislocation density adjacent to the formations of strain-induced martensite ( i.e., samples prestrained at 253 K (-20 °C) and 296 K (23 °C)).

  12. Effects of hydrogen on film structure and pitting susceptibility of nickel and 310 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y.M.; Chu, W.Y.; Qiao, L.J.; Yang, Q.; Luo, J.L.

    1998-12-31

    Effects of hydrogen on the pitting susceptibility of Ni and 310 stainless steel (SS) were investigated. The results showed that hydrogen changed p-type oxide of 310 SS to n-type while it did not change the p-type oxide of Ni. Hydrogen enhanced remarkably pitting susceptibility of 310 SS. No pitting occurred for over 6 days for the samples without precharged hydrogen in 6% FeCl{sub 3} solution at room temperature. For samples precharged with very small current density of 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, pitting occurred within 80 minutes. The pitting even occurred within 2 minutes for the charged samples with current density of 0.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Hydrogen decreased pitting incubation time, increased pitting initiation density and growth rate. Average pit diameter D increased linearly with logarithm of immersion time t, i.e., D = {alpha} ln(t) + {beta}, where {alpha} and {beta} are constants. The value of constant {alpha} increased with the rise of charging current density. Effect of hydrogen on the pitting of Ni was not so obvious as on 310 SS. The hydrogen interactions with defects both in surface film and metal were used to explain the hydrogen deleterious effects on the resistance to pitting corrosion.

  13. Allosteric Effects of Sodium Ion Binding on Activation of the M3 Muscarinic G-Protein-Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yinglong; Caliman, Alisha D.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important membrane proteins that mediate cellular signaling and represent primary targets for about one-third of currently marketed drugs. Recent x-ray crystallographic studies identified distinct conformations of GPCRs in the active and inactive states. An allosteric sodium ion was found bound to a highly conserved D2.50 residue in inactive GPCRs, whereas the D2.50 allosteric pocket became collapsed in active GPCR structures. However, the dynamic mechanisms underlying these observations remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to understand the mechanistic effects of sodium ion binding on dynamic activation of the M3 muscarinic GPCR through long-timescale accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations. Results showed that with the D2.50 residue deprotonated, the M3 receptor is bound by an allosteric sodium ion and confined mostly in the inactive state with remarkably reduced flexibility. In contrast, the D2.50-protonated receptor does not exhibit sodium ion binding to the D2.50 allosteric site and samples a significantly larger conformational space. The receptor activation is captured and characterized by large-scale structural rearrangements of the transmembrane helices via dynamic hydrogen bond and salt bridge interactions. The residue motions are highly correlated during receptor activation. Further network analysis revealed that the allosteric signaling between residue D2.50 and key residues in the intracellular, extracellular, and orthosteric pockets is significantly weakened upon sodium ion binding. PMID:25863070

  14. Inhibitory effect of midkine-binding peptide on tumor proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui-Lian; Shen, Jian-Fen; Min, Li-Shan; Ping, Jin-Liang; Lu, Yong-Liang; Dai, Li-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the inhibitory effect of midkine-binding peptides on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) proliferation and angiogenesis of xenograft tumor. Methods: The midkine-binding peptides were panned by Ph.D.-7™ Phage Display Peptide Library Kit, and the specific binding activities of positive clones to target protein were examined by phage ELISA. The effect of midkine-binding peptides on proliferation of HUVECs was confirmed by MTT test. The xenograft tumor model was formed in BALB/c mice with the murine hepatocarcinoma cells H22 (H22). Microvessel density (MVD) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry of factor VIII staining. Results: Midkine-binding peptides have the inhibitory effects on tumor angiogenesis, a proliferation assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) indicated that particular midkine-binding peptides significantly inhibited the proliferation of the HUVECs. Midkine-binding peptides were also observed to efficiently suppress angiogenesis induced by murine hepatocarcinoma H22 cells in BALB/c nude mice. Conclusion: The midkine-binding peptides can inhibit solid tumor growth by retarding the formation of new blood vessels. The results indicate that midkine-binding peptides may represent potent anti-angiogenesis agents in vivo. PMID:26191241

  15. Effective hydrogen generation and resource circulation based on sulfur cycle system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Mabuchi, Takashi; Hayashi, Tsugumi; Yokoyama, Shun; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2013-12-10

    For the effective hydrogen generation from H{sub 2}S, it should be compatible that the increscent of the photocatalytic (or electrochemical) activities and the development of effective utilization method of by-products (poly sulfide ion). In this study, “system integration” to construct the sulfur cycle system, which is compatible with the increscent of the hydrogen and or electron energy generation ratio and resource circulation, is investigated. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation rate can be enhanced by using stratified photocatalysts. Photo excited electron can be transpired to electrode to convert the electron energy to hydrogen energy. Poly sulfide ion as the by-products can be transferred into elemental sulfur and/or industrial materials such as rubber. Moreover, elemental sulfur can be transferred into H{sub 2}S which is the original materials for hydrogen generation. By using this “system integration”, the sulfur cycle system for the new energy generation can be constructed.

  16. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Coral Photosynthesis and Calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, T.; Fujimura, H.; Arakaki, T.; Oomori, T.

    2007-12-01

    The widely-observed decline of coral reefs is considered to be caused by changes in the environment by natural and anthropogenic activities. As one important factor, the run-off of various matters from human activities to the coastal seawater poses stresses to the corals by degrading the quality of the seawater. In Okinawa, Japan, red- soil running off from the developed land has been a major environmental issue since 1980s. Hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), a strong active oxygen species, is one of the photochemically formed chemicals in the red-soil-polluted seawater. Recent photochemical studies of seawater showed that HOOH photo-formation was faster in the red- soil-polluted seawater than clean seawater. We studied the effects of HOOH on corals by studying the changes in coral carbon metabolisms such as photosynthesis and calcification, which are indicators of the physiological state of a coral colony. The corals were exposed to various concentrations of HOOH (0, 0.3, 3 μM). Two massive coral species of Porites sp. and Goniastrea aspera and one branch coral of Galaxea facicularis were used for the exposure experiments. The control experiments showed that when no HOOH was added, metabolisms of each coral colony were relatively stable. On the other hand, when HOOH was added to the seawater, we observed obvious changes in the coral metabolisms in all the coral species. When 0.3 μM HOOH was added, photosynthesis decreased by 14% and calcification decreased by 17% within 3 days, compared with the control. When 3 μM HOOH was added, photosynthesis decreased by 21% and calcification decreased by 41% within 3 days, compared with the control. Our study showed that higher concentrations of HOOH posed more stress to the coral colonies.

  17. Molecular hydrogen: An inert gas turns clinically effective.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2015-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) appeared as an experimental agent in biomedicine approximately 40 years ago, yet the past 5 years seem to confirm its medicinal value in the clinical environment. H2 improves clinical end-points and surrogate markers in several clinical trials, from metabolic diseases to chronic systemic inflammatory disorders to cancer. However, less information is available concerning its medicinal properties, such as dosage and administration, or adverse reactions and use in specific populations. The present paper overviews the clinical relevance of molecular hydrogen, and summarizes data from clinical trials on this innovative medical agent. Clinical profiles of H2 provide evidence-based direction for practical application and future research on molecular hydrogen for the wider health care community.

  18. Molecular hydrogen: An inert gas turns clinically effective.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2015-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) appeared as an experimental agent in biomedicine approximately 40 years ago, yet the past 5 years seem to confirm its medicinal value in the clinical environment. H2 improves clinical end-points and surrogate markers in several clinical trials, from metabolic diseases to chronic systemic inflammatory disorders to cancer. However, less information is available concerning its medicinal properties, such as dosage and administration, or adverse reactions and use in specific populations. The present paper overviews the clinical relevance of molecular hydrogen, and summarizes data from clinical trials on this innovative medical agent. Clinical profiles of H2 provide evidence-based direction for practical application and future research on molecular hydrogen for the wider health care community. PMID:25936365

  19. The effect of hydrogen on the deformation behavior of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walston, W. S.; Thompson, A. W.; Bernstein, I. M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the tensile deformation behavior of PWA 1480 is presented. Tensile tests were interrupted at different plastic strain levels to observe the development of the dislocation structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) foils were cut perpendicular to the tensile axis to allow the deformation of both phases to be simultaneously observed as well as parallel to zone axes (III) to show the superdislocations on their slip planes. Similar to other nickel-base superalloys, hydrogen was detrimental to the room temperature tensile properties of PWA 1480. There was little effect on strength, however the material was severely embrittled. Even without hydrogen, the elongation-to-failure was only approximately 3 percent. The tensile fracture surface was made up primarily of ductile voids with regions of cleavage fracture. These cleavage facets are the eutectic (gamma') in the microstructure. It was shown by quantitative fractography that hydrogen embrittles the eutectic (gamma') and causes the crack path to seek out and fracture through the eutectic (gamma'). There was two to three times the amount of cleavage on the fracture surface of the hydrogen-charged samples than on the surface of the uncharged samples. The effect of hydrogen can also be seen in the dislocation structure. There is a marked tendency for dislocation trapping in the gamma matrix with and without hydrogen at all plastic strain levels. Without hydrogen there is a high dislocation density in the gamma matrix leading to strain exhaustion in this region and failure through the matrix. The dislocation structure at failure with hydrogen is slightly different. The TEM foils cut parallel to zone axes (III) showed dislocations wrapping around gamma precipitates. Zone axes (001) foils show that there is a lower dislocation density in the gamma matrix which can be linked to the effects of hydrogen on the fracture behavior. The primary activity in the gamma precipitates is in the form of

  20. The effect of melanin on iron associated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Pilas, B; Sarna, T; Kalyanaraman, B; Swartz, H M

    1988-01-01

    The effects of melanin on the iron-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to hydroxyl radicals and hydroxyl ions have been studied using electron spin resonance, spin trapping and visible light spectrophotometry. Melanin altered these reactions by several different mechanisms and consequently, depending on conditions, can significantly increase or decrease the yield of reactive products, including hydroxyl radicals. For low concentrations of ferrous ions, melanin decreased the yield of hydroxyl radicals due to binding of ferrous ions by melanin; ferrous ions bound to melanin did not decompose H2O2 efficiently. Melanins increased the rate of hydroxyl radical production if the predominant form of iron was ferric, due to the ability of melanin to reduce ferric to ferrous iron. Hydroxyl radical production in the presence of a strong chelator (e.g. EDTA) and melanin was greater than in the presence of a weak chelator (e.g. ADP) and melanin. Melanin also increased the rate of destruction of the DMPO-OH adduct. PMID:2834276

  1. The effect of chronic ethanol on glutamate binding in human and rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, J.T.; Sack, M.; von Hungen, K. Univ. of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles )

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic techniques demonstrate that chronic alcohol administration causes a decrease in ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding to hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. A 14% decrease in ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding in the hippocampal CA{sub 1} region is seen both in the rat after five days of ethanol administration and in postmortem hippocampal tissues from alcoholics. In the rat, 24 hr ethanol withdrawal values are intermediate between control and alcohol binding levels. There was no significant effect of ethanol on ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding in the cortex or caudate.

  2. The effect of antenatal dexamethasone on maternal and fetal retinol-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hustead, V A; Zachman, R D

    1986-01-01

    Sixteen rhesus monkeys received 0.1 to 15 mg/kg of antenatal dexamethasone at 132 days' gestation; seven control animals received placebo. At 135 days' gestation they underwent cesarean section, and maternal and fetal serum was assayed for retinol-binding protein. Fetal and maternal concentrations of retinol-binding protein increased after dexamethasone (p less than 0.05) and there was a trend for fetal levels of retinol-binding protein to increase with increasing dosage (p less than 0.01). Whether the elevation of retinol-binding protein in response to antenatal dexamethasone is a desirable side effect is not clear at this time. PMID:3946495

  3. Metal ion binding with carbon nanotubes and graphene: Effect of chirality and curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umadevi, Deivasigamani; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2012-10-01

    First principles calculations have been used to comprehensively study the binding of a series alkali (Li+, Na+, K+) and alkaline earth (Be2+, Mg2+, Ca2+) metal ions with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. It is interesting to note that the mono-cationic systems prefer binding to armchair CNTs over zigzag CNTs, while the preference for the di-cationic systems is exactly opposite. We have also observed significant changes in the HOMO-LUMO energy gap of the CNTs on metal ion binding and these results indicate that the fine tuning of energy gap of the CNTs can be effected through metal ion binding.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress disrupts calcium binding on calmodulin: More evidence for oxidative stress in vitiligo

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, K.U. . E-mail: k.schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, N.C.J.; Zothner, C.; Abou Elloof, M.M.; Wood, J.M.

    2007-08-17

    Patients with acute vitiligo have low epidermal catalase expression/activities and accumulate 10{sup -3} M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. One consequence of this severe oxidative stress is an altered calcium homeostasis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Here, we show decreased epidermal calmodulin expression in acute vitiligo. Since 10{sup -3}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidises methionine and tryptophan residues in proteins, we examined calcium binding to calmodulin in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} utilising {sup 45}calcium. The results showed that all four calcium atoms exchanged per molecule of calmodulin. Since oxidised calmodulin looses its ability to activate calcium ATPase, enzyme activities were followed in full skin biopsies from lesional skin of patients with acute vitiligo (n = 6) and healthy controls (n = 6). The results yielded a 4-fold decrease of ATPase activities in the patients. Computer simulation of native and oxidised calmodulin confirmed the loss of all four calcium ions from their specific EF-hand domains. Taken together H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation affects calcium binding in calmodulin leading to perturbed calcium homeostasis and perturbed L-phenylalanine-uptake in the epidermis of acute vitiligo.

  5. Binding of hydrogen-citrate to photoactive yellow protein is affected by the structural changes related to signaling state formation.

    PubMed

    Hospes, Marijke; Ippel, Johannes H; Boelens, Rolf; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Hendriks, Johnny

    2012-11-01

    The tricarboxylic acid citric acid is a key intermediary metabolite in organisms from all domains of the tree of life. Surprisingly, this metabolite specifically interacts with the light-induced signaling state of the photoactive yellow protein (PYP), such that, at 30 mM, it retards recovery of this state to the stable ground state of the protein with up to 30%, in the range from pH 4.5 to pH 7. We have performed a detailed UV/vis spectroscopic study of the recovery of the signaling state of wild type (WT) PYP and two mutants, H108F and Δ25-PYP, derived from this protein, as a function of pH and the concentration of citric acid. This revealed that it is the dianionic form of citric acid that binds to the pB state of PYP. Its binding site is located in between the N-terminal cap and central β-sheet of PYP, which is accessible only in the signaling state of the protein. The obtained results show how changes in the distribution of subspecies of the signaling state of PYP influence the rate of ground state recovery.

  6. Metal replacement in "zinc finger" and its effect on DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Predki, P F; Sarkar, B

    1994-01-01

    Metal replacement studies were used to investigate the metal requirement of a bacterially expressed polypeptide encoding the zinc finger DNA binding domain of the estrogen receptor. Apopolypeptide was generated by dialysis of native polypeptide against low-pH buffer under reducing conditions. Specific DNA binding can be restored by refolding the apopolypeptide in the presence of ionic zinc, cadmium, or cobalt. However, refolding in the presence of copper or nickel fails to regenerate DNA binding activity. While cobalt-reconstituted polypeptide has a reduced affinity for its AGGTCA-binding site compared to zinc- or cadmium-polypeptide, it has the surprising property of increased cooperative DNA binding. Our work indicates that metal substitution results in a range of effects upon DNA binding in vitro. The potential biological significance of metal substitution in vivo is discussed. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:7843097

  7. Effects of membrane physical parameters on hematoporphyrin-derivative binding to liposomes: a spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, E.; Malik, Z.; Ehrenberg, B.

    1987-01-01

    Physical parameters of membrane bilayers were studied for their effect on the binding of hematoporphyrin derivative (Hpd), which is used as a sensitizer in photodynamic therapy of cancerous tissues. The purpose of this study was to clarify which parameters were relevant, under physiological conditions, to the selectivity of Hpd binding to cancer cells. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the relative partitioning of the dye between the lipid and aqueous media. Increasing the microviscosity of the liposomes' membranes by various bilayer additives results in a strong reduction of Hpd binding, to an extent independent of the specific additive. The effect of temperature near the physiological value as well as the effect of cross membrane potential are small. Surface potential does not affect the binding constant, indicating that the binding species does not carry a net electric charge.

  8. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-04-29

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the reusltant hydrogen.

  9. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, Larry A.; Mead, Keith E.; Smith, Henry M.

    1983-01-01

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  10. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, L.A.; Mead, K.E.; Smith, H.M.

    1983-09-20

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (1) a solid acetylenic compound and (2) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  11. On quantum effects on the surface of solid hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, V. I.

    2013-10-15

    The low-frequency spectrum of hypothetical superfluidity on the free surface of a quantum crystal of hydrogen is determined. In the quantum-rough state of the surface, crystallization waves with a quadratic spectrum should propagate. In the atomically smooth state, the spectrum is linear. Crystallization waves propagating along elementary steps are also considered.

  12. Effect of water on hydrogen permeability. [Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulligan, D. D.; Tomazic, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    Doping of hydrogen with CO or CO2 was developed to reduce hydrogen permeation in Stirling engines by forming low permeability oxide coatings in the heater tubes. An end product of this process is water - which can condense in the cold parts of the engine system. If the water vapor is reduced to a low enough level, the hydrogen can reduce the oxide coating resulting in increased permeability. The equilibrium level of water (oxygen bearing gas) required to avoid reduction of the oxide coating was investigated. Results at 720 C and 13.8 MPa have shown that: (1) pure hydrogen will reduce the coating; (2) 500 ppm CO (500 ppm water equivalent) does not prevent the reduction; and (3) 500 ppm CO2 (1000 ppm water) appears to be close to the equilibrium level. Further tests are planned to define the equilibrium level more precisely and to extend the data to 820 C and 3.4, 6.9, and 13.8 MPa.

  13. Palmitate uptake by hepatocyte monolayers. Effect of albumin binding.

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, A B; Shurmantine, W O; Luxon, B A; Forker, E L

    1986-01-01

    The uptake of 14C-palmitate by rat liver cell monolayers is depressed by binding of the fatty acid to albumin. When the uptake flux is divided by the concentration of free palmitate in the bathing medium, however, the resulting clearance is approximately 14 times greater in the presence of albumin than in its absence. These findings are not accounted for by the different diffusion rates of free and bound palmitate across an unstirred fluid layer, nor attributable to nonequilibrium binding. Instead we argue that the most plausible explanation is accelerated dissociation of albumin-palmitate complexes mediated by the cell surface--an interpretation that also explains the uptake kinetics of other albumin-bound organic anions by perfused rat liver. Images PMID:3949983

  14. The Effect of Atmospheric Hydrogen on the Albedo and Surface Temperature of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallack, Nicole Lisa; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Ramirez, Ramses

    2016-01-01

    The presence of hydrogen in planetary atmospheres has been shown to have the potential to dramatically effect the temperatures of planets. The collision-induced absorption (CIA) of hydrogen with carbon dioxide or nitrogen has been shown to have a substantial effect on the atmospheric temperature and albedo of a planet, possibly to the point at which life could exist on a planet where without such CIA the planet would be too cold. Using a single-column radiative-convective climate model, we investigated the effect of the presence of hydrogen on planetary temperatures and albedos across different amounts of hydrogen and across host stars of different temperatures using present-day Mars-like planets. We found that the addition of hydrogen in a planet's atmosphere increased the surface temperature of the planet. This effect was stronger for the planets orbiting hotter stars. The water vapor profiles showed that this was the case due to the presence of more water vapor in the atmospheres of planets orbiting hotter stars across all percentages of hydrogen. The water vapor concentrations also varied more with the addition of more hydrogen for the planets orbiting hotter stars.

  15. Arrhenius curves of hydrogen transfers: tunnel effects, isotope effects and effects of pre-equilibria

    PubMed Central

    Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Miguel Lopez, Juan; Kohen, Amnon

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the Arrhenius curves of selected hydrogen-transfer reactions for which kinetic data are available in a large temperature range are reviewed. The curves are discussed in terms of the one-dimensional Bell–Limbach tunnelling model. The main parameters of this model are the barrier heights of the isotopic reactions, barrier width of the H-reaction, tunnelling masses, pre-exponential factor and minimum energy for tunnelling to occur. The model allows one to compare different reactions in a simple way and prepare the kinetic data for more-dimensional treatments. The first type of reactions is concerned with reactions where the geometries of the reacting molecules are well established and the kinetic data of the isotopic reactions are available in a large temperature range. Here, it is possible to study the relation between kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and chemical structure. Examples are the tautomerism of porphyrin, the porphyrin anion and related compounds exhibiting intramolecular hydrogen bonds of medium strength. We observe pre-exponential factors of the order of kT/h≅1013 s−1 corresponding to vanishing activation entropies in terms of transition state theory. This result is important for the second type of reactions discussed in this paper, referring mostly to liquid solutions. Here, the reacting molecular configurations may be involved in equilibria with non- or less-reactive forms. Several cases are discussed, where the less-reactive forms dominate at low or at high temperature, leading to unusual Arrhenius curves. These cases include examples from small molecule solution chemistry like the base-catalysed intramolecular H-transfer in diaryltriazene, 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)-benzoxazole, 2-hydroxy-phenoxyl radicals, as well as in the case of an enzymatic system, thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase. In the latter case, temperature-dependent KIEs are interpreted in terms of a transition between two regimes with different temperature

  16. Effects of spermine binding on Taxol-stabilized microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Regmi, Chola

    Previous studies have shown that polyamines such as spermine present in cells at physiological concentrations can facilitate the polymerization of tubulins into microtubules (MTs). A recent experiment demonstrates that in the presence of high-concentration spermine, Taxol-stabilized MTs undergo a shape transformation into inverted tubulin tubules (ITTs), the outside surface of which corresponds to the inside surface of a regular MT. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the shape transformation of MTs into ITTs is unclear. We perform all atom molecular dynamics simulations on Taxol-stabilized MT sheets containing two protofilaments surrounded by spermine ions. The spermine concentration is varied from 0 to 25mM to match the range probed experimentally. We identify important spermine binding regions on the MT surface and the influence of the spermine binding on the structure and dynamics of MTs. In contrast to Taxol, our results show that spermine binding seems to decrease the flexibility of tubulin proteins, resulting in weaker tubulin-tubulin contacts and promoting the bending of protofilaments into curved protofilaments, inverted rings, and eventually inverted tubules.

  17. Effect Of Substrates On The Fractionation Of Hydrogen Isotopes During Lipid-Biosynthesis By Haloarcula marismortui

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirghangi, S. S.; Pagani, M.

    2010-12-01

    Lipids form an important class of proxies for paleoclimatological research, and hydrogen isotope ratios of lipids are being increasingly used for understanding changes in the hydrological system. Proper understanding of hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis is therefore important and attention has been directed toward understanding the magnitude of hydrogen isotope fractionation that occurs during lipid biosynthesis in various organisms. Hydrogen isotope ratios of lipids depend on the hydrogen isotopic composition of the ambient water, hydrogen isotopic composition of NADPH used during biosynthesis, growth conditions, pathways of lipid biosynthesis, and substrates in the case of heterotrophic organisms. Recently it has been observed that NADPH contributes a significant part of the hydrogen in fatty acids synthesized by bacteria during heterotrophic growth (Zhang et al, 2009). As NADPH is formed by reduction of NADP+ during metabolism of substrates, different metabolic pathways form NADPH with different D/H ratios, which in turn results in variation in D/H ratios of lipids (Zhang et al, 2009). Therefore, substrates play a significant role in hydrogen isotopic compositions of lipids. For this study, we are investigating the effects of substrates on hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis of isoprenoidal lipids by heterotrophically growing halophilic archaea. Haloarcula marismortui is a halophilic archaea which synthesizes Archaeol (a diether lipid) and other isoprenoidal lipids. We have grown Haloarcula marismortui in pure cultures on three different substrates and are in the process of evaluating isotopic variability of Archaeol and other lipids associated with substrate and the D/H composition of ambient water. Our results will be helpful for a better understanding of hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid synthesis by archaea. Also, halophilic archaea are the only source of archaeol in hypersaline environments. Therefore, our

  18. The effect of hydrogen on the parameters of plastic deformation localization in low carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lunev, Aleksey G. E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru; Nadezhkin, Mikhail V. E-mail: nadjozhkin@ispms.tsc.ru; Shlyakhova, Galina V.; Barannikova, Svetlana A.; Zuev, Lev B.

    2014-11-14

    In the present study, the effect of interstitial hydrogen atoms on the mechanical properties and plastic strain localization patterns in tensile tested polycrystals of low-carbon steel Fe-0.07%C has been studied using double exposure speckle photography technique. The main parameters of plastic flow localization at various stages of deformation hardening have been determined in polycrystals of steel electrolytically saturated with hydrogen in a three-electrode electrochemical cell at a controlled constant cathode potential. Also, the effect of hydrogen on changing of microstructure by using optical microscopy has been demonstrated.

  19. Effects of copper catalytic reactions on the development of supersonic hydrogen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Berry, G.F.

    1992-10-01

    Copper species are present in hydrogen flames in arc heated supersonic ramjet testing facilities. Homogeneous and heterogeneous copper catalytic reactions may affect the flame development by enhancing the recombination of hydrogen atoms. Computer simulation is used to investigate the effects of the catalytic reactions on the reaction and ignition times of the flames. The simulation uses a modified general chemical kinetics computer program to simulate the development of copper-contaminated hydrogen flames under scramjet testing conditions. Reaction times of hydrogen flames are found to be reduced due to the copper catalytic effects, but ignition times are much less sensitive to such effects. The reduction of reaction time depends on copper concentration, particle size (if copper is in the condensed phase), and Mach number (or initial temperature and pressure). As copper concentration increases or the particle size decreases, reaction time decreases. As Mach number increases (or pressure and temperature decrease), the copper catalytic effects are greater.

  20. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-30

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between "static" and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N-. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles.

  1. Nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya I.

    2015-12-31

    The present work summarizes recent progress in the investigation of nanoscale microstructure effects on hydrogen behavior in rapidly solidified aluminum alloys foils produced at exceptionally high cooling rates. We focus here on the potential of modification of hydrogen desorption kinetics in respect to weak and strong trapping sites that could serve as hydrogen sinks in Al materials. It is shown that it is important to elucidate the surface microstructure of the Al alloy foils at the submicrometer scale because rapidly solidified microstructural features affect hydrogen trapping at nanostructured defects. We discuss the profound influence of solute atoms on hydrogen−lattice defect interactions in the alloys. with emphasis on role of vacancies in hydrogen evolution; both rapidly solidified pure Al and conventionally processed aluminum samples are considered.

  2. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  3. Hydrogen effects in dilute III-N-V alloys: From defect engineering to nanostructuring

    SciTech Connect

    Pettinari, G.; Felici, M.; Capizzi, M.; Polimeni, A.; Trotta, R.

    2014-01-07

    The variation of the band gap energy of III-N-V semiconductors induced by hydrogen incorporation is the most striking effect that H produces in these materials. A special emphasis is given here to the combination of N-activity passivation by hydrogen with H diffusion kinetics in dilute nitrides. Secondary ion mass spectrometry shows an extremely steep (smaller than 5 nm/decade) forefront of the H diffusion profile in Ga(AsN) under appropriate hydrogenation conditions. This discovery prompts the opportunity for an in-plane nanostructuring of hydrogen incorporation and, hence, for a modulation of the material band gap energy at the nanoscale. The properties of quantum dots fabricated by a lithographically defined hydrogenation are presented, showing the zero-dimensional character of these novel nanostructures. Applicative prospects of this nanofabrication method are finally outlined.

  4. Pressure effect on hydrogen tunneling and vibrational spectrum in α-Mn

    DOE PAGES

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Sadykov, Ravil A.; Antonov, Vladimir E.; Kuzovnikov, Michael; Ehlers, Georg; Granroth, Garrett E

    2016-10-03

    Here in this paper, the pressure effect on the tunneling mode and vibrational spectra of hydrogen in α-MnH0.07 has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. Applying hydrostatic pressure of up to 30 kbar is shown to shift both the hydrogen optical modes and the tunneling peak to higher energies. First-principles calculations show that the potential for hydrogen in α-Mn becomes overall steeper with increasing pressure. At the same time, the barrier height and its extent in the direction of tunneling decrease and the calculations predict significant changes of the dynamics of hydrogen in α-Mn at 100 kbar, when the estimatedmore » tunneling splitting of the hydrogen ground state exceeds the barrier height.« less

  5. Pressure effect on hydrogen tunneling and vibrational spectrum in α -Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, A. I.; Podlesnyak, A.; Sadykov, R. A.; Antonov, V. E.; Kuzovnikov, M. A.; Ehlers, G.; Granroth, G. E.

    2016-10-01

    The pressure effect on the tunneling mode and vibrational spectra of hydrogen in α -MnH0.07 has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. Applying hydrostatic pressure of up to 30 kbar is shown to shift both the hydrogen optical modes and the tunneling peak to higher energies. First-principles calculations show that the potential for hydrogen in α -Mn becomes overall steeper with increasing pressure. At the same time, the barrier height and its extent in the direction of tunneling decrease and the calculations predict significant changes of the dynamics of hydrogen in α -Mn at 100 kbar, when the estimated tunneling splitting of the hydrogen ground state exceeds the barrier height.

  6. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility of a laser dressed donor impurity in a GaAs/GaAlAs nanowire superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarpour, Gh.; Jamasb, A.; Dialameh, M.; Yazdanpanahi, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper the effects of hydrostatic pressure and laser radiation on the binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility of an off-center hydrogenic donor impurity in a nanowire superlattice (NWSL) are studied. The energy eigenvalues and corresponding wave functions of ground and first excited states are numerically computed using finite difference method for a NWSL with circular cross-section which involved an array of spherical quantum dots (QDs). The numerical results show that oscillatory behaviors appear in binding energies and diamagnetic susceptibilities of ground and first excited states as impurity shifts away from center of QDs. Maximum values of ground state binding energy (first excited state binding energy) occur when impurity is located at the center of QDs (at the center of barriers). Additionally, binding energies of ground and first excited states shift towards higher (lower) energies as pressure (laser radiation) increases. An opposite behavior is observed for absolute value of diamagnetic susceptibility as pressure or laser radiation increases. Also, as the QDs' volume increases the binding energies (I) decrease or (II) increase, reach maximum values and then decrease; which strongly depend on the position of impurity.

  7. Intra- and Interdomain Effects Due to Mutation of Calcium-binding Sites in Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liang-Wen; Kleerekoper, Quinn K.; Wang, Xu; Putkey, John A.

    2010-01-01

    The IQ-motif protein PEP-19, binds to the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM) with significantly different kon and koff rates in the presence and absence of Ca2+, which could play a role in defining the levels of free CaM during Ca2+ transients. The initial goal of the current study was to determine whether Ca2+ binding to sites III or IV in the C-domain of CaM was responsible for affecting the kinetics of binding PEP-19. EF-hand Ca2+-binding sites were selectively inactivated by the common strategy of changing Asp to Ala at the X-coordination position. Although Ca2+ binding to both sites III and IV appeared necessary for native-like interactions with PEP-19, the data also indicated that the mutations caused undesirable structural alterations as evidenced by significant changes in amide chemical shifts for apoCaM. Mutations in the C-domain also affected chemical shifts in the unmodified N-domain, and altered the Ca2+ binding properties of the N-domain. Conversion of Asp93 to Ala caused the greatest structural perturbations, possibly due to the loss of stabilizing hydrogen bonds between the side chain of Asp93 and backbone amides in apo loop III. Thus, although these mutations inhibit binding of Ca2+, the mutated CaM may not be able to support potentially important native-like activity of the apoprotein. This should be taken into account when designing CaM mutants for expression in cell culture. PMID:20048169

  8. MutaBind estimates and interprets the effects of sequence variants on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Simonetti, Franco L; Goncearenco, Alexander; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-07-01

    Proteins engage in highly selective interactions with their macromolecular partners. Sequence variants that alter protein binding affinity may cause significant perturbations or complete abolishment of function, potentially leading to diseases. There exists a persistent need to develop a mechanistic understanding of impacts of variants on proteins. To address this need we introduce a new computational method MutaBind to evaluate the effects of sequence variants and disease mutations on protein interactions and calculate the quantitative changes in binding affinity. The MutaBind method uses molecular mechanics force fields, statistical potentials and fast side-chain optimization algorithms. The MutaBind server maps mutations on a structural protein complex, calculates the associated changes in binding affinity, determines the deleterious effect of a mutation, estimates the confidence of this prediction and produces a mutant structural model for download. MutaBind can be applied to a large number of problems, including determination of potential driver mutations in cancer and other diseases, elucidation of the effects of sequence variants on protein fitness in evolution and protein design. MutaBind is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/mutabind/. PMID:27150810

  9. Effect of surface modification, microstructure, and trapping on hydrogen diffusion coefficients in high strength alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebaraj Johnley Muthuraj, Josiah

    Cathodic protection is widely used for corrosion prevention. However, this process generates hydrogen at the protected metal surface, and diffusion of hydrogen through the metal may cause hydrogen embrittlement or hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking. Thus the choice of a metal for use as fasteners depends upon its hydrogen uptake, permeation, diffusivity and trapping. The diffusivity of hydrogen through four high strength alloys (AISI 4340, alloy 718, alloy 686, and alloy 59) was analyzed by an electrochemical method developed by Devanathan and Stachurski. The effect of plasma nitriding and microstructure on hydrogen permeation through AISI 4340 was studied on six different specimens: as-received (AR) AISI 4340, nitrided samples with and without compound layer, samples quenched and tempered (Q&T) at 320° and 520°C, and nitrided samples Q&T 520°C. Studies on various nitrided specimens demonstrate that both the gamma'-Fe 4N rich compound surface layer and the deeper N diffusion layer that forms during plasma nitriding reduce the effective hydrogen diffusion coefficient, although the gamma'-Fe4N rich compound layer has a larger effect. Multiple permeation transients yield evidence for the presence of only reversible trap sites in as-received, Q&T 320 and 520 AISI 4340 specimens, and the presence of both reversible and irreversible trap sites in nitrided specimens. Moreover, the changes in microstructure during the quenching and tempering process result in a significant decrease in the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen compared to as-received specimens. In addition, density functional theory-based molecular dynamics simulations yield hydrogen diffusion coefficients through gamma'- Fe4N one order of magnitude lower than through α-Fe, which supports the experimental measurements of hydrogen permeation. The effect of microstructure and trapping was also studied in cold rolled, solutionized, and precipitation hardened Inconel 718 foils. The effective hydrogen

  10. Beneficial biological effects and the underlying mechanisms of molecular hydrogen - comprehensive review of 321 original articles.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Masatoshi; Sobue, Sayaka; Ito, Mikako; Ito, Masafumi; Hirayama, Masaaki; Ohno, Kinji

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of molecular hydrogen for a wide range of disease models and human diseases have been investigated since 2007. A total of 321 original articles have been published from 2007 to June 2015. Most studies have been conducted in Japan, China, and the USA. About three-quarters of the articles show the effects in mice and rats. The number of clinical trials is increasing every year. In most diseases, the effect of hydrogen has been reported with hydrogen water or hydrogen gas, which was followed by confirmation of the effect with hydrogen-rich saline. Hydrogen water is mostly given ad libitum. Hydrogen gas of less than 4 % is given by inhalation. The effects have been reported in essentially all organs covering 31 disease categories that can be subdivided into 166 disease models, human diseases, treatment-associated pathologies, and pathophysiological conditions of plants with a predominance of oxidative stress-mediated diseases and inflammatory diseases. Specific extinctions of hydroxyl radical and peroxynitrite were initially presented, but the radical-scavenging effect of hydrogen cannot be held solely accountable for its drastic effects. We and others have shown that the effects can be mediated by modulating activities and expressions of various molecules such as Lyn, ERK, p38, JNK, ASK1, Akt, GTP-Rac1, iNOS, Nox1, NF-κB p65, IκBα, STAT3, NFATc1, c-Fos, and ghrelin. Master regulator(s) that drive these modifications, however, remain to be elucidated and are currently being extensively investigated. PMID:26483953

  11. When moving without volition: implied self-causation enhances binding strength between involuntary actions and effects.

