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Sample records for effective biosolids management

  1. Technological options for the management of biosolids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Brown, Sally L; Magesan, Guna N; Slade, Alison H; Quintern, Michael; Clinton, Peter W; Payn, Tim W

    2008-06-01

    Large quantities of biosolids (sewage sludge), which are produced from municipal wastewater treatment, are ever-increasing because of the commissioning of new treatment plants and continuous upgrades of the existing facilities. A large proportion of biosolids are currently landfilled. With increasing pressure from regulators and the general public, landfilling of biosolids is being phased out in many countries because of potential secondary pollution caused by leachate and the emission of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Biosolids contain nutrients and energy that can be used beneficially. Significant efforts have been made recently to develop new technologies to manage biosolids and make useful products from them. In this paper, we provide a review of the technologies in biosolids management. A survey of literature was conducted. At present, the most common beneficial use of biosolids is agricultural land application because of inherent fertilizer values found in biosolids. Expansion of land application, however, may be limited in the future because of more stringent regulatory requirements and public concern about food chain contamination in some countries. Perceived as a green energy source, the combustion of biosolids has received renewed interest. Anaerobic digestion is generally a more effective method than incineration for energy recovery, and digested biosolids are suitable for further beneficial use through land application. Although conventional incineration systems for biosolid management generally consume more energy than they produce because of the high moisture content in the biosolids, it is expected that more combustion systems, either monocombustion or cocombustion, will be built to cope with the increasing quantity of biosolids. Under the increasingly popular low-carbon economy policy, biosolids may be recognized as a renewable fuel and be eligible for 'carbon credits'. Because ash can be used to manufacture construction materials, combustion can

  2. Indicators for managing biosolids in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Amajirionwu, Magnus; Connaughton, Noel; McCann, Brian; Moles, Richard; Bartlett, John; O'Regan, Bernadette

    2008-09-01

    Sustainable development indicators (SDIs) have emerged as a tool to measure progress towards sustainable development for a number of fields. However, no indicator initiative to date has been aimed at biosolids management at local authority, regional or national levels. This paper presents a study where stakeholders involved in the management of biosolids in Ireland participated in the development of SDIs for managing biosolids at the local/regional level. A significant 81% of participating stakeholders find SDIs either 'useful' or 'very useful' as a tool for managing biosolids. A suite of 22 indicators has been developed and arranged according to the driving force-pressure-state-impact-response (DPSIR) indicator framework. The indicators address all the domains of biosolids management namely, production, quality, cost, legislation/regulation, training/research and recycling/disposal. The stakeholder approach is recognition that no effective indicator set can be developed without the input of stakeholders.

  3. Integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective biosolids management at a large Canadian wastewater treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, R J; Allain, C J; Laughton, P J; Henry, J G

    2004-01-01

    The Greater Moncton Sewerage Commission's 115,000 m3/d advanced, chemically assisted primary wastewater treatment facility located in New Brunswick, Canada, has developed an integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective programme for the management and beneficial utilization of biosolids from lime stabilized raw sludge. The paper overviews biosolids production, lime stabilization, conveyance, and odour control followed by an indepth discussion of the wastewater sludge as a resource programme, namely: composting, mine site reclamation, landfill cover, land application for agricultural use, tree farming, sod farm base as a soil enrichment, topsoil manufacturing. The paper also addresses the issues of metals, pathogens, organic compounds, the quality control program along with the regulatory requirements. Biosolids capital and operating costs are presented. Research results on removal of metals from primary sludge using a unique biological process known as BIOSOL as developed by the University of Toronto, Canada to remove metals and destroy pathogens are presented. The paper also discusses an ongoing cooperative research project with the Université de Moncton where various mixtures of plant biosolids are composted with low quality soil. Integration, approach to sustainability and "cumulative effects" as part of the overall biosolids management strategy are also discussed.

  4. Managing urban biosolids: Beneficial uses

    SciTech Connect

    Forste, J.B.

    1998-07-01

    Biosolids (the primarily organic product produced by wastewater treatment processes that can be beneficially recycled) are becoming a significant challenge for operators of both small and large urban wastewater facilities. More stringent water quality standards, coupled with increasingly sensitive environmental and public health considerations, have made the treatment and use/disposal of solids from treatment processes a growing and complex field of environmental management.

  5. Streamside management zones effectiveness for protecting water quality after forestland application of biosolids.

    PubMed

    Pratt, W A; Fox, T R

    2009-01-01

    Biosolids, materials resulting from domestic sewage treatment, are surface applied to forest soils to increase phosphorus (P), nitrate, and ammonium availability. Retaining streamside management zones (SMZs) can limit nutrient pollution of streams. We delineated 15-m SMZs along three intermittent streams in an 18-yr-old Pinus taeda L. plantation. We applied biosolids at a rate of 1120 and 629 kg ha(-1) of total nitrogen and total P outside the SMZ on one side of each of the streams while maintaining the other side of the stream as control. We collected water samples from the three treated and six reference streams and from the perennial stream upstream and downstream from the intermittent streams for 12 mo after treatment. Along transects perpendicular to the treated streams, we collected overland flow samples, soil solution samples at 60 cm, and extracts from ion exchange membranes (IEMs) placed in the surface soil. We observed significantly elevated P concentrations adjacent to the stream in overland flow during one period on the treated side of the stream. We found significantly elevated nitrate concentrations outside the SMZ in the treated-side soil solution samples, in which concentrations remained below 1.5 mg L(-1). Phosphorus, nitrate, and ammonium concentrations outside the SMZ in treated-side IEM extracts showed significant increases after biosolids application, returning to near control levels after 1 yr. Phosphorus, nitrate, and ammonium concentrations in IEM extracts were not different adjacent to the streams. Stream P, nitrate, and ammonium concentrations showed few differences downstream from the treatment with concentrations below 1.5 mg L(-1). Our results indicate that at 15 m, SMZ protected streams from P, nitrate, and ammonium pollution for the first year after biosolids application to adjacent loblolly pine plantations in the Virginia Piedmont.

  6. Biosolids management strategies: an evaluation of energy production as an alternative to land application.

    PubMed

    Egan, Maureen

    2013-07-01

    Currently, more than half of the biosolids produced within the USA are land applied. Land application of biosolids introduces organic contaminants into the environment. There are potential ecological and human health risks associated with land application of biosolids. Biosolids may be used as a renewable energy source. Nutrients may be recovered from biosolids used for energy generation for use as fertilizer. The by-products of biosolids energy generation may be used beneficially in construction materials. It is recommended that energy generation replace land application as the leading biosolids management strategy.

  7. Storage management influences greenhouse gas emissions from biosolids.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Ramaprasad; Livesley, Stephen J; Gregory, David; Arndt, Stefan K

    2015-03-15

    Biosolids produced by wastewater treatment plants are often stored in stockpiles and can be a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHG). Growing trees in shallow stockpiled biosolids may remove nutrients, keep the biosolids drier and offset GHG emissions through C sequestration. We directly measured methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) flux from a large biosolid stockpile and two shallow stockpiles, one planted with Salix reichardtii (willow) trees, from December 2009 to January 2011. All stockpiles emitted large annual amounts of GHG ranging from 38 kg CO2-e Mg(-1) dry biosolid for the large stockpile, to 65 kg CO2-e Mg(-1) for the unplanted shallow stockpile, probably due to the greater surface area to volume ratio. GHG emissions were dominated by N2O and CO2 whilst CH4 emissions were negligible (<2%) from the large stockpile and the shallow stockpiles were actually a CH4 sink. Annual willow tree growth was 12 Mg dry biomass ha(-1), but this only offset 8% of the GHG emissions from the shallow planted stockpile. Our data highlight that biosolid stockpiles are significant sources for GHG emissions but alternate management options such as shallow stockpiles or planting for biomass production will not lead to GHG emission reductions.

  8. Evaluating the effects of triclosan on 3 field crops grown in 4 formulations of biosolids.

    PubMed

    Shahmohamadloo, René S; Lissemore, Linda; Prosser, Ryan S; Sibley, Paul K

    2017-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that amending soil with biosolids can be an integral component of sustainable agriculture. Despite strong evidence supporting its beneficial use in agriculture, there are concerns that chemicals, such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products, could present a risk to terrestrial ecosystems and human health. Triclosan is one of the most commonly detected compounds in biosolids. To date, laboratory studies indicate that triclosan likely poses a de minimis risk to field crops; however, these studies were either conducted under unrealistic exposure conditions or only assessed 1 or 2 formulations of biosolids. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effects of triclosan on field crops in soils amended with 4 different formulations of biosolids (liquid, dewatered, compost, and alkaline-hydrolyzed), containing both background and spiked triclosan concentrations, following best management practices used in the province of Ontario. Three crop species (corn, soybean, and spring wheat) were evaluated using several plant growth endpoints (e.g., root wet mass, shoot length, shoot wet/dry mass) in 70-d to 90-d potted soil tests. The results indicated no adverse impact of triclosan on any crop-biosolids combination. Conversely, amending soil with biosolids either enhanced or had no negative effect, on the growth of plants. Results of the present study suggest little risk of triclosan to crops in agricultural fields amended with biosolids. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1896-1908. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  9. Meta-Analyses of Biosolids Effect in Dryland Wheat Agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Barbarick, Kenneth; Ippolito, James; McDaniel, Jacob

    2017-03-01

    Land application to cropping systems is USEPA's preferred method of recycling biosolids. Determination of biosolids effect size through meta-analyses from two decades of field-location research at three sites should answer the question: Does 20 yr of biosolids application affect dryland wheat ( L.) grain production, grain nutrient concentrations, and soil elemental extractability compared with equivalent rates of commercial N fertilizer? At two sites, biennial biosolids application rates to a wheat-fallow (WF) rotation were up to 11.2 dry Mg ha and up to 112 kg commercial N fertilizer ha, whereas rates at the third location varied to match soil-test information. Crop rotations included WF and wheat-corn ( L.)-fallow. We completed meta-analyses of biosolids effects compared with N fertilizer on wheat yield, grain protein, grain total, and soil ammonium bicarbonate-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (ABDTPA)-extractable P, Zn, Cu, Fe, and Ni concentrations at the aforementioned sites from 1993 through 2013. Results showed that biosolids produced greater grain P and Zn at one site. Biosolids rates at two sites resulted in greater grain Zn and ABDTPA P, Zn, Cu, and Fe. Meta-analyses tests for heterogeneity indicated that the variance for all sites and rates could be explained as consistent across treatments, whereas the test for the 20 yr showed that heterogeneity was large and other factors affected the variance (e.g., climatic variability between years). Meta-analysis showed the practical effect of biosolids over a 20-yr study and demonstrated that the primary biosolids effect was an improvement in Zn availability to wheat. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. MANAGING AVIAN FLU, CARCASS MANAGEMENT & BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The avian influenza virus is discussed with emphasis on the impact to poultry and possible movement of the highly pathogenic H5N 1 virus to humans. A review is made of the worldwide effects to date of the avian influenza viruses; methods for the viruses to enter recreational wate...

  11. MANAGING AVIAN FLU, CARCASS MANAGEMENT & BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The avian influenza virus is discussed with emphasis on the impact to poultry and possible movement of the highly pathogenic H5N 1 virus to humans. A review is made of the worldwide effects to date of the avian influenza viruses; methods for the viruses to enter recreational wate...

  12. EFFECTS OF BIOSOLIDS ON SORPTION AND DESORPTION BEHAVIOR OF CADMIUM IN BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium sorption and desorption experiments were conducted on different fractions of soils amended with different biosolids with varying chemical properties and unamended soil (control). Biosolids addition increased the slope of the Cd sorption isotherms compared to the control s...

  13. EFFECTS OF BIOSOLIDS ON SORPTION AND DESORPTION BEHAVIOR OF CADMIUM IN BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium sorption and desorption experiments were conducted on different fractions of soils amended with different biosolids with varying chemical properties and unamended soil (control). Biosolids addition increased the slope of the Cd sorption isotherms compared to the control s...

  14. NRMRL BIOSOLIDS RESEARCH UNDERWAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) has a reputation for producing useful and highly regarded research in the area of wastewater sludges and biosolids. Presently many projects are underway which uphold this reputation. NRMRL biosolids research can be categori...

  15. NRMRL BIOSOLIDS RESEARCH UNDERWAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) has a reputation for producing useful and highly regarded research in the area of wastewater sludges and biosolids. Presently many projects are underway which uphold this reputation. NRMRL biosolids research can be categori...

  16. Meta-analysis of biosolid effects on persistence of triclosan and triclocarban in soil.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuguo; Sanganyado, Edmond; Ye, Qingfu; Gan, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Biosolids are extensively used in agriculture as fertilizers while offering a practical solution for waste disposal. Many pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs), such as triclosan and triclocarban, are enriched in biosolids. Biosolid amendment changes soil physicochemical properties, which may in turn alter the persistence of PPCPs and hence the risk for secondary contamination such as plant uptake. To delineate the effect of biosolids on PPCPs persistence, triclosan and triclocarban were used as model compounds in this study and their sorption (Kd) and persistence (t1/2) were determined in different soils before and after biosolid amendment. Biosolids consistently increased sorption of triclosan and triclocarban in soil. The Kd of triclosan increased by 3.9-21 times following amendment of a sandy loam soil with biosolids at 2-10%. The persistence of both compounds was prolonged, with t1/2 of triclosan increasing from 10 d in the unamended soil to 63 d after biosolid amendment at 10%. The relationship between t1/2 and Kd was further examined through a meta-analysis using data from this study and all relevant published studies. A significant linear relationship between t1/2 and Kd was observed for triclosan (r(2) = 0.69, p < 0.01) and triclocarban (r(2) = 0.38, p < 0.05) in biosolid-amended soils. On the average, when biosolid amendment increased by 1%, t1/2 of triclosan was prolonged by 7.5 d, while t1/2 of triclocarban was extended by 4.7 d. Therefore, biosolid amendment greatly enhances persistence of triclosan and triclocarban, likely due to enhanced sorption or decreased chemical bioavailability. This finding highlights the importance to consider the effect of biosolids when evaluating the environmental risks of these and other biosolid-borne PPCPs.

  17. Effects of Triclosan and biosolids on microbial community composition in an agricultural soil

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyoku, Temitope A.; Young, Thomas M.; Scow, Kate M.

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a widely used antimicrobial agent found at high concentrations in biosolids produced during municipal wastewater treatment. The effect of adding TCS, in the presence or absence of biosolids, on the composition of an agricultural soil microbial community was measured using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). Most changes observed in microbial community composition were attributable to addition of biosolids or passage of time, with smaller changes due to TCS exposure, regardless of the biosolids presence. TCS slightly reduced the relative abundance of Gram positive and negative bacteria and fungi, both with or without biosolids. Bacteria were more sensitive than eukaryotes, consistent with the mode of action of TCS, which selectively targets fatty acid synthesis and disrupts cell membranes of bacteria. TCS slightly increased biomarkers of microbial stress, but stress biomarkers were lower in all biosolid treated soils, presumably due to increased availability of nutrients mitigating potential TCS toxicity. PMID:24597039

  18. Surface biosolids application: effects on infiltration, erosion, and soil organic carbon in Chihuahuan Desert grasslands and shrublands.

    PubMed

    Moffet, C A; Zartman, R E; Wester, D B; Sosebee, R E

    2005-01-01

    Land application of biosolids is a beneficial-use practice whose ecological effects depend in part on hydrological effects. Biosolids were surface-applied to square 0.5-m2 plots at four rates (0, 7, 34, and 90 dry Mg ha(-1)) on each of three soil-cover combinations in Chihuahuan Desert grassland and shrubland. Infiltration and erosion were measured during two seasons for three biosolids post-application ages. Infiltration was measured during eight periods of a 30-min simulated rain. Biosolids application affected infiltration rate, cumulative infiltration, and erosion. Infiltration increased with increasing biosolids application rate. Application of biosolids at 90 dry Mg ha(-1) increased steady-state infiltration rate by 1.9 to 7.9 cm h(-1). Most of the measured differences in runoff among biosolids application rates were too large to be the result of interception losses and/or increased hydraulic gradient due to increased roughness. Soil erosion was reduced by the application of biosolids; however, the extent of reduction in erosion depended on the initial erodibility of the site. Typically, the greatest marginal reductions in erosion were achieved at the lower biosolids application rates (7 and 34 dry Mg ha(-1)); the difference in erosion between 34 and 90 dry Mg ha(-1) biosolids application rates was not significant. Surface application of biosolids has important hydrological consequences on runoff and soil erosion in desert grasslands that depend on the rate of biosolids applied, and the site and biosolids characteristics.

  19. EFFECT OF BIOSOLIDS APPLICATION ON SOIL METAL CHEMISTRY AND PHYTOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Addition of biosolids to soils increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) and alters the chemistry and phytoavailability of these metals. This alteration in phytoavailability associated with biosolids amended soil was recognized and utilized ...

  20. EFFECT OF BIOSOLIDS APPLICATION ON SOIL METAL CHEMISTRY AND PHYTOAVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Addition of biosolids to soils increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) and alters the chemistry and phytoavailability of these metals. This alteration in phytoavailability associated with biosolids amended soil was recognized and utilized ...

  1. Potential of an Alkaline-stabilized Biosolid to Manage Nematodes: Case Studies on Soybean Cyst and Root-knot Nematodes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2001 a collaborative research effort was initiated to evaluate an alkaline stabilized biosolid amendment for plant-parasitic nematode management. This biosolid amendment, N-Viro Soil (NVS), is produced from a unique process that destroys pathogens through a combination of the following stresses:...

  2. Earthworms (Oligochaeta: Acanthodrilidae and Lumbricidae) associated with Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant, Travis County, Texas, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Earthworm populations were surveyed in soils from a variety of habitats associated with the Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant, Austin, Texas, from November 2009 through March 2010. Seven species of terrestrial Oligochaeta, including one species new to science, are reported from two families, ...

  3. Effects of surface applications of biosolids on soil, crops, ground water, and streambed sediment near Deer Trail, Colorado, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; Smith, David B.; Crock, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Metro Wastewater Reclamation District and North Kiowa Bijou Groundwater Management District, studied natural geochemical effects and the effects of biosolids applications to the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District properties near Deer Trail, Colorado, during 1999 through 2003 because of public concern about potential contamination of soil, crops, ground water, and surface water from biosolids applications. Parameters analyzed for each monitoring component included arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc (the nine trace elements regulated by Colorado for biosolids), gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity, and plutonium, as well as other parameters. Concentrations of the nine regulated trace elements in biosolids were relatively uniform and did not exceed applicable regulatory standards. All plutonium concentrations in biosolids were below the minimum detectable level and were near zero. The most soluble elements in biosolids were arsenic, molybdenum, nickel, phosphorus, and selenium. Elevated concentrations of bismuth, mercury, phosphorus, and silver would be the most likely inorganic biosolids signature to indicate that soil or streambed sediment has been affected by biosolids. Molybdenum and tungsten, and to a lesser degree antimony, cadmium, cobalt, copper, mercury, nickel, phosphorus, and selenium, would be the most likely inorganic 'biosolids signature' to indicate ground water or surface water has been affected by biosolids. Soil data indicate that biosolids have had no measurable effect on the concentration of the constituents monitored. Arsenic concentrations in soil of both Arapahoe and Elbert County monitoring sites (like soil from all parts of Colorado) exceed the Colorado soil remediation objectives and soil cleanup standards, which were determined by back-calculating a soil concentration equivalent to a one-in-a-million cumulative cancer risk. Lead concentrations

  4. EFFECTS OF LIME (CAO) ON THE ENDOTOXIN LEVELS OF BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lime addition is a common practice for treating biosolids in order to meet EPA 503 requirements for land application. Since this treatment kills the majority of microorganisms, will it increase the level of endotoxins present in biosolids? And, if endotoxin levels are increased, ...

  5. EFFECTS OF LIME (CAO) ON THE ENDOTOXIN LEVELS OF BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lime addition is a common practice for treating biosolids in order to meet EPA 503 requirements for land application. Since this treatment kills the majority of microorganisms, will it increase the level of endotoxins present in biosolids? And, if endotoxin levels are increased, ...

  6. Moisture Effects on Nitrogen Availability in Municipal Biosolids from End-of-Life Municipal Lagoons.

    PubMed

    Jeke, Nicholson N; Zvomuya, Francis; Ross, Lisette

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen (N) availability affects plant biomass yield and, hence, phytoextraction of contaminants during phytoremediation of end-of-life municipal lagoons. End-of-life lagoons are characterized by fluctuating moisture conditions, but the effects on biosolid N dynamics have not been adequately characterized. This 130-d laboratory incubation investigated effects of three moisture levels (30, 60, and 90% water-filled pore space [WFPS]) on N mineralization (N) in biosolids from a primary (PB) and a secondary (SB) municipal lagoon cell. Results showed a net increase in N with time at 60% WFPS and a net decrease at 90% WFPS in PB, while N at 30% WFPS did not change significantly. Moisture level and incubation time had no significant effect on N in SB. Nitrogen mineralization rate in PB followed three-half-order kinetics. Potentially mineralizable N (N) in PB was significantly greater at 60% WFPS (222 mg kg) than at 30% WFPS (30 mg kg), but rate constants did not differ significantly between the moisture levels. Nitrogen mineralization in SB followed first-order kinetics, with N significantly greater at 60% WFPS (68.4 mg kg) and 90% WFPS (94.1 mg kg) than at 30% WFPS (32 mg kg). Low N in SB suggests high-N-demanding plants may eventually have limited effectiveness to remediate biosolids in the secondary cell. While high N in PB would provide sufficient N to support high biomass yield, phytoextraction potential is reduced under dry and near-saturated conditions. These results have important implications on the management of moisture during phytoextraction of contaminants in end-of-life municipal lagoons. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Risk perception, risk communication, and stakeholder involvement for biosolids management and research.

    PubMed

    Beecher, Ned; Harrison, Ellen; Goldstein, Nora; McDaniel, Mary; Field, Patrick; Susskind, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    An individual's perception of risk develops from his or her values, beliefs, and experiences. Social scientists have identified factors that affect perceptions of risk, such as whether the risk is knowable (uncertainty), voluntary (can the individual control exposure?), and equitable (how fairly is the risk distributed?). There are measurable differences in how technical experts and citizen stakeholders define and assess risk. Citizen knowledge and technical expertise are both relevant to assessing risk; thus, the 2002 National Research Council panel on biosolids recommended stakeholder involvement in biosolids risk assessments. A survey in 2002 identified some of the factors that influence an individual's perception of the risks involved in a neighbor's use of biosolids. Risk communication was developed to address the gap between experts and the public in knowledge of technical topics. Biosolids management and research may benefit from applications of current risk communication theory that emphasizes (i) two-way communications (dialogue); (ii) that the public has useful knowledge and concerns that need to be acknowledged; and (iii) that what may matter most is the credibility of the purveyor of information and the levels of trustworthiness, fairness, and respect that he or she (or the organization) demonstrates, which can require cultural change. Initial experiences in applying the dialogue and cultural change stages of risk communication theory--as well as consensus-building and joint fact-finding--to biosolids research suggest that future research outcomes can be made more useful to decision-makers and more credible to the broader public. Sharing control of the research process with diverse stakeholders can make research more focused, relevant, and widely understood.

  8. Effect of Pine Waste and Pine Biochar on Nitrogen Mobility in Biosolids.

    PubMed

    Paramashivam, Dharini; Clough, Timothy J; Dickinson, Nicholas M; Horswell, Jacqui; Lense, Obed; Clucas, Lynne; Robinson, Brett H

    2016-01-01

    Humanity produces ∼27 kg of dry matter in biosolids per person per year. Land application of biosolids can improve crop production and remediate soils but may result in excessive nitrate N (NO-N) leaching. Carbonaceous materials can reduce the environmental impact of biosolids application. We aimed to ascertain and compare the potentials for Monterey pine ( D. Don)-sawdust-derived biochars and raw sawdust to reduce NO-N leaching from biosolids. We used batch sorption experiments 1:10 ratio of material to solution (100 mg kg of NH or NO) and column leaching experiments with columns containing biosolids (2.7% total N, 130 mg kg NH and 1350 mg kg NO) mixed with soil, biochar, or sawdust. One type of low-temperature (350°C) biochar sorbed 335 mg kg NH, while the other biochars and sawdust sorbed <200 mg kg NH. None of the materials sorbed NO. Biochar added at rates of 20 to 50% reduced NH-N (<1% of total N) leaching from columns by 40 to 80%. Nitrate leaching (<7% of total N) varied little with biochar form or rate but was reduced by sawdust. Incorporating dried sawdust with biosolids showed promise for mitigating NO-N leaching. This effect likely is due to sorption into the pores of the biochar combined with denitrification and immobilization of N rather than chemical sorption onto surfaces. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  9. Amendment of biosolids with waste materials and lime: Effect on geoenvironmental properties and leachate production.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Claudia; Larkin, Tam; Singhal, Naresh

    2015-12-01

    Residuals from wastewater treatment operations (biosolids) were mixed with lime, fly ash, lime kiln dust, or two smelter slags to assess their efficacy as potential stabilisation agents by assessing their effects on the shear strength, compressibility, and solids content of mixtures. In addition, the minerals formed and leachate produced during stabilisation were determined. Tests were performed to explore the change of the geoenvironmental properties of the amended biosolids, while under pressure, at different scales using laboratory, pilot and field scale tests. The settlement characteristics of the amended biosolids under a range of applied pressures were determined using a consolidometer. All amended biosolids mixtures showed higher strength than the unamended biosolids, with mixtures containing a combination of 20% fly ash and 20% lime giving the highest (up to eightfold) increase in strength, and that with lime kiln dust and the smelter slags showing the lowest (up to twofold). The biosolids mixtures with only lime gave the second highest increase in strength (up to fourfold), but produced the largest amount of leachate, with higher level of dissolved calcium. The increase in strength correlated with availability of calcium oxide in the mixtures which lead to calcium carbonate formation, accompanied with higher leachate production and settlement during consolidation. Copper, nickel and zinc concentrations increased with alkaline additives and corresponded to higher pH and DOC levels. Nonetheless, concentrations were within the New Zealand regulatory limits for Class A landfills.

  10. Effect of land-applied biosolids on surface-water nutrient yields and groundwater quality in Orange County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Chad R.; Fitzgerald, Sharon A.; McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Harden, Stephen L.; Gurley, Laura N.; Rogers, Shane W.

    2015-01-01

    The data, analysis, and conclusions associated with this study can be used by regulatory agencies, resource managers, and wastewater-treatment operators to (1) better understand the quantity and characteristics of nutrients, bacteria, metals, and contaminants of emerging concern that are transported away from biosolids land-application fields to surface water and groundwater under current regulations for the purposes of establishing effective total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) and restoring impaired water resources, (2) assess how well existing regulations protect waters of the State and potentially recommend effective changes to regulations or land-application procedures, and (3) establish a framework for developing guidance on effective techniques for monitoring and regulatory enforcement of permitted biosolids land-application fields.

  11. Amelioration of iron mine soils with biosolids: Effects on plant tissue metal content and earthworms.

    PubMed

    Cele, Emmanuel Nkosinathi; Maboeta, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The achievement of environmentally sound and economically feasible disposal strategies for biosolids is a major issue in the wastewater treatment industry around the world, including Swaziland. Currently, an iron ore mine site, which is located within a wildlife sanctuary, is being considered as a suitable place where controlled disposal of biosolids may be practiced. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of urban biosolids on iron mine soils with regard to plant metal content and ecotoxicological effects on earthworms. This was done through chemical analysis of plants grown in biosolid-amended mine soil. Earthworm behaviour, reproduction and bioaccumulation tests were also conducted on biosolid-amended mine soil. According to the results obtained, the use of biosolids led to creation of soil conditions that were generally favourable to earthworms. However, plants were found to have accumulated Zn up to 346 mg kg(-1) (in shoots) and 462 mg kg(-1) (in roots). This was more than double the normal Zn content of plants. It was concluded that while biosolids can be beneficial to mine soils and earthworms, they can also lead to elevated metal content in plant tissues, which might be a concern to plant-dependant wildlife species. Nonetheless, it was not possible to satisfactorily estimate risks to forage quality since animal feeding tests with hyperaccumulator plants have not been reported. Quite possibly, there may be no cause for alarm since the uptake of metals from soil is greater in plants grown in pots in the greenhouse than from the same soil in the field since pot studies fail to mimic field conditions where the soil is heterogeneous and where the root system possesses a complex topology. It was thought that further field trials might assist in arriving at more satisfactory conclusions.

  12. A unique, environmentally sustainable and cost-effective programme to re-vegetate military training lands utilising composted wastewater biosolids at a large Canadian military training centre.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, R J; Allain, C J; Downe, S; Pond, N; Laughton, P J

    2006-01-01

    The Greater Moncton Sewerage Commission has developed, in concert with National Defence Canada, an environmentally sustainable and cost effective biosolids management and land reclamation programme at the Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Gagetown, New Brunswick, Canada (the second largest land based Military Training Facility in the British Commonwealth). The use of composted biosolids to revegetate military training lands is thought to be a unique application for the beneficial use of biosolids. Results and practical experience gained from this approach to successfully re-vegetate initial sections of extremely large and vast tracts of these lands are described. The paper also overviews the Commission's modern 115000 m3 x d(-1) advanced, chemically assisted primary wastewater treatment facility and associated alkaline (lime) sludge stabilisation process. Planning strategies, security aspects, special and unique challenges in operating adjacent to an active military training facility, costs, spreading techniques, monitoring, next steps and conclusions are also presented.

  13. Effect of long-term application of biosolids for land reclamation on surface water chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tian, G; Granato, T C; Pietz, R I; Carlson, C R; Abedin, Z

    2006-01-01

    Biosolids are known to have a potential to restore degraded land, but the long-term impacts of this practice on the environment, including water quality, still need to be evaluated. The surface water chemistry (NO3-, NH4+, and total P, Cd, Cu, and Hg) was monitored for 31 yr from 1972 to 2002 in a 6000-ha watershed at Fulton County, Illinois, where the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago was restoring the productivity of strip-mined land using biosolids. The mean cumulative loading rates during the past 31 yr were 875 dry Mg ha(-1) for 1120-ha fields in the biosolids-amended watershed and 4.3 dry Mg ha(-1) for the 670-ha fields in the control watershed. Biosolids were injected into mine spoil fields as liquid fertilizer from 1972 to 1985, and incorporated as dewatered cake from 1980 to 1996 and air-dried solids from 1987 to 2002. The mean annual loadings of nutrients and trace elements from biosolids in 1 ha were 735 kg N, 530 kg P, 4.5 kg Cd, 30.7 kg Cu, and 0.11 kg Hg in the fields of the biosolids-amended watershed, and negligible in the fields of the control watershed. Sampling of surface water was conducted monthly in the 1970s, and three times per year in the 1980s and 1990s. The water samples were collected from 12 reservoirs and 2 creeks receiving drainage from the fields in the control watershed, and 8 reservoirs and 4 creeks associated with the fields in the biosolids-amended watershed for the analysis of NO3- -N (including NO2- N), NH4+-N, and total P, Cd, Cu, and Hg. Compared to the control (0.18 mg L(-1)), surface water NO3- -N in the biosolids-amended watershed (2.23 mg L(-1)) was consistently higher; however, it was still below the Illinois limit of 10 mg L(-1) for public and food-processing water supplies. Biosolids applications had a significant effect on mean concentrations of ammonium N (0.11 mg L(-1) for control and 0.24 mg L(-1) for biosolids) and total P (0.10 mg L(-1) for control and 0.16 mg L(-1) for biosolids) in

  14. Carbon storage in a heavy clay soil landfill site after biosolid application.

    PubMed

    Bolan, N S; Kunhikrishnan, A; Naidu, R

    2013-11-01

    Applying organic amendments including biosolids and composts to agricultural land could increase carbon (C) storage in soils and contribute significantly to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of biosolids as a soil conditioner and nutrient source, there has been only limited work on the impact of biosolid application on C sequestration in soils. The objective of this study was to examine the potential value of biosolids in C sequestration in soils. Two types of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of biosolid application on C sequestration. In the first laboratory incubation experiment, the rate of decomposition of a range of biosolid samples was compared with other organic amendments including composts and biochars. In the second field experiment, the effect of biosolids on the growth of two bioenergy crops, Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower) on a landfill site was examined in relation to biomass production and C sequestration. The rate of decomposition varied amongst the organic amendments, and followed: composts>biosolids>biochar. There was a hundred fold difference in the rate of decomposition between biochar and other organic amendments. The rate of decomposition of biosolids decreased with increasing iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) contents of biosolids. Biosolid application increased the dry matter yield of both plant species (by 2-2.5 fold), thereby increasing the biomass C input to soils. The rate of net C sequestration resulting from biosolid application (Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) Mg(-1) biosolids) was higher for mustard (0.103) than sunflower (0.087). Biosolid application is likely to result in a higher level of C sequestration when compared to other management strategies including fertilizer application and conservation tillage, which is attributed to increased microbial biomass, and Fe and Al oxide-induced immobilization of C.

  15. Biosolid and alum effects on runoff losses during turfgrass establishment.

    PubMed

    Vietor, D M; Schnell, R W; Munster, C L; Provin, T L; White, R H

    2010-05-01

    Large, volume-based rates of composted biosolids (CB) enhance turfgrass establishment and soil properties, but nonpoint-source runoff losses could occur during production and after transplanting of sod. The objective was to evaluate runoff losses of N, P, sediment, and organic C during establishment of sprigs or transplanted sod of Tifway bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L. Pers. X C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davey) with and without CB and aluminum sulfate (Alum). Four treatments comprised Tifway sprigged in a sandy loam soil with and without incorporation of 0.25 m(3) CB m(-3) soil and Alum. In four additional treatments, sod transplanted from Tifway grown with and without CB was established with and without a surface spray of Alum. During early establishment, CB incorporated in soil before sprigging reduced runoff loss of sediment and total N to amounts comparable to transplanted sod. In contrast, mean runoff losses of total dissolved P and soluble-reactive P (SRP) were more than 50% greater for CB-amended sod than for fertilizer-grown sod or Tifway sprigged in soil with or without CB. Yet, the surface spray of Alum reduced runoff loss from sod more than 88% for SRP and 41% for dissolved organic C. Both surface sprays and incorporation of Alum effectively reduced SRP runoff loss from CB, soil, and turfgrass sources during turfgrass establishment.

  16. Papermill biosolids effect on soil physical and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Price, G W; Voroney, R P

    2007-01-01

    Papermill biosolids (PB) can provide multiple benefits to the soil system. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of a high C/N ratio (C/N = 100) de-inked PB on soil physical and chemical properties, including soil bulk density, infiltration rates, wet aggregate stability, total soil carbon, and heavy metal concentrations. Four rates of PB (0, 50, 100, and 150 Mg ha(-1)) were applied annually, for up to 3 yr, on four agricultural soils in Ontario, Canada. Decreases in soil bulk density between 0.27 and 0.35 g cm(-3), relative to the nonamended treatment, were observed in soils receiving PB treatments over 3 yr. Total soil carbon increased within 1 yr on PB-amended soils planted to soybeans but not on soils planted to corn. Hydraulic conductivities (K fs) were greater in all soils receiving PB amendments relative to the nonamended treatment throughout the study. Other properties measured, such as pH and electrical conductivity, were relatively unchanged after 2 yr of PB applications. While some increases in heavy metal accumulation occurred, there were no clear trends observed at any of the sites related to PB rates. The results of this study provide support to the idea that annual applications of PB can add significantly to the stability of soil structure.

  17. Effect of the application of acid treated biosolids on marigold (Tagetes erecta) development.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Avelar, J; Barrios, J A; Jiménez, B

    2004-01-01

    The use of biosolids for land restoration and crop production is a potential solution to improve food production worldwide. However, the microbial content usually restricts its application in crops that are consumed uncooked. An alternative practice is their use in floriculture. In this study, the effects of acid treated sludge on the development of marigold (Tagetes erecta) plants were evaluated under green house conditions. Biosolids were applied at the agronomic rate (AR) based on nitrogen requirements of the marigold. In addition, higher rates (10 and 20xAR) were applied to study their effect on the plants. Biosolids were mixed with tepetate (hard volcanic indurate layers). Due to its origin, tepetate lacks nutrients and organic matter to adequately support plant development. The best treatment for marigold development was 10xAR, as plants reached an average height of 107 cm, with a growing speed of 1.01 cm/d, which is 20 times more than the control. Plants that received no biosolids produced 0.25 buds and 0.5 flowers per plant. In contrast, AR and 10xAR showed a production that ranged from 2 to 29 buds/plant and 4 to 15 flowers/plant, respectively. These results indicate the viability of reusing acid treated biosolids to improve marigold development.

  18. Surface-applied biosolids enhance soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks but have contrasting effects on soil physical quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beneficial reuse of biosolids through land application can increase soil organic carbon (SOC) storage while also improving soil physical properties that affect fertility. The effects of continuous biosolids applications in the mid- to long-term, however, are likely to depend on application rate, me...

  19. Global climate change, land management, and biosolids application to semiarid grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    Global climate change combined with improper land management, including over-grazing, can lead to a severe reduction in plant cover and soil productivity. This process is especially common in arid and semiarid regions with sparse vegetation cover. New and innovative methods of land management are needed to restore and maintain these ecosystems in a productive and sustainable state. Research conducted in New Mexico on the Rio Puerco Resource Area and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge has shown that biosolids (municipal sewage sludge) application to semiarid grasslands can increase soil nutrient availability, increase plant cover and productivity, and decrease surface runoff and soil erosion without harming environmental quality.

  20. Processing biosolids for market value

    SciTech Connect

    Columbo, J.; Nelson, J.

    1994-09-01

    Until recently, publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) focused on complying with liquid effluent discharge requirements. A distant, secondary emphasis was placed on managing sludge, the other product of the wastewater treatment process. Consequently, the quality of municipal wastewater solids, as well as the cost-effectiveness of solids management, generally suffered.By adopting certain strategies commonly found in the manufacturing industry, municipalities can ensure proper and efficient biosolids production.

  1. Bacterial populations within copper mine tailings: long-term effects of amendment with Class A biosolids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluates the effect of surface application of dried Class A biosolids on microbial populations within copper mine tailings. Methods and Results: Mine tailing sites were established at ASARCO Mission Mine close to Sahuarita, Arizona. Site 1 (Dec. 1998) was amended with 248 tons ha-1 of C...

  2. EFFECTS OF COFIRING LIGNIN AND BIOSOLIDS WITH COAL ON FIRESIDE PERFORMANCE AND COMBUSTION PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin C. Galbreath

    2002-08-01

    Lignin, derived from municipal solid waste and biosolid feedstocks using Masada Resource Group's patented CES OxyNol{trademark} process, and acidified biosolids were evaluated as supplemental fuels with coal for producing steam and electricity. Tests were conducted in a pilot-scale (550,000-Btu/hr [580-MJ/hr]) combustion system to evaluate the effects of coal characteristics, blend mixture (on a dry wt% basis) and furnace exit gas temperature (FEGT) on boiler heat-exchange surface slagging and fouling, NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} production, fly ash characteristics, and combustion efficiency. The effects of blending lignin and acidified biosolids with coal on fuel handling and pulverization characteristics were also addressed. An 80 wt% Colorado--20 wt% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal blend from the Tennessee Valley Authority Colbert Steam Plant, hereafter referred to as the Colbert coal, and a bituminous Pittsburgh No. 8 coal were tested. The lignin and acidified biosolids were characterized by possessing higher moisture content and lower carbon, hydrogen, and heating values relative to the coals. Ash contents of the fuels were similar. The lignin also possessed higher concentrations of TiO{sub 2}, CaO, and SO{sub 3} and lower concentrations of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, K{sub 2}O, and N relative to the coals. The sulfur content of lignin could be reduced through a more thorough washing and drying of the lignin in an efficient commercial-scale dewatering device. Acidified biosolids were distinguished by higher concentrations of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and MgO and lower SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} relative to the other fuels. Trace element concentrations, especially for Cr, Pb, Hg, and Ni, were generally greater in the lignin and acidified biosolid fuels relative to the Colbert coal. Maximum trace element emission factors were calculated for 95:5 Colbert coal--lignin and 90:5:5 Colbert coal--lignin--acidified biosolid blends and compared to U

  3. Using data mining to predict soil quality after application of biosolids in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Cortet, Jérôme; Kocev, Dragi; Ducobu, Caroline; Džeroski, Sašo; Debeljak, Marko; Schwartz, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The amount of biosolids recycled in agriculture has steadily increased during the last decades. However, few models are available to predict the accompanying risks, mainly due to the presence of trace element and organic contaminants, and benefits for soil fertility of their application. This paper deals with using data mining to assess the benefits and risks of biosolids application in agriculture. The analyzed data come from a 10-yr field experiment in northeast France focusing on the effects of biosolid application and mineral fertilization on soil fertility and contamination. Biosolids were applied at agriculturally recommended rates. Biosolids had a significant effect on soil fertility, causing in particular a persistent increase in plant-available phosphorus (P) relative to plots receiving mineral fertilizer. However, soil fertility at seeding and crop management method had greater effects than biosolid application on soil fertility at harvest, especially soil nitrogen (N) content. Levels of trace elements and organic contaminants in soils remained below legal threshold values. Levels of extractable metals correlated more strongly than total metal levels with other factors. Levels of organic contaminants, particularly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were linked to total metal levels in biosolids and treated soil. This study confirmed that biosolid application at rates recommended for agriculture is a safe option for increasing soil fertility. However, the quality of the biosolids selected has to be taken into account. The results also indicate the power of data mining in examining links between parameters in complex data sets.

  4. Sustainable approaches for minimizing biosolids production and maximizing reuse options in sludge management: A review.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sung Hee; Dello Monaco, Francesca; Antmann, Eric; Chorath, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Sludge generation during wastewater treatment is inevitable even with proper management and treatment. Yet proper handling and disposal of sludge are still challenging in terms of treatment cost, presence of recalcitrant contaminants of concern, sanitary issues, and public acceptance. Conventional disposal methods (i.e. landfilling, incineration) have created concerns in terms of legislative restrictions and community perception, incentivizing consideration of substitute sludge management options. Furthermore, with proper treatment, biosolids from sludge, rich in organic materials and nutrients, could be utilizable as fertilizer. Despite the challenges of dealing with sludge, no review has dealt with integrated source reduction and reuse as the best sustainable management practices for sludge treatment. In this review, we present two main approaches as potentially sustainable controls: (i) pretreatment for minimizing extensive sludge treatment, and (ii) recycling and reuse of residual sludge. Drawing on these approaches, we also suggest strategies for efficient pretreatment mechanisms and residual reuse, presenting ideas for prospective future research.

  5. Chemical Characterization of Phosphorus in Soils Amended with Biosolids and DWTRs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The concept of co-application of biosolids and drinking water treatment residues (DWTRs) represents an environmentally sustainable and economically sound strategy for the management of municipal solid wastes. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of reducing water-soluble P in biosolids-amended ...

  6. Effect of biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban on the colonization of plant roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Prosser, R S; Lissemore, L; Shahmohamadloo, R S; Sibley, P K

    2015-03-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form a symbiotic relationship with the majority of crop plants. AMF provide plants with nutrients (e.g., P), modulate the effect of metal and pathogen exposure, and increase tolerance to moisture stress. The benefits of AMF to plant growth make them important to the development of sustainable agriculture. The land application of biosolids is becoming an increasingly common practice in sustainable agriculture, as a source of nutrients. However, biosolids have been found to contain numerous pharmaceutical and personal care products including antimicrobial chemicals such as triclosan and triclocarban. The potential risks that these two compounds may pose to plant-AMF interactions are poorly understood. The current study investigated whether biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban affect the colonization of the roots of lettuce and corn plants by AMF. Plants were grown in soil amended with biosolids that contained increasing concentrations of triclosan (0 to 307 μg/g dw) or triclocarban (0 to 304 μg/g dw). A relationship between the concentration of triclosan or triclocarban and colonization of plants roots by AMF was not observed. The presence of biosolids did not have a significant (p>0.05) effect on percent colonization of corn roots but had a significant, positive effect (p<0.05) on lettuce roots. Biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban did not inhibit the colonization of crop plant roots by AMF. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Biosolids, Crop, and Ground-Water Data for a Biosolids-Application Area Near Deer Trail, Colorado, 2004 Through 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; Smith, David B.; Crock, James G.