    PubMed

    Dogge, Myrthel; Schaap, Marloes; Custers, Ruud; Wegner, Daniel M; Aarts, Henk

    2012-03-01

    The conscious awareness of voluntary action is associated with systematic changes in time perception: The interval between actions and outcomes is experienced as compressed in time. Although this temporal binding is thought to result from voluntary movement and provides a window to the sense of agency, recent studies challenge this idea by demonstrating binding in involuntary movement. We offer a potential account for these findings by proposing that binding between involuntary actions and effects can occur when self-causation is implied. Participants made temporal judgements concerning a key press and a tone, while they learned to consider themselves as the cause of the effect or not. Results showed that implied self-causation (vs. no implied self-causation) increased temporal binding. Since intrinsic motor cues of movement were absent, these results suggest that sensory evidence about the key press caused binding in retrospect and in line with the participant's sense of being an agent.

  12. Staebler-Wronski effect in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Shenoy, Subodh R.

    1996-02-01

    A scenario for the Staebler-Wronski (SW) photoconductivity σ( t) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon is modeled by the kenetics of the dangling bond density d( t). Hydrogen atoms (H) on SiSi bonds are induced to hop by the illumination-triggered breakage of weak neighboring bonds ( d(t) ∼ t {1}/{3}). The breakage leads to enhanced H diffusion over disordered barriers, which breaks further bonds, inducing further diffusion and causing a d( t) rise as a stretched exponential. d( t) then saturates to a temperature-dependent value, as breakage is limited by bond-pair thermal healing. Above a temperature TSW, thermal bond-pair healing beats breakage, and σ( t) recovers.

  13. Effect of Hydrogen Plasma on Model Corrosion Layers of Bronze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fojtíková, P.; Sázavská, V.; Mika, F.; Krčma, F.

    2016-05-01

    Our work is about plasmachemical reduction of model corrosion layers. The model corrosion layers were produced on bronze samples with size of 10 × 10 × 5 mm3, containing Cu and Sn. Concentrated hydrochloric acid was used as a corrosive environment. The application of reduction process in low-pressure low-temperature hydrogen plasma followed. A quartz cylindrical reactor with two outer copper electrodes was used. Plasma discharge was generated in pure hydrogen by a RF generator. Each corroded sample was treated in different conditions (supplied power and a continual or pulsed regime with a variable duty cycle mode). Process monitoring was ensured by optical emission spectroscopy. After treatment, samples were analyzed by SEM and EDX.

  14. Effects of Temperature on the p53-DNA Binding Interactions and Their Dynamical Behavior: Comparing the Wild Type to the R248Q Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Khaled; Issack, Bilkiss B.; Stepanova, Maria; Tuszynski, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Background The protein p53 plays an active role in the regulation of cell cycle. In about half of human cancers, the protein is inactivated by mutations located primarily in its DNA-binding domain. Interestingly, a number of these mutations possess temperature-induced DNA-binding characteristics. A striking example is the mutation of Arg248 into glutamine or tryptophan. These mutants are defective for binding to DNA at 310 K although they have been shown to bind specifically to several p53 response elements at sub-physiological temperatures (298–306 K). Methodology/Principal Findings This important experimental finding motivated us to examine the effects of temperature on the structure and configuration of R248Q mutant and compare it to the wild type protein. Our aim is to determine how and where structural changes of mutant variants take place due to temperature changes. To answer these questions, we compared the mutant to the wild-type proteins from two different aspects. First, we investigated the systems at the atomistic level through their DNA-binding affinity, hydrogen bond networks and spatial distribution of water molecules. Next, we assessed changes in their long-lived conformational motions at the coarse-grained level through the collective dynamics of their side-chain and backbone atoms separately. Conclusions The experimentally observed effect of temperature on the DNA-binding properties of p53 is reproduced. Analysis of atomistic and coarse-grained data reveal that changes in binding are determined by a few key residues and provide a rationale for the mutant-loss of binding at physiological temperatures. The findings can potentially enable a rescue strategy for the mutant structure. PMID:22110706

  15. Substituent effects on hydrogen bonding of aromatic amide-carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ibrahim; Kara, Hulya; Azizoglu, Akın

    2016-10-01

    N-(p-benzoyl)-anthranilic acid (BAA) derivatives have been synthesized with different substituents (X: Br, Cl, OCH3, CH3), and their crystal structures have been analyzed in order to understand the variations in their molecular geometries with respect to the substituents by using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The carboxylic acid group forms classic OH⋯O hydrogen bonded dimers in a centrosymmetric R2(2)(8) ring motifs for BAA-Br and BAA-Cl. However, no carboxylic acid group forms classic OH⋯O hydrogen bonded dimers in BAA-OCH3 and BAA-CH3. The asymmetric unit consists of two crystallographically independent molecules in BAA-OCH3. DFT computations show that the interaction energies between monomer and dimer are in the range of 0.5-3.8kcal/mol with the B3LYP/6-31+G*, B3LYP/6-31++G*, B3LYP/6-31++G**, and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The presence of different hydrogen bond patterns is also governed by the substrate. For monomeric compounds studied herein, theoretical calculations lead to two low-energy conformers; trans (a) and cis (b). Former one is more stable than latter by about 4kcal/mol. PMID:27239947

  16. Substituent effects on hydrogen bonding of aromatic amide-carboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ibrahim; Kara, Hulya; Azizoglu, Akın

    2016-10-01

    N-(p-benzoyl)-anthranilic acid (BAA) derivatives have been synthesized with different substituents (X: Br, Cl, OCH3, CH3), and their crystal structures have been analyzed in order to understand the variations in their molecular geometries with respect to the substituents by using 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in a centrosymmetric R22(8) ring motifs for BAA-Br and BAA-Cl. However, no carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in BAA-OCH3 and BAA-CH3. The asymmetric unit consists of two crystallographically independent molecules in BAA-OCH3. DFT computations show that the interaction energies between monomer and dimer are in the range of 0.5-3.8 kcal/mol with the B3LYP/6-31 + G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G**, and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The presence of different hydrogen bond patterns is also governed by the substrate. For monomeric compounds studied herein, theoretical calculations lead to two low-energy conformers; trans (a) and cis (b). Former one is more stable than latter by about 4 kcal/mol.

  17. Co-operative inhibitory effects of hydrogen peroxide and iodine against bacterial and yeast species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen peroxide and iodine are powerful antimicrobials widely used as antiseptics and disinfectants. Their antimicrobial properties are known to be enhanced by combining them with other compounds. We studied co-operative inhibitory activities (synergism, additive effects and modes of growth inhibition) of hydrogen peroxide and iodine used concurrently against 3 bacterial and 16 yeast species. Results Synergistic or additive inhibitory effects were shown for hydrogen peroxide and iodine mixtures against all 19 species used in the study. Both biocides were mostly cidal individually and in mixtures against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Both compounds manifested static inhibitory effects individually, but their mixtures were synergistically cidal for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherihia coli. Cells of S. cerevisiae treated with hydrogen peroxide and iodine-hydrogen peroxide mixture produced increased numbers of respiratory deficient mutants indicating genotoxic effects. Conclusion Iodine and hydrogen peroxide used concurrently interact synergistically or additively against a range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. The study provides an insight as to how these traditional antimicrobials could be used more effectively for disinfection and antisepsis. In addition, a simple approach is proposed for scoring genotoxicity of different biocides by using the budding yeast system. PMID:23856115

  18. Inhibitory effects of butyrate on biological hydrogen production with mixed anaerobic cultures.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xian-Jun; Yu, Han-Qing

    2005-01-01

    In this study batch experiments were conducted to investigate the inhibitory effects of butyrate addition on hydrogen production from glucose by using anaerobic mixed cultures. Experimental results showed that addition of butyrate at 4.18 and 6.27 g/l only slightly inhibited hydrogen production, and addition of butyrate at 8.36-12.54 g/l imposed a moderate inhibitory effect on hydrogen production. At addition of 25.08 g/l, butyrate had a strong inhibitory influence on substrate degradation and hydrogen production. The distribution of the volatile fatty acids produced from the acidogeneisis of glucose was significantly influenced by the addition of butyrate. The inhibition of butyrate addition on hydrogen production was described well by a non-competitive and non-linear inhibition model, with the maximum hydrogen production rate of 59.3 ml/g-SS/h, critical added butyrate concentration of 25.08 g/l, and inhibition degree of 0.323, respectively. The C(I,50) values (the butyrate concentration at which bioactivity is reduced by 50%) for hydrogen production rate and yield were estimated as 19.39 and 20.78 g/l of added butyrate, respectively.

  19. Effects of Co and Al Contents on Cryogenic Mechanical Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement for Austenitic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Ma, L. M.; Li, Y. Y.

    2004-06-01

    The effects of Co and Al content on ambient and cryogenic mechanical properties, microstructure and hydrogen embrittlement of a high strength precipitate-strengthened austenitic alloy (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo system) had been investigated with temperature range from 293K to 77 K. Hydrogen embrittlement tests were conducted using the method of high pressure thermal hydrogen charging. It was found that increasing Co content can cause increasing in ambient and cryogenic ductility, but has less effect on ultimate tensile strength. When Co content is 9.8%, obvious decrease was found in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Al content can result in decreasing ambient and cryogenic ductility and severe hydrogen embrittlement, but slight increase in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Co content, reducing Al content, and decreasing test temperature tend to decrease the hydrogen embrittlement tendency for the alloys. This work showed that the alloy with composition of Fe-31%Ni-15%Cr-5%Co-4.5%Mo-2.4%Ti-0.3%Al-0.3%Nb-0.2%V has the superior cryogenic mechanical properties and lower hydrogen embrittlement tendency, is a good high strength cryogenic hydrogen-resistant material.

  20. [Effect of Fe2+ on fermentation hydrogen production in an UASB].

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Feng; Wang, Yi-Xuan; Cheng, Guo-Ling; Liu, Chun-Yan

    2013-06-01

    Fe2+ has an important effect on the production of hydrogen in a biological way. With the brown sugar as the substrate, the effect of biotechnology hydrogen production capacity of the Fe2+ concentration ranging from 0-1650 mg x L(-1) on the condition of anaerobic fermentation was studied. The results showed that appropriate divalent ions had the ability to enhance the hydrogen production. Biogas amounts and hydrogen content increased with increasing Fe2+ concentration from 0-450 mg x L(-1). Compared with the control group increased by 40.75%, the maximum biogas amount of 17.72 L was obtained at Fe2+ concentration of 450 mg x L(-1). And at the same time, the hydrogen content was 60.01 percent. Biogas amounts and hydrogen content decreased gradually when the concentration of Fe2+ was higher than 450 mg x L(-1). Therefore Fe2+ is one of important engineering parameters for the fermentative hydrogen production.

  1. Hydrogen effects on low-cycle fatigue of the single-crystal nickel-base superalloy CMSX-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollar, M.; Bernstein, I. M.; Kromp, W.; Domnanovitch, A.; Pinczolits, H.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on the low-cycle fatigue behavior of CMSX-2 (001)-oriented single crystals were examined. Fatigue tests were conducted under constant plastic strain amplitude control. Cyclic stress-strain curves and fatigue life data at different plastic strain amplitudes were determined for hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged specimens. Two charging procedures, leading to different hydrogen concentrations, were applied. Hydrogen was found to decrease significantly the number of cycles to failure under the various experimental conditions. The increasing hydrogen concentration and ratio of the hydrogen to nonhydrogen-containing volume were found to shorten fatigue life in hydrogen-charged specimens. Based on the analysis of cyclic stress-strain curves and optical and transmission electron microscopy, it was established that hydrogen enhanced strain localization and promoted crystallographic stage I cracking, leading to embrittlement.

  2. Effect of B-ring substitution pattern on binding mode of propionamide selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Bohl, Casey E; Wu, Zengru; Chen, Jiyun; Mohler, Michael L; Yang, Jun; Hwang, Dong Jin; Mustafa, Suni; Miller, Duane D; Bell, Charles E; Dalton, James T

    2008-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are essentially prostate sparing androgens, which provide therapeutic potential in osteoporosis, male hormone replacement, and muscle wasting. Herein we report crystal structures of the androgen receptor (AR) ligand-binding domain (LBD) complexed to a series of potent synthetic nonsteroidal SARMs with a substituted pendant arene referred to as the B-ring. We found that hydrophilic B-ring para-substituted analogs exhibit an additional region of hydrogen bonding not seen with steroidal compounds and that multiple halogen substitutions affect the B-ring conformation and aromatic interactions with Trp741. This information elucidates interactions important for high AR binding affinity and provides new insight for structure-based drug design.

  3. Effects of cavities at the nicotinamide binding site of liver alcohol dehydrogenase on structure, dynamics and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yahashiri, Atsushi; Rubach, Jon K; Plapp, Bryce V

    2014-02-11

    A role for protein dynamics in enzymatic catalysis of hydrogen transfer has received substantial scientific support, but the connections between protein structure and catalysis remain to be established. Valine residues 203 and 207 are at the binding site for the nicotinamide ring of the coenzyme in liver alcohol dehydrogenase and have been suggested to facilitate catalysis with "protein-promoting vibrations" (PPV). We find that the V207A substitution has small effects on steady-state kinetic constants and the rate of hydrogen transfer; the introduced cavity is empty and is tolerated with minimal effects on structure (determined at 1.2 Å for the complex with NAD(+) and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol). Thus, no evidence is found to support a role for Val-207 in the dynamics of catalysis. The protein structures and ligand geometries (including donor-acceptor distances) in the V203A enzyme complexed with NAD(+) and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol or 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (determined at 1.1 Å) are very similar to those for the wild-type enzyme, except that the introduced cavity accommodates a new water molecule that contacts the nicotinamide ring. The structures of the V203A enzyme complexes suggest, in contrast to previous studies, that the diminished tunneling and decreased rate of hydride transfer (16-fold, relative to that of the wild-type enzyme) are not due to differences in ground-state ligand geometries. The V203A substitution may alter the PPV and the reorganization energy for hydrogen transfer, but the protein scaffold and equilibrium thermal motions within the Michaelis complex may be more significant for enzyme catalysis.

  4. Effect of hydrogen on degradation mechanism of zirconium: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Poulami; Moitra, Amitava; Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri

    2015-11-01

    Using large scale molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the deleterious effect of hydrogen in Zr. We consider both dilute and concentrated limit of H. In the dilute and concentrated H limits, we study the effect of 1-5 atomic percentage of hydrogen, and that of ε-ZrH2 precipitate having 5-10 nm diameters, respectively. From the stress-strain curves and micro-structure analysis at different strain values, we characterize the deformation behavior and correlate our result with previously reported mechanisms. We show hydrogen atoms in dilute limit help in dislocation multiplication, following the hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity mechanism. In the concentrated limit, on the other hand, dislocations and cracks nucleate from precipitate-matrix interface, indicating the decohesion mechanism as primary method for Zr degradation. These findings are corroborated with a nucleation and growth model as expressed in Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation.

  5. Effects of Hydrogen on the Fatigue Crack Growth Rate of Low Alloy Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sang Gyu, Lee; Changheui, Jang; In Sup, Kim

    2006-07-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate of low alloy steels in air and oxygen-controlled water, from room temperature to 288 deg C, were measured and the results were analyzed. In high dissolved oxygen water, the loading frequency effect was observed; on the other hand, the effect of loading frequency was not clearly seen in low dissolved oxygen water. Moreover, crystallographic features, especially the formation of highly localized strained zone, that is related to the hydrogen assisted cracking was observed on the fracture surface of the sample tested in the water environments. To confirm this mechanism, some samples were hydrogen charged and fatigue tested in air and in argon gas, at RT and at 288 deg. C, respectively. The fatigue crack growth rate increased in the hydrogen charged samples. The fracture surface of the hydrogen charged samples showed brittle cracking at 288 deg C as well as at room temperature, which resulted in the fast crack growth rate. (authors)

  6. The effect of hydrogen on the low cycle fatigue behavior of a single crystal superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    The present study compares the room temperature fatigue properties of PWA 1480 single crystals containing either normal or elevated hydrogen levels, giving attention to the effects of various levels of HIPing process-controlled porosity on hydrogen-trapping and fatigue life. Hydrogen charging is found to degrade the fatigue lives of alloy samples by an order of magnitude; the magnitude of this degradation is comparable at both high and low porosity. HIPing accomplished a small beneficial effect on the fatigue life of both the hydrogen-charged and uncharged PWA 1480 samples. Fatigue cracks are noted to have consistently initiated at large, near-surface pores. By reducing the size and frquency of the larger pores, HIPing apparently retarded fatigue-crack initiation.

  7. Effects of vitamin B-6 nutrition on benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor binding in the developing rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, J.P.; Guilarte, T.R. )

    1990-02-26

    A dietary deficiency of vitamin B-6 promotes seizure activity in neonatal animals and human infants. Previous studied have shown that neonatal vitamin B-6 deprivation results in reduced levels of brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and increased binding at the GABA site of the GABA/BDZ receptor complex. Since the GABA and BDZ receptors are allosterically linked, this study was undertaken to determine if vitamin B-6 deprivation had an effect on BDZ receptor binding. Benzodiazepine receptor binding isotherms using {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam as ligand were performed in the presence and absence of 10 {mu}M GABA. The results indicate a significant increase in the binding affinity (Kd) in the presence of GABA in cerebellar membranes from deficient rat pups at 14 days of age with no effect on receptor number (Bmax). By 28 days of age, the increase in Kd was no longer present. No change in Kd or Bmax was observed in cortical tissue from deficient animals at 14 or 28 days of age. Preliminary studies of GABA-enhancement of {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam binding indicate that vitamin B-6 deficiency also induces alterations in the ability of GABA to enhance BZD receptor binding. In summary, these results indicate that the effects of vitamin B-6 deprivation on BDZ receptor binding are region specific and age related.

  8. Double binding energy differences: Mean-field or pairing effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chong

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter we present a systematic analysis on the average interaction between the last protons and neutrons in atomic nuclei, which can be extracted from the double differences of nuclear binding energies. The empirical average proton-neutron interaction Vpn thus derived from experimental data can be described in a very simple form as the interplay of the nuclear mean field and the pairing interaction. It is found that the smooth behavior as well as the local fluctuations of the Vpn in even-even nuclei with N ≠ Z are dominated by the contribution from the proton-neutron monopole interactions. A strong additional contribution from the isoscalar monopole interaction and isovector proton-neutron pairing interaction is seen in the Vpn for even-even N = Z nuclei and for the adjacent odd-A nuclei with one neutron or proton being subtracted.

  9. Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Tolley, George S.; Jones, Donald W. Mintz, Marianne M.; Smith, Barton A.; Carlson, Eric; Unnasch, Stefan; Lawrence, Michael; Chmelynski, Harry

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy report, Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States Report to Congress, estimates the effects on employment of a U.S. economy transformation to hydrogen between 2020 and 2050. The report includes study results on employment impacts from hydrogen market expansion in the transportation, stationary, and portable power sectors and highlights possible skill and education needs. This study is in response to Section 1820 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) (EPACT). Section 1820, “Overall Employment in a Hydrogen Economy,” requires the Secretary of Energy to carry out a study of the effects of a transition to a hydrogen economy on several employment [types] in the United States. As required by Section 1820, the present report considers: • Replacement effects of new goods and services • International competition • Workforce training requirements • Multiple possible fuel cycles, including usage of raw materials • Rates of market penetration of technologies • Regional variations based on geography • Specific recommendations of the study Both the Administration’s National Energy Policy and the Department’s Strategic Plan call for reducing U.S. reliance on imported oil and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The National Energy Policy also acknowledges the need to increase energy supplies and use more energy-efficient technologies and practices. President Bush proposed in his January 2003 State of the Union Address to advance research on hydrogen so that it has the potential to play a major role in America’s future energy system. Consistent with these aims, EPACT 2005 authorizes a research, development, and demonstration program for hydrogen and fuel cell technology. Projected results for the national employment impacts, projections of the job creation and job replacement underlying the total employment changes, training implications, regional employment impacts and the

  10. A Preorganized Hydrogen Bond Network and Its Effect on Anion Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, Masoud; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2014-08-07

    Rigid tricyclic locked in all axial 1,3,5-cyclohexanetriol derivatives with 0–3 trifluoromethyl groups were synthesized and photoelectron spectra of their conjugate bases and chloride anion clusters are reported along with density functional computations. The resulting vertical and adiabatic detachment energies provide measures of the anion stabilization due to the hydrogen bond network and inductive effects. The latter mechanism is found to be transmitted through space via hydrogen bonds

  11. Isotope effects in dense solid hydrogen - Phase transition in deuterium at 190 + or - 20 GPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Mao, H. K.

    1989-01-01

    Raman measurements of solid normal deuterium compressed in a diamond-anvil cell indicate that the material undergoes a structural phase transformation at 190 + or - 20 GPa and 77 K. Spectroscopically, the transition appears analogous to that observed in hydrogen at 145 + or - 5 GPa. The large isotope effect on the transition pressure suggests there is a significant vibrational contribution to the relative stability of the solid phases of hydrogen at very high densities.

  12. Effects of thermally pretreated temperature on bio-hydrogen production from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ben-Yi; Liu, Jun-Xin

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen can be obtained by anaerobic fermentation of sewage sludge. Therefore, in this paper the effects of thermally pretreated temperatures on hydrogen production from sewage sludge were investigated under different pre-treatment conditions. In the thermal pretreatment, some microbial matters of sludge were converted into soluble matters from insoluble ones. As a result, the suspended solid (SS) and volatile suspended solid (VSS) of sludge decreased and the concentration of soluble COD (SCOD) increased, including soluble carbohydrates and proteins. The experimental results showed that all of those pretreated sludge could produce hydrogen by anaerobic fermentation and the hydrogen yields under the temperatures of 121 degrees C and 50 degrees C were 12.23 ml/g VS (most) and 1.17 ml/g VS (least), respectively. It illuminated that the hydrogen yield of sludge was affected by the thermally pretreated temperatures. Additionally, the endurance of high hydrogen yield depended on the translation of microbial matters and inhibition of methanogens in the sludge. The temperatures of 100 degrees C and 121 degrees C (treated time, 30 min) could kill or inhibit completely the methanogens while the others could not. To produce hydrogen and save energy, 100 degrees C was chosen as the optimal temperature for thermal pretrcatment. The composition changes in liquid phase in the fermentation process were also discussed. The SCOD of sludge increased, which was affected by the pretreatment temperature. The production of volatile fatty acids in the anaerobic fermentation increased with the pretreatment temperature.

  13. Prooxidative effect of copper--metallothionein in the acute cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Suntres, Zacharias E; Lui, Edmund M K

    2006-01-16

    This study was concerned with the role of copper (Cu) and Cu-metallothionein (Cu-MT) in oxidative stress. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced oxidative injury was examined in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells isolated from host mice pretreated with 0, 1 or 2mg of CuSO(4) (ip) 24h earlier. Control Ehrlich cells contained low levels of Cu and Cu treatment produced dose-related increases in cellular Cu and Cu-MT levels and corresponding increases in sensitivity to oxidative toxicity of H(2)O(2) (LC(50), cell blebbing, lipid peroxidation, GSH depletion, and increase in intracellular free [Ca(2+)](i)). Hydrogen peroxide treatment also resulted in the oxidation of MT thiolates, reduction in the binding of Cu to MT resulting in translocation of Cu to other subcellular sites. d-penicillamine, a Cu-chelating agent, obliterated the sensitization effect of Cu-pretreatment and reduced the redistribution of MT-bound Cu, suggesting the participation of Cu ions derived from MT in promoting oxidant stress. Additional experiments with desferoxamine and mannitol have revealed the involvement of a Cu-dependent Fenton reaction in the mediation of the prooxidative effect of Cu-MT. These data suggest that cells with high levels of Cu-MT may be particularly susceptible to oxidative stress. PMID:16221516

  14. Magnetic Properties of High-Surface-Area Carbons and Their Effect on Adsorbed Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matthew; Kraus, Michael; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2009-03-01

    We report the discovery that a large number of nanoporous carbon samples, made from corn cob and exhibiting high hydrogen storage capacities (Pfeifer et al, Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 1041 R02-02 (2008)), show unexpected magnetic properties, due to iron impurities in the samples. Magnetization curves are consistent with ferromagnetic and/or super-paramagnetic behavior. Magnetic susceptibilities, saturation magnetizations, coercivities and remanence magnetizations, from measurements on a SQUID magnetometer, will be presented, and their temperature dependence will be discussed. Results will be presented regarding the presence of small iron clusters, magnetic properties of iron-leached samples, and hydrogen binding energies as a function of iron leaching. This material is based on work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Award No. DE-FG-08GO18142.

  15. The effect of hydrogenation on strain hardening and deformation mechanisms in <113> single crystals of Hadfield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, Elena; Maier, Galina; Melnikov, Eugene; Koshovkina, Vera; Moskvina, Valentina; Smirnov, Alexander; Bataev, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    The effect of hydrogenation on the strain-hardening behavior and the deformation mechanisms of <113>-oriented single crystals of Hadfield steel was investigated under tension at room temperature. The stages of plastic flow and deformation mechanisms for hydrogen-charged specimens are similar to one in hydrogen-free state: slip → slip + single twinning → slip + multiple twinning. Hydrogen alloying favors to mechanical twinning, micro- and macrolocalization of plastic flow.

  16. Kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution:. ionic strength effects and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaß, Frank; Elias, Horst; Wannowius, Klaus J.

    Conductometry was used to study the kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite, HSO -3, by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous non-buffered solution at the low concentration level of 10 -5-10 -6 M, typically found in cloud water. The kinetic data confirm that the rate law reported for the pH range 3-6 at higher concentration levels, rate= kH·[H +]·[HSO -3]·[H 2O 2], is valid at the low concentration level and at low ionic strength Ic. At 298 K and Ic=1.5×10 -4 M, third-order rate constant kH was found to be kH=(9.1±0.5)×10 7 M -2 s -1. The temperature dependence of kH led to an activation energy of Ea=29.7±0.9 kJ mol -1. The effect of the ionic strength (adjusted with NaCl) on rate constant kH was studied in the range Ic=2×10 -4-5.0 M at pH=4.5-5.2 by conductometry and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The dependence of kH on Ic can be described with a semi-empirical relationship, which is useful for the purpose of comparison and extrapolation. The kinetic data obtained are critically compared with those reported earlier.

  17. Quantification of the Effects of Ionic Strength, Viscosity, and Hydrophobicity on Protein–Ligand Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In order to quantify the interactions between molecules of biological interest, the determination of the dissociation constant (Kd) is essential. Estimation of the binding affinity in this way is routinely performed in “favorable” conditions for macromolecules. Crucial data for ligand–protein binding elucidation is mainly derived from techniques (e.g., macromolecular crystallography) that require the addition of high concentration of salts and/or other additives. In this study we have evaluated the effect of temperature, ionic strength, viscosity, and hydrophobicity on the Kd of three previously characterized protein–ligand systems, based on variation in their binding sites, in order to provide insight into how these often overlooked unconventional circumstances impact binding affinity. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) increasing solvent viscosity in general is detrimental to ligand binding, (2) moderate increases in temperature have marginal effects on the dissociation constant, and (3) the degree of hydrophobicity of the ligand and the binding site determines the extent of the influence of cosolvents and salt concentration on ligand binding affinity. PMID:25147617

  18. Effects of Varying the Three-Body Molecular Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, Matthew J.; Clark, Paul; Glover, S.C.O.; Greif, T.H.; Abel, Tom; Klessen, Ralf; Bromm, Volker; /Texas U., Astron. Dept.

    2011-03-03

    The transformation of atomic hydrogen to molecular hydrogen through three-body reactions is a crucial stage in the collapse of primordial, metal-free halos, where the first generation of stars (Population III stars) in the Universe are formed. However, in the published literature, the rate coefficient for this reaction is uncertain by nearly an order of magnitude. We report on the results of both adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the collapse of metal-free halos as a function of the value of this rate coefficient. For each simulation method, we have simulated a single halo three times, using three different values of the rate coefficient. We find that while variation between halo realizations may be greater than that caused by the three-body rate coefficient being used, both the accretion physics onto Population III protostars as well as the long-term stability of the disk and any potential fragmentation may depend strongly on this rate coefficient.

  19. Effects of heterocyclic aromatic substituents on binding affinities at two distinct sites of somatostatin receptors. Correlation with the electrostatic potential of the substituents.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vidya; Birzin, Elizabeth T; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Van Rijn, Rachel D; Rohrer, Susan P; Chicchi, Gary; Underwood, Dennis J; Thornton, Edward R; Smith, Amos B; Hirschmann, Ralph

    2003-05-01

    In our continuing program exploring glucose-based peptidomimetics of somatostatin (SRIF-14), we sought to improve the water solubility of our glycosides. This led to insights into the nature of the ligand binding sites at the SRIF receptor. Replacement of the C4 benzyl substituent in glucoside (+)-2 with pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners increased water solubility and enhanced affinity for the human SRIF subtype receptor 4 (sst4). We attribute this effect to hydrogen bond formation. The pyridin-3-ylmethyl substituent at C4, when combined with the imidazol-4-ylmethyl group at C2, generated (-)-19, which has the highest affinity of a glucose-based peptidomimetic at a human SRIF receptor to date (K(i) 53 +/- 23 nM, n = 6 at sst4). The C4 heterocyclic congeners of glucosides bearing a 1-methoxy substituent rather than an indole side chain at the anomeric carbon, such as (+)-16, also provided information about the Trp(8) binding pocket. We correlated the SARs at both the C4 and the Trp(8) binding pockets with calculations of the electrostatic potentials of the diverse C4 aromatic substituents using Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis. These calculations provide an approximate analysis of a molecule's ability to interact within a receptor binding site. Our binding studies show that benzene and indole rings, but not pyridinylmethyl nor pyrazin-2-ylmethyl rings, can bind the hydrophobic Trp(8) binding pocket of sst4. The Spartan 3-21G(*) MO analysis reveals significant negative electrostatic potential in the region of the pi-clouds for the benzene and indole rings but not for the pyridinylmethyl or pyrazin-2-ylmethyl congeners. Our data further demonstrate that the replacement of benzene or indole side chains by heterocyclic aromatic rings typified by pyridine and pyrazine not only enhances water solubility and hydrogen bonding capacity as expected, but can also profoundly diminish the ability of the pi-cloud of the aromatic substituent to interact with side chains

  20. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effect of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed. Additional research is required to determine whether hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement are similar or distinct types of embrittlement.

  1. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  2. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  3. Effect of hydrogen peroxide treatment on the properties of wool fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Shen, Xiaolin; Xu, Weilin

    2012-10-01

    In this study, hydrogen peroxide treatment was applied to improve the surface wettability, moisture transfer properties and other related properties of wool fabric. SEM images showed the tip of wool scale was smoothened and parts of the scale were peeled off after hydrogen peroxide treatment. The time for a water droplet to sink into the fabric could decrease to less than 1 s and the wicking properties of wool fabrics were dramatically improved after hydrogen peroxide treatment. Shrinkage and whiteness of the fabric were improved due to the modification of scale and the bleaching effect of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The fabrics became weaker and ductile with less than 4% weight loss. This study would benefit further application of wool fiber in summer clothing in which the surface wettability and moisture transfer properties are essential and determinative.

  4. Effect of irradiation by argon ions on hydrogen transport through the surface oxide layer of zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evsin, A. E.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Gumarov, A. I.; Kashapov, N. F.; Luchkin, A. G.; Vakhitov, I. R.; Yanilkin, I. V.; Tagirov, L. R.

    2016-09-01

    Effect of zirconium irradiation by 1 keV Ar+ ions on hydrogen transport through the surface oxide layer is studied. It is shown that deuterium trapping under subsequent irradiation of the Ar-treated sample by deuterium atoms of thermal energies in D2 + 30at.% O2 gas mixture is 2 times less than trapping in the untreated sample. Besides, irradiation of the untreated sample by D-atoms provokes desorption of ≈25% of hydrogen contained therein, whereas hydrogen desorption from the ion-treated zirconium surface does not occur. It is proposed that oxygen depletion of the surface oxide layer, caused by ion bombardment, is a reason of mitigation of the hydrogen transport through this layer in both directions.

  5. Tunable Anderson Localization in Hydrogenated Graphene Based on the Electric Field Effect: First-Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joongoo; Wei, Su-Huai

    2014-03-01

    We present a mechanism for reversible switching of the Anderson localization (AL) of electrons in hydrogenated graphene through modulation of the H coverage on graphene by external electric fields. The main idea is to exploit the unique acid-base chemistry (i.e., proton transfer reaction) between NH3 gas and hydrogenated graphene, which can be controlled by applying perpendicular electric fields. The proposed field-induced control of disorder in hydrogenated graphene not only has scientific merits in a systematic study of AL of electrons in grapheme but can also lead to new insight into the development of a new type of transistor based on reversible on/off switching of AL. Furthermore, the reversible and effective tuning of the H coverage on graphene should be useful for tailoring material properties of weakly hydrogenated graphene. This work was funded by the NREL LDRD program (DE-AC36-08GO28308).

  6. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B. Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-28

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  7. Effects of microstructure banding on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth in X65 pipeline steels

    DOE PAGES

    Ronevich, Joseph A.; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Chris W.

    2015-09-10

    Banded ferrite-pearlite X65 pipeline steel was tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to evaluate the effects of oriented pearlite on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth. Test specimens were oriented in the steel pipe such that cracks propagated either parallel or perpendicular to the banded pearlite. The ferrite-pearlite microstructure exhibited orientation dependent behavior in which fatigue crack growth rates were significantly lower for cracks oriented perpendicular to the banded pearlite compared to cracks oriented parallel to the bands. Thus the reduction of hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth across the banded pearlite is attributed to a combination of crack-tip branching and impededmore » hydrogen diffusion across the banded pearlite.« less

  8. Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous carbon as an effective hydrogenation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Li Li; Zhang, Jiatao; Liu, Tao; Zhao, X S

    2013-11-21

    Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in D-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal. PMID:24072134

  9. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular TH-naloxone binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, A.E.; Wooten, G.F.