    2009-01-01

    From 2004 through 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored the chemical composition of biosolids, crops, dust, and ground water related to biosolids applications near Deer Trail, Colorado, in cooperation with the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District. This monitoring effort was a continuation of the monitoring program begun in 1999 in cooperation with the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District and the North Kiowa Bijou Groundwater Management District. The monitoring program addresses concerns from the public about the chemical effects from applications of biosolids to farmland in the Deer Trail, Colorado, area. This report presents chemical data from 2004 through 2006 for biosolids, crops, and alluvial and bedrock ground water. The chemical data include the constituents of highest concern to the public (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, zinc, and plutonium) in addition to many other constituents. The ground-water section also includes climate and water-level data.

  8. Biosolids, crop, and groundwater data for a biosolids-application area near Deer Trail, Colorado, 2007 and 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; Smith, David B.; Crock, James G.

    2011-01-01

    During 2007 and 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored the chemical composition of biosolids, crops, and groundwater related to biosolids applications near Deer Trail, Colorado, in cooperation with the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District. This monitoring effort was a continuation of the monitoring program begun in 1999 in cooperation with the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District and the North Kiowa Bijou Groundwater Management District. The monitoring program addressed concerns from the public about potential chemical effects from applications of biosolids to farmland in the area near Deer Trail, Colo. This report presents chemical data from 2007 and 2008 for biosolids, crops, and alluvial and bedrock groundwater. The chemical data include the constituents of highest concern to the public (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, zinc, and plutonium) in addition to many other constituents. The groundwater section also includes data for precipitation, air temperature, and depth to groundwater at various groundwater-monitoring sites.

  9. Biosolids, crop, and groundwater data for a biosolids-application area near Deer Trail, Colorado, 2009 and 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; Smith, David B.; Crock, James G.

    2012-01-01

    During 2009 and 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored the chemical composition of biosolids, crops, and groundwater related to biosolids applications near Deer Trail, Colorado, in cooperation with the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District. This monitoring effort was a continuation of the monitoring program begun in 1999 in cooperation with the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District and the North Kiowa Bijou Groundwater Management District. The monitoring program addressed concerns from the public about potential chemical effects from applications of biosolids to farmland in the area near Deer Trail, Colo. This report presents chemical data from 2009 and 2010 for biosolids, crops, and alluvial and bedrock groundwater. The chemical data include the constituents of highest concern to the public (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, zinc, and plutonium) in addition to many other constituents. The groundwater section also includes data for precipitation, air temperature, and depth to groundwater at various groundwater-monitoring sites.

  10. Effects of biosolids and compost amendment on chemistry of soils contaminated with copper from mining activities.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Virinder; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Datta, Rupali

    2016-03-01

    Several million metric tons of mining wastes, called stamp sands, were generated in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan during extensive copper (Cu) mining activities in the past. These materials, containing large amounts of Cu, were discharged into various offshoots of Lake Superior. Due to evidences of Cu toxicity on aquatic organisms, in due course, the materials were dredged and dumped on lake shores, thus converting these areas into vast, fallow lands. Erosion of these Cu-contaminated stamp sands back to the lakes is severely affecting aquatic life. A lack of uniform vegetation cover on stamp sands is facilitating this erosion. Understanding the fact that unless the stamp sands are fertilized to the point of sustaining vegetation growth, the problem with erosion and water quality degradation will continue, amending the stamp sands with locally available biosolids and composts, was considered. The purpose of the reported study was to assess potential effects of such organic fertilizer amendments on soil quality. As the first step of a combined laboratory and greenhouse study, a 2-month-long incubation experiment was performed to investigate the effects of biosolids and compost addition on the soil nutrient profile of stamp sands and organic matter content. Results showed that both biosolids and compost amendments resulted in significant increase in nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations and organic matter contents of stamp sands. Sequential extraction data demonstrated that Cu was mostly present as bound forms in stamp sands, and there was no significant increase in the plant available fraction of Cu because of fertilizer application.

  11. Effects of unseeded areas on species richness of coal mines reclaimed with municipal biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    Halofsky, J.E.; McCormick, L.H.

    2005-12-01

    Land application of municipal biosolids on coal mine spoils can benefit vegetation establishment in mine reclamation. However, the application of biosolids leads to domination by early-successional species, such as grasses, and low establishment of woody and volunteer species, thus reducing potential for forestry as a postmining land use. In this experiment, tree seedlings were planted in strips (0.6-, 1-, and 4-m wide) that were not seeded with grasses, and the effects of unseeded strip width on seedling growth and species richness were assessed. Planted seedling mortality was high; therefore, the effect of unseeded strip width on seedling growth could not be determined. However, it was found that natural plant invasion and species richness were highest in the 4-m unseeded strips. The practice of leaving 4-m-wide unseeded strips in mine reclamation with biosolids in the eastern United States, along with the improvement of tree seedling planting practices and planting stock, would help promote a more species-rich plant community that could be utilized for forestry or a variety of other postmining land uses.

  12. EFFECT OF BIOSOLIDS APPLICATION ON SOIL METAL CHEMISTRY AND PHYTOAVAILABILITY (LAKE BUENA VISTA, FL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Addition of biosolids to soils increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) and alters the chemistry and phytoavailability of these metals. This alteration in phytoavailability associated with biosolids amended soil was recognized and utilized ...

  13. EFFECT OF BIOSOLIDS ON PHYTOAVAILABILITY OF CD IN LONG-TERM AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium sorption and desorption experiments were conducted on different fractions of soils amended with different biosolids with varying chemical properties and unamended soil (control). Biosolids addition increased the slope of the Cd sorption isotherms compared to the control s...

  14. EFFECT OF BIOSOLIDS APPLICATION ON SOIL METAL CHEMISTRY AND PHYTOAVAILABILITY (LAKE BUENA VISTA, FL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Addition of biosolids to soils increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) and alters the chemistry and phytoavailability of these metals. This alteration in phytoavailability associated with biosolids amended soil was recognized and utilized ...

  15. EFFECT OF BIOSOLIDS ON PHYTOAVAILABILITY OF CD IN LONG-TERM AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cadmium sorption and desorption experiments were conducted on different fractions of soils amended with different biosolids with varying chemical properties and unamended soil (control). Biosolids addition increased the slope of the Cd sorption isotherms compared to the control s...

  16. Managing biosolids runoff phosphorus using buffer strips enhanced with drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wagner, D J; Elliott, H A; Brandt, R C; Jaiswal, D

    2008-01-01

    Vegetated buffers strips typically have limited ability to reduce delivery of dissolved phosphorus (DP) from agricultural fields to surface waters. A field study was conducted to evaluate the ability of buffer strips enhanced with drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) to control runoff P losses from surface-applied biosolids characterized by high water-extractable P (4 g kg(-)(1)). Simulated rainfall (62.4 mm h(-1)) was applied to grassed plots (3 m x 10.7 m including a 2.67 m downslope buffer) surface-amended with biosolids at 102 kg P ha(-1) until 30 min of runoff was collected. With buffer strips top-dressed with WTR (20 Mg ha(-1)), runoff total P (TP = 2.5 mg L(-1)) and total DP (TDP = 1.9 mg L(-1)) were not statistically lower (alpha = 0.05) compared to plots with unamended grass buffers (TP = 2.7 mg L(-1); TDP = 2.6 mg L(-1)). Although the applied WTR had excess capacity (Langmuir P maxima of 25 g P kg(-1)) to sorb all runoff P, kinetic experiments suggest that sheet flow travel time across the buffers ( approximately 30 s) was insufficient for significant P reduction. Effective interception of dissolved P in runoff water by WTR-enhanced buffer strips requires rapid P sorption kinetics and hydrologic flow behavior ensuring sufficient runoff residence time and WTR contact in the buffer. Substantial phosphate-adsorbent contact opportunity may be more easily achieved by incorporating WTRs into P-enriched soils or blending WTRs with applied P sources.

  17. Toxicity of biosolids-derived triclosan and triclocarban to six crop species.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Ryan S; Lissemore, Linda; Solomon, Keith R; Sibley, Paul K

    2014-08-01

    Biosolids are an important source of nutrients and organic matter, which are necessary for the productive cultivation of crop plants. Biosolids have been found to contain the personal care products triclosan and triclocarban at high concentrations relative to other pharmaceuticals and personal care products. The present study investigates whether exposure of 6 plant species (radish, carrot, soybean, lettuce, spring wheat, and corn) to triclosan or triclocarban derived from biosolids has an adverse effect on seed emergence and/or plant growth parameters. Plants were grown in soil amended with biosolids at a realistic agronomic rate. Biosolids were spiked with triclosan or triclocarban to produce increasing environmentally relevant exposures. The concentration of triclosan and triclocarban in biosolids-amended soil declined by up to 97% and 57%, respectively, over the course of the experiments. Amendment with biosolids had a positive effect on the majority of growth parameters in radish, carrot, soybean, lettuce, and wheat plants. No consistent triclosan- or triclocarban-dependent trends in seed emergence and plant growth parameters were observed in 5 of 6 plant species. A significant negative trend in shoot mass was observed for lettuce plants exposed to increasing concentrations of triclocarban (p<0.001). If best management practices are followed for biosolids amendment, triclosan and triclocarban pose a negligible risk to seed emergence and growth of crop plants.

  18. Slow pyrolysis enhances the recovery and reuse of phosphorus and reduces metal leaching from biosolids.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David A; Cole, Andrew J; Whelan, Anna; de Nys, Rocky; Paul, Nicholas A

    2017-03-16

    In this study, biochar is produced from biosolids with and without alum at a range of temperatures and simulated oxidative aging of the biochars is conducted to quantify the long-term leaching of P and metals. While biosolids containing alum had negligible amounts of plant-available P, after pyrolysis >90% of the P became immediately available for plant growth. When biosolids with no alum were converted into biochar there was a small increase in the availability of P but a larger pool was available after oxidation. Both of the biosolids leached significant amounts of metals after oxidation. In contrast, the biochars had a very low available metal content and this did not increase with oxidation, demonstrating a stable metal content. Pyrolysis is an effective waste management strategy for biosolids that can simultaneously reduce the leaching of metals and increase the efficiency of recycling of P for beneficial re-use.

  19. Evaluation Of Airborne Endotoxin Concentrations Associated With Management Of Crop Grown On Applied Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public health concerns have been expressed regarding inhalation exposure associated with the application of biosolids on cropland, which is due to the potential aerosolization of microorganisms, cell wall products, volatile chemicals, and nuisance odors. Endotoxin is a component...

  20. Evaluation Of Airborne Endotoxin Concentrations Associated With Management Of Crop Grown On Applied Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public health concerns have been expressed regarding inhalation exposure associated with the application of biosolids on cropland, which is due to the potential aerosolization of microorganisms, cell wall products, volatile chemicals, and nuisance odors. Endotoxin is a component...

  1. EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASE AGENTS AND ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH THE MANAGEMENT OF TREATED SLUDGES (BIOSOLIDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation looks at the pathogenic microorganisms present in municipal sludges and the public's concerns with the land application of sludges/biosolids. Methods for reducing pathogens in sludge; methods for reducing the vector attractiveness of sludge; and issues associate...

  2. Predicting pathogen transport and risk of infection from land-applied biosolids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, M. S.; Teng, J.; Kumar, A.; Gurian, P.

    2011-12-01

    Biosolids have been recycled as fertilizer to sustainably improve and maintain productive soils and to stimulate plant growth for over forty years, but may contain low levels of microbial pathogens. The Spreadsheet Microbial Assessment of Risk: Tool for Biosolids ("SMART Biosolids") is an environmental transport, exposure and risk model that compiles knowledge on the occurrence, environmental dispersion and attenuation of biosolids-associated pathogens to estimate microbial risk from biosolids land application. The SMART Biosolids model calculates environmental pathogen concentrations and assesses risk associated with exposure to pathogens from land-applied biosolids through five pathways: 1) inhalation of aerosols from land application sites, 2) consumption of groundwater contaminated by land-applied biosolids, 3) direct ingestion of biosolids-amended soils, 4) ingestion of plants contaminated by land-applied biosolids, and 5) consumption of surface water contaminated by runoff from a land application site. The SMART Biosolids model can be applied under a variety of scenarios, thereby providing insight into effective management practices. This study presents example results of the SMART Biosolids model, focusing on the groundwater and surface water pathways, following biosolids application to a typical site in Michigan. Volumes of infiltration and surface water runoff are calculated following a 100-year storm event. Pathogen transport and attenuation through the subsurface and via surface runoff are modeled, and pathogen concentrations in a downstream well and an adjacent pond are calculated. Risks are calculated for residents of nearby properties. For a 100-year storm event occurring immediately after biosolids application, the surface water pathway produces risks that may be of some concern, but best estimates do not exceed the bounds of what has been considered acceptable risk for recreational water use (Table 1); groundwater risks are very uncertain and at the

  3. Comparison of Overall Resource Consumption of Biosolids Management System Processes Using Exergetic Life Cycle Assessment.

    PubMed

    Alanya, Sevda; Dewulf, Jo; Duran, Metin

    2015-08-18

    This study focused on the evaluation of biosolids management systems (BMS) from a natural resource consumption point of view. Additionally, the environmental impact of the facilities was benchmarked using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to provide a comprehensive assessment. This is the first study to apply a Cumulative Exergy Extraction from the Natural Environment (CEENE) method for an in-depth resource use assessment of BMS where two full-scale BMS and seven system variations were analyzed. CEENE allows better system evaluation and understanding of how much benefit is achievable from the products generated by BMS, which have valorization potential. LCA results showed that environmental burden is mostly from the intense electricity consumption. The CEENE analysis further revealed that the environmental burden is due to the high consumption of fossil and nuclear-based natural resources. Using Cumulative Degree of Perfection, higher resource-use efficiency, 53%, was observed in the PTA-2 where alkaline stabilization rather than anaerobic digestion is employed. However, an anaerobic digestion process is favorable over alkaline stabilization, with 35% lower overall natural resource use. The most significant reduction of the resource footprint occurred when the output biogas was valorized in a combined heat and power system.

  4. Effects of co-application of biosolids and water treatment residuals on corn growth and bioavailable phosphorus and aluminum in alkaline soils in egypt.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, A M; Elkhatib, E A; Fathi, N O; Lin, Z-Q

    2009-01-01

    The co-application of biosolids and water treatment residuals (WTRs) has been previously trialed to reduce excessive bioavailable P in the soil treated with biosolids. However, uncertainty still exists regarding the environmental consequences of the co-application of biosolids and WTRs, especially in alkaline soils in Egypt or the Middle East region. A greenhouse pot study was conducted with Egyptian alkaline soils to (i) quantify the effects of co-application of biosolids and drinking WTRs on biomass production of corn (Zea mays L. cultivar single hybrid 10), (ii) determine the co-application effects on Olsen-P and KCl-extractable Al in relation to their accumulation in plant tissues, and (iii) optimize the co-application ratio of biosolids to WTRs for the best yield and effective reduction of soil bioavailable P. The results show that, among the studied soils treated with 1% biosolids along with various rates of WTRs, the corn yield increased significantly (P < 0.01) with increasing WTR application rate from 0 to 3% (w/w), but decreased at 4% application rate. The corn yield also significantly correlated with soil water holding capacity that increased with the addition of WTRs. Phosphorus uptake by plants significantly (P < 0.01) increased when the biosolid application rate was increased from 1 to 3% in the three studied soils that were treated with 1, 2, or 3% WTRs. The application of 4% WTRs in the biosolid-amended soils resulted in a significant reduction in soil Olsen-P values, but without having observable phytotoxicity of metals (such as Al) to corn during the growth period. The effective co-application ratio of biosolids to WTRs, for increasing corn yield and minimizing the potential for bioavailable P in runoff, was approximately 1:1 at the application rate of 3% biosolids and 4% WTRs in the alkaline soils.

  5. Effects of surface applications of biosolids on groundwater quality and trace-element concentrations in crops near Deer Trail, Colorado, 2004-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; Crock, James G.; Smith, David B.; Furlong, Edward T.; Hageman, Philip L.; Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Metro Wastewater Reclamation District (Metro District), studied biosolids composition and the effects of biosolids applications on groundwater quality and trace-element concentrations in crops of the Metro District properties near Deer Trail, Colorado, during 2004 through 2010. Priority parameters for each monitoring component included the nine trace elements regulated by Colorado for biosolids (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc); other constituents also were analyzed. All concentrations for the priority parameters in monthly biosolids samples were less than Colorado regulatory limits, and the concentrations were relatively consistent. Biosolids likely were the largest source of nitrogen and phosphorus on the Metro District properties. Plutonium isotopes were not detected in the biosolids, but many organic wastewater compounds (organic wastewater compounds: wastewater indicators, pharmaceuticals, and hormones) were detected in substantial concentrations relative to minimum reporting levels and various surface-water concentrations. Bismuth, copper, mercury, nitrogen, phosphorus, silver, biogenic sterols, detergent degradates, disinfectants, fire retardants, fragrances, pharmaceuticals, and plasticizers would be the most likely biosolids signature to indicate the presence of Metro District biosolids in soil or streambed sediment from the study area. Antimony, cadmium, cobalt, copper, molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen, phosphorus, selenium, tungsten, vanadium, zinc, detergent degradates, disinfectants, fire retardants, fragrances, pharmaceuticals or their degradates, and plasticizers would be the most likely biosolids signature for groundwater and surface water in the study area. More biosolids-signature components detected and larger concentration differences from untreated materials, baseline, and blank samples indicate more evidence of biosolids presence or effects

  6. Acoustic Evaluation of Thinning and Biosolid Fertilization Effects on Wood Quality of a Douglas-fir stand

    Treesearch

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Steve Verrill; Eini Lowell; Jamie Barbour

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the potential of using a time-of-flight (TOF) acoustic wave method to evaluate thinning and biosolid fertilization effects on acoustic velocity of trees and modulus of elasticity (MOE) of structural lumber in a 76-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii, (Mirb., Franco)) experimental stand. The stand consisted of four...

  7. The effect of lignite on nitrogen mobility in a low-fertility soil amended with biosolids and urea.

    PubMed

    Paramashivam, Dharini; Clough, Tim J; Carlton, Anna; Gough, Kelsi; Dickinson, Nicholas; Horswell, Jacqui; Sherlock, Robert R; Clucas, Lynne; Robinson, Brett H

    2016-02-01

    Lignite has been proposed as a soil amendment that reduces nitrate (NO3(-)) leaching from soil. Our objective was to determine the effect of lignite on nitrogen (N) fluxes from soil amended with biosolids or urea. The effect of lignite on plant yield and elemental composition was also determined. Batch sorption and column leaching experiments were followed by a lysimeter trial where a low fertility soil was amended with biosolids (400 kg N/ha equivalent) and urea (200 kg N/ha equivalent). Treatments were replicated three times, with and without lignite addition (20 t/ha equivalent). Lignite did not reduce NO3(-) leaching from soils amended with either biosolids or urea. While lignite decreased NO3(-) leaching from an unamended soil, the magnitude of this effect was not significant in an agricultural context. Furthermore, lignite increased cumulative N2O production from soils receiving urea by 90%. Lignite lessened the beneficial growth effects of adding biosolids or urea to soil. Further work could investigate whether coating urea granules with lignite may produce meaningful environmental benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Biosolids application to no-till dryland agroecosytems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dryland agroecosystems are generally ideal environments for recycling biosolids. However, what is the efficacy of biosolids addition to a no-till dryland management agroecosystem? From 2000 to 2010, we studied application of biosolids from the Littleton/Englewood, CO Wastewater Treatment Plant ver...

  9. Comparative evaluation of four biosolids formulations on the effects of triclosan on plant-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal interactions in three crop species.

    PubMed

    Shahmohamadloo, René S; Lissemore, Linda; Prosser, Ryan S; Sibley, Paul K

    2017-04-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial ingredient found in personal care products that include soaps, shampoos, and other sanitation goods. TCS is moderately hydrophobic and has been shown to be resistant to wastewater treatment and thus accumulates in biosolids. Biosolids are commonly applied to agricultural land but little is known about the risk that TCS in biosolids poses to soil fungal communities following land application. The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of TCS on the symbiotic colonization of roots in three field crops (soybean, corn, and spring wheat) by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in soils amended with four different types of biosolids (liquid, dewatered, composted, alkaline and hydrolyzed). Crops were grown to maturity in pot-exposure systems under controlled temperature settings. Biosolids treatments were spiked with concentrations of TCS typically found in amended fields. Analysis of AMF colonization by hyphae, and the production of arbuscules and vesicles indicated no significant TCS concentration-dependent effects in the three plant species for any of the biosolids formulations. The data indicate that TCS present in municipal biosolids applied to agricultural lands likely poses minimal risks to AMF or its establishment of a symbiotic relationship in the three species tested.

  10. Phosphorous Speciation in WTR-treated Biosolids Using XANES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. Q.; Huff, D.; Lin, Z.-Q.

    2009-04-01

    The concept of co-application of biosolids and drinking water treatment residues (DWTRs) represents an environmentally sustainable and economically sound strategy for the management of municipal solid wastes. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of reducing water-soluble P in biosolids-amended agricultural soil by the addition of DWTRs. Results showed that total P in soil leachate was significantly reduced during the initial 42-days of a 200-day greenhouse study when biosolids (50 g kg-1) were applied along with DWTRs (40 g kg-1). Particulate P was the dominant fraction of P in the soil leachate, which decreases with increasing DWTR application rate. The application of DWTRs does not significantly decrease the growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The primary P chemical composition in biosolids include cupper phytate [Cu(IP6)6], barium phytate [Ba6IP6], and cupper phosphate [Cu3(PO4)2]. The addition of DWTRs to biosolids alternated the P speciation, and the P speciation change became significant with increasing the incubation time of the mixture of biosolids and DWTRs. The chemical component of Cu3(PO4)2 became non significant (<5%) with the addition of DWTRs. During the 14-day incubation time period, the proportion of P that was adsorbed on amorphous Fe(OH)3 increased substantially from 8 to 46% and Ba6IP6 increased steadily from 30 to 50%, while the proportion of Cu(IP6)6 decreased significantly from 53 to 5%. The amorphous Fe(OH)3-adsorbed P and Ba6IP6 formed the dominant P chemical components in the mixture of biosolids and DWTRs.

  11. Fractionation and mobility of phosphorus in a sandy forest soil amended with biosolids.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingjun; Wang, Hailong; Kimberley, Mark O; Beecroft, Katie; Magesan, Guna N; Hu, Chengxiao

    2007-11-01

    significantly higher in the high biosolids treatment than in the control. Mass balance calculation indicated that most P applied with biosolids was retained by the top soil (0-25 cm). The standard biosolids treatment (equivalent to 300 kg N ha(-1) applied every three years) had no significant effect on concentrations of TP, Mehlich 3 P and Olsen P, and P fractions in soil. The results indicate that the soil had the capacity to retain most biosolids-derived P, and there was a minimal risk of P losses via leaching in the medium term in the sandy forest soil because of the repeated biosolids application, particularly at the standard rate. Application to low-fertility forest land can be used as an environmentally friendly option for biosolids management. When biosolids are applied at a rate to meet the N requirement of the tree crop, it can take a very long time before the forest soil is saturated with P. However, when a biosolids product contains high concentrations of P and is applied at a high rate, the forest ecosystem may not have the capacity to retain all P applied with biosolids in the long term.

  12. Effect of biosolids on a loblolly pine plantation forest in the Virginia piedmont

    Treesearch

    Eduardo C. Arellano; Thomas R. Fox

    2010-01-01

    Forests in the piedmont of VA may be a good alternative location for land application of biosolids. The objectives of this study were to quantify nutrient availability and tree growth in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation following the application of different biosolids types, at different rates, and at two different times. The study was...

  13. Biosolids inhibit bioavailability and plant uptake of triclosan and triclocarban.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuguo; Wu, Xiaoqin; Ye, Qingfu; Ernst, Fredrick; Gan, Jay

    2016-10-01

    Biosolids from wastewater treatment are primarily disposed of via land applications, where numerous pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) may contaminate food crops and pose a human exposure risk. Biosolids are rich in organic carbon and addition of biosolids can increase the sorption of certain PPCPs in soil, decreasing their bioavailability. This study tested the hypothesis that the relative plant uptake of PPCPs decreases with increasing biosolids amendment. Accumulation of triclosan and triclocarban was measured in roots of radish and carrot grown in soils with or without biosolids. Addition of biosolids significantly prolonged the persistence of triclosan in soil. When expressed in bioaccumulation factor (BCF), accumulation of triclosan drastically decreased in biosolids-amended soils, while the effect was limited for triclocarban. Compared to the unamended soil, amending biosolids at 2% (w/w) decreased BCF of triclosan in the edible tissues of radish and carrot by 85.4 and 89.3%, respectively. Measurement using a thin-film passive sampler provided direct evidence showing that the availability of triclosan greatly decreased in biosolids-amended soils. Partial correlation analysis using data from this and published studies validated that biosolids decreased plant uptake primarily by increasing soil organic carbon content and subsequently sorption. Therefore, contamination of food crops by biosolids-borne contaminants does not linearly depend on biosolids use rates. This finding bears significant implications in the overall risk evaluation of biosolids-borne contaminants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biosolids applied to agricultural land: Influence on structural and functional endpoints of soil fauna on a short- and long-term scale.

    PubMed

    Coors, Anja; Edwards, Mark; Lorenz, Pascale; Römbke, Jörg; Schmelz, Rüdiger M; Topp, Edward; Waszak, Karolina; Wilkes, Graham; Lapen, David R

    2016-08-15

    Biosolids have well-documented crop and soil benefits similar to other sources of organic amendment, but there is environmental concern due to biosolids-associated pollutants. The present study investigated two field sites that had received biosolids at commercial-scale rates in parallel to associated field sections which were managed similarly but without receiving biosolids (controls). The investigated endpoints were abundance and diversity of soil organisms (nematodes, enchytraeids and earthworms) and soil fauna feeding activity as measured by the bait lamina assay. Repeated sampling of one of the field sites following the only biosolids application demonstrated an enrichment effect typical for organic amendments, which was mostly exhausted after 44months. After an initial suppression, the proportion of free-living plant-parasitic nematodes tended to increase in the biosolids-amended soil over time. Yet, none of the endpoints at this site indicated significant negative effects resulting from the biosolids until 44months post application. In contrast to the repeatedly tilled first field site, the second one was left fallow after three biosolids applications, and was sampled 96months post last application. It was only at this field site that potential evidence for a long-term impact of biosolids was detected with regard to two endpoints: earthworm abundance and structure of the nematode assemblage. Agricultural management and correlation with abiotic soil parameters explained the observed difference in earthworm abundance. Yet, the development of a highly structured and mature nematode assemblage at the control but not at the biosolids-amended section of this fallow field could not be explained by such correlations nor by soil metal concentrations. Overall, the present study found only weak evidence for negative long-term impacts of biosolids applied at commercial rates on soil fauna. High-level community parameters such as the nematode structure index (SI

  15. EFFECTS OF STORAGE ON STABILITY AND PATHOGEN REDUCTION IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Storage can be an effective means of stabilizing small quantities of wastewater sludge. This paper summarizes the performance of two laboratory-scale sludge storage units and that of four full-scale tanks sampled at four treatment facilities in eastern Nebraska. The bench-scale u...

  16. EFFECTS OF STORAGE ON STABILITY AND PATHOGEN REDUCTION IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Storage can be an effective means of stabilizing small quantities of wastewater sludge. This paper summarizes the performance of two laboratory-scale sludge storage units and that of four full-scale tanks sampled at four treatment facilities in eastern Nebraska. The bench-scale u...

  17. Emergy Analysis for the Sustainable Utilization of Biosolids ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This contribution describes the application of an emergy-based methodology for comparing two management alternatives of biosolids produced in a wastewater treatment plant. The current management practice of using biosolids as soil fertilizers was evaluated and compared to another alternative, the recovery of energy from the biosolid gasification process. This emergy assessment and comparison approach identifies more sustainable processes which achieve economic and social benefits with a minimal environmental impact. In addition, emergy-based sustainability indicators and the GREENSCOPE methodology were used to compare the two biosolid management alternatives. According to the sustainability assessment results, the energy production from biosolid gasification is energetically profitable, economically viable, and environmentally suitable. Furthermore, it was found that the current use of biosolids as soil fertilizer does not generate any considerable environmental stress, has the potential to achieve more economic benefits, and a post-processing of biosolids prior to its use as soil fertilizer improves its sustainability performance. In conclusion, this emergy analysis provides a sustainability assessment of both alternatives of biosolid management and helps decision-makers to identify opportunities for improvement during the current process of biosolid management. This work aims to identify the best option for the use and management of biosolids generated in a wa

  18. Biosolids use for reclaiming fluvial mine tailings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of biosolids and lime on reclamation of a heavily contaminated metal site. Within the Superfund area near Leadville, CO, biosolids and lime were amended (1998) to a 1 ha site at rates of 240 Mg per ha each. In 2006, soil samples were collected on a ...

  19. Emergy Analysis for the Sustainable Utilization of Biosolids Generated in a Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant

    EPA Science Inventory

    This contribution describes the application of an emergy-based methodology for comparing two management alternatives of biosolids produced in a wastewater treatment plant. The current management practice of using biosolids as soil fertilizers was evaluated and compared to another...

  20. Infrequent composted biosolids applications affect semi-arid grassland soils and vegetation.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, J A; Barbarick, K A; Paschke, M W; Brobst, R B

    2010-05-01

    Monitoring of repeated composted biosolids applications is necessary for improving beneficial reuse program management strategies, because materials will likely be reapplied to the same site at a future point in time. A field trial evaluated a single and a repeated composted biosolids application in terms of long-term (13-14 years) and short-term (2-3 years) effects, respectively, on soil chemistry and plant community in a Colorado semi-arid grassland. Six composted biosolids rates (0, 2.5, 5, 10, 21, 30 Mg ha(-1)) were surface applied in a split-plot design study with treatment (increasing compost rates) as the main factor and co-application time (1991, or 1991 and 2002) as the split factor applications. Short- and long-term treatment effects were evident in 2004 and 2005 for soil 0-8 cm depth pH, EC, NO(3)-N, NH(4)-N, total N, and AB-DTPA soil Cd, Cu, Mo, Zn, P, and Ba. Soil organic matter increases were still evident 13 and 14 years following composted biosolids application. The repeated composted biosolids application increased soil NO(3)-N and NH(4)-N and decreased AB-DTPA extractable Ba as compared to the single composted biosolids application in 2004; differences between short- and long-term applications were less evident in 2005. Increasing biosolids rates resulted in increased native perennial grass cover in 2005. Plant tissue Cu, Mo, Zn, and P concentrations increased, while Ba content decreased depending on specific plant species and year. Overall, the lack of many significant negative effects suggests that short- or long-term composted biosolids application at the rates studied did not adversely affect this semi-arid grassland ecosystem.

  1. Bench and full-scale studies for odor control from lime stabilized biosolids: the effect of mixing on odor generation.

    PubMed

    Krach, Kenneth R; Li, Baikun; Burns, Benjamin R; Mangus, Jessica; Butler, Howard G; Cole, Charles

    2008-09-01

    Lime stabilization is a means to raise the pH of biosolids to meet specific pathogen requirements. Along with controlling the microbial growth, lime stabilization reduces the potential for offensive odors. Lime stabilized biosolids can be beneficially used as a soil amendment and also for land reclamation. However, if biosolids are not properly incorporated with the lime, there is a potential for microbial growth, which consequently leads to the emanation of offensive odors and growth of pathogens. Proper mixing was found to be an important factor for the reduction of offensive odors in biosolids treatment. To better understand the effects of mixing on odorous products, bench-scale and full-scale tests were conducted to assess the lime stabilization process and investigate mixing quality at a wastewater treatment plant to help reduce odors associated with known odorants. The results of 4-week laboratory bench-scale tests showed that mixing had the largest effect on odor. The hedonic tone test of the control samples with poor mixing showed a hedonic tone of -2.9 initially and then dropped to -7.3 on Day 29. The hedonic tone of the 3.5%, 7%, and 10% lime mixed biosolids had similar hedonic tones (-2.8 to -2.5) on Day 1 and slightly fluctuated over time and ended at -1.6 to -2.7 on Day 29, which was less odorous than the controls. The control sample with poor mixing showed a rapid pH drop from 12.1 on Day 1 to 8.4 on Day 7. The pH of the control sample was considerably lower than the mixed samples and ended up on Day 28 with a pH of 8.0. The pH of the 7% and 10% samples were relatively stable throughout the 4-week period with a pH still higher than 12 on Day 28. The biosolids with better mixing had a less offensive odor and weaker odor strength than the controls collected at the plant with poor mixing. The lime stabilization process in the wastewater treatment plant was modified in a full-scale study by prolonging the mixing time. The samples collected from the

  2. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sewage sludge and treated biosolids: effect factors and mass balance.

    PubMed

    Kim, M; Guerra, P; Theocharides, M; Barclay, K; Smyth, S A; Alaee, M

    2013-11-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants have been consistently detected in sewage sludge and treated biosolids. Two hundred and eighty-eight samples including primary sludge (PS), waste biological sludge (WBS) and treated biosolids from fifteen wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Canada were analyzed to investigate the factors affecting accumulation of PBDEs in sludge and biosolids. Factors examined included environmental/sewershed conditions and operational parameters of the WWTPs. PBDE concentrations in PS, WBS and treated biosolids were 230-82,000 ng/g, 530-8800 ng/g and 420-6000 ng/g, respectively; BDE-209,-99, and -47 were the predominant congeners. Concentrations were influenced by industrial input, leachate, and temperature. Several examinations including the measurement of BDE-202 indicated minimal debromination during wastewater treatment. Estimated solids-liquid distribution coefficients were moderately correlated to hydraulic retention time, solids loading rate, mixed liquor suspended solids, solids retention time, and removal of organic solids, indicating that PBDE partitioning to solids can be optimized by WWTPs' operational conditions. Solids treatment type strongly affected PBDE levels in biosolids: 1.5 times increase after solids digestion, therefore, digestion efficiency could be a potential factor for variability of PBDEs concentration. In contrast, alkaline treatment reduced PBDE concentrations in biosolids. Overall, mass balance approaches confirmed that PBDEs were removed from the liquid stream through partitioning to solids. Variability of PBDE levels in biosolids could result in different PBDEs burdens to agricultural land, and different exposure levels to soil organisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Typical azole biocides in biosolid-amended soils and plants following biosolid applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Feng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Ma, Yi-Bing; Lai, Hua-Jie; Chen, Feng; Pan, Chang-Gui

    2013-07-03

    Biosolid application on agricultural land may contaminate soils with various household chemicals and personal care products. This study investigated the occurrence and dissipation of typical azole biocides climbazole, clotrimazole, and miconazole in biosolid-amended soils as well as the uptake of these biocides by plants. The field trial includes two treatment groups: old groups with biosolid application at rates of 5, 10, 20, and 40 t/ha every year within 5 years, and new groups with only one biosolid application. The results showed that climbazole, clotrimazole, and miconazole were detected in biosolid-amended soils, but not detected in control soils. These biocides were not found in the crop plants collected from the trial plots. The dissipation half-lives for climbazole, clotrimazole, and miconazole under the field conditions were 175-179, 244, and 130-248 days, respectively. High biosolid application rates and repeated biosolid applications could lead to higher persistence of the biocides in the agricultural soils. An exposure model could effectively predict the residual concentrations of climbazole and miconazole in the biosolid-amended soils of the old treatments with different biosolid application rates. Thus, the field trial demonstrated high persistence of these three biocides in the soil environments.

  4. The effect of liming on antibacterial and hormone levels in wastewater biosolids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order to meet Class B quality requirements, wastewater biosolids are regulated for pathogen levels, metal concentrations, and vector attraction. One common method to decrease pathogen levels in these solids is to stabilize them by lime addition (CaO), which raises the pH and temperature of the m...

  5. Path analyses of grain P, Zn, Cu, Fe, and Ni in a biosolids-amended dryland wheat agroecosystem

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosolids land application is an effective means of recycling plant nutrients and is the preferred method of biosolids reuse by the US Environmental Protection Agency. One issue concerning biosolids application is the extent of the contribution of biosolids-borne plant nutrients to the overall crop...

  6. Production of Biomass Crops Using Biowastes on Low-Fertility Soil: 2. Effect of Biowastes on Nitrogen Transformation Processes.

    PubMed

    Esperschuetz, J; Bulman, S; Anderson, C; Lense, O; Horswell, J; Dickinson, N; Robinson, B H

    2016-11-01

    Increasing production of biowastes, particularly biosolids (sewage sludge), requires sustainable management strategies for their disposal. Biosolids can contain high concentrations of nutrients; hence, land application can have positive effects on plant growth and soil fertility, especially when applied to degraded soils. However, high rates of biosolids application may result in excessive nitrogen (N) leaching, which can be mitigated by blending biosolids with other biowastes, such as sawdust. We aimed to determine the effects of biosolids and sawdust on growth and N uptake by sorghum, rapeseed, and ryegrass as well as N losses via leaching. Plants were grown in a greenhouse over a 5-mo period in a low-fertility soil amended with biosolids (1250 kg N ha), biosolids-sawdust (0.5:1), or urea (200 kg N ha). Urea application increased biomass production of sorghum and ryegrass but proved insufficient for rapeseed on low-fertility soil. Biosolids application increased plant N concentrations in ryegrass and rapeseed and increased N uptake into the seeds of sorghum, increasing seed quality. Biosolids application did result in lower N leaching compared with urea, irrespective of plant species, and N leaching was unaffected by mixing the biosolids with sawdust. There was an indication of biological nitrification inhibition in the rhizosphere of sorghum. Rapeseed had similar growth and N uptake into biomass in biosolids and biosolids-sawdust treatments and hence was the most promising species with regard to recycling fresh sawdust in combination with high rates of biosolids on low-fertility soil.

  7. Biosolids, soil, crop, ground-water, and streambed-sediment data for a biosolids-application area near Deer Trail, Colorado, 2002-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; Smith, David B.; Crock, James G.

    2004-01-01

    In January 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey began an expanded monitoring program near Deer Trail, Colorado, in cooperation with the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District and the North Kiowa Bijou Groundwater Management District. Monitoring components were biosolids, soils, crops, ground water, and streambed sediments. The monitoring program addresses concerns from the public about chemical effects from applications of biosolids to farmland in the Deer Trail, Colorado, area. Constituents of primary concern to the public are arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, zinc, plutonium, and gross alpha and gross beta activity, and they are included for all monitoring components. This report presents chemical data from the fourth and fifth years of the monitoring program, 2002 through 2003, for biosolids, soils, crops, alluvial and bedrock ground water, and streambed sediment. The ground-water section also includes climate data and water levels. The chemical data include the constituents of highest concern to the public in addition to many other constituents.

  8. Metal uptake by corn grown on media treated with particle-size fractionated biosolids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiping; Chang, Andrew C; Wu, Laosheng; Zhang, Yongsong

    2008-03-15

    Particle-size of biosolids may affect plant uptake of heavy metals when the biosolids are land applied. In this study, corn (Zea mays L.) was grown on sand media treated with biosolids to study how particle-size of biosolids affected the plant uptake of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). Two biosolids, the Nu-Earth biosolids and the Los Angeles biosolids, of dissimilar surface morphology were utilized. The former exhibited a porous and spongy structure and had considerably greater specific surface area than that of the latter, which was granular and blocky. The specific surface area of the Los Angeles biosolids was inversely proportional to its particle-size, while that of Nu-Earth biosolids did not change significantly with particle-size. For each biosolid, the metal concentrations were not affected by particle sizes. The biomass yields of plants grown on the treated media increased as the biosolid particle-size decreased, indicating that plant uptake of nutrients from biosolids was dependent on interactions at the root-biosolids interface. The effect of particle-size on a metal's availability to plants was element-specific. The uptake rate of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Ni was correlated with the surface area of the particles, i.e., smaller particles having higher specific area provided greater root-biosolids contact and resulted in enhanced uptake of Cd and Zn and slightly less increased uptake of Cu and Ni. The particle morphology of biosolids had limited influence on the plant tissue concentrations of Cr and Pb. For both types of biosolids, total metal uptake increased as biosolid particle-size decreased. Our research indicates that biosolid particle-size distribution plays a deciding role in plant uptake of heavy metals when they are land applied.

  9. Restoring Ecosystem Function in Degraded Urban Soil Using Biosolids, Biosolids Blend, and Compost.

    PubMed

    Basta, N T; Busalacchi, D M; Hundal, L S; Kumar, K; Dick, R P; Lanno, R P; Carlson, J; Cox, A E; Granato, T C

    2016-01-01

    Many soils at former industrial sites are degraded. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of compost, biosolids, and biosolids blends to improve soil ecosystem function with minimal potential impact to surface water. Treatments rototilled into the top 12.5 cm of soil were biosolids at 202 Mg ha; biosolids at 404 Mg ha; compost at 137 Mg ha; or a blend consisting of biosolids applied at 202 Mg ha, drinking water treatment residual, and biochar. Rainfall runoff from experimental plots was collected for 3 yr. One year after soil amendments were incorporated, a native seed mix containing grasses, legumes, and forbs was planted. Soil amendments improved soil quality and nutrient pools, established a dense and high-quality vegetative cover, and improved earthworm reproductive measures. Amendments increased soil enzymatic activities that support soil function. Biosolids treatments increased the Shannon-Weaver Diversity Index for grasses. For the forbs group, control plots had the lowest diversity index and the biosolids blend had the highest diversity index. Biosolids and compost increased the number of earthworm juveniles. In general, biosolids outperformed compost. Biosolids increased N and P in rainfall runoff more than compost before vegetation was established. Several microconstituents (i.e., pharmaceutical and personal care products) were detected in runoff water but at concentrations below the probable no-effect levels and therefore should pose little impact to the aquatic environment. Future restoration design should ensure that runoff control measures are used to control sediment loss from the restored sites at least until vegetation is established. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Effects of biosolid amendment on populations of Meloidogyne hapla and soils with different textures and pHs.

    PubMed

    Mennan, Sevilhan; Melakeberhan, Haddish

    2010-09-01

    Temperate vegetable and nursery industries face significant challenges in managing Meloidogyne hapla, a plant-parasite for which few resistant cultivars and/or viable alternatives to methyl bromide exist. N-Viro Soil(R) (NVS), an alkaline-stabilized biosolid product, has soil nutrition enrichment capacity and potential for plant-parasitic nematode suppression. In three sets of experiments, we investigated the effects of NVS on M. hapla populations from Rhode Island (RI), Connecticut (CT), New York, Geneva (NYG) and Lyndonville (NYL), and Michigan (MI), and growth of tomato cv 'Rutgers' in five soils commonly used for vegetable and nursery crop production in the Great Lakes Region of the USA. Either 0 (control) or 600 eggs/100 cm(3) of soil per M. hapla population were added in all experiments. In the first set, NVS was applied at rates of 0, 1, 2 and 4 g/100 cm(3) of sandy loam soil (pH 7) and resulted in variable responses on the numbers of nematodes recovered and plant growth at 30 and 90 days (25+/-2 degrees C); however, the 2g NVS treatment consistently increased plant growth. Either 0 or 2 NVS/100 cm(3) were applied to a coarse loamy (pH 4.5) and sandy loam (pH 8, second set of experiments), and muck (pH 5.5), loamy sand (pH 7.1) and sandy loam (pH 7.5, third set of experiments) soils and experiments terminated four weeks after nematode inoculation. Across experiments, the effect of NVS on the M. hapla populations varied. Generally nematode infection decreased plant growth. NVS increased soil pH the most in muck and the least in sandy loam soil. The most consistent interaction effects of NVS*soil, NVS*M. hapla, soil*M. hapla and/or NVS*soil*M. hapla across the experiments indicate that NVS affects M. hapla populations in different ways in different soil types, suggesting that NVS application is likely to be site-specific. These findings further provide basis that may potentially explain reports of variable effects of NVS on nematodes and how future studies may

  11. Native Australian species are effective in extracting multiple heavy metals from biosolids.

    PubMed

    Mok, Hoi-Fei; Majumder, Ramaprasad; Laidlaw, W Scott; Gregory, David; Baker, Alan J M; Arndt, Stefan K

    2013-01-01

    Selecting native plant species with characteristics suitable for extraction of heavy metals may have multiple advantages over non-native plants. Six Australian perennial woody plant species and one willow were grown in a pot trial in heavy metal-contaminated biosolids and a potting mix. The plants were harvested after fourteen months and above-ground parts were analysed for heavy metal concentrations and total metal contents. All native species were capable of growing in biosolids and extracted heavy metals to varying degrees. No single species was able to accumulate heavy metals at particularly high levels and metal extraction depended upon the bioavailability of the metal in the substrate. Metal extraction efficiency was driven by biomass accumulation, with the species extracting the most metals also having the greatest biomass yield. The study demonstrated that Grevillea robusta, Acacia mearnsii, Eucalyptus polybractea, and E. cladocalyx have the greatest potential as phytoextractor species in the remediation of heavy metal-contaminated biosolids. Species survival and growth were the main determinants of metal extraction efficiency and these traits will be important for future screening of native species.