    1987-07-27

    The binding of the opiate antagonist TH-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, TH-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables.

  10. The effect of saturation of ACE binding sites on the pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat in man.

    PubMed Central

    Wade, J R; Meredith, P A; Hughes, D M; Elliott, H L

    1992-01-01

    1. Eight healthy male volunteers received oral enalapril, 10 mg, in the presence and absence of pretreatment with captopril, 50 mg, twice daily for 5 days. 2. Enalaprilat pharmacokinetics were characterised after both doses of enalapril to investigate the effect of saturating ACE binding sites by pretreatment with captopril. 3. The pharmacokinetics of enalaprilat were best described by a one compartment model with zero order input incorporating saturable binding to plasma and tissue ACE. 4. Values of AUC (0.72 h) for enalaprilat were 419 +/- 97 and 450 +/- 87 ng ml-1 h in the presence and absence of captopril, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant nor were there any other differences in model parameters. 5. Induction of ACE by captopril resulting in an increase in the number of ACE binding sites, may have obscured any effect of captopril on the occupancy of ACE binding sites by enalapril. PMID:1312853

  11. Effect of cashew nut shell liquid on metabolic hydrogen flow on bovine rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Enishi, Osamu; Shinkai, Takumi; Higuchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Takenaka, Akio; Nagashima, Kyo; Mochizuki, Masami; Kobayashi, Yasuo

    2014-03-01

    Effect of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), a methane inhibitor, on bovine rumen fermentation was investigated through analysis of the metabolic hydrogen flow estimated from concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and methane. Three cows were fed a concentrate and hay diet without or with a CNSL-containing pellet. Two trials were conducted using CNSL pellets blended with only silica (trial 1) or with several other ingredients (trial 2). Methane production was measured in a respiration chamber system, and energy balance and nutrient digestibility were monitored. The estimated flow of metabolic hydrogen demonstrated that a part of metabolic hydrogen was used for hydrogen gas production, and a large amount of it flowed into production of methane and SCFA in both trial 1 and 2, when CNSL was administered to the bovine rumen. The results obtained by regression analyses showed that the effect of CNSL supply on methane reduction was coupled with a significant (P < 0.01) decrease of acetate and a significant (P < 0.01) increase of propionate and hydrogen gas. These findings reveal that CNSL is able to reduce methane and acetate production, and to increase hydrogen gas and propionate production in vivo. PMID:24128067

  12. Effect of cashew nut shell liquid on metabolic hydrogen flow on bovine rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Enishi, Osamu; Shinkai, Takumi; Higuchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Takenaka, Akio; Nagashima, Kyo; Mochizuki, Masami; Kobayashi, Yasuo

    2014-03-01

    Effect of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), a methane inhibitor, on bovine rumen fermentation was investigated through analysis of the metabolic hydrogen flow estimated from concentrations of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and methane. Three cows were fed a concentrate and hay diet without or with a CNSL-containing pellet. Two trials were conducted using CNSL pellets blended with only silica (trial 1) or with several other ingredients (trial 2). Methane production was measured in a respiration chamber system, and energy balance and nutrient digestibility were monitored. The estimated flow of metabolic hydrogen demonstrated that a part of metabolic hydrogen was used for hydrogen gas production, and a large amount of it flowed into production of methane and SCFA in both trial 1 and 2, when CNSL was administered to the bovine rumen. The results obtained by regression analyses showed that the effect of CNSL supply on methane reduction was coupled with a significant (P < 0.01) decrease of acetate and a significant (P < 0.01) increase of propionate and hydrogen gas. These findings reveal that CNSL is able to reduce methane and acetate production, and to increase hydrogen gas and propionate production in vivo.

  13. Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous carbon as an effective hydrogenation catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Li Li; Zhang, Jiatao; Liu, Tao; Zhao, X. S.

    2013-10-01

    Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in d-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal.Bimetallic ruthenium-copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon were prepared via a template route and evaluated in terms of catalytic properties in d-glucose hydrogenation. The existence of bimetallic entities was supported by Ru L3-edge and Cu K-edge X-ray absorption results. The hydrogen spillover effect of the bimetallic catalyst on the hydrogenation reaction was evidenced by the results of both hydrogen and carbon monoxide chemisorptions. The bimetallic catalyst displayed a higher catalytic activity than the single-metal catalysts prepared using the same approach, namely ruthenium or copper nanoparticles embedded in the pore walls of mesoporous carbon. This improvement was due to the changes in the geometric and electronic structures of the bimetallic catalyst because of the presence of the second metal. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03813k

  14. Effect of hydrogenation on the memory properties of Si nanocrystals obtained by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Young-Kwan; Park, Sangjin; Park, Youngsoo; Yoo, In-Kyeong; Cha, Daigil; Shin, Jung H.; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2006-11-01

    Effect of hydrogenation on memory properties has been studied for metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures with Si nanocrystals fabricated using inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition and subsequent annealing. Hydrogenation induces a drastic increase of a dip in the quasistatic capacitance-voltage (C-V) curve of the MOS capacitor, caused by the reduction of the interface states due to hydrogen passivation. This is consistent with high-frequency C-V measurements showing more well-defined curves with less distortion in hydrogenated samples. After hydrogenation, the MOS device shows a significantly larger decrease of flatband voltage shift in electron charging than in hole charging, indicating more effective passivation of the defect states related to the electron charging. A longer retention time is found for electron charging after hydrogenation, but almost no change of charge loss rate for hole charging. These results suggest that an asymmetry exists in the effect of hydrogenation between electron and hole storage.

  15. Progress in the study of biological effects of hydrogen on higher plants and its promising application in agriculture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    While the medical effects of hydrogen have been broadly analyzed, research into the effects of hydrogen on higher plants has often been of lesser concern. Recent studies on the botanical effects of hydrogen have shown that it is involved in signal transduction pathways of plant hormones and can improve the resistance of plants to stressors, such as drought, salinity, cold and heavy metals. In addition, hydrogen could delay postharvest ripening and senescence of fruits. Observational evidence has also shown that hydrogen can regulate the flowering time of plants. These results indicate that hydrogen may have great potential applications within agricultural production, indicating that there may be a new ‘hydrogen agricultural era’ to come. PMID:25276344

  16. Polar solvent effects on tartaric acid binding by aromatic oligoamide foldamer capsules.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Nagula; El-Behairy, Mohammed Farrag; Lautrette, Guillaume; Ferrand, Yann; Huc, Ivan

    2016-02-28

    Aromatic oligoamide sequences able to fold into single helical capsules were functionalized with two types of side chains to make them soluble in various solvents such as chloroform, methanol or water and their propensity to recognize tartaric acid was evaluated. The binding affinities to tartaric acid and binding thermodynamics in different media were investigated by variable temperature (1)H NMR and ITC experiments, the two methods giving consistent results. We show that tartaric acid binding mainly rests on enthalpically favourable polar interactions that were found to be sufficiently strong to be effective in the presence of a polar aprotic solvent (DMSO) and even in pure methanol. Binding in water was very weak. The stronger binding interactions were found to be more susceptible to the effect of competitive solvents and compensated by unfavourable entropic effects. Thus, the best host in a less polar medium eventually was found to be the worst host in protic solvents. An interesting case of entropically driven binding was evidenced in methanol.

  17. Fundamental Kinetics of Supercritical Coal Liquefaction: Effect of Catalysts and Hydrogen-Donor Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Ben J; Madras, Girodhar; Smith, J M; Kodera, Yoichi

    1997-04-16

    This is the quarterly report on our recent progress toward the overall objective to understand the supercritical fluid extraction of hydrocarbons from coal. Our strategy is to simulate coal as a high molecular-weight polymeric material by studying the degradation of polymers under various conditions. The hypothesis we are testing is that degradation of such macromolecules is applicable to the decomposition (depolymerization) of the coal network. Polymer degradation and coal liquefaction are influenced strongly by the solvent in the reaction. This motivated our investigation of the effect of hydrogen donor solvents on polymer degradation. In particular, we obtained new experimental data to show how a hydrogen donor, 6-hydroxy tetralin, influences the degradation rate of polystyrene. We also developed a detailed radical mechanism for hydrogen donation based on the Rice-Herzfeld chain reaction concept with the elementary steps of initiation, depropagation, hydrogen abstraction, and termination. Expressions for the degradation rate parameters were obtained by applying continuous distribution kinetics to the MWD of the reacting polymer. The theory explains the different influences of the hydrogen donor solvent on the degradation rate coefficients for different polymers. Though developed for the degradation of polymers, the mechanism and the theory are potentially applicable for chain scission and addition reactions among distributions of paraffins, olefins, and radicals of all chain lengths. The concepts can, in principle, be extended to examine the effect of hydrogen donors on coal liquefaction and on the complex mixture of liquefaction compounds. Based on this work, a research paper titled "Effect of Hydrogen Donors on Polymer Degradation", has been submitted for publication. Our research paper entitled, "Molecular weight effect on the dynamics of polystyrene degradation", has been accepted for publication by the journal, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research.

  18. Effects of cell volume regulating osmolytes on glycerol 3-phosphate binding to triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Gulotta, Miriam; Qiu, Linlin; Desamero, Ruel; Rösgen, Jörg; Bolen, D Wayne; Callender, Robert

    2007-09-01

    During cell volume regulation, intracellular concentration changes occur in both inorganic and organic osmolytes in order to balance the extracellular osmotic stress and maintain cell volume homeostasis. Generally, salt and urea increase the Km's of enzymes and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) counteracts these effects by decreasing Km's. The hypothesis to account for these effects is that urea and salt shift the native state ensemble of the enzyme toward conformers that are substrate-binding incompetent (BI), while TMAO shifts the ensemble toward binding competent (BC) species. Km's are often complex assemblies of rate constants involving several elementary steps in catalysis, so to better understand osmolyte effects we have focused on a single elementary event, substrate binding. We test the conformational shift hypothesis by evaluating the effects of salt, urea, and TMAO on the mechanism of binding glycerol 3-phosphate, a substrate analogue, to yeast triosephosphate isomerase. Temperature-jump kinetic measurements promote a mechanism consistent with osmolyte-induced shifts in the [BI]/[BC] ratio of enzyme conformers. Importantly, salt significantly affects the binding constant through its effect on the activity coefficients of substrate, enzyme, and enzyme-substrate complex, and it is likely that TMAO and urea affect activity coefficients as well. Results indicate that the conformational shift hypothesis alone does not account for the effects of osmolytes on Km's. PMID:17696453

  19. Antitumor effect of synergistic contribution of nitrite and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Mizuno, Masaaki; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas (NEAPP) have been attracted attention in the noble application of cancer therapy. Although good effects of the Plasma-Activated-Medium (PAM) such as the selective antitumor effect and killing effect for the anticancer agent resistant cells were reported, a mechanism of this effect has not been still clarified yet. In this study, we have investigated a contribution of the reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) generated in PAM such as hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. Those species generated in the PAM quantitatively measured by light absorbance of commercial regent. Moreover, viable cell count after cell culture with those RNOS intentionally added medium or PAM were also measured by MTS assay. Our NEAPP source generated hydrogen peroxide and nitrite with the generation ratio of 0.35 μM/s and 9.8 μM/s. In those RNOS, hydrogen peroxide has respective antitumor effect. On the other hands, nitrite has no antitumor effect singly. But, synergistically enhance the antitumor effect of hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, this effect of those RNOS also contribute for the selectively cancer killing effect of PAM.

  20. A molecular dynamics study of nuclear quantum effect on the diffusion of hydrogen in condensed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Tokumasu, Takashi; Tsuda, Shin-ichi; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki; Koshi, Mitsuo; Hayashie, A. Koichi

    2014-10-06

    In this paper, the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule on its diffusivity is analyzed using Molecular Dynamics (MD) method. The path integral centroid MD (CMD) method is applied for the reproduction method of time evolution of the molecules. The diffusion coefficient of liquid hydrogen is calculated using the Green-Kubo method. The simulation is performed at wide temperature region and the temperature dependence of the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule is addressed. The calculation results are compared with those of classical MD results. As a result, it is confirmed that the diffusivity of hydrogen molecule is changed depending on temperature by the quantum effect. It is clarified that this result can be explained that the dominant factor by quantum effect on the diffusivity of hydrogen changes from the swollening the potential to the shallowing the potential well around 30 K. Moreover, it is found that this tendency is related to the temperature dependency of the ratio of the quantum kinetic energy and classical kinetic energy.

  1. Copper contamination effects on hydrogen-air combustion under SCRAMJET (supersonic combustion ramjet) testing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Berry, G.F.

    1990-01-01

    Two forms of copper catalytic reactions (homogeneous and heterogeneous) in hydrogen flames were found in a literature survey. Hydrogen atoms in flames recombine into hydrogen molecules through catalytic reactions, and these reactions which affect the timing of the combustion process. Simulations of hydrogen flames with copper contamination were conducted by using a modified general chemical kinetics program (GCKP). Results show that reaction times of hydrogen flames are shortened by copper catalytic reactions, but ignition times are relatively insensitive to the reactions. The reduction of reaction time depends on the copper concentration, copper phase, particle size (if copper is in the condensed phase), and initial temperature and pressure. The higher the copper concentration of the smaller the particle, the larger the reduction in reaction time. For a supersonic hydrogen flame (Mach number = 4.4) contaminated with 200 ppm of gaseous copper species, the calculated reaction times are reduced by about 9%. Similar reductions in reaction time are also computed for heterogeneous copper contamination. Under scramjet testing conditions, the change of combustion timing appears to be tolerable (less than 5%) if the Mach number is lower than 3 or the copper contamination is less than 100 ppm. The higher rate the Mach number, the longer the reaction time and the larger the copper catalytic effects. 7 tabs., 8 figs., 34 refs.

  2. Effect of hydrogen on dynamic charge transport in amorphous oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Nam, Yunyong; Hur, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang-Hee Ko; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen in zinc oxide based semiconductors functions as a donor or a defect de-activator depending on its concentration, greatly affecting the device characteristics of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs). Thus, controlling the hydrogen concentration in oxide semiconductors is very important for achieving high mobility and minimizing device instability. In this study, we investigated the charge transport dynamics of the amorphous semiconductor InGaZnO at various hydrogen concentrations as a function of the deposition temperature of the gate insulator. To examine the nature of dynamic charge trapping, we employed short-pulse current‑voltage and transient current‑time measurements. Among various examined oxide devices, that with a high hydrogen concentration exhibits the best performance characteristics, such as high saturation mobility (10.9 cm2 v‑1 s‑1), low subthreshold slope (0.12 V/dec), and negligible hysteresis, which stem from low defect densities and negligible transient charge trapping. Our finding indicates that hydrogen atoms effectively passivate the defects in subgap states of the bulk semiconductor, minimizing the mobility degradation and threshold voltage instability. This study indicates that hydrogen plays a useful role in TFTs by improving the device performance and stability.

  3. Effect of hydrogen on dynamic charge transport in amorphous oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Nam, Yunyong; Hur, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang-Hee Ko; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen in zinc oxide based semiconductors functions as a donor or a defect de-activator depending on its concentration, greatly affecting the device characteristics of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs). Thus, controlling the hydrogen concentration in oxide semiconductors is very important for achieving high mobility and minimizing device instability. In this study, we investigated the charge transport dynamics of the amorphous semiconductor InGaZnO at various hydrogen concentrations as a function of the deposition temperature of the gate insulator. To examine the nature of dynamic charge trapping, we employed short-pulse current-voltage and transient current-time measurements. Among various examined oxide devices, that with a high hydrogen concentration exhibits the best performance characteristics, such as high saturation mobility (10.9 cm2 v-1 s-1), low subthreshold slope (0.12 V/dec), and negligible hysteresis, which stem from low defect densities and negligible transient charge trapping. Our finding indicates that hydrogen atoms effectively passivate the defects in subgap states of the bulk semiconductor, minimizing the mobility degradation and threshold voltage instability. This study indicates that hydrogen plays a useful role in TFTs by improving the device performance and stability.

  4. Effect of hydrogen on dynamic charge transport in amorphous oxide thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeho; Nam, Yunyong; Hur, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang-Hee Ko; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-08-12

    Hydrogen in zinc oxide based semiconductors functions as a donor or a defect de-activator depending on its concentration, greatly affecting the device characteristics of oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs). Thus, controlling the hydrogen concentration in oxide semiconductors is very important for achieving high mobility and minimizing device instability. In this study, we investigated the charge transport dynamics of the amorphous semiconductor InGaZnO at various hydrogen concentrations as a function of the deposition temperature of the gate insulator. To examine the nature of dynamic charge trapping, we employed short-pulse current-voltage and transient current-time measurements. Among various examined oxide devices, that with a high hydrogen concentration exhibits the best performance characteristics, such as high saturation mobility (10.9 cm(2) v(-1) s(-1)), low subthreshold slope (0.12 V/dec), and negligible hysteresis, which stem from low defect densities and negligible transient charge trapping. Our finding indicates that hydrogen atoms effectively passivate the defects in subgap states of the bulk semiconductor, minimizing the mobility degradation and threshold voltage instability. This study indicates that hydrogen plays a useful role in TFTs by improving the device performance and stability. PMID:27363543

  5. CO hydrogenation on nickel-based catalysts: Effects of copper addition

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.; Mirodatos, C.

    2000-05-15

    The effect of copper addition on the catalytic properties of silica-supported nickel catalysts for the reaction of CO hydrogenation in the temperature range of 200--500 C has been investigated. Different effects, positive or negative, depending on the temperature and the copper content, are described and explained. At low temperature (230 C), the addition of low copper content prevents the loss of the active surface by sintering without inhibiting the rate of CO hydrogenation too much. At high temperatures (450 C), high copper content is necessary to limit the accumulation of poisonous carbon products, but at the expense of CO conversion. On the basis of the various kinetic and morphologic effects of copper addition, an advanced description of the CO hydrogenation mechanism is also provided, assuming an active site formed by 2--3 adjacent Ni atoms, whatever the temperature or the copper content may be.

  6. Hybrid simulations of the effects of interstellar pickup hydrogen on the solar wind termination shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, P. C.; Goldstein, B. E.; Omidi, N.

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid (kinetic ions/fluid electrons) plasma simulations are used to study the effects of a population of energetic interstellar pickup hydrogen ions on the solar wind termination shock. The pickup hydrogen is treated as a second ion species in the simulations, and thus the effects of the pick-ups on the shock, as well as the effects of the shock on the pickups, are treated in a fully self-consistent manner. For quasi-perpendicular shocks with 10-20 percent pickup hydrogen the pickup ions manifest themselves in a small foot ahead of the shock ramp caused by pickup ion reflection. For oblique shocks with smaller angles between the field and the shock normal, a large fraction of the pickup ions are reflected and move back upstream where they excite large amplitude magnetosonic waves which steepen into shocklets. These backstreaming pickup ions may provide advance warning of a spacecraft encounter with the termination shock.

  7. Effect of Li Adsorption on the Electronic and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Acenes: A Dispersion-Corrected TAO-DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Seenithurai, Sonai; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2016-09-09

    Due to the presence of strong static correlation effects and noncovalent interactions, accurate prediction of the electronic and hydrogen storage properties of Li-adsorbed acenes with n linearly fused benzene rings (n = 3-8) has been very challenging for conventional electronic structure methods. To meet the challenge, we study these properties using our recently developed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) with dispersion corrections. In contrast to pure acenes, the binding energies of H2 molecules on Li-adsorbed acenes are in the ideal binding energy range (about 20 to 40 kJ/mol per H2). Besides, the H2 gravimetric storage capacities of Li-adsorbed acenes are in the range of 9.9 to 10.7 wt%, satisfying the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) ultimate target of 7.5 wt%. On the basis of our results, Li-adsorbed acenes can be high-capacity hydrogen storage materials for reversible hydrogen uptake and release at ambient conditions.

  8. Effect of Li Adsorption on the Electronic and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Acenes: A Dispersion-Corrected TAO-DFT Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seenithurai, Sonai; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2016-09-01

    Due to the presence of strong static correlation effects and noncovalent interactions, accurate prediction of the electronic and hydrogen storage properties of Li-adsorbed acenes with n linearly fused benzene rings (n = 3–8) has been very challenging for conventional electronic structure methods. To meet the challenge, we study these properties using our recently developed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) with dispersion corrections. In contrast to pure acenes, the binding energies of H2 molecules on Li-adsorbed acenes are in the ideal binding energy range (about 20 to 40 kJ/mol per H2). Besides, the H2 gravimetric storage capacities of Li-adsorbed acenes are in the range of 9.9 to 10.7 wt%, satisfying the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) ultimate target of 7.5 wt%. On the basis of our results, Li-adsorbed acenes can be high-capacity hydrogen storage materials for reversible hydrogen uptake and release at ambient conditions.

  9. Effect of Li Adsorption on the Electronic and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Acenes: A Dispersion-Corrected TAO-DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Seenithurai, Sonai; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2016-01-01

    Due to the presence of strong static correlation effects and noncovalent interactions, accurate prediction of the electronic and hydrogen storage properties of Li-adsorbed acenes with n linearly fused benzene rings (n = 3–8) has been very challenging for conventional electronic structure methods. To meet the challenge, we study these properties using our recently developed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) with dispersion corrections. In contrast to pure acenes, the binding energies of H2 molecules on Li-adsorbed acenes are in the ideal binding energy range (about 20 to 40 kJ/mol per H2). Besides, the H2 gravimetric storage capacities of Li-adsorbed acenes are in the range of 9.9 to 10.7 wt%, satisfying the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) ultimate target of 7.5 wt%. On the basis of our results, Li-adsorbed acenes can be high-capacity hydrogen storage materials for reversible hydrogen uptake and release at ambient conditions. PMID:27609626

  10. Effect of Li Adsorption on the Electronic and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Acenes: A Dispersion-Corrected TAO-DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Seenithurai, Sonai; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2016-01-01

    Due to the presence of strong static correlation effects and noncovalent interactions, accurate prediction of the electronic and hydrogen storage properties of Li-adsorbed acenes with n linearly fused benzene rings (n = 3-8) has been very challenging for conventional electronic structure methods. To meet the challenge, we study these properties using our recently developed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) with dispersion corrections. In contrast to pure acenes, the binding energies of H2 molecules on Li-adsorbed acenes are in the ideal binding energy range (about 20 to 40 kJ/mol per H2). Besides, the H2 gravimetric storage capacities of Li-adsorbed acenes are in the range of 9.9 to 10.7 wt%, satisfying the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) ultimate target of 7.5 wt%. On the basis of our results, Li-adsorbed acenes can be high-capacity hydrogen storage materials for reversible hydrogen uptake and release at ambient conditions. PMID:27609626

  11. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Effect of gravity on the stability and structure of lean hydrogen-air flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, G.; Kailasanath, K.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed, time-dependent, 2D numerical simulations with full hydrogen-oxygen chemistry are used to investigate the effects of gravity on the stability and structure of laminar flames in lean, premixed hydrogen-air mixtures. The calculations show that the effects of gravity becomes more important as the lean flammability limit is approached. In a 12 percent hydrogen-air mixture, gravity plays only a secondary role in determining the multidimensional structure of the flame with the stability and structure of the flame controlled primarily by the thermo-diffusive instability mechanism. However, in leaner hydrogen-air mixtures gravity becomes more important. Upward-propagating flames are highly curved and evolve into a bubble rising upwards in the tube. Downward-propagating flames are flat or even oscillate between structures with concave and convex curvatures. The zero-gravity flame shows only cellular structures. Cellular structures which are present in zero gravity can be suppressed by the effect of buoyancy for mixtures leaner than 11 percent hydrogen. These observations are explained on the basis of an interaction between the processes leading to buoyancy-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the thermo-diffusive instability.

  13. Effects of hydrogen-rich water on aging periodontal tissues in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kawabata, Yuya; Kasuyama, Kenta; Endo, Yasumasa; Yoneda, Toshiki; Yamane, Mayu; Azuma, Tetsuji; Ekuni, Daisuke; Morita, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damage is involved in age-related inflammatory reactions. The anti-oxidative effects of hydrogen-rich water suppress oxidative damage, which may aid in inhibiting age-related inflammatory reactions. We investigated the effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on aging periodontal tissues in healthy rats. Four-month-old male Fischer 344 rats (n = 12) were divided into two groups: the experimental group (hydrogen-rich water treatment) and the control group (distilled water treatment). The rats consumed hydrogen-rich water or distilled water until 16 months of age. The experimental group exhibited lower periodontal oxidative damage at 16 months of age than the control group. Although protein expression of interleukin-1β did not differ, gene expression of Nod-like receptor protein 3 inflammasomes was activated in periodontal tissues from the experimental group as compared with the control group. Drinking hydrogen-rich water is proposed to have anti-aging effects on periodontal oxidative damage, but not on inflammatory reactions in healthy rats. PMID:24985521

  14. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms. PMID:25330347

  15. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms.

  16. Binding of comminuted meat: Effect of high pressure.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, J J; McKenzie, I J; Turner, R H; Jones, P N

    1984-01-01

    Patties prepared from comminuted meat were pressure-treated at up to 150 MPa at 0-3°C and the cohesion between meat particles in the cooked patty investigated from tensile strength measurements. Pressure treatment increased tensile strength, the magnitude of the increase depending upon the intensity and duration of pressure treatment, the concentration of salt in the patty and pH value. The effect was most pronounced in patties of pH 5 to 6 and with 1% salt in the aqueous phase. Under these conditions cooking losses were reduced. When compared with the effect of addition of 0·5% tetrasodium pyrophosphate in a patty with 1% salt, pressure treatment retained its effect at lower pH values.

  17. MODELING THE EFFECTS OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE BINDING OF ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS TO THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the effects of flexibility on the binding of environmental estrogens to the estrogen receptor
    There are many reports of environmental endocrine disruption in the literature, yet it has been difficult to identify the specific chemicals responsible for these effects. ...

  18. The effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the planarity of amides.

    PubMed

    Platts, James A; Maarof, Hasmerya; Harris, Kenneth D M; Lim, Gin Keat; Willock, David J

    2012-09-14

    Ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations on some model systems are presented to assess the extent to which intermolecular hydrogen bonding can affect the planarity of amide groups. Formamide and urea are examined as archetypes of planar and non-planar amides, respectively. DFT optimisations suggest that appropriately disposed hydrogen-bond donor or acceptor molecules can induce non-planarity in formamide, with OCNH dihedral angles deviating by up to ca. 20° from planarity. Ab initio energy calculations demonstrate that the energy required to deform an amide molecule from the preferred geometry of the isolated molecule is more than compensated by the stabilisation due to hydrogen bonding. Similarly, the NH(2) group in urea can be made effectively planar by the presence of appropriately positioned hydrogen-bond acceptors, whereas hydrogen-bond donors increase the non-planarity of the NH(2) group. Small clusters (a dimer, two trimers and a pentamer) extracted from the crystal structure of urea indicate that the crystal field acts to force planarity of the urea molecule; however, the interaction with nearest neighbours alone is insufficient to induce the molecule to become completely planar, and longer-range effects are required. Finally, the potential for intermolecular hydrogen bonding to induce non-planarity in a model of a peptide is explored. Inter alia, the insights obtained in the present work on the extent to which the geometry of amide groups may be deformed under the influence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding provide structural guidelines that can assist the interpretation of the geometries of such groups in structure determination from powder X-ray diffraction data. PMID:22847473

  19. Quantum Calculations on Hydrogen Bonds in Certain Water Clusters Show Cooperative Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Znamenskiy, Vasiliy S.; Green, Michael E.

    2007-01-09

    Water molecules in clefts and small clusters are in a significantly different environment than those in bulk water. We have carried out ab initio calculations that demonstrate this in a series of clusters, showing that cooperative effects must be taken into account in the treatment of hydrogen bonds and water clusters in such bounded systems. Hydrogen bonds between water molecules in simulations are treated most frequently by using point-charge water potentials, such as TIP3P or SPC, sometimes with a polarizable extension. These produce excellent results in bulk water, for which they are calibrated. Clefts are different from bulk; it is necessary to look at smaller systems and investigate the effect of limited numbers of neighbors. We start with a study of isolated clusters of water with varying numbers of neighbors of a hydrogen-bonded pair of water molecules. The cluster as a whole is in a vacuum. The clusters are defined so as to provide the possible arrangements of nearest neighbors of a central hydrogen-bonded pair of water molecules. We then scan the length and angles of the central hydrogen bond of the clusters, using density functional theory, for each possible arrangement of donor and acceptor hydrogen bonds on the central hydrogen-bonding pair; the potential of interaction of two water molecules varies with the number of donor and acceptor neighbors. This also involves changes in charge on the water molecules as a function of bond length and changes in energy and length as a function of the number of neighboring donor and acceptor molecules. The energy varies by approximately 6 kBT near room temperature from the highest to the lowest energy when bond length alone is varied, enough to seriously affect simulations.

  20. Quantum Calculations on Hydrogen Bonds in Certain Water Clusters Show Cooperative Effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Znamenskiy, Vasiliy S.; Green, Michael E.

    2006-12-08

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Water molecules in clefts and small clusters are in a significantly different environment than those in bulk water. We have carried out ab initio calculations that demonstrate this in a series of clusters, showing that cooperative effects must be taken into account in the treatment of hydrogen bonds and water clusters in such bounded systems. Hydrogen bonds between water molecules in simulations are treated most frequently by using point-charge water potentials, such as TIP3P or SPC, sometimes with a polarizable extension. These produce excellent results in bulk water, for which they are calibrated. Clefts are different from bulk; it is necessary to look at smaller systems and investigate the effect of limited numbers of neighbors. We start with a study of isolated clusters of water with varying numbers of neighbors of a hydrogen-bonded pair of water molecules. The cluster as a whole is in a vacuum. The clusters are defined so as to provide the possible arrangements of nearest neighbors of a central hydrogen-bonded pair of water molecules. We then scan the length and angles of the central hydrogen bond of the clusters, using density functional theory, for each possible arrangement of donor and acceptor hydrogen bonds on the central hydrogen-bonding pair; the potential of interaction of two water molecules varies with the number of donor and acceptor neighbors. This also involves changes in charge on the water molecules as a function of bond length and changes in energy and length as a function of the number of neighboring donor and acceptor molecules. The energy varies by approximately 6 kBT near room temperature from the highest to the lowest energy when bond length alone is

  1. The Effect of Hydrogen Annealing on the Impurity Content of Alumina-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2000-01-01

    Previously, the effect of hydrogen annealing on increasing the adhesion of Al2O3 scales had been related to the effective desulfurization that occurred during this process. The simultaneous reduction of other impurities has now been re-examined for up to 20 impurity elements in the case of five different alloys (NiCrAl, FeCrAl, PWA 1480, Rene'142, and Rene'N5). Hydrogen annealing produced measurable reductions in elemental concentration for B, C, Na, Mg, P, K, Sr, or Sn in varying degrees for at least one and up to three of these alloys. No single element was reduced by hydrogen annealing for all the alloys except sulfur. In many cases spalling occurred at low levels of these other impurities, while in other cases the scales were adherent at high levels of the impurities. No impurity besides sulfur was strongly correlated with adhesion.

  2. Hydrogen isotope effect on storage behavior of U2Ti and UZr2.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jat, Ram Avtar; Sawant, S. G.; Rajan, M. B.; Dhanuskar, J. R.; Kaity, Santu; Parida, S. C.

    2013-11-01

    U2Ti and UZr2.3 alloys were prepared by arc melting method, vacuum annealed and characterized by XRD, SEM and EDX methods. Hydrogen isotope effect on the storage behavior of these alloys were studied by measuring the hydrogen/deuterium desorption pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) profiles in the temperature range of 573-678 K using a Sievert's type volumetric apparatus. It was observed that, in the temperature and pressure range of investigation, all the isotherms show a single desorption plateau. The PCT data reveals that both U2Ti and UZr2.3 alloys had normal isotope effects on hydrogen/deuterium desorption at all experimental temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters for dehydrogenation and dedeuteration reactions of the corresponding hydrides and deuterides of the above alloys were deduced from the PCT data.

  3. Effect of dehydrogenation/hydrogenation on the linear and nonlinear optical properties of Li@porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Qing; Sun, Shi-Ling; Zhong, Rong-Lin; Xu, Hong-Liang; Su, Zhong-Min

    2012-11-01

    In the present work, Li@porphyrins and their derivatives were designed in order to explore the effect of dehydrogenation/hydrogenation on linear and nonlinear optical properties. Their stable structures were obtained by the M06-2X method. Moreover, the M06-2X method showed that dehydrogenation/hydrogenation has greatly influences polarizabilities (α₀ values) and hyperpolarizabilities (β(tot) and γ(tot) values): α₀ values ranged from 331 to 389 au, β(tot) values from 0 to 2465 au, and γ(tot) values from -21.2 × 10⁴ to 21.4 × 10⁴ au. This new knowledge of the effect of dehydrogenation/hydrogenation on nonlinear optical properties may prove beneficial to the design and development of high-performance porphyrin materials. PMID:22722697

  4. Effect of oxide films on hydrogen permeability of candidate Stirling engine heater head tube alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S. R.; Misencik, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of oxide films developed in situ from CO/CO2 doped hydrogen on high pressure hydrogen permeability at 820 C was studied on N-155, A-286, IN 800, 19-9DL, Nitronic 40, HS-188, and IN 718 tubing in a Stirling materials simulator. The hydrogen permeability decreased with increasing dopant levels of CO or CO2 and corresponding decreases in oxide porosity. Minor reactive alloying elements strongly influenced permeability. At high levels of CO or CO2, a liquid oxide formed on alloys with greater than 50 percent Fe. This caused increased permeability. The oxides formed on the inside tube walls were analyzed and their effective permeabilities were calculated.

  5. Molecular hydrogen: an overview of its neurobiological effects and therapeutic potential for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a bioactive molecule that has a diversity of effects, including anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties; these overlap with the process of neuroprogression in major psychiatric disorders. Specifically, both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are associated with increased oxidative and inflammatory stress. Moreover, lithium which is commonly administered for treating bipolar disorder has effects on oxidative stress and apoptotic pathways, as do valproate and some atypical antipsychotics for treating schizophrenia. Molecular hydrogen has been studied pre-clinically in animal models for the treatment of some medical conditions including hypoxia and neurodegenerative disorders, and there are intriguing clinical findings in neurological disorders including Parkinson’s disease. Therefore, it is hypothesized that administration of hydrogen molecule may have potential as a novel therapy for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and other concurrent disorders characterized by oxidative, inflammatory and apoptotic dysregulation. PMID:23742229

  6. Magnetocaloric properties of distilled gadolinium: Effects of structural inhomogeneity and hydrogen impurity

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhanov, G. S.; Kolchugina, N. B.; Chzhan, V. B.; Chistyakov, O. D.; Tereshina, E. A.; Tereshina, I. S.; Politova, G. A.; Badurski, D.; Drulis, H.; Paukov, M.; Havela, L.

    2014-06-16

    High-purity Gd prepared by distillation is a structurally inhomogeneous system consisting of needle-shaped crystals of cross section 0.5–2.5 μm with near-c-axis orientation embedded in a matrix of nanosized (30–100 nm) grains. By measuring the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) directly, we find that the MCE values differ markedly for the plate-shaped samples cut out of a distillate along and perpendicular to the crystals. The effect of small controlled amounts of impurity (hydrogen) on the properties of distilled Gd is further studied. We observe opposite trends in the MCE response to hydrogen charging with respect to the crystal's orientation within the samples and discuss mechanisms interrelating the unique structural morphology with the impurity behavior. As an overall assessment, the Curie temperatures of α-GdH{sub x} solid solutions increase from 291 K up to 294 K when increasing hydrogen concentration x from 0 to 0.15. Hydrogenation is found to broaden the ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic phase transition. Hydrogen-containing specimens demonstrate reversibility of MCE at these temperatures.

  7. Tuning the interaction energy of hydrogen bonds: the effect of the substituent.

    PubMed

    Mata, Ignasi; Molins, Elies; Alkorta, Ibon; Espinosa, Enrique

    2011-11-17

    The effect of the substituent R in the hydrogen bonding properties of FH···FR (R = H, Al, Li, Cl and CCH) complexes has been studied by theoretical calculations. The dependency of the interaction energy with the hydrogen bond distance and R is explained in terms of the topologies of the electron density and the electrostatic potential. A simple model of the hydrogen bond interaction energy, which can be assimilated to an interaction potential, is defined in terms of a stabilizing mutual polarization of the monomers and an overall destabilizing contribution associated with the electron density reorganization when the overlap of the closed shells is large enough. This model shows an excellent agreement with the ab initio interaction energies and is common for all the analyzed complexes. The substituent effect is represented in the model by a single parameter that can be calculated from the electron distribution in the acceptor atom region. The perturbation in the hydrogen bonding interaction induced by the change of R presents a close similarity with that produced by an external electric field of the same order of magnitude than those found in crystalline solids, indicating that both perturbations should play a significant and similar role on the properties of hydrogen bonds in condensed matter.

  8. Effective Potential Approach to the Simulation of Large Para-Hydrogen Clusters and Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    The quantum simulation of large molecular system is a formidable task. We explore the use of effective potentials based on the Feynman path centroid variable in order to simulate large quantum clusters at a reduced computational cost. This centroid can be viewed as the ``most classical'' variable of a quantum system. Earlier work has shown that one can use a pairwise centroid pseudo-potential to simulate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen in the bulk phase at 25 K and 14 K. Bulk hydrogen, however, freezes below 14 K and we rather focus on nanodroplets in the very low temperature regime in order to study the superfluid behaviour of hydrogen. The calculation of the effective potential will be discussed along with its use in the context of molecular dynamics simulations. Centroid structural properties will be presented and compared to the results of path integral Monte Carlo simulations. We will present an approach for de-convoluting centroid structural properties in order to obtain real space results for hydrogen clusters of a wide range of sizes. The extension of the approach to the treatment of confined hydrogen will be discussed. M. Pavese and G.A. Voth, Chem. Phys. Lett. 249, 231 (1996).

  9. Protective Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline on Rats with Smoke Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Liu, Qi; Wang, Dawei; Feng, Shihai; Zhao, Yongjian; Shi, Yun; Liu, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on rats with smoke inhalation injury. Methods. 36 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 12 per group): sham group (S), inhalation injury plus normal saline treatment group (I+NS), and inhalation injury plus hydrogen-rich saline treatment group (I+HS). 30 min after injury, normal saline and hydrogen-rich saline were injected intraperitoneally (5 mL/kg) in I+NS group and I+HS group, respectively. All rats were euthanized and blood and organ specimens were collected for determination 24 h after inhalation injury. Results. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 expression, and apoptosis index (AI) in I+HS group were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), while superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were increased compared with those in I+NS group; and a marked improvement in alveolar structure was also found after hydrogen-rich saline treatment. Conclusions. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment exerts protective effects in acute lung injury induced by inhalation injury, at least in part through the activation of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant pathways and inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:26090070

  10. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE BURST PROPERTIES OF TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL FLAWED VESSELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Monica Hall, M; Ps Lam, P; Dean Thompson, D

    2008-03-27

    The effect of hydrogen on the burst properties Type 304L stainless steel vessels was investigated. The purpose of the study was to compare the burst properties of hydrogen-exposed stainless steel vessels burst with different media: water, helium gas, or deuterium gas. A second purpose of the tests was to provide data for the development of a predictive finite-element model. The burst tests were conducted on hydrogen-exposed and unexposed axially-flawed cylindrical vessels. The results indicate that samples burst pneumatically had lower volume ductility than those tested hydraulically. Deuterium gas tests had slightly lower ductility than helium gas tests. Burst pressures were not affected by burst media. Hydrogen-charged samples had lower volume ductility and slightly higher burst pressures than uncharged samples. Samples burst with deuterium gas fractured by quasi-cleavage near the inside wall. The results of the tests were used to improve a previously developed predictive finite-element model. The results show that predicting burst behavior requires as a material input the effect of hydrogen on the plastic strain to fracture from tensile tests. The burst test model shows that a reduction in the plastic strain to fracture of the material will result in lower volume ductility without a reduction in burst pressure which is in agreement with the burst results.

  11. Mapping the Effect of Gly Mutations in Collagen on α2β1 Integrin Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Sezin; Yu, Hongtao; An, Bo; Hamaia, Samir; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of one Gly in the essential repeating tripeptide sequence of the type I collagen triple helix results in the dominant hereditary bone disorder osteogenesis imperfecta. The mechanism leading to pathology likely involves misfolding and autophagy, although it has been hypothesized that some mutations interfere with known collagen interactions. Here, the effect of Gly replacements within and nearby the integrin binding GFPGER sequence was investigated using a recombinant bacterial collagen system. When a six-triplet human type I collagen sequence containing GFPGER was introduced into a bacterial collagen-like protein, this chimeric protein bound to integrin. Constructs with Gly to Ser substitutions within and nearby the inserted human sequence still formed a trypsin-resistant triple helix, suggesting a small local conformational perturbation. Gly to Ser mutations within the two Gly residues in the essential GFPGER sequence prevented integrin binding and cell attachment as predicted from molecular dynamics studies of the complex. Replacement of Gly residues C-terminal to GFPGER did not affect integrin binding. In contrast, Gly replacements N-terminal to the GFPGER sequence, up to four triplets away, decreased integrin binding and cell adhesion. This pattern suggests either an involvement of the triplets N-terminal to GFPGER in initial binding or a propagation of the perturbation of the triple helix C-terminal to a mutation site. The asymmetry in biological consequences relative to the mutation site may relate to the observed pattern of osteogenesis imperfecta mutations near the integrin binding site. PMID:27432884

  12. Effective tight-binding model for transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yen-Hung; Cazalilla, Miguel; Ochoa, Hector

    For transition metal dichalcogenides, various band models have been developed to describe the novel subband features. In this work, we propose a new effective minimum-band model by preforming a canonical transformation on the full-band Hamiltonian. We found that, depending on the form of transformation, both the Γ- and K-valley electrons can be well captured, including the frequency and band effective mass. And, for the full-band parameters used, starting from Wannier function basis set leads to a better result than from Slater-Koster basis set. A close inspection of the transformation projection also enables us to extract the modification on the site energy, as well as the orbital hopping between several nearest neighboring atoms. Instead of pure empirical fitting, our effective models preserve rich orbital physics inside, which is shown to be versatile in studying a variety of fundamental physical properties. Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan (NSC 102-2112-M-007-024-MY5).

  13. Statistical Thermodynamics for Actin-Myosin Binding: The Crucial Importance of Hydration Effects.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Hiraku; Hayashi, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    Actomyosin is an important molecular motor, and the binding of actin and myosin is an essential research target in biophysics. Nevertheless, the physical factors driving or opposing the binding are still unclear. Here, we investigate the role of water in actin-myosin binding using the most reliable statistical-mechanical method currently available for assessing biomolecules immersed in water. This method is characterized as follows: water is treated not as a dielectric continuum but as an ensemble of molecules; the polyatomic structures of proteins are taken into consideration; and the binding free energy is decomposed into physically insightful entropic and energetic components by accounting for the hydration effect to its full extent. We find that the actin-myosin binding brings large gains of electrostatic and Lennard-Jones attractive interactions. However, these gains are accompanied by even larger losses of actin-water and myosin-water electrostatic and LJ attractive interactions. Although roughly half of the energy increase due to the losses is cancelled out by the energy decrease arising from structural reorganization of the water released upon binding, the remaining energy increase is still larger than the energy decrease brought by the gains mentioned above. Hence, the net change in system energy is positive, which opposes binding. Importantly, the binding is driven by a large gain of configurational entropy of water, which surpasses the positive change in system energy and the conformational entropy loss occurring for actin and myosin. The principal physical origin of the large water-entropy gain is as follows: the actin-myosin interface is closely packed with the achievement of high shape complementarity on the atomic level, leading to a large increase in the total volume available to the translational displacement of water molecules in the system and a resultant reduction of water crowding (i.e., entropic correlations among water molecules). PMID

  14. Effect of protein aggregates on characterization of FcRn binding of Fc-fusion therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bajardi-Taccioli, Adriana; Blum, Andrew; Xu, Chongfeng; Sosic, Zoran; Bergelson, Svetlana; Feschenko, Marina

    2015-10-01

    Recycling of antibodies and Fc containing therapeutic proteins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is known to prolong their persistence in the bloodstream. Fusion of Fc fragment of IgG1 to other proteins is one of the strategies to improve their pharmacokinetic properties. Accurate measurement of Fc-FcRn binding provides information about the strength of this interaction, which in most cases correlates with serum half-life of the protein. It can also offer insight into functional integrity of Fc region. We investigated FcRn binding activity of a large set of Fc-fusion samples after thermal stress by the method based on AlphaScreen technology. An unexpected significant increase in FcR binding was found to correlate with formation of aggregates in these samples. Monomer purified from a thermally-stressed sample had normal FcRn binding, confirming that its Fc portion was intact. Experiments with aggregates spiked into a sample with low initial aggregation level, demonstrated strong correlation between the level of aggregates and FcRn binding. This correlation varied significantly in different methods. By introducing modifications to the assay format we were able to minimize the effects of aggregated species on FcRn binding, which should prevent masking functional changes of Fc-fusion protein. Biolayer interferometry (BLI) was used as an alternative method to measure FcRn binding. Both optimized AlphaScreen- and BLI-based assays were sensitive to structural changes in Fc portion of the molecule, such as oxidation of methionines 252 and 428, and therefore suitable for characterization of FcRn binding.

  15. The effect of a tin barrier layer on the permeability of hydrogen through mild steel and ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, J.; Piercy, G.R.

    1984-11-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the effectiveness of a commercially electroplated tin layer as a barrier to hydrogen, and to see how this altered when the tin layer was converted to FeSn. The authors measured the permeability of hydrogen through AISI 410 ferritic stainless steel and determined the effectiveness of tin as a surface barrier on it. The measured values for the permeability of hydrogen in iron and ferritic stainless steel are shown.

  16. Specific binding and biological effects of tumor promoting phorbol esters on sponges.

    PubMed

    Mazzorana, M; Garrone, R; Martel, N; Yamasaki, H

    1984-01-01

    Sponges grown in the presence of 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) show deep alterations of their structure and development. Their aquiferous system (flagellated cells and canals) is largely altered and the tissues show an unusually high cell density. This focalized effect of TPA on the aquiferous system seems specific and is reversible at low concentrations (100 ng/ml). A toxic, non-specific effect is also noted, particularly at high concentrations (5000 ng/ml). Using 3H-phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (3H-PDBu), we demonstrate a class of specific binding sites for phorbol esters in the homogenates of sponges. These binding sites have high affinity (Kd = 26.0 nM) for PDBu and at saturation about 20 pmoles of 3H-PDBu is bound per mg protein of sponge homogenates. The binding of 3H-PDBu was inhibited by other phorbol esters and their congeners, and there was a good correlation between their potency in binding inhibition and their tumor promoting activity. It is concluded that sponges have a class of specific saturable and high affinity receptors for phorbol esters and that there is a very high conservation of these receptors during evolution. Such specific binding may be responsible for subsequent biological effect of TPA on sponges.

  17. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  18. Binding effect of polychlorinated compounds and environmental carcinogens on rice bran fiber.

    PubMed

    Sera, Nobuyuki; Morita, Kunimasa; Nagasoe, Masami; Tokieda, Hisako; Kitaura, Taeko; Tokiwa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    To accelerate the fecal excretion of polycyclic biphenyl (PCB), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polychlorinated-p-dioxines (PCDDs) and various mutagens and carcinogens, their binding effect on rice bran fiber (RBF) was investigated for nine heterocyclic amines, six nitroarenes, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, benzo[a]pyrene, furylfuramide, two kinds of flavonoid compounds and formaldehyde and ascorbic acid. PCBs, PCDFs and PCDDs suspended in nonane were incubated with RBF (10 mg/ml) at 37 degrees C and after centrifugation, unbound chemicals in the supernatant were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC). The binding effects on RBF were enhanced more than other dietary fibers (DFs), which were tested including corn, wheat bran, spinach, Hijiki (a kind of seaweed), sweet potatoes and burdock fibers. It was found that the binding effects were related to lignin contents. Binding of 3-amino-1(or 1,4)-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-p-1 and Trp-p-2), food-derived carcinogens and 1-nitropyrene (1-NP), suspended in methanol, to RBF occurred within 10 min of incubation at 37 degrees C at pH 5-7, and decreased below pH 4; binding of food-derived carcinogens was pH dependent. The binding effects to RBF and pulp lignin were obtained at ratio of over 90%, while corn fiber and cellulose were at ratios of 4-30%. Polycyclic aromatic compounds were related to the number of rings, showing high binding effects to chemical structures with triple rings. Binding of 1-NP and PCB to RBF was not influenced in any aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures. It was also found that RBF was capable of binding even conjugates containing mutagens such as glucuronides and sulfates, as well as metabolites in urine. It was suggested, therefore, that mutagens and carcinogens were available for the fecal excretion of residual chemicals and their metabolites, and also for the fecal excretion of PCBs, PCDFs and related compound residues in patients of

  19. Unconjugated bilirubin effect on 3H-ouabain binding to human fetal red cells.

    PubMed

    Corchs, J L; Corchs, M J; Serrani, R E

    1994-03-01

    Human fetal red cells show heterogeneity of 3H-ouabain binding sites. These cells were chosen as a model to look into unconjugated bilirubin effects on the primary active Na(+)-K+ transport mechanism. Evidences are presented suggesting that unconjugated bilirubin affects 3H-ouabain binding but not through a direct effect. This is supported by the fact that the "low affinity" subgroup sites of the last mentioned ligand persists after unconjugated bilirubin treatment of cells, whereas the "high-affinity" subgroup disappears.

  20. Super-saturated hydrogen effects on radiation damages in tungsten under the high-flux divertor plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, D.; Iwakiri, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Morishita, K.; Muroga, T.

    2015-08-01

    Tungsten is a prime candidate as the divertor material of the ITER and DEMO reactors, which would be exposed to unprecedentedly high-flux plasmas as well as neutrons. For a better characterization of radiation damages in the tungsten under the divertor condition, we examine influences of super-saturated hydrogen on vacancies in the tungsten. The present calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) reveal unusual phenomena predicted at a super-saturated hydrogen concentration: (1) strongly enhanced vacancy concentration with the super-saturated hydrogen concentration is predicted by a thermodynamics model assuming multiple-hydrogen trapping, i.e. hydrogen clusters formation, in the vacancies; and (2) DFT molecular dynamics revealed that hydrogen clusters can prevent a vacancy from recombining with the neighboring crowdion-type self-interstitial-atom. This suggests that neutron damage effects will be increased in the presence of the hydrogen clusters.

  1. Excellent catalytic effects of highly crumpled graphene nanosheets on hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of magnesium hydride.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang; Wang, Yijing; Xu, Changchang; Qiu, Fangyuan; An, Cuihua; Li, Li; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2013-02-01

    Highly crumpled graphene nanosheets (GNS) with a BET surface area as high as 1159 m(2) g(-1) was fabricated by a thermal exfoliation method. A systematic investigation was performed on the hydrogen sorption properties of MgH(2)-5 wt% GNS nanocomposites acquired by ball-milling. It was found that the as-synthesized GNS exhibited a superior catalytic effect on hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of MgH(2). Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal hydrogenation/dehydrogenation measurements indicated that both hydrogen sorption capacity and dehydrogenation/hydrogenation kinetics of the composites improved with increasing milling time. The composites MgH(2)-GNS milled for 20 h can absorb 6.6 wt% H(2) within 1 min at 300 °C and 6.3 wt% within 40 min at 200 °C, even at 150 °C, it can also absorb 6.0 wt% H(2) within 180 min. It was also demonstrated that MgH(2)-GNS-20 h could release 6.1 wt% H(2) at 300 °C within 40 min. In addition, microstructure measurements based on XRD, SEM, TEM as well as Raman spectra revealed that the grain size of thus-prepared MgH(2)-GNS nanocomposites decreased with increasing milling time, moreover, the graphene layers were broken into smaller graphene nanosheets in a disordered and irregular manner during milling. It was confirmed that these smaller graphene nanosheets on the composite surface, providing more edge sites and hydrogen diffusion channels, prevented the nanograins from sintering and agglomerating, thus, leading to promotion of the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics of MgH(2). PMID:23254449

  2. Influence of gamma irradiation on a natural source of peroxidase and its effect in the reagentless amperometric biosensor for hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor, M P; Facchin, I; Neto, G O; Kubota, L T

    2001-06-01

    Peroxidase was extracted from a natural source (turnip) and irradiated with 60Co (0.1 kGy). It was then used in the construction of biosensors for hydrogen peroxide determination, in order to study the effect of the gamma irradiation on the performance of the biosensors. The biosensors were constructed using two immobilization procedures: cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and covalent binding through carbodiimide. The biosensor prepared using covalent binding through carbodiimide showed a higher sensitivity for H2O2. A good enhancement in stability and sensitivity was obtained for the biosensors from irradiated material, when compared to biosensors prepared with non-irradiated enzyme. However, the initial linear response range (1.0 to 10.0 mmol dm-3) and response time (0.5 s) were equal with or without irradiation. PMID:11450686

  3. Protein-protein recognition: an experimental and computational study of the R89K mutation in Raf and its effect on Ras binding.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, J.; Fridman, M.; Maruta, H.; Treutlein, H. R.; Simonson, T.

    1999-01-01

    Binding of the protein Raf to the active form of Ras promotes activation of the MAP kinase signaling pathway, triggering cell growth and differentiation. Raf/Arg89 in the center of the binding interface plays an important role determining Ras-Raf binding affinity. We have investigated experimentally and computationally the Raf-R89K mutation, which abolishes signaling in vivo. The binding to [gamma-35S]GTP-Ras of a fusion protein between the Raf-binding domain (RBD) of Raf and GST was reduced at least 175-fold by the mutation, corresponding to a standard binding free energy decrease of at least 3.0 kcal/mol. To compute this free energy and obtain insights into the microscopic interactions favoring binding, we performed alchemical simulations of the RBD, both complexed to Ras and free in solution, in which residue 89 is gradually mutated from Arg into Lys. The simulations give a standard binding free energy decrease of 2.9+/-1.9 kcal/mol, in agreement with experiment. The use of numerous runs with three different force fields allows insights into the sources of uncertainty in the free energy and its components. The binding decreases partly because of a 7 kcal/mol higher cost to desolvate Lys upon binding, compared to Arg, due to better solvent interactions with the more concentrated Lys charge in the unbound state. This effect is expected to be general, contributing to the lower propensity of Lys to participate in protein-protein interfaces. Large contributions to the free energy change also arise from electrostatic interactions with groups up to 8 A away, namely residues 37-41 in the conserved effector domain of Ras (including 4 kcal/mol from Ser39 which loses a bifurcated hydrogen bond to Arg89), the conserved Lys84 and Lys87 of Raf, and 2-3 specific water molecules. This analysis will provide insights into the large experimental database of Ras-Raf mutations. PMID:10210183

  4. Bivalent cation binding effect on formation of the peptide bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Rode, Bernd Michael

    2000-01-01

    The reactions between formic acid (or glycine) and ammonia, without and with Mg 2+, Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ cations as catalysts, have been studied as model reactions for peptide bond formation using the Becke3LYP functional and 6-311+G(d,p) basis set of DFT theory. Enthalpies and free energies for the stationary points of each reaction have been calculated to determine the thermodynamics of reactions investigated. A substantial decrease in reaction enthalpies and free energies was found for formic acid-ammonia and glycine-ammonia reactions catalysed by Mg 2+, Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ ions compared with those of the uncatalysed amide bond formation. The catalytic effect of the transition metal ions Ni 2+ and Cu 2+ is of similar strength and more pronounced than that of the Mg 2+ cation.

  5. Crystal Properties and Radiation Effects in Solid Molecular Hydrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioiziemski, B

    2000-09-01

    The crystal lattice structure, growth shapes and helium generated by beta-decay of solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures have been studied. Understanding of these D-T properties is important for predicting and optimizing the target design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Raman spectroscopy showed the D-T crystal structure is hexagonal close packed, common to the non-tritiated isotopes. The isotopic mixtures of both tritiated and non-tritiated species broadens the rotational transitions, especially of the lighter species in the mixture. The vibrational frequencies of each isotope is shifted to higher energy in the mixture than the pure components. The J = 1-0 population decreases exponentially with a 1/e time constant which rapidly increases above 10.5 K for both D{sub 2} and T{sub 2} in D-T. The conversion rate is nearly constant from 5 K to 10 K for both D{sub 2} and T{sub 2} at 7.1 hours and 2.1 hours, respectively. The smoothing of D-T layers by beta decay heating is limited by the crystal surface energy. Deuterium and hydrogen-deuteride crystals were grown at a number of temperatures below the triple point to determine the surface energy and roughening transition. Several distinct crystal shapes were observed on a number of different substrates. The a facet roughens between 0.9 T{sub TP} and T{sub TP}, while the c facet persists up to the melting temperature. This is very different from the behavior of the other rare gas crystals which grow completely rounded above 0.8 T{sub TP}. Helium bubbles formed as a product of the beta decay were observed using optical microscopy and the diffusion of smaller bubbles measured with dynamic light scattering. Bubble diffusion coefficients as high as 2.0 x 10{sup -16} m{sup 2}/s were measured for 10-50 nm bubbles. The bubbles move in response to a thermal gradient, with speeds between 1 {micro}m/hour and 100 {micro}m/hour for thermal gradients and temperatures appropriate to NIF targets.

  6. Effects of hydrogen and acetate on benzene mineralisation under sulphate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Rakoczy, Jana; Schleinitz, Kathleen M; Müller, Nicolai; Richnow, Hans H; Vogt, Carsten

    2011-08-01

    Syntrophic mineralisation of benzene, as recently proposed for a sulphate-reducing enrichment culture, was tested in product inhibition experiments with acetate and hydrogen, both putative intermediates of anaerobic benzene fermentation. Using [(13)C(6)]-benzene enabled tracking the inhibition of benzene mineralisation sensitively by analysis of (13)CO(2). In noninhibited cultures, hydrogen was detected at partial pressures of 2.4 × 10(-6) ± 1.5 × 10(-6) atm. Acetate was detected at concentrations of 17 ± 2 μM. Spiking with 0.1 atm hydrogen produced a transient inhibitory effect on (13)CO(2) formation. In cultures spiked with higher amounts of hydrogen, benzene mineralisation did not restart after hydrogen consumption, possibly due to the toxic effects of the sulphide produced. An inhibitory effect was also observed when acetate was added to the cultures (0.3, 3.5 and 30 mM). Benzene mineralisation resumed after acetate was degraded to concentrations found in noninhibited cultures, indicating that acetate is another key intermediate in anaerobic benzene mineralisation. Although benzene mineralisation by a single sulphate reducer cannot be ruled out, our results strongly point to an involvement of syntrophic interactions in the process. Thermodynamic calculations revealed that, under in situ conditions, benzene fermentation to hydrogen and acetate yielded a free energy change of ΔG'=-83.1 ± 5.6 kJ mol(-1). Benzene mineralisation ceased when ΔG' values declined below -61.3 ± 5.3 kJ mol(-1) in the presence of acetate, indicating that ATP-consuming reactions are involved in the pathway.

  7. Manganese rescues adverse effects on lifespan and development in Podospora anserina challenged by excess hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Carolin; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2015-03-01

    For biological systems, balancing cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is of great importance because ROS are both, essential for cellular signaling and dangerous in causing molecular damage. Cellular ROS abundance is controlled by a delicate network of molecular pathways. Within this network, superoxide dismutases (SODs) are active in disproportion of the superoxide anion leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. The fungal aging model Podospora anserina encodes at least three SODs. One of these is the mitochondrial PaSOD3 isoform containing manganese as a cofactor. Previous work resulted in the selection of strains in which PaSod3 is strongly overexpressed. These strains display impairments in growth and lifespan. A computational model suggests a series of events to occur in Sod3 overexpressing strains leading to adverse effects due to elevated hydrogen peroxide levels. In an attempt to validate this model and to obtain more detailed information about the cellular responses involved in ROS balancing, we further investigated the PaSod3 overexpressing strains. Here we show that hydrogen peroxide levels are indeed strongly increased in the mutant strain. Surprisingly, this phenotype can be rescued by the addition of manganese to the growth medium. Strikingly, while we obtained no evidence for an antioxidant effect of manganese, we found that the metal is required for induction of components of the ROS scavenging network and lowers the hydrogen peroxide level of the mutant. A similar effect of manganese on lifespan reversion was obtained in wild-type strains challenged with exogenous hydrogen peroxide. It appears that manganese is limited under high hydrogen peroxide and suggests that a manganese-dependent activity leads to the induction of ROS scavenging components.

  8. Effect of pressure and hydrogen flow in nucleation density and morphology of graphene bidimensional crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaitoglou, S.; Bertran, E.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present new results concerning the growth of graphene by low pressure chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline copper foils and using methane as carbon precursor. We have studied the role of hydrogen and pressure in graphene growth on substrates of polycrystalline copper foil and we have examined how they affect the nucleation density and the size of graphene bidimensional crystals. For that, small ranges of pressure (between 10 and 30 Pa) and hydrogen flow (between 10 and 20 sccm) were explored. In addition, the antagonism between two of the main effects of hydrogen was studied. Hydrogen promotes the growth but, at the same time, applies an intense dry etching during the growth process of graphene. The challenge of the present study is to find the equilibrium between these two effects so that, the growth of highly ordered crystals on copper becomes possible. The results reveal that the total pressure during the growth process of graphene affects the size as well as the nucleation density of the graphene bidimensional crystals on polycrystalline copper. Besides, the hydrogen flow affects the morphology and quality of the graphene layer. An important parameter for a correct interpretation of the results is the change of the partial pressure ratio, < {P}{{{H}}2}> /< {P}{{{C}{{H}}}4}> , during the growth process under a constant flow of H2 and CH4. Dendritic graphene crystals with lobe lengths around 30 μm along with a nucleation density of 25 nuclei/10 000 μm2 were obtained in the studied technological conditions, which corroborates that a low nucleation of graphene is required to obtain large graphene islands and a low number of crystal boundaries. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy evidenced the effects of hydrogen on the characteristics of growth and morphology of the graphene dendritic bidimensional crystals.

  9. Cooperative protein-DNA interactions: effects of KCl on lambda cI binding to OR.

    PubMed

    Koblan, K S; Ackers, G K

    1991-08-01

    The effects of monovalent salt activity on the site-specific and cooperative interactions of cI repressor with its three operator sites OR were studied by using quantitative DNase I footprint titration methods. Individual-site binding isotherms were obtained for binding repressor dimers to each site of wild-type OR and to mutant operator templates in which binding to one or two sites has been eliminated. The standard Gibbs energies for intrinsic binding, delta G1, delta G2, and delta G3, and cooperative interactions, delta G12 and delta G23, were determined at each condition (range 50-200 mM KCl). It is found that the dimer affinity for each of the three sites increases as [KCl] decreases, a striking result given that the monomer-dimer equilibrium shifts toward monomer formation under identical solution conditions [Koblan, K. S., & Ackers, G. K. (1991) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)]. The magnitudes of ion-linked effects are found to differ at the three operator sites, while the intrinsic interaction binding free energies for sites OR1 and OR3 change in parallel over the entire range of [KCl]. The KCl dependencies at OR1 and OR3 represent the average release of 3.7 +/- 0.6 and 3.8 +/- 0.6 apparent ions, respectively. By contrast, the KCl dependency of OR2 binding corresponds to the displacement of 5.2 +/- 0.7 apparent ions. The ability of cI repressor to discriminate between the three operator sites thus appears linked to ion binding/release reactions.

  10. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  11. Effects of the binding of a dextran derivative on fibroblast growth factor 2: secondary structure and receptor-binding studies.

    PubMed

    Bittoun, P; Bagheri-Yarmand, R; Chaubet, F; Crépin, M; Jozefonvicz, J; Fermandjian, S

    1999-06-15

    CMDB (carboxymethyldextran-benzylamide) are dextrans statistically substituted with carboxymethyl and benzylamide groups which can mimick some of the biological properties of heparin. It has previously been shown that CMDB inhibit autocrine growth of breast tumor cells (Bagheri-Yarmand et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 239: 424-428, 1997) and selectively displace fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) from its receptor. Here, we used circular dichroism and fluorescence anisotropy measurements to show that the conformation of FGF-2 was significantly altered upon its binding to CMDB and to short CMDB fragments prepared within this study. CMDB and fragments formed a stable 1:1 complex with FGF-2, with affinities being estimated as 20+/-10 nM from fluorescence anisotropy analysis. No such a complex was formed with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) or epidermal growth factor (EGF). CMDB competed with the FGF-2 receptor for binding to FGF-2 but did not disturb the binding of IGF-1 and EGF to their receptors. Thus, our results highlight the selectivity of CMDB and their fragments towards FGF-2. Heparin, however, competes with CMDB and their fragments for binding to FGF-2. The carboxymethyl and benzylamide groups of these molecules likely interact directly with a heparin-binding region of FGF-2. The resulting change in conformation disturbs the binding of FGF-2 to its receptor and consecutively its mitogenic activity.

  12. Effect of hydrogen on plastic strain localization and fracture of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadjozhkin, M. V.; Lunev, A. G.; Li, Yu V.; Barannikova, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of interstitial hydrogen atoms on the mechanical properties and plastic strain localization patterns in tensile tested specimens of low-carbon steels have been studied using a double exposure speckle photography technique. It is found that the mechanical properties of low-carbon steels are affected adversely by hydrogen embrittlement. The deformation diagrams were examined for the deformed samples of low-carbon steels. These are found to show all the plastic flow stages: the linear, parabolic and pre-failure stages would occur for the respective values of the exponent n from the Ludwik-Holomon equation.

  13. GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P

    2006-06-08

    This report is a compendium of sets of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following the short-term effects of hydrogen exposure. The property sets include the following: Yield Strength; Ultimate Tensile Strength; Uniform Elongation; Reduction of Area; Threshold Cracking, K{sub H} or K{sub th}; Fracture Toughness (K{sub IC}, J{sub IC}, and/or J-R Curve); and Fatigue Crack Growth (da/dN). These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  14. The effect of hydrogen embrittlement on the localized plastic deformation of aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bochkareva, Anna Lunev, Aleksey; Barannikova, Svetlana; Gorbatenko, Vadim; Shlyakhova, Galina; Zuev, Lev

    2015-10-27

    The effect of hydrogen embrittlement on the localized plastic deformation of aluminum alloy D1 was investigated. The studies were performed for the test samples of aluminum alloy subjected to electrolytic hydrogenation. It is found that the mechanical properties and localized plastic deformation parameters of aluminum alloy are affected adversely by hydrogen embrittlement. The hydrogenated counterpart of alloy has a lower degree of ductility relative to the original alloy; however, the plastic flow behavior of material remains virtually unaffected. Using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy methods, the changes in the fracture surface were investigated. The deformation diagrams were examined for the deformed samples of aluminum alloy. These are found to show all the plastic flow stages: the linear, parabolic and pre-failure stages would occur for the respective values of the exponent n from the Ludwik-Holomon equation. Using digital speckle image technique, the local strain patterns were being registered for the original alloy D1 and the counterpart subjected to electrolytic hydrogenation for 100 h.

  15. Black titania: effect of hydrogenation on structural and thermal stability of nanotitania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanam, Rizwin; Taparia, Dolly; Mondal, Biplob; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2016-02-01

    We report on the effect of hydrogenation on sol-gel-derived, anatase-phase TiO2 nanoparticles. The structural analysis of white nanotitania (W-TiO2) and hydrogenated black titania (B-TiO2) has been carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies, which confirms anatase phase for both the cases, but with weak diffraction signals in the latter system. Upon hydrogenation, nanotitania system is believed to acquire a disordered phase in the form of a thin amorphous layer surrounding the nanoparticles, which can be realized through transmission electron microscopy analyses. As compared to W-TiO2 (~3.15 eV), the optical band gap of B-TiO2 is substantially reduced with respective band gap values of ~1.99 and 1.53 eV for 0.5 and 1 % H2 inclusion cases. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis reveals high temperature thermal stability of B-TiO2 system, especially in the range of 350-600 °C. Exploiting thermal, optical and electronic properties of hydrogenated nanotitania could find scope in infrared optics, hydrogen storage and suitable photocatalytic applications.

  16. A probabilistic approach to the effect of hydrogen bonding on the hydrophobic attraction.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Y S; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2009-03-28

    Water molecules, belonging to the first hydration shell around a hydrophobic particle, form fewer hydrogen bonds than bulk molecules. On the other hand, the former (boundary) bonds may be slightly stronger than the latter. When two hydrophobic particles are sufficiently close to each other, the disruption of water-water hydrogen bonds in their first hydration layers can give rise to an additional contribution to their overall interaction potential. Here we present a probabilistic approach to studying this phenomenon. The proposed method allows one to determine the average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule in the first hydration shell. Numerical evaluations show that in the interplay between a decrease in the number of boundary bonds per water molecule and the enhancement of such a bond the former effect is clearly predominant. As a result, the disruption of boundary hydrogen bonds, which occurs when the first two hydration shells of two particles overlap, leads to an attractive contribution to the overall particle interaction. This contribution is naturally short range, appearing only when the separation between the two particles becomes smaller than four lengths of a hydrogen bond. It is greater than the overall van der Waals interaction potential of the same hydrophobic particles (with typical Hamaker constants) by at least an order of magnitude.