  12. Land application of biosolids: Comparison among stabilization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Theis, T.L.; Brown, R.L.; Gibbs, J.; Collins, A.G.

    1998-07-01

    The land application of municipal wastewater biosolids provides several commercial and economical advantages if properly administered. The presence of both macro and micro nutrients necessary for plant growth enable biosolids to be used as a fertilizer for agricultural lands, forests, yards, and gardens. Despite these advantages, it is important to remember that biosolids are a by-product of wastewater treatment. Trace metals and organic compounds often found in biosolids can be detrimental to the environment and/or toxic to animals and humans and may accumulate in the food chain. In this study, the long-term effects of accelerated weathering of several biosolids products were investigated with respect to trace element leaching, and plant uptake of trace metals. Emphasis in this paper is placed on comparisons of leachate and uptake data across the biosolid types.

  13. Protecting groundwater resources at biosolids recycling sites.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Kumarasamy, Karthik; Brobst, Robert B; Hais, Alan; Schmitz, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    In developing the national biosolids recycling rule (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulation Part 503 or Part 503), the USEPA conducted deterministic risk assessments whose results indicated that the probability of groundwater impairment associated with biosolids recycling was insignificant. Unfortunately, the computational capabilities available for performing risk assessments of pollutant fate and transport at that time were limited. Using recent advances in USEPA risk assessment methodology, the present study evaluates whether the current national biosolids pollutant limits remain protective of groundwater quality. To take advantage of new risk assessment approaches, a computer-based groundwater risk characterization screening tool (RCST) was developed using USEPA's Multimedia, Multi-pathway, Multi-receptor Exposure and Risk Assessment program. The RCST, which generates a noncarcinogenic human health risk estimate (i.e., hazard quotient [HQ] value), has the ability to conduct screening-level risk characterizations. The regulated heavy metals modeled in this study were As, Cd, Ni, Se, and Zn. Results from RCST application to biosolids recycling sites located in Yakima County, Washington, indicated that biosolids could be recycled at rates as high as 90 Mg ha, with no negative human health effects associated with groundwater consumption. Only under unrealistically high biosolids land application rates were public health risks characterized as significant (HQ ≥ 1.0). For example, by increasing the biosolids application rate and pollutant concentrations to 900 Mg ha and 10 times the regulatory limit, respectively, the HQ values varied from 1.4 (Zn) to 324.0 (Se). Since promulgation of Part 503, no verifiable cases of groundwater contamination by regulated biosolids pollutants have been reported.

  14. Long-term effects of biosolid-amended soils on phosphorus, copper, manganese and zinc uptake by wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosolids have been applied to agricultural land for many years as a source of plant nutrients. There are growing concerns of residual phosphorus and metals from long-term biosolids amended fields and their potential impact on the environment. Objectives of this study were to determine, i) phosphor...

  15. Regression modeling weather and biosolids effects on dryland on dryland wheat yields in Eastern Colorado, 2011-2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the western Great Plains, climate dictates dryland wheat (Triticum aestivum, L) and corn (Zea mays, L.) production. Municipalities also use this region to recycle sewage biosolids. Will biosolids (from the Littleton/Englewood, CO Wastewater Treatment Plant) applications to western Great Plains ...

  16. Recent findings on biosolids cake odor reduction--results of WERF phase 3 biosolids odor research.

    PubMed

    Erdal, Zeynep K; Forbes, Robert H; Witherspoon, Jay; Adams, Greg; Hargreaves, Ron; Morton, Rob; Novak, John; Higgins, Matthew

    2008-11-01

    The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) has sponsored three phases of a long-term project entitled "Identifying and Controlling Odors in the Municipal Wastewater Environment." The current (third) phase focuses on reduction of odors from dewatered biosolids cakes, and is entitled "Biosolids Processing Modifications for Cake Odor Reduction." This phase encompasses nine research agenda items developed from the results of the prior phase of research (Phase 2), which was completed in December 2003 as WERF Report No. 00-HHE-5T and was entitled "Impacts of In-Plant Parameters on Biosolids Odor Quality." The current phase (Phase 3) was a 2.5-year project, the first half of which was dedicated to testing several of the more promising hypotheses from Phase 2 in the laboratory to help determine the cause-effect relationships of odor generation from biosolids, and to develop odor reduction techniques. It is important to note that this research project covers the reduction or prevention of odorous emissions from dewatered biosolids cake, not odor control by means of containment or adsorption or absorption of malodorous emissions. In the remainder of the Phase 3 project, promising laboratory findings are being applied to biosolids handling processes at one or more wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), with the goal of achieving significant cake odor reduction in a realistic, full-scale setting. The Phase 3 laboratory results were used to identify the relative effectiveness of methods for reducing biosolids cake odors, using techniques and measurements of biosolids cake odor production potential that have been developed by the WERF Project Team. Plans to demonstrate the most promising research findings at full-scale biosolids digestion and dewatering facilities constitute the final, fourth phase of the project. Contacts have been made with wastewater treatment facilities that have an interest or need to reduce their biosolids cake odors. The main goal of the next phase of

  17. Impact of tilling on biosolids drying and indicator microorganisms survival during solar drying process.

    PubMed

    Song, Inhong; Dominguez, Teodulo; Choi, Christopher Y; Kang, Moon Seong

    2014-01-01

    As biosolids application to croplands becomes a common practice, potential harm from pathogenic microbes needs to be mitigated for its safe reuse. The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of tilling treatment on biosolids drying and microbial inactivation during the solar drying process in a semi-arid and temperate region. Solar drying experiments were conducted in sand and gravel dying beds open-to-the-air and under covering structures with biosolids to 20 cm depth from 2004 to 2006. Anaerobically- and Aerobically-digested biosolids received different tilling treatments throughout the drying process, while a series of biosolids samples were collected to determine the impact on total solids and microbial concentrations (Salmonella spp and heminth ova). Tilling treatments appeared to enhance the biosolids drying and microbial inactivation. Tilling was more effective during the cold season compared with the summer season and tilling treatments were also helpful in elevating biosolids temperature by expediting biosolids drying. The combined effect of temperature increase and moisture decrease by tilling may have resulted in faster microbial inactivation, particularly for persistent helminth ova. It was concluded that incorporation of tilling into biosolids solar drying can expedite biosolids drying as well as microbial inactivation, and thus can be an effective measure for shortening the biosolids conversion to Class A biosolids in which pathogens are reduced to below detectable levels.

  18. Biosolids decomposition after surface applications in west Texas.

    PubMed

    Jaynes, W F; Zartman, R E; Sosebee, R E; Wester, D B

    2003-01-01

    In a semiarid environment, climate is a critical factor in the decomposition of surface-applied biosolids. This study examined the effect of 2- to 7-yr exposure times on the composition of single applications of New York, NY biosolids in western Texas. Exposure time effects on organic matter, N, P, S, Cu, Cr, Pb, Hg, and Zn were studied near Sierra Blanca, TX. Due to organic matter decomposition, total organic C decreased from 340 g kg(-1) in fresh biosolids to 180 g kg(-1) in biosolids after 82 mo of exposure, whereas the inorganic ash content of the biosolids increased from 339 to 600 g kg(-1). Total N decreased from 50 to 10 g N kg(-1) and total S decreased from 12 to 6 g S kg(-1). Bicarbonate-available P in the biosolids decreased from 0.9 to 0.2 g kg(-1). Successive H2O extractions yielded soluble P concentrations consistent with dicalcium phosphate (dical) for fresh biosolids and tricalcium phosphate (trical) for biosolids exposed for 59 months or more. Sparingly soluble phosphates, such as dical and trical, potentially yield > 0.5 mg P L(-1) in runoff waters for extended periods after biosolids applications, especially after multiple applications. Selective dissolution of the biosolids indicated that as much as 66 to 78% of P exists as iron phosphates, 16 to 21% as Fe oxides, and 5 to 12% as insoluble Ca phosphates. Chemical analyses of ash samples suggest that Cu and Zn have been lost from biosolids through leaching or runoff and no losses of Pb, Cr, or Hg have occurred since application.

  19. Application of self-sustaining smouldering combustion for the destruction of wastewater biosolids.

    PubMed

    Rashwan, Tarek L; Gerhard, Jason I; Grant, Gavin P

    2016-04-01

    Managing biosolids, the major by-product from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), persists as a widespread challenge that often constitutes the majority of WWTP operating costs. Self-sustained smouldering combustion is a new approach for organic waste treatment, in which the waste - the combustion fuel - is destroyed in an energy efficient manner after mixing it with sand. Smouldering has never been applied to biosolids. Column experiments, using biosolids obtained from a WWTP, were employed to identify if, and under what conditions, smouldering could be used for treating biosolids. The parameter space in which smouldering was self-sustaining was mapped as a function of key system metrics: (1) sand/biosolids mass fraction, (2) biosolids moisture content, and (3) forced air flux. It was found that a self-sustaining reaction is achievable using biosolids with water content as high as 80% (with a biosolids lower heating value greater than 1.6 kJ/g). Moreover, results suggest that operator-controlled air flux can assist in keeping the reaction self-sustaining in response to fluctuations in biosolids properties. This proof-of-concept demonstrates the potential for smouldering as a new energy efficient biosolids disposal method for very wet (i.e., minimally processed) biosolids that may offer WWTPs significant operating cost savings. This study emphasizes smouldering's usefulness as a novel waste management technique.

  20. Effects of long-term application of biosolids for mine land reclamation on groundwater chemistry: trace metals.

    PubMed

    Oladeji, Olawale O; Tian, Guanglong; Cox, Albert E; Granato, Thomas C; Pietz, Richard I; Carlson, Carl R; Abedin, Zainul

    2012-01-01

    Data collected for 35 yr from a 1790-ha strip mine reclamation site in Fulton County, Illinois, where biosolids were applied from 1972 to 2004, were used to evaluate the impacts of long-term biosolids application on metal concentrations in groundwater. Groundwater samples were collected between 1972 and 2006 from wells installed in seven strip-mined fields treated with biosolids at cumulative loading rates of 801 to 1815 dry Mg ha and from another seven fields (also strip mined) treated with mineral fertilizer. Samples were collected monthly between 1972 and 1986 and quarterly between 1987 and 2004 and were analyzed for total metals. The concentrations of metals in groundwater were generally below regulatory limits. Lead, Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, and Hg concentrations in groundwater were similar for the biosolids-amended and fertilizer-treated sites across all sampling intervals. Zinc concentration was increased by biosolids application only for samples collected before the 1993 promulgation of the USEPA 40 CFR Part 503 rule. Iron and Mn were the only metals that were consistently increased after biosolids application; however, Mn concentrations did not exceed the 10 mg L regulatory limits. Zinc, Cu, Cd, Pb, Fe, Al, and Mn concentrations in groundwater decreased with time, coupled with the change from pre-part 503 to post-Part 503 biosolids. The concentrations of other metals, including Ni, Cr, and Hg, did not increase in groundwater with the prolonged biosolids application. The study suggests that the long-term application of biosolids at high loading rates does not result in trace metal pollution of groundwater. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Land Application of Biosolids

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Recycling biosolids through land application serves several purposes. It improves soil properties, such as texture and water holding capacity, which make conditions more favorable for root growth and increases the drought tolerance of vegetation.

  2. Distinct Responses in Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria after Addition of Biosolids to an Agricultural Soil▿

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John J.; Policht, Katherine; Grancharova, Tanya; Hundal, Lakhwinder S.

    2011-01-01

    The recently discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have been suggested as contributors to the first step of nitrification in terrestrial ecosystems, a role that was previously assigned exclusively to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The current study assessed the effects of agricultural management, specifically amendment of soil with biosolids or synthetic fertilizer, on nitrification rates and copy numbers of archaeal and bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes. Anaerobically digested biosolids or synthetic fertilizer was applied annually for three consecutive years to field plots used for corn production. Biosolids were applied at two loading rates, a typical agronomic rate (27 Mg hectare−1 year−1) and double the agronomic rate (54 Mg hectare−1 year−1), while synthetic fertilizer was applied at an agronomic rate typical for the region (291 kg N hectare−1 year−1). Both biosolids amendments and synthetic fertilizer increased soil N and corn yield, but only the biosolids amendments resulted in significant increases in nitrification rates and increases in the copy numbers of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes. In addition, only archaeal amoA gene copy numbers increased in response to biosolids applied at the typical agronomic rate and showed a significant correlation with nitrification rates. Finally, copy numbers of archaeal amoA genes were significantly higher than copy numbers of bacterial amoA genes for all treatments. These results implicate AOA as being primarily responsible for the increased nitrification observed in an agricultural soil amended with biosolids. These results also support the hypothesis that physiological differences between AOA and AOB may enable them to occupy distinct ecological niches. PMID:21803892

  3. Distinct responses in ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria after addition of biosolids to an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J; Policht, Katherine; Grancharova, Tanya; Hundal, Lakhwinder S

    2011-09-01

    The recently discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have been suggested as contributors to the first step of nitrification in terrestrial ecosystems, a role that was previously assigned exclusively to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The current study assessed the effects of agricultural management, specifically amendment of soil with biosolids or synthetic fertilizer, on nitrification rates and copy numbers of archaeal and bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes. Anaerobically digested biosolids or synthetic fertilizer was applied annually for three consecutive years to field plots used for corn production. Biosolids were applied at two loading rates, a typical agronomic rate (27 Mg hectare(-1) year(-1)) and double the agronomic rate (54 Mg hectare(-1) year(-1)), while synthetic fertilizer was applied at an agronomic rate typical for the region (291 kg N hectare(-1) year(-1)). Both biosolids amendments and synthetic fertilizer increased soil N and corn yield, but only the biosolids amendments resulted in significant increases in nitrification rates and increases in the copy numbers of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes. In addition, only archaeal amoA gene copy numbers increased in response to biosolids applied at the typical agronomic rate and showed a significant correlation with nitrification rates. Finally, copy numbers of archaeal amoA genes were significantly higher than copy numbers of bacterial amoA genes for all treatments. These results implicate AOA as being primarily responsible for the increased nitrification observed in an agricultural soil amended with biosolids. These results also support the hypothesis that physiological differences between AOA and AOB may enable them to occupy distinct ecological niches.

  4. Phosphorus leaching from biosolids-amended sandy soils.

    PubMed

    Elliott, H A; O'Connor, G A; Brinton, S

    2002-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on phosphorus (P)-based nutrient management underscores the need to understand P behavior in soils amended with biosolids and manures. Laboratory and greenhouse column studies characterized P forms and leachability of eight biosolids products, chicken manure (CM), and commercial fertilizer (triple superphosphate, TSP). Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) was grown for 4 mo on two acid, P-deficient Florida sands, representing both moderate (Candler series: hyperthermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments) and very low (Immokalee series: sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Alaquods) P-sorbing capacities. Amendments were applied at 56 and 224 kg P(T) ha(-1), simulating P-based and N-based nutrient loadings, respectively. Column leachate P was dominantly inorganic and lower for biosolids P sources than TSP. For Candler soil, only TSP at the high P rate exhibited P leaching statistically greater (alpha = 0.05) than control (soil-only) columns. For the high P rate and low P-sorbing Immokalee soil, TSP and CM leached 21 and 3.0% of applied P, respectively. Leachate P for six biosolids was <1.0% of applied P and not statistically different from controls. Largo biosolids, generated from a biological P removal process, exhibited significantly greater leachate P in both cake and pelletized forms (11 and 2.5% of applied P, respectively) than other biosolids. Biosolids P leaching was correlated to the phosphorus saturation index (PSI = [Pox]/[Al(ox) + Fe(ox)]) based on oxalate extraction of the pre-applied biosolids. For hiosolids with PSI < or = approximately 1.1, no appreciable leaching occurred. Only Largo cake (PSI = 1.4) and pellets (PSI = 1.3) exhibited P leaching losses statistically greater than controls. The biosolids PSI appears useful for identifying biosolids with potential to enrich drainage P when applied to low P-sorbing soils.

  5. Native plant restoration of biosolids-amended copper mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.A.; Zabowski, D.; Everett, R.L.; Scherer, G.

    1998-12-31

    Copper mine tailings are difficult to revegetate due to nutrient deficiencies, high levels of acidity, and potential metal toxicities. An amendment of biosolids could ameliorate these harsh growing conditions through the addition of available nutrients, improvement of physical soil properties (e.g., increased water holding capacity), and possible lowering of toxic metal availability through complexation with organic matter. A study was conducted on mine tailings at Holden, WA to evaluate the effect of an amendment of biosolids on the survival and growth of five native plant species (Sitka alder, big leaf maple, fireweed, w. yarrow, and pearly everlasting). Plots were established in tailings, gravel over tailings (G/T), and biosolids plus gravel over tailings. Each of the native plant species, except maple, had their highest survival in the biosolids-amended plot with 3 species at 100% survival. The biosolids amendment was shown to improve the growth of all species except maple. Fireweed produced 62 times more biomass in the biosolids-amended plot compared to the unamended plot (G/T). Plant analysis revealed a dramatic increase in nutrient content with the amendment of biosolids. Biosolids improved the survival, growth, and nutritional status of native plant species on the copper mine tailings.

  6. Sorption and desorption of cadmium by different fractions of biosolids-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Hettiarachchi, Ganga M; Ryan, James A; Chaney, Rufus L; La Fleur, Cherie M

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of both the inorganic and organic fractions in biosolids on Cd chemistry, a series of Cd sorption and desorption batch experiments (at pH 5.5) were conducted on different fractions of soils from a long-term field experimental site. The slope of the Cd sorption isotherm increased with rate of biosolids and was different for the different biosolids. Removal of organic carbon (OC) reduced the slope of the Cd sorption isotherm but did not account for the observed differences between biosolids-amended soils and a control soil, indicating that the increased adsorption associated with biosolids application was not limited to the increased OC from the addition of biosolids. Removal of both OC and Fe/Mn further reduced the slopes of Cd sorption isotherms and the sorption isotherm of the biosolids-amended soil was the same as that of the control, indicating both OC and Fe/Mn fractions added by the biosolids were important to the increased sorption observed for the biosolids-amended soil samples. Desorption experiments failed to remove from 60 to 90% of the sorbed Cd. This "apparent hysteresis" was higher for biosolids-amended soil than the control soil. Removal of both OC and Fe/Mn fractions was more effective in removing the observed differences between the biosolids-amended soil and the control than either alone. Results show that Cd added to biosolids-amended soil behaves differently than Cd added to soils without biosolids and support the hypothesis that the addition of Fe and Mn in the biosolids increased the retention of Cd in biosolids-amended soils.

  7. Biosolids recycling at a pulp and paper mill

    SciTech Connect

    Gratton, P.F.; Montgomery, K.L.; Page, S.H.

    1997-12-31

    The Bio Gro Division of Wheelabrator Water Technologies Inc. has traditionally been involved in recycling biosolids from domestic wastewater treatment plants. The biosolids, or primarily organic residuals that result from the treatment of wastewater, have long been used in agriculture as a soil conditioner, fertilizer, organic lime material and also for other soil fertility practices. It has long been known that residuals from certain industrial wastewater processes are very high in nutrients and organic matter which can also be successfully used in agricultural activities. One of these industrial biosolids with well-documented agricultural value is the organic residual from the treatment of wastewater from pulp and paper mills. Most pulp and paper producers in the US recognize the value of pulp and paper biosolids as a material that can fertilize their own tree stands or can be used in normal agricultural practices. In 1995, Bio Gro entered into a contract with a two large pulp and paper mills in Maine for the management of its pulp and paper biosolids. Bio Gro was responsible for implementing the beneficial use options for a mixture of primary and secondary biosolids from the wastewater treatment process which was combined with combustion ash from the facility`s power generation facilities. The contract included the layout of spreading areas, mixing of the residuals and spreading the material on the sites. This paper will explain the process that Bio Gro employed to manage the pulp and paper biosolids generated at the mill.

  8. Metal stress and decreased tree growth in response to biosolids application in greenhouse seedlings and in situ Douglas-fir stands.

    PubMed

    Cline, Erica T; Nguyen, Quyen T N; Rollins, Lucy; Gawel, James E

    2012-01-01

    To assess physiological impacts of biosolids on trees, metal contaminants and phytochelatins were measured in Douglas-fir stands amended with biosolids in 1982. A subsequent greenhouse study compared these same soils to soils amended with fresh wastewater treatment plant biosolids. Biosolids-amended field soils had significantly higher organic matter, lower pH, and elevated metals even after 25 years. In the field study, no beneficial growth effects were detected in biosolids-amended stands and in the greenhouse study both fresh and historic biosolids amendments resulted in lower seedling growth rates. Phytochelatins - bioindicators of intracellular metal stress - were elevated in foliage of biosolids-amended stands, and significantly higher in roots of seedlings grown with fresh biosolids. These results demonstrate that biosolids amendments have short- and long-term negative effects that may counteract the expected tree growth benefits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sustainability of land application of class B biosolids.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Ian L; Zerzghi, Huruy; Brooks, John P; Gerba, Charles P

    2008-01-01

    Land application of Class B biosolids is routinely undertaken in the United States. However, due to public concern over potential hazards, the long-term sustainability of land application has been questioned. Thus, the objective of this review article was to evaluate the sustainability of land application of Class B biosolids. To do this we evaluated (i) the fate and transport of potential biological and chemical hazards within biosolids, and (ii) the influence of long-term land application on the microbial and chemical properties of the soil. Direct risks to human health posed by pathogens in biosolids have been shown to be low. Risks from indirect exposure such as aerosolized pathogens or microbially contaminated ground water are also low. A long-term land application study showed enhanced microbial activity and no adverse toxicity effects on the soil microbial community. Long-term land application also increased soil macronutrients including C, N, and, in particular, P. In fact, care should be taken to avoid contamination of surface waters with high phosphate soils. Available soil metal concentrations remained low over the 20-yr land application period due to the low metal content of the biosolids and a high soil pH. Soil salinity increases were not detected due to the low salt content of biosolids and irrigation rates in excess of consumptive use rates for cotton. Our conclusion, based on these studies, is that long-term land application of Class B biosolids is sustainable.

  10. Effects of biosolids application on nitrogen dynamics and microbial structure in a saline-sodic soil of the former Lake Texcoco (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Rojas-Oropeza, M; Dendooven, L; Garza-Avendaño, L; Souza, V; Philippot, L; Cabirol, N

    2010-04-01

    The saline-sodic soil of the former Lake Texcoco, a large area exposed to desertification, is a unique environment, but little is known about its microbial ecology. The objective of this study was to examine bacterial community structure, activity, and function when biosolids were added to microcosms. The application rates were such that 0, 66, 132, or 265 mg total Nk g(-1) were added with the biosolids (total C and N content 158 and 11.5 g kg(-1) dry biosolids, respectively). Approximately 60% of the biosolids were mineralized within 90 days. Microbial respiration and to a lesser extent ammonification and nitrification, increased after biosolids application. The rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) patterns for the biosolids and unamended soil bacterial communities were different, indicating that the microorganisms in the biosolids were distinct from the native population. It appears that the survival of the allochthonous microorganisms was short, presumably due to the adverse soil conditions.

  11. Increasing thermal drying temperature of biosolids reduced nitrogen mineralisation and soil N2O emissions.

    PubMed

    Case, Sean D C; Gómez-Muñoz, Beatriz; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies found that thermally dried biosolids contained more mineralisable organic nitrogen (N) than the raw or anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids they were derived from. However, the effect of thermal drying temperature on biosolid N availability is not well understood. This will be of importance for the value of the biosolids when used to fertilise crops. We sourced AD biosolids from a Danish waste water treatment plant (WWTP) and dried it in the laboratory at 70, 130, 190 or 250 °C to >95 % dry matter content. Also, we sourced biosolids from the WWTP dried using its in-house thermal drying process (input temperature 95 °C, thermal fluid circuit temperature 200 °C, 95 % dry matter content). The drying process reduced the ammonium content of the biosolids and reduced it further at higher drying temperatures. These findings were attributed to ammonia volatilisation. The percentage of mineralisable organic N fraction (min-N) in the biosolids, and nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) production were analysed 120 days after addition to soil. When incubated at soil field capacity (pF 2), none of the dried biosolids had a greater min-N than the AD biosolids (46.4 %). Min-N was lowest in biosolids dried at higher temperatures (e.g. 19.3 % at 250 °C vs 35.4 % at 70 °C). Considering only the dried biosolids, min-N was greater in WWTP-dried biosolids (50.5 %) than all of the laboratory-dried biosolids with the exception of the 70 °C-dried biosolids. Biosolid carbon mineralisation (CO2 release) and N2O production was also the lowest in treatments of the highest drying temperature, suggesting that this material was more recalcitrant. Overall, thermal drying temperature had a significant influence on N availability from the AD biosolids, but drying did not improve the N availability of these biosolids in any case.

  12. Aquatic hazard assessment for pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and endocrine-disrupting compounds from biosolids-amended land.

    PubMed

    Langdon, K A; Warne, M St J; Kookana, R S

    2010-10-01

    Reuse of biosolids on agricultural land is a common practice. Following the application of biosolids to land, contaminants in the biosolids have the potential to migrate offsite via surface runoff and/or leaching and pose a hazard to aquatic ecosystems. The aim of this screening-level assessment study was to determine the relative hazard posed to aquatic ecosystems by pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) that have been detected and quantified in biosolids. This involved estimating maximum possible runoff water concentrations of compounds, using an equilibrium partitioning approach and then comparing these with the lowest available aquatic toxicity data, using the hazard quotient (HQ) approach. A total of 45 pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and EDCs have been detected in biosolids. Ten of these compounds (tonalide, galaxolide, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethinylestradiol, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, triclosan, and triclocarban) posed a high (HQ >1.0) hazard to aquatic ecosystems relative to the other compounds. This hazard assessment indicated that further research into potential offsite migration and deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems is warranted for the 10 organic contaminants identified, and possibly for chemicals with similar physicochemical and toxicological properties, in biosolids-amended soils. Because many antibiotic compounds (e.g., ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin) have ionic properties, the methods used may have overestimated their predicted aqueous concentrations and hazard. Further research that includes site-specific variables, e.g., dilution factors in waterways, rain intensity, slope of land, degradation, and the use of management strategies such as buffer zones, is likely to decrease the hazard posed by these high hazard compounds. © 2010 SETAC.

  13. Effects of biosolids and FGD-gypsum amended soil on metal uptake by lettuce and Edamame soybean and nodules development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosolids and flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum amended soils are a rich nutrient source for plant growth and could reduce soil contamination by synthetic fertilizers. According to previous studies, these soil amendments have also enhanced some rhizobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum) in the rh...

  14. Effect of lime stabilized biosolids and inorganic fertilizer applications on a thinned longleaf stand - ten year results

    Treesearch

    E. David Dickens; Bryan C. McElvany; David J. Moorhead

    2010-01-01

    This project was initiated on the Sand Hills State Forest in Chesterfield County, SC in May 1995 to determine the benefits of inorganic fertilizer (NPK) and lime stabilized biosolids applications in a twice-thinned longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) stand planted in 1963 on an excessively well drained deep sand (Alpin soil series). Major...

  15. Interactions of triclosan, gemfibrozil and galaxolide with biosolid-amended soils: Effects of the level and nature of soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Usyskin, Alla; Bukhanovsky, Nadezhda; Borisover, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Triclosan, gemfibrozil and galaxolide, representing acidic and non-ionized hydrophobic organic compounds, are biologically active and can be accumulated during wastewater treatment in sewage sludge. The interactions of these substances with the soils amended by sewage sludge-originating biosolids may control their environmental fate. Therefore, the sorption of three organic compounds was studied in dune sand, loess soil, clay soil and mixtures of these media with three different sewage sludge-originating biosolids that were incubated under aerobic conditions for 6 months. For each compound, 15 sorption isotherms were produced at pH 7.8-8.0. The sorption of triclosan and gemfibrozil on sand-containing sorbents was examined also under acidic conditions. In some soil series, the compound's Freundlich constants (KF) are linearly related to the soil organic carbon (OC) content. Notably, for a given OC content, the sand-containing sorbents tend to demonstrate enhanced interactions with triclosan and galaxolide. This may be related with more hydrophobic and/or less rigid soil organic matter (SOM) as compared with the clay-containing soils, implying indirect effects of minerals. Generally the OC-normalized KF vary among different soil-biosolid combinations which is explained by the differences in the composition and properties of SOM, and is also contributed by the non-zero intercepts of the linear KF upon soil OC dependencies. The negative intercepts suggest that below a certain OC level no considerable organic compound-soil interactions would occur. Interactions of molecular and anionic forms of triclosan with a sand-containing sorbent may be comparable, but interactions involving gemfibrozil molecules could be stronger than interactions involving its anion.

  16. Monitoring Alkyl Phenol Ethoxylates And Degradation Products After Land Application Of Anaerobically Digested Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Annually, over 3 million dry tons of treated sewage sludge (or biosolids) are applied on agricultural lands in the U.S. In 2002, the National Research Council (NRC) recommended an examination of biosolids management practices including chemicals such as surfactants used in clean...

  17. Monitoring Alkyl Phenol Ethoxylates And Degradation Products After Land Application Of Anaerobically Digested Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Annually, over 3 million dry tons of treated sewage sludge (or biosolids) are applied on agricultural lands in the U.S. In 2002, the National Research Council (NRC) recommended an examination of biosolids management practices including chemicals such as surfactants used in clean...

  18. Economic analysis of a pine plantation receiving repeated applications of biosolids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Kimberley, Mark O; Wilks, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Treated biosolids have been applied to 750-ha of a Pinus radiata forest plantation on Rabbit Island near Nelson City in New Zealand since 1996. A long-term research trial was established in 1997 to investigate the effects of the biosolids applications on the receiving environment and tree growth. An analysis of the likely economic impact of biosolids application shows that biosolids application has been beneficial. Stem volume of the high treatment (biosolids applied at 600 kg N ha(-1) every three years) was 36% greater than the control treatment (no biosolids applied), and stem volume of the standard treatment (300 kg N ha(-1)) was 27% greater than the control treatment at age 18 years of age. Biosolids treatments have effectively transformed a low productivity forest site to a medium productivity site. Although this increased productivity has been accompanied by some negative influences on wood quality attributes with reduced wood stiffness, wood density, and larger branches, an economic analysis shows that the increased stem volume and greater average log diameter in the biosolids treatments outweighs these negative effects. The high and standard biosolids treatments are predicted to increase the net stumpage value of logs by 24% and 14% respectively at harvesting, providing a large positive impact on the forest owner's economic return.

  19. Growth, Root Formation, and Nutrient Value of Triticale Plants Fertilized with Biosolids

    PubMed Central

    Rauw, Wendy Mercedes; Teglas, Michael Bela; Chandra, Sudeep; Forister, Matthew Lewis

    2012-01-01

    Biosolids are utilized as nutrient rich fertilizer. Little material is available on benefits to forage crops resulting from fertilization with biosolids. This paper aimed to compare the effects of fertilization with biosolids versus commercial nitrogen fertilizer on growth, root formation, and nutrient value of triticale plants in a greenhouse experiment. Per treatment, five pots were seeded with five triticale seeds each. Treatments included a nonfertilized control, fertilization with 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 ml biosolids per pot, and fertilization with a commercial nitrogen fertilizer at the recommended application rate and at double that rate. Biomass production, root length, root diameter, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium concentration were analyzed at harvest. Fertilization with biosolids increased triticale production (P < 0.001); production was similar for the 100 to 400 mL treatments. Root length, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentration increased, and potassium concentration decreased linearly with application rate. At the recommended rate, biomass production was similar between fertilization with biosolids and commercial fertilizer. However, plants fertilized with commercial fertilizer had considerably longer roots (P < 0.001), higher nitrogen concentration (P < 0.05), and lower potassium concentration (P < 0.01) than those fertilized with biosolids. Our results indicate that at the recommended application rate, biomass production was similar between fertilization with biosolids and with commercial nitrogen fertilizer, indicating the value of biosolids fertilization as a potential alternative. PMID:22593686

  20. Growth, root formation, and nutrient value of triticale plants fertilized with biosolids.

    PubMed

    Rauw, Wendy Mercedes; Teglas, Michael Bela; Chandra, Sudeep; Forister, Matthew Lewis

    2012-01-01

    Biosolids are utilized as nutrient rich fertilizer. Little material is available on benefits to forage crops resulting from fertilization with biosolids. This paper aimed to compare the effects of fertilization with biosolids versus commercial nitrogen fertilizer on growth, root formation, and nutrient value of triticale plants in a greenhouse experiment. Per treatment, five pots were seeded with five triticale seeds each. Treatments included a nonfertilized control, fertilization with 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 ml biosolids per pot, and fertilization with a commercial nitrogen fertilizer at the recommended application rate and at double that rate. Biomass production, root length, root diameter, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium concentration were analyzed at harvest. Fertilization with biosolids increased triticale production (P < 0.001); production was similar for the 100 to 400 mL treatments. Root length, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentration increased, and potassium concentration decreased linearly with application rate. At the recommended rate, biomass production was similar between fertilization with biosolids and commercial fertilizer. However, plants fertilized with commercial fertilizer had considerably longer roots (P < 0.001), higher nitrogen concentration (P < 0.05), and lower potassium concentration (P < 0.01) than those fertilized with biosolids. Our results indicate that at the recommended application rate, biomass production was similar between fertilization with biosolids and with commercial nitrogen fertilizer, indicating the value of biosolids fertilization as a potential alternative.

  1. Biosolids, soils, ground-water, and streambed-sediment data for a biosolids-application area near Deer Trail, Colorado, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Michael R.; Yager, Tracy J.B.; Smith, D.B.; Crock, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    In January 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey began an expanded monitoring program near Deer Trail, Colorado, in cooperation with the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District and the North Kiowa Bijou Groundwater Management District. Monitoring components were biosolids, soils, crops, ground water, and streambed sediments. The monitoring program addresses concerns from the public about chemical effects from applications of biosolids to farmland in the Deer Trail, Colorado, area. Constituents of primary concern to the public are arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, zinc, plutonium, and gross alpha and beta activity and are included for all monitoring components. This report presents chemical data from the first year of the monitoring program, January?December 1999, for biosolids, soils, alluvial and bedrock ground water, and streambed sediments. The groundwater section of this report also includes climate data, lithologic descriptions, well-completion diagrams, water levels, summary statistics for the water-quality data, and results of statistical testing of selected data for trends and for exceedance of Colorado regulatory standards. Data in this report provide a geochemical baseline for each monitoring component prior to the planned water transfer in 2000 from the Lowry Landfill Superfund site to Metro Wastewater Reclamation District treatment facilities.

  2. Biosolids, soil, crop, ground-water, and streambed-sediment data for a biosolids-application area near Deer Trail, Colorado, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; Smith, David B.; Crock, James G.

    2004-01-01

    In January 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began an expanded monitoring program near Deer Trail, Colorado, in cooperation with the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District and the North Kiowa Bijou Groundwater Management District. Monitoring components were biosolids, soils, crops, ground water, and streambed sediment. The monitoring program addresses concerns from the public about chemical effects from applications of biosolids to farmland in the Deer Trail, Colorado, area. Constituents of primary concern to the public are arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, zinc, plutonium, and gross alpha and beta activity, and they are included for all monitoring components. This report presents chemical data from the third year of the monitoring program, JanuaryDecember 2001, for biosolids, soils, alluvial and bedrock ground water, and streambed sediment. The ground-water section also includes climate data, water levels, and results of statistical testing of selected data for trends and for exceedance of Colorado regulatory standards. The chemical data include the constituents of highest concern to the public in addition to many other constituents.

  3. Biosolids, Soil, Crop, Ground-Water, and Streambed-Sediment Data for a Biosolids-Application Area Near Deer Trail, Colorado, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; Smith, David B.; Crock, James G.; Stevens, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    In January 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey began an expanded monitoring program near Deer Trail, Colorado, in cooperation with the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District and the North Kiowa Bijou Groundwater Management District. Monitoring components were biosolids, soils, crops, ground water, and streambed sediments. The monitoring program addresses concerns from the public about chemical effects from applications of biosolids to agricultural land in the Deer Trail area. Constituents of primary concern to the public are arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, zinc, plutonium, and gross alpha and beta activity, and they are included for all monitoring components. This report presents chemical data from the second year of the monitoring program, January?December 2000, for biosolids, crops, alluvial and bedrock ground water, and streambed sediments. The ground-water section also includes climate data, water levels, and results of statistical testing of selected data for trends and for exceedance of Colorado regulatory standards. The chemical data included are for the constituents of highest concern to the public as well as for many other constituents.

  4. Effect of a One-Time Biosolids Application in and Old-Field Loblolly Pine Plantation on Diameter Distributions, Volume per Acre, and Value per Acre

    Treesearch

    E. David Dickens

    2002-01-01

    A forest land application of biosolids study was initiated in 1991 in the lower Coastal Plain of South Carolina (SC). A major objective of this project was to quantify the magnitude and duration of old-field loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) growth response to a one-time biosolids application after canopy closure. The study area is located on Alcoa...

  5. Transformations of nitrogen and carbon in entrenched biosolids at a reclaimed mineral sands mining site.

    PubMed

    Kostyanovsky, K I; Evanylo, G K; Lasley, K K; Shang, C; Sukkariyah, B F; Daniels, W L

    2011-01-01

    Biosolids deep-row incorporation (DRI) provides high levels of nutrients to the reclamation sites; however, additions of N in excess of the vegetation requirements can potentially impair water quality. The effects of anaerobically digested (AD) and lime stabilized (LS) DRI biosolids and inorganic N fertilizer were compared on C and N transformations and transport at a reclaimed mineral sands mining site. Biosolids were applied at 213 and 426 Mg AD biosolids ha(-1) and 328 and 656 Mg LS biosolids ha)(-1) (dry mass), and inorganic N fertilizer was applied at 0 (control) and 504 kg N ha-(-1) yr(-1). Zero tension lysimeters were installed to collect leachate for determination of vertical N transport, and the biosolids seams were analyzed for N and C transformations after 28 mo aging. The leachijng masses from the DRI biosolids treatments were 139 to 291 kg ha(-1) NO3-N, 61 to 243 kg ha(-1) NH4-N, and 61 to 269 kg ha(-1) organic N, while the fertilizer treatment did not differ from the control. Aged biosolids analysis showed that total N lost over the course of 2 yr was 15.2 Mg ha(-1) and 10.9 Mg ha(-1) for LS and AD biosolids, respectively, which was roughly 50% of the N applied. Organic C losses were 81 Mg ha(-1) and 33 Mg ha(-1) for LS and AD biosolids, respectively. Our results indicated that entrenchment of biosolids in coarse-textured media should not be used as a mined land reclamation technique because the anaerobic conditions required to limit mineralization and nitrification cannot be maintained in such permeable soils.

  6. Water treatment residuals and biosolids coapplications affect semiarid rangeland phosphorus cycling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Land co-application of water treatment residuals (WTR) with biosolids has not been extensively researched, but the limited studies performed suggest that WTR sorb excess biosolids-borne P. To understand the long-term effects of a single co-application and the short-term impacts of a repeated co-app...

  7. LIMITED PHYTO- AND BIO-AVAILABILITY PREVENT RISK FROM CADMIUM IN REGULATED BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids are a complex mixture which usually contain 100-times more Zn than Cd, and both inorganic and organic Cd adsorbents. Experiments were conducted to test the effect of persistent inorganic adsorbents in biosolids on phytoavailability of soil Cd to lettuce, and the role of...

  8. LIMITED PHYTO-AND BIO-AVAILABILITY PREVENT RISK FROM CADMIUM IN REGULATED BIOSOLIDS (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids are a complex mixture which usually contain 100-times more Zn than Cd, and both inorganic and organic Cd adsorbents. Experiments were conducted to test the effect of persistent inorganic adsorbents in biosolids on phytoavailability of soil Cd to lettuce, and the role of...

  9. LIMITED PHYTO- AND BIO-AVAILABILITY PREVENT RISK FROM CADMIUM IN REGULATED BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids are a complex mixture which usually contain 100-times more Zn than Cd, and both inorganic and organic Cd adsorbents. Experiments were conducted to test the effect of persistent inorganic adsorbents in biosolids on phytoavailability of soil Cd to lettuce, and the role of...

  10. LIMITED PHYTO-AND BIO-AVAILABILITY PREVENT RISK FROM CADMIUM IN REGULATED BIOSOLIDS (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids are a complex mixture which usually contain 100-times more Zn than Cd, and both inorganic and organic Cd adsorbents. Experiments were conducted to test the effect of persistent inorganic adsorbents in biosolids on phytoavailability of soil Cd to lettuce, and the role of...

  11. Public attitudes and risk perception toward land application of biosolids within the south-eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kevin G; Robinson, Carolyn H; Raup, Lauren A; Markum, Travis R

    2012-05-15

    A descriptive-correlational study of biosolids recycling was conducted in the south-eastern United States to assess current knowledge, attitudes and risk perceptions of participants in two communities that land apply biosolids as part of their waste management programs. One community, Amelia County VA, has been outspoken against biosolids recycling in the past, whereas the second community, Knoxville, TN region, has voiced few concerns about biosolids recycling. Additionally, gender differences within the entire study population were assessed. A 45-question telephone survey, utilizing a 4-point Likert scale, was developed and administered to 311 randomly selected adults in the two regions. Commonalities identified during the study revealed key risk perceptions by the public regarding biosolids regulations, treatment, and application. Given current perceptions and knowledge, respondents felt that the benefits derived from biosolids recycling do not offset the perceived health and safety risks. However, as distance between application and personal property increased, a decrease in opposition of biosolids reuse became evident for all respondents. Survey participants were dissatisfied with the level of stakeholder involvement in research and decision-making processes concerning biosolids. The outspoken Amelia County residents perceived greater health risks due to inadequate treatment of biosolids and odorous emissions during the application process than the less engaged Knox Metro respondents. Significant gender differences were observed with sampled females perceiving greater risks to health and safety from biosolids recycling than males. There was also indication that decisions and risks were not sufficiently communicated to the public, leading to respondents being inadequately informed about biosolids land application in both communities. Community-specific outreach programs must address these public risk perceptions and the differences in perception caused by

  12. Runoff of pharmaceuticals and personal care products following application of biosolids to an agricultural field.

    PubMed

    Topp, Edward; Monteiro, Sara C; Beck, Andrew; Coelho, Bonnie Ball; Boxall, Alistair B A; Duenk, Peter W; Kleywegt, Sonya; Lapen, David R; Payne, Michael; Sabourin, Lyne; Li, Hongxia; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2008-06-15

    Municipal biosolids are a source of nutrients for crop production. Beneficial Management Practices (BMPs) can be used to minimize the risk of contamination of adjacent water resources with chemical or microbial agents that are of public or environmental health concern. In this field study, we applied biosolids slurry at a commercial rate using either subsurface injection or broadcast application followed by incorporation. Precipitation was simulated at 1, 3, 7, 22, 36 and 266 days post-application on 2 m(2) microplots to evaluate surface runoff of 9 model pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), atenolol, carbamazepine, cotinine, gemfibrozil, naproxen, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, sulfamethoxazole and triclosan. In runoff from the injected plots, concentrations of the model PPCPs were generally below the limits of quantitation. In contrast, in the broadcast application treatment, the concentrations of atenolol, carbamazepine, cotinine, gemfibrozil, naproxen, sulfamethoxazole and triclosan on the day following application ranged from 70-1477 ng L(-1) in runoff and generally declined thereafter with first order kinetics. The total mass of PPCPs mobilized in surface runoff per m(2) of the field ranged from 0.63 microg for atenolol to 21.1 microg for ibuprofen. For ibuprofen and acetaminophen, concentrations in runoff first decreased and then increased, suggesting that these drugs were initially chemically or physically sequestered in the biosolids slurry, and subsequently released in the soil. Carbamazepine and triclosan were detected at low concentrations in a runoff event 266 days after broadcast application. Overall, this study showed that injection of biosolids slurry below the soil surface could effectively eliminate surface runoff of PPCPs.