  17. Effect of Cadmium Plating Thickness on the Charpy Impact Energy of Hydrogen-Charged 4340 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-Said, O. S.; Alcisto, J.; Guerra, J.; Jones, E.; Dominguez, A.; Hahn, M.; Ula, N.; Zeng, L.; Ramsey, B.; Mulazimoglu, H.; Li, Yong-Jun; Miller, M.; Alrashid, J.; Papakyriakou, M.; Kalnaus, S.; Lee, E. W.; Frazier, W. E.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen was intentionally introduced into ultra-high strength steel by cadmium plating. The purpose was to examine the effect of cadmium plate thickness and hence hydrogen on the impact energy of the steel. The AISI 4340 steel was austenitized at 1000 °C for 1 h, water quenched, and tempered at temperatures between 257 and 593 °C in order to achieve a range of targeted strength levels. The specimens were cadmium plated with 0.00508 mm (0.2 mils), 0.00762 mm (0.3 mils), and 0.0127 mm (0.5 mils). Results demonstrated that the uncharged specimens exhibited higher impact energy values when compared to the plated specimens at all tempering temperatures. The cadmium-plated specimens had very low Charpy impact values irrespective of their ultimate tensile strength values. The model of hydrogen transport by mobile dislocations to the fracture site appears to provide the most suitable explanation of the results.

  18. Effect of hydrogen glow discharge conditioning on Zr/Al getter pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Cecchi, J.L.; Ulrickson, M.

    1981-01-01

    Zr/Al bulk getter pumps are presently being considered for use in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to reduce impurities and limit the recycling of hydrogenic species. It is necessary that these pumps not be adversely affected by the hydrogen glow discharge cleaning (GDC) which is planned as part of the routine TFTR vessel wall conditioning. The GDC procedure involves the use of a dc glow discharge with a 400 V bias voltage. The total fluence of hydrogenic ions given to the affected surfaces during a typical conditioning period is 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -2/. We have investigated the effects of typical GDC runs on a getter-pump module containing 25 g of Zr/Al mounted in a 100 liter test stand. Pumping speed, capacity, and regeneration characteristics have been studied after various exposures to GDC.

  19. Effect of boron and hydrogen on the electronic structure of Ni{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Kioussi, N.; Watanabe, H.; Hemker, R.G.; Gourdin, W.: Gonis, A.; Johnson, P.E.

    1993-11-19

    Using first-principles electronic structure calculations based on the Linear-Muffin-Tin Orbital (LMTO) method, we have investigated the effects of interstitial born and hydrogen on the electronic structure of the Ll{sub 2} ordered intermetallic Ni{sub 3}Al. When it occupies an octahedral interstitial site entirely coordinated by six Ni atoms, we find that boron enhances the charge distribution found in the strongly-bound ``pure`` Ni{sub 3}Al crystal: Charge is depleted at Ni and Al region. Substitution Al atoms for two of the Ni atoms coordinating the boron, however, reduces the interstitial charge density between atomic planes. In contrast to boron, hydrogen appears to deplete the interstitial charge, even when fully coordinated by Ni atoms. We suggest that these results are broadly consistent with the notion of boron as a cohesion enhancer and hydrogen as an embrittler.

  20. DFT investigations of the hydrogenation effect on silicene/graphene hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drissi, L. B.; Saidi, E. H.; Bousmina, M.; Fassi-Fehri, O.

    2012-12-01

    We report here a study on the effect of hydrogenation on a new one-atom thick material made of silicon and carbon atoms (silicene/graphene (SG) hybrid) within density functional theory. The structural, electronic and magnetic properties are investigated for non-, semi- and fully hydrogenated SG hybrids in a chair configuration and are compared with their parent materials. Calculations reveal that pure SG is a non-zero band gap semi-conductor with stable planar honeycomb structure. So mixing C and Si in an alternating manner gives another way to generate a finite band gap in one-atom thick materials. Fully hydrogenation makes the gap larger; however half chemical modification with H reduces the gap in favor of ferromagnetism order. The findings of this work open a wide spectrum of possibilities for designing SG-based nanodevices with controlled and tuned properties.

  1. Effects of human low and high density lipoproteins on the binding of rat intermediate density lipoproteins to rat liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Brissette, L.; Nol, S.P.

    1986-05-25

    Upon incubation with rat liver membranes, radioiodinated rat intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) interacted with at least two binding sites having a low and a high affinity as demonstrated by the curvilinear Scatchard plots obtained from the specific binding data. The purpose of our work was to identify the nature of these binding sites. Human low density lipoproteins (LDL), contain apolipoprotein B only, and human high density lipoproteins (HDL3), containing neither apolipoprotein B nor E, were both capable of decreasing the specific binding of rat /sup 125/I-IDL. The Scatchard analysis clearly revealed that only the low affinity component was affected by the addition of these human lipoproteins. In fact, the low affinity binding component gradually decreased as the amount of human LDL or HDL3 increased in the binding assay. At a 200-fold excess of human LDL or HDL3, the low affinity binding was totally masked, and the Scatchard plot of the specific /sup 125/I-IDL binding became linear. Only the high affinity binding component was left, enabling a precise measurement of its binding parameters. In a series of competitive displacement experiments in which the binding assay contained a 200-fold excess of human LDL or HDL3, only unlabeled rat IDL effectively displaced the binding of rat /sup 125/I-IDL. We conclude that the low affinity binding of rat IDL to rat liver membranes is due to weak interactions with unspecified lipoprotein binding sites. The camouflage of these sites by human lipoproteins makes possible the study of IDL binding to the high affinity component which likely represents the combined effect of IDL binding to both the remnant and the LDL receptors.

  2. Quantum effects and anharmonicity in the H{sub 2}-Li{sup +}-benzene complex: A model for hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kolmann, Stephen J.; D'Arcy, Jordan H.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.

    2013-12-21

    Quantum and anharmonic effects are investigated in H{sub 2}-Li{sup +}-benzene, a model for hydrogen adsorption in metal-organic frameworks and carbon-based materials. Three- and 8-dimensional quantum diffusion Monte Carlo (QDMC) and rigid-body diffusion Monte Carlo (RBDMC) simulations are performed on potential energy surfaces interpolated from electronic structure calculations at the M05-2X/6-31+G(d,p) and M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) levels of theory using a three-dimensional spline or a modified Shepard interpolation. These calculations investigate the intermolecular interactions in this system, with three- and 8-dimensional 0 K H{sub 2} binding enthalpy estimates, ΔH{sub bind} (0 K), being 16.5 kJ mol{sup −1} and 12.4 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively: 0.1 and 0.6 kJ mol{sup −1} higher than harmonic values. Zero-point energy effects are 35% of the value of ΔH{sub bind} (0 K) at M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) and cannot be neglected; uncorrected electronic binding energies overestimate ΔH{sub bind} (0 K) by at least 6 kJ mol{sup −1}. Harmonic intermolecular binding enthalpies can be corrected by treating the H{sub 2} “helicopter” and “ferris wheel” rotations as free and hindered rotations, respectively. These simple corrections yield results within 2% of the 8-dimensional anharmonic calculations. Nuclear ground state probability density histograms obtained from the QDMC and RBDMC simulations indicate the H{sub 2} molecule is delocalized above the Li{sup +}-benzene system at 0 K.

  3. Solubility of hydrogen in metals and its effect of pore-formation and embrittlement. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahani, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of alloying elements on hydrogen solubility were determined by evaluating solubility equations and interaction coefficients. The solubility of dry hydrogen at one atmosphere was investigated in liquid aluminum, Al-Ti, Al-Si, Al-Fe, liquid gold, Au-Cu, and Au-Pd. The design of rapid heating and high pressure casting furnaces used in meta foam experiments is discussed as well as the mechanism of precipitation of pores in melts, and the effect of hydrogen on the shrinkage porosity of Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys. Hydrogen embrittlement in iron base alloys is also examined.

  4. Effects of a transition to a hydrogen economy on employment in the United States Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-07-01

    DOE's Effects of a Transition to a Hydrogen Economy on Employment in the United States Report to Congress estimates the employment effects of a transformation of the U.S. economy to the use of hydrogen in the 2020 to 2050 timeframe. This report fulfills requirements of section 1820 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  5. Effects of Plasma Hydrogenation on Trapping Properties of Dislocations in Heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringel, S. A.; Chatterjee, B.

    1994-01-01

    In previous work, we have demonstrated the effectiveness of a post-growth hydrogen plasma treatment for passivating the electrical activity of dislocations in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown InP on GaAs substrates by a more than two order of magnitude reduction in deep level concentration and an improvement in reverse bias leakage current by a factor of approx. 20. These results make plasma hydrogenation an extremely promising technique for achieving high efficiency large area and light weight heteroepitaxial InP solar cells for space applications. In this work we investigate the carrier trapping process by dislocations in heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs and the role of hydrogen passivation on this process. It is shown that the charge trapping kinetics of dislocations after hydrogen passivation are significantly altered, approaching point defect-like behavior consistent with a transformation from a high concentration of dislocation-related defect bands within the InP bandgap to a low concentration of individual deep levels after hydrogen passivation. It is further shown that the "apparent" activation energies of dislocation related deep levels, before and after passivation, reduce by approx. 70 meV as DLTS fill pulse times are increased from 1 usec. to 1 msec. A model is proposed which explains these effects based on a reduction of Coulombic interaction between individual core sites along the dislocation cores by hydrogen incorporation. Knowledge of the trapping properties in these specific structures is important to develop optimum, low loss heteroepitaxial InP cells.

  6. Effects of shielding gas hydrogen content on the arc behavior in gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoien, M.I.; Olson, D.L.; Liu, S.

    1994-12-31

    The primary role of the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is to protect the weld pool and tungsten electrode from the oxygen and nitrogen in the surrounding atmosphere. Traditionally inert gases such as argon and helium have been used, either as pure gases or mixed with each other. However, additions of small amounts of hydrogen have been reported to improve weld bead penetration and enable higher welding speeds to be used. The present work was performed to investigate the effect of small hydrogen additions on the arc behavior in GTAW, and to further the fundamental understanding of the effect of shielding gas on arc characteristics. GTAW bead-on-plate welds were made on 12.5 mm x 150 mm x 75 mm Type 304 stainless steel test coupons. The welding current, voltage, and their variations were continuously monitored during welding. After welding, each test coupon was sectioned and prepared using standard metallographic techniques and etched in Vilella`s etch for macroexamination of the weld bead cross section. Bead width, depth, and cross-sectional area were measured using a LECO image analysator system. The influence of hydrogen content in an argon has tungsten arc was characterized. The electrical behavior of the arc, including the arc resistance, was measured as a function of current and hydrogen content. A better fundamental understanding of arc behavior and energy transfer was achieved using these experimental gas mixes. The results allow the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) Small additions of hydrogen in the argon based shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding significantly change the weld bead geometry due to changes in the arc column. (2) Selection of the right argon, hydrogen shielding gas mixture to give the optimum arc column characteristics for a given condition can improve weld quality and increase productivity. (3) The resistance of the arc column was found to be an adequate parameter to describe the arc column behavior.

  7. Effects of Low Temperature on Hydrogen-Assisted Crack Growth in Forged 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Heather; San Marchi, Chris; Balch, Dorian; Somerday, Brian; Michael, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of low temperature on hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in forged 304L austenitic stainless steel. Fracture initiation toughness and crack-growth resistance curves were measured using fracture mechanics specimens that were thermally precharged with 140 wppm hydrogen and tested at 293 K or 223 K (20 °C or -50 °C). Fracture initiation toughness for hydrogen-precharged forgings decreased by at least 50 to 80 pct relative to non-charged forgings. With hydrogen, low-temperature fracture initiation toughness decreased by 35 to 50 pct relative to room-temperature toughness. Crack growth without hydrogen at both temperatures was microstructure-independent and indistinguishable from blunting, while with hydrogen microcracks formed by growth and coalescence of microvoids. Initiation of microvoids in the presence of hydrogen occurred where localized deformation bands intersected grain boundaries and other deformation bands. Low temperature additionally promoted fracture initiation at annealing twin boundaries in the presence of hydrogen, which competed with deformation band intersections and grain boundaries as sites of microvoid formation and fracture initiation. A common ingredient for fracture initiation was stress concentration that arose from the intersection of deformation bands with these microstructural obstacles. The localized deformation responsible for producing stress concentrations at obstacles was intensified by low temperature and hydrogen. Crack orientation and forging strength were found to have a minor effect on fracture initiation toughness of hydrogen-supersaturated 304L forgings.

  8. Diffusion Study on Dissolved Hydrogen toward Effective Bioremediation of Chlorinated Ethenes in Aquitards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Zhang, M.; Takeuchi, M.; Komai, T.

    2010-12-01

    In Japan, the demand for in-situ remediation of contaminated sediments is expected to increase in the future due to the recent amendment of Soil Contamination Countermeasures Act. The Japanese law requires remediating not only contaminated groundwater but also contaminated sediments including those in aquitards. In-situ remediation of contaminated aquitards has been a challenging issue and bioremediation is considered to be one of the effective techniques. In microbial degradation of chrolinated ethenes such as tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene under anaerobic environments, dissolved hydrogen plays an important role. The dechlorinating microbes utilize hydrogen and chlorinated ethenes as an electron donor and an electron accepter, respectively. The size of hydrogen molecule is extremely small and the diffusion rate of dissolved hydrogen in an aquitard would be the key factor that controls the process of microbial dechlorination. However, the diffusion behavior of dissolved hydrogen in subsurface sediments remains unclear. The purposes of this study are to develop a practically utilizable test apparatus, carry out a series of dissolved hydrogen diffusion tests on representative samples, and illustrate the applicability of bioremediation in aquitards. A completely leak-free apparatus was developed by using aluminum alloy and gas tight rubber. This apparatus is capable of testing specimens with a diameter as large as 100 mm by a length from 5 mm to 10 mm, depending on the maximum grain size within a test specimen. Preliminary tests have been performed with glass beads as an ideal material, commercially available kaolin clay, and core samples taken from a polluted site containing clay minerals. The effective diffusion coefficients of these samples were all on the order of 10E-10 m2/s, though their coefficients of permeability varied between the orders of 10E-2 and 10E-7 cm/s. These results showed that there was no obvious relationship between the effective

  9. Binding of recombinant annexin V to endothelial cells: effect of annexin V binding on endothelial-cell-mediated thrombin formation.

    PubMed Central

    van Heerde, W L; Poort, S; van 't Veer, C; Reutelingsperger, C P; de Groot, P G

    1994-01-01

    Annexin V binds with high affinity to procoagulant phospholipid vesicles and thereby inhibits the procoagulant reactions catalysed by these surfaces in vitro. In vivo, vascular endothelial cells are known to catalyse the formation of thrombin by the expression of binding sites at which procoagulant complexes can assemble. Here, we have studied the binding capacity of recombinant annexin V (rANV) to quiescent, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)- and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)-stimulated cultured human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The dissociation constant (Kd) was 15.5 +/- 3.3 nM and the number of binding sites was 8.8 (+/- 3.9) x 10(6)/cell. These binding parameters did not change significantly during a 30 h incubation period with PMA or TNF-alpha. rANV inhibited HUVEC-mediated factor Xa formation via the extrinsic as well as the intrinsic route. Activation of factor X by the tissue factor-factor VII-factor X complex and tenase complex was inhibited with IC50 values of 43 +/- 30 nM and 33 +/- 24 nM respectively. Endothelial-cell-mediated generation of thrombin by the prothrombinase complex was inhibited by rANV with an IC50 of 16 +/- 12 nM. Preincubation of rANV with the endothelial cells did not significantly influence the IC50 values. These results show that rANV binds to the same extent to quiescent, PMA- and TNF-stimulated HUVEC, and, as a result of this binding, rANV efficiently inhibits endothelial-cell-mediated thrombin formation. PMID:8068019

  10. Effective interface state effects in hydrogenated amorphous-crystalline silicon heterostructures using ultraviolet laser photocarrier radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A.; Mandelis, A.; Halliop, B.; Kherani, N. P.

    2013-12-01

    Ultraviolet photocarrier radiometry (UV-PCR) was used for the characterization of thin-film (nanolayer) intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (i-a-Si:H) on c-Si. The small absorption depth (approximately 10 nm at 355 nm laser excitation) leads to strong influence of the nanolayer parameters on the propagation and recombination of the photocarrier density wave (CDW) within the layer and the substrate. A theoretical PCR model including the presence of effective interface carrier traps was developed and used to evaluate the transport parameters of the substrate c-Si as well as those of the i-a-Si:H nanolayer. Unlike conventional optoelectronic characterization methods such as photoconductance, photovoltage, and photoluminescence, UV-PCR can be applied to more complete quantitative characterization of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells, including transport properties and defect structures. The quantitative results elucidate the strong effect of a front-surface passivating nanolayer on the transport properties of the entire structure as the result of effective a-Si:H/c-Si interface trap neutralization through occupation. A further dramatic improvement of those properties with the addition of a back-surface passivating nanolayer is observed and interpreted as the result of the interaction of the increased excess bulk CDW with, and more complete occupation and neutralization of, effective front interface traps.

  11. Effective interface state effects in hydrogenated amorphous-crystalline silicon heterostructures using ultraviolet laser photocarrier radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, A.; Mandelis, A.; Halliop, B.; Kherani, N. P.

    2013-12-28

    Ultraviolet photocarrier radiometry (UV-PCR) was used for the characterization of thin-film (nanolayer) intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (i-a-Si:H) on c-Si. The small absorption depth (approximately 10 nm at 355 nm laser excitation) leads to strong influence of the nanolayer parameters on the propagation and recombination of the photocarrier density wave (CDW) within the layer and the substrate. A theoretical PCR model including the presence of effective interface carrier traps was developed and used to evaluate the transport parameters of the substrate c-Si as well as those of the i-a-Si:H nanolayer. Unlike conventional optoelectronic characterization methods such as photoconductance, photovoltage, and photoluminescence, UV-PCR can be applied to more complete quantitative characterization of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells, including transport properties and defect structures. The quantitative results elucidate the strong effect of a front-surface passivating nanolayer on the transport properties of the entire structure as the result of effective a-Si:H/c-Si interface trap neutralization through occupation. A further dramatic improvement of those properties with the addition of a back-surface passivating nanolayer is observed and interpreted as the result of the interaction of the increased excess bulk CDW with, and more complete occupation and neutralization of, effective front interface traps.

  12. Dopamine transporter binding in social anxiety disorder: the effect of treatment with escitalopram.

    PubMed

    Warwick, J M; Carey, P D; Cassimjee, N; Lochner, C; Hemmings, S; Moolman-Smook, H; Beetge, E; Dupont, P; Stein, D J

    2012-06-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is characterised by fear of social or performance situations where the individual is exposed to unfamiliar people or to possible scrutiny by others. The literature on dopamine ligands and dopamine genotypes in SAD is however inconsistent. In this study we measured the effects of SSRI pharmacotherapy on dopamine transporter (DAT) binding in patients with SAD, also addressing variability in DAT genotype. Adult subjects meeting DSM-IV criteria for generalised SAD were studied before and after 12 weeks of pharmacotherapy with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram. DAT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using (123)I-FP-CIT was performed at baseline, and repeated at 12 weeks. Striatal DAT binding was analysed for changes following therapy, and for correlations with clinical efficacy, in the whole group as well as for a subgroup with the A10/A10 DAT genotype. The study included 14 subjects (9 male, 5 female) with a mean (SD) age of 41 (±13) years. The subjects' Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) score was significantly decreased following pharmacotherapy. In the combined group the left caudate and left putamen showed clusters of increased DAT binding after therapy. The left caudate changes were also observed in the subgroup of 9 A10/A10 homozygotes. However no correlation was found between improved symptoms and DAT binding. The changes found in DAT binding in the caudate and putamen may be due to serotonergic activation of dopamine function by SSRI therapy. This is consistent with previous work indicating decreased DAT binding in SAD, and increased DAT binding after SSRI administration.

  13. Effects of boiling on the IgE-binding properties of tropomyosin of shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-Ming; Cheng, Hsiaopo; Nesbit, Jacqueline B; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie; Maleki, Soheila J

    2010-01-01

    The thermal stability and IgE binding of raw and boiled shrimp extracts and the tropomyosins (TM) have not been reported. In this study, we compare the stability of raw and boiled shrimp TM of Litopenaeus vannamei and evaluate how boiling may alter the allergenicity of L. vannamei. Extracts were prepared from raw and boiled shrimp and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and two-dimensional electrophoresis. The IgE-binding of the extracts was determined by western-blot and competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA). The TM was then purified from raw and boiled shrimp, the secondary structures analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and the IgE binding compared by slot blot analysis. The soluble protein content decreased and the higher molecular weight proteins increased in the extracts from boiled versus raw shrimp. Similar IgE binding characteristics were seen by extracts when using western blot analysis. Although iELISA results showed that extracts from raw shrimp bound higher IgE than extracts from boiled shrimp, dot-blot assay demonstrates higher IgE binding to purified TM from boiled shrimp than raw shrimp. The purified TM had a typical alpha-helical secondary structure and the stability of boiled TM was lower than that of raw TM. Extracts from boiled shrimp produce lower IgE binding than extracts from raw shrimp, which suggest that boiling can be used as a tool in attempting to reduce shrimp allergenicity. However, the purified TM from boiled shrimp, which shows enhanced IgE binding over that of raw shrimp, may be a more effective antigen in diagnosing shrimp allergy through immunoassay.

  14. Review on the effects of hydrogen at extreme pressures and temperatures on the mechanical behavior of polymers.

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, Ethan S.

    2013-03-01

    The effects of hydrogen on the mechanics (e.g. strength, ductility, and fatigue resistance) of polymer materials are outlined in this report. There are a small number of studies reported in the literature on this topic, and even fewer at the extreme temperatures to which hydrogen service materials will be exposed. Several studies found little evidence that hydrogen affects the static tensile properties, long term creep, or ductile fracture of high density polyethylene or polyamide. However, there has been a report that a recoverable drop in the modulus of high density polyethylene is observable under high hydrogen pressure. A research need exists on the mechanical effects of hydrogen on the wide range of polymers used or considered for use in the hydrogen economy, due to the lack of data in the literature.

  15. Deformation and fracture of aluminum-lithium alloys: The effect of dissolved hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivet, F. C.; Swanson, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of dissolved hydrogen on the mechanical properties of 2090 and 2219 alloys are studied. The work done during this semi-annual period consists of the hydrogen charging study and some preliminary mechanical tests. Prior to SIMS analysis, several potentiostatic and galvanostatic experiments were performed for various times (going from 10 minutes to several hours) in the cathodic zone, and for the two aqueous solutions: 0.04N of HCl and 0.1N NaOH both combined with a small amount of As2O3. A study of the surface damage was conducted in parallel with the charging experiments. Those tests were performed to choose the best charging conditions without surface damage. Disk rupture tests and tensile tests are part of the study designed to investigate the effect of temperature, surface roughness, strain rate, and environment on the fracture behavior. The importance of the roughness and environment were shown using the disk rupture test as well as the importance of the strain rate under hydrogen environment. The tensile tests, without hydrogen effects, have not shown significant differences between low and room temperature.

  16. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states.

  17. Improving the binding efficiency of quartz crystal microbalance biosensors by applying the electrothermal effect

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yao-Hung; Chang, Jeng-Shian; Chao, Sheng D.; Wu, Kuang-Chong; Huang, Long-Sun

    2014-01-01

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) serving as a biosensor to detect the target biomolecules (analytes) often suffers from the time consuming process, especially in the case of diffusion-limited reaction. In this experimental work, we modify the reaction chamber of a conventional QCM by integrating into the multi-microelectrodes to produce electrothermal vortex flow which can efficiently drive the analytes moving toward the sensor surface, where the analytes were captured by the immobilized ligands. The microelectrodes are placed on the top surface of the chamber opposite to the sensor, which is located on the bottom of the chamber. Besides, the height of reaction chamber is reduced to assure that the suspended analytes in the fluid can be effectively drived to the sensor surface by induced electrothermal vortex flow, and also the sample costs are saved. A series of frequency shift measurements associated with the adding mass due to the specific binding of the analytes in the fluid flow and the immobilized ligands on the QCM sensor surface are performed with or without applying electrothermal effect (ETE). The experimental results show that electrothermal vortex flow does effectively accelerate the specific binding and make the frequency shift measurement more sensible. In addition, the images of the binding surfaces of the sensors with or without applying electrothermal effect are taken through the scanning electron microscopy. By comparing the images, it also clearly indicates that ETE does raise the specific binding of the analytes and ligands and efficiently improves the performance of the QCM sensor. PMID:25538808

  18. Effect of d-amino acids on IgE binding to peanut allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-amino acids are formed when L-amino acids are exposed to heat. The objective was to determine the existence of D-amino acids in roasted peanut and their effect on IgE binding. Raw and roasted peanut protein extracts were hydrolyzed in 6 N HCL under vacuum. The hydrolysates were then analyzed for D...

  19. Biophysical studies of a ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complex binding to DNA and RNA prove that nucleic acid structure has significant effects on binding behaviors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Liang, Yi; Zhang, Peng; Du, Fen; Zhou, Bing-Rui; Wu, Jun; Liu, Jian-Hong; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2005-08-01

    The interactions of a metal complex [Ru(phen)(2)PMIP](2+) {Ru=ruthenium, phen=1,10-phenanthroline, PMIP=2-(4-methylphenyl)imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline} with yeast tRNA and calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) have been investigated comparatively by UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosity measurements, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), as well as equilibrium dialysis and circular dichroism (CD). Spectroscopic studies together with ITC and viscosity measurements indicate that both binding modes of the Ru(II) polypyridyl complex to yeast tRNA and CT DNA are intercalation and yeast tRNA binding of the complex is stronger than CT DNA binding. ITC experiments show that the interaction of the complex with yeast tRNA is driven by a moderately favorable enthalpy decrease in combination with a moderately favorable entropy increase, while the binding of the complex to CT DNA is driven by a large favorable enthalpy decrease with a less favorable entropy increase. The results from equilibrium dialysis and CD suggest that both interactions are enantioselective and the Delta enantiomer of the complex may bind more favorably to both yeast tRNA and CT DNA than the Lambda enantiomer does, and that the complex is a better candidate for an enantioselective binder to yeast tRNA than to CT DNA. Taken together, these results indicate that the structures of nucleic acids have significant effects on the binding behaviors of metal complexes.

  20. Crystal orientation effects on implantation of low-energy hydrogen, helium and hydrogen/helium mixtures in plasma-facing tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linn, Brian C.

    The development of plasma-facing materials (PFM) is one of the major challenges in. realizing fusion reactors. Materials deployed in PFMs must be capable of withstanding the high-flux of low-energy hydrogen and helium ions omitted from the plasma. while not hindering the plasma. Tungsten is considered a promising candidate material due to desirable material properties including its high melting temperature, good thermal conductivity and relatively low physical and chemical sputtering yields. This thesis uses molecular dynamic simulations to investigate helium and hydrogen bombardment of tungsten and the underlying physical effects (e.g. sputtering, erosion, blistering). Non-cumulative and cumulative bombardment simulations of helium, hydrogen, and hydrogen/helium bombardment of tungsten were modeled using the molecular dynamics code LAMMPS. Two orientations of monocrystalline bcc tungsten surfaces were considered, (001) and (111). Simulations were performed for temperatures ranging from 600K up to 1500K and helium / hydrogen incident energies of 20eV to 100eV . The results of these simulations showed the effect of temperature and incident particle energy on retention rates and implantation/deposition profiles in tungsten.

  1. Beyond the detergent effect: a binding site for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in mammalian apoferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Renyu Bu, Weiming; Xi, Jin; Mortazavi, Shirin R.; Cheung-Lau, Jasmina C.; Dmochowski, Ivan J.; Loll, Patrick J.

    2012-05-01

    Using X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) binds specifically to a pre-formed internal cavity in horse-spleen apoferritin. Although sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is widely used as an anionic detergent, it can also exert specific pharmacological effects that are independent of the surfactant properties of the molecule. However, structural details of how proteins recognize SDS are scarce. Here, it is demonstrated that SDS binds specifically to a naturally occurring four-helix bundle protein: horse apoferritin. The X-ray crystal structure of the apoferritin–SDS complex was determined at a resolution of 1.9 Å and revealed that the SDS binds in an internal cavity that has previously been shown to recognize various general anesthetics. A dissociation constant of 24 ± 9 µM at 293 K was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. SDS binds in this cavity by bending its alkyl tail into a horseshoe shape; the charged SDS head group lies in the opening of the cavity at the protein surface. This crystal structure provides insights into the protein–SDS interactions that give rise to binding and may prove useful in the design of novel SDS-like ligands for some proteins.

  2. Effects of oxymorphazone in frogs: long lasting antinociception in vivo, and apparently irreversible binding in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Benyhe, S.; Hoffman, G.; Varga, E.; Hosztafi, S.; Toth, G.; Borsodi, A.; Wollemann, M.

    1989-01-01

    Oxymorphazone was found to be a relatively weak antinociceptive drug in intact frog (Rana esculenta) when acetic acid was used as pain stimulus. Frogs remained analgesic for at least 48 hrs following oxymorphazone administration. The ligand increased the latency of wiping reflex in spinal frogs too. There effects were blocked by naloxone. In equilibrium binding studies (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone had high affinity to the opioid receptors of frog brain and spinal cord as well. Kinetic experiments show that only 25% of the bound (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone is readily dissociable. Preincubation of the membranes with labeled oxymorphazone results in a washing resistant inhibition of the opioid binding sites. At least 70% of the (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone specific binding is apparently irreversible after reaction at 5 nM ligand concentration, and this can be enhanced by a higher concentration of tritiated ligand.

  3. Shape and Composition Effects on Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production for Pt-Pd Alloy Cocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Luo, Muhua; Lu, Pan; Yao, Weifeng; Huang, Cunping; Xu, Qunjie; Wu, Qiang; Kuwahara, Yasutaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-08-17

    The shape and composition effects of platinum-palladium (Pt-Pd) alloy nanoparticle cocatalysts on visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from an aqueous ammonium sulphite solution have been reported and discussed. The activity of Pt-Pd nanoparticles loaded Pt-Pd/CdS photocatalysts are affected based on both the Pt-Pd alloy nanoparticles' shape and their compositions. In this research, two shapes of Pt-Pd nanoparticles have been studied. One is Pt-Pd nanocubes enclosed by {100} crystal planes and the other is nano-octahedra covered with {111} crystal facets. Results show that the photocatalytic turnover frequency (TOF), defined as moles of hydrogen produced per surface mole of Pt-Pd metal atom per second, for Pt-Pd nanocubes/CdS (Pt-Pd NCs/CdS) photocatalyst can be 3.4 times more effective than Pt-Pd nano-octahedra/CdS (Pt-Pd NOTa/CdS) nanocomposite photocatalyst. Along with the shape effect, the atomic ratio of Pt to Pd can also impact the efficiency of Pt-Pd/CdS photocatalysts. When the Pt to Pd atomic ratio changes from 1:0 to about 2:1, the rate of hydrogen production increases from 900 μmol/h for Pt NCs/CdS catalyst to 1837 μmol/h for Pt-Pd (2:1) NCs/CdS photocatalyst-a 104% rate increase. This result suggests that the 33 mol % of more expensive Pt can be replaced with less costly Pd, resulting in a more than 100% hydrogen production rate increase. The finding of this research will lead to the research and development of highly effective catalysts for photocatalytic hydrogen production using solar photonic energy. PMID:27439590

  4. Collective vibrational effects in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins studied by isotopic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Johansson, C.; Christensen, D. H.; Hvidt, S.; Flink, J.; Høime Hansen, S.; Poulsen, F.

    2000-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the fast dynamics of simple liquid amides and proteins. Raman spectra in the visible region of liquid amides are obtained with a triple additive scanning monochromator, whereas FT-Raman technique is used in the near-IR region in order to avoid fluorescence from impurities in the proteins. Raman spectra are shown in the amide-I region of HCONHCH 3 ( N-methylformamide with all isotopes in their natural abundance), H 13CONHCH 3, HC 18ONHCH 3, human growth hormone, frog tropomyosin and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 including C-13 and N-15 enriched samples of the latter. Resonance energy transfer (RET) between amide molecules gives rise to a non-coincidence effect of the anisotropic and the isotropic components of the amide-I band. This effect influences the band position in mixtures of liquid amide isotopomers. A further spectral feature caused by collective vibrational modes in the hydrogen bonded liquid amides is named coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). The result of this effect is that only one band is found in mixtures of isotopomers where bands at different frequencies are observed for each of the isotopomers. A similar effect may account for the observation of protein amide-I bands with frequencies dependent only on the secondary structure of the protein and not on the amino acid residues. RET and CBMI are due to a collectivity of vibrational modes in different amide molecules. This collectivity may be related to a cooperativity of hydrogen bonds. A low-frequency band around 100 cm -1 is observed in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins. Isotopic substitution shows that the mode corresponding to this band involves displacements of atoms in hydrogen bonds. This mode may drive a breaking of the hydrogen bond.

  5. Stability of surface and subsurface hydrogen on and in Au/Ni near-surface alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Fuat E.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2015-10-01

    Periodic, self-consistent DFT-GGA (PW91) calculations were used to study the interaction of hydrogen atoms with the (111) surfaces of substitutional near-surface alloys (NSAs) of Au and Ni with different surface layer compositions and different arrangements of Au atoms in the surface layer. The effect of hydrogen adsorption on the surface and in the first and second subsurface layers of the NSAs was studied. Increasing the Au content in the surface layer weakens hydrogen binding on the surface, but strengthens subsurface binding, suggesting that the distribution of surface and subsurface hydrogen will be different than that on pure Ni(111). While the metal composition of the surface layer has an effect on the binding energy of hydrogen on NSA surfaces, the local composition of the binding site has a stronger effect. For example, fcc hollow sites consisting of three Ni atoms bind H nearly as strongly as on Ni(111), and fcc sites consisting of three Au atoms bind H nearly as weakly as on Au(111). Sites with one or two Au atoms show intermediate binding energies. The preference of hydrogen for three-fold Ni hollow sites alters the relative stabilities of different surface metal atom arrangements, and may provide a driving force for adsorbate-induced surface rearrangement.

  6. Stability of Surface and Subsurface Hydrogen on and in Au/Ni Near-Surface Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Celik, Fuat E.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2015-10-01

    Periodic, self-consistent DFT-GGA (PW91) calculations were used to study the interaction of hydrogen atoms with the (111) surfaces of substitutional near-surface alloys (NSAs) of Au and Ni with different surface layer compositions and different arrangements of Au atoms in the surface layer. The effect of hydrogen adsorption on the surface and in the first and second subsurface layers of the NSAs was studied. Increasing the Au content in the surface layer weakens hydrogen binding on the surface, but strengthens subsurface binding, suggesting that the distribution of surface and subsurface hydrogen will be different than that on pure Ni(111). While the metal composition of the surface layer has an effect on the binding energy of hydrogen on NSA surfaces, the local composition of the binding site has a stronger effect. For example, fcc hollow sites consisting of three Ni atoms bind H nearly as strongly as on Ni(111), and fcc sites consisting of three Au atoms bind H nearly as weakly as on Au(111). Sites with one or two Au atoms show intermediate binding energies. The preference of hydrogen for three-fold Ni hollow sites alters the relative stabilities of different surface metal atom arrangements, and may provide a driving force for adsorbate-induced surface rearrangement.

  7. Formation of 6-, 7- or 8-membered ring intra-side-chain NH rad O hydrogen bond toward Ca-binding oxyanion in poly(allylaminocarboxylate) ligands stabilizes CaCO 3 vaterite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Doi, Mototsugu; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Taguchi, Takahisa; Onoda, Akira; Okamura, Taka-aki; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Ueyama, Norikazu

    2004-03-01

    Novel poly(allylaminocarboxylate) ligands, which have a carboxylate and the neighboring amide group in the same side-chain, were synthesized as model ligands for crystalline CaCO3 biominerals. Poly{N-allyl-malonamate}, poly{N-allyl-succinamate} and poly{4-allylcarbamoyl-butyrate} form 6-, 7- or 8-membered ring intra-side-chain NHrad O hydrogen bonds, respectively, between the carboxylate and the neighboring amide NH in the carboxylate anion state, although the formation of each intra-side-chain NHrad O hydrogen bond is independent on the stereoisomers of the polymer main-chain. In the polymer ligand-CaCO3 composites, strong binding of polymer ligands to CaCO3 crystals is caused by stabilizing a Ca-O (carboxylate) bond due to the pKa shift of carboxylic acid by the NHrad O hydrogen bond. Furthermore, the strong Ca binding in CaCO3 composites stabilizes the meta-stable morphology of CaCO3 vaterite crystals.

  8. Glucocorticoid interactions with ethanol effects on synaptic plasma membranes: influence on [125I]calmodulin binding.

    PubMed

    Sze, P Y

    1996-02-01

    Ca(++)-dependent binding of calmodulin (CaM) to brain synaptic plasma membranes is known to be inhibited by ethanol and stimulated by glucocorticoids. These opposite neurochemical actions between ethanol and the steroids in vitro are consistent with glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol-induced sedation reported to occur in vivo. The present study was undertaken to characterize the interactions of corticosterone with ethanol effects on [125I]CaM binding in synaptic plasma membranes. From the shift of concentration-response curves when corticosterone and ethanol were present in combination, the interaction between steroid stimulation and ethanol inhibition occurred in an additive relationship over the range of their effective concentrations. From Scatchard analyses, ethanol-induced decrease in membrane affinity for [125I]CaM was antagonized by steroid-induced increase in the membrane affinity, indicating that the convergent event in their interaction was the alteration of membrane affinity for CaM. Glucocorticoid antagonism of ethanol inhibition of [125I]CaM binding exhibited a high degree of steroid specificity; steroids with glucocorticoid activity including cortisol, dexamethasone and triamcinolone were effective, whereas gonadal steroids and excitatory neuroactive steroid metabolites were ineffective. The demonstration that glucocorticoids antagonized the inhibition of CaM binding by ethanol provides support for the hypothesis that these steroids are among the endogenous factors that modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol.

  9. Quantum Electrodynamics Effects in Rovibrational Spectra of Molecular Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Komasa, Jacek; Piszczatowski, Konrad; Łach, Grzegorz; Przybytek, Michał; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2011-10-11

    The dissociation energies from all rovibrational levels of H2 and D2 in the ground electronic state are calculated with high accuracy by including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects in the nonadiabatic treatment of the nuclear motion. For D2, the obtained energies have theoretical uncertainties of 0.001 cm(-1). For H2, similar uncertainties are for the lowest levels, while for the higher ones the uncertainty increases to 0.005 cm(-1). Very good agreement with recent high-resolution measurements of the rotational v = 0 levels of H2, including states with large angular momentum J, is achieved. This agreement would not have been possible without accurate evaluation of the relativistic and QED contributions and may be viewed as the first observation of the QED effects, mainly the electron self-energy, in a molecular spectrum. For several electric quadrupole transitions, we still observe certain disagreement with experimental results, which remains to be explained.

  10. The existence of memory effect on hydrogen ordering in ice: The effect makes ice attractive

    SciTech Connect

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C

    2011-01-01

    The existence of ferroelectric ice XI with ordered hydrogen in space becomes of interest in astronomy and physical chemistry because of the strong electrostatic force. However, the influence was believed to be limited because it forms in a narrow temperature range. From neutron diffraction experiments, we found that small hydrogen-ordered domains exist at significantly higher temperature and the domains induce the growth of 'bulk' ice XI. The small ordered domain is named 'memory' of hydrogen ordered ice because it is the residual structure of ice XI. Since the memory exists up to at least 111 K, most of ices in the solar system are hydrogen ordered and may have ferroelectricity. The small hydrogen-ordered domains govern the cosmochemical properties of ice and evolution of icy grains in the universe.

  11. Effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen production and fermentation products.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Organic waste from municipalities, food waste and agro-industrial residues are ideal feedstocks for use in biological conversion processes in biorefinery chains, representing biodegradable materials containing a series of substances belonging to the three main groups of the organic matter: carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation may assume a central role in the biorefinery concept, representing an up-front treatment for organic waste capable of hydrolysing complex organics and producing biohydrogen. This research study was aimed at evaluating the effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen yields, volatile fatty acid production and carbon-fate. Biogas and hydrogen productions were linearly correlated to carbohydrate content of substrates while proteins and lipids failed to produce significant contributions. Chemical composition also produced effects on the final products of dark fermentation. Acetic and butyric acids were the main fermentation products, with their ratio proving to correlate with carbohydrate and protein content. The results obtained in this research study enhance the understanding of data variability on hydrogen yields from organic waste. Detailed information on waste composition and chemical characterisation are essential to clearly identify the potential performances of the dark fermentation process.

  12. Effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment of thermomechanical pulp on hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loranger, E.; Charles, A.; Daneault, C.

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasound pre-treatments of softwood TMP had been carried to evaluate its impact on the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The trials were performed after a factorial design of experiment using frequency, power and time as variables. The experiments were conducted in an ultrasonic bath and then bleached with hydrogen peroxide. Measurements such as brightness, L*A*B* color system coordinate, residual hydrogen peroxide and metal content were evaluated on bleached pulp. The results indicate that the effect of ultrasonic treatment on brightness was dependent on the ultrasound frequency used; the brightness increased slightly at 68 kHz and decreased at 40 and 170 kHz. These results were correlated to the ultrasound effect on the generation of transition metals (copper, iron and manganese) which are responsible for catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The influence of metal interference was minimized by using a chelating agent such as diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). With the results obtained in this study we have identified a set of option conditions, e.g. 1000 W, 40 kHz, 1.5 % consistency and 0.2% addition of DTPA prior to the bleaching stage (after ultrasonic pre-treatment) who improve brightness by 2.5 %ISO.

  13. Effect of low-energy hydrogen ion implantation on dendritic web silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D. L.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Fonash, S. J.; Singh, R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of a low-energy (0.4 keV), short-time (2-min), heavy-dose (10 to the 18th/sq cm) hydrogen ion implant on dendritic web silicon solar cells and material was investigated. Such an implant was observed to improve the cell open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current appreciably for a number of cells. In spite of the low implant energy, measurements of internal quantum efficiency indicate that it is the base of the cell, rather than the emitter, which benefits from the hydrogen implant. This is supported by the observation that the measured minority-carrier diffusion length in the base did not change when the emitter was removed. In some cases, a threefold increase of the base diffusion length was observed after implantation. The effects of the hydrogen implantation were not changed by a thermal stress test at 250 C for 111 h in nitrogen. It is speculated that hydrogen enters the bulk by traveling along dislocations, as proposed recently for edge-defined film-fed growth silicon ribbon.

  14. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide on renal injury in the experimental unilateral ureteral obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Murat; Otunctemur, Alper; Ozbek, Emin; Sahin, Suleyman; Besiroglu, Huseyin; Ozsoy, Ozgur Doga; Cekmen, Mustafa; Somay, Adnan; Ozbay, Nurver

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction/Objective: Ureteral obstruction is a common pathology and causes kidney fibrosis and dysfunction at late period. In this present study, we investigated the antifibrotic and antiinflammatory effects of hydrogen sulfide on kidney damage after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in rats. Materials and Methods: 24 rats were divided into four groups. Group 1 was control, group 2 was sham, group 3 included rats with UUO and group 4 rats with UUO which were given sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS)-exogenous donor of hydrogen sulfide (intraperitoneally 56μmoL/kg/day). After 14 days, rats were killed and their kidneys were taken and blood analysis was performed. Tubular necrosis, mononuclear cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis were determined histopathologically in a part of the kidneys; nitric oxide (NO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were determined in the other part of the kidneys. Urea-creatinine levels were investigated by blood analysis. Statistical analyses were made by the Chi-square test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: There was no significantly difference for urea-creatinine levels among groups. Pathologically, there was serious tubular necrosis and fibrosis in group 3 and there was significantly decreasing of tubular necrosis and fibrosis in group 4 (p<0.005). Also, there was significantly increase of NO and MDA levels and decrease of GSH levels in group 3 compared to other groups (p<0.005). Conclusions: hydrogen sulfide prevents kidney damage with antioxidant and antiinflammatory effect. PMID:26742979

  15. Effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen production and fermentation products.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Organic waste from municipalities, food waste and agro-industrial residues are ideal feedstocks for use in biological conversion processes in biorefinery chains, representing biodegradable materials containing a series of substances belonging to the three main groups of the organic matter: carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation may assume a central role in the biorefinery concept, representing an up-front treatment for organic waste capable of hydrolysing complex organics and producing biohydrogen. This research study was aimed at evaluating the effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen yields, volatile fatty acid production and carbon-fate. Biogas and hydrogen productions were linearly correlated to carbohydrate content of substrates while proteins and lipids failed to produce significant contributions. Chemical composition also produced effects on the final products of dark fermentation. Acetic and butyric acids were the main fermentation products, with their ratio proving to correlate with carbohydrate and protein content. The results obtained in this research study enhance the understanding of data variability on hydrogen yields from organic waste. Detailed information on waste composition and chemical characterisation are essential to clearly identify the potential performances of the dark fermentation process. PMID:26254676

  16. Large effect of irradiance on hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones in Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Benthien, Albert; French, Katherine L.; Epping, Eric; Zondervan, Ingrid; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bijma, Jelle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen isotopic (δD) composition of long-chain alkenones produced by certain haptophyte algae has been suggested as a potential proxy for reconstructing paleo sea surface salinity. However, environmental parameters other than salinity may also affect the δD of alkenones. We investigated the impact of the level of irradiance on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of alkenones versus growth water by cultivating two strains of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi at different light intensities. The hydrogen isotope fractionation decreased by approximately 40‰ when irradiance was increased from 15 to 200 μmol photons m-2 s-1 above which it was relatively constant. The response is likely a direct effect of photosystem I and II activity as the relationship of the fractionation factor α versus light intensity can be described by an Eilers-Peeters photosynthesis model. This irradiance effect is in agreement with published δD data of alkenones derived from suspended particulate matter collected from different depths in the photic zone of the Gulf of California and the eastern tropical North Pacific. However, haptophyte algae tend to bloom at relatively high light intensities (>500 μmol photons m-2 s-1) occurring at the sea surface, at which hydrogen isotope fractionation is relatively constant and not affected by changes in light intensity. Alkenones accumulating in the sediment are likely mostly derived from these surface water haptophyte blooms, when the largest amount of biomass is produced. Therefore, the observed irradiance effect is unlikely to affect the applicability of the hydrogen isotopic composition of sedimentary long chain alkenones as a proxy for paleosalinity.

  17. Inverse Ubbelohde effect in the short hydrogen bond of photosystem II: Relation between H/D isotope effect and symmetry in potential energy profile.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Takano, Yu

    2016-09-01

    The short hydrogen bond between tyrosine Yz and D1-His190 of photosystem II (PSII) was investigated using multicomponent quantum mechanics, where the quantum fluctuation of a hydrogen nucleus was incorporated into electronic structure calculation. Our computation demonstrated that the deuteration for hydrogen in the short hydrogen bond of PSII led to the reduction of the O…N distance. It indicated an inverse Ubbelohde effect typically recognized in strong and symmetric hydrogen-bonding clusters such as FHF(-) and H3O2-. We confirmed that the relation between the geometric isotope effect and the symmetry of the potential energy profile of FHF(-) was reasonably agreed with that of PSII. According to this agreement, the short hydrogen bond in PSII can be regarded as a short strong hydrogen bond. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effects of hydrogen adsorption on the properties of double wall BN and (BN)xCy nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A.; Azevedo, S.; Kaschny, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    In the present contribution, we apply first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory, to study the effects of hydrogen adsorption on the structural and electronic properties of boron nitride and hybrid carbon-boron nitride double wall nanotubes. The results demonstrate that the hydrogen decoration induces significant structural deformation and an appreciable reduction in the gap energy. When the number of hydrogen atoms introduced on the outer wall is increased, desorption of hydrogen pairs are observed. The calculations indicate that each adsorbed hydrogen atom induces a structural deformation with an energetic cost of about 68 meV/atom. It is also found that the introduction of hydrogen atoms can be applied as an efficient tool for tuning the electronic properties of such structures.

  19. Effect of mutations of the human serpin protein corticosteroid-binding globulin on cortisol-binding, thermal and protease sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Braun, Beate C; Meyer, Hellmuth-A; Reetz, Antje; Fuhrmann, Ulrike; Köhrle, Josef

    2010-05-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG, transcortin) belongs to the serpin family of serine protease inhibitors (SERPINA6) and is mainly secreted by the liver. The negative acute phase protein CBG regulates free cortisol levels in the blood and distributes cortisol to its target tissues. So far no CBG serpin partner protease has been identified. However, its cleavage by human neutrophil elastase destroys ligand binding capacity and supposedly liberates cortisol at sites of inflammation. Here we report on the recombinant expression and secretion of human wild-type CBG and several novel mutants by human 293-EBNA cells. Functional characterization of wild-type and mutant CBG revealed distinct differences in ligand binding sensitivity to heat or elastase. Certain mutants are almost devoid of cortisol binding activity (Q232R and CBG Lyon), some display higher sensitivity for heat inactivation (G335V, Q232R and CBG Lyon) or for elastase cleavage (G335V). CBG mutant T342A is more resistant to elastase cleavage. Our data support the validity of the serpin structural concept. The expression system used provides functionally active human recombinant transcortin for further functional characterization of wild-type and human CBG mutant variants, which have been associated with altered serum free cortisol levels or pathophysiological constellations such as increased body weight, fatigue or hypotension.

  20. Effect of detergent binding on cytochrome P450 2B4 structure as analyzed by X-ray crystallography and deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manish B; Jang, Hyun-Hee; Wilderman, P Ross; Lee, David; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C David; Halpert, James R

    2016-09-01

    Multiple crystal structures of CYP2B4 have demonstrated the binding of the detergent 5-cyclohexyl-1-pentyl-β-D-maltoside (CYMAL-5) in a peripheral pocket located adjacent to the active site. To explore the consequences of detergent binding, X-ray crystal structures of the peripheral pocket mutant CYP2B4 F202W were solved in the presence of hexaethylene glycol monooctyl ether (C8E6) and CYMAL-5. The structure in the presence of CYMAL-5 illustrated a closed conformation indistinguishable from the previously solved wild-type. In contrast, the F202W structure in the presence of C8E6 revealed a detergent molecule that coordinated the heme-iron and extended to the protein surface through the substrate access channel 2f. Despite the overall structural similarity of these detergent complexes, remarkable differences were observed in the A, A', and H helices, the F-G cassette, the C-D and β4 loop region. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) was employed to probe these differences and to test the effect of detergents in solution. The presence of either detergent increased the H/D exchange rate across the plastic regions, and the results obtained by DXMS in solution were consistent in general with the relevant structural snapshots. The study provides insight into effect of detergent binding and the interpretation of associated conformational dynamics of CYP2B4. PMID:27280734

  1. Self-consistent field theory for lipid-based liquid crystals: hydrogen bonding effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Bo; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Fredrickson, Glenn H

    2008-02-21

    A model to describe the self-assembly properties of aqueous blends of nonionic lipids is developed in the framework of self-consistent field theory (SCFT). Thermally reversible hydrogen bonding between lipid heads and water turns out to be a key factor in describing the lyotropic and thermotropic phase behavior of such systems. Our model includes reversible hydrogen bonding imposed in the context of the grand canonical ensemble and exact conditions of binding equilibrium. The lipid molecules are modeled as a rigid head and a flexible Gaussian tail, and the water molecules are treated explicitly. Here, we focus on systems where the lipid molecule has a relatively small hydrophilic head compared to the hydrophobic tail, such as monoolein in water. Experimentally, this system has both normal phase sequences (inverted hexagonal to inverted double gyroid cubic phase) and reverse phase sequences (lamellar to inverted double gyroid cubic phase) as the water volume fraction increases. From SCFT simulations of the model, two phase diagrams corresponding to temperature independent or dependent interaction parameters chi are constructed, which qualitatively capture the phase behavior of the monoolein-water mixture. The lattice parameters of the simulated mesophases are compared with the experimental values and are found to be in semiquantitative agreement. The role of various structural and solution parameters on the phase diagrams is also discussed.

  2. Substrate and Transition State Binding in Alkaline Phosphatase Analyzed by Computation of Oxygen Isotope Effects.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Cui, Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Enzymes are powerful catalysts, and a thorough understanding of the sources of their catalytic power will facilitate many medical and industrial applications. Here we have studied the catalytic mechanism of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which is one of the most catalytically proficient enzymes known. We have used quantum mechanics calculations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to model a variety of isotope effects relevant to the reaction of AP. We have calculated equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs), binding isotope effects (BIEs), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for a range of phosphate mono- and diester substrates. The results agree well with experimental values, but the model for the reaction's transition state (TS) differs from the original interpretation of those experiments. Our model indicates that isotope effects on binding make important contributions to measured KIEs on V/K, which complicated interpretation of the measured values. Our results provide a detailed interpretation of the measured isotope effects and make predictions that can test the proposed model. The model indicates that the substrate is deformed in the ground state (GS) of the reaction and partially resembles the TS. The highly preorganized active site preferentially binds conformations that resemble the TS and not the GS, which induces the substrate to adapt to the enzyme, rather than the other way around-as with classic "induced fit" models. The preferential stabilization of the TS over the GS is what lowers the barrier to the chemical step.

  3. Substrate and Transition State Binding in Alkaline Phosphatase Analyzed by Computation of Oxygen Isotope Effects.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Cui, Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Enzymes are powerful catalysts, and a thorough understanding of the sources of their catalytic power will facilitate many medical and industrial applications. Here we have studied the catalytic mechanism of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which is one of the most catalytically proficient enzymes known. We have used quantum mechanics calculations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to model a variety of isotope effects relevant to the reaction of AP. We have calculated equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs), binding isotope effects (BIEs), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for a range of phosphate mono- and diester substrates. The results agree well with experimental values, but the model for the reaction's transition state (TS) differs from the original interpretation of those experiments. Our model indicates that isotope effects on binding make important contributions to measured KIEs on V/K, which complicated interpretation of the measured values. Our results provide a detailed interpretation of the measured isotope effects and make predictions that can test the proposed model. The model indicates that the substrate is deformed in the ground state (GS) of the reaction and partially resembles the TS. The highly preorganized active site preferentially binds conformations that resemble the TS and not the GS, which induces the substrate to adapt to the enzyme, rather than the other way around-as with classic "induced fit" models. The preferential stabilization of the TS over the GS is what lowers the barrier to the chemical step. PMID:27541005

  4. Quantification of joint effect for hydrogen bond and development of QSARs for predicting mixture toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhifen; Zhong, Ping; Yin, Kedong; Wang, Liansheng; Yu, Hongxia

    2003-08-01

    A QSAR model is successfully proposed to predict the toxicity effect on Photobacterium phosphoreum by nonpolar-narcotic-chemical mixtures and/or polar-narcotic-chemical mixtures. For nonpolar-narcotic-chemical mixtures and polar-narcotic-chemical mixtures, their corresponding hydrophobicity-based QSAR models are derived from regression analysis. Comparison of these two QSAR models make us believe that it is the joint effect of hydrogen bond in polar-narcotic-chemical mixture that leads to the difference between these two models. Such joint effect of hydrogen bond can be quantified as AMH and BMH by using the different partition coefficients of mixtures in various organic phase/water systems. And the regression analysis results convinced us that the introduction of AMH does improve the quality of the QSAR model with r2=0.948, S.E.=0.166 and F=745.201 at P=0.000 for total 84 mixtures.

  5. Effect of odd hydrogen on ozone depletion by chlorine reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.; Cicerone, R. J.; Liu, S. C.; Chameides, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    The present paper discusses how the shape of the ozone layer changes under the influence of injected ClX for several choices of two key HOx reaction rates. The two HOx reactions are: OH + HO2 yields H2O + O2 and O + HO2 yields OH + O2. Results of calculations are presented which show that the two reaction rates determine the stratospheric concentrations of OH and HO2, and that these concentrations regulate the amount by which the stratospheric ozone column can be reduced due to injections of odd chlorine. It is concluded that the amount of ozone reduction by a given mixing ratio of ClX will remain very uncertain until the significance of several possible feedback effects involving HOx in a chlorine-polluted atmosphere are determined and measurements of the reaction rates and HOx concentrations are made at the relevant temperatures.

  6. Effects of Buoyancy in Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Al-Ammar, K.; Gollahalli, S. R.; Griffin, D. W.

    1999-01-01

    This project was carried out to understand the effects of heat release and buoyancy on the flame structure of diffusion flames. Experiments were conducted at atmospheric pressure in both normal gravity and microgravity conditions in the NASA LeRC 2.2 s drop tower. Experiments were also conducted in a variable pressure combustion facility in normal gravity to scale buoyancy and thus, to supplement the drop tower experiments. Pure H2 or H2 mixed with He was used as the jet fluid to avoid the complexities associated with soot formation. Fuel jet burning in quiescent air was visualized and quantified by the Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry (RSD) to obtain scalar profiles (temperature, oxygen concentration) within the flame. Burner tube diameter (d) was varied from 0.3 to 1.19 mm producing jet exit Reynolds numbers ranging from 40 to 1900, and generating flames encompassing laminar and transitional (laminar to turbulent) flow structure. Some experiments were also complemented with the CFD analysis. In a previous paper, we have presented details of the RSD technique, comparison of computed and measured scalar distributions, and effects of buoyancy on laminar and transitional H2 gas-jet diffusion flames. Results obtained from the RSD technique, variable pressure combustion chamber, and theoretical models have been published. Subsequently, we have developed a new drop rig with improved optical and image acquisition. In this set up, the schlieren images are acquired in real time and stored digitally in RAM of an onboard computer. This paper deals with laminar diffusion flames of pure H2 in normal and microgravity.

  7. Effects of bromocriptine on (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding in cytosol of anterior pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    De Nicola, A.F.; Weisenberg, L.S.; Arakelian, M.C.; Libertun, C.

    1981-07-01

    The hypothalamus may control hormone receptors in the anterior pituitary either by a direct trophic effect or indirectly by regulation of serum pituitary hormone levels. Rats whose medial basal hypothalamus had been destroyed in order to suppress neural control of the gland showed a reduction in (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding in the anterior pituitary and high serum PRL levels; both changes were reversed by treatment of the lesioned rats with daily injections of bromocriptine, a dopamine agonist. In nonlesioned animals, the same treatment did not modify significantly those parameters. In another hyperprolactinemic model (rats with anterior pituitaries transplanted under the kidney capsule), (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding by the in situ pituitaries of the host rats was similar to that in the nongrafted controls. These results suggest that changes due to median eminence lesion are reversible and that bromocriptine is able to act as a substitutive therapy which restores binding of estradiol in glands whose receptors have been decreased by the effect of the lesion. High PRL levels due to pituitary transplant do not account for the observed changes in the pituitary estradiol binding.

  8. Effect of BET Missense Mutations on Bromodomain Function, Inhibitor Binding and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lori, Laura; Pasquo, Alessandra; Lori, Clorinda; Petrosino, Maria; Chiaraluce, Roberta; Tallant, Cynthia; Knapp, Stefan; Consalvi, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important epigenetic mark regulating gene transcription and chromatin structure. Acetylated lysine residues are specifically recognized by bromodomains, small protein interaction modules that read these modification in a sequence and acetylation dependent way regulating the recruitment of transcriptional regulators and chromatin remodelling enzymes to acetylated sites in chromatin. Recent studies revealed that bromodomains are highly druggable protein interaction domains resulting in the development of a large number of bromodomain inhibitors. BET bromodomain inhibitors received a lot of attention in the oncology field resulting in the rapid translation of early BET bromodomain inhibitors into clinical studies. Here we investigated the effects of mutations present as polymorphism or found in cancer on BET bromodomain function and stability and the influence of these mutants on inhibitor binding. We found that most BET missense mutations localize to peripheral residues in the two terminal helices. Crystal structures showed that the three dimensional structure is not compromised by these mutations but mutations located in close proximity to the acetyl-lysine binding site modulate acetyl-lysine and inhibitor binding. Most mutations affect significantly protein stability and tertiary structure in solution, suggesting new interactions and an alternative network of protein-protein interconnection as a consequence of single amino acid substitution. To our knowledge this is the first report studying the effect of mutations on bromodomain function and inhibitor binding. PMID:27403962

  9. Action-effect binding is decreased in motor conversion disorder: implications for sense of agency.

    PubMed

    Kranick, Sarah M; Moore, James W; Yusuf, Nadia; Martinez, Valeria T; LaFaver, Kathrin; Edwards, Mark J; Mehta, Arpan R; Collins, Phoebe; Harrison, Neil A; Haggard, Patrick; Hallett, Mark; Voon, Valerie

    2013-07-01

    The abnormal movements seen in motor conversion disorder are affected by distraction and entrainment, similar to voluntary movement. Unlike voluntary movement, however, patients lack a sense of control for the abnormal movements, a failure of "self-agency." The action-effect binding paradigm has been used to quantify the sense of self-agency, because subjective contraction of time between an action and its effect only occurs if the patient feels that they are the agent responsible for the action. We used this paradigm, coupled with emotional stimuli, to investigate the sense of agency with voluntary movements in patients with motor conversion disorder. Twenty patients with motor conversion disorder and 20 age-matched and sex-matched healthy volunteers used a rotating clock to judge the time of their own voluntary key presses (action) and a subsequent auditory tone (effect) after they completed conditioning blocks in which high, medium, and low tones were coupled to images of happy, fearful, and neutral faces. The results replicated those produced previously: it was reported that an effect after a voluntary action occurred earlier, and the preceding action occurred later, compared with trials that used only key presses or tones. Patients had reduced overall binding scores relative to healthy volunteers, suggesting a reduced sense of agency. There was no effect of the emotional stimuli (faces) or other interaction effects. Healthy volunteers with subclinical depressive symptoms had higher overall binding scores. We demonstrate that patients with motor conversion disorder have decreased action-effect binding for normal voluntary movements compared with healthy volunteers, consistent with the greater experience of lack of control.

  10. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Kinetics Demonstrate Long Range Allosteric Effects of Thumb Site 2 Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Deredge, Daniel; Li, Jiawen; Johnson, Kenneth A; Wintrode, Patrick L

    2016-05-01

    New nonnucleoside analogs are being developed as part of a multi-drug regimen to treat hepatitis C viral infections. Particularly promising are inhibitors that bind to the surface of the thumb domain of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B). Numerous crystal structures have been solved showing small molecule non-nucleoside inhibitors bound to the hepatitis C viral polymerase, but these structures alone do not define the mechanism of inhibition. Our prior kinetic analysis showed that nonnucleoside inhibitors binding to thumb site-2 (NNI2) do not block initiation or elongation of RNA synthesis; rather, they block the transition from the initiation to elongation, which is thought to proceed with significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme-RNA complex. Here we have mapped the effect of three NNI2 inhibitors on the conformational dynamics of the enzyme using hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics. All three inhibitors rigidify an extensive allosteric network extending >40 Å from the binding site, thus providing a structural rationale for the observed disruption of the transition from distributive initiation to processive elongation. The two more potent inhibitors also suppress slow cooperative unfolding in the fingers extension-thumb interface and primer grip, which may contribute their stronger inhibition. These results establish that NNI2 inhibitors act through long range allosteric effects, reveal important conformational changes underlying normal polymerase function, and point the way to the design of more effective allosteric inhibitors that exploit this new information. PMID:27006396

  11. Sensing (un)binding events via surface plasmons: effects of resonator geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Claudio, Virginia; Käll, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    The resonance conditions of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) can be perturbed in any number ways making plasmon nanoresonators viable tools in detection of e.g. phase changes, pH, gasses, and single molecules. Precise measurement via LSPR of molecular concentrations hinge on the ability to confidently count the number of molecules attached to a metal resonator and ideally to track binding and unbinding events in real-time. These two requirements make it necessary to rigorously quantify relations between the number of bound molecules and response of plasmonic sensors. This endeavor is hindered on the one hand by a spatially varying response of a given plasmonic nanosensor. On the other hand movement of molecules is determined by stochastic effects (Brownian motion) as well as deterministic flow, if present, in microfluidic channels. The combination of molecular dynamics and the electromagnetic response of the LSPR yield an uncertainty which is little understood and whose effect is often disregarded in quantitative sensing experiments. Using a combination of electromagnetic finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the plasmon resonance peak shift of various metal nanosensors (disk, cone, rod, dimer) and stochastic diffusion-reaction simulations of biomolecular interactions on a sensor surface we clarify the interplay between position dependent binding probability and inhomogeneous sensitivity distribution. We show, how the statistical characteristics of the total signal upon molecular binding are determined. The proposed methodology is, in general, applicable to any sensor and any transduction mechanism, although the specifics of implementation will vary depending on circumstances. In this work we focus on elucidating how the interplay between electromagnetic and stochastic effects impacts the feasibility of employing particular shapes of plasmonic sensors for real-time monitoring of individual binding reactions or sensing low concentrations

  12. Effect of platinum nanoparticle deposition parameters on hydrogen peroxide transduction for applications in wearable electrochemical glucose biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargill, Allison A.; Neil, Kathrine M.; Hondred, John A.; McLamore, Eric S.; Claussen, Jonathan C.

    2016-05-01

    Enhanced interest in wearable biosensor technology over the past decade is directly related to the increasing prevalence of diabetes and the associated requirement of daily blood glucose monitoring. In this work we investigate the platinum-carbon transduction element used in traditional first-generation glucose biosensors which rely on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide produced by the glucose-glucose oxidase binding scheme. We electrodeposit platinum nanoparticles on a commercially-available screen printed carbon electrode by stepping an applied current between 0 and 7.12 mA/cm2 for a varying number of cycles. Next, we examine the trends in deposition and the effect that the number of deposition cycles has on the sensitivity of electrochemical glucose sensing. Results from this work indicate that applying platinum nanoparticles to screen printed carbon via electrodeposition from a metal salt solution improves overall biosensor sensitivity. This work also pinpoints the amount of platinum (i.e., number of deposition cycles) that maximizes biosensor sensitivity in an effort to minimize the use of the precious metals, viz., platinum, in electrode fabrication. In summary, this work quantifies the relationship between platinum electrodeposition and sensor performance, which is crucial in designing and producing cost-effective sensors.

  13. Effects of plasma hydrogenation on trapping properties of dislocations in heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringel, S. A.; Chatterjee, B.

    1994-01-01

    In previous work, we have demonstrated the effectiveness of a post-growth hydrogen plasma treatment for passivating the electrical activity of dislocations in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown InP on GaAs substrates by a more than two order of magnitude reduction in deep level concentration and an improvement in reverse bias leakage current by a factor of approximately 20. These results make plasma hydrogenation an extremely promising technique for achieving high efficiency large area and light weight heteroepitaxial InP solar cells for space applications. In this work we investigate the carrier trapping process by dislocations in heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs and the role of hydrogen passivation on this process. It is shown that the charge trapping kinetics of dislocations after hydrogen passivation are significantly altered, approaching point defect-like behavior consistent with a transformation from a high concentration of dislocation-related defect bands within the InP bandgap to a low concentration of individual dislocation related deep levels, before and after passivation. It is further shown that the 'apparent' activation energies of dislocation related deep levels, before and after passivation, reduce by approximately 70 meV as DLTS fill pulse times are increased from 1 microsecond to 1 millisecond. A model is proposed which explains these effects based on a reduction of Coulombic interaction between individual core sites along the dislocation cores by hydrogen incorporation. Knowledge of the trapping properties in these specific structures is important to develop optimum, low loss heteroepitaxial InP cells.

  14. Protective effect and mechanism of hydrogen treatment on lung epithelial barrier dysfunction in rats with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, L-D; Wu, X-Y; Tao, B-D; Wang, N; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the protective effect of hydrogen and to investigate the underlying mechanism of its preliminary effect on the alveolar epithelial barrier function in septic rats. Forty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into three groups (N = 15): control [saline injection (intraperitoneal, ip), air drawing; SA], acute lung injury group [lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection (ip, 15 mg/kg), air drawing; LA], and acute lung injury combined with hydrogen drawing group [LPS injection (ip, 15 mg/kg), 2% hydrogen drawing; LH]. The rats were euthanized after 6 h of treatment, and the extravascular lung water (EVLW), pulmonary alveolar-arterial oxygen pressure (A-aDO2), and respiratory index (RI) of each group were measured. The aquaporin-1 (AQP-1) protein expression in the lung tissues was detected using immunohistochemistry and western blotting, and the correlation between the EVLW and AQP-1 was analyzed. The lung morphology was observed with light and electron microscopy. In the LA group, EVLW (0.87 ± 0.17), A-aDO2 (113.21 ± 13.92), RI (0.65 ± 0.26), and AQP-1 expression increased. Additionally, thickened alveolar walls, significant invasion of inflammatory cells around the vessels, capillary ectasia, hyperemia/hemorrhage in the alveolar space, significantly swollen mitochondria, and increased vacuolar degeneration were observed. A significant negative correlation between AQP-1 expression and EVLW was observed (R2 = 0.8806). Compared with the LA group, EVLW (0.71 ± 0.19), A-aDO2 (132.42 ± 17.39), RI (0.75 ± 0.24), and inflammatory reaction decreased and AQP-1 expression increased in the LH group. The damage to pulmonary epithelial cells improved after hydrogen treatment in rats with sepsis; hydrogen could protect the pulmonary epithelial barrier function by acting on AQP-1. PMID:26909920

  15. Regulation of uptake hydrogenase and effects of hydrogen utilization on gene expression in Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed

    Rey, Federico E; Oda, Yasuhiro; Harwood, Caroline S

    2006-09-01

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris is a purple, facultatively phototrophic bacterium that uses hydrogen gas as an electron donor for carbon dioxide fixation during photoautotrophic growth or for ammonia synthesis during nitrogen fixation. It also uses hydrogen as an electron supplement to enable the complete assimilation of oxidized carbon compounds, such as malate, into cell material during photoheterotrophic growth. The R. palustris genome predicts a membrane-bound nickel-iron uptake hydrogenase and several regulatory proteins to control hydrogenase synthesis. There is also a novel sensor kinase gene (RPA0981) directly adjacent to the hydrogenase gene cluster. Here we show that the R. palustris regulatory sensor hydrogenase HupUV acts in conjunction with the sensor kinase-response regulator protein pair HoxJ-HoxA to activate hydrogenase expression in response to hydrogen gas. Transcriptome analysis indicated that the HupUV-HoxJA regulatory system also controls the expression of genes encoding a predicted dicarboxylic acid transport system, a putative formate transporter, and a glutamine synthetase. RPA0981 had a small effect in repressing hydrogenase synthesis. We also determined that the two-component system RegS-RegR repressed expression of the uptake hydrogenase, probably in response to changes in intracellular redox status. Transcriptome analysis indicated that about 30 genes were differentially expressed in R. palustris cells that utilized hydrogen when growing photoheterotrophically on malate under nitrogen-fixing conditions compared to a mutant strain that lacked uptake hydrogenase. From this it appears that the recycling of reductant in the form of hydrogen does not have extensive nonspecific effects on gene expression in R. palustris. PMID:16923881

  16. The Effect of Phosphorus Content on the Hydrogen Stress Cracking of High Strength 4130 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Bruce D.