  13. The effect of liming on antibacterial and hormone levels in wastewater biosolids.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Jennifer M; Lozano, Nuria; Haines, Christine; Rice, Clifford P; Ramirez, Mark; Torrents, Alba

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the effect of liming on levels of triclocarban (TCC), triclosan (TCS), estrone (E1), and progesterone (P), two antimicrobial agents and two natural hormones, respectively. Factors studied include lime particle size, mixing time, and overall lime contact time. The study results suggest that coarse lime may be more active than fine lime due to less interaction with surrounding air. Both TCS and TCC concentrations were lower in coarse limed samples versus unlimed samples and the decrease was a function of time. A similar, but statistically insignificant trend in TCC and TCS levels was observed in fine lime samples with respect to unlimed samples. Liming was also found to decrease apparent E1 levels, with more notable decreases in samples amended with coarse lime. P-levels significantly increased after 1-day of contact time, stabilizing over the next 14 days of the study period. This increase and stabilization of P-levels was attributed to the pH and moisture-driven conversion of more chemically complex steroids into P.

  14. Nitrogen mineralization from anaerobically digested centrifuge cake and aged air-dried biosolids.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kuldip; Hundal, Lakhwinder S; Cox, Albert E; Granato, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to estimate nitrogen (N) mineralization of anaerobically digested centrifuge cake from the Stickney Water Reclamation Plant (SWRP) and Calumet Water Reclamation Plant (CWRP), lagoon-aged air-dried biosolids from the CWRP, and Milorganite at three rates of application (0, 12.5 and 25 Mg ha(-1)). The N mineralized varied among biosolids as follows: Milorganite (44%) > SWRP centrifuge cake (35%) > CWRP centrifuge cake (31%) > aged air-dried (13%). The N mineralized in the SWRP cake (32%) and CWRP aged air-dried biosolids (12%) determined from the 15N study were in agreement with the first study. The N mineralization value for centrifuge cake biosolids observed in our study is higher than the value given in the Part 503 rule and Illinois Part 391 guidelines. These results will be used to fine-tune biosolids application rate to match crop N demand without compromising yield while minimizing any adverse effect on the environment.

  15. Water quality at a biosolids-application area near Deer Trail, Colorado, 1993-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Tracy J.B.

    2014-01-01

    The Metro Wastewater Reclamation District (Metro District) in Denver, Colo., applied biosolids resulting from municipal sewage treatment to farmland in eastern Colorado beginning in December 1993. In mid-1993, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Metro District began monitoring water quality at the biosolids-application area about 10 miles east of Deer Trail, Colo., to evaluate baseline water quality and the combined effects of natural processes, land uses, and biosolids applications on water quality of the biosolids application area. Water quality was characterized by baseline and post-biosolids-application sampling for selected inorganic and bacteriological constituents during 1993 through 1998, with some additional specialized sampling in 1999. The study included limited sampling of surface water and the unsaturated zone, but primarily focused on groundwater. See report for complete abstract.

  16. Effect of biosolid waste compost on soil respiration in salt-affected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raya, Silvia; Gómez, Ignacio; García, Fuensanta; Navarro, José; Jordán, Manuel Miguel; Belén Almendro, María; Martín Soriano, José

    2013-04-01

    respiration, compost, electrical conductivity, salinization, Bac-Trac References: Abdelbasset Lakhdar, Mokded Rabhi, Tahar Ghnaya, Francesco Montemurro, Naceur Jedidi , Chedly Abdelly. Effectiveness of compost use in salt-affected soil. Journal of Hazardous Materials 171 (2009) pp 29-37. M. Tejada, C. Garcia, J.L. Gonzalez , M.T. Hernandez . Use of organic amendment as a strategy for saline soil remediation:Influence on the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) pp 1413-1421. I. Gomez; J.M. Disla Soriano; J. Navarro-Pedreño; F. García-Orenes; M.B. Almendro-Candel; M.M. Jordan. Quantification of soil respiration in different saline soil of Alicante (Spain). EGU General Assembly (2012). Viena. Ed. Geophysycal Research Abstracts. Vol 14 EGU2012-2399,(2012). (Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Spanish MICINN. Project Ref.: CGL2009-11194)

  17. SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF METALS IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of decades of research illustrate that metals in biosolids-amended soils are retained at a higher rate than soils without biosolids-amendments indicating that either an individual or combination of constituents within biosolids is responsible for the elevated sorption...

  18. Perfluorinated Compounds In Lime-Treated Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land application of wastewater treatment residuals, or biosolids, is a common practice in the United States, about 50% of all biosolids being applied to agricultural land as a soil amendment. Incidents have been reported in Germany and the United States where biosolids containin...

  19. Perfluorinated Compounds In Lime-Treated Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land application of wastewater treatment residuals, or biosolids, is a common practice in the United States, about 50% of all biosolids being applied to agricultural land as a soil amendment. Incidents have been reported in Germany and the United States where biosolids containin...

  20. Survival of murine norovirus and hepatitis A virus in different types of manure and biosolids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Jin, Yan; Sims, Tom; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2010-08-01

    Noroviruses and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are common causes of foodborne disease. They are usually shed in feces and have been found in sewage water, biosolids, and animal manures. With the wide application of manure and biosolids on agricultural lands, there is an increasing interest in investigating virus survival in manure and biosolids. In this study, Murine norovirus-1 (MNV) and HAV were inoculated into different types of animal manure and three types of differently treated biosolids at 20 degrees C and 4 degrees C for up to 60 days. Both HAV and MNV viral genomes degraded immediately in high pH biosolids type 2 and 3 at time zero. For other types of manure and biosolids, HAV RNA was significantly reduced in biosolids type 1 and in liquid dairy manure (DM) after 60 days stored at 20 degrees C, but was stable in all types of manure and biosolids type 1 at 4 degrees C. MNV RNA was unstable in pelletized poultry litter and biosolids type 1 at 20 degrees C, and less stable in liquid DM at both temperatures. For MNV infectivity, there was no significant difference among pelletized poultry litter, alum-treated poultry litter, raw poultry litter, and swine manure at either 20 degrees C or 4 degrees C after 60 days of storage. However, HAV stored in swine manure and raw poultry litter had significantly higher infectivity levels than HAV stored in alum-treated poultry litter at both 20 degrees C and 4 degrees C. Overall, both viruses were inactivated rapidly in alkaline pH biosolids and unstable in liquid DM, but alum added in poultry litter had different effects on the two viruses: alum inactivated some HAV at both temperatures but had no effect on MNV.

  1. Ecological impacts of long-term application of biosolids to a radiata pine plantation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianming; Kimberley, Mark O; Ross, Craig; Gielen, Gerty; Tremblay, Louis A; Champeau, Olivier; Horswell, Jacqui; Wang, Hailong

    2015-10-15

    Assessment of the ecological impact of applying biosolids is important for determining both the risks and benefits. This study investigated the impact on soil physical, chemical and biological properties, tree nutrition and growth of long-term biosolids applications to a radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) plantation growing on a Sandy Raw Soil in New Zealand. Biosolids were applied to the trial site every 3 years from tree age 6 to 19 years at three application rates: 0 (Control), 300 (Standard) and 600 (High) kg nitrogen (N) ha(-1), equivalent to 0, 3 and 6 Mg ha(-1) of dry biosolids, respectively. Tree nutrition status and growth have been monitored annually. Soil samples were collected 13 years after the first biosolids application to assess the soil properties and functioning. Both the Standard and High biosolids treatments significantly increased soil (0-50 cm depth) total carbon (C), N, and phosphorus (P), Olsen P and cation exchange capacity (CEC), reduced soil pH, but had no significant effects on soil (0-20 cm depth) physical properties including bulk density, total porosity and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The High biosolids treatment also increased concentrations of soil total cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) at 25-50 cm depth, but these concentrations were still considered very low for a soil. Ecotoxicological assessment showed no significant adverse effects of biosolids application on either the reproduction of springtails (Folsomia candida) or substrate utilisation ability of the soil microbial community, indicating no negative ecological impact of bisolids-derived heavy metals or triclosan. This study demonstrated that repeated application of biosolids to a plantation forest on a poor sandy soil could significantly improve soil fertility, tree nutrition and pine productivity. However, the long-term fate of biosolids-derived N, P and litter-retained heavy metals needs to be further monitored in the receiving environment

  2. Using biosolids from agricultural processing as food for animals

    SciTech Connect

    Belyea, R.L.; Clevenger, T.E.; Van Dyne, D.L.; Eckhoff, S.E.; Wallig, M.A.; Tumbleson, M.E.

    1993-12-31

    A diverse inventory of secondary products arise from processing of agricultural commodities. Societal, economic and physical constraints will curtail traditional disposal methods and create a need for alternatives that conserve, recycle and capitalize on these underutilized resources. Economic viability of some processes or primary products may depend upon practical alternatives for disposing of secondary products. The broad nature of secondary products and the process from which they emanate along with the complex transformations needed for remediation will require the efforts of multidisciplinary teams of scientists to identify creative solutions. Most secondary products have significant nutritional value and could be fed to animals as a means of disposal. However, detailed chemical and biological characterization is needed to determine nutrient concentrations and to ensure safety and efficacy. Feeding studies will be necessary to demonstrate palatability and to determine effects upon animal health and performance. New bioprocessing techniques will be needed to remediate the attributes of some secondary products into more appropriate forms or qualities. The potential for using wash water biosolids as animal food was investigated. Wash water biosolids from a broad cross section of food processing plants were found to be free from pollutants and other harmful entities. Nutrient composition varied considerably within and among different types of food processing plants (i.e., milk vs poultry). However, within a particular plant, variation in mineral concentration of biosolids over several months was quite small. Wash water biosolids from a milk processing plant were found to be free of pollutants and to have nutritional value. Diets containing biosolids were palatable when fed to sheep, cows, turkeys, or swine. Safety and efficacy studies with sheep and swine indicated that feeding up to 20% biosolids did not adversely affect growth, reproduction or survival.

  3. The phytoavailability of cadmium to lettuce in long-term biosolids-amended soils

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.L.; Chaney, R.L.; Angle, J.S.; Ryan, J.A.

    1998-09-01

    A field study was conducted to assess the phytoavailability of Cd in long-term biosolids-amended plots managed at high and low pH. The experiment, established 13 to 15 yr prior to the present cropping, on a Christiana fine sandy loam soil used a variety of biosolids. Two of the biosolids had total Cd concentrations of 13.4 and 210 mg kg{sup {minus}1}. A Cd salt treatment, with Cd added to soil at a rate equivalent to the Cd added by the higher Cd biosolids applied at 100 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}, was also included. The lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. longifolia) cultivar (Paris Island Cos) used in the initial study was also used in the current study. Lettuce Cd was compared between treatments, and in relation to the soil Cd/soil organic C (OC) ratio. There has been no significant increase in plant Cd since the initial cropping. With 16% of the biosolids added OC remaining, lettuce grown on the soil amended with the more contaminated biosolids was not different than that of the initial cropping. Further, significantly less Cd was taken up by lettuce grown on biosolids-amended soil than lettuce grown on soil amended with equivalent rates of Cd salt. The Cd concentration in lettuce grown in the low Cd biosolids treatment was not different from the control. These results indicate that the potential hazards associated with food chain transfer of biosolids-applied Cd are substantially lower than equivalent Cd salt treatments, and that the hazards do not increase over time.

  4. Development of a chemical kinetic model for a biosolids fluidized-bed gasifier and the effects of operating parameters on syngas quality.

    PubMed

    Champion, Wyatt M; Cooper, C David; Mackie, Kevin R; Cairney, Paul

    2014-02-01

    In an effort to decrease the land disposal of sewage sludge biosolids and to recover energy, gasification has become a viable option for the treatment of waste biosolids. The process of gasification involves the drying and devolatilization and partial oxidation of biosolids, followed closely by the reduction of the organic gases and char in a single vessel. The products of gasification include a gaseous fuel composed largely of N2, H2O, CO2, CO, H2, CH4, and tars, as well as ash and unburned solid carbon. A mathematical model was developed using published devolatilization, oxidation, and reduction reactions, and calibrated using data from three different experimental studies of laboratory-scale fluidized-bed sewage sludge gasifiers reported in the literature. The model predicts syngas production rate, composition, and temperature as functions of the biosolids composition and feed rate, the air input rate, and gasifier bottom temperature. Several data sets from the three independent literature sources were reserved for model validation, with a focus placed on five species of interest (CO, CO2, H2, CH4, and C6H6). The syngas composition predictions from the model compared well with experimental results from the literature. A sensitivity analysis on the most important operating parameters of a gasifier (bed temperature and equivalence ratio) was performed as well, with the results of the analysis offering insight into the operations of a biosolids gasifier.

  5. Reducing Phosphorus Runoff from Biosolids with Water Treatment Residuals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A large fraction of the biosolids produced in the U.S. are placed in landfills or incinerated to avoid potential water quality problems associated with non-point source phosphorus (P) runoff. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of various chemical amendments on P runoff from bi...

  6. Biosolids composting in Davenport, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Boyette, R.A.; Williams, T.; Plett, S.

    1996-09-01

    The City of Davenport, Iowa constructed an aerated static pile composting facility to process 28 dry tons per day of dewatered biosolids and 25,000 cubic yards per year of yard wastes. This is the first large totally enclosed aerated static pile biosolids composting facility to be built in several years in the US. Design of the facility was completed in March 1994, construction began in July 1994, with substantial completion of the facility in August 1995. This paper outlines the major operating systems and describes the major components of the facility. The facility processes all of the City`s anaerobically digested biosolids which is currently dewatered by belt filter presses to 20% solids. Yard wastes are used as the primary bulking agent supplemented by wood chips and shredded rubber tires to minimize O and M costs. A mechanized continuous feed mixing system consisting of hoppers, conveyors, and pugmill mixers is used to combine bulk agents with the dewatered biosolids to the desired ratio for composting. Composting and drying of these materials occurs in a totally enclosed pre-fabricated metal building for maximum environmental control and odor control. Multiple aeration stations provide both positive and negative aeration through pre-cast aeration trenches beneath compost piles.

  7. A critical review of nitrogen mineralization in biosolids-amended soil, the associated fertilizer value for crop production and potential for emissions to the environment.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Hannah; Clarke, Bradley O; Pritchard, Deborah L; Meehan, Barry; Beshah, Firew; Smith, Stephen R; Porter, Nichola A

    2016-01-15

    , compared to cooler temperate areas. It is also probably influenced by differences in upstream wastewater treatment processes that affect the balance of primary and secondary, biological sludges in the final combined sludge output from wastewater treatment, as well as the relative effectiveness of sludge stabilization treatments at specific sites. Better characterization of biosolids used in N release and mineralization investigations is therefore necessary to improve comparison of system conditions. Furthermore, the review suggested that some international fertilizer recommendations may underestimate mineralizable N in biosolids, and the N fertilizer value. Consequently, greater inputs of supplementary mineral fertilizer N may be supplied than are required for crop production, potentially increasing the risk of fertilizer N emissions to the environment. Thus greater economic and environmental savings in mineral N fertilizer application are potentially possible than are currently realized from biosolids recycling programmes.

  8. Multimedia Sampling During the Application of Biosolids on a Land Test Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This project integrated research from several disciplines to evaluate the effects of land application of biosolids on air and volatile emissions and soil microbial characteristics. Measurements included chemical, physical, and microbiological analytes.

  9. Chemical, physical and microbial properties and microbial diversity in manufactured soils produced from co-composting green waste and biosolids.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, O N; Haynes, R J; Sturm, E C

    2012-12-01

    The effects of adding biosolids to a green waste feedstock (100% green waste, 25% v/v biosolids or 50% biosolids) on the properties of composted products were investigated. Following initial composting, 20% soil or 20% fly ash/river sand mix was added to the composts as would be carried out commercially to produce manufactured soil. Temperatures during composting reached 50 °C, or above, for 23 days when biosolids were included as a composting feedstock but temperatures barely reached 40 °C when green waste alone was composted. Addition of biosolids to the feedstock increased total N, EC, extractable NH(4), NO(3) and P but lowered pH, macroporosity, water holding capacity, microbial biomass C and basal respiration in composts. Additions of soil or ash/sand to the composts greatly increased the available water holding capacity of the materials. Principal component analysis (PCA) of PCR-DGGE 16S rDNA amplicons separated bacterial communities according to addition of soil to the compost. For fungal ITS-RNA amplicons, PCA separated communities based on the addition of biosolids. Bacterial species richness and Shannon's diversity index were greatest for composts where soil had been added but for fungal communities these parameters were greatest in the treatments where 50% biosolids had been included. These results were interpreted in relation to soil having an inoculation effect and biosolids having an acidifying effect thereby favouring a fungal community. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Low Cost Remediation of Mining Sites with Biosolids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Walter; Evanylo, Gregory; Stuczynski, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    This paper will present collective results of 25 years of research by the authors into the use of municipal biosolids (sewage sludge) and other residuals to reclaim sites disturbed by a range of mining and construction activities. Loading rate experiments and demonstrations have been conducted on areas drastically disturbed by coal mining, sand mining, heavy mineral mining, urbanization, airport construction and heavy metal processing. At all sites, the post-mining soils were devoid of organic matter, very low in nutrients and frequently quite acidic. At all sites, addition of biosolids at higher than agronomic rates resulted in complete stabilization of the resultant mine soils and vigorous stable vegetation that persisted for > 5 years and has allowed enhanced invasion of native herbaceous species. Application of higher rates is not compatible with establishment of certain native tree species (e.g. Pinus sp.), however, due to adverse effects of soluble salts, nutrient enrichment and enhanced competition by grasses. An underlying goal of this program has been to develop approaches that use higher than agronomic rates of biosolids while simultaneously minimizing losses of N and P to local ground- and surface-waters. In the early 1980's, working on USA coal mining spoils, we determined that that approximately 100 Mg/ha of secondary cake biosolids was optimal for revegetation with herbaceous species, but water quality monitoring was not a concern at that time. This finding raised concerns, however, that the large amounts of total N applied (> 2500 kg/ha) would lead to nitrate-N contamination of local waters. Subsequent work in the early 1990's indicated that similar rates of biosolids could be mixed with woodchips (high palatable C source) and land-applied to large (> 100 ha) coal mining sites with no losses of nitrate-N to surface or ground-water due to microbial immobilization of the applied N. Follow-up work at three sand mining (sand & gravel and mineral sands

  11. Path Analyses of Grain P, Zn, Cu, Fe, and Ni in a Biosolids-Amended Dryland Wheat Agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Barbarick, Kenneth A; Ippolito, James A; McDaniel, Jacob P

    2016-07-01

    Land application of biosolids is an effective means of recycling plant nutrients and is the primary method of biosolids reuse endorsed by the USEPA. One issue concerning biosolids application is the extent of the contribution of biosolids-borne plant nutrients to the overall crop concentration and uptake or removal of these nutrients. We studied the effects of biosolids application on wheat ( L.) grain P, Zn, Cu, Fe, and Ni concentrations and uptake (removal) at two dryland agroecosystem sites from 1993 to 2014. We hypothesized that biosolids would have the greatest impact on wheat grain and uptake compared with ammonium bicarbonate-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (AB-DTPA)-extractable nutrient levels, soil pH, or soil organic C concentrations. We used path analyses in combination with multiple linear regression to differentiate the direct, indirect, and total effects of cumulative biosolids applications, soil AB-DTPA, soil pH, and organic C. Biosolids rates, applied biennially from 1993 to 2014 at the beginning of a wheat-fallow rotation, were 0, 2.24, 4.48, 6.72, 8.96, and 11.2 Mg ha. None of the parameters had significant direct, indirect, or total effects on grain concentrations. Biosolids applications had the greatest positive direct impact compared with AB-DTPA levels, soil pH, or soil organic C on P, Zn, Fe, and Ni uptake (removal), whereas AB-DTPA had the greatest positive direct impact on Cu uptake. Soil AB-DTPA, pH, and organic C directly affected some grain concentrations and cumulative uptake, but no consistent trends were noted. This pathway approach allowed differentiation between causation and simple correlation for the effects of cumulative biosolids applications on wheat P, Zn, Cu, Fe, and Ni cumulative uptake but did not provide these same results for grain concentrations. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. Groundwater quality protection at biosolids land application sites.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Kumarsamy, Karthik; Brobst, Robert B; Hais, Alan; Schmitz, Mark D

    2012-11-15

    Using the United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Multimedia, Multi-pathway, Multi-receptor Exposure and Risk Assessment (3MRA) technology, a computer-based biosolids groundwater risk characterization screening tool (RCST) was developed. The RCST, which generates a non-carcinogenic human health risk estimate (i.e., hazard quotient or HQ value), has the ability to conduct screening-level risk-based characterization of potential human risks associated with pollutants released from biosolids land application sites. The HQ is a human health indicator that is equal to the ratio of the pollutant dose (mass of pollutant per unit body weight per time) to the specific pollutant reference dose (R(f)d) which, in turn, is a human health benchmark defined by the EPA as a scientific estimate of the daily exposure level. A HQ value equal to or greater than one (1) suggests that the resulting conditions pose an unacceptable risk to human health. The focus of the current study was to evaluate whether the present regulatory limits established for biosolids pollutants (e.g., heavy metals) were sufficiently protective of human health associated with potential groundwater consumption using a new EPA risk assessment tool. Application of the RCST to two biosolids land application sites located near Columbus, Georgia predicted that, when the depth to groundwater was maintained at a distance of at least 2 m, regulated pollutant concentrations as large as ten (10) times the current regulatory limit (i.e., Title 40 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 503 - Ceiling Concentration Limit) could be safely land applied at rates as high as ninety (90) Megagrams per hectare (Mg ha(-1)) with no apparent non-carcinogenic human health effects associated with groundwater consumption. At these pollutant concentrations, the HQ ranged from 1.79 × 10(-9) for cadmium to 3.03 × 10(-3) for selenium. Only under unrealistically high biosolids application rates were the public

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND REVIEW OF MONITORING METHODS AND RISK ASSESSMENT MODELS USED TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF BIOSOLIDS LAND APPLICATION ON HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development and Review of monitoring methods and risk assessment models for biosolids land application impacts on air and land

    Ronald F Herrmann (NRMRL), Mike Broder (NCEA), and Mike Ware (NERL)

    Science Questions .

    MYP Science Question: What additional model...

  14. DEVELOPMENT AND REVIEW OF MONITORING METHODS AND RISK ASSESSMENT MODELS USED TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF BIOSOLIDS LAND APPLICATION ON HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development and Review of monitoring methods and risk assessment models for biosolids land application impacts on air and land

    Ronald F Herrmann (NRMRL), Mike Broder (NCEA), and Mike Ware (NERL)

    Science Questions .

    MYP Science Question: What additional model...

  15. Fermentative hydrogen gas production using biosolids pellets as the inoculum source.

    PubMed

    Kalogo, Youssouf; Bagley, David M

    2008-02-01

    Biosolids pellets produced from anaerobically digested municipal wastewater sludge by drying to greater than 90% total solids at 110-115 degrees C for at least 75 min, were tested for their suitability as an inoculum source for fermentative hydrogen production. The hydrogen recoveries (mg gaseous H(2) produced as COD/mg added substrate COD) for glucose-fed batch systems were equal, 20.2-21.5%, between biosolids pellets and boiled anaerobic digester sludge as inoculum sources. Hydrogen recoveries from primary sludge were 2.4% and 3.5% using biosolids pellets and boiled sludge, respectively, and only 0.2% and 0.8% for municipal wastewater. Biosolids pellets should be a practical inoculum source for fermentative hydrogen reactors, although the effectiveness will depend on the wastewater treated.

  16. Characterization of the biosolids composting process by hyperspectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Ilani, Talli; Herrmann, Ittai; Karnieli, Arnon; Arye, Gilboa

    2016-02-01

    Composted biosolids are widely used as a soil supplement to improve soil quality. However, the application of immature or unstable compost can cause the opposite effect. To date, compost maturation determination is time consuming and cannot be done at the composting site. Hyperspectral spectroscopy was suggested as a simple tool for assessing compost maturity and quality. Nevertheless, there is still a gap in knowledge regarding several compost maturation characteristics, such as dissolved organic carbon, NO3, and NH4 contents. In addition, this approach has not yet been tested on a sample at its natural water content. Therefore, in the current study, hyperspectral analysis was employed in order to characterize the biosolids composting process as a function of composting time. This goal was achieved by correlating the reflectance spectra in the range of 400-2400nm, using the partial least squares-regression (PLS-R) model, with the chemical properties of wet and oven-dried biosolid samples. The results showed that the proposed method can be used as a reliable means to evaluate compost maturity and stability. Specifically, the PLS-R model was found to be an adequate tool to evaluate the biosolids' total carbon and dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen and dissolved nitrogen, and nitrate content, as well as the absorbance ratio of 254/365nm (E2/E3) and C/N ratios in the dry and wet samples. It failed, however, to predict the ammonium content in the dry samples since the ammonium evaporated during the drying process. It was found that in contrast to what is commonly assumed, the spectral analysis of the wet samples can also be successfully used to build a model for predicting the biosolids' compost maturity.

  17. Recycling biosolids and lake-dredged materials to pasture-based animal agriculture: Alternative nutrient sources for forage productivity and sustainability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Domestic sewage sludge or biosolids and lake-dredged materials are examples of materials that can be used to cut fertilizer costs in pasture-based animal agriculture. Sustainable biosolids and lake-dredged materials management is based upon controlling and influencing the quantity, quality and chara...

  18. Review of 'emerging' organic contaminants in biosolids and assessment of international research priorities for the agricultural use of biosolids.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Bradley O; Smith, Stephen R

    2011-01-01

    A broad spectrum of organic chemicals is essential to modern society. Once discharged from industrial, domestic and urban sources into the urban wastewater collection system they may transfer to the residual solids during wastewater treatment and assessment of their significance and implications for beneficial recycling of the treated sewage sludge biosolids is required. Research on organic contaminants (OCs) in biosolids has been undertaken for over thirty years and the increasing body of evidence demonstrates that the majority of compounds studied do not place human health at risk when biosolids are recycled to farmland. However, there are 143,000 chemicals registered in the European Union for industrial use and all could be potentially found in biosolids. Therefore, a literature review of 'emerging' OCs in biosolids has been conducted for a selection of chemicals of potential concern for land application based upon human toxicity, evidence of adverse effects on the environment and endocrine disruption. To identify monitoring and research priorities the selected chemicals were ranked using an assessment matrix approach. Compounds were evaluated based upon environmental persistence, human toxicity, evidence of bioaccumulation in humans and the environment, evidence of ecotoxicity and the number and quality of studies focussed on the contaminant internationally. The identified chemicals of concern were ranked in decreasing order of priority: perfluorinated chemicals (PFOS, PFOA); polychlorinated alkanes (PCAs), polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs); organotins (OTs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), triclosan (TCS), triclocarban (TCC); benzothiazoles; antibiotics and pharmaceuticals; synthetic musks; bisphenol A, quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), steroids; phthalate acid esters (PAEs) and polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMSs). A number of issues were identified and recommendations for the prioritisation of further research and monitoring of 'emerging' OCs for the

  19. Evaluation of a biosolids minimization system

    SciTech Connect

    Bizier, P.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Micronair{trademark} residuals management system has been described by its manufacturer as a zero biosolids system. The system consists of three main parts--RAS screening, inerts removal, and an extremely fine bubble aeration system for the digester. The system's design assumes that trash and other non-biodegradable materials make up the bulk of residuals which would normally be digested. If these materials are removed, then the remaining biological material is assumed to biodegrade to either inerts or dissolved materials. This paper presents additional background on the design and operation of the residuals handling system. In addition, actual data from the facility detailing the operation of the residuals handling system. In addition, actual data from the facility detailing the operation of the Micronair{trademark} system since its initial start-up is provided. Finally, the benefits and drawbacks of the existing system are discussed and points for consideration in future installations identified.

  20. Vegetation success, seepage, and erosion on tailing sites reclaimed with cattle and biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    Vinson, J.; Jones, B.; Milczarek, M.; Hammermeister, D.; Word, J.

    1999-07-01

    Reclamation field studies were designed at the Phelps Dodge Morenci Mine in Arizona to evaluate the benefits of biosolids, cattle impact, and other treatment variables on soil-capped tailings. First-year monitoring has provided preliminary data about soil chemical and physical parameters, soil matrix potential profiles, erosion, and vegetation measurements of ground cover, biomass production and frequency. Plots were first seeded in January 1998 with a cover crop of oats or barley. Plots were seeded again in August 1998 with native and native plus non-native plant species. Early productivity from the second seeding was inversely related to seedling density. Plots capped with unamended Gila conglomerate (Gila) materials contained meager plant nutrient levels and produced numerous small seedlings that were poorly rooted and had little standing biomass. Vegetation on the cattle and biosolids treatments was vigorous and productive but at a much lower density than unamended Gila plots. Cattle treatment added little plant-nutrient value to the Gila cap compared to biosolids amendment. However, high rates of biosolids brought excessive salinity. Straw from the cattle treatment provided an effective mulch to improve soil moisture storage but increased the potential for deep seepage. Unamended Gila and biosolids plots had intermediate moisture storage and a modest potential for seepage compared to bare tailings. Mulch cover plus a lower rate of biosolids on Gila is seen as a promising, cost-effective amendment combination for future evaluation.

  1. Wind erosion potential following application of biosolids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The application of biosolids to agricultural land has the potential to improve soil health and crop production. These benefits could also possibly reduce the threat of wind erosion in arid and semiarid regions. Therefore, we assessed the impact of biosolids on wind erosion of agricultural land at Li...

  2. Nitrogen loss during solar drying of biosolids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Solar drying has been used extensively to dewater biosolids for ease of transportation and to a lesser degree to reduce pathogens prior to land application. The nitrogen in biosolids makes it a relatively inexpensive but valuable source of fertilizer. In this study, nitrogen loss from tilled and unt...

  3. Innovative methodology for electrical conductivity measurements and metal partition in biosolid pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Manuel Miguel; Rincón-Mora, Beatriz; Belén Almendro-Candel, María; Navarro-Pedreño, José; Gómez-Lucas, Ignacio; Bech, Jaume

    2017-04-01

    Use of biosolids to improve the nutrient content in a soil is a common practice. The obligation to restore abandoned mine and the correct application of biosolids is guaranteed by the legislation on waste management, biosolids and soil conservation (Jordán et al. 2008). The present research was conducted to determine electrical conductivity in dry wastes (pellets) using a innovative methodology (Camilla and Jordán, 2009). On the other hand, the present study was designed to examine the distribution of selected heavy metals in biosolid pellets, and also to relate the distribution patterns of these metals. In this context, heavy metal concentrations were studied in biosolid pellets under different pressures. Electrical conductivity measurements were taken in biosolid pellets under pressures on the order of 50 to 150 MPa and with currents of 10-15 A. Measurements of electrical conductivity and heavy metal content for different areas (H1, H2, and H3) were taken. Total content of metals was determined following microwave digestion and analysed by ICP/MS. Triplicate portions were weighed in polycarbonate centrifuge tubes and sequentially extracted. The distribution of chemical forms of Cd, Ni, Cr, and Pb in the biosolids was studied using a sequential extraction procedure that fractionates the metal into soluble-exchangeable, specifically sorbed-carbonate bound, oxidizable, reducible, and residual forms. The residual, reducible, and carbonate-sorbed forms were dominant. Higher Cr and Ni content were detected in pellets made with biosolids from the H3. The highest Cd and Ni values were detected in the H2. The trends of the conductivity curves were similar for the sludge from the isolation surface (H1) and for the mesophilous area (H2). In the case of the thermophilous area (H3), the electrical conductivity showed extremely high values. This behaviour was similar in the case of the Cr and Ni content. However, in the case of Cd and Pb, the highest values were detected in

  4. Sorption of Pharmaceuticals, Heavy Metals, and Herbicides to Biochar in the Presence of Biosolids.

    PubMed

    Bair, Daniel A; Mukome, Fungai N D; Popova, Inna E; Ogunyoku, Temitope A; Jefferson, Allie; Wang, Daoyuan; Hafner, Sarah C; Young, Thomas M; Parikh, Sanjai J

    2016-11-01

    Agricultural practices are increasingly incorporating recycled waste materials, such as biosolids, to provide plant nutrients and enhance soil functions. Although biosolids provide benefits to soil, municipal wastewater treatment plants receive pharmaceuticals and heavy metals that can accumulate in biosolids, and land application of biosolids can transfer these contaminants to the soil. Environmental exposure of these contaminants may adversely affect wildlife, disrupt microbial communities, detrimentally affect human health through long-term exposure, and cause the proliferation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This study considers the use of biochar co-amendments as sorbents for contaminants from biosolids. The sorption of pharmaceuticals (ciprofloxacin, triclocarban, triclosan), and heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Ni, Pb) to biochars and biochar-biosolids-soil mixtures was examined. Phenylurea herbicide (monuron, diuron, linuron) sorption was also studied to determine the potential effect of biochar on soil-applied herbicides. A softwood (SW) biochar (510°C) and a walnut shell (WN) biochar (900°C) were used as contrasting biochars to highlight potential differences in biochar reactivity. Kaolinite and activated carbon served as mineral and organic controls. Greater sorption for almost all contaminants was observed with WN biochar over SW biochar. The addition of biosolids decreased sorption of herbicides to SW biochar, whereas there was no observable change with WN biochar. The WN biochar showed potential for reducing agrochemical and contaminant transport but may inhibit the efficacy of soil-applied herbicides. This study provides support for minimizing contaminant mobility from biosolids using biochar as a co-amendment and highlights the importance of tailoring biochars for specific characteristics through feedstock selection and pyrolysis-gasification conditions. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science

  5. Bioavailability of heavy metals in strongly acidic soils treated with exceptional quality biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    Basta, N.T.; Sloan, J.J.

    1999-03-01

    New federal regulations may increase application of exceptional quality (EQ) biosolids to acidic soils, and information on the effect of this practice on bioavailability of heavy metal is limited. The objective of this study was to compare bioavailability of heavy metal in soil treated with nonalkaline or alkaline EQ biosolids with limestone-treated soils. Three acidic soils (pH 3.7--4.3) were treated with three amounts of lime-stabilized biosolids (LS), anaerobic-digested biosolids (AN), or agricultural limestone (L), and incubated at 25 C. Soil solution Cd, Zn, and other chemical constituents were measured at 1, 30, 90, and 180 d incubation. Soil solution Cd and Zn were AN > LS {ge} L, C. Soil solution Cd and Zn increased with AN applied but decreased wit h LS applied. The high application of LS had soil solution Zn dramatically decreased at soil pH > 5.5 and >5.1, respectively. Soil solution Cd and Zn increases were AN > LS with incubation time. Biosolids treatments increased heavy metal in Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and NaOAc fractions. Except for Cd, most metal from biosolids were in EDTA and HNO{sub 3} fractions. Heavy metal bioavailability, measured using lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), was AN > LS {ge} L, C. Although state regulations prohibiting application of nonalkaline EQ biosolids to acidic soil is a prudent practice, application of EQ alkaline biosolids that achieves soil pH > 5 minimizes risk from soil solution Cd and Zn and plant uptake of heavy metal.

  6. Nitrogen loss during solar drying of biosolids.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, S A; Song, I; Artiola, J F; Choi, C Y

    2008-01-01

    Solar drying has been used extensively to dewater biosolids for ease of transportation and to a lesser degree to reduce pathogens prior to land application. The nitrogen in biosolids makes them a relatively inexpensive but valuable source of fertilizer. In this study, nitrogen loss from tilled and untilled biosolids was investigated during the solar drying process. Samples of aerobically and anaerobically digested biosolids during three solar drying experiments were analyzed for their nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) ions concentrations. Nitrogen losses varied depending on the solar drying season and tillage. Although not directly measured, the majority of nitrogen loss occurred through ammonia volatilization; organic nitrogen content (organic N) remained relatively stable for each sample, nitrate concentrations for the majority of samples remained below detectable levels and the decline of ammonium-nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) generally followed the trend of moisture loss in the biosolids.

  7. Odorants and malodors associated with land application of biosolids stabilized with lime and coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Laor, Yael; Naor, Moshe; Ravid, Uzi; Fine, Pinchas; Halachmi, Ilan; Chen, Yona; Baybikov, Rima

    2011-01-01

    Malodor emissions limit public acceptance of using municipal biosolids as natural organic resources in agricultural production. We aimed to identify major odorants and to evaluate odor concentrations associated with land application of anaerobically digested sewage sludges (Class B) and their alkaline (lime and coal fly ash)-stabilized products (Class A). These two types of biosolids were applied at 12.6 tonnes ha(-1) (dry weight) to microplots of very fine clayey Vertisol in the Jezreel Valley, northern Israel. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the biosolids before and during alkaline stabilization and after incorporation into the soil were analyzed by headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Odor concentrations at the plots were evaluated on site with a Nasal Ranger field olfactometer that sniffed over a defined land surface area through a static chamber. The odors emitted by anaerobically digested sewage sludges from three activated sludge water treatment plants had one characteristic chemical fingerprint. Alkaline stabilization emitted substantial odors associated with high concentrations of ammonia and release of nitrogen-containing VOCs and did not effectively reduce the potential odor annoyance. Odorous VOCs could be generated within the soil after biosolids incorporation, presumably because of anaerobic conditions within soil-biosolids aggregates. We propose that dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, which seem to be most related to the odor concentrations of biosolids-treated soil, be used as potential chemical markers for the odor annoyance associated with incorporation of anaerobically digested sewage sludges.

  8. Behaviour of fullerenes (C60) in the terrestrial environment: potential release from biosolids-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Divina A; Kookana, Rai S; Kirby, Jason K; Martin, Sheridan M; Shareef, Ali; Du, Jun; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2013-11-15

    Owing of their wide-range of commercial applications, fullerene (C60) nanoparticles, are likely to reach environments through the application of treated sludge (biosolids) from wastewater treatment plants to soils. We examined the release behaviour of C60 from contaminated biosolids added to soils with varying physicochemical characteristics. Incubation studies were carried out in the dark for up to 24 weeks, by adding biosolids spiked (1.5mg/kg) with three forms of C60 (suspended in water, in humic acid, and precipitated/particulate) to six contrasting soils. Leaching of different biosolids+soil systems showed that only small fractions of C60 (<5% of applied amount) were released, depending on incubation time and soil properties (particularly dissolved organic carbon content). Release of C60 from unamended soils was greater (at least twice as much) than from biosolids-amended soils. The form of C60 used to spike the biosolids had no significant effect on the release of C60 from the different systems. Contact time of C60 in these systems only slightly increased the apparent release up to 8 weeks, followed by a decrease to 24 weeks. Mass balance analysis at the completion of the experiment revealed that 20-60% of the initial C60 applied could not be accounted for in these systems; the reasons for this are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Biosolid colloid-mediated transport of copper, zinc, and lead in waste-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Karathanasis, A D; Johnson, D M C; Matocha, C J

    2005-01-01

    Increasing land applications of biosolid wastes as soil amendments have raised concerns about potential toxic effects of associated metals on the environment. This study investigated the ability of biosolid colloids to transport metals associated with organic waste amendments through subsurface soil environments with leaching experiments involving undisturbed soil monoliths. Biosolid colloids were fractionated from a lime-stabilized, an aerobically digested, and a poultry manure organic waste and applied onto the monoliths at a rate of 0.7 cm/h. Eluents were monitored for Cu, Zn, Pb, and colloid concentrations over 16 to 24 pore volumes of leaching. Mass-balance calculations indicated significantly higher (up to 77 times) metal elutions in association with the biosolid colloids in both total and soluble fractions over the control treatments. Eluted metal loads varied with metal, colloid, and soil type, following the sequences Zn = Cu > Pb, and ADB > PMB > LSB colloids. Colloid and metal elution was enhanced by decreasing pH and colloid size, and increasing soil macroporosity and organic matter content. Breakthrough curves were mostly irregular, showing several maxima and minima as a result of preferential macropore flow and multiple clogging and flushing cycles. Soil- and colloid-metal sorption affinities were not reliable predictors of metal attenuation/elution loads, underscoring the dynamic nature of transport processes. The findings demonstrate the important role of biosolid colloids as contaminant carriers and the significant risk they pose, if unaccounted, for soil and ground water contamination in areas receiving heavy applications of biosolid waste amendments.

  10. Pyrolysis of wastewater biosolids significantly reduces estrogenicity.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, T C; Zitomer, D H; McNamara, P J

    2016-11-05

    Most wastewater treatment processes are not specifically designed to remove micropollutants. Many micropollutants are hydrophobic so they remain in the biosolids and are discharged to the environment through land-application of biosolids. Micropollutants encompass a broad range of organic chemicals, including estrogenic compounds (natural and synthetic) that reside in the environment, a.k.a. environmental estrogens. Public concern over land application of biosolids stemming from the occurrence of micropollutants hampers the value of biosolids which are important to wastewater treatment plants as a valuable by-product. This research evaluated pyrolysis, the partial decomposition of organic material in an oxygen-deprived system under high temperatures, as a biosolids treatment process that could remove estrogenic compounds from solids while producing a less hormonally active biochar for soil amendment. The estrogenicity, measured in estradiol equivalents (EEQ) by the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay, of pyrolyzed biosolids was compared to primary and anaerobically digested biosolids. The estrogenic responses from primary solids and anaerobically digested solids were not statistically significantly different, but pyrolysis of anaerobically digested solids resulted in a significant reduction in EEQ; increasing pyrolysis temperature from 100°C to 500°C increased the removal of EEQ with greater than 95% removal occurring at or above 400°C. This research demonstrates that biosolids treatment with pyrolysis would substantially decrease (removal>95%) the estrogens associated with this biosolids product. Thus, pyrolysis of biosolids can be used to produce a valuable soil amendment product, biochar, that minimizes discharge of estrogens to the environment.

  11. Biosolid stockpiles are a significant point source for greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Ramaprasad; Livesley, Stephen J; Gregory, David; Arndt, Stefan K

    2014-10-01

    CH4 production probably because of aerobic stockpile conditions or CH4 oxidation in the outer stockpile layers. Although the GHG emission rate decreased with biosolid age, managers of biosolid stockpiles should assess alternate storage or uses for biosolids to avoid nutrient losses and GHG emissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Occurrence and fate of Ascaris lumbricoides ova in biosolids in Victoria, Australia: a human health risk assessment of biosolids storage periods.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Nicholas A; Surapaneni, Aravind; Smith, David; Stevens, Daryl

    2017-09-01

    Reuse of sewage biosolids in Victoria, Australia, typically involves mesophilic anaerobic digestion followed by air-drying and long-term storage to ensure removal of ova of soil-transmitted helminths (STH) such as Ascaris lumbricoides. Long-term storage degrades the biosolids' agronomic quality due to the loss of key plant nutrients and takes up large areas of storage space. The impact of varying biosolids holding times and other processes on STH using Ascaris as the reference STH pathogen was examined in this study using a quantitative risk analysis approach. Risk modelling of the potential human health impacts from the presence of Ascaris ova in biosolids was undertaken for discrete holding periods of 1, 2 and 3 years. Modelling showed that to meet the WHO 1 μDALY·person(-1)·year(-1) disease burdens guideline for limiting exposure category, a biosolids storage period of 1.24 years or 2.1 years would be required, depending on the data source of ova shedding rates per worm (Bangladesh or Nigeria, respectively). The soil exposure and salad/root vegetable consumption models included a number of variables with moderate to high degrees of uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulation was used to assess the effect of uncertainty in model input variables and to assist in highlighting areas for further research.

  13. Dynamics of nitrogen in a PAHs contaminated soil amended with biosolid or vermicompost in the presence of earthworms.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Ramos, S M; Alvarez-Bernal, D; Dendooven, L

    2007-05-01

    Nitrogen mineralization in PAHs contaminated soil in presence of Eisenia fetida amended with biosolid or vermicompost was investigated. Sterilized and unsterilized soil was contaminated with PAHs, added with E. fetida and biosolid or vermicompost and incubated aerobically for 70 days, while dynamics of inorganic N were monitored. Addition of E. fetida to sterilized soil increased concentration of NH(4)(+) 100> mg N kg(-1), while concentrations in unsterilized remained <60 mg N kg(-1) except for soil amended with biosolid plus PAHs where it increased to >80 mg kg(-1). Addition of PAHs had no significant effect on concentration of NH(4)(+) compared to the unamended soil, except in the soil added with biosolid. Addition of E. fetida to sterilized soil increased concentration of NO(2)(-) 15> mg N kg(-1) while concentrations in unsterilized soil remained <7.5 mg N kg(-1) except for soil amended with biosolid where it increased to >20 mg kg(-1). Addition of PAHs had no significant effect on concentration of NO(2)(-) compared to the unamended soil. Addition of biosolid and vermicompost increased concentration of NO(3)(-), while addition of E. fetida decreased concentration of NO(3)(-) in biosolid amended soil. It was found that NH(4)(+) and NO(2)(-) oxidizers were present in the gut of E. fetida, but their activity was not sufficient enough to inhibit a temporarily increase in concentrations of NH(4)(+) and NO(2)(-). Contamination with PAHs induced immobilization of N in biosolid or vermicompost amended soil, as did feeding of E. fetida on biosolid or vermicompost.

  14. Improvements in biosolids quality resulting from the Clean Water Act.

    PubMed

    Hundal, Lakhwinder S; Kumar, Kuldip; Cox, Albert; Zhang, Heng; Granato, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Promulgation of the Clean Water Act (CWA) authorized the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) to regulate quality standards for surface waters and establish regulations limiting the amounts and types of pollutants entering the nation's waters. U.S. EPA imposed national pretreatment standards on industrial wastes discharged to the collection systems of publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) and promulgated General Pretreatment Regulations in 1978. This study analyzed trace metals data from the National Sewage Sludge Surveys conducted by U.S. EPA and the American Metropolitan Sewage Agencies (AMSA) to evaluate the effect of implementation of the national industrial pretreatment standards on concentrations of trace metals in sludges generated by POTWs in the United States. The data showed that implementation of pretreatment programs has been highly effective in reducing the amount of pollutants that enter POTWs and has resulted in a substantial reduction in the levels of trace metals in the municipal sludges. Concentrations of chromium, lead, and nickel in sludge declined by 78, 73, and 63%, respectively, within a year after promulgation of General Pretreatment Regulations. Resulting from these measures, metal concentrations in the sludges generated by a majority of POTWs in the United States are sufficiently low that the sludges can be classified as biosolids and also meet the U.S. EPA's exceptional quality criteria for trace metals in biosolids. This improvement gives POTWs the option to use their biosolids beneficially through land application.

  15. Desorption kinetics of ciprofloxacin in municipal biosolids determined by diffusion gradient in thin films.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, E; Starnes, D

    2016-12-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a commonly-prescribed antibiotic that is largely excreted by the body, and is often found at elevated concentrations in treated sewage sludge (biosolids) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. When biosolids are applied to soils, they could release CIP to surface runoff, which could adversely affect growth of aquatic organisms that inhabit receiving water bodies. The hazard risk largely depends on the amount of antibiotic in the solid phase that can be released to solution (labile CIP), its diffusion coefficient, and sorption/desorption exchange rates in biosolids particles. In this study, these processes were evaluated in a Class A Exceptional Quality Biosolids using a diffusion gradient in thin films (DGT) sampler that continuously removed CIP from solution, which induced desorption and diffusion in biosolids. Mass accumulation of antibiotic in the sampler over time was fit by a diffusion transport and exchange model available in the software tool 2D-DIFS to derive the distribution coefficient of labile CIP (Kdl) and sorption/desorption rate constants in the biosolids. The Kdl was 13 mL g(-1), which equated to 16% of total CIP in the labile pool. Although the proportion of labile CIP was considerable, release rates to solution were constrained by slow desorption kinetics (desorption rate constant = 4 × 10(-6) s(-1)) and diffusion rate (effective diffusion coefficient = 6 × 10(-9) cm(2) s(-1). Studies are needed to investigate how changes in temperature, water content, pH and other physical and chemical characteristics can influence antibiotic release kinetics and availability and mobility in biosolid-amended soils.

  16. Other Clean Water Act Test Methods: Biosolids

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Methods for analysis of chemical pollutants in biosolids (municipal sewage sludge). These methods are not approved under 40 CFR Part 136, but may be of interest to regulated entities, permitting authorities and the public.

  17. ANALYZING BIOSOLIDS FOR FECAL COLIFORM AND SALMONELLAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current federal regulations required monitoring for fecal coliforms or Salmonella in biosolids destined for land application. Standard protocols designed to quantify these organisms in water or wastewater were identified and specified in these regulations. However, proto...

  18. ANALYZING BIOSOLIDS FOR FECAL COLIFORM AND SALMONELLAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current federal regulations required monitoring for fecal coliforms or Salmonella in biosolids destined for land application. Standard protocols designed to quantify these organisms in water or wastewater were identified and specified in these regulations. However, proto...

  19. Influence of thermal hydrolysis-anaerobic digestion treatment of wastewater solids on concentrations of triclosan, triclocarban, and their transformation products in biosolids.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Dana L; Rice, Clifford P; Ramirez, Mark; Torrents, Alba

    2017-03-01

    The growing concern worldwide regarding the presence of emerging contaminants in biosolids calls for a better understanding of how different treatment technologies at water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) can influence concentrations prior to biosolids land application. This study focuses on the influence of solids treatment via the Cambi Thermal Hydrolysis Process™ in conjunction with anaerobic digestion (TH-AD) on concentrations of triclosan (TCS), triclocarban (TCC), and their transformation products in biosolids and sludges. Concentrations of the target analytes in biosolids from the TH-AD process (Class A), sludges from the individual TH-AD treatment steps, and limed biosolids (Class B) from the same WRRF were compared. TCC concentrations were significantly lower in Class A biosolids than those in the Class B product - a removal that occurred during thermal hydrolysis. Concentrations of TCS, methyl triclosan, and 2,4-dichlorophenol, conversely, increased during anaerobic digestion, leading to significantly higher concentrations of these compounds in Class A biosolids when compared to Class B biosolids. Implementation of the TH-AD process had mixed effect on contaminant concentrations.

  20. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF MICROBIOLOGICAL METHODS FOR EXAMINATION OF BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this presentation is to discuss pathogens of concern in biosolids, the analytical techniques used to evaluate microorganisms in biosolids, and to discuss standardization and validation of analytical protocols for microbes within a complex matrix. Implications of ...

  1. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF MICROBIOLOGICAL METHODS FOR EXAMINATION OF BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this presentation is to discuss pathogens of concern in biosolids, the analytical techniques used to evaluate microorganisms in biosolids, and to discuss standardization and validation of analytical protocols for microbes within a complex matrix. Implications of ...

  2. SAMPLE COLLECTION AND HANDLING FOR MICROBIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this presentation is to discuss sample collection and handling methods currently in use for detection and enumeration of microorganisms in biosolids and municipal wastewater sludges. Untreated sludges and biosolids are rarely homogeneous and present a challenge ...

  3. Evaluation Of Odors Associated With Land Application Of Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    An odor study was performed at a biosolids application demonstration site using several different gas collection devices and analytical methods to determine changes in air concentration of several organic and inorganic compounds associated with biosolids application over various ...

  4. Evaluation Of Odors Associated With Land Application Of Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    An odor study was performed at a biosolids application demonstration site using several different gas collection devices and analytical methods to determine changes in air concentration of several organic and inorganic compounds associated with biosolids application over various ...

  5. SAMPLE COLLECTION AND HANDLING FOR MICROBIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this presentation is to discuss sample collection and handling methods currently in use for detection and enumeration of microorganisms in biosolids and municipal wastewater sludges. Untreated sludges and biosolids are rarely homogeneous and present a challenge ...

  6. MICROORGANISMS IN BIOSOLIDS: ANALYTICAL METHODS DEVELOPMENT, STANDARDIZATION, AND VALIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this presentation is to discuss pathogens of concern in biosolids, the analytical techniques used to evaluate microorganisms in biosolids, and to discuss standardization and validation of analytical protocols for microbes within such a complex matrix. Implicatio...

  7. Terrestrial ecological risk evaluation for triclosan in land-applied biosolids.

    PubMed

    Fuchsman, Phyllis; Lyndall, Jennifer; Bock, Michael; Lauren, Darrel; Barber, Timothy; Leigh, Katrina; Perruchon, Elyse; Capdevielle, Marie

    2010-07-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial compound found in many consumer products including soaps and personal care products. Most triclosan is disposed of down household drains, whereupon it is conveyed to wastewater treatment plants. Although a high percentage of triclosan biodegrades during wastewater treatment, most of the remainder is adsorbed to sludge, which may ultimately be applied to land as biosolids. We evaluated terrestrial ecological risks related to triclosan in land-applied biosolids for soil microbes, plants, soil invertebrates, mammals, and birds. Exposures are estimated using a probabilistic fugacity-based model. Triclosan concentrations in biosolids and reported biosolids application rates are compiled to support estimation of triclosan concentrations in soil. Concentrations in biota tissue are estimated using an equilibrium partitioning model for plants and worms and a steady-state model for small mammals; the resulting tissue concentrations are used to model mammalian and avian dietary exposures. Toxicity benchmarks are identified from a review of published and proprietary studies. The results indicate that adverse effects related to soil fertility (i.e., disruption of nitrogen cycling) would be expected only under "worst-case" exposures, under certain soil conditions and would likely be transient. The available data indicate that adverse effects on plants, invertebrates, birds, and mammals due to triclosan in land-applied biosolids are unlikely. (c) 2010 SETAC.

  8. Adsorption and degradation of triclosan and triclocarban in soils and biosolids-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenxi; Spongberg, Alison L; Witter, Jason D

    2009-06-10

    Triclosan and triclocarban are antibacterial agents that are widely used in numerous personal care products. Limited information is available on their environmental behavior in soils and soils land applied with wastewaters and biosolids. In this study, laboratory experiments were performed to investigate their adsorption and degradation in soils. Both antibacterial agents adsorbed strongly to the sandy loam and silty clay soils with and without addition of biosolids, with distribution coefficients (K(d)) ranging from 178 to 264 L kg(-1) for triclosan and from 763 to 1187 L kg(-1) for triclocarban. Sorption of triclosan decreased with increase in soil pH from 4 to 8, whereas triclocarban sorption showed no effect within the tested pH range. Competitive sorption was observed when triclosan and triclocarban coexisted, but the cosolute effect was concentration dependent. Biosolids amendment increased the sorption of triclosan and triclocarban, likely due to the addition of soil organic matter, but displayed no significant effect on degradation.

  9. THE PHYTOAVAILABILITY OF CADMIUM TO LETTUCE IN LONG-TERM BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was conducted to assess the phytoavailability of Cd in long-term biosolids-amended field plots managed at high and low pH. The experiment, established 13-15 yr prior to the present cropping, on a Christiana fine sandy loam soil (a clayey, kaolinitic, mesic Typic Pa...

  10. THE PHYTOAVAILABILITY OF CADMIUM TO LETTUCE IN LONG-TERM BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was conducted to assess the phytoavailability of Cd in long-term biosolids-amended field plots managed at high and low pH. The experiment, established 13-15 yr prior to the present cropping, on a Christiana fine sandy loam soil (a clayey, kaolinitic, mesic Typic Pa...

  11. Relevant approach to assess performances of wastewater biosolids composting in terms of micropollutants removal.

    PubMed

    Patureau, D; Hernandez-Raquet, G; Balaguer, P; Delgenes, N; Muller, M; Dagnino, S; Delgenes, J P

    2008-01-01

    The presence of organic pollutants in wastewater biosolids and their possible impact to the environment contribute to decrease interest for the agricultural spreading of biosolids. It is thus important to have a better overview of sewage sludge quality in terms of organic pollutant content and ecotoxicity assessment. It is also necessary to better understand the impact of biosolid composting processes on the pollutant and toxicity removal. Therefore, concentrations of oestrogens (E), nonyphenol ethoxylates (NPE), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and linear alkyl benzene sulphonates (LAS) and some of their associated toxic effects were determined at different stages of a composting process using, respectively, chemical analysis and in vitro bioassays (estrogen receptor alpha, dioxin receptor and pregnan X receptor reporter cell lines). Pollutants concentrations were higher in the final compost than in biosolid due to dry matter reduction through composting. Mass balance calculation shows a positive impact of the aerobic treatment on the removal of the most degradable pollutants. The three toxicological activities were measured in both biosolids and in the initial and final compost: oestrogenic activity increased whereas dioxin-like and pregnan X activities decreased. The difficulty in correlating chemical and toxicological results underlines the importance of combining both approaches in order to improve the assessment of the compost quality. (c) IWA Publishing 2008.

  12. ADSORPTION OF CADMIUM ON BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A considerable controversy exists over the biosolid phase (organic or inorganic) responsible for the reduction in phytoavailable Cd in soils amended with biosolids as compared to soils amended with inorganic salts. To test the importance of these two phases, 2 biosolids, 15 bioso...

  13. A STUDY OF LAND APPLICATION OF ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field-scale research project was conducted in 2004-2005 to evaluate land application of anaerobically digested biosolids at agronomic levels. Biosolids had not been applied to this land previously. For this study, biosolids wee applied in a 100-m diameter circle by a side dis...

  14. Fate of triclosan and methyltriclosan in soil from biosolids application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosolids contain synthetic chemicals that have the potential to alter soil microbial communities and disrupt endocrine functions if they move offsite. In this study, the persistence of triclosan (TCS), an antibacterial compound normally found in biosolids and in soils after biosolids applications ...

  15. Fate of triclosan and methyltriclosan in soil from biosolids application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosolids contain synthetic chemicals that have the potential to alter soil microbial communities and disrupt endocrine functions if they move offsite. The persistence of triclosan (TCS), an antibacterial compound normally found in biosolids and in soils after biosolids applications was evaluated. ...

  16. EVALUATION OF BACTERIOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF DISINFECTION FOR ALKALINE TREATED BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States, treated municipal sludge, also known as biosolids, may be land applied with certain site restrictions. According to U.S. regulations a Class B biosolid is any biosolid that following appropriate treatment, meets the criterion of 2 million or less fecal coli...

  17. Can biosolids reduce wind erosion of agricultural soils?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The application of biosolids to agricultural land has the potential to improve soil health and crop production. In addition, organic material contained in biosolids may enhance biological activity, retention of soil water, and soil aggregation. Thus, there is a likelihood that biosolids applied to s...

  18. EVALUATION OF BACTERIOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF DISINFECTION FOR ALKALINE TREATED BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States, treated municipal sludge, also known as biosolids, may be land applied with certain site restrictions. According to U.S. regulations a Class B biosolid is any biosolid that following appropriate treatment, meets the criterion of 2 million or less fecal coli...

  19. A STUDY OF LAND APPLICATION OF ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field-scale research project was conducted in 2004-2005 to evaluate land application of anaerobically digested biosolids at agronomic levels. Biosolids had not been applied to this land previously. For this study, biosolids wee applied in a 100-m diameter circle by a side dis...

  20. ADSORPTION OF CADMIUM ON BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A considerable controversy exists over the biosolid phase (organic or inorganic) responsible for the reduction in phytoavailable Cd in soils amended with biosolids as compared to soils amended with inorganic salts. To test the importance of these two phases, 2 biosolids, 15 bioso...

  1. Towards a comprehensive greenhouse gas emissions inventory for biosolids.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Gaitan, J P; Short, Michael D; Lundie, Sven; Stuetz, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Effective handling and treatment of the solids fraction from advanced wastewater treatment operations carries a substantial burden for water utilities relative to the total economic and environmental impacts from modern day wastewater treatment. While good process-level data for a range of wastewater treatment operations are becoming more readily available, there remains a dearth of high quality operational data for solids line processes in particular. This study seeks to address this data gap by presenting a suite of high quality, process-level life cycle inventory data covering a range of solids line wastewater treatment processes, extending from primary treatment through to biosolids reuse in agriculture. Within the study, the impacts of secondary treatment technology and key parameters such as sludge retention time, activated sludge age and primary-to-waste activated sludge ratio (PS:WAS) on the life cycle inventory data of solids processing trains for five model wastewater treatment plant configurations are presented. BioWin(®) models are calibrated with real operational plant data and estimated electricity consumption values were reconciled against overall plant energy consumption. The concept of "representative crop" is also introduced in order to reduce the uncertainty associated with nitrous oxide emissions and soil carbon sequestration offsets under biosolids land application scenarios. Results indicate that both the treatment plant biogas electricity offset and the soil carbon sequestration offset from land-applied biosolids, represent the main greenhouse gas mitigation opportunities. In contrast, fertiliser offsets are of relatively minor importance in terms of the overall life cycle emissions impacts. Results also show that fugitive methane emissions at the plant, as well as nitrous oxide emissions both at the plant and following agricultural application of biosolids, are significant contributors to the overall greenhouse gas balance and combined are

  2. Transesterification of waste activated sludge for biosolids reduction and biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    2017-08-01

    Transesterification of waste activated sludge (WAS) was evaluated as a cost-effective technique to reduce excess biosolids and recover biodiesel feedstock from activated sludge treatment plants. A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated with recycling transesterification-treated WAS back to the aeration basin. Seventy percent recycling of WAS resulted in 48% reduction of excess biosolids in comparison to a conventional SBR, which was operated in parallel as the control SBR. Biodiesel recovery of 8.0% (dried weight basis) was achieved at an optimum transesterification condition using acidic methanol and xylene as co-solvent. Average effluent soluble COD and TSS concentrations from the test SBR and control SBR were comparable, indicating that the recycling of transesterification-treated WAS did not have detrimental effect on the effluent quality. This study demonstrated that transesterification and recycling of WAS may be a feasible technique for reducing excess biosolids while producing valuable biodiesel feedstock from activated sludge process.

  3. Earthworm bioassays and seedling emergence for monitoring toxicity, aging and bioaccumulation of anthropogenic waste indicator compounds in biosolids-amended soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinney, Chad A.; Campbell, Bryan R.; Thompson, Regina; Furlong, Edward T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Burkhardt, Mark R.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Werner, Stephen L.; Hay, Anthony G.

    2012-01-01

    Land application of biosolids (treated sewage sludge) can be an important route for introducing xenobiotic compounds into terrestrial environments. There is a paucity of available information on the effects of biosolids amendment on terrestrial organisms. In this study, the influence of biosolids and biosolids aging on earthworm (Eisenia fetida) reproduction and survival and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seedling emergence was investigated. Earthworms were exposed to soils amended with varying quantities of biosolids (0, 1, 2, 3, or 4% dry mass). To investigate the influence of biosolids aging, the biosolids used in the study were aged for differing lengths of time (2 or 8 weeks) prior to exposure. All of the adult earthworms survived in the biosolids–amended soils at all concentrations that were aged for 2 weeks; however, only 20% of the adults survived in the soil amended with the highest concentration of biosolids and aged for 8 weeks. Reproduction as measured by mean number of juveniles and unhatched cocoons produced per treatment correlated inversely with biosolids concentration, although the effects were generally more pronounced in the 8-week aged biosolids–soil samples. Latent seedling emergence and reduced seedling fitness correlated inversely with biosolids concentration, but these effects were tempered in the 8-week aged versus the 2-week aged soil–biosolids mixtures. Anthropogenic waste indicator compounds (AWIs) were measured in the biosolids, biosolids–soil mixtures, and earthworm samples. Where possible, bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were calculated or estimated. A wide variety of AWIs were detected in the biosolids (51 AWIs) and earthworm samples (≤ 19 AWI). The earthworms exposed to the 8-week aged biosolids–soil mixtures tended to accumulate greater quantities of AWIs compared to the 2-week aged mixture, suggesting that the bioavailability of some AWIs was enhanced with aging. The BAFs for a given AWI varied with treatment. Notably large

  4. Analytical Results for Municipal Biosolids Samples from a Monitoring Program near Deer Trail, Colorado (U.S.A.), 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Smith, D.B.; Yager, T.J.B.; Berry, C.J.; Adams, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Since late 1993, the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District of Denver (Metro District), a large wastewater treatment plant in Denver, Colorado, has applied Grade I, Class B biosolids to about 52,000 acres of nonirrigated farmland and rangeland near Deer Trail, Colorado (U.S.A.). In cooperation with the Metro District in 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began monitoring ground water at part of this site. In 1999, the USGS began a more comprehensive monitoring study of the entire site to address stakeholder concerns about the potential chemical effects of biosolids applications to water, soil, and vegetation. This more comprehensive monitoring program recently has been extended through 2010. Monitoring components of the more comprehensive study include biosolids collected at the wastewater treatment plant, soil, crops, dust, alluvial and bedrock ground water, and streambed sediment. Streams at the site are dry most of the year, so samples of streambed sediment deposited after rain were used to indicate surface-water effects. This report will present only analytical results for the biosolids samples collected at the Metro District wastewater treatment plant in Denver and analyzed during 2007. We have presented earlier a compilation of analytical results for the biosolids samples collected and analyzed for 1999 through 2006. More information about the other monitoring components is presented elsewhere in the literature. Priority parameters for biosolids identified by the stakeholders and also regulated by Colorado when used as an agricultural soil amendment include the total concentrations of nine trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc), plutonium isotopes, and gross alpha and beta activity. Nitrogen and chromium also were priority parameters for ground water and sediment components. In general, the objective of each component of the study was to determine whether concentrations of priority parameters (1

  5. Measurement of flame retardants and triclosan in municipal sewage sludge and biosolids.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth F; Klosterhaus, Susan L; Stapleton, Heather M

    2012-04-01

    As polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) face increasing restrictions worldwide, several alternate flame retardants are expected to see increased use as replacement compounds in consumer products. Chemical analysis of biosolids collected from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) can help determine whether these flame retardants are migrating from the indoor environment to the outdoor environment, where little is known about their ultimate fate and effects. The objective of this study was to measure concentrations of a suite of flame retardants, and the antimicrobial compound triclosan, in opportunistic samples of municipal biosolids and the domestic sludge Standard Reference Material (SRM) 2781. Grab samples of biosolids were collected from two WWTPs in North Carolina and two in California. Biosolids samples were also obtained during three subsequent collection events at one of the North Carolina WWTPs to evaluate fluctuations in contaminant levels within a given facility over a period of three years. The biosolids and SRM 2781 were analyzed for PBDEs, hexabromobenzene (HBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), di(2-ethylhexyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), the chlorinated flame retardant Dechlorane Plus (syn- and anti-isomers), and the antimicrobial agent 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol (triclosan). PBDEs were detected in every sample analyzed, and ΣPBDE concentrations ranged from 1750 to 6358ng/g dry weight. Additionally, the PBDE replacement chemicals TBB and TBPH were detected at concentrations ranging from 120 to 3749 ng/g dry weight and from 206 to 1631 ng/g dry weight, respectively. Triclosan concentrations ranged from 490 to 13,866 ng/g dry weight. The detection of these contaminants of emerging concern in biosolids suggests that these chemicals have the potential to migrate out of consumer products and enter the outdoor environment.

  6. Risk assessment of land-applied biosolids-borne triclocarban (TCC).

    PubMed

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A

    2013-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is monitored under the USEPA High Production Volume (HPV) chemical program and is predominantly used as the active ingredient in select antibacterial bar soaps and other personal care products. The compound commonly occurs at parts-per-million concentrations in processed wastewater treatment residuals (i.e. biosolids), which are frequently land-applied as fertilizers and soil conditioners. Human and ecological risk assessment parameters measured by the authors in previous studies were integrated with existing data to perform a two-tiered human health and ecological risk assessment of land-applied biosolids-borne TCC. The 14 exposure pathways identified in the Part 503 Biosolids Rule were expanded, and conservative screening-level hazard quotients (HQ values) were first calculated to estimate risk to humans and a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms (Tier 1). The majority of biosolids-borne TCC exposure pathways resulted in no screening-level HQ values indicative of significant risks to exposed organisms (including humans), even under worst-case land application scenarios. The two pathways for which the conservative screening-level HQ values exceeded one (i.e. Pathway 10: biosolids➔soil➔soil organism➔predator, and Pathway 16: biosolids➔soil➔surface water➔aquatic organism) were then reexamined using modified parameters and scenarios (Tier 2). Adjusted HQ values remained greater than one for Exposure Pathway 10, with the exception of the final adjusted HQ values under a one-time 5 Mg ha(-1) (agronomic) biosolids loading rate scenario for the American woodcock (Scolopax minor) and short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda). Results were used to prioritize recommendations for future biosolids-borne TCC research, which include additional measurements of toxicological effects and TCC concentrations in environmental matrices at the field level.

  7. Analytical Results for Municipal Biosolids Samples from a Monitoring Program Near Deer Trail, Colorado (USA), 1999 through 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Smith, D.B.; Yager, T.J.B.; Brown, Z.A.; Adams, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Since late 1993, Metro Wastewater Reclamation District of Denver (Metro District), a large wastewater treatment plant in Denver, Colorado, has applied Grade I, Class B biosolids to about 52,000 acres of non-irrigated farmland and rangeland near Deer Trail, Colorado. In cooperation with the Metro District in 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began monitoring ground water at part of this site (Yager and Arnold, 2003). In 1999, the USGS began a more comprehensive monitoring study of the entire site to address stakeholder concerns about the potential chemical effects of biosolids applications. This more comprehensive monitoring program has recently been extended through 2010. Monitoring components of the more comprehensive study include biosolids collected at the wastewater treatment plant, soil, crops, dust, alluvial and bedrock ground water, and stream bed sediment. Streams at the site are dry most of the year, so samples of stream bed sediment deposited after rain were used to indicate surface-water effects. This report will present only analytical results for the biosolids samples collected at the Metro District wastewater treatment plant in Denver and analyzed during 1999 through 2006. More information about the other monitoring components is presented elsewhere in the literature (e.g., Yager and others, 2004a, 2004b, 2004c, 2004d). Priority parameters for biosolids identified by the stakeholders and also regulated by Colorado when used as an agricultural soil amendment include the total concentrations of nine trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc), plutonium isotopes, and gross alpha and beta activity. Nitrogen and chromium also were priority parameters for ground water and sediment components. In general, the objective of each component of the study was to determine whether concentrations of priority parameters (1) were higher than regulatory limits, (2) were increasing with time, or (3) were

  8. Endotoxin Studies And Biosolids Stabilization Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation has three parts; a review of bench-scale endotoxin research, a review of observations from a field scale endotoxin release study, and discussion of biosolids stabilization and characterization by PLFA/FAME microbial community analysis. Endotoxins are part of th...

  9. EVALUATION OF BACTERIOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF BIOSOLIDS DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the current regulations (CFR 503), Class B biosolids may be land applied with certain site restrictions. One method for achieving Class B status is to raise the pH of the sludge to >12 for a minimum of 2 hours with an alkaline material (normally lime). Alternately, a Clas...

  10. ORD'S RESEARCH ON PATHOGENS IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2002 the National Academy of Sciences issued a report on EPA's regulations governing the preparation of class A and B biosolids. They stated that the science supporting the rule was outdated and recommended that EPA develop new standardized methods for measuring pathogens in ...

  11. EVALUATION OF BACTERIOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF BIOSOLIDS DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the current regulations (CFR 503), Class B biosolids may be land applied with certain site restrictions. One method for achieving Class B status is to raise the pH of the sludge to >12 for a minimum of 2 hours with an alkaline material (normally lime). Alternately, a Clas...

  12. RESTORATION OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS USING BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids in combination with different types of limestone have been applied to metal mine tailings in Bunker Hill, ID, Leadville, Co, Joplin, MO and Tar Creek, OK. For each of these sites, tailings were unable to support a vegetative cover prior to amendment addition. Elevated...

  13. ORD'S RESEARCH ON PATHOGENS IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2002 the National Academy of Sciences issued a report on EPA's regulations governing the preparation of class A and B biosolids. They stated that the science supporting the rule was outdated and recommended that EPA develop new standardized methods for measuring pathogens in ...

  14. RESTORATION OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS USING BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids in combination with different types of limestone have been applied to metal mine tailings in Bunker Hill, ID, Leadville, Co, Joplin, MO and Tar Creek, OK. For each of these sites, tailings were unable to support a vegetative cover prior to amendment addition. Elevated...

  15. Endotoxin Studies And Biosolids Stabilization Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation has three parts; a review of bench-scale endotoxin research, a review of observations from a field scale endotoxin release study, and discussion of biosolids stabilization and characterization by PLFA/FAME microbial community analysis. Endotoxins are part of th...

  16. Analytical Results for Municipal Biosolids Samples from a Monitoring Program Near Deer Trail, Colorado (U.S.A.), 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Smith, D.B.; Yager, T.J.B.; Berry, C.J.; Adams, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Since late 1993, Metro Wastewater Reclamation District of Denver (Metro District), a large wastewater treatment plant in Denver, Colo., has applied Grade I, Class B biosolids to about 52,000 acres of nonirrigated farmland and rangeland near Deer Trail, Colo. (U.S.A.). In cooperation with the Metro District in 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began monitoring groundwater at part of this site. In 1999, the USGS began a more comprehensive monitoring study of the entire site to address stakeholder concerns about the potential chemical effects of biosolids applications to water, soil, and vegetation. This more comprehensive monitoring program has recently been extended through 2010. Monitoring components of the more comprehensive study include biosolids collected at the wastewater treatment plant, soil, crops, dust, alluvial and bedrock groundwater, and stream-bed sediment. Streams at the site are dry most of the year, so samples of stream-bed sediment deposited after rain were used to indicate surface-water effects. This report will present only analytical results for the biosolids samples collected at the Metro District wastewater treatment plant in Denver and analyzed during 2008. Crock and others have presented earlier a compilation of analytical results for the biosolids samples collected and analyzed for 1999 thru 2006, and in a separate report, data for the 2007 biosolids are reported. More information about the other monitoring components is presented elsewhere in the literature. Priority parameters for biosolids identified by the stakeholders and also regulated by Colorado when used as an agricultural soil amendment include the total concentrations of nine trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc), plutonium isotopes, and gross alpha and beta activity. Nitrogen and chromium also were priority parameters for groundwater and sediment components.

  17. Analytical results for minicipal biosolids samples from a monitoring program near Deer Trail, Colorado (U.S.A.) 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Smith, D.B.; Yager, T.J.B.; Berry, C.J.; Adams, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Since late 1993, Metro Wastewater Reclamation District of Denver (Metro District), a large wastewater treatment plant in Denver, Colo., has applied Grade I, Class B biosolids to about 52,000 acres of nonirrigated farmland and rangeland near Deer Trail, Colo., U.S.A. In cooperation with the Metro District in 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began monitoring groundwater at part of this site. In 1999, the USGS began a more comprehensive monitoring study of the entire site to address stakeholder concerns about the potential chemical effects of biosolids applications to water, soil, and vegetation. This more comprehensive monitoring program was recently extended through the end of 2010 and is now completed. Monitoring components of the more comprehensive study include biosolids collected at the wastewater treatment plant, soil, crops, dust, alluvial and bedrock groundwater, and stream-bed sediment. Streams at the site are dry most of the year, so samples of stream-bed sediment deposited after rain were used to indicate surface-water runoff effects. This report summarizes analytical results for the biosolids samples collected at the Metro District wastewater treatment plant in Denver and analyzed for 2010. In general, the objective of each component of the study was to determine whether concentrations of nine trace elements ("priority analytes") (1) were higher than regulatory limits, (2) were increasing with time, or (3) were significantly higher in biosolids-applied areas than in a similar farmed area where biosolids were not applied (background). Previous analytical results indicate that the elemental composition of biosolids from the Denver plant was consistent during 1999-2009, and this consistency continues with the samples for 2010. Total concentrations of regulated trace elements remain consistently lower than the regulatory limits for the entire monitoring period. Concentrations of none of the priority analytes appear to have increased during the 12 years

  18. Analytical results for municipal biosolids samples from a monitoring program near Deer Trail, Colorado (U.S.A.), 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Smith, D.B.; Yager, T.J.B.; Berry, C.J.; Adams, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Since late 1993, Metro Wastewater Reclamation District of Denver, a large wastewater treatment plant in Denver, Colo., has applied Grade I, Class B biosolids to about 52,000 acres of nonirrigated farmland and rangeland near Deer Trail, Colo., U.S.A. In cooperation with the Metro District in 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey began monitoring groundwater at part of this site. In 1999, the Survey began a more comprehensive monitoring study of the entire site to address stakeholder concerns about the potential chemical effects of biosolids applications to water, soil, and vegetation. This more comprehensive monitoring program has recently been extended through the end of 2010. Monitoring components of the more comprehensive study include biosolids collected at the wastewater treatment plant, soil, crops, dust, alluvial and bedrock groundwater, and stream-bed sediment. Streams at the site are dry most of the year, so samples of stream-bed sediment deposited after rain were used to indicate surface-water effects. This report presents analytical results for the biosolids samples collected at the Metro District wastewater treatment plant in Denver and analyzed for 2009. In general, the objective of each component of the study was to determine whether concentrations of nine trace elements ('priority analytes') (1) were higher than regulatory limits, (2) were increasing with time, or (3) were significantly higher in biosolids-applied areas than in a similar farmed area where biosolids were not applied. Previous analytical results indicate that the elemental composition of biosolids from the Denver plant was consistent during 1999-2008, and this consistency continues with the samples for 2009. Total concentrations of regulated trace elements remain consistently lower than the regulatory limits for the entire monitoring period. Concentrations of none of the priority analytes appear to have increased during the 11 years of this study.

  19. Nitrate and phosphate leaching in a Phaeozem soil treated with biosolids, composted biosolids and inorganic fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Esteller, M V; Martínez-Valdés, H; Garrido, S; Uribe, Q

    2009-06-01

    The use of organic wastes in agriculture may increase the production of crops by incorporating organic matter and nutrients into the soil, and by improving its physical characteristics; however, this use may cause environmental problems such as the leaching of certain ions. The objective of this study was to establish possible nitrogen and phosphorus leaching under real field conditions in Phaeozem soils. The experimental work was performed in a corn (Zea mays L.) field where three plots were conditioned with inorganic fertilizer, three plots with 4.5 Mgha(-1) of biosolids on dry basis, and three plots with the same amount of composted biosolids. The quality of biosolids and composted biosolids complied with the Mexican Official Standards. Soil water samples were collected with suction cups during two agricultural cycles and were analysed. Soil samples were also taken and analysed. The N-NO(3) concentrations in soil water fluctuated between 0.9 and 98mgL(-1) in the composted biosolid treatment, between 0.7 and 64 mgL(-1) in the biosolid treatment, and between 1 and 61 mgL(-1) in the inorganic fertilizer treatment. The maximum concentration of N-NO(2) and N-NH(3) in soil water was 1.02 and 2.65 mgL(-1), respectively. The greatest percentage of nitrogen leached is produced when inorganic fertilizer is used (37.4% and 24.0% N leached in the first and second years, respectively), followed by composted biosolids (17.1% and 13.5% N leached in the first and second years, respectively) and last by biosolids (11% for both years). This difference could be related to the form in which nitrogen is present in the fertilizers, while commercial fertilizer is as inorganic nitrogen, organic wastes are basically presented as organic nitrogen. The maximum PO(4)(3-) concentration in soil water was 1.9 mgL(-1) in the composted biosolid treatment, 1.7mgL(-1) in the biosolid treatment and 0.9 mgL(-1) in the inorganic fertilizer treatment. The estimated percentage of leached phosphorus

  20. Reducing biosolids disposal costs using land application in forested areas

    SciTech Connect

    Huffines, R.L.

    1995-11-01

    Switching biosolids land application from a reclamation site to a forested site significantly reduced the cost of biosolids disposal at the Savannah River Site. Previous beneficial reuse programs focused on reclamation of existing borrow pits. While extremely beneficial, this program became very costly due to the regulatory requirements for groundwater monitoring, soil monitoring and frequent biosolids analyses. A new program was developed to reuse biosolids in forested areas where the biosolids could be used as a soil conditioner and fertilizer to enhance timber yield. The forested land application site was designed so that groundwater monitoring and soil monitoring could be eliminated while biosolids monitoring and site maintenance were minimized. Monitoring costs alone were reduced by 80%. Capital costs for site preparation were also significantly reduced since there was no longer a need for expensive groundwater monitoring wells.

  1. Deodorization and dewatering of biosolids by using dimethyl ether.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Hideki; Morita, Mayumi; Makino, Hisao; Takegami, Keizou; Yoshikoshi, Akio; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Takaoka, Masaki; Morisawa, Shinsuke; Takeda, Nobuo

    2011-01-01

    We proposed a method for the deodorising and dewatering of biosolids. In the proposed method, liquefied dimethyl ether (DME) was used as an extractant for odorous components and water. We developed a bench-scale experiment to almost completely deodorize and dewater biosolids by using liquefied DME at room temperature. The deodorized and dewatered biosolids have sufficient caloric density and can be used as a carbon neutral fuel.

  2. Impacts of tilling and covering treatments on the biosolids solar drying conversion from class B to class A.

    PubMed

    Song, Inhong; O'Shaughnessy, Susan A; Choi, Christopher Y; Gerba, Charles P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of tillage and cover treatments of solar drying on the conversion of class B treated sewage sludge to a class A product. The experiments were performed over two years at Green Valley, Arizona in steel-constructed sand-filled drying beds of 1.0 m (width) x 3.0 m (length) x 0.6 m (depth). Freshly produced aerobically and anaerobically digested biosolids from nearby wastewater treatment plants received tillage and cover treatments for expediting solar drying and microbial inactivation. During the summer drying, covered drying bed increased faecal inactivation rate by 26% over other treatments and automated rain shield abated faecal coliform regrowth from summer rains. Tilling accelerated evaporation of moisture from the biosolids and increased the inactivation rate of faecal coliforms during the summer season. An automated retractable roof to protect the biosolids from rain aided in maintaining class A criteria by preventing dried biosolids from re-wetting by rainfall. However, results from tilling and passive solar heating during the cold winter seasons did not improve the faecal coliform inactivation rate due mainly to lower ambient temperatures. Thus, tilling and cover treatments can be effective in accelerating biosolids solar drying and thus enhancing pathogen inactivation during the summer season. Investigation on the effects of tillage depth and frequency is recommended to determine optimal tilling practice.

  3. Bioaugmenting anaerobic digestion of biosolids with selected strains of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and Actinomycetes species for increased methanogenesis and odor control.

    PubMed

    Duran, Metin; Tepe, Nalan; Yurtsever, Deniz; Punzi, Vito L; Bruno, Charles; Mehta, Raj J

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of bioaugmenting anaerobic biosolids digestion with a commercial product containing selected strains of bacteria from genera Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and Actinomycetes, along with ancillary organic compounds containing various micronutrients. Specifically, the effects of the bioaugment in terms of volatile solids destruction and generation and fate of odor-causing compounds during anaerobic digestion and during storage of the digested biosolids were studied. Two bench-scale anaerobic digesters receiving primary and secondary clarifier biosolids from various full-scale biological wastewater treatment plants were operated. One of the digesters received the bioaugment developed by Organica Biotech, while the other was operated as control. The bioaugmented digester generated 29% more net CH(4) during the 8 weeks of operation. In addition, the average residual propionic acid concentration in the bioaugmented digester was 54% of that in the control. The monitoring of two organic sulfide compounds, methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH) and dimethyl sulfide (CH(3)SCH(3)), clearly demonstrated the beneficial effects of the bioaugmentation in terms of odor control. The biosolids digested in the bioaugmented digester generated a negligible amount of CH(3)SH during 10 days of post-digestion storage, while CH(3)SH concentration in the control reached nearly 300 ppm(v) during the same period. Similarly, peak CH(3)SCH(3) generated by stored biosolids from the bioaugmented digester was only 37% of that from the control.

  4. Irrigation water quality influences heavy metal uptake by willows in biosolids.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, W Scott; Baker, Alan J M; Gregory, David; Arndt, Stefan K

    2015-05-15

    Phytoextraction is an effective method to remediate heavy metal contaminated landscapes but is often applied for single metal contaminants. Plants used for phytoextraction may not always be able to grow in drier environments without irrigation. This study investigated if willows (Salix x reichardtii A. Kerner) can be used for phytoextraction of multiple metals in biosolids, an end-product of the wastewater treatment process, and if irrigation with reclaimed and freshwater influences the extraction process. A plantation of willows was established directly onto a tilled stockpile of metal-contaminated biosolids and irrigated with slightly saline reclaimed water (EC ∼2 dS/cm) at a wastewater processing plant in Victoria, Australia. Biomass was harvested annually and analysed for heavy metal content. Phytoextraction of cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc was benchmarked against freshwater irrigated willows. The minimum irrigation rate of 700 mm per growing season was sufficient for willows to grow and extract metals. Increasing irrigation rates produced no differences in total biomass and also no differences in the extraction of heavy metals. The reclaimed water reduced both the salinity and the acidity of the biosolids significantly within the first 12 months after irrigation commenced and after three seasons the salinity of the biosolids had dropped to <15% of initial values. A flushing treatment to remove excess salts was therefore not necessary. Irrigation had an impact on biosolids attributes such as salinity and pH, and that this had an influence on metal extraction. Reclaimed water irrigation reduced the biosolid pH and this was associated with reductions of the extraction of Ni and Zn, it did not influence the extraction of Cu and enhanced the phytoextraction of Cd, which was probably related to the high chloride content of the reclaimed water. Our results demonstrate that flood-irrigation with reclaimed water was a successful treatment to grow willows in a

  5. Interactions of inorganic oxide nanoparticles with sewage biosolids.

    PubMed

    Rottman, Jeff; Shadman, Farhang; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2012-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in manufacturing continues to increase despite the growing concern over their potential environmental and health effects. Understanding the interaction of NPs and sewage sludge is crucial for determining the ultimate fate of NPs released to municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as those interactions will determine whether the bulk of the material is retained in the sludge or released in the effluent stream. Analyzing the affinity of aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and silicon oxide NPs, which are commonly used in semiconductor manufacturing processes, for biosolids used in municipal WWTPs provides a basis for estimating their removal efficiency. Batch studies were performed and the NPs were shown to partition onto the cellular surface. At the maximum equilibrium values tested (75-92 mg nanoparticles/L), the concentration of Al(2)O(3), CeO(2) and SiO(2) associated with the sludge was 137, 238, and 28 mg/g-sludge VSS, respectively. These results suggest that electrostatic interactions play a major role in determining NP association with biosolids.

  6. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of biosolids-borne triclosan in terrestrial organisms.