    1982-05-01

    A series of four 4130 base steels with various phosphorus concentrations was subjected to cathodic charging to determine the effect of P on hydrogen stress cracking resistance. Static fatigue curves for several different yield strengths were obtained for each alloy. At high yield strengths under applied loads of 60 to 80 pct of the yield, 50 ppm P (bulk concentration) was enough to provide sufficient grain boundary P for an impurity-hydrogen interaction which produced intergranular fracture along prior austenite grain boundaries. Decreasing yield strength and applied stress caused a transition in fracture mode to transgranular while the resistance to hydrogen stress cracking increased with decreasing P. Microhardness measurements of prior austenite grain boundaries were made to establish the role of P. The role of P is not apparently related to its capacity as a strengthening element but more probably as a hydrogen recombination poison. Grain boundary hardness measurements for low temperature tempers (200 °C) appear to be valid while those at 500 °C were not.

  17. The effects of cations and anions on hydrogen chemisorption at Pt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. C.; Ogrady, W. E.; Yeager, E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence based on linear sweep voltammetry is presented to substantiate the view that ionic adsorption substantially shifts electrode potentials in addition to the relative heights of the hydrogen adsorption peaks. HClO4 and HF are chosen as better reference electrolytes for anion studies. The voltammetry curves for 0.1M HF and 0.1M HClO4 as well as the effect of adding successively increasing amounts of H2SO4 to these electrolytes are discussed. The measurements are also extended to alkaline solutions. Mechanisms whereby the addition of various cations and anions to electrolytes such as HF and HClO4 can induce changes in the structure of the hydrogen adsorption region in the voltammetry curves are identified: (1) blocking of sites by anion adsorption and coupling of hydrogen adsorption and anion desorption, (2) modification in the hydrogen adsorption energies for sites adjacent to adsorbed anions, (3) changes in the potential distribution across the interface, and (4) surface restructuring.

  18. Mass spectrometry reveals synergistic effects of nucleotides, lipids, and drugs binding to a multidrug resistance efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Julien; Wang, Sheila C; Politis, Argyris; Reading, Eamonn; Ma, Jerome; Biggin, Philip C; Zhou, Min; Tao, Houchao; Zhang, Qinghai; Chang, Geoffrey; Morgner, Nina; Robinson, Carol V

    2013-06-11

    Multidrug resistance is a serious barrier to successful treatment of many human diseases, including cancer, wherein chemotherapeutics are exported from target cells by membrane-embedded pumps. The most prevalent of these pumps, the ATP-Binding Cassette transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp), consists of two homologous halves each comprising one nucleotide-binding domain and six transmembrane helices. The transmembrane region encapsulates a hydrophobic cavity, accessed by portals in the membrane, that binds cytotoxic compounds as well as lipids and peptides. Here we use mass spectrometry (MS) to probe the intact P-gp small molecule-bound complex in a detergent micelle. Activation in the gas phase leads to formation of ions, largely devoid of detergent, yet retaining drug molecules as well as charged or zwitterionic lipids. Measuring the rates of lipid binding and calculating apparent KD values shows that up to six negatively charged diacylglycerides bind more favorably than zwitterionic lipids. Similar experiments confirm binding of cardiolipins and show that prior binding of the immunosuppressant and antifungal antibiotic cyclosporin A enhances subsequent binding of cardiolipin. Ion mobility MS reveals that P-gp exists in an equilibrium between different states, readily interconverted by ligand binding. Overall these MS results show how concerted small molecule binding leads to synergistic effects on binding affinities and conformations of a multidrug efflux pump.

  19. Growth hormone (GH) binding and effects of GH analogs in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bartke, A.; Steger, R.W.; Turyn, D.

    1994-12-31

    Overexpression of human (h) or bovine (b) growth hormone (GH) in transgenic mice is associated with marked (2- to 12-fold) and significant increase in hepatic binding of GH and prolactin (PRL). This is due to an increase in the number of GH and PRL receptors (GHR, PRLR) per mg of microsomal protein without changes in binding affinity. Comparison of results obtained in transgenic animals expressing bGH with a mouse metallothionein (MT) or a rat phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) promoter suggests that effects of bGH on hepatic GHR and PRLR do not require GH overexpression during fetal life and, within the dose range tested, the effects on PRLR are not dose dependent. The increase in hepatic GHR was accompanied by significant increases in plasma GH-binding protein (GHBP) and in mean residence time of injected GH. Thus life-long elevation of peripheral GH levels alters the availability of both free GH and GHR. Site-directed in vitro mutagenesis was used to produce hGH and bGH analogs mutated within one of the sites involved in binding to GHR and PRLR. Mutating hGH to produce amino acid identity with bGH at Position 11, 18 (within Helix 1), 57, or 60 (within the loop between Helix 1 and 2) did not affect binding to GHR in vitro, or somatotropic activity in transgenic mice in vivo but reduced lactogenic activity in Nb{sub 2} cells by 22%-45%. Mutations of bGH designed to produce amino acid identity with hGH at one to four of the corresponding positions in the bGH molecule did not interfere with binding to GHR or somatotropic activity in vivo, and failed to produce significant binding to PRLR but resulted in alterations in the effects on the hypothalamic and anterior pituitary function in transgenic mice. Apparently region(s) outside the domains examined are essential for lactogenic activity of hGH, and different portions of the GH molecule are responsible for its diverse actions in vivo. 35 refs.

  20. Sustained hydrogen photoproduction by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Effects of culture parameters.

    PubMed

    Kosourov, Sergey; Tsygankov, Anatoly; Seibert, Michael; Ghirardi, Maria L

    2002-06-30

    The green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is capable of sustained H(2) photoproduction when grown under sulfur-deprived conditions. This phenomenon is a result of the partial deactivation of photosynthetic O(2)-evolution activity in response to sulfur deprivation. At these reduced rates of water-oxidation, oxidative respiration under continuous illumination can establish an anaerobic environment in the culture. After 10-15 hours of anaerobiosis, sulfur-deprived algal cells induce a reversible hydrogenase and start to evolve H(2) gas in the light. Using a computer-monitored photobioreactor system, we investigated the behavior of sulfur-deprived algae and found that: (1) the cultures transition through five consecutive phases: an aerobic phase, an O(2)-consumption phase, an anaerobic phase, a H(2)-production phase and a termination phase; (2) synchronization of cell division during pre-growth with 14:10 h light:dark cycles leads to earlier establishment of anaerobiosis in the cultures and to earlier onset of the H(2)-production phase; (3) re-addition of small quantities of sulfate (12.5-50 microM MgSO(4), final concentration) to either synchronized or unsynchronized cell suspensions results in an initial increase in culture density, a higher initial specific rate of H(2) production, an increase in the length of the H(2)-production phase, and an increase in the total amount of H(2) produced; and (4) increases in the culture optical density in the presence of 50 microM sulfate result in a decrease in the initial specific rates of H(2) production and in an earlier start of the H(2)-production phase with unsynchronized cells. We suggest that the effects of sulfur re-addition on H(2) production, up to an optimal concentration, are due to an increase in the residual water-oxidation activity of the algal cells. We also demonstrate that, in principle, cells synchronized by growth under light:dark cycles can be used in an outdoor H(2)-production system without loss of

  1. Computational insights into the photocyclization of diclofenac in solution: effects of halogen and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Bani-Yaseen, Abdulilah Dawoud

    2016-08-21

    The effects of noncovalent interactions, namely halogen and hydrogen bonding, on the photochemical conversion of the photosensitizing drug diclofenac (DCF) in solution were investigated computationally. Both explicit and implicit solvent effects were qualitatively and quantitatively assessed employing the DFT/6-31+G(d) and SQM(PM7) levels of theory. Full geometry optimizations were performed in solution for the reactant DCF, hypothesized radical-based intermediates, and the main product at both levels of theories. Notably, in good agreement with previous experimental results concerning the intermolecular halogen bonding of DCF, the SQM(PM7) method revealed different values for d(ClO, Å) and ∠(C-ClO, °) for the two chlorine-substituents of DCF, with values of 2.63 Å/162° and 3.13 Å/142° for the trans and cis orientations, respectively. Employing the DFT/6-31+G(d) method with implicit solvent effects was not conclusive; however, explicit solvent effects confirmed the key contribution of hydrogen and halogen bonding in stabilizing/destabilizing the reactant and hypothesized intermediates. Interestingly, the obtained results revealed that a protic solvent such as water can increase the rate of photocyclization of DCF not only through hydrogen bonding effects, but also through halogen bonding. Furthermore, the atomic charges of atoms majorly involved in the photocyclization of DCF were calculated using different methods, namely Mulliken, Hirshfeld, and natural bond orbital (NBO). The obtained results revealed that in all cases there is a notable nonequivalency in the noncovalent intermolecular interactions of the two chlorine substituents of DCF and the radical intermediates with the solvent, which in turn may account for the discrepancy of their reactivity in different media. These computational results provide insight into the importance of halogen and hydrogen bonding throughout the progression of the photochemical conversion of DCF in solution. PMID:27424600

  2. The effect of 75% glycerol on the oxygen binding properties of carp hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, L D; Noble, R W

    1993-09-30

    At pH 6 in the presence of inositol hexaphosphate, IHP, conditions where ligand-saturated carp hemoglobin is already in the low affinity T state, the addition of glycerol has little effect on affinity and ligand binding remains noncooperative. At all other pH values examined, with and without IHP, the effect of glycerol is to lower oxygen affinity possibly by shifting the equilibrium between the T state and the high affinity R state in the direction of the T state. Although glycerol does not appear to have an appreciable effect on the T state itself, a small effect on the R state cannot be excluded by our data.

  3. Effect of hydrogen injected subcutaneously on testicular tissues of rats exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is one of the most common reasons inducing reactive oxygen species in semen. High concentration of active oxygen will cause decrease of sperm density and viability and induce oxidative injury of sperm DNA which has become the hot spot in male infertility. Although hydrogen was found to be an effective remover of active oxygen in liver, heart, kidney and brain, the same effect has not been discussed in reproductive system. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of hydrogen against cigarette smoke-induced damage in rat reproductive system. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups to conduct this experiment, results showed that rats in SK+HSI group (passive smoking and hydrogen subcutaneous injection group) exhibited larger amount of sperm count, smaller sperm deformation rate, higher levels of testosterone and SOD in serum and testis, lower levels of MDA in testis and less morphologic abnormalities compared to SK+NSI group (passive smoking and nitrogen subcutaneous injection group). As a consequence, we concluded that injected subcutaneously exerted protective effects on reproductive system injury of male rats exposed to cigarette smoke through inhibiting oxidative damage. PMID:26131139

  4. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  5. Hydrogen physisorption on metal-organic framework linkers and metalated linkers: a computational study of the factors that control binding strength.

    PubMed

    Tsivion, Ehud; Long, Jeffrey R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-12-24

    In order for hydrogen gas to be used as a fuel, it must be stored in sufficient quantity on board the vehicle. Efforts are being made to increase the hydrogen storage capabilities of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by introducing unsaturated metal sites into their linking element(s), as hydrogen adsorption centers. In order to devise successful hydrogen storage strategies there is a need for a fundamental understanding of the weak and elusive hydrogen physisorption interaction. Here we report our findings from the investigation of the weak intermolecular interactions of adsorbed hydrogen molecules on MOF-linkers by using cluster models. Since physical interactions such as dispersion and polarization have a major contribution to attraction energy, our approach is to analyze the adsorption interaction using energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that distinguishes the contribution of the physical interactions from the charge-transfer (CT) "chemical" interaction. Surprisingly, it is found that CT from the adsorbent to the σ*(H2) orbital is present in all studied complexes and can contribute up to approximately -2 kJ/mol to the interaction. When metal ions are present, donation from the σ(H2) → metal Rydberg-like orbital, along with the adsorbent → σ*(H2) contribution, can contribute from -2 to -10 kJ/mol, depending on the coordination mode. To reach a sufficient adsorption enthalpy for practical usage, the hydrogen molecule must be substantially polarized. Ultimately, the ability of the metalated linker to polarize the hydrogen molecule is highly dependent on the geometry of the metal ion coordination site where a strong electrostatic dipole or quadrupole moment is required.

  6. Ice-binding mechanism of winter flounder antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, A; Merz, K M

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the winter flounder antifreeze protein (AFP) and two of its mutants using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. The simulations were performed under four conditions: in the gas phase, solvated by water, adsorbed on the ice (2021) crystal plane in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. This study provided details of the ice-binding pattern of the winter flounder AFP. Simulation results indicated that the Asp, Asn, and Thr residues in the AFP are important in ice binding and that Asn and Thr as a group bind cooperatively to the ice surface. These ice-binding residues can be collected into four distinct ice-binding regions: Asp-1/Thr-2/Asp-5, Thr-13/Asn-16, Thr-24/Asn-27, and Thr-35/Arg-37. These four regions are 11 residues apart and the repeat distance between them matches the ice lattice constant along the (1102) direction. This match is crucial to ensure that all four groups can interact with the ice surface simultaneously, thereby, enhancing ice binding. These Asx (x = p or n)/Thr regions each form 5-6 hydrogen bonds with the ice surface: Asn forms about three hydrogen bonds with ice molecules located in the step region while Thr forms one to two hydrogen bonds with the ice molecules in the ridge of the (2021) crystal plane. Both the distance between Thr and Asn and the ordering of the two residues are crucial for effective ice binding. The proper sequence is necessary to generate a binding surface that is compatible with the ice surface topology, thus providing a perfect "host/guest" interaction that simultaneously satisfies both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. The results also show the relation among binding energy, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the activity. The activity is correlated to the binding energy, and in the case of the mutants we have studied the number of hydrogen bonds. The greater the number of the hydrogen bonds the greater the antifreeze activity. The roles van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic

  7. Effect of hydrogen passivation on the photoluminescence of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatryb, G.; Klak, M. M.; Wojcik, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Mascher, P.; Podhorodecki, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, silicon-rich silicon oxide films containing terbium were prepared by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The influence of hydrogen passivation on defects-mediated non-radiative recombination of excited Tb3+ ions was investigated by photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation, and photoluminescence decay measurements. Passivation was found to have no effect on shape and spectral position of the excitation spectra. In contrast, a gradual increase in photoluminescence intensity and photoluminescence decay time was observed upon passivation for the main 5D4-7F5 transition of Tb3+ ions. This observation was attributed to passivation of non-radiative recombination defects centers with hydrogen. It was found that the number of emitted photons increases upon passivation as a result of two effects: (1) longer Tb3+ lifetime in the 5D4 excited state and (2) optical activation of new Tb3+ emitters. The obtained results were discussed and compared with other experimental reports.

  8. Substituent effects in double-helical hydrogen-bonded AAA-DDD complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Mudraboyina, Bhanu P; Wisner, James A

    2012-01-27

    Two series of DDD and AAA hydrogen-bond arrays were synthesized that form triply-hydrogen-bonded double-helical complexes when combined in CDCl(3) solution. Derivatization of the DDD arrays with electron-withdrawing groups increases the complex association constants by up to a factor of 30 in those arrays examined. Derivatization of the AAA arrays with electron donating substituents reveals a similar magnitude effect on the complex stabilities. The effect of substitution on both types of arrays are modeled quite satisfactorily (R(2) > 0.96 in all cases) as free energy relationships with respect to the sums of their Hammett substituent constants. In all, the complex stabilities can be manipulated over more than three orders of magnitude (>20 kJ mol(-1)) using this type of modification.

  9. Recombination line intensities for hydrogenic ions. III - Effects of finite optical depth and dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummer, D. G.; Storey, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect on the recombination spectrum of hydrogen arising from: (1) finite optical thickness in the Lyman lines; (2) the overlapping of Lyman lines near the series limit; (3) the absorption of Lyman lines by dust or photoionization, and (4) the long-wave radiation emitted by dust is examined. Full account is taken of electron and heavy particle collisions in redistributing energy and angular momentum. It is seen that each of these deviations from the classical Case B leads to observable effects, and that dust influences the recombination spectrum in characteristic ways that may make possible new observational constraints on dust properties in nebulosities. On the basis of these calculations it is believed that the uncertainty in the determination of the helium-to-hydrogen abundance ratio in the universe may be larger than currently claimed.

  10. Effect of hydrogenation on the electrical and optical properties of GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.S.; Bhat, H.L.; Kumar, V.

    1996-12-31

    The effect of hydrogen plasma treatment on the optical and electrical properties of Gallium Antimonide bulk single crystals is presented. Plasma exposure gives rise to a layer of defects on the surface. These defects introduce multiple trap levels in the band gap from which a slow emission of carriers is observed during the capacitance-voltage measurements. On removal of the defect layer by controlled etching, the effects of hydrogen passivation are seen. The results of optical measurements indicate that passivation of shallow acceptors is more efficient than that of the donors and in general the passivation efficiency depends on the doping level. Passivation of deep levels and extended defects like grain boundaries and dislocations has also been observed. The thermal stability of the passivated deep level and extended defects is higher than that of the shallow level.

  11. Effects of van der Waals density functional corrections on trends in furfural adsorption and hydrogenation on close-packed transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry; Greeley, Jeffrey

    2014-04-01

    The hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol on Pd(111), Cu(111) and Pt(111) is studied with both standard Density Functional Theory (DFT)-GGA functionals and with van der Waals-corrected density functionals. VdW-DF functionals, including optPBE, optB88, optB86b, and Grimme's method, are used to optimize the adsorption configurations of furfural, furfuryl alcohol, and related intermediates resulting from hydrogenation of furfural, and the results are compared to corresponding values determined with GGA functionals, including PW91 and PBE. On Pd(111) and Pt(111), the adsorption geometries of the intermediates are not noticeably different between the two classes of functionals, while on Cu(111), modest changes are seen in both the perpendicular distance and the orientation of the aromatic ring with respect to the planar surface. In general, the binding energies increase substantially in magnitude as a result of van der Waals contributions on all metals. In contrast, however, dispersion effects on the kinetics of hydrogenation are relatively small. It is found that activation barriers are not significantly affected by the inclusion of dispersion effects, and a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relationship developed solely from PW91 calculations on Pd(111) is capable of describing corresponding results on Cu(111) and Pt(111), even when the dispersion effects are included. Finally, the reaction energies and barriers derived from the dispersion-corrected and pure GGA calculations are used to plot simple potential energy profiles for furfural hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol on the three considered metals, and an approximately constant downshift of the energetics due to the dispersion corrections is observed.

  12. Effects of van der Waals Density Functional Corrections on Trends in Furfural Adsorption and Hydrogenation on Close-Packed Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.

    2014-04-01

    The hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol on Pd(111), Cu(111) and Pt(111) is studied with both standard Density Functional Theory (DFT)-GGA functionals and with van der Waals-corrected density functionals. VdWDF functionals, including optPBE, optB88, optB86b, and Grimme's method, are used to optimize the adsorption configurations of furfural, furfuryl alcohol, and related intermediates resulting from hydrogenation of furfural, and the results are compared to corresponding values determined with GGA functionals, including PW91 and PBE. On Pd(111) and Pt(111), the adsorption geometries of the intermediates are not noticeably different between the two classes of functionals, while on Cu(111), modest changes are seen in both the erpendicular distance and the orientation of the aromatic ringwith respect to the planar surface. In general, the binding energies increase substantially in magnitude as a result of van derWaals contributions on all metals. In contrast, however, dispersion effects on the kinetics of hydrogenation are relatively small. It is found that activation barriers are not significantly affected by the inclusion of dispersion effects, and a Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi relationship developed solely fromPW91 calculations on Pd(111) is capable of describing corresponding results on Cu(111) and Pt(111), even when the dispersion effects are included. Finally, the reaction energies and barriers derived from the dispersion-corrected and pure GGA calculations are used to plot simple potential energy profiles for furfural hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol on the three considered metals, and an approximately constant downshift of the energetics due to the dispersion corrections is observed.

  13. Effects of conformational ordering on protein/polyelectrolyte electrostatic complexation: ionic binding and chain stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yiping; Fang, Yapeng; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Phillips, Glyn O.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling of electrostatic complexation with conformational transition is rather general in protein/polyelectrolyte interaction and has important implications in many biological processes and practical applications. This work studied the electrostatic complexation between κ-carrageenan (κ-car) and type B gelatin, and analyzed the effects of the conformational ordering of κ-car induced upon cooling in the presence of potassium chloride (KCl) or tetramethylammonium iodide (Me4NI). Experimental results showed that the effects of conformational ordering on protein/polyelectrolyte electrostatic complexation can be decomposed into ionic binding and chain stiffening. At the initial stage of conformational ordering, electrostatic complexation can be either suppressed or enhanced due to the ionic bindings of K+ and I− ions, which significantly alter the charge density of κ-car or occupy the binding sites of gelatin. Beyond a certain stage of conformational ordering, i.e., helix content θ > 0.30, the effect of chain stiffening, accompanied with a rapid increase in helix length ζ, becomes dominant and tends to dissociate the electrostatic complexation. The effect of chain stiffening can be theoretically interpreted in terms of double helix association. PMID:27030165

  14. Effects of conformational ordering on protein/polyelectrolyte electrostatic complexation: ionic binding and chain stiffening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiping; Fang, Yapeng; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Phillips, Glyn O.

    2016-03-01

    Coupling of electrostatic complexation with conformational transition is rather general in protein/polyelectrolyte interaction and has important implications in many biological processes and practical applications. This work studied the electrostatic complexation between κ-carrageenan (κ-car) and type B gelatin, and analyzed the effects of the conformational ordering of κ-car induced upon cooling in the presence of potassium chloride (KCl) or tetramethylammonium iodide (Me4NI). Experimental results showed that the effects of conformational ordering on protein/polyelectrolyte electrostatic complexation can be decomposed into ionic binding and chain stiffening. At the initial stage of conformational ordering, electrostatic complexation can be either suppressed or enhanced due to the ionic bindings of K+ and I‑ ions, which significantly alter the charge density of κ-car or occupy the binding sites of gelatin. Beyond a certain stage of conformational ordering, i.e., helix content θ > 0.30, the effect of chain stiffening, accompanied with a rapid increase in helix length ζ, becomes dominant and tends to dissociate the electrostatic complexation. The effect of chain stiffening can be theoretically interpreted in terms of double helix association.

  15. Effects of conformational ordering on protein/polyelectrolyte electrostatic complexation: ionic binding and chain stiffening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yiping; Fang, Yapeng; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Phillips, Glyn O.

    2016-03-01

    Coupling of electrostatic complexation with conformational transition is rather general in protein/polyelectrolyte interaction and has important implications in many biological processes and practical applications. This work studied the electrostatic complexation between κ-carrageenan (κ-car) and type B gelatin, and analyzed the effects of the conformational ordering of κ-car induced upon cooling in the presence of potassium chloride (KCl) or tetramethylammonium iodide (Me4NI). Experimental results showed that the effects of conformational ordering on protein/polyelectrolyte electrostatic complexation can be decomposed into ionic binding and chain stiffening. At the initial stage of conformational ordering, electrostatic complexation can be either suppressed or enhanced due to the ionic bindings of K+ and I- ions, which significantly alter the charge density of κ-car or occupy the binding sites of gelatin. Beyond a certain stage of conformational ordering, i.e., helix content θ > 0.30, the effect of chain stiffening, accompanied with a rapid increase in helix length ζ, becomes dominant and tends to dissociate the electrostatic complexation. The effect of chain stiffening can be theoretically interpreted in terms of double helix association.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide releasing capacity of natural isothiocyanates: is it a reliable explanation for the multiple biological effects of Brassicaceae?

    PubMed

    Citi, Valentina; Martelli, Alma; Testai, Lara; Marino, Alice; Breschi, Maria C; Calderone, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an endogenous pleiotropic gasotransmitter, which mediates important physiological effects in the human body. Accordingly, an impaired production of endogenous hydrogen sulfide contributes to the pathogenesis of important disorders. To date, exogenous compounds, acting as hydrogen sulfide-releasing agents, are viewed as promising pharmacotherapeutic agents. In a recent report, the hydrogen sulfide-releasing properties of some synthetic aryl isothiocyanate derivatives have been reported, indicating that the isothiocyanate function can be viewed as a suitable slow hydrogen sulfide-releasing moiety, endowed with the pharmacological potential typical of this gasotransmitter. Many isothiocyanate derivatives (deriving from a myrosinase-mediated transformation of glucosinolates) are well-known secondary metabolites of plants belonging to the family Brassicaceae, a large botanical family comprising many edible species. The phytotherapeutic and nutraceutic usefulness of Brassicaceae in the prevention of important human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative processes and cardiovascular diseases has been widely discussed in the scientific literature. Although these effects have been largely attributed to isothiocyanates, the exact mechanism of action is still unknown. In this experimental work, we aimed to investigate the possible hydrogen sulfide-releasing capacity of some important natural isothiocyanates, studying it in vitro by amperometric detection. Some of the tested natural isothiocyanates exhibited significant hydrogen sulfide release, leading us to hypothesize that hydrogen sulfide may be, at least in part, a relevant player accounting for several biological effects of Brassicaceae.

  17. Effects of copper ions on DNA binding and cytotoxic activity of a chiral salicylidene Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Fei, Bao-Li; Xu, Wu-Shuang; Tao, Hui-Wen; Li, Wen; Zhang, Yu; Long, Jian-Ying; Liu, Qing-Bo; Xia, Bing; Sun, Wei-Yin

    2014-03-01

    A chiral Schiff base HL N-(5-bromo-salicylaldehyde)dehydroabietylamine (1) and its chiral dinuclear copper complex [Cu2L4]·4DMF (2) have been synthesized and fully characterized. The interactions of 1 and 2 with salmon sperm DNA have been investigated by viscosity measurements, UV, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques. Absorption spectral (Kb=3.30 × 10(5)M(-)(1) (1), 6.63 × 10(5)M(-)(1)(2)), emission spectral (Ksv=7.58 × 10(3)M(-)(1) (1), 1.52 × 10(4)M(-)(1) (2)), and viscosity measurements reveal that 1 and 2 interact with DNA through intercalation and 2 exhibits a higher DNA binding ability. In addition, CD study indicates 2 cause a more evident perturbation on the base stacking and helicity of B-DNA upon binding to it. In fluorimetric studies, the enthalpy (ΔH>0) and entropy (ΔS>0) changes of the reactions between the compounds with DNA demonstrate hydrophobic interactions. 1 and 2 were also screened for their cytotoxic ability and 2 demonstrates higher growth inhibition of the selected cancer cells at concentration of 50 μM, this result is identical with their DNA binding ability order. All the experimental results show that the involvement of Cu (II) centers has some interesting effect on DNA binding ability and cytotoxicity of the chiral Schiff base.

  18. The effect of hyperthyroidism on opiate receptor binding and pain sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, E.A. ); Bonnet, K.A.; Friedhoff, A.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of thyroid hormone on opiate receptor ligand-binding and pain sensitivity. Specific opiate receptor-binding was performed on brain homogenates of Swiss-Webster mice. There was a significant increase in {sup 3}H-naloxone-binding in thyroxine-fed subjects (hyperthyroid). Scatchard analysis revealed that the number of opiate receptors was increased in hyperthyroid mice (Bmax = 0.238 nM for hyperthyroid samples vs. 0.174 nM for controls). Binding affinity was unaffected (Kd = 1.54 nM for hyperthyroid and 1.58 nM for control samples). When mice were subjected to hotplate stimulation, the hyperthyroid mice were noted to be more sensitive as judged by pain aversion response latencies which were half that of control animals. After morphine administration, the hyperthyroid animals demonstrated a shorter duration of analgesia. These findings demonstrate that thyroxine increases opiate receptor number and native pain sensitivity but decreases the duration of analgesia from morphine.

  19. Effect of diet on insulin binding and glucose transport in rat sarcolemmal vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Grimditch, G.K.; Barnard, R.J.; Sternlicht, E.; Whitson, R.H.; Kaplan, S.A.

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a high-fat, high-sucrose diet (HFS) and a low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diet (LFC) on glucose tolerance, insulin binding, and glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle. During the intravenous glucose tolerance test, peak glucose values at 5 min were significantly higher in the HFS group; 0-, 20-, and 60-min values were similar. Insulin values were significantly higher in the HFS group at all time points (except 60 min), indicating whole-body insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle was responsible, in part, for this insulin resistance, because specific D-glucose transport in isolated sarcolemmal (SL) vesicles under basal conditions was similar between LFC and HFS rats, despite the higher plasma insulin levels. Scatchard analyses of insulin binding curves to sarcolemmal vesicles revealed that the K/sub a/ of the high-affinity binding sites was significantly reduced by the HFS diet; no other binding changes were noted. Specific D-glucose transport in SL vesicles after maximum insulin stimulation (1 U/kg) was significantly depressed in the HFS group, indicating that HFS feeding also caused a postbinding defect. These results indicate that the insulin resistance in skeletal muscle associated with a HFS diet is due to both a decrease in the K/sub a/ of the high-affinity insulin receptors and a postbinding defect.

  20. Thermal post-deposition treatment effects on nanocrystalline hydrogenated silicon prepared by PECVD under different hydrogen flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Sana Ben; Meddeb, Hosny; Daik, Ridha; Othman, Afef Ben; Slama, Sonia Ben; Dimassi, Wissem; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin films were deposited on mono-crystalline silicon substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) under different hydrogen flow rates followed by a thermal treatment in an infrared furnace at different temperature ranging from 300 to 900 °C. The investigated structural, morphological and optoelectronic properties of samples were found to be strongly dependent on the annealing temperature. Raman spectroscopy revealed that nc-Si:H films contain crystalline, amorphous and mixed structures as well. We find that post-deposition thermal treatment may lead to a tendency for structural improvement and a decrease of the disorder in the film network at moderate temperature under 500 °C. As for annealing at higher temperature up to 900 °C induces the recrystallization of the film which is correlated with the grain size and volume fraction in the layer. We demonstrate that high annealing temperature can lead to a decrease of silicon-hydrogen bonds corresponding to a reduction of the amorphous matrix in the layer promoting the formation of covalent Si-Si bonds. The effusion of the hydrogen from the grown film leads to increase its density and therefore induces a decrease in the thickness of the layer. For post-deposition thermal treatment in temperature range under 700 °C, the post-deposition anneal seems to be crucial for obtaining good passivation quality as expressed by a minority carrier lifetime of 17 μs, as it allows a significant reduction in defect states at the layer/substrate interface. While for a temperature higher than 900 °C, the lifetime reduction is obtained because of hydrogen effusion phenomenon, thus a tendency for crystallization in the grown film.

  1. The vitamin B12 analog cobinamide is an effective hydrogen sulfide antidote in a lethal rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    BRENNER, M.; BENAVIDES, S.; MAHON, S. B.; LEE, J.; YOON, D.; MUKAI, D.; VISEROI, M.; CHAN, A.; JIANG, J.; NARULA, N.; AZER, S. M.; ALEXANDER, C.; BOSS, G. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a highly toxic gas for which no effective antidotes exist. It acts, at least in part, by binding to cytochrome c oxidase, causing cellular asphyxiation and anoxia. We investigated the effects of three different ligand forms of cobinamide, a vitamin B12 analog, to reverse sulfide (NaHS) toxicity. Methods New Zealand white rabbits received a continuous intravenous (IV) infusion of NaHS (3 mg/min) until expiration or a maximum 270 mg dose. Animals received six different treatments, administered at the time when they developed signs of severe toxicity: Group 1—saline (placebo group, N = 9); Group 2—IV hydroxocobalamin (N = 7); Group 3—IV aquohydroxocobinamide (N = 6); Group 4—IV sulfitocobinamide (N = 6); Group 5—intramuscular (IM) sulfitocobinamide (N = 6); and Group 6—IM dinitrocobinamide (N = 8). Blood was sampled intermittently, and systemic blood pressure and deoxygenated and oxygenated hemoglobin were measured continuously in peripheral muscle and over the brain region; the latter were measured by diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS). Results Compared with the saline controls, all cobinamide derivatives significantly increased survival time and the amount of NaHS that was tolerated. Aquohydroxocobinamide was most effective (261.5 ± 2.4 mg NaHS tolerated vs. 93.8 ± 6.2 mg in controls, p < 0.0001). Dinitrocobinamide was more effective than sulfitocobinamide. Hydroxocobalamin was not significantly more effective than the saline control. Conclusions Cobinamide is an effective agent for inhibiting lethal sulfide exposure in this rabbit model. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal dose and form of cobinamide and route of administration. PMID:24716792

  2. Distortion effects in electron excitation of hydrogen atoms by impact of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, C.A.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    Electron excitation from the fundamental state of hydrogen atoms by impact of bare ions is studied at intermediate and high collision velocities. Total cross sections for final {ital np} states by impact of protons, alpha particles, and He{sup +} ions are calculated using the symmetric eikonal approximation and compared with experimental data. This comparison supports the existence of distortion effects recently predicted by Bugacov and co-workers [Phys. Rev. A {bold 47}, 1052 (1993)]. The validity of scaling laws is analyzed.

  3. High electric field effects on the thermal generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ilie, A.; Equer, B.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the electric field dependence of the electron-hole thermal generation process in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. A model was developed which takes into account the Poole-Frenkel effect and the thermally assisted tunneling. In order to explain the experimental results it was necessary to consider a strong electron-lattice interaction describing the carrier tunneling mechanism. Deep defects relaxation is also discussed.

  4. Effects of a Hydrogen Gas Environment on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Stable Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Kyohei; Oda, Yasuji; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Higashida, Kenji

    In order to clarify the effects of a hydrogen gas environment on the fatigue crack growth characteristics of stable austenitic stainless steels, bending fatigue tests were carried out in a hydrogen gas, in a nitrogen gas at 1.0 MPa and in air on a SUS316L using the Japanese Industrial Standards (type 316L). Also, in order to discuss the difference in the hydrogen sensitivity between austenitic stainless steels, the fatigue tests were also carried out on a SUS304 using the Japanese Industrial Standards (type 304) metastable austenitic stainless steel as a material for comparison. The main results obtained are as follows. Hydrogen gas accelerates the fatigue crack growth rate of type 316L. The degree of the fatigue crack growth acceleration is low compared to that in type 304. The fracture surfaces of both the materials practically consist of two parts; the faceted area seemed to be brittle and the remaining area occupying a greater part of the fracture surface and seemed to be ductile. The faceted area does not significantly contribute to the fatigue crack growth rate in both austenitic stainless steels. The slip-off mechanism seems to be valid not only in air and in nitrogen, but also in hydrogen. Also, the main cause of the fatigue crack growth acceleration of both materials occurs by variation of the slip behaviour. The difference in the degree of the acceleration, which in type 316L is lower than in type 304, seems to be caused by the difference in the stability of the γ phase.