    PubMed

    Pannu, Manmeet W; O'Connor, George A; Toor, Gurpal S

    2012-03-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a common constituent of personal care products and is frequently present in biosolids. Application of biosolids to land transfers significant amounts of TCS to soils. Because TCS is an antimicrobial and is toxic to some aquatic organisms, concern has arisen that TCS may adversely affect soil organisms. The objective of the present study was to investigate the toxicity and bioaccumulation potential of biosolids-borne TCS in terrestrial micro- and macro-organisms (earthworms). Studies were conducted in two biosolids-amended soils (sand, silty clay loam), following U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) guidelines. At the concentrations tested herein, microbial toxicity tests suggested no adverse effects of TCS on microbial respiration, ammonification, and nitrification. The no observed effect concentration for TCS for microbial processes was 10 mg/kg soil. Earthworm subchronic toxicity tests showed that biosolids-borne TCS was not toxic to earthworms at the concentrations tested herein. The estimated TCS earthworm lethal concentration (LC50) was greater than 1 mg/kg soil. Greater TCS accumulation was observed in earthworms incubated in a silty clay loam soil (bioaccumulation factor [BAF] = 12 ± 3.1) than in a sand (BAF = 6.5 ± 0.84). Field-collected earthworms had a significantly smaller BAF value (4.3 ± 0.7) than our laboratory values (6.5-12.0). The BAF values varied significantly with exposure conditions (e.g., soil characteristics, laboratory vs field conditions); however, a value of 10 represents a reasonable first approximation for risk assessment purposes. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  7. Application of municipal biosolids to dry-land wheat fields - A monitoring program near Deer Trail, Colorado (USA). A presentation for an international conference: "The Future of Agriculture: Science, Stewardship, and Sustainability", August 7-9, 2006, Sacramento, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, James G.; Smith, David B.; Yager, Tracy J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Since late 1993, Metro Wastewater Reclamation District of Denver (Metro District), a large wastewater treatment plant in Denver, Colorado, has applied Grade I, Class B biosolids to about 52,000 acres of non-irrigated farmland and rangeland near Deer Trail, Colorado. In cooperation with the Metro District in 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began monitoring ground water at part of this site. In 1999, the USGS began a more comprehensive study of the entire site to address stakeholder concerns about the chemical effects of biosolids applications. This more comprehensive monitoring program has recently been extended through 2010. Monitoring components of the more comprehensive study included biosolids collected at the wastewater treatment plant, soil, crops, dust, alluvial and bedrock ground water, and stream bed sediment. Streams at the site are dry most of the year, so samples of stream bed sediment deposited after rain were used to indicate surface-water effects. This presentation will only address biosolids, soil, and crops. More information about these and the other monitoring components are presented in the literature (e.g., Yager and others, 2004a, b, c, d) and at the USGS Web site for the Deer Trail area studies at http://co.water.usgs.gov/projects/CO406/CO406.html. Priority parameters identified by the stakeholders for all monitoring components, included the total concentrations of nine trace elements (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc), plutonium isotopes, and gross alpha and beta activity, regulated by Colorado for biosolids to be used as an agricultural soil amendment. Nitrogen and chromium also were priority parameters for ground water and sediment components. In general, the objective of each component of the study was to determine whether concentrations of priority parameters (1) were higher than regulatory limits, (2) were increasing with time, or (3) were significantly higher in biosolids

  8. Subsurface transport of Cd, Cr, and Mo mediated by biosolid colloids.

    PubMed

    Karathanasis, A D; Johnson, D M C

    2006-02-01

    The potential of biosolid colloids to transport metals associated with organic-waste amendments through subsurface soil environments was investigated with leaching experiments involving undisturbed soil monoliths. The monoliths (25 cm in height and 18 cm in diameter) were carved from the upper solum of an Alfisol, a Mollisol, and an Entisol in the Bluegrass region of Kentucky. Biosolid colloids were fractionated from two municipal wastes (lime-stabilized/LSB, and aerobically-digested/ADB), and a poultry-manure (PMB) organic waste and applied onto the monoliths at a rate of approximately 0.7 cm/h. Eluents were monitored for soluble and sorbed Cd, Cr, and Mo concentrations over 16-24 pore volumes of leaching. Colloid-free solutions with metal concentrations similar to those of the biosolid colloids were used as controls. The results indicated significantly (P<0.05) higher (up to 4 orders of magnitude) cationic and anionic metal elutions in association with the biosolid colloids in both, total and soluble fractions, over the control treatments. The elution of significant soluble metal loads in association with the biosolid colloids is attributed to increasing organic-metal complexation and exclusion processes, and emphasizes their importance as contaminant carriers and facilitators. Eluted metal loads varied with metal, colloid, and soil type, following the sequences Mo>Cd>Cr for the metals, and ADB>PMB>LSB (Cd and Cr) or ADB>LSB>PMB (Mo) for the colloids. Metal elution was generally enhanced by soil macroporosity and increasing OM content, while pH and Fe-Al oxides had significant, but opposite effects for the elution of cationic and anionic metal forms. Colloid and metal breakthrough curves were correlated well, being mostly asymmetrical with several maxima and minima caused by multiple clogging and flushing cycles. Soil- and colloid-metal sorption affinities were not reliable predictors of metal attenuation/elution loads, underscoring the dynamic nature of

  9. Derivation of ecological criteria for copper in land-applied biosolids and biosolid-amended agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Li, Jumei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Ma, Yibing; Smolders, Erik; Zhu, Nanwen

    2016-12-01

    The difference in availability between soil metals added via biosolids and soluble salts was not taken into account in deriving the current land-applied biosolids standards. In the present study, a biosolids availability factor (BAF) approach was adopted to investigate the ecological thresholds for copper (Cu) in land-applied biosolids and biosolid-amended agricultural soils. First, the soil property-specific values of HC5add (the added hazardous concentration for 5% of species) for Cu(2+) salt amended were collected with due attention to data for organisms and soils relevant to China. Second, a BAF representing the difference in availability between soil Cu added via biosolids and soluble salts was estimated based on long-term biosolid-amended soils, including soils from China. Third, biosolids Cu HC5input values (the input hazardous concentration for 5% of species of Cu from biosolids to soil) as a function of soil properties were derived using the BAF approach. The average potential availability of Cu in agricultural soils amended with biosolids accounted for 53% of that for the same soils spiked with same amount of soluble Cu salts and with a similar aging time. The cation exchange capacity was the main factor affecting the biosolids Cu HC5input values, while soil pH and organic carbon only explained 24.2 and 1.5% of the variation, respectively. The biosolids Cu HC5input values can be accurately predicted by regression models developed based on 2-3 soil properties with coefficients of determination (R(2)) of 0.889 and 0.945. Compared with model predicted biosolids Cu HC5input values, current standards (GB4284-84) are most likely to be less protective in acidic and neutral soil, but conservative in alkaline non-calcareous soil. Recommendations on ecological criteria for Cu in land-applied biosolids and biosolid-amended agriculture soils may be helpful to fill the gaps existing between science and regulations, and can be useful for Cu risk assessments in soils

  10. Biosolids and dredged materials: alternative sources of nutrients for crop productivity and sustainability of pasture-based agroecosystem

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Domestic sewage sludge or “biosolids” and lake-dredged materials are examples of materials that can be used to cut fertilizer costs in pasture-based animal agriculture. Sustainable biosolids and lake-dredged materials management is based upon controlling and influencing the quantity, quality and cha...

  11. Fate of zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles in a pilot wastewater treatment plant and in processed biosolids.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Levard, Clément; Judy, Jonathan D; Unrine, Jason M; Durenkamp, Mark; Martin, Ben; Jefferson, Bruce; Lowry, Gregory V

    2014-01-01

    Chemical transformations of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) during wastewater treatment and sludge treatment must be characterized to accurately assess the risks that these nanomaterials pose from land application of biosolids. Here, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and supporting characterization methods are used to determine the chemical speciation of Ag and Zn in sludge from a pilot wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) that had received PVP coated 50 nm Ag NPs and 30 nm ZnO NPs, dissolved metal ions, or no added metal. The effects of composting and lime and heat treatment on metal speciation in the resulting biosolids were also examined. All added Ag was converted to Ag2S, regardless of the form of Ag added (NP vs ionic). Zn was transformed to three Zn-containing species, ZnS, Zn3(PO4)2, and Zn associated Fe oxy/hydroxides, also regardless of the form of Zn added. Zn speciation was the same in the unamended control sludge. Ag2S persisted in all sludge treatments. Zn3(PO4)2 persisted in sludge and biosolids, but the ratio of ZnS and Zn associated with Fe oxy/hydroxide depended on the redox state and water content of the biosolids. Limited differences in Zn and Ag speciation among NP-dosed, ion-dosed, and control biosolids indicate that these nanoparticles are transformed to similar chemical forms as bulk metals already entering the WWTP.

  12. Effect of citric acid on metals mobility in pruning wastes and biosolids compost and metals uptake in Atriplex halimus and Rosmarinus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Y; Eymar, E; Gárate, A; Masaguer, A

    2013-05-01

    To assess metal mobility in pruning waste and biosolids compost (pH 6.9 and total concentration of metals in milligram per kilogram of Cd 1.9, Cu 132, Fe 8,513, Mn 192, Pb 81, and Zn 313), shrubs species Atriplex halimus and Rosmarinus officinalis were transplanted in this substrate and irrigated with citric acid (4 g L(-1), pH 2.9) and nutrient solution daily for 60 days. Citric acid significantly increased the concentrations of soluble Mn and Fe in the nutrient substrate solution measured by suction probes, while other metals did not vary in concentration (Cu and Zn) or were not observed at detectable levels (Cd and Pb). In plants, citric acid significantly increased the concentrations of Cu (2.7 ± 0.1-3.3 ± 0.1 mg kg(-1)), Fe (49.2 ± 5.2-76.8 ± 6.8 mg kg(-1)), and Mn (7.2 ± 1.1-11.4 ± 0.7 mg kg(-1)) in leaves of R. officinalis, whereas the concentration of only Mn (25.4 ± 0.3-42.2 ± 2.9 mg kg(-1)) was increased in A. halimus. Increasing Fe and Mn solubility by citric acid addition indicates the possibility of using it to improve plant nutrition. The mobility of metals in this substrate was influenced for the concentration of the metal, the degree of humification of organic matter and its high Fe content.

  13. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of biosolids-borne triclocarban (TCC) in terrestrial organisms.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A; McAvoy, Drew C

    2011-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) toxicity and bioaccumulation data are primarily limited to direct human and animal dermal exposures, animal ingestion exposures to neat and feed-spiked TCC, and/or aquatic organism exposures. Three non-human, terrestrial organism groups anticipated to be the most highly exposed to land-applied, biosolids-borne TCC are soil microbes, earthworms, and plants. The three ecological receptors are expected to be at particular risk due to unique modes of exposure (e.g. constant, direct contact with soil; uptake of amended soil and pore water), inherently greater sensitivity to environmental contaminants (e.g. increased body burdens, permeable membranes), and susceptibility to minute changes in the soil environment. The toxicities of biosolids-borne TCC to Eisenia fetida earthworms and soil microbial communities were characterized using adaptations of the USEPA Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) Guidelines 850.6200 (Earthworm Subchronic Toxicity Test) and 850.5100 (Soil Microbial Community Toxicity Test), respectively. The resultant calculated TCC LC50 value for E. fetida was 40 mg TCC kg amended fine sand(-1). Biosolids-borne TCC in an amended fine sand had no significant effect on soil microbial community respiration, ammonification, or nitrification. Bioaccumulation of biosolids-borne TCC by E. fetida and Paspulum notatum was measured to characterize potential biosolids-borne TCC movement through the food chain. Dry-weight TCC bioaccumulation factor (BAF) values in E. fetida and P. notatum ranged from 5.2-18 and 0.00041-0.007 (gsoil gtissue(-1)), respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. X-RAY MICROSCOPY AND SPECTROSCOPY STUDIES ON METAL BINDING IN BIOSOLIDS (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption/desorption data from intact and different fractions of biosolids and biosolids-amended soils indicated the importance of Fe and Mn fractions on both sorption and desorption of metals in biosolids and biosolids-amended soils. Extraction procedures used to separate organi...

  15. X-RAY MICROSCOPY AND SPECTROSCOPY STUDIES ON METAL BINDING IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption/desorption data from intact and different fractions of biosolids and biosolids-amended soils indicated the importance of Fe and Mn fractions on both sorption and desorption of metals in biosolids and biosolids-amended soils. Extraction procedures used to separate organi...

  16. Sustainable Biosolids/Renewable Energy Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Steven D.; Smith, Arenee Fanchon Teena

    2016-09-01

    In keeping with its designation as being Florida’s first “Green City”, the City's primary purpose of this project is to process and dispose of biosolids and yard wastes in a manner that results in the production of thermal, electrical, gas, or some other form of energy. This project was completed in two budget periods. Budget period one of the project consisted of a feasibility evaluation to determine potential applicable technologies, budget period two consisted of project design.

  17. Ecotoxicological assessment of biosolids by microcosms.

    PubMed

    Groth, Vitor Avelar; Carvalho-Pereira, Ticiana; da Silva, Eduardo Mendes; Niemeyer, Júlia Carina

    2016-10-01

    Biosolids have been applied as soil amendments to improve and maintain the soil fertility and faster plant growth. In spite of its beneficial use, the potential risks of land disposal should be analyzed, considering potential ecological receptors in soil and water. This work describes the use of an early warning laboratory microcosm system to evaluate the integrated ecotoxicological potential of two biosolids: BIO-1 and BIO-2 (18 and 28 months after landfarming, respectively), from an effluent treatment station in a petrochemical and industrial district. The endpoints related to habitat function were: a) germination, growth and biomass of Phaseolus vulgaris; b) survival, biomass and number of cocoons of Eisenia andrei (Oligochaeta) and; c) reproduction of Folsomia candida (Collembola). The retention function was evaluated by testing the leachates using the tropical cladoceran Latonopsis australis (Cladocera) in a 48-h acute toxicity test, and growth of the aquatic plant Lemna minor in a 7-d chronic test. Tropical artificial soil (TAS) and a natural soil (NS) from the region were used as control soils. Results showed no chronic toxicity of BIO-1 and BIO-2 to the soil organisms tested, but acute toxicity of BIO-1 in the leachate for 50% of L. australis, and chronic toxicity of both biosolid leachates to L. minor (inhibition of growth rate), indicating potential risks to aquatic ecosystems. The results confirmed the ability of this microcosm system as a rapid tool to assess biosolid toxicity over time and its potential for hazardous waste characterization in environmental risk assessment, in a screening phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Phytoremediation of biosolids from an end-of-life municipal lagoon using cattail (Typha latifolia L.) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.).

    PubMed

    Jeke, Nicholson N; Hassan, Adenike O; Zvomuya, Francis

    2017-03-04

    Land spreading of biosolids as a disposal option is expensive and can disperse pathogens and contaminants in the environment. This growth room study examined phytoremediation using switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) and cattail (Typha latifolia L.) as an alternative to land spreading of biosolids. Seedlings were transplanted into pots containing 3.9 kg of biosolids (dry wt.). Aboveground biomass (AGB) was harvested either once or twice during each 90-day growth period. Switchgrass AGB yield was greater with two harvests than with one harvest during the first 90-day growth period, whereas cattail yield was not affected by harvest frequency. In the second growth period, harvesting frequency did not affect the yield of either plant species. However, repeated harvesting significantly improved nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake by both plants in the first period. Phytoextraction of P was significantly greater for switchgrass (3.9% of initial biosolids P content) than for cattail (2.8%), while plant species did not have a significant effect on N phytoextraction. The trace element accumulation in the AGB of both plant species was negligible. Phytoextraction rates attained in this study suggest that phytoremediation can effectively remove P from biosolids and offers a potentially viable alternative to the disposal of biosolids on agricultural land.

  19. Wind Erodibility of Biosolids - Amended Soils: A Status Report

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Metro Wastewater Reclamation District in Denver has been applying municipal biosolids to agricultural land known as the METROGRO Farm since 1993. The farm, located approximately 105 km (65 mi) east of Denver, is in an area historically susceptible to wind erosion. Since biosolids can potentially i...

  20. CD SPECIATION ASSOCIATED WITH IRON OXIDES AND BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental impact and potential hazards of metals in biosolids to plants, animals and the human food chain have been studied for decades. From this body of work, it has been concluded the addition of biosolids to the soil alters the chemical phases in the soil system beyon...

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF IRON PHASES IN BIOSOLIDS VIA MOSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous debate regarding inorganic and organic phases in biosolids as prominent sorbents of metals has yielded limited definitive data. We have demonstrated with X-ray absorption and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies that metals in biosolids have a significant association with...

  2. Fate of Triclosan and Triclocarban in Land-Applied Biosolids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The heavily-used antimicrobials, triclosan and triclocarbon, are commonly present in biosolids generated in waste water treatment plants. A common practice for handling biosolids is to use them as soil amendments. We have embarked on a cooperative study with the Blue Plains Waste Water Treatment P...

  3. Hyperthermophilic hydrogen production from wastewater biosolids by caldicellulosiruptor bescii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wastewater biosolids are abundant renewable resources that are rich in organic matter and offer a low cost potential feedstock for biohydrogen production. Relevant literature indicates that biosolids conversion rates are relatively low and therefore this option is not considered feasible. This study...

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF IRON PHASES IN BIOSOLIDS VIA MOSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous debate regarding inorganic and organic phases in biosolids as prominent sorbents of metals has yielded limited definitive data. We have demonstrated with X-ray absorption and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies that metals in biosolids have a significant association with...

  5. LAND REMEDIATION WITH BIOSOLIDS - SLUDGE MAGIC - TIME BOMB?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Addition of biosolids to soils increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) and alters the chemistry and phytoavailability of these metals. This alteration in phytoavailability associated with biosolids amended soil was recognized and utilized by...

  6. Influence of water treatment residuals on dewaterability of wastewater biosolids.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Malcolm; Elliott, Herschel A

    2013-01-01

    Co-dewatering of water treatment residuals (WTR) and wastewater biosolids can potentially benefit municipalities by reducing processing equipment and costs. This study investigated dewaterability (using capillary suction time, CST) of combined alum residuals (Al-WTR) and anaerobically digested biosolids at various blending ratios (BR), defined as the mass ratio of WTR to biosolids on a dry solids basis. Without polymer addition, the CST was 160 s for a BR of 0.75 compared with 355 s for the biosolids alone. The optimum polymer dose (OPD), defined as the polymer dose yielding CST of 20 s, was reduced from 20.6 g kg(-1) dry solids for the biosolids alone to 16.3 and 12.6 g kg(-1) when BR was 0.75 and 1.5, respectively. Precipitated Al hydrous oxides in the WTR likely caused flocculation of the biosolids particles through heterocoagulation or charge neutralization. The solids contents of the blended materials and biosolids at their respective OPDs were not statistically different (α = 0.05) following dewatering by a belt-filter press. We conclude addition of Al-WTR improved biosolids dewaterability and reduced polymer dosage. In practice, the extent of these benefits may be limited by the quantity of WTR produced relative to the amount of wastewater solids generated by a municipality.

  7. LAND REMEDIATION WITH BIOSOLIDS - SLUDGE MAGIC - TIME BOMB?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Addition of biosolids to soils increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) and alters the chemistry and phytoavailability of these metals. This alteration in phytoavailability associated with biosolids amended soil was recognized and utilized by...

  8. CD SPECIATION ASSOCIATED WITH IRON OXIDES AND BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental impact and potential hazards of metals in biosolids to plants, animals and the human food chain have been studied for decades. From this body of work, it has been concluded the addition of biosolids to the soil alters the chemical phases in the soil system beyon...

  9. Metal and nanoparticle occurrence in biosolids - amended soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Approximately 40% of the 7 million dry tons of municipal biosolids produced annually in the US are applied to soils for disposal nutrient enrichment. The goal of this study is to prospect agricultural sites with long-term biosolids application for a suite of metals, some of which are regulated and o...

  10. Phosphorus and heavy metal extraction from wastewater treatment plant sludges using microwaves for generation of exceptional quality biosolids.

    PubMed

    Danesh, Paymon; Hong, Seung M; Moon, Kyong W; Park, Jae K

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the amount of phosphorus and metals in sludge that can be released into solution by microwave irradiation when applied to sludge before anaerobic digestion and determine the effectiveness of subsequent lime precipitation. The fraction of phosphorus in the soluble form increased to 23 to 28% for thickened sludge and to 31 to 38% for unthickened sludge, after raising temperatures by microwave heating to 50 to 70 degrees C. Microwave irradiation also caused the release of arsenic, molybdenum, nickel, and selenium into solution to 33, 15, 13, and 28% for thickened sludge and 63, 61, 37, and 27% for unthickened sludge, respectively. Microwave irradiation has been found to destruct pathogens in sludge to meet Class A biosolids requirements. Therefore, the reduction of phosphorus and metals in biosolids using microwave heating is economically attractive when considered as a secondary benefit to the use of microwave heating to generate Class A biosolids.

  11. Evaluation of dioxin mobility and spoils leaching in a surface coal mine reclaimed with bleached kraft pulp and paper mill biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, D.P.; Krouskop, D.J.; Ayers, K.C.; Proctor, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    A surface coal mine in southeastern Ohio has been reclaimed with approximately 15 to 25 cm thickness of biosolids from a bleached kraft pulp and paper mill wastewater treatment plant. Soil, vegetation, rodents, earthworms, insects, fish, frogs, sediment, and algae samples were collected and analyzed for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran. Water samples from lakes receiving drainage from unreclaimed and biosolids reclaimed areas were collected and analyzed for various parameters, including pH and metals. The trace levels of dioxin and furan in the pulp and paper mill biosolids did not bioaccumulate in rodents, insects, or earthworms or translocate into plants living in the reclaimed area. The trace levels of dioxin and furan in biosolids did not sufficiently migrate to a drainage lake to result in significant concentrations in fish, frogs, algae, or vegetation. The biosolids reclamation resulted in dramatic decreases in spoils leaching of acid, aluminum, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, nickel, and zinc. This work supports the thesis that surface mine reclamation with pulp and paper mill biosolids is safe and effective. 4 refs., 6 tabs.

  12. ADSORPTION OF CADMIUM ONTO ORGANIC, TOTAL INORGANIC, AND METAL OXIDE FRACTIONS IN BIOSOLIDS AND BIOSOLID-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental impact and potential hazards of metals in biosolids to plants, animals and the human food chain from biosolids application on soils has been studied for decades. The early hypothesis known as "Time Bomb" has been questioned by recent research results which tend ...

  13. ADSORPTION OF CADMIUM ONTO ORGANIC, TOTAL INORGANIC, AND METAL OXIDE FRACTIONS IN BIOSOLIDS AND BIOSOLID-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental impact and potential hazards of metals in biosolids to plants, animals and the human food chain from biosolids application on soils has been studied for decades. The early hypothesis known as "Time Bomb" has been questioned by recent research results which tend ...

  14. Estimating potential risks to terrestrial invertebrates and plants exposed to bisphenol A in soil amended with activated sludge biosolids.

    PubMed

    Staples, Charles; Friederich, Urs; Hall, Tilghman; Klecka, Gary; Mihaich, Ellen; Ortego, Lisa; Caspers, Norbert; Hentges, Steven

    2010-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume substance primarily used to produce polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins. During manufacture and use, BPA may enter wastewater treatment plants. During treatment, BPA may become adsorbed to activated sludge biosolids, which may expose soil organisms to BPA if added to soil as an amendment. To evaluate potential risks to organisms that make up the base of the terrestrial food web (i.e., invertebrates and plants) in accordance with international regulatory practice, toxicity tests were conducted with potworms (Enchytraeids) and springtails (Collembolans) in artificial soil, and six plant types using natural soil. No-observed-effect concentrations (NOEC) for potworms and springtails were equal to or greater than 100 and equal to or greater than 500 mg/kg (dry wt), respectively. The lowest organic matter-normalized NOEC among all tests (dry shoot weight of tomatoes) was 37 mg/kg-dry weight. Dividing by an assessment factor of 10, a predicted-no-effect concentration in soil (PNEC(soil)) of 3.7 mg/kg-dry weight was calculated. Following international regulatory guidance, BPA concentrations in soil hypothetically amended with biosolids were calculated using published BPA concentrations in biosolids. The upper 95th percentile BPA biosolids concentration in North America is 14.2 mg/kg-dry weight, and in Europe is 95 mg/kg-dry weight. Based on recommended biosolids application rates, predicted BPA concentrations in soil (PEC(soil)) would be 0.021 mg/kg-dry weight for North America and 0.14 mg/kg-dry weight for Europe. Hazard quotients (ratio of PEC(soil) and PNEC(soil)) for BPA were all equal to or less than 0.04. This indicates that risks to representative invertebrates and plants at the base of the terrestrial food web are low if exposed to BPA in soil amended with activated sludge biosolids.

  15. ROLE OF IRON AND MANGANESE OXIDES IN BIOSOLIDS AND BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS ON METAL BINDING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids contain high levels of Fe, Mn, and Al. Surfaces of freshly precipitated metal oxides, especially Fe and Mn, are known to be highly active sites for most dissolved metal ion species. We nw have metal sorption/desorption data that illustrate the importance of Fe and Mn fr...

  16. ROLE OF IRON AND MANGANESE OXIDES IN BIOSOLIDS AND BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS ON METAL BINDING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids contain high levels of Fe, Mn, and Al. Surfaces of freshly precipitated metal oxides, especially Fe and Mn, are known to be highly active sites for most dissolved metal ion species. We nw have metal sorption/desorption data that illustrate the importance of Fe and Mn fr...

  17. Dispersion Modeling and Characterization of Particulates from Land Application of Class B Biosolids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Abhishek S.

    This study presents a comprehensive approach to understand the particle characteristics, identify the source profile, develop new equations for emission rates, analyze the source-receptor relationship, and develop and evaluate a numerical model for the dispersion and transport of particles released during the injection of biosolids. Two field studies were conducted in the summer of 2008 and 2009 to collect airborne particulate matter emitted during the injection application of class B biosolids. The sampling was carried out before (pre-application), during (application), and after (post-application) the application. The research work characterized the particulate emissions deposited on the aerosols spectrometer. The mass concentrations of fine (PM2.5) and ultrafine (PM 1.0) particles were highest during the pre-application. The mass concentration of thoracic fraction (PM2.5-10) increased significantly during the application. A bimodal size distribution was observed throughout the sampling. Nuclei mode formation was predominant during the pre-application and the post-application, whereas the accumulation mode was distinctive during the application. Airborne particles were collected on filter papers during the biosolids application process using an aerosol spectrometer. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) tool was used to analyze particles collected before, during, and after injection of biosolids. The major emphasis of the analysis was on providing in depth information on particle count, size, shape, morphology, and chemical composition. The particle count was significantly sensitive towards the different activities surrounding the application. The combination of SEM, particle analysis software, and EDS technique was capable of revealing detailed information on the size, shape, morphology, and chemical composition of individual particles. These techniques proved to be an effective non-destructive method for the

  18. Beneficial reuse of precast concrete industry sludge to produce alkaline stabilized biosolids.

    PubMed

    Gowda, C; Seth, R; Biswas, N

    2008-01-01

    The precast concrete industry generates waste called concrete sludge during routine mixer tank washing. It is highly alkaline and hazardous, and typically disposed of by landfilling. This study examined the stabilization of municipal sewage sludge using concrete sludge as an alkaline agent. Sewage sludge was amended with 10 to 40% of concrete sludge by wet weight, and 10 and 20% of lime by dry weight of the sludge mix. Mixes containing 30 and 40% of concrete sludge with 20% lime fulfilled the primary requirements of Category 1 and 2 (Canada) biosolids of maintaining a pH of 12 for at least 72 hours. The heavy metals were below Category 1 regulatory limits. The 40% concrete sludge mix was incubated at 52 degrees C for 12 of the 72 hours to achieve the Category 1 and 2 regulations of less than 1000 fecal coliform/g solids. The nutrient content of the biosolids was 8.2, 10 and 0.6 g/kg of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium respectively. It can be used as a top soil or augmented with potassium for use as fertilizer. The study demonstrates that concrete sludge waste can be beneficially reused to produce biosolids, providing a long-term sustainable waste management solution for the concrete industry.

  19. Pyrolysis of Dried Wastewater Biosolids Can Be Energy Positive.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Patrick J; Koch, Jon D; Liu, Zhongzhe; Zitomer, Daniel H

      Pyrolysis is a thermal process that converts biosolids into biochar (a soil amendment), py-oil and py-gas, which can be energy sources. The objectives of this research were to determine the product yield of dried biosolids during pyrolysis and the energy requirements of pyrolysis. Bench-scale experiments revealed that temperature increases up to 500 °C substantially decreased the fraction of biochar and increased the fraction of py-oil. Py-gas yield increased above 500 °C. The energy required for pyrolysis was approximately 5-fold less than the energy required to dry biosolids (depending on biosolids moisture content), indicating that, if a utility already uses energy to dry biosolids, then pyrolysis does not require a substantial amount of energy. However, if a utility produces wet biosolids, then implementing pyrolysis may be costly because of the energy required to dry the biosolids. The energy content of py-gas and py-oil was always greater than the energy required for pyrolysis.

  20. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that biosolids Ag concentrations have decreased significantly over recent decades. XANES revealed the importance of reduced-sulfur binding environments for Ag speciation in materials ranging from freshly produced sludge to biosolids weathered under ambient environmental conditions for more than 50 years. Isotopic dilution with 110mAg showed that Ag was predominantly non-labile in both fresh and aged biosolids (13.7% mean lability), with E-values ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg and 5 mM CaNO3 extractable Ag from 1.2 to 609 µg/kg (0.002 - 3.4% of the total Ag). This study indicates that at the time of soil application, biosolids Ag will be predominantly Ag-sulfides and characterised by low isotopic lability. This paper presents an overview of biosolids Ag chemistry in historic and contemporary biosolids sourced from the UK, USA and Australia from the 1950s until today by drawing on a unique collection of archived, stockpiled and contemporary biosolids samples. Characteristics of biosolids Ag chemistry determined in this study included total Ag measurement by neutron activation analysis (NAA); the assessment of Ag lability by 110mAg isotopic dilution (E-values); and Ag speciation by X-ray Absorp

  1. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that biosolids Ag concentrations have decreased significantly over recent decades. XANES revealed the importance of reduced-sulfur binding environments for Ag speciation in materials ranging from freshly produced sludge to biosolids weathered under ambient environmental conditions for more than 50 years. Isotopic dilution with 110mAg showed that Ag was predominantly non-labile in both fresh and aged biosolids (13.7% mean lability), with E-values ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg and 5 mM CaNO3 extractable Ag from 1.2 to 609 µg/kg (0.002 - 3.4% of the total Ag). This study indicates that at the time of soil application, biosolids Ag will be predominantly Ag-sulfides and characterised by low isotopic lability. This paper presents an overview of biosolids Ag chemistry in historic and contemporary biosolids sourced from the UK, USA and Australia from the 1950s until today by drawing on a unique collection of archived, stockpiled and contemporary biosolids samples. Characteristics of biosolids Ag chemistry determined in this study included total Ag measurement by neutron activation analysis (NAA); the assessment of Ag lability by 110mAg isotopic dilution (E-values); and Ag speciation by X-ray Absorp

  2. Phosphorus recovery prior to land application of biosolids using the “Quick Wash” process developed by USDA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objectives: To present the case study of a new treatment process, called “quick wash”, that was developed by the USDA-ARS for extraction and recovery of phosphorus from animal manure solids but research has shown the approach is equally effective to recover phosphorus from biosolids prior to applica...

  3. Efficacy of lime, biosolids, and mycorrhiza for the phytostabilization of sulfidic copper tailings in Chile: a greenhouse experiment.

    PubMed

    Verdugo, César; Sánchez, Pablo; Santibáñez, Claudia; Urrestarazu, Paola; Bustamante, Elena; Silva, Yasna; Gourdon, Denis; Ginocchio, Rosanna

    2011-02-01

    Inadequate abandonment of copper mine tailings under semiarid Mediterranean climate type conditions has posed important environmental risks in Chile due to wind and rain erosion. There are cost-effective technologies for tailings stabilization such as phytostabilization. However, this technology has not been used in Chile yet. This study evaluated in a greenhouse assay the efficacy of biosolids, lime, and a commercial mycorrhiza to improve adverse conditions of oxidized Cu mine tailings for adequate establishment and grow of Lolium perenne L. var nui. Chemical characterization of experimental substrates and pore water samples were performed; plant density, biomass production, chlorophyll content, and metal content in shoots was evaluated in rye grass plants after an eight-week growth period. Results showed that neutralization of tailings and superficial application of biosolids increased both aerial biomass production and chlorophyll content of rye grass. Increased Cu solubilization and translocation to shoots occurred after biosolids application (mixed), particularly on unlimed tailings, due to formation of soluble organometallic complexes with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which can be readily absorbed by plant roots. Positive effects of mycorrhizal inoculation on rye grass growth were restricted to treatments with superficial application of biosolids, probably due to Cu toxicity effects on commercial mycorrhiza used (Glomulus intraradices).

  4. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils: comparison of biosolids addition, carbon supplementation, and monitored natural attenuation.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Dibyendu; Ferguson, Michael; Datta, Rupali; Birnbaum, Stuart

    2005-07-01

    Two methods of biostimulation were compared in a laboratory incubation study with monitored natural attenuation (MNA) for total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) degradation in diesel-contaminated Tarpley clay soil with low carbon content. One method utilized rapid-release inorganic fertilizers rich in N and P, and the other used sterilized, slow-release biosolids, which added C in addition to N and P. After 8 weeks of incubation, both biostimulation methods degraded approximately 96% of TPH compared to MNA, which degraded 93.8%. However, in the first week of incubation, biosolids-amended soils showed a linear two orders of magnitude increase in microbial population compared to MNA, whereas, in the fertilizer-amended soils, only a one order of magnitude increase was noted. In the following weeks, microbial population in the fertilizer-amended soils dropped appreciably, suggesting a toxic effect owing to fertilizer-induced acidity and/or NH(3) overdosing. Results suggest that biosolids addition is a more effective soil amendment method for biostimulation than the commonly practiced inorganic fertilizer application, because of the abilities of biosolids to supplement carbon. No statistically significant difference was observed between the biostimulation methods and MNA, suggesting that MNA can be a viable remediation strategy in certain soils with high native microbial population.

  5. Impact of biosolids and wastewater effluent application to agricultural land on steroidal hormone content in lettuce plants.

    PubMed

    Shargil, Dorit; Gerstl, Zev; Fine, Pinchas; Nitsan, Ido; Kurtzman, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    One of the major concerns for human health in the past decade is the potential dangers posed by increased concentrations of steroidal hormones in soils and water. These hormones are considered to be endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), which may harm human health when exposed to high concentrations, or in the case of long term exposure to lower concentrations. In a 3 year study, two steroids, estrone and testosterone, were measured in lettuce plants irrigated with wastewater effluents and freshwater and treated with several types of biosolids. The relative contribution of the different factors, mainly irrigation water and biosolids, to the hormone levels in the lettuce plants was determined. It was found that irrigation water, which contained significant amounts of hormones, had the most substantial effect, whereas biosolids had only minor influence on hormone levels in the lettuce. The hormone levels in the plants were compared to the FDA recommendation for daily consumption in food, and were found to exceed the recommended level (when consumed by a typical individual), and therefore could have negative physiological impacts. Overall this study shows that biosolids have little effect on hormone uptake by lettuce, and it emphasizes the negative impact of irrigation water on these levels, which is of concern to public health.

  6. Interactions in Natural Colloid Systems "Biosolids" - Soil and Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinichenko, Kira V.; Nikovskaya, Galina N.; Ulberg, Zoya R.

    2016-04-01

    The "biosolids" are complex biocolloid system arising in huge amounts (mln tons per year) from biological municipal wastewater treatment. These contain clusters of nanoparticles of heavy metal compounds (in slightly soluble or unsoluble forms, such as phosphates, sulphates, carbonates, hydroxides, and etc.), cells, humic substances and so on, involved in exopolysaccharides (EPS) net matrix. One may consider that biosolids are the natural nanocomposite. Due to the presence of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other macro- and microelements (heavy metals), vitamins, aminoacids, etc., the biosolids are a depot of bioelements for plant nutrition. Thus, it is generally recognized that most rationally to utilize them for land application. For this purpose the biocolloid process was developed in biosolids system by initiation of microbial vital ability followed by the synthesis of EPS, propagation of ecologically important microorganisms, loosening of the structure and weakening of the coagulation contacts between biosolids colloids, but the structure integrity maintaining [1,2]. It was demonstrated that the applying of biosolids with metabolizing microorganisms to soil provided the improving soil structure, namely the increasing of waterstable aggregates content (70% vs. 20%). It occurs due to flocculation ability of biosolids EPS. The experimental modelling of mutual interactions in systems of soils - biosolids (with metabolizing microorganisms) were realized and their colloid and chemical mechanisms were formulated [3]. As it is known, the most harmonious plant growth comes at a prolonged entering of nutrients under the action of plant roots exudates which include pool of organic acids and polysaccharides [4]. Special investigations showed that under the influence of exudates excreted by growing plants, the biosolids microelements can release gradually from immobilized state into environment and are able to absorb by plants. Thus, the biosolids can serve as an active

  7. Holistic visualisation of the multimodal transport and fate of twelve pharmaceuticals in biosolid enriched topsoils.

    PubMed

    Barron, Leon; Nesterenko, Ekaterina; Hart, Kris; Power, Emma; Quinn, Brian; Kelleher, Brian; Paull, Brett

    2010-05-01

    The use of municipal biosolids as agricultural fertilisers has raised significant concerns in recent years. As part of this, the presence of complex mixtures of pharmaceutical residues and their effects on soil ecosystems remains particularly under-researched. This study focuses on the transfer of a selection of pharmaceutical residues from municipal sewage sludge to agricultural topsoils and their fate therein after an accelerated 6-month rainfall event. Twelve pharmaceuticals encompassing antibiotics, analgesics, anti-inflammatories, beta-blockers, hyperlipidaemics and stimulants were invesigated by employing a combination of extraction techniques and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Both liquid- and solid-phase pharmaceutical contents were analysed and pharmaceutical and personal care products quantified at defined timepoints to elucidate transport behaviour and transformation potential. Results show the distribution and separation of pharmaceuticals over a 100-mm soil depth following typical biosolid enrichment. Using experimentally determined solid-water partition coefficients (K (d)) and hydrophobicity distribution ratios (D (ow)), mobility and modes of interaction under dynamic conditions are discussed. Finally, a brief study into the susceptibility of soil microbes is also presented. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation of pharmaceutical and personal care products release from amended biosolids to soils to include the factors and mechanisms governing their distribution and transformation even over relatively shallow depths. It applies multicompartmental and mass-balanced chemical analyses as well as microbiological approaches for a holistic view of these complex processes.

  8. Impact of biosolids and wastewater effluent application to agricultural land on corticosterone content in lettuce plants.

    PubMed

    Shargil, Dorit; Fine, Pinchas; Gerstl, Zev; Nitsan, Ido; Kurtzman, Daniel

    2016-01-15

    We studied corticosterone occurrence in lettuce plants grown on three biosolids amended soils under irrigation with either tap water or secondary wastewater effluent. Corticosterone was examined as it has possible implications for human health. It is a major glucocorticoid, and as such has an effect on regulation of metabolism, immune functions and stress response. The plants were grown in 220-L lysimeters packed with 3 soils which represent a wide range of physicochemical properties. Lettuce was grown in cycles (two in summer and two in winter) during 3 years, and in every spring season the sludges were re-applied. Corticosterone was quantified using ELISA and LCMS, and was found in the biosolids, tap water, wastewater effluent and lettuce plants. The respective ranges of concentrations were: 11-92 ng g(-1), 0.5-1.6 ng L(-1), 4.2-4.7 ng L(-1); and 1-900 ng g(-1) dry weight. A positive relationship was found between corticosterone concentrations in winter-grown lettuces and the plants fresh weight. The corticosterone content of the plants did not correspond with either the type of irrigation water or the biosolids type and rate of application or the soil properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phytotoxicity of biosolids and screening of selected plant species with potential for mercury phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Lomonte, Cristina; Doronila, Augustine I; Gregory, David; Baker, Alan J M; Kolev, Spas D

    2010-01-15

    Mercury contaminated stockpiles of biosolids (3.5-8.4 mg kg(-1) Hg) from Melbourne Water's Western Treatment Plant (MW-WTP) were investigated to evaluate the possibility for their phytoremediation. Nine plant species (Atriplex codonocarpa, Atriplex semibaccata, Austrodanthonia caespitosa, Brassica juncea, Brassica napus, Gypsophila paniculata, Sorghum bicolor, Themeda triandra and Trifolium subterraneum) were screened for phytoextraction potential in Hg-contaminated biosolids from MW-WTP. In addition, the same plant species were germinated and grown in two other substrates (i.e. potting mix and potting mix spiked with mercury(II)). Growth measurements and the mercury uptake for all three substrates were compared. Some plant species grown in potting mix spiked with mercury(II) grew more vigorously than in the other two substrates and showed higher levels of sulphur in their tissues. These results suggested that the mercury stress activated defence mechanisms and it was hypothesised that this was the likely reason for the enhanced production of sulphur compounds in the plant species studied which stimulated their growth. Some species did not grow in biosolids because of the combined effect of high mercury toxicity and high salt content. Atriplex conodocarpa and Australodanthonia caespitose proved to be the most suitable candidates for mercury phytoextraction because of their ability to translocate mercury from roots to the above-ground tissues.

  10. CRITICAL EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SEWAGE SLUDGE DISINFECTION AND VECTOR ATTRACTION REDUCTION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    What is the current state of management practices for biosolids production and application, and how can those be made more effective? How effective are Class B disinfection and vector attraction processes, and public access and harvesting restrictions at reducing the public's exp...

  11. Use of nuclear receptor luciferase-based bioassays to detect endocrine active chemicals in a biosolids-biochar amended soil.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Carolyn G; Joshi, Geetika; Bair, Daniel A; Oriol, Charlotte; He, Guochun; Parikh, Sanjai J; Denison, Michael S; Scow, Kate M

    2017-08-01

    Biosolids are a potentially valuable source of carbon and nutrients for agricultural soils; however, potential unintended impacts on human health and the environment must be considered. Virtually all biosolids contain trace amounts endocrine-disrupting chemicals derived from human use of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). One potential way to reduce the bioavailability of PPCPs is to co-apply biosolids with biochar to soil, because biochar's chemical (e.g., aromaticity) and physical properties (e.g., surface area) give it a high affinity to bind many organic chemicals in the environment. We developed a soil-specific extraction method and utilized a luciferase-based bioassay (CALUX) to detect endocrine active chemicals in a biosolids-biochar co-amendment soil greenhouse study. Both biochar (walnut shell, 900 °C) and biosolids had positive impacts on carrot and lettuce biomass accumulation over our study period. However, the walnut shell biochar stimulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity, suggesting the presence of potential endocrine active chemicals in the biochar. Since the biochar rate tested (100 t ha(-1)) is above the average agronomic rate (10-20 t ha(-1)), endocrine effects would not be expected in most environmental applications. The effect of high temperature biochars on endocrine system pathways must be explored further, using both quantitative analytical tools to identify potential endocrine active chemicals and highly sensitive bioanalytical assays such as CALUX to measure the resulting biological activity of such compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanomaterials in Biosolids Inhibit Nodulation, Shift Microbial Community Composition, and Result in Increased Metal Uptake Relative to Bulk/Dissolved Metals.

    PubMed

    Judy, Jonathan D; McNear, David H; Chen, Chun; Lewis, Ricky W; Tsyusko, Olga V; Bertsch, Paul M; Rao, William; Stegemeier, John; Lowry, Gregory V; McGrath, Steve P; Durenkamp, Mark; Unrine, Jason M

    2015-07-21

    We examined the effects of amending soil with biosolids produced from a pilot-scale wastewater treatment plant containing a mixture of metal-based engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) on the growth of Medicago truncatula, its symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti, and on soil microbial community structure. Treatments consisted of soils amended with biosolids generated with (1) Ag, ZnO, and TiO2 ENMs introduced into the influent wastewater (ENM biosolids), (2) AgNO3, Zn(SO4)2, and micron-sized TiO2 (dissolved/bulk metal biosolids) introduced into the influent wastewater stream, or (3) no metal added to influent wastewater (control). Soils were amended with biosolids to simulate 20 years of metal loading, which resulted in nominal metal concentrations of 1450, 100, and 2400 mg kg(-1) of Zn, Ag, and Ti, respectively, in the dissolved/bulk and ENM treatments. Tissue Zn concentrations were significantly higher in the plants grown in the ENM treatment (182 mg kg(-1)) compared to those from the bulk treatment (103 mg kg(-1)). Large reductions in nodulation frequency, plant growth, and significant shifts in soil microbial community composition were found for the ENM treatment compared to the bulk/dissolved metal treatment. These results suggest differences in metal bioavailability and toxicity between ENMs and bulk/dissolved metals at concentrations relevant to regulatory limits.

  13. Biosolids application affects the competitive sorption and lability of cadmium, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc in fluvial and calcareous soils.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Antoniadis, Vasileios; Kwon, Eilhann E; Biswas, Jayanta K; Wang, Hailong; Ok, Yong Sik; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2017-03-03

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of biosolids on the competitive sorption and lability of the sorbed Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in fluvial and calcareous soils. Competitive sorption isotherms were developed, and the lability of these metals was estimated by DTPA extraction following their sorption. Sorption of all metals was higher in the fluvial than in the calcareous soil. Sorption of Cu and Pb was stronger than that of Cd, Ni, and Zn in all soils. Biosolids application (2.5%) reduced the sorption of all metals especially Cu and Pb (28-43%) in both soils (especially the calcareous soil) at the lower added metal concentrations (50 and 100 mg L(-1)). However, it increased the sorption of all metals especially Pb and Cu in both soils (especially the calcareous soil; 15.5-fold for Cu) at the higher added concentrations (250 and 300 mg L(-1)). Nickel showed the highest lability followed by Cd, Zn, and Pb in both soils. Biosolids increased the lability of the sorbed Ni in the fluvial soils at all added concentrations and the lability of Cd, Pb, and Zn at 50 mg L(-1), but decreased the lability of Cd, Pb, and Zn at 250 and 300 mg L(-1) in both soils. We conclude that at low loading rate (e.g., 50 mg L(-1)) biosolids treatment might increase the lability and environmental risk of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. However, at high loading rate (e.g., 300 mg L(-1)) biosolids may be used as an immobilizing agent for Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn and mobilizing agent for Ni.

  14. Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Archived U.S. Biosolids from the 2001 EPA National Sewage Sludge Survey

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Kristin; Halden, Rolf U.

    2010-01-01

    In response to the U.S. National Academies’ call for a better assessment of chemical pollutants contained in the approximately 6.9 million dry tons of digested municipal sludge produced annually in the United States, the mean concentration of 72 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP) were determined in 110 biosolids samples collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in its 2001 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Composite samples of archived biosolids, collected at 94 U.S. wastewater treatment plants from 32 states and the District of Columbia, were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using EPA Method 1694. Thirty-eight (54%) of the 72 analytes were detected in at least one composite sample at concentrations ranging from 0.002 to 48 mg kg−1 dry weight. Triclocarban and triclosan were the most abundant analytes with mean concentrations of 36 ± 8 and 12.6 ± 3.8 mg kg−1 (n = 5), respectively, accounting for 65% of the total PPCP mass found. The loading to U.S. soils from nationwide biosolids recycling was estimated at 210–250 metric tons per year for the sum of the 72 PPCPs investigated. The results of this nationwide reconnaissance of PPCPs in archived U.S. biosolids mirror in contaminant occurrences, frequencies and concentrations, those reported by the U.S. EPA for samples collected in 2006/07. This demonstrates that PPCP releases in U.S. biosolids have been ongoing for many years and the most abundant PPCPs appear to show limited fluctuations in mass over time when assessed on a nationwide basis. The here demonstrated use of five mega composite samples holds promise for conducting cost-effective, routine monitoring on a regional basis. PMID:20106500

  15. SPECTROSCOPIC APPROACHES TO DEFINING THE INORGANIC AND ORGANIC CONSTITUENTS OF BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The long-term debate over the fate of metals in biosolids and biosolids-amended soils has traditionally relied on intellectual theory and empirical data. The results of decades of research illustrate that metals in biosolids-amended soils are retained at a higher rate than soils...

  16. Triclosan and methyl-triclosan dissipation in soils after biosolid application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triclosan (TCS) is removed in waste water treatment plants (WWTP) primarily as biosolids (approx. 66%). Therefore, biosolids disposal as land applications represents a significant path for release to the environment. Biosolids collected over three years from a large WWTP had concentrations of TCS ...

  17. SPECTROSCOPIC APPROACHES TO DEFINING THE INORGANIC AND ORGANIC CONSTITUENTS OF BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The long-term debate over the fate of metals in biosolids and biosolids-amended soils has traditionally relied on intellectual theory and empirical data. The results of decades of research illustrate that metals in biosolids-amended soils are retained at a higher rate than soils...

  18. Application of anaerobically digested biosolids to dryland winter wheat: 2006-2007 results

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The application of biosolids to lands in EPA Region 8 is the major method of biosolids disposal, with 85% of the material being reused. This disposal method can greatly benefit municipalities and farmers by recycling plant nutrients in an environmentally sound manner. Our long-term biosolids proje...

  19. Removal of Triclocarban and Triclosan during Municipal Biosolid Production

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyoku, Temitope A.; Young, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial compounds triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) accumulate in sludges produced during municipal wastewater treatment and persist through sludge treatment processes into finished biosolids. The objective of this research was to determine the extent to which conventional sludge processing systems such as aerobic digestion, anaerobic digestion, and lime stabilization were able to remove TCC and TCS. Sludge and biosolid samples were collected from 10 municipal wastewater treatment plants in the United States. The concentrations of TCC and TCS in sludge and biosolid samples were determined via heated solvent extraction and analysis with liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Dry weight concentrations of TCC and TCS frequently were higher in finished biosolids than in the source sludges because of sludge mass reduction during digestion. The removal of TCC and TCS in municipal biosolid processing systems was determined from the measured concentration change after correcting for reductions in solid mass during sludge treatment. Removal in the digester systems ranged from 15 – 68 % for TCC and 20 – 75 % for TCS. Increased solid retention times during sludge treatment operations were correlated with higher removals of TCC and TCS. Apparent first order degradation rates for TCC ranged from 0.015–0.08 1/d and for TCS were between 0.003–0.15 1/d. PMID:24734467

  20. Solid phosphorus phase in aluminum- and iron-treated biosolids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Chen, Yona; Shenker, Moshe

    2007-01-01

    Stabilization of phosphorus (P) in sewage sludge (biosolids) to reduce water-soluble P concentrations is essential for minimizing P loss from amended soils and maximizing the capacity of the soil to safely serve as an outlet for this waste material. The chemical form at which P is retained in biosolids stabilized by Al(2)(SO(4))(3) x 18H(2)O (alum) or FeSO(4) x 7H(2)O (FeSul) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray elemental spectrometry (EDXS) and by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Both treatments resulted in the formation of a Ca-P phase, probably brushite. Phosphorus was further retained in the alum-treated biosolids by precipitation of an Al-P phase with an Al/P molar ratio of about 1:1, while in the FeSul-treated biosolids, P was retained by both precipitation with Fe/P molar ratios of 1:1 or 1.5:1, and by adsorption onto newly formed Fe hydroxides exhibiting an Fe/P molar ratio of up to 11:1. All of these mechanisms efficiently reduced P solubility and are crucial in biosolids environmentally safe agronomic beneficial use for this waste product; however, each P phase formed may react differently in the amended soil, depending on soil properties. Thus, the proper P stabilization method would depend on the target soil.

  1. Metal and nanoparticle occurrence in biosolid-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Wang, Yifei; Westerhoff, Paul; Hristovski, Kiril; Jin, Virginia L; Johnson, Mari-Vaughn V; Arnold, Jeffrey G

    2014-07-01

    Metals can accumulate in soils amended with biosolids in which metals have been concentrated during wastewater treatment. The goal of this study is to inspect agricultural sites with long-term biosolid application for a suite of regulated and unregulated metals, including some potentially present as commonly used engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Sampling occurred in fields at a municipal and a privately operated biosolid recycling facilities in Texas. Depth profiles of various metals were developed for control soils without biosolid amendment and soils with different rates of biosolid application (6.6 to 74 dry tons per hectare per year) over 5 to 25 years. Regulated metals of known toxicity, including chromium, copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc, had higher concentrations in the upper layer of biosolid-amended soils (top 0-30 cm or 0-15 cm) than in control soils. The depth profiles of unregulated metals (antimony, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, gold, silver, tantalum, tin, tungsten, and zirconium) indicate higher concentrations in the 0-30 cm soil increment than in the 70-100 cm soil increment, indicating low vertical mobility after entering the soils. Titanium-containing particles between 50 nm and 250 nm in diameter were identified in soil by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. In conjunction with other studies, this research shows the potential for nanomaterials used in society that enter the sewer system to be removed at municipal biological wastewater treatment plants and accumulate in agricultural fields. The metal concentrations observed herein could be used as representative exposure levels for eco-toxicological studies in these soils.

  2. Comparison of arsenic content in pelletized poultry house waste and biosolids fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Nachman, Keeve E; Mihalic, Jana N; Burke, Thomas A; Geyh, Alison S

    2008-03-01

    Managers of human biosolids have been incorporating the practice of waste pelletization for use as fertilizer since the mid 1920s, and waste pelletization has recently been embraced by some poultry producers as a way to move nutrients away from saturated agricultural land. However, the presence of arsenic in pelletized poultry house waste (PPHW) resulting from the use of organoarsenical antimicrobial drugs in poultry production raises concerns regarding additional incremental population exposures. Arsenic concentrations were determined in PPHW and pelletized biosolids fertilizer (PBF) samples. Pellets were processed using strong acid microwave digestion and analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. The mean arsenic concentration in PPHW (20.1 ppm) fell within the lower part of the range of previously report arsenic concentrations in unpelletized poultry house waste. Arsenic concentrations in PBF, the source of which is less clear than for PPHW, were approximately a factor of 5 times lower than those in PPHW, with a mean concentration of 4.1 ppm. The pelletization and sale of these biological waste fertilizers present new pathways of exposure to arsenic in consumer populations who would otherwise not come into contact with these wastes. Arsenic exposures in humans resulting from use of these fertilizer pellets should be quantified to avoid potential unintended negative consequences of managing wastes through pelletization.

  3. Developing Effective Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, T.J.

    In this introductory work, the main principles on which British companies are basing management development programs are presented, and stages in assuring a supply of effective managerial talent are set forth: stages in assuring a supply of effective managerial t"lent are set forth: program planning based on clear objectives and…

  4. Bioaccumulation of triclosan and triclocarban in plants grown in soils amended with municipal dewatered biosolids.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Ryan S; Lissemore, Linda; Topp, Edward; Sibley, Paul K

    2014-05-01

    Biosolids generally contain the microbiocidal agents triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) that are persistent during wastewater treatment and sorp to organic material. The present study investigated the concentration of TCS in tissues of radish, carrot, and soybean grown in potted soil amended with biosolids. Highest mean concentrations of TCS in radish, carrot, and soybean root tissue midway through the life cycle were 24.8 ng/g, 49.8 ng/g, and 48.1 ng/g dry weight, respectively; by the conclusion of the test, however, concentrations had declined to 2.1 ng/g, 5.5 ng/g, and 8.4 ng/g dry weight, respectively. Highest mean concentrations of TCS in radish and carrot shoot tissue were 33.7 and 18.3 ng/g dry weight at days 19 and 45, respectively, but had declined to 13.7 ng/g and 5.5 ng/g dry weight at days 34 and 69, respectively. Concentration of TCS in all samples of soybean seeds was below method detection limit (i.e., 2.8 ng/g dry wt). The present study also examined the concentration of TCS and TCC in edible portions of green pepper, carrot, cucumber, tomato, radish, and lettuce plants grown in a field amended with biosolids. Triclosan was detected only in cucumber and radish up to 5.2 ng/g dry weight. Triclocarban was detected in carrot, green pepper, tomato, and cucumber up to 5.7 ng/g dry weight. On the basis of the present study and other studies, we estimate that vegetable consumption represents less than 0.5% of the acceptable daily intake of TCS and TCC. These results demonstrate that, if best management practices for land application of biosolids in Ontario are followed, the concentration of TCS and TCC in edible portions of plants represents a negligible exposure pathway to humans.

  5. Siletz River nutrients: Effects of biosolids application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream water nutrients were measured in the Siletz River, Oregon, with the goal of comparing dissolved nutrient concentrations, primarily the nitrogenous nutrients nitrate and ammonium, with previously collected data for the Yaquina and Alsea Rivers for the nutrient criteria prog...

  6. Siletz River nutrients: Effects of biosolids application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream water nutrients were measured in the Siletz River, Oregon, with the goal of comparing dissolved nutrient concentrations, primarily the nitrogenous nutrients nitrate and ammonium, with previously collected data for the Yaquina and Alsea Rivers for the nutrient criteria prog...

  7. Human health risk assessment of triclosan in land-applied biosolids.

    PubMed

    Verslycke, Tim; Mayfield, David B; Tabony, Jade A; Capdevielle, Marie; Slezak, Brian

    2016-09-01

    Triclosan (5-chloro-2-[2,4-dichlorophenoxy]-phenol) is an antimicrobial agent found in a variety of pharmaceutical and personal care products. Numerous studies have examined the occurrence and environmental fate of triclosan in wastewater, biosolids, biosolids-amended soils, and plants and organisms exposed to biosolid-amended soils. Triclosan has a propensity to adhere to organic carbon in biosolids and biosolid-amended soils. Land application of biosolids containing triclosan has the potential to contribute to multiple direct and indirect human health exposure pathways. To estimate exposures and human health risks from biosolid-borne triclosan, a risk assessment was conducted in general accordance with the methodology incorporated into the US Environmental Protection Agency's Part 503 biosolids rule. Human health exposures to biosolid-borne triclosan were estimated on the basis of published empirical data or modeled using upper-end environmental partitioning estimates. Similarly, a range of published triclosan human health toxicity values was evaluated. Margins of safety were estimated for 10 direct and indirect exposure pathways, both individually and combined. The present risk assessment found large margins of safety (>1000 to >100 000) for potential exposures to all pathways, even under the most conservative exposure and toxicity assumptions considered. The human health exposures and risks from biosolid-borne triclosan are concluded to be de minimis. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2358-2367. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  8. Particulate matter composition and emission rates from the disk incorporation of class B biosolids into soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paez-Rubio, Tania; Xin, Hua; Anderson, James; Peccia, Jordan

    Biosolids contain metal, synthetic organic compound, endotoxin, and pathogen concentrations that are greater than concentrations in the agricultural soils to which they are applied. Once applied, biosolids are incorporated into soils by disking and the aerosols produced during this process may pose an airborne toxicological and infectious health hazard to biosolids workers and nearby residents. Field studies at a Central Arizona biosolids land application site were conducted to characterize the physical, chemical, and biological content of the aerosols produced during biosolids disking and the content of bulk biosolids and soils from which the aerosols emanate. Arrayed samplers were used to estimate the vertical source aerosol concentration profile to enable plume height and associated source emission rate calculations. Source aerosol concentrations and calculated emission rates reveal that disking is a substantial source of biosolids-derived aerosols. The biosolids emission rate during disking ranged from 9.91 to 27.25 mg s -1 and was greater than previously measured emission rates produced during the spreading of dewatered biosolids or the spraying of liquid biosolids. Adding biosolids to dry soils increased the moisture content and reduced the total PM 10 emissions produced during disking by at least three times. The combination of bulk biosolids and aerosol measurements along with PM 10 concentrations provides a framework for estimating aerosol concentrations and emission rates by reconstruction. This framework serves to eliminate the difficulty and inherent limitations associated with monitoring low aerosol concentrations of toxic compounds and pathogens, and can promote an increased understanding of the associated biosolids aerosol health risks to workers and nearby residents.

  9. Occurrence and fate of perfluorochemicals in soil following the land application of municipal biosolids.

    PubMed

    Sepulvado, Jennifer G; Blaine, Andrea C; Hundal, Lakhwinder S; Higgins, Christopher P

    2011-10-01

    The recent implementation of soil and drinking water screening guidance values for two perfluorochemicals (PFCs), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), reflects the growing concerns regarding the presence of these persistent and bioaccumulative chemicals in the natural environment. Previous work has established the potential risk to the environment from the land application of industrially contaminated biosolids, but studies focusing on environmental risk from land application of typical municipal biosolids are lacking. Thus, the present study investigated the occurrence and fate of PFCs from land-applied municipal biosolids by evaluating the levels, mass balance, desorption, and transport of PFCs in soils receiving application of municipal biosolids at various loading rates. This study is the first to report levels of PFCs in agricultural soils amended with typical municipal biosolids. PFOS was the dominant PFC in both biosolids (80-219 ng/g) and biosolids-amended soil (2-483 ng/g). Concentrations of all PFCs in soil increased linearly with increasing biosolids loading rate. These data were used to develop a model for predicting PFC soil concentrations in soils amended with typical municipal biosolids using cumulative biosolids loading rates. Mass balance calculations comparing PFCs applied vs those recovered in the surface soil interval indicated the potential transformation of PFC precursors. Laboratory desorption experiments indicated that the leaching potential of PFCs decreases with increasing chain length and that previously derived organic-carbon normalized partition coefficients may not be accurate predictors of the desorption of long-chain PFCs from biosolids-amended soils. Trace levels of PFCs were also detected in soil cores from biosolids-amended soils to depths of 120 cm, suggesting potential movement of these compounds within the soil profile over time and confirming the

  10. Effective Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Eng, Wong Kim; Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study…

  11. Tips for Effective Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supple, Kevin F.

    2009-01-01

    School business officials' days are filled with numbers and reports--audits, balance sheets, check registers, financial statements, journal entries, vouchers, and warrant reports, just to name a few. Those are all important tools that school business officers use to manage the financial resources of the district effectively. However, they are also…

  12. Effective Instructional Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakariya, Sally Banks; Steller, Arthur, Ed.

    Effective instructional management processes come in many guises, but all share four essential components: (1) a set of educational goals toward which progress can be measured; (2) a means of assessing students' instructional needs and determining placement and grouping; (3) an organizational structure and instructional delivery process capable of…

  13. Fate of tricloasa and methyltriclosan from biosolids application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosolids contain synthetic chemicals such as Triclosan (TCS) which is heavily used as an antibacterial compound with endocrine disruptor properties. Thus, TCS has the potential to alter soil microbial communities and disrupt endocrine functions if they move offsite. Due to its low solubility and ...

  14. Transformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Fresh, Aged, and Incinerated Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract The purpose of this research was to assess the chemical transformation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aged, fresh, and incinerated biosolids in order to provide information for AgNP life cycle analyses. Silver nanoparticles were introduced to the influent of a pilot...

  15. Uptake coefficients for biosolids-amended dryland winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosolids regulations developed in the United States employed risk assessment impacts of trace element additions on plant uptake. The US Environmental Protection Agency adapted the uptake coefficient (ratio of plant concentration to quantity of element added) when developing limitations on selected...

  16. Transformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Fresh, Aged, and Incinerated Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract The purpose of this research was to assess the chemical transformation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aged, fresh, and incinerated biosolids in order to provide information for AgNP life cycle analyses. Silver nanoparticles were introduced to the influent of a pilot...

  17. Utilizing water treatment residuals to reduce phosphorus runoff from biosolids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Approximately 40% of biosolids (sewage sludge) produced in the U.S. are incinerated or landfilled rather than land applied due to concern over non-point source phosphorus (P) runoff. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of chemical amendments on water-extractable P (WEP) in appli...

  18. Pathogen Characterization of Fresh and Stored Mesophilic Anaerobically Digested Biosolids.

    PubMed

    A, Cecily

    2017-01-13

    Culturable bacterial pathogens (Campylobacter, Salmonella, Listeria, Yersinia) and indicators (E. coli, enterococci, Clostridium perfringens) were quantified at six wastewater treatment plants that land apply anaerobically digested biosolids in Ontario, Canada. Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia were also quantified by PCR. Salmonella and Listeria were frequently detected in sludge and liquid biosolids (70-100% of samples) but less often in fresh dewatered cake biosolids (50-60%); with low levels in fresh cake (<100 cells/g dw). Yersinia were in 20-30% of samples, typically at very low levels (<10 cell/g dw). Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in 80% and 20% of cake biosolids at geometric means of 270 cysts/g dw and 70 oocysts/g dw, respectively. E. coli reduction was typically >2-log10 while pathogen reduction was variable. "Sudden increase" of pathogens was not observed, however, Salmonella and E. coli showed regrowth (at 1 to 3 orders of magnitude) after 2 to 3 day storage at 30°C.

  19. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers: Residence time in soils receiving biosolids application.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Natasha A; McConnell, Laura L; Anderson, Marya O; Torrents, Alba; Ramirez, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) may enter the environment because of accumulation in biosolids followed by application to agricultural lands. No published dissipation studies are available for PBDEs in agricultural soils after biosolids application. Therefore, we conducted a 3-year study to examine the fate of PBDEs in a small-scale 0.24-ha continuously cropped field after a single biosolids application at 72.3 wet tons/ha and determined dissipation half-lives for BDE-47+BDE-99 and BDE-209. In addition, we conducted a large-scale survey of soils from 26 mostly pasture fields at 10 farms with detailed information on timing and rate of biosolids applications. In the small-scale experiment, maximum soil PBDE concentrations of 43.7 ± 42.7 μg kg(-1) d.w. for BDE-209 and 6.05 ± 7.15 μg kg(-1) d.w. for BDE-47+BDE-99 were reached 1 year after application. We hypothesized that PBDEs were slowly released from the biosolids matrix into the soil over the first year. After 3 years, median BDE-47+BDE-99 concentrations were approximately equal to preapplication levels, whereas median BDE-209 concentrations remained ∼129% above preapplication levels. The estimated residence time from the small-scale experiment was 342 d for BDE-47+BDE-99 and 861 d for BDE-209. In the large-scale study, a subset of fields that received a single biosolids application was used to generate another estimate of residence time: 704 d for BDE-47+BDE-99 and 1440 d for BDE-209. These longer residence time estimates were used in three different first-order decay dissipation scenarios (continuous, limited, and no dissipation) to predict PBDE concentration in fields with single and multiple biosolids applications. Results indicate that dissipation occurs primarily in the first 2 years after application, but residues remaining in the soil after this period are likely to be much more tightly bound and less available for degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biosolids, Soil, Crop, Ground-Water, and Streambed-Sediment Data for a Biosolids-Application Area Near Deer Trail, Colorado, 2002-2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    applied and could alter MWRD plans for the application of biosolids in Arapa - hoe and Elbert Counties. The composition of biosolids was monitored to...and one site was selected on the MWRD south property in Elbert County. The Arapa - hoe County site is located in T. 4 S., R. 58 W., sec. 22 and lies

  1. MOBILIZATION OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS AND ESTROGENIC ACTIVITY IN SIMULATED RAINFALL RUNOFF FROM LAND-APPLIED BIOSOLIDS

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Ben D.; Young, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Municipal biosolids are commonly applied to land as soil amendment or fertilizer as a form of beneficial reuse of what could otherwise be viewed as waste. Balanced against this benefit are potential risks to groundwater and surface water quality from constituents that may be mobilized during storm events. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mobilization of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), heavy metals, and total estrogenic activity in rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids. Rainfall simulations were conducted on soil plots amended with biosolids. Surface runoff and leachate was collected and analyzed for the EDCs bisphenol A, 17α-ethynylestradiol, triclocarban, triclosan, octylphenol, and nonylphenol; a suite of sixteen metals; and estrogenic activity via the ER-CALUX bioassay. Triclocarban (2.3–17.3 ng/L), triclosan (<51–309 ng/L), and octylphenol (<4.9–203 ng/L) were commonly detected. Chromium (2.0–22 µg/L), cobalt (2.5–10 µg/L), nickel (28–235 µg/L), copper (14–110 µg/L), arsenic (1.2–2.7 µg/L), and selenium (0.29–12 µg/L) were quantifiable over background levels. Triclosan, nickel, and copper were detected at levels that might pose some risk to aquatic life, though levels of metals in the biosolids were well below maximum allowable regulatory limits. ER-CALUX results were mostly explained by background bisphenol A contamination and octylphenol in runoff, though unknown contributors and/or matrix effects were also found. PMID:21786314

  2. Mobilization of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and estrogenic activity in simulated rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Ben D; Young, Thomas M

    2011-10-01

    Municipal biosolids are commonly applied to land as soil amendment or fertilizer as a form of beneficial reuse of what could otherwise be viewed as waste. Balanced against this benefit are potential risks to groundwater and surface water quality from constituents that may be mobilized during storm events. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mobilization of selected endocrine-disrupting compounds, heavy metals, and total estrogenic activity in rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids. Rainfall simulations were conducted on soil plots amended with biosolids. Surface runoff and leachate was collected and analyzed for the endocrine-disrupting compounds bisphenol A, 17α-ethynylestradiol, triclocarban, triclosan, octylphenol, and nonylphenol; a suite of 16 metals; and estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor-mediated chemical activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) bioassay. Triclocarban (2.3-17.3 ng/L), triclosan (<51-309 ng/L), and octylphenol (<4.9-203 ng/L) were commonly detected. Chromium (2.0-22 µg/L), Co (2.5-10 µg/L), Ni (28-235 µg/L), Cu (14-110 µg/L), As (1.2-2.7 µg/L), and Se (0.29-12 µg/L) were quantifiable over background levels. Triclosan, Ni, and Cu were detected at levels that might pose some risk to aquatic life, though levels of metals in the biosolids were well below the maximum allowable regulatory limits. The ER-CALUX results were mostly explained by background bisphenol A contamination and octylphenol in runoff, although unknown contributors or matrix effects were also found.

  3. Validation of mega composite sampling and nationwide mass inventories for 26 previously unmonitored contaminants in archived biosolids from the U.S National Biosolids Repository.

    PubMed

    Chari, Bipin P; Halden, Rolf U

    2012-10-01

    In the present study, archived U.S biosolids from the 2001 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Sewage Sludge Survey were analyzed with an expanded U.S EPA Method 1694, to determine the occurrence of 26 previously unmonitored pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) among a total of 120 analytes. The study further served to examine the reproducibility of a mega-composite approach for creating chemical mass inventories in biosolids based on pooled samples from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) nationwide. Five mega-composites reflecting 94 WWTPs in 32 states and the District of Columbia were constructed from archived biosolids and analyzed by LC/ESI-MS/MS using a newly introduced analytical method expanding upon U.S EPA Method 1694. In addition, soil-biosolids mixtures from a mesocosm setup were analyzed to experimentally determine the half-lives of biosolids-borne compounds applied on U.S land. Among 59 analytes detected, 33 had been reported previously, whereas 26 are reported in biosolids for the first time, at levels ranging from 1.65 to 673 μg kg⁻¹ dry weight. Newly recognized biosolids constituents were identified as Ca²⁺ channel blockers, antidepressants, diuretics, β-blockers and analgesics. Using a mass balance approach, the total loading of these 26 pharmaceuticals to U.S soils from biosolids land application was estimated at 5-15 tons year⁻¹. Past and present datasets for 30 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) were determined to be statistically indistinguishable (paired t-test; p = 0.01). This study expands the list of PPCPs reported in U.S biosolids, provides the first estimates of nationwide release rates to and environmental half-lives in U.S agricultural soils, and confirms the utility of using mega-composite sampling for economical tracking of chemical inventories in biosolids on a national scale. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Validation of mega composite sampling and nationwide mass inventories for 26 previously unmonitored contaminants in archived biosolids from the U.S National Biosolids Repository

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Bipin P.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, archived U.S biosolids from the 2001 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Sewage Sludge Survey were analyzed with an expanded U.S EPA Method 1694, to determine the occurrence of 26 previously unmonitored pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) among a total of 120 analytes. The study further served to examine the reproducibility of a mega-composite approach for creating chemical mass inventories in biosolids based on pooled samples from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) nationwide. Five mega-composites reflecting 94 WWTPs in 32 states and the District of Columbia were constructed from archived biosolids and analyzed by LC/ESI-MS/MS using a newly introduced analytical method expanding upon U.S EPA Method 1694. In addition, soil-biosolids mixtures from a mesocosm setup were analyzed to experimentally determine the half-lives of biosolids-borne compounds applied on U.S land. Among 59 analytes detected, 33 had been reported previously, whereas 26 are reported in biosolids for the first time, at levels ranging from 1.65 to 673 μg kg−1 dry weight. Newly recognized biosolids constituents were identified as Ca2+ channel blockers, antidepressants, diuretics, β-blockers and analgesics. Using a mass balance approach, the total loading of these 26 pharmaceuticals to U.S soils from biosolids land application was estimated at 5–15 tons year−1. Past and present datasets for 30 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) were determined to be statistically indistinguishable (paired t-test; p = 0.01). This study expands the list of PPCPs reported in U.S biosolids, provides the first estimates of nationwide release rates to and environmental half-lives in U.S agricultural soils, and confirms the utility of using mega-composite sampling for economical tracking of chemical inventories in biosolids on a national scale. PMID:22789759

  5. Ground-Water Quality in the Vicinity of Coal-Refuse Areas Reclaimed with Biosolids in Fulton County, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, William S.

    2007-01-01

    The Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago has applied biosolids, followed by revegetation, to reclaim three coal-refuse areas. Most of the reclamation at the three sites was done from 1989 through 1992, and included the application of lime, clay, and various loads of biosolids up to 1,000 dry tons per acre. Water samples collected from 12 monitoring wells installed in the vicinity of the three reclaimed coal-refuse areas were analyzed to better understand the hydrogeology and water-quality effects. Ground water probably flows along preferential paths in the disturbed coal-refuse areas, and is impeded by undisturbed glacial till. Most of the samples contained elevated concentrations of sulfate, iron, and manganese, constituents associated with ground water in coal-mined areas. Concentrations of aluminum, cadmium, nickel, or zinc were somewhat elevated in samples from four wells, and greatest in water samples with pH less than 5. The smaller nutrient concentrations indicate that the applied biosolids are not identifiably affecting nutrients or metal concentrations in shallow ground water near the refuse piles. The coal refuse likely is the primary influence on the chemical characterization of ground-water in the area.

  6. Survey of organic wastewater contaminants in biosolids destined for land application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinney, C.A.; Furlong, E.T.; Zaugg, S.D.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Werner, S.L.; Cahill, J.D.; Jorgensen, G.R.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the presence, composition, and concentrations of organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) were determined in solid materials produced during wastewater treatment. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of these solids, collectively referred to as biosolids, as a source of OWCs to soil and water in contact with soil. Nine different biosolid products, produced by municipal wastewater treatment plants in seven different states, were analyzed for 87 different OWCs. Fifty-five of the OWCs were detected in at least one biosolid product. The 87 different OWCs represent a diverse cross section of emerging organic contaminants that enter wastewater treatment plants and may be discharged without being completely metabolized or degraded. A minimum of 30 and a maximum of 45 OWCs were detected in any one biosolid. The biosolids used in this study are produced by several production methods, and the plants they originate from have differing population demographics, yet the percent composition of total OWC content, and of the most common OWCs, typically did not vary greatly between the biosolids tested. The summed OWC content ranged from 64 to 1811 mg/kg dry weight. Six biosolids were collected twice, 3-18 months apart, and the total OWC content of each biosolid varied by less than a factor of 2. These results indicate that the biosolids investigated in this study have OWC compositions and concentrations that are more similar than different and that biosolids are highly enriched in OWCs (as mass-normalized concentrations) when compared to effluents or effluent-impacted water. These results demonstrate the need to better describe the composition and fate of OWCs in biosolids since about 50% of biosolids are land applied and thus become a potentially ubiquitous nonpoint source of OWCs into the environment. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  7. The fate of nitrogen in a moderately alkaline and calcareous soil amended with biosolids and urea.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Christina; Assadian, Naomi W; Lindemann, William

    2006-06-01

    The determination of nitrogen (N) based loading rates for land application of biosolids is challenging and site specific. Over loading may contribute to environmental, agricultural, or human health problems. The objective of this study was to monitor N mineralization and losses in a moderately alkaline and calcareous desert soil amended with either anaerobically digested (AN) or lime-stabilized (LS) biosolids, and irrigated with and without urea enriched water. For Experiment 1, N inputs, leaching and residuals in soil were evaluated in an open soil column system. For Experiment 2, ammonia (NH(3)) emissions were evaluated in a closed soil column system. In Experiment 1, AN and LS biosolids increased soil ON (organic N) by three and two fold, respectively. Respective net N mineralization of ON from biosolids alone was 90% and 62% without urea, and 71% and 77%, respectively with added urea. Nitrogen leaching losses and residuals in amended soil did not account for all N inputs into the soil/biosolids system. In Experiment 2, NH(3) emissions were not significantly different among treated soils with or without added urea, except LS amended soil receiving urea. Ammonia losses did not account for unaccounted N in Experiment 1. We concluded that deep placement and rapid mineralization of AN biosolids promoted anaerobic soil conditions and denitrification, in addition to the high denitrification potential of desert soil. LS biosolids showed greater potential than AN biosolids for safe and beneficial land application to desert soils regardless of biosolids placement and the inclusion of N rich irrigation water.

  8. Dynamics of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in soil amended with irradiated, pasteurized and limed biosolids.

    PubMed

    Franco-Hernández, Olivia; Mckelligan-Gonzalez, Alba Natalia; Lopez-Olguin, Ana Maria; Espinosa-Ceron, Fabiola; Escamilla-Silva, Eleazar; Dendooven, Luc

    2003-03-01

    Sewage biosolids contain high concentrations of pathogens, which limits their use as soil amendment. This study investigated how application of lime (Ca(OH)2), irradiation, or pasteurization reduced pathogens in biosolids and how its application affected soil characteristics. A soil sampled outside the canopy of Mesquite trees (Prosopis laevigata) and from a pasture at Lerma (Mexico) was amended with treated or untreated biosolids, characterized and incubated aerobically while dynamics of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) were monitored. Heavy metals concentrations in the biosolids were low, so it was of excellent quality (USEPA). The amount of pathogens in the biosolids made it a class "B" (USEPA) which can be used in forests. Only irradiation sufficiently reduced faecal coliforms to make it a class "A" biosolids without restrictions in application. C mineralization increased significantly when biosolids were added, but not concentrations of available P (P < 0.05). Ammonium (NH4+) concentrations in soil amended with biosolids were higher compared to unamended soil, but not the concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) except when biosolids treated with Ca(OH)2 was added to the Lerma soil.

  9. Reclamation of acid sulfate soils using lime-stabilized biosolids.

    PubMed

    Orndorff, Zenah W; Daniels, W Lee; Fanning, Delvin S

    2008-01-01

    Excavation of sulfidic materials during construction has resulted in acid rock drainage (ARD) problems throughout Virginia. The most extensive documented uncontrolled disturbance at a single location is Stafford Regional Airport (SRAP) in Stafford, Virginia. Beginning in 1998, over 150 ha of sulfidic Coastal Plain sediments were disturbed, including steeply sloping cut surfaces and spoils placed into fills. Acid sulfate soils developed, and ARD generated on-site degraded metal and concrete structures and heavily damaged water quality with effects noted over 1 km downstream. The site was not recognized as sulfidic until 2001 when surface soil sampling revealed pH values ranging from 1.9 to 5.3 and peroxide potential acidity (PPA) values ranging from 1 to 42 Mg CaCO(3) per 1000 Mg material. In February 2002 a water quality program was established in and around the site to monitor baseline pH, EC, NO(3)-N, NH(4)-N, PO(4)-P, Fe, Al, Mn, and SO(4)-S, and initial pH values as low as 2.9 were noted in on-site receiving streams. In the spring and fall of 2002, the site was treated with variable rates of lime-stabilized biosolids, straw-mulch, and acid- and salt-tolerant legumes and grasses. By October 2002, the site was fully revegetated (> or = 90% living cover) with the exception of a few highly acidic outcrops and seepage areas. Surface soil sampling in 2003, 2004, and 2006 revealed pH values typically > 6.0. Water quality responded quickly to treatment, although short-term NH(4)(+) release occurred. Despite heavy loadings, no significant surface water P losses were observed.

  10. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Pain It’s important to treat pain. If you ... to pay for pain medicine. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain Keep track of the pain. Each day, ...

  11. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Infection “I am extra careful to stay away ... doctor or nurse right away. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Infection Take these steps to lower your chances ...

  12. A greenhouse trial to investigate the ameliorative properties of biosolids and plants on physicochemical conditions of iron ore tailings: Implications for an iron ore mine site remediation.

    PubMed

    Cele, Emmanuel Nkosinathi; Maboeta, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An iron ore mine site in Swaziland is currently (2015) in a derelict state as a consequence of past (1964-1988) and present (2011 - current) iron ore mining operations. In order to control problems associated with mine wastes, the Swaziland Water Services Corporation (SWSC) recently (2013) proposed the application of biosolids in sites degraded by mining operations. It is thought that this practice could generally improve soil conditions and enhance plant reestablishment. More importantly, the SWSC foresees this as a potential solution to the biosolids disposal problems. In order to investigate the effects of biosolids and plants in soil physicochemical conditions of iron mine soils, we conducted two plant growth trials. Trial 1 consisted of tailings that received biosolids and topsoil (TUSB mix) while in trial 2, tailings received biosolids only (TB mix). In the two trials, the application rates of 0 (control), 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 t ha(-1) were used. After 30 days of equilibration, 25 seeds of Cynodon dactylon were sown in each pot and thinned to 10 plants after 4 weeks. Plants were watered twice weekly and remained under greenhouse conditions for 12 weeks, subsequent to which soils were subjected to chemical analysis. According to the results obtained, there were significant improvements in soil parameters related to fertility such as organic matter (OM), water holding capacity (WHC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), ammonium [Formula: see text] , magnesium (Mg(2+)), calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphorus ( [Formula: see text] ). With regard to heavy metals, biosolids led to significant increases in soil total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb. The higher concentrations of Zn and Cu in treated tailings compared to undisturbed adjacent soils are a cause for concern because in the field, this might work against the broader objectives of mine soil remediation, which include the recolonization of reclaimed sites by soil-dwelling organisms. Therefore, while

  13. Land application of sewage sludge (biosolids) in Australia: risks to the environment and food crops.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, D L; Penney, N; McLaughlin, M J; Rigby, H; Schwarz, K

    2010-01-01

    Australia is a large exporter of agricultural products, with producers responsible for a range of quality assurance programs to ensure that food crops are free from various contaminants of detriment to human health. Large volumes of treated sewage sludge (biosolids), although low by world standards, are increasingly being recycled to land, primarily to replace plant nutrients and to improve soil properties; they are used in agriculture, forestry, and composted. The Australian National Biosolids Research Program (NBRP) has linked researchers to a collective goal to investigate nutrients and benchmark safe concentrations of metals nationally using a common methodology, with various other research programs conducted in a number of states specific to regional problems and priorities. The use of biosolids in Australia is strictly regulated by state guidelines, some of which are under review following recent research outcomes. Communication and research between the water industry, regulators and researchers specific to the regulation of biosolids is further enhanced by the Australian and New Zealand Biosolids Partnership (ANZBP). This paper summarises the major issues and constraints related to biosolids use in Australia using specific case examples from Western Australia, a member of the Australian NBRP, and highlights several research projects conducted over the last decade to ensure that biosolids are used beneficially and safely in the environment. Attention is given to research relating to plant nutrient uptake, particularly nitrogen and phosphorus (including that of reduced phosphorus uptake in alum sludge-amended soil); the risk of heavy metal uptake by plants, specifically cadmium, copper and zinc; the risk of pathogen contamination in soil and grain products; change to soil pH (particularly following lime-amended biosolids); and the monitoring of faecal contamination by biosolids in waterbodies using DNA techniques. Examples of products that are currently

  14. Soil carbon sequestration resulting from long-term application of biosolids for land reclamation.

    PubMed

    Tian, G; Granato, T C; Cox, A E; Pietz, R I; Carlson, C R; Abedin, Z

    2009-01-01

    Investigations on the impact of application of biosolids for land reclamation on C sequestration in soil were conducted at Fulton County, Illinois, where 41 fields (3.6-66 ha) received biosolids at a cumulative loading rate from 455 to 1654 dry Mg ha(-1) for 8 to 23 yr in rotation from 1972 to 2004. The fields were cropped with corn, wheat, and sorghum and also with soybean and grass or fallowed. Soil organic carbon (SOC) increased rapidly with the application of biosolids, whereas it fluctuated slightly in fertilizer controls. The peak SOC in the 0- to 15-cm depth of biosolids-amended fields ranged from 4 to 7% and was greater at higher rates of biosolids. In fields where biosolids application ceased for 22 yr, SOC was still much higher than the initial levels. Over the 34-yr reclamation, the mean net soil C sequestration was 1.73 (0.54-3.05) Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) in biosolids-amended fields as compared with -0.07 to 0.17 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) in fertilizer controls, demonstrating a high potential of soil C sequestration by the land application of biosolids. Soil C sequestration was significantly correlated with the biosolids application rate, and the equation can be expressed as y = 0.064x - 0.11, in which y is the annual net soil C sequestration (Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1)), and x is annual biosolids application in dry weight (Mg ha(-1) yr(-1)). Our results indicate that biosolids applications can turn Midwest Corn Belt soils from current C-neutral to C-sink. A method for calculating SOC stock under conditions in which surface soil layer depth and mass changes is also described.

  15. Relative risk assessment of cruise ships biosolids disposal alternatives.

    PubMed

    Avellaneda, Pedro M; Englehardt, James D; Olascoaga, Josefina; Babcock, Elizabeth A; Brand, Larry; Lirman, Diego; Rogge, Wolfgang F; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Tchobanoglous, George

    2011-10-01

    A relative risk assessment of biosolids disposal alternatives for cruise ships is presented in this paper. The area of study encompasses islands and marine waters of the Caribbean Sea. The objective was to evaluate relative human health and ecological risks of (a) dewatering/incineration, (b) landing the solids for disposal, considering that in some countries land-disposed solids might be discharged in the near-shore environment untreated, and (c) deep ocean disposal. Input to the Bayesian assessment consisted of professional judgment based on available literature and modeling information, data on constituent concentrations in cruise ship biosolids, and simulations of constituent concentrations in Caribbean waters assuming ocean disposal. Results indicate that human health and ecological risks associated with land disposal and shallow ocean disposal are higher than those of the deep ocean disposal and incineration. For incineration, predicted ecological impacts were lower relative to deep ocean disposal before considering potential impacts of carbon emissions.

  16. Microbial safety of air-dried and rewetted biosolids.

    PubMed

    Rouch, Duncan A; Mondal, Tania; Pai, Sneha; Glauche, Florian; Fleming, Vennessa A; Thurbon, Nerida; Blackbeard, Judy; Smith, Stephen R; Deighton, Margaret

    2011-06-01

    To assess microbial safety of treated sewage sludge (biosolids), we examined the inactivation of microbial indicators for potential bacterial, viral and protozoan pathogens. The levels of indicators were determined throughout the air-drying and storage phases of anaerobically digested sewage sludge. Samples were collected from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPS) in Victoria, Australia. Established methods were applied for analysis of bacteria and coliphages, based on membrane filtration and layered plates, respectively. In the pan drying phase, the prevalence of Escherichia coli was reduced by >5 log10 compared with sludge entering the pan. Thus, after pan drying of 8-11 months at WWTP A and 15 months at WWTP B, the numbers of E. coli were reduced to below 10(2) cfu/g dry solids (DS). This level is acceptable for unrestricted use in agriculture in Australia (P1 treatment grade), the UK (enhanced treatment status) and the USA (Class A pathogen reduction). Coliphage numbers also decreased substantially during the air-drying phase, indicating that enteric viruses are also likely to be destroyed during this phase. Clostridium perfringens appeared to be an overly conservative indicator. Survival, but not regrowth, of E. coli or Salmonella was observed in rewetted biosolids (15-20% moisture content), after being seeded with these species, indicating a degree of safety of stored biosolids upon rewetting by rain.

  17. ALTERATION OF SOIL METAL CHEMISTRY AND PHYTOAVAILABILITY ASSOCIATED WITH BIOSOLIDS APPLICATION (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids are a complex mixture which contain both inorganic and organic adsorbents. Thus, addition of biosolids to soil not only increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) it alters the phytoavailability of these metals. This reduction in ph...

  18. INTERLABORATORY VALIDATION OF USEPA METHOD 1680: FECAL COLIFORMS IN BIOSOLIDS BY MULTIPLE-TUBE FERMENTATION PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the US, the use and disposal of biosolids (including domestic septage) are regulated under 40 CFR Part 503. Subpart D of this regulation protects public health and the environment through requirements designed to reduce the potential for contact with pathogens in biosolids app...

  19. Sulfur flows and biosolids processing: Using Material Flux Analysis (MFA) principles at wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R M; Alvarez-Gaitan, J P; Stuetz, R M; Moore, S J

    2017-08-01

    High flows of sulfur through wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) may cause noxious gaseous emissions, corrosion of infrastructure, inhibit wastewater microbial communities, or contribute to acid rain if the biosolids or biogas is combusted. Yet, sulfur is an important agricultural nutrient and the direct application of biosolids to soils enables its beneficial re-use. Flows of sulfur throughout the biosolids processing of six WWTPs were investigated to identify how they were affected by biosolids processing configurations. The process of tracking sulfur flows through the sites also identified limitations in data availability and quality, highlighting future requirements for tracking substance flows. One site was investigated in more detail showing sulfur speciation throughout the plant and tracking sulfur flows in odour control systems in order to quantify outflows to air, land and ocean sinks. While the majority of sulfur from WWTPs is removed as sulfate in the secondary effluent, the sulfur content of biosolids is valuable as it can be directly returned to soils to combat the potential sulfur deficiencies. Biosolids processing configurations, which focus on maximising solids recovery, through high efficiency separation techniques in primary sedimentation tanks, thickeners and dewatering centrifuges retain more sulfur in the biosolids. However, variations in sulfur loads and concentrations entering the WWTPs affect sulfur recovery in the biosolids, suggesting industrial emitters, and chemical dosing of iron salts are responsible for differences in recovery between sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. INTERLABORATORY VALIDATION OF USEPA METHOD 1680: FECAL COLIFORMS IN BIOSOLIDS BY MULTIPLE-TUBE FERMENTATION PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the US, the use and disposal of biosolids (including domestic septage) are regulated under 40 CFR Part 503. Subpart D of this regulation protects public health and the environment through requirements designed to reduce the potential for contact with pathogens in biosolids app...

  1. Copper and zinc speciation in a biosolids-amended, semiarid grassland soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Predicting trace metal solid phase speciation changes associated with long-term biosolids land application is important for understanding and improving environmental quality. Biosolids were surface-applied (no incorporation; 0, 1, 2, 5, 10, and 15 tons per acre) to a semi-arid grassland in 1991 (si...

  2. METAL-BINDING ROLE OF IRON AND MANGANESE OXIDES IN BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental impact and potential hazards of metals in biosolids to plants, animals and the human food chain have been studied for decades. From this body of work, it has been concluded that the addition of biosolids to the soil alters the soil system beyond that of the simp...