  5. Substituent effects on the reaction rates of hydrogen abstraction in the pyrolysis of phenethyl phenyl ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Buchanan III, A C

    2010-01-01

    We report reaction profiles and forward rate constants for hydrogen abstraction reactions occurring in the pyrolysis of methoxy-substituted derivatives of phenethyl phenyl ether (PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh, PPE), where the substituents are located on the aryl ether ring (PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh-X). We use density functional theory in combination with transition-state theory, and anharmonic corrections are included within the independent mode approximation. PPE is the simplest model of the abundant {beta}-O-4 linkage in lignin. The mechanism of PPE pyrolysis and overall product selectivities have been studied experimentally by one of us, which was followed by computational analysis of key individual hydrogen-transfer reaction steps. In the previous work, we have been able to use a simplified kinetic model based on quasi-steady-state conditions to reproduce experimental {alpha}/{beta} selectivities for PPE and PPEs with substituents on the phenethyl ring (X-PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh). This model is not applicable to PPE derivatives where methoxy substituents are located on the phenyl ring adjacent to the ether oxygen because of the strongly endothermic character of the hydrogen abstraction by substituted phenoxy radicals as well as the decreased kinetic chain lengths resulting from enhanced rates of the initial C?O homolysis step. Substituents decelerate the hydrogen abstraction by the phenoxy radical, while the influence on the benzyl abstraction is less homogeneous. The calculations provide insight into the contributions of steric and polar effects in these important hydrogen-transfer steps. We emphasize the importance of an exhaustive conformational space search to calculate rate constants and product selectivities. The computed rate constants will be used in future work to numerically simulate the pyrolysis mechanism, pending the calculation of the rate constants of all participating reactions.

  6. Electrostatic effect of H1-histone protein binding on nucleosome repeat length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Teif, Vladimir B.

    2014-08-01

    Within a simple biophysical model we describe the effect of electrostatic binding of H1 histone proteins on the nucleosome repeat length in chromatin. The length of wrapped DNA optimizes its binding energy to the histone core and the elastic energy penalty of DNA wrapping. The magnitude of the effect predicted from our model is in agreement with the systematic experimental data on the linear variation of nucleosome repeat lengths with H1/nucleosome ratio (Woodcock C L et al 2006 Chromos. Res. 14 17-25). We compare our model to the data for different cell types and organisms, with a widely varying ratio of bound H1 histones per nucleosome. We underline the importance of this non-specific histone-DNA charge-balance mechanism in regulating the positioning of nucleosomes and the degree of compaction of chromatin fibers in eukaryotic cells.

  7. Estramustine binding protein and anti-proliferative effect of estramustine in human glioma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    von Schoultz, E.; Lundblad, D.; Bergh, J.; Grankvist, K.; Henriksson, R.

    1988-01-01

    Four human cell lines derived from malignant gliomas were immunohistochemically examined for their content of estramustine-binding protein (EMBP). EMBP was detected in a large amount in all glioma cells during the entire cell cycle. EMBP has previously been demonstrated to be the major receptor protein in prostatic cancers for the cytostatic drug estramustine-phosphate (EMP). EMP caused a dose-dependent inhibition of exponentially growing cells by increasing the number of cells in G2/M stage of the cell cycle as monitored by flow cytofluorometry. The effect may be coupled to arrest of the glioma cells at metaphase. The presence of EMBP may suggest a selective binding and effect of EMP in glioma cells. Images Figure 2 PMID:3052561

  8. Influence of the image charge effect on the hydrogen-like impurity-bound polaron in a spherical quantum dot in the presence of an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanian, Arshak L.; Vardanyan, Lyudvig A.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of an external electric field on the binding energies and polaronic shifts of the ground and some first few excited states of a hydrogenic impurity in a spherical quantum dot by taking into account the image charge effect. By using Landau-Pekar variational method the general analytical expression is obtained for the impurity bound-polaron energies. It has been numerically identified the conditions (electric field, nominal radius of quantum dot, etc.) in which the bound-polaron states can be existence in GaAs quantum dot. We have shown that the polaronic shifts in the binding energy of 1s-like state are the same in cases with and without image charge effect while they for 2s-like state are not coincide and have different monotonic behavior versus confinement potential. Electron-phonon interaction lifts the degeneracy of the 2px-, 2py-, and 2pz-like states of a donor impurity and reduces their binding energies.

  9. Tribology in Gaseous Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawae, Yoshinori; Sugimura, Joich

    Hydrogen is expected as a clean and renewable energy carrier for future environment-friendly society. Many machine elements in hydrogen energy systems should be operating within hydrogen gas and tribological behavior, such as friction and wear, of bearings and seals are affected by the hydrogen environment through some interactions between material surfaces and gaseous hydrogen, i.e., physisorption of hydrogen molecules and following chemisorptions of dissociated atoms on metal surfaces, formation of metal hydride and reduction of metal oxide layer by hydrogen atoms diffused into bulk. Therefore, friction and wear characteristics of tribomaterials in the hydrogen environment should be appropriately understood to establish a design guideline for reliable hydrogen utilizing systems. This paper reviews the current knowledge about the effect of hydrogen on friction and wear of materials, and then describes our recent progress of hydrogen research in the tribology field.

  10. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-han; Wang, Chun-mei; Tang, Hua-xin; Zuo, Cheng-ji; Xu, Hong-ming

    2009-06-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition timing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its application, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NOx while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NOx is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  11. The effect of stress on hydrogen uptake and desorption by A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1991-01-01

    The uptake and desorption of hydrogen by A-286 as a function of stress was studied using electrochemical methods. It was found that the apparent surface hydrogen concentration, the mean hydrogen concentration, and the hydrogen distribution uniformity all increased up to a stress level 50 percent of yield and decreased thereafter. The value of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient was relatively unaffected by stress while the percent of trapped hydrogen appeared to decrease with increasing stress.

  12. Exciton Binding energies and effective masses in Organo-lead Tri-Halide Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portugall, Oliver; Miyata, Atsuhiko; Mitioglu, Anatol; Plochocka, Paulina; Wang, Jacob Tse-Wei; Stranks, Samuel; Snaith, Henry; Nicholas, Robin; Lncmi Toulouse Team; Oxford University Team

    2015-03-01

    Solid-state perovskite-based solar cells have made a dramatic impact on emerging PV research with efficiencies of over 17% already achieved. However, to date the basic electronic properties of the perovskites such as the electron and hole effective masses and the exciton binding energy are not well known. We have measured both for methyl ammonium lead tri-iodide using magneto absorption in very high magnetic fields up to 150T showing that the exciton binding energy at low temperatures is only 16 meV, a value three times smaller than previously thought and sufficiently small to completely transform the way in which the devices must operate. Landau level spectroscopy shows that the reduced effective mass of 0.104 me is also smaller than previously thought. In addition by using a fast pulse 150T magnet we measure the band structure change due to the structural phase transition that occurs in this system at around 160K. We also observe Landau levels in the high temperature phase as used for device production, which has a very similar effective mass and the analysis suggests an exciton binding energy which is even smaller than in the low temperature phase.

  13. [Transthyretin-binding activity of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and its thyroid hormone disrupting effects after developmental exposure].

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiu-Ling; Liu, Yang; Liu, Fang; Lu, Yue; Zhong, Gao-Ren

    2010-09-01

    In vivo and in vitro research approaches were carried out to survey the potential health risk of environmental exposure by hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs). Transthyretin-binding assay was designed to test for the potency of HBCDs to compete with thyroxine (T4) for binding to the transport protein. The results showed that the binding of 25I-T4 and T4 was only slightly inhabited even at the highest competitive concentration of HBCDs (75.08%, 80 micromol x L(-1)), indicating the marginally interfere potency of HBCDs in the transportation of T4. Sprague-Dawley rats of 3-days old were exposed to 0.2 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg HBCDs for 21 d to examine the thyroid hormones (THs) disrupting effects of HBCDs after developmental exposure. Compared with the controls, levels of total 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (TT3), free 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (FT3), increased significantly (p < 0.05, p < 0.05) in low- and high-dose exposures, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) also increased slightly while the total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) had a decline about two-fold inversely. Combined both the in vivo and in vitro results, the possible mode of action of HBCDs on THs disruption may through the synergy or substitution effect of T3. The findings support further investigation of the potential THs disrupting effects of HBCDs on public health, especially on children during brain development. PMID:21072945

  14. Effects of inorganic polyphosphate on the proteolytic and DNA-binding activities of Lon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazutaka; Kato, Junichi; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao; Kuroda, Akio

    2004-08-13

    Lon belongs to a unique group of proteases that bind to DNA and is involved in the regulation of several important cellular functions, including adaptation to nutritional downshift. Previously, we revealed that inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) increases in Escherichia coli in response to amino acid starvation and that it stimulates the degradation of free ribosomal proteins by Lon. In this work, we examined the effects of polyP on the proteolytic and DNA-binding activities of Lon. An order-of-addition experiment suggested that polyP first binds to Lon, which stimulates Lon-mediated degradation of ribosomal proteins. A polyP-binding assay using Lon deletion mutants showed that the polyP-binding site of Lon is localized in the ATPase domain. Because the same ATPase domain also contains the DNA-binding site, polyP can compete with DNA for binding to Lon. In fact, an equimolar amount of polyP almost completely inhibited DNA-Lon complex formation, suggesting that Lon binds to polyP with a higher affinity than it binds to DNA. Collectively, our results showed that polyP may control the cellular activity of Lon not only as a protease but also as a DNA-binding protein. PMID:15187082

  15. Distinct effects of Cu2+-binding on oligomerization of human and rabbit prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kejiang; Yu, Ziyao; Yu, Yuanhui; Liao, Xinli; Huang, Pei; Guo, Chenyun; Lin, Donghai

    2015-10-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a kind of cell-surface Cu(2+)-binding glycoprotein. The oligomerization of PrP(C) is highly related to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Cu(2+) plays a vital role in the oligomerization of PrP(C), and participates in the pathogenic process of TSE diseases. It is expected that Cu(2+)-binding has different effects on the oligomerization of TSE-sensitive human PrP(C) (HuPrP(C)) and TSE-resistant rabbit PrP(C) (RaPrP(C)). However, the details of the distinct effects remain unclear. In the present study, we measured the interactions of Cu(2+) with HuPrP(C) (91-230) and RaPrP(C) (91-228) by isothermal titration calorimetry, and compared the effects of Cu(2+)-binding on the oligomerization of both PrPs. The measured dissociation constants (Kd) of Cu(2+) were 11.1 ± 2.1 μM for HuPrP(C) and 21.1 ± 3.1 μM for RaPrP(C). Cu(2+)-binding promoted the oligomerization of HuPrP(C) more significantly than that of RaPrP(C). The far-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectroscopy experiments showed that Cu(2+)-binding induced more significant secondary structure change and increased more β-sheet content for HuPrP(C) compared with RaPrP(C). Moreover, the urea-induced unfolding transition experiments indicated that Cu(2+)-binding decreased the conformational stability of HuPrP(C) more distinctly than that of RaPrP(C). These results suggest that RaPrP(C) possesses a low susceptibility to Cu(2+), potentially weakening the risk of Cu(2+)-induced TSE diseases. Our work sheds light on the Cu(2+)-promoted oligomerization of PrP(C), and may be helpful for further understanding the TSE-resistance of rabbits. PMID:26350098

  16. The effect of amorphous silicon surface hydrogenation on morphology, wettability and its implication on the adsorption of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filali, Larbi; Brahmi, Yamina; Sib, Jamal Dine; Bouhekka, Ahmed; Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of amorphous silicon (a-Si) surface hydrogenation on Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption. A set of (a-Si) films was prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS) and after deposition; they were treated in molecular hydrogen ambient at different pressures (1-3 Pa). Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used to study the hydrogenation effect and BSA adsorption. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate morphological changes caused by hydrogenation. The wettability of the films was measured using contact angle measurement, and in the case of the hydrogenated surfaces, it was found to be driven by surface roughness. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy and SE measurements show that proteins had the strongest affinity toward the surfaces with the highest hydrogen content and their secondary structure was affected by a significant decrease of the α-helix component (-27%) compared with the proteins adsorbed on the un-treated surface, which had a predominantly α-helix (45%) structure. The adsorbed protein layer was found to be densely packed with a large thickness (30.9 nm) on the hydrogen-rich surfaces. The most important result is that the surface hydrogen content was the dominant factor, compared to wettability and morphology, for protein adsorption.

  17. Effects of detergent on the binding of solubilized sodium channels to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin: structural implications.

    PubMed

    Weiner, J S; Rudy, B

    1988-10-20

    The binding of the solubilized voltage-dependent sodium channel from rat brain to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is detergent-dependent. When solubilized in sodium cholate, only 11% of total recovered channels bound to a WGA-Sepharose column. When solubilized in Triton X-100 or CHAPS, however, 80% and 60% could bind, respectively. The effect of cholate on sodium channel binding is relatively specific: the major rat brain glycoproteins which bind to immobilized WGA are roughly the same in either Triton or cholate, as analyzed by SDS gel electrophoresis. The structural implications for the channel are discussed.

  18. Allosteric effects of the antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine on the energetics of calcium binding by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Feldkamp, Michael D; O'Donnell, Susan E; Yu, Liping; Shea, Madeline A

    2010-08-01

    Trifluoperazine (TFP; Stelazine) is an antagonist of calmodulin (CaM), an essential regulator of calcium-dependent signal transduction. Reports differ regarding whether, or where, TFP binds to apo CaM. Three crystallographic structures (1CTR, 1A29, and 1LIN) show TFP bound to (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM in ratios of 1, 2, or 4 TFP per CaM. In all of these, CaM domains adopt the "open" conformation seen in CaM-kinase complexes having increased calcium affinity. Most reports suggest TFP also increases calcium affinity of CaM. To compare TFP binding to apo CaM and (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM and explore differential effects on the N- and C-domains of CaM, stoichiometric TFP titrations of CaM were monitored by (15)N-HSQC NMR. Two TFP bound to apo CaM, whereas four bound to (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM. In both cases, the preferred site was in the C-domain. During the titrations, biphasic responses for some resonances suggested intersite interactions. TFP-binding sites in apo CaM appeared distinct from those in (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM. In equilibrium calcium titrations at defined ratios of TFP:CaM, TFP reduced calcium affinity at most levels tested; this is similar to the effect of many IQ-motifs on CaM. However, at the highest level tested, TFP raised the calcium affinity of the N-domain of CaM. A model of conformational switching is proposed to explain how TFP can exert opposing allosteric effects on calcium affinity by binding to different sites in the "closed," "semi-open," and "open" domains of CaM. In physiological processes, apo CaM, as well as (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM, needs to be considered a potential target of drug action.

  19. The effect of polyamines on the binding of anti-DNA antibodies from patients with SLE and normal human subjects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Stearns, Nancy A; Li, Xingfu; Pisetsky, David S

    2014-07-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To elucidate specificity further, the effect of polyamines on the binding of anti-DNA antibodies from patients with lupus was tested by ELISA to calf thymus (CT) DNA; we also assessed the binding of plasmas of patients and normal human subjects (NHS) to Micrococcus luteus (MC) DNA. As these studies showed, spermine can dose-dependently inhibit SLE anti-DNA binding to CT DNA and can promote dissociation of preformed immune complexes. With MC DNA as antigen, spermine failed to inhibit the NHS anti-DNA binding. Studies using plasmas adsorbed to a CT DNA cellulose affinity indicated that SLE plasmas are mixtures of anti-DNA that differ in inhibition by spermine and binding to conserved and non-conserved determinants. Together, these studies demonstrate that spermine can influence the binding of anti-DNA autoantibodies and may contribute to the antigenicity of DNA.

  20. The Effect of Intermolecular Modes on the Xh-Stretching Vibrations in Hydrogen Bonded Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2016-06-01

    Vibrational spectra of hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes (XH\\cdotsY, where X is the hydrogen bond donor atom, and Y is the acceptor atom) have long been a theoretical challenge. Specifically, the XH-stretching motion is difficult to describe due to the effect of the large amplitude intermolecular modes inherent to complexes. We have developed a vibrational model, the Local Mode Perturbation Theory (LMPT) model, to accurately determine the transition wavenumber and oscillator strength of the XH-stretching transition in hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes. The model is based on a local mode (LM) model of the XH-stretching transition and the effect of the intermolecular modes is included via Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory. Our model has significantly improved results obtained using the LM model (see Figure). Additionally, our LMPT model does not require a full-dimensional anharmonic calculation, which enables application to large systems and the usage of higher level ab initio theory for the required potential energy surfaces. This work was inspired by our recent efforts to accurately determine equilibrium constants of complex formation, which rely on an accurate determination of the oscillator strength of the XH-stretching transition.

  1. Tunneling and delocalization effects in hydrogen bonded systems: A study in position and momentum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrone, Joseph A.; Lin, Lin; Car, Roberto

    2009-05-01

    Novel experimental and computational studies have uncovered the proton momentum distribution in hydrogen bonded systems. In this work, we utilize recently developed open path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics methodology in order to study the momentum distribution in phases of high pressure ice. Some of these phases exhibit symmetric hydrogen bonds and quantum tunneling. We find that the symmetric hydrogen bonded phase possesses a narrowed momentum distribution as compared with a covalently bonded phase, in agreement with recent experimental findings. The signatures of tunneling that we observe are a narrowed distribution in the low-to-intermediate momentum region, with a tail that extends to match the result of the covalently bonded state. The transition to tunneling behavior shows similarity to features observed in recent experiments performed on confined water. We corroborate our ice simulations with a study of a particle in a model one-dimensional double well potential that mimics some of the effects observed in bulk simulations. The temperature dependence of the momentum distribution in the one-dimensional model allows for the differentiation between ground state and mixed state tunneling effects.

  2. Tunneling and delocalization effects in hydrogen bonded systems: a study in position and momentum space.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Joseph A; Lin, Lin; Car, Roberto

    2009-05-28

    Novel experimental and computational studies have uncovered the proton momentum distribution in hydrogen bonded systems. In this work, we utilize recently developed open path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics methodology in order to study the momentum distribution in phases of high pressure ice. Some of these phases exhibit symmetric hydrogen bonds and quantum tunneling. We find that the symmetric hydrogen bonded phase possesses a narrowed momentum distribution as compared with a covalently bonded phase, in agreement with recent experimental findings. The signatures of tunneling that we observe are a narrowed distribution in the low-to-intermediate momentum region, with a tail that extends to match the result of the covalently bonded state. The transition to tunneling behavior shows similarity to features observed in recent experiments performed on confined water. We corroborate our ice simulations with a study of a particle in a model one-dimensional double well potential that mimics some of the effects observed in bulk simulations. The temperature dependence of the momentum distribution in the one-dimensional model allows for the differentiation between ground state and mixed state tunneling effects. PMID:19485461

  3. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwu; Liu, Kehuan; Ma, Chunqing; Yu, Jiangang; Peng, Zhaoyun; Huang, Guoyang; Cai, Zhiyu; Li, Runping; Xu, Weigang; Sun, Xuejun; Liu, Kan; Zheng, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is one of the most widely used clinical interventions to counteract insufficient pulmonary oxygen delivery in patients with severe lung injury. However, prolonged exposure to hyperoxia leads to inflammation and acute lung injury. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Rats were intraperitoneally treated with sodium hydrosulphide (NaHS) at 28 μmol/kg immediately before hyperoxia exposure and then exposed to pure oxygen at 2.5 atmospheres absolute (atm abs) with continuous ventilation for six hours, Immediately after hyperoxia exposure, rats were sacrificed via anesthesia. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was harvested for the detection of protein concentration and IL-1 content, and the lungs were collected for HE staining, TUNEL staining and detection of wet/dry weight ratio. Our results showed hyperbaric hyperoixa exposure could significantly damage the lung (HE staining), increase the protein and IL-13 in the BALF, elevate the wet/dry Weight ratio and raise the TUNEL positive cells. However, pre-treatment with hydrogen sulfide improved the lung morphology, reduced the TUNEL positive cells and attenuated the lung inflammation (reduction in IL-13 of BALF and HE staining). Taken together, our findings indicate that hydrogen sulfide pretreatment may exert protective effects on hyperbaric hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

  4. NOVEL CATALYTIC EFFECTS OF FULLERENE FOR LIBH4 HYDROGEN UPTAKE AND RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Wellons, M; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Polly Perseth, P

    2008-11-10

    Our recent novel finding, involving a synergistic experiment and first-principles theory, shows that carbon nanostructures can be used as catalysts for hydrogen uptake/release in aluminum based complex metal hydrides (sodium alanate) and also provides an unambiguous understanding of how the catalysts work. Here we show that the same concepts can be applied to boron based complex hydride such as lithium borohydride, LiBH{sub 4}. Taking into account electronegativity and curvature effect a fullerene-LiBH{sub 4} composite demonstrates catalytic properties with not only lowered hydrogen desorption temperatures, but regenerative rehydriding at relatively lower temperature of 350 C. This catalytic effect likely originates from interfering with the charge transfer from Li to the BH4 moiety, resulting in an ionic bond between Li{sup +} and BH{sub 4}{sup -}, and a covalent bond between B and H. Interaction of LiBH{sub 4} with an electronegative substrate such as carbon fullerene affects the ability of Li to donate its charge to BH{sub 4}, consequently weakening the B-H bond and causing hydrogen to desorb at lower temperatures as well as facilitating the absorption of H{sub 2} to reverse the dehydrogenation reaction. Degradation of cycling capacity is observed and is attributed to forming irreversible intermediates or diboranes.

  5. Sliding discharges in steam: effects of dielectric surface and hydrocarbon additives on hydrogen, oxygen and hydrogen peroxide generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Malik, Muhammad; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2013-04-01

    A sliding surface discharge was formed on a dielectric layer in steam at ˜100 °C and atmospheric pressure. The material properties and the thickness of the dielectric layer were found to strongly affect the energy deposition into the plasma. With a 0.32 cm thick dielectric the energy deposition was 1.4 times greater than with a 0.48 cm thick dielectric, and with window glass it was 1.3 times greater than with Macor of the same thickness. Product gases were H2 (73 ± 4%) and O2 (27 ± 1%), and H2O2 accumulated in the condensed water up to 0.4 g l-1. The energy yield for hydrogen was 1.2 ± 0.1 g H2 kWh-1 and independent of the input power and thickness or material of the dielectric. However, for hydrogen peroxide the energy yield, which varied between 0.61 and 3.2 g H2O2 kWh-1, was found to depend strongly on the thickness and material of the dielectric. The addition of benzene to the steam increased the energy efficiency of hydrogen to 2.3 g kWh-1, and decreased oxygen and hydrogen peroxide by about 3 and 6 times, respectively. It also caused the deposition of phenol and polymer-like layers on the dielectric. The results are explained on the basis of reactions of H and OH radicals adsorbed on the surface and/or in gas phase.

  6. Kinetic Isotope Effects as a Probe of Hydrogen Transfers to and from Common Enzymatic Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Islam, Zahidul; Kohen, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes use a number of common cofactors as sources of hydrogen to drive biological processes, but the physics of the hydrogen transfers to and from these cofactors is not fully understood. Researchers study the mechanistically important contributions from quantum tunneling and enzyme dynamics and connect those processes to the catalytic power of enzymes that use these cofactors. Here we describe some progress that has been made in studying these reactions, particularly through the use of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). We first discuss the general theoretical framework necessary to interpret experimental KIEs, and then describe practical uses for KIEs in the context of two case studies. The first example is alcohol dehydrogenase, which uses a nicotinamide cofactor to catalyze a hydride transfer, and the second example is thymidylate synthase, which uses a folate cofactor to catalyze both a hydride and a proton transfer. PMID:24161942

  7. Kinetic isotope effects as a probe of hydrogen transfers to and from common enzymatic cofactors.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Islam, Zahidul; Kohen, Amnon

    2014-02-15

    Enzymes use a number of common cofactors as sources of hydrogen to drive biological processes, but the physics of the hydrogen transfers to and from these cofactors is not fully understood. Researchers study the mechanistically important contributions from quantum tunneling and enzyme dynamics and connect those processes to the catalytic power of enzymes that use these cofactors. Here we describe some progress that has been made in studying these reactions, particularly through the use of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). We first discuss the general theoretical framework necessary to interpret experimental KIEs, and then describe practical uses for KIEs in the context of two case studies. The first example is alcohol dehydrogenase, which uses a nicotinamide cofactor to catalyze a hydride transfer, and the second example is thymidylate synthase, which uses a folate cofactor to catalyze both a hydride and a proton transfer.

  8. Modeling the Interaction between Integrin-Binding Peptide (RGD) and Rutile Surface: The Effect of Na+ on Peptide Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chunya; Skelton, Adam; Chen, Mingjun; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of a single tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) adsorbing onto negatively charged hydroxylated rutile (110) surface in aqueous solution was studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results indicate that the adsorbed Na{sup +} ions play an important role in determining the binding geometry of RGD. With an initial 'horseshoe' configuration, the charged side groups (COO{sup -} and NH{sub 2}) of the peptide are able to interact with the surface through direct hydrogen bonds (H bonds) in the very early stage of adsorption. The Na{sup +} ions approach the positively charged Arg side chain, competing with the Arg side chain for adsorption to the negatively charged hydroxyl oxygen. In coordination with the structural adjustment of the peptide, the Arg residue is driven to detach from the rutile surface. In contrast, the Na+ ions in close proximity to the negatively charged Asp side chain contribute to the binding of the COO{sup -} group on the surface, helping the carboxyl oxygen not involved in COO{sup -}-surface H bonds to orientate toward the hydroxyl hydrogens. Once both carboxyl oxygens form enough H bonds with the hydroxyl hydrogens, the redundant ions move toward a more favorable adsorption site.

  9. Hyper-Binding across Time: Age Differences in the Effect of Temporal Proximity on Paired-Associate Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Karen L.; Trelle, Alexandra; Hasher, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Older adults show hyper- (or excessive) binding effects for simultaneously and sequentially presented distraction. Here, we addressed the potential role of hyper-binding in paired-associate learning. Older and younger adults learned a list of word pairs and then received an associative recognition task in which rearranged pairs were formed from…

  10. Assessment of the in vitro binding of JHW 007, a dopamine transport inhibitor that blocks the effects of cocaine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Benztropine (BZT) and its analogues, like cocaine, bind to the dopamine transporter and block dopamine uptake. However, while BZT analogues bind the DAT with high affinity, they generally do not have cocaine-like behavioral effects. JHW 007 is a BZT analogue that displaces [3H]WIN 35,428 from the D...

  11. The negative effects of hydrogenated trans fats and what to do about them.

    PubMed

    Kummerow, Fred A

    2009-08-01

    Partially hydrogenated vegetable oils have been in the American diet since 1900. More than 50 years ago they were found to contain trans fatty acids that were different from natural fatty acids in plant oils and in animal fat. There was growing evidence that the consumption of trans fats have negative health effects, including increasing plasma lipid levels. In 2003, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ruled that the amount of trans fat in a food item must be stated on the label after January 1, 2006; food items could be labeled 0% trans if they contain less than 0.5g/serving. Since the initial ruling, it is now known that the fatty acids in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil are 14 cis and trans isomers of octadecenoic and octadecadienoic acids that are formed during hydrogenation. They cause inflammation and calcification of arterial cells: known risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). They inhibit cyclooxygenase, an enzyme required for the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostacyclin, necessary for the regulation of blood flow. There have been several reformulations of hydrogenated fat containing varying amounts of trans fatty acids and linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid that is converted to arachidonic acid. Epidemiological data suggest that when trans fat percentages go up and linoleic acid percentages go down, death rates rise; when trans goes down, death rates go down. In spite of the harmful effects of trans fats, the FDA allows it in the food supply as long as the amount in a food item is declared on the label. Trans fat should be banned from the food supply.

  12. Anchored clathrate waters bind antifreeze proteins to ice

    PubMed Central

    Garnham, Christopher P.; Campbell, Robert L.; Davies, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca2+-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP∶ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the “anchored clathrate” mechanism of AFP action. PMID:21482800

  13. Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice

    SciTech Connect

    C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

    2011-12-31

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

  14. Binding energies of exciton complexes in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers and effect of dielectric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylänpää, Ilkka; Komsa, Hannu-Pekka

    2015-11-01

    Excitons, trions, biexcitons, and exciton-trion complexes in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide sheets of MoS2, MoSe2, MoTe2, WS2, and WSe2 are studied by means of density functional theory and path-integral Monte Carlo method in order to accurately account for the particle-particle correlations. In addition, the effect of dielectric environment on the properties of these exciton complexes is studied by modifying the effective interaction potential between particles. Calculated exciton and trion binding energies are consistent with previous experimental and computational studies, and larger systems such as biexciton and exciton-trion complex are found highly stable. Binding energies of biexcitons are similar to or higher than those of trions, but the binding energy of the trion depends significantly stronger on the dielectric environment than that of biexciton. Therefore, as a function of an increasing dielectric constant of the environment the exciton-trion complex "dissociates" to a biexciton rather than to an exciton and a trion.

  15. Arsenic and 17-β-estradiol bind to each other and neutralize each other's signaling effects.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sukhdeep; Mukherjee, Tapan K; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2016-09-01

    We report that arsenic trioxide (ATO) and 17-beta-estradiol (E2) abolish each other's independent cell signaling effects in respect of cell survival and proliferation/migration of breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. The possibility that this is due to binding of ATO to E2 was confirmed through difference absorption spectroscopy, chromatography-coupled voltammometry and 1-D (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Binding leads to attenuation of E2's hydroxyl (1)H peaks at its C17 and C3 carbon positions. The results suggest that ATO and E2 can titrate each other's levels, potentially explaining why sustained arsenic exposure tends to be associated with delays in age of menarche, advanced age of menopause, poorer sperm quality, higher overall morbidity in men, and lower incidences of breast cancer in women in some arsenic-contaminated areas. PMID:27346132

  16. In vitro assessment of the effects of vedolizumab binding on peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wyant, Timothy; Yang, Lili; Fedyk, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Vedolizumab (VDZ) is a humanized monoclonal antibody in development for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. VDZ binds to the α4β7 integrin complex and inhibits its binding to mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1), thus preventing lymphocyte extravasation to gut mucosal tissues. To understand whether VDZ has additional effects that may affect its overall safety as a therapeutic molecule, we examined other potential actions of VDZ. In vitro assays with human peripheral blood lymphocytes demonstrated that VDZ fails to elicit cytotoxicity, lymphocyte activation, and cytokine production from memory T lymphocytes and does not interfere with the suppressive ability of regulatory T cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that VDZ induces internalization of α4β7 and that the integrin is rapidly re-expressed and fully functional after VDZ withdrawal. These studies provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the observed safety profile of VDZ in clinical trials. PMID:24492340

  17. Acid pre-treatment of sewage anaerobic sludge to increase hydrogen producing bacteria HPB: effectiveness and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, T; Sassi, G; Ruggeri, B

    2008-01-01

    The present study is aimed to test the effectiveness and the reproducibility of the acid pre-treatment of sewage sludge to suppress the methanogenic bacteria activity, in order to increase the hydrogen forming bacteria activity, mainly Clostridium species. The treated sludge has been tested on glucose reach medium under mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C), in batch mode to quantify the biological fermentative hydrogen production. In the whole series of experiments, the main components of biogas are hydrogen (52-60%) and carbon dioxide (40-48%); no methane and hydrogen sulphide were present in it. The rate of biogas production reached a maximum of 75 ml/lh. An overall mean hydrogen conversion efficiency was 11.20% on the assumption of maximum of 3 mol H2/mol glucose. Clostridium spp. multiplied ten times after 10 h of fermentation and over that thousand times at the end of fermentation.

  18. Effects of reducing temperatures on the hydrogen storage capacity of double-walled carbon nanotubes with Pd loading.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qu; Wu, Huimin; Wexler, David; Liu, Huakun

    2014-06-01

    The effects of different temperatures on the hydrogen sorption characteristics of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with palladium loading have been investigated. When we use different temperatures, the particle sizes and specific surface areas of the samples are different, which affects the hydrogen storage capacity of the DWCNTs. In this work, the amount of hydrogen storage capacity was determined (by AMC Gas Reactor Controller) to be 1.70, 1.85, 2.00, and 1.93 wt% for pristine DWCNTS and for 2%Pd/DWCNTs-300 degrees C, 2%Pd/DWCNTs-400 degrees C, and 2%Pd/DWCNTs-500 degrees C, respectively. We found that the hydrogen storage capacity can be enhanced by loading with 2% Pd nanoparticles and selecting a suitable temperature. Furthermore, the sorption can be attributed to the chemical reaction between atomic hydrogen and the dangling bonds of the DWCNTs. PMID:24738450

  19. Theoretical investigation of the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct current argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, P.; Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. K.

    2014-03-01

    In this study the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct-current (DC) argon plasma is theoretically investigated. By coupling fluid equations with Poisons equation for such multi-component plasma, the Mach number and amplitude of the soliton are determined following pseudo potential method. Addition of hydrogen in argon discharge leads to the decrease of electron, Ar+ ion density while a reverse trend was observed for ArH+ and hydrogen like ions. It was found that presence of hydrogen like ions in argon plasma affects the formation of soliton with its amplitude significantly decreases as concentration of hydrogen increases. On the other hand, increase in ion to electron temperature ratios of the lighter ions in the discharge also has a significant influence on the amplitude and formation of soliton. The inverse relation between solitons width and amplitude is found to be consistent for the entire range of study.

  20. Effects of reducing temperatures on the hydrogen storage capacity of double-walled carbon nanotubes with Pd loading.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qu; Wu, Huimin; Wexler, David; Liu, Huakun

    2014-06-01

    The effects of different temperatures on the hydrogen sorption characteristics of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with palladium loading have been investigated. When we use different temperatures, the particle sizes and specific surface areas of the samples are different, which affects the hydrogen storage capacity of the DWCNTs. In this work, the amount of hydrogen storage capacity was determined (by AMC Gas Reactor Controller) to be 1.70, 1.85, 2.00, and 1.93 wt% for pristine DWCNTS and for 2%Pd/DWCNTs-300 degrees C, 2%Pd/DWCNTs-400 degrees C, and 2%Pd/DWCNTs-500 degrees C, respectively. We found that the hydrogen storage capacity can be enhanced by loading with 2% Pd nanoparticles and selecting a suitable temperature. Furthermore, the sorption can be attributed to the chemical reaction between atomic hydrogen and the dangling bonds of the DWCNTs.