  3. Problem Formulation for Human Health Risk Assessments of Pathogens in Land-Applied Biosolids (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    biosolids_cover.jpg" vspace = "5" hspace="5" align="right" border="1" alt="Cover of the Land-Applied Biosolids 2011 Final Report "> Millions of tons of treated sewage sludges or “biosolids” are applied annually to f...

  4. VALIDATION OF EPA METHOD 1682: SALMONELLA IN BIOSOLIDS BY MODIFIED, SEMISOLID RAPPAPORT-VASSILIADIS (MSRV) MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treated biosolids may be applied to land as a crop nutrient and soil conditioner. However, land application of biosolids may pose the risk of releasing pathogens into the environment if disinfection and use criteria established by EPA at 40 CFR part 503 are not met. Among these c...

  5. Phosphorus recovery prior to land application of biosolids using the "quick wash" process developed by USDA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Excess soil phosphorus (P) beyond the assimilative capacity of soils is a major factor to discontinue application of biosolids to land nearby municipal wastewater treatment plants. For this reason, municipalities incur in hefty fees for transportation and landfilling biosolids that otherwise could b...

  6. VALIDATION OF EPA METHOD 1682: SALMONELLA IN BIOSOLIDS BY MODIFIED, SEMISOLID RAPPAPORT-VASSILIADIS (MSRV) MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treated biosolids may be applied to land as a crop nutrient and soil conditioner. However, land application of biosolids may pose the risk of releasing pathogens into the environment if disinfection and use criteria established by EPA at 40 CFR part 503 are not met. Among these c...

  7. MONITORING MICROBES, ALKYL PHENOLS, AND SOIL TOXICITY AFTER LAND APPLICATION OF ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A common disposal practice for municipal biosolids is to spread this material on agricultural fields as a soil amendment. For example, over 3 million dry tons of treated sewage sludge (or biosolids) are applied on agricultural lands in the US. The regulations which govern the lan...

  8. Occurrence and dissipation of three azole biocides climbazole, clotrimazole and miconazole in biosolid-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Feng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Ma, Yi-Bing; Lai, Hua-Jie; Chen, Feng; Pan, Chang-Gui

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the occurrence and dissipation of three azole biocides climbazole, clotrimazole and miconazole in biosolid-amended soils of the three sites (Zhejiang, Hunan and Shandong) in China following three treatments (CK: control without biosolid application; T1: one biosolid application; T2: biosolid application every year). The results showed that climbazole, clotrimazole and miconazole were present in the biosolid and biosolid-amended soils, but absent in the control soils. In the soils treated with biosolids, the concentrations of climbazole, clotrimazole and miconazole were mostly lower in the Zhejiang soils than in the Shandong or Hunan soils, suggesting that these three biocides are more readily dissipated under the flooding condition. During the one year monitoring, the concentrations of climbazole, clotrimazole and miconazole in the biosolid-applied soils showed only slight variations. The dissipation half-lives for miconazole calculated under the field conditions of Shandong site were 440 days for T1 and the half-lives for clotrimazole were 365 days for T2. The results suggested the persistence of these three biocides in the soil environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. SORPTION AND DESORPTION OF CADMIUM BY DIFFERENT FRACTIONS OF BIOSOLIDS - AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Series of Cd sorption and desorption experiments were conducted on different fractions of soils amended with biosolids, Cd-salt, and unamended soils (control) to test the hypothesize that not only organic but also inorganic fraction in biosolids controls the metal availability in...

  10. Long-term crop and soil response to biosolids applications in dryland wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosolids have the potential to improve degraded soils in grain-fallow rotations. Our objectives were to determine if repeated use of biosolids in wheat-fallow rotations could (i) supply adequate but not excessive N for grain production and (ii) maintain or increase soil C, without creating high ris...

  11. SORPTION AND DESORPTION OF CADMIUM BY DIFFERENT FRACTIONS OF BIOSOLIDS - AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Series of Cd sorption and desorption experiments were conducted on different fractions of soils amended with biosolids, Cd-salt, and unamended soils (control) to test the hypothesize that not only organic but also inorganic fraction in biosolids controls the metal availability in...

  12. Physical and chemical properties of pyrolyzed MWRDGC biosolids for utilization in sand-based turfgrass rootzones

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosolids are several forms of treated sewage sludge that are intended for use as soil conditioners for horticultural and agricultural crops. In the U.S., biosolids may only refer to conditioned sludge that meets USEPA pollutant and pathogen requirements for land application and surface disposal. Th...

  13. Multimedia Sampling During The Application Of Biosolids On A Land Test Site (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research study was to evaluate air and soil sampling methods and analytical techniques for commercial land application of biosolids. Biosolids, were surface applied at agronomic rates to an agricultural field. During the period of August 2004 to January 2005, 3...

  14. IS "RECLAIMED WATER AND BIOSOLIDS: BENEFITS AND HAZARDS" IT: "BIOACCULULATION AND FOODCHAIN CONTAMINATION IN TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids are a complex mixture which contain both inorganic and organic adsorbents. Thus, addition of biosolids to soil not only increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) it alters the phytoavailability of these metals. This reduction in ph...

  15. ALTERATION OF SOIL METAL CHEMISTRY AND PHYTOAVAILABILITY ASSOCIATED WITH BIOSOLIDS APPLICATION (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids are a complex mixture which contain both inorganic and organic adsorbents. Thus, addition of biosolids to soil not only increases the environmental loading of toxic metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, etc.) it alters the phytoavailability of these metals. This reduction in ph...

  16. MONITORING MICROBES, ALKYL PHENOLS, AND SOIL TOXICITY AFTER LAND APPLICATION OF ANAEROBICALLY DIGESTED BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A common disposal practice for municipal biosolids is to spread this material on agricultural fields as a soil amendment. For example, over 3 million dry tons of treated sewage sludge (or biosolids) are applied on agricultural lands in the US. The regulations which govern the lan...

  17. METAL-BINDING ROLE OF IRON AND MANGANESE OXIDES IN BIOSOLIDS-AMENDED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental impact and potential hazards of metals in biosolids to plants, animals and the human food chain have been studied for decades. From this body of work, it has been concluded that the addition of biosolids to the soil alters the soil system beyond that of the simp...

  18. Field Studies Measuring the aerosolization of Endotoxin during the Land Application of Class B Biosolids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endotoxin is a component of the cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria and is known to be present in biosolids. Endotoxins have been shown to be a potent stimulator of the innate immune response causing airway irritation and shortness of breath. Class B biosolids are routinely ap...

  19. Effective Public Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Joseph L.

    1977-01-01

    Argues that public management differs from private management not just in degree but in quality, so that American business is an inappropriate analogy for evaluating public management. In particular, "purpose,""organization," and "people" have different meaning and significance in public agencies and private businesses. (JG)

  20. Effective Public Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Joseph L.

    1977-01-01

    Argues that public management differs from private management not just in degree but in quality, so that American business is an inappropriate analogy for evaluating public management. In particular, "purpose,""organization," and "people" have different meaning and significance in public agencies and private businesses. (JG)

  1. Uptake of silver by brown rice and wheat in soils repeatedly amended with biosolids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Longhua; Yang, Lu; Wang, Zhaoyang; Cheng, Miaomiao; Li, Zhu; Liu, Wuxing; Ma, Tingting; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yongming

    2017-08-25

    There have been numerous studies simulating the behaviour and fate of silver (Ag) applied to soils in biosolids in recent decades but the results remain to be verified under actual farming conditions. Here, we report a study of the transfer of Ag along the biosolids-soil-crop pathway with repeated biosolid applications over a four-year period to three contrasting soil types under rice-wheat rotation cultivation. A systematic investigation of Ag concentrations in biosolids throughout China shows Ag concentrations ranging from 0.64 to 7.47mgkg(-1) with a mean value of 3.58mgkg(-1) and a median of 3.02mgkg(-1) on a dry weight basis. Silver concentrations were significantly higher in industrial biosolids than in domestic or mixed flow biosolids. Biosolids application enhanced Ag accumulation in whole wheat. Silver concentrations in whole wheat increased to 20.8, 20.5 and 4.87μgkg(-1) after four years of high-metal industrial biosolids application to an acid Typic Ali-Perudic Aragsol, a neutral Typic Hapli-Stagnic Anthrosol, and a calcareous Typic Carbonati-Perudic Ferrosol, respectively. Moreover, the Ag translocation factor also increased in wheat following biosolids application with values of 5.6, 3.1 and 1.4, respectively. However, Ag accumulation in rice was found only in the acid soil with no discernible increase (p>0.05) in the translocation factor. The seasonal redox cycle may contribute to this phenomenon. A seedling incubation experiment confirms the influence of soil water regime on Ag bioavailability with a higher Ag translocation factor during the wheat growing season than the rice growth period. Incorporating a fallow period during the wheat (winter crop) season might be a suitable strategy for repeated biosolids application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Wastewater Biosolid Composting Optimization Based on UV-VNIR Spectroscopy Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Temporal-Lara, Beatriz; Melendez-Pastor, Ignacio; Gómez, Ignacio; Navarro-Pedreño, Jose

    2016-11-15

    Conventional wastewater treatment generates large amounts of organic matter-rich sludge that requires adequate treatment to avoid public health and environmental problems. The mixture of wastewater sludge and some bulking agents produces a biosolid to be composted at adequate composting facilities. The composting process is chemically and microbiologically complex and requires an adequate aeration of the biosolid (e.g., with a turner machine) for proper maturation of the compost. Adequate (near) real-time monitoring of the compost maturity process is highly difficult and the operation of composting facilities is not as automatized as other industrial processes. Spectroscopic analysis of compost samples has been successfully employed for compost maturity assessment but the preparation of the solid compost samples is difficult and time-consuming. This manuscript presents a methodology based on a combination of a less time-consuming compost sample preparation and ultraviolet, visible and short-wave near-infrared spectroscopy. Spectroscopic measurements were performed with liquid compost extract instead of solid compost samples. Partial least square (PLS) models were developed to quantify chemical fractions commonly employed for compost maturity assessment. Effective regression models were obtained for total organic matter (residual predictive deviation-RPD = 2.68), humification ratio (RPD = 2.23), total exchangeable carbon (RPD = 2.07) and total organic carbon (RPD = 1.66) with a modular and cost-effective visible and near infrared (VNIR) spectroradiometer. This combination of a less time-consuming compost sample preparation with a versatile sensor system provides an easy-to-implement, efficient and cost-effective protocol for compost maturity assessment and near-real-time monitoring.

  3. Wastewater Biosolid Composting Optimization Based on UV-VNIR Spectroscopy Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Temporal-Lara, Beatriz; Melendez-Pastor, Ignacio; Gómez, Ignacio; Navarro-Pedreño, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wastewater treatment generates large amounts of organic matter–rich sludge that requires adequate treatment to avoid public health and environmental problems. The mixture of wastewater sludge and some bulking agents produces a biosolid to be composted at adequate composting facilities. The composting process is chemically and microbiologically complex and requires an adequate aeration of the biosolid (e.g., with a turner machine) for proper maturation of the compost. Adequate (near) real-time monitoring of the compost maturity process is highly difficult and the operation of composting facilities is not as automatized as other industrial processes. Spectroscopic analysis of compost samples has been successfully employed for compost maturity assessment but the preparation of the solid compost samples is difficult and time-consuming. This manuscript presents a methodology based on a combination of a less time-consuming compost sample preparation and ultraviolet, visible and short-wave near-infrared spectroscopy. Spectroscopic measurements were performed with liquid compost extract instead of solid compost samples. Partial least square (PLS) models were developed to quantify chemical fractions commonly employed for compost maturity assessment. Effective regression models were obtained for total organic matter (residual predictive deviation—RPD = 2.68), humification ratio (RPD = 2.23), total exchangeable carbon (RPD = 2.07) and total organic carbon (RPD = 1.66) with a modular and cost-effective visible and near infrared (VNIR) spectroradiometer. This combination of a less time-consuming compost sample preparation with a versatile sensor system provides an easy-to-implement, efficient and cost-effective protocol for compost maturity assessment and near-real-time monitoring. PMID:27854280

  4. Establishment of vegetation in constructed wetlands using biosolids and quarry fines

    SciTech Connect

    Danehy, T.P.; Zick, R.; Brenner, F.; Chmielewski, J.; Dunn, M.H.; Cooper, D.C.

    1999-07-01

    A common problem with constructing wetlands on abandoned mine sties is the lack of adequate soil needed to establish vegetation. One component of a full-scale passive treatment system built at Jennings Environmental Education Center in Brady Township, Butler County, PA addressed this issue through the development of a field trial to find an inexpensive alternative substrate for wetland plants. A simple soil recipe was followed which called for the mixing of an inorganic material with a nutrient-rich organic material. The inorganic constituent used was silt-size pond cleanings from a sand and gravel operation. The organic material used was a composted product made from exceptional-quality biosolids. Both soil components were obtained from local sources (less than 16 kilometers (12 miles) from the site) and mixed on site with a Caterpillar 963 track loader. The soil was used to construct a channel wetland 3 meters (10 feet) wide by 61 meters (200 feet) long. A seed mixture which contained 24 different wetland plant species native to western Pennsylvania was added to the substrate prior to releasing the water from the vertical flow system into the wetland. After one year, the vegetation was studied to determine the percent cover and species composition in order to document the effectiveness of this method of wetland construction. The preliminary results of this study indicate that this is an effective means to establish and sustain wetland vegetation. The addition of a fabricated substrate consisting of composted biosolids and silt can be a very effective method to establish dense and diverse vegetation in a constructed wetland.

  5. Heavy metal fractionation during the co-composting of biosolids, deinking paper fibre and green waste.

    PubMed

    Tandy, S; Healey, J R; Nason, M A; Williamson, J C; Jones, D L

    2009-09-01

    Due to the introduction of the European Union Landfill Directive, composting has become a potentially viable disposal route for some organic wastes. As waste-derived compost is frequently added to soil to improve soil quality, it is important to quantify the environmental risk posed by potentially toxic elements contained within it. Here we used a sequential chemical extraction procedure to investigate the temporal dynamics of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb and Ni) during the co-composting of biosolids, deinking paper fibre and green waste. Overall, composting over 26 weeks reduced the availability of Ni, had no effect on Pb and slightly increased the availability of Cu and Zn. We conclude that although the total Cu and Ni concentrations in the compost exceed legislative guidelines for land application, due to their recalcitrant nature within the compost, this compost posed very little threat to soil or plant quality if used in agriculture or land restoration.

  6. Effective ED complaint management.

    PubMed

    Dagher, M; Kelbert, P; Lloyd, R J

    1995-12-01

    Handling patient complaints is possibly one of the most delicate tasks any manager must face. Although managing patient complaints is never a pleasant experience, a detailed plan can make it easier and more uniform, resulting in less stress and anxiety. Before improvements can be accomplished, deficiencies in the system must be corrected. Only after the department's processes have been deemned stable can the qualiuty of care be improved and the customer satisfied.

  7. Dissipation of antibiotics in three different agricultural soils after repeated application of biosolids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Wu, Longhua; Liu, Wuxing; Huang, Yujuan; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2016-11-21

    Application of biosolids to agricultural soils is one of the pathways by which antibiotics can be introduced into agricultural ecosystems. A pot experiment was conducted with repeated soil amendment with biosolids to examine the concentrations of four classes of antibiotics (tetracyclines, sulfonamides, fluoroquinolones, and macrolides) and their dissipation in three different soil types in wheat-rice rotations. Antibiotics accumulate in the soils after repeated application of biosolids. Fluoroquinolones showed stronger accumulation and persistence in the test soils than the other three classes of antibiotics. The maximum residual antibiotic concentration was that of norfloxacin at 155 ± 16 μg kg(-1) in the Typic Hapli-Stagnic Anthrosols (paddy soil). Predicted half-lives were up to 3.69 years, a much longer period than that between biosolid applications (twice each year on average). Antibiotic accumulation followed the rough order fluoroquinolones > tetracyclines > macrolides > sulfonamides, and the sulfonamides were seldom encountered. When biosolid application was suspended, the dissipation rate accelerated. Antibiotic dissipation was slightly slower when biosolids with high heavy metal concentrations were applied and microbial degradation may have been the main mechanism of dissipation. Norfloxacin persistence was positively correlated with its soil adsorption capacity. Cation exchange capacity and soil organic matter content may have vital roles in the soil adsorption of fluoroquinolones. Because of their persistence, the fluoroquinolones must be taken into account in the planning of biosolid applications in agricultural practice.

  8. Phytoextraction of heavy metals by willows growing in biosolids under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, W S; Arndt, S K; Huynh, T T; Gregory, D; Baker, A J M

    2012-01-01

    Biosolids produced by sewage treatment facilities can exceed guideline thresholds for contaminant elements. Phytoextraction is one technique with the potential to reduce these elements allowing reuse of the biosolids as a soil amendment. In this field trial, cuttings of seven species/cultivars of Salix(willows) were planted directly into soil and into biosolids to identify their suitability for decontaminating biosolids. Trees were irrigated and harvested each year for three consecutive years. Harvested biomass was weighed and analyzed for the contaminant elements: As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Hg, Pb, Ni, and Zn. All Salix cultivars, except S. chilensis, growing in soils produced 10 to 20 t ha(-1) of biomass, whereas most Salix cultivars growing in biosolids produced significantly less biomass (<6 t ha(-1)). Salix matsudana (30 t ha(-1)) and S. × reichardtii A. Kerner (18 t ha(-1)) had similar aboveground biomass production in both soil and biosolids. These were also the most successful cultivars in extracting metals from biosolids, driven by superior biomass increases and not high tissue concentrations. The willows were effectual in extracting the most soluble/exchangeable metals (Cd, 0.18; Ni, 0.40; and Zn, 11.66 kg ha(-1)), whereas Cr and Cu were extracted to a lesser degree (0.02 and 0.11 kg ha(-1)). Low bioavailable elements, As, Hg, and Pb, were not detectable in any of the aboveground biomass of the willows.

  9. Growth, yield, and nutrient status of pecans fertilized with biosolids and inoculated with rizosphere fungi.

    PubMed

    Tarango Rivero, S H; Nevárez Moorillón, V G; Orrantia Borunda, E

    2009-03-01

    The application of anaerobically digested biosolids as a nutrient source for pecan, Carya illinoinensis (Wangeh.) K. Koch, cultivar Western, was evaluated. Conventional NPK fertilizers (CF) and biosolids included a treatment with the rhizospheric fungi Pisolithus tinctorius+Scleroderma sp. and Trichoderma sp. After an average of three years, the tree trunks with biosolid treatment grew 9.5% more than with CF; the length of the bearing shoots was 18.1 and 18.3cm and the production of nuts/tree was 9.26 and 8.75kg for pecans with CF and with biosolids, respectively. Western foliar nutrient concentration and nut quality were statistically equal in trees with CF and with biosolids. Soil inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi improved shoot growth by 19.4% when CF was applied, but did not when biosolids were used. Nutrient status and yield did not increase with mycorrhizal fungi. The addition of Trichoderma sp. did not favor any of the variables evaluated with both nutrient sources. Biosolids are efficient fertilizer at promoting the growth, production and nut quality of pecan trees.

  10. Ciprofloxacin Residues in Municipal Biosolid Compost Do Not Selectively Enrich Populations of Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Youngquist, Caitlin P.; Liu, Jinxin; Orfe, Lisa H.; Jones, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    Biosolids and livestock manure are valuable high-carbon soil amendments, but they commonly contain antibiotic residues that might persist after land application. While composting reduces the concentration of extractable antibiotics in these materials, if the starting concentration is sufficiently high then remaining residues could impact microbial communities in the compost and soil to which these materials are applied. To examine this issue, ciprofloxacin was added to biosolid compost feedstock to achieve a total concentration of 19 ppm, approximately 5-fold higher than that normally detected by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (1 to 3.5 ppm). This feedstock was placed into mesh bags that were buried in aerated compost bays. Once a week, a set of bags was removed and analyzed (treated and untreated, three replicates of each; 4 weeks). Addition of ciprofloxacin had no effect on the recovery of resistant bacteria at any time point (P = 0.86), and a separate bioassay showed that aqueous extractions from materials with an estimated 59 ppm ciprofloxacin had no effect on the growth of a susceptible strain of Escherichia coli (P = 0.28). Regression analysis showed that growth of the susceptible strain of E. coli can be reduced given a sufficiently high concentration of ciprofloxacin (P < 0.007), a result that is consistent with adsorption being the primary mechanism of sequestration. While analytical methods detected biologically significant concentrations of ciprofloxacin in the materials tested here, the culture-based methods were consistent with the materials having sufficient adsorptive capacity to prevent typical concentrations of ciprofloxacin residues from selectively enriching populations of resistant bacteria. PMID:25261519

  11. Ciprofloxacin residues in municipal biosolid compost do not selectively enrich populations of resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Youngquist, Caitlin P; Liu, Jinxin; Orfe, Lisa H; Jones, Stephen S; Call, Douglas R

    2014-12-01

    Biosolids and livestock manure are valuable high-carbon soil amendments, but they commonly contain antibiotic residues that might persist after land application. While composting reduces the concentration of extractable antibiotics in these materials, if the starting concentration is sufficiently high then remaining residues could impact microbial communities in the compost and soil to which these materials are applied. To examine this issue, ciprofloxacin was added to biosolid compost feedstock to achieve a total concentration of 19 ppm, approximately 5-fold higher than that normally detected by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (1 to 3.5 ppm). This feedstock was placed into mesh bags that were buried in aerated compost bays. Once a week, a set of bags was removed and analyzed (treated and untreated, three replicates of each; 4 weeks). Addition of ciprofloxacin had no effect on the recovery of resistant bacteria at any time point (P = 0.86), and a separate bioassay showed that aqueous extractions from materials with an estimated 59 ppm ciprofloxacin had no effect on the growth of a susceptible strain of Escherichia coli (P = 0.28). Regression analysis showed that growth of the susceptible strain of E. coli can be reduced given a sufficiently high concentration of ciprofloxacin (P < 0.007), a result that is consistent with adsorption being the primary mechanism of sequestration. While analytical methods detected biologically significant concentrations of ciprofloxacin in the materials tested here, the culture-based methods were consistent with the materials having sufficient adsorptive capacity to prevent typical concentrations of ciprofloxacin residues from selectively enriching populations of resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Sorption-desorption equilibrium and diffusion of tetracycline in poultry litter and municipal biosolids soil amendments.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, E

    2017-12-01

    Tetracycline (TET) is commonly used to treat bacterial diseases in humans and chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus), is largely excreted, and is found at elevated concentrations in treated sewage sludge (biosolids) and poultry litter (excrement plus bedding materials). Routine application of these nutrient-and carbon-enriched materials to soils improves fertility and other characteristics, but the presence of antibiotics (and other pharmaceuticals) in amendments raises questions about potential adverse effects on biota and development of antibiotic resistance in the environment. Hazard risks are largely dictated by sorption-desorption and diffusion behavior in amendments, so these processes were evaluated from sorption-desorption equilibrium isotherm and diffusion cell experiments with four types amendments (biosolids, poultry manure, wood chip litter, and rice hull litter) at three temperatures (8 °C, 20 °C and 32 °C). Linear sorption-desorption equilibrium distribution constants (Kd) in native amendments ranged between 124-2418 L kg(-1). TET sorption was significantly increased after treatment with alum, and there was a strong exponential relationship between Kd and the concentration of bound Al(3+) in amendments (R(2) = 0.94), which indicated that amendments contained functional groups capable of chelating Al(3+) and forming metal bridges with TET. Effective diffusion coefficients of TET in amendments ranged between 0.1 and 5.2 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1), which were positively related to temperature and inversely related to Kd by a multiple regression model (R(2) = 0.86). Treatment of organic amendments with alum greatly increased Kd, would decrease Ds, and so would greatly reduce hazard risks of applying these organic amendments with this antibiotic to soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation of the factors affecting adult fly production in biosolid cake.

    PubMed

    Dadour, Ian R; Voss, Sasha C

    2009-06-01

    The seasonal pattern of adult fly production in both fresh and aged biosolid cake was established by the exposure of biosolid cake to natural conditions in the central coastal region of Perth, Western Australia, over the course of a year. Relationships between fly emergence and six factors (weeks exposed, pH, NH(4), rainfall, temperature, and moisture) suspected of facilitating the attraction of adult flies to biosolid cake were measured. The aim was to study the production of adult flies with regard to weeks exposed in different seasons to establish a "best practice" storage procedure for aged biosolid cake. Four fly species were collected during the study; Musca domestica L. (house fly), Stomoxys calcitrans L. (stable fly), Fannia canicularis L. (lesser house fly), and Muscina stabulans (Fallén) (false stable fly). Of the 5,303 flies identified, >97% of these were either M. domestica or S. calcitrans. Adult flies emerged from biosolid cake all year round with a sharp decline in winter. The number of emerged flies peaked in summer (3,163 flies) and declined during autumn (1,545 flies) and spring (532 flies). Significant positive relationships were observed between the number of adult flies emerging from biosolid cake and ambient temperature, NH(4) content, and weeks exposed. Higher ambient temperatures and a higher NH(4) content of the biosolid cake were associated with increased number of adult flies emerging from the biosolid cake. Similarly, the majority of flies emerged from biosolid cake in the first 10 wk of exposure to fly activity.

  14. Response of microbial activities to heavy metals in a neutral loamy soil treated with biosolid.

    PubMed

    Kao, Po-Hsu; Huang, Cheng-Chieh; Hseu, Zeng-Yei

    2006-06-01

    Application of biosolid on land has been widespread in numerous countries for last several decades. This study performed incubation experiments by mixing a neutral loamy soil and biosolid enriched in Cu, Pb and Zn to explore how heavy metal affects soil mineralization and microbial biomass. The experimental results indicated that large nutrient, microorganism and C sources from biosolid were beneficial to microbial respiration. However, compared to the biosolid alone treatment, the supplemented Cu, Pb and Zn in biosolid reduced the mineralized C by roughly 36%. This phenomenon was probably caused by a portion of the Cu, Pb and Zn being complexed with organic matter to prevent decomposition of organic carbon by microorganisms. Equally, soil treated with biosolid increased the quantity of mineralized N by approximately five-fold and accelerated the rate of N mineralization by about one-fold compared to untreated soil. Notably, addition of heavy metals impaired the mineralization process, particularly when Pb reached about 64%. The reduced N mineralization occurred for similar reasons to the microbial respiration. The addition of biosolid in soil considerably increased the amount of mineralizable N; however, the increase was lower in biosolid-treated soil spiked by heavy metals. The addition of heavy metals in the soil-biosolid mixture clearly reduced the microbial biomasses C (MBC) and N (MBN), indicating that the microbial activities had been disrupted by the heavy metals. The microbial biomass C/N ratio had changed initially from 8 to 13 at the end of incubation period, owing to various groups of microbes expressing different mechanisms of metabolism, indicating that the microbial population had changed from bacteria to fungi, which had higher metal tolerance.

  15. Sludge, biosolids, and the propaganda model of communication.

    PubMed

    Rampton, Sheldon

    2002-01-01

    The Water Environment Federation's elaborate effort to rename sewage sludge as "biosolids" is an example in practice of the "propaganda model" of communications, which sees its task as indoctrinating target audiences with ideas favorable to the interests of the communicators. The propaganda model assumes that members of the public are irrational and focuses therefore on symbolic and emotional aspects of communication. This approach to communicating arouses public resentment rather than trust. In place of a "propaganda model," public officials should adopt a "democratic model," which assumes that audiences are rational and intellectually capable of meaningful participation in decision-making.

  16. Quantification of enteric viruses, pathogen indicators, and Salmonella bacteria in class B anaerobically digested biosolids by culture and molecular methods.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin; Onan, Brandon M; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2010-10-01

    The most common class B biosolids in the United States are generated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD), and MAD biosolids have been used for land application. However, the pathogen levels in MAD biosolids are still unclear, especially with respect to enteric viruses. In this study, we determined the occurrence and the quantitative levels of enteric viruses and indicators in 12 MAD biosolid samples and of Salmonella enterica in 6 MAD biosolid samples. Three dewatered biosolid samples were also included in this study for purposes of comparison. Human adenoviruses (HAdV) had the highest gene levels and were detected more frequently than other enteric viruses. The gene levels of noroviruses (NV) reported were comparable to those of enteroviruses (EV) and human polyomaviruses (HPyV). The occurrence percentages of HAdV, HAdV species F, EV, NV GI, NV GII, and HPyV in MAD samples were 83, 83, 42, 50, 75, and 58%, respectively. No hepatitis A virus was detected. Infectious HAdV was detected more frequently than infectious EV, and all infectious HAdV were detected when samples were propagated in A549 cells. Based on most-probable-number (MPN) analysis, A549 cells were more susceptible to biosolid-associated viruses than BGM cells. All indicator levels in MAD biosolids were approximately 10(4) MPN or PFU per gram (dry), and the dewatered biosolids had significantly higher indicator levels than the MAD biosolids. Only two MAD samples tested positive for Salmonella enterica, where the concentration was below 1.0 MPN/4 g. This study provides a broad comparison of the prevalence of different enteric viruses in MAD biosolids and reports the first detection of noroviruses in class B biosolids. The observed high quantitative and infectivity levels of adenoviruses in MAD biosolids indicate that adenovirus is a good indicator for the evaluation of sludge treatment efficiency.

  17. Application of phytotoxicity data to a new Australian soil quality guideline framework for biosolids.

    PubMed

    Heemsbergen, Diane A; Warne, Michael St J; Broos, Kris; Bell, Mike; Nash, David; McLaughlin, Mike; Whatmuff, Mark; Barry, Glenn; Pritchard, Deb; Penney, Nancy

    2009-04-01

    To protect terrestrial ecosystems and humans from contaminants many countries and jurisdictions have developed soil quality guidelines (SQGs). This study proposes a new framework to derive SQGs and guidelines for amended soils and uses a case study based on phytotoxicity data of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) from field studies to illustrate how the framework could be applied. The proposed framework uses normalisation relationships to account for the effects of soil properties on toxicity data followed by a species sensitivity distribution (SSD) method to calculate a soil added contaminant limit (soil ACL) for a standard soil. The normalisation equations are then used to calculate soil ACLs for other soils. A soil amendment availability factor (SAAF) is then calculated as the toxicity and bioavailability of pure contaminants and contaminants in amendments can be different. The SAAF is used to modify soil ACLs to ACLs for amended soils. The framework was then used to calculate soil ACLs for copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). For soils with pH of 4-8 and OC content of 1-6%, the ACLs range from 8 mg/kg to 970 mg/kg added Cu. The SAAF for Cu was pH dependant and varied from 1.44 at pH 4 to 2.15 at pH 8. For soils with pH of 4-8 and OC content of 1-6%, the ACLs for amended soils range from 11 mg/kg to 2080 mg/kg added Cu. For soils with pH of 4-8 and a CEC from 5-60, the ACLs for Zn ranged from 21 to 1470 mg/kg added Zn. A SAAF of one was used for Zn as it concentrations in plant tissue and soil to water partitioning showed no difference between biosolids and soluble Zn salt treatments, indicating that Zn from biosolids and Zn salts are equally bioavailable to plants.

  18. Inactivation of Adenovirus Type 5, Rotavirus WA and Male Specific Coliphage (MS2) in Biosolids by Lime Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Jacqueline J.; Warden, Paul S.; Margolin, Aaron B.

    2007-01-01

    The use of lime to reduce or eliminate pathogen content is a cost-effective treatment currently employed in many Class B biosolids production plants in the United States. A bench scale model of lime stabilization was designed to evaluate the survival of adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and the male specific bacteriophage, MS2, in various matrices. Each virus was initially evaluated independently in a reverse osmosis treated water matrix limed with an aqueous solution of calcium hydroxide for 24-hr at 22 ± 5°C. In all R/O water trials, adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa and MS2 were below detectable levels (<100.5 TCID50/mL and <1 PFU/mL respectively) following 0.1-hr of liming. Adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and MS2, were inoculated into composted, raw and previously limed matrices, representative of sludge and biosolids, to achieve a final concentration of approximately 104 PFU or TCID50/mL. Each matrix was limed for 24-hr at 22 ± 5°C and 4 ± 2°C. In all trials virus was below detectable levels following a 24-hr incubation. The time required for viral inactivation varied depending on the temperature and sample matrix. This research demonstrates reduction of adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and male-specific bacteriophage, in water, sludge and biosolids matrices following addition of an 8% calcium hydroxide slurry to achieve a pH of 12 for 2-hr reduced to 11.5 for 22-hr by addition of 0.1 N HCl. In these trials, MS2 was a conservative indicator of the efficacy of lime stabilization of adenovirus Type 5 and rotavirus Wa and therefore is proposed as a useful indicator organism. PMID:17431317

  19. Inactivation of adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa and male specific coliphage (MS2) in biosolids by lime stabilization.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jacqueline J; Warden, Paul S; Margolin, Aaron B

    2007-03-01

    The use of lime to reduce or eliminate pathogen content is a cost-effective treatment currently employed in many Class B biosolids production plants in the United States. A bench scale model of lime stabilization was designed to evaluate the survival of adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and the male specific bacteriophage, MS2, in various matrices. Each virus was initially evaluated independently in a reverse osmosis treated water matrix limed with an aqueous solution of calcium hydroxide for 24-hr at 22 +/- 5 degrees C. In all R/O water trials, adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa and MS2 were below detectable levels (<100.5 TCID50/mL and <1 PFU/mL respectively) following 0.1-hr of liming. Adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and MS2, were inoculated into composted, raw and previously limed matrices, representative of sludge and biosolids, to achieve a final concentration of approximately 104 PFU or TCID50/mL. Each matrix was limed for 24-hr at 22 +/- 5 degrees C and 4 +/- 2 degrees C. In all trials virus was below detectable levels following a 24-hr incubation. The time required for viral inactivation varied depending on the temperature and sample matrix. This research demonstrates reduction of adenovirus type 5, rotavirus Wa, and male-specific bacteriophage, in water, sludge and biosolids matrices following addition of an 8% calcium hydroxide slurry to achieve a pH of 12 for 2-hr reduced to 11.5 for 22-hr by addition of 0.1 N HCl. In these trials, MS2 was a conservative indicator of the efficacy of lime stabilization of adenovirus Type 5 and rotavirus Wa and therefore is proposed as a useful indicator organism.

  20. Effective School Management. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everard, K.B.; Morris, Geoffrey; Wilson, Ian

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this book is to help teachers with senior management responsibilities, and the schools and colleges that they work in, to become more effective. It is a book by practitioners for practitioners. They authors believe their book is unique, because there are so few people who have had enough management responsibility and training…

  1. Effective School Management. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everard, K.B.; Morris, Geoffrey; Wilson, Ian

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this book is to help teachers with senior management responsibilities, and the schools and colleges that they work in, to become more effective. It is a book by practitioners for practitioners. They authors believe their book is unique, because there are so few people who have had enough management responsibility and training…

  2. Side Effects (Management)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ...

  3. Synthetic organic chemicals in earthworms from agriculture soil amended with municipal biosolids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: Biosolids resulting from municipal wastewater treatment are known to contain residues of pharmaceuticals, personal care products (PPCPs) and other synthetic organic compounds. Many of these are contaminants of emerging concern for their potential endocrine disruption of fish and wildli...

  4. IMPLICATIONS OF BIOSOLIDS/COMPOST UTILIZATION ON THE RISK OF SOIL METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes the current work on the fundamental changes in soil mineralogical accomplished by additions of biosolids and P to the system which results in changes in phytoavailability/bioavailability. The concepts of phytoavailability/bioavailability are rather s...

  5. IMPLICATIONS OF BIOSOLIDS/COMPOST UTILIZATION ON THE RISK OF SOIL METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes the current work on the fundamental changes in soil mineralogical accomplished by additions of biosolids and P to the system which results in changes in phytoavailability/bioavailability. The concepts of phytoavailability/bioavailability are rather s...

  6. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF METHODS FOR ENUMERATION OF FECAL COLIFORM AND SALMONELLA IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current federal regulations require monitoring for fecal coliforms or Salmonella in biosolids destined for land application. Methods used for analysis of fecal coliforms and Salmonella were reviewed and a standard protocol was developed. The protocols were then evaluated by testi...

  7. EVALUATION OF A DNA PROBE TEST KIT FOR DETECTION OF SALMONELLAE IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: Current United States regulations (40 CFR 503) for "Class A" biosolids requires use of multiple-tube fermentation techniques for fecal coliform or multiple tube enrichment techniques for Salmonella spp. followed by isolation and biochemical and serological confirmation. T...

  8. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF METHODS FOR ENUMERATION OF FECAL COLIFORM AND SALMONELLA IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current federal regulations require monitoring for fecal coliforms or Salmonella in biosolids destined for land application. Methods used for analysis of fecal coliforms and Salmonella were reviewed and a standard protocol was developed. The protocols were then evaluated by testi...

  9. Biosolids - a fuel or a waste? An integrated appraisal of five co-combustion scenarios with policy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Elise Cartmell; Peter Gostelow; Drusilla Riddell-Black; Nigel Simms; John Oakey; Joe Morris; Paul Jeffrey; Peter Howsam; Simon J. Pollard

    2006-02-01

    An integrated appraisal of five technology scenarios for the co-combustion of biosolids in the UK energy and waste management policy context is presented. Co-combustion scenarios with coal, municipal solid waste, wood, and for cement manufacture were subject to thermodynamic and materials flow modeling and evaluated by 19 stakeholder representatives. All scenarios provided a net energy gain (0.58-5.0 kWh/kg dry solids), having accounted for the energy required for transportation and sludge drying. Co-combustion within the power generation and industrial (e.g., cement) sectors is most readily implemented but provides poor water utility control, and it suffers from poor public perception. Co-combustion with wastes or biomass appears more sustainable but requires greater investment and presents significant risks to water utilities. Incongruities within current energy and waste management policy are discussed and conclusions for improved understanding are drawn. 28 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Study of Mn Phytoavailability in Soil Treated with Biosolids Using NAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fátima Mateus, Natalina; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2011-08-01

    This work evaluated the behavior of Mn absorption by Eucalyptus grandis that was cultivated in soil treated with biosolid. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) followed by gamma ray spectrometry was the analytical method used to determine the Mn content. Manganese is an important micronutrient because it is an activator of enzymes, controller of oxyreduction reactions, essential to the photosynthesis and synthesis of chlorophyll and protein. The results showed that the phytoavailability of Mn was reduced increasing the doses of biosolid applied.

  11. A unified method to process biosolids samples for the recovery of bacterial, viral, and helminths pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alum, Absar; Rock, Channah; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    For land application, biosolids are classified as Class A or Class B based on the levels of bacterial, viral, and helminths pathogens in residual biosolids. The current EPA methods for the detection of these groups of pathogens in biosolids include discrete steps. Therefore, a separate sample is processed independently to quantify the number of each group of the pathogens in biosolids. The aim of the study was to develop a unified method for simultaneous processing of a single biosolids sample to recover bacterial, viral, and helminths pathogens. At the first stage for developing a simultaneous method, nine eluents were compared for their efficiency to recover viruses from a 100 gm spiked biosolids sample. In the second stage, the three top performing eluents were thoroughly evaluated for the recovery of bacteria, viruses, and helminthes. For all three groups of pathogens, the glycine-based eluent provided higher recovery than the beef extract-based eluent. Additional experiments were performed to optimize performance of glycine-based eluent under various procedural factors such as, solids to eluent ratio, stir time, and centrifugation conditions. Last, the new method was directly compared with the EPA methods for the recovery of the three groups of pathogens spiked in duplicate samples of biosolids collected from different sources. For viruses, the new method yielded up to 10% higher recoveries than the EPA method. For bacteria and helminths, recoveries were 74% and 83% by the new method compared to 34% and 68% by the EPA method, respectively. The unified sample processing method significantly reduces the time required for processing biosolids samples for different groups of pathogens; it is less impacted by the intrinsic variability of samples, while providing higher yields (P = 0.05) and greater consistency than the current EPA methods.

  12. Decay of enteric microorganisms in biosolids-amended soil under wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivation.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, K R; Sidhu, J P S; Pritchard, D L; Li, Y; Toze, S

    2014-08-01

    There is a growing need for better assessment of health risks associated with land-applied biosolids. This study investigated in-situ decay of seeded human adenovirus (HAdV), Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and bacteriophage (MS2) in biosolids-amended soil under wheat cultivation. The biosolids seeded with microorganisms were placed in decay chambers which were then placed in the topsoil (10 cm depth) at three different sites. Sites were selected in arid wheat-growing regions of Australia with loamy-sand soil type (Western Australia) and sandy soil (South Australia). Seeded E. coli and S. enterica had a relatively short decay time (T90 = 4-56 days) in biosolids-amended soil compared to un-amended soil (T90 = 8-83 days). The decreasing soil moisture over the wheat-growing season significantly (P < 0.05) influenced survival time of both bacteria and MS2 at Western Australia (Moora) and South Australia (Mt Compass) sites, particularly in the un-amended soils. Increasing soil temperature also significantly (P < 0.05) influenced the decay of MS2 at these sites. In this study, no notable decline in HAdV numbers (PCR detectable units) was observed in both biosolids-amended and the un-amended soils at all three sites. The HAdV decay time (T90 ≥ 180 days) in biosolids-amended and un-amended soils was significantly higher than MS2 (T90 = 22-108 days). The results of this study suggest that adenovirus could survive for a longer period of time (>180 days) during the winter in biosolids-amended soil. The stability of adenovirus suggests that consideration towards biosolids amendment frequency, time, rates and appropriate withholding periods are necessary for risk mitigation. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Persistence of Triclocarban and Triclosan in Soils after Land Application of Biosolids and Bioaccumulation in Eisenia foetida

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Christopher P.; Paesani, Zachary J.; Chalew, Talia E. Abbot; Halden, Rolf U.; Hundal, Lakhwinder S.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of antimicrobial chemicals triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) in municipal biosolids has raised concerns about the potential impacts of these chemicals on soil ecosystems following land application of municipal biosolids. The relative persistence of TCC and TCS in agricultural fields receiving yearly applications of biosolids at six different loading rates over a three-year period was investigated. Soil and biosolids samples were collected, extracted, and analyzed for TCC and TCS using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, the potential for bioaccumulation of TCC and TCS from the biosolids-amended soils was assessed over 28 d in the earthworm Eisenia foetida. Standard 28-d bioaccumulation tests were conducted for three biosolids loading rates from two sites, representing agronomic and twice the agronomic rates of biosolids application plots as well as control plots receiving no applications of biosolids. Additional bioaccumulation kinetics data were collected for the soils receiving the high biosolids loadings to ensure attainment of quasi-steady state conditions. The results indicate that TCC is relatively more persistent in biosolids-amended soil than TCS. In addition, TCC bioaccumulated in E. foetida, reaching body burdens of 25 ± 4 and 133 ± 17 ng/gww in worms exposed for 28 d to the two soils amended with biosolids at agronomic rates. The 28-d organic carbon and lipid-normalized biota soil accumulation factors (BSAFs) were calculated for TCC and ranged from 0.22 ± 0.12 to 0.71 ± 0.13. These findings suggest that TCC bioaccumulation is somewhat consistent with the traditional hydrophobic organic contaminant (HOC) partitioning paradigm. However, these data also suggest substantially reduced bioavailability of TCC in biosolids-amended soils when compared to HOC partitioning theory. PMID:21128266

  14. Persistence of triclocarban and triclosan in soils after land application of biosolids and bioaccumulation in Eisenia foetida.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Christopher P; Paesani, Zachary J; Chalew, Talia E Abbott; Halden, Rolf U; Hundal, Lakhwinder S

    2011-03-01

    The presence of the antimicrobial chemicals triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) in municipal biosolids has raised concerns about the potential impacts of these chemicals on soil ecosystems following land application of municipal biosolids. The relative persistence of TCC and TCS in agricultural fields receiving yearly applications of biosolids at six different loading rates over a three-year period was investigated. Soil and biosolids samples were collected, extracted, and analyzed for TCC and TCS using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In addition, the potential for bioaccumulation of TCC and TCS from the biosolids-amended soils was assessed over 28 d in the earthworm Eisenia foetida. Standard 28-d bioaccumulation tests were conducted for three biosolids loading rates from two sites, representing agronomic and twice the agronomic rates of biosolids application plots as well as control plots receiving no applications of biosolids. Additional bioaccumulation kinetic data were collected for the soils receiving the high biosolids loadings to ensure attainment of quasi steady-state conditions. The results indicate that TCC is relatively more persistent in biosolids-amended soil than TCS. In addition, TCC bioaccumulated in E. foetida, reaching body burdens of 25 ± 4 and 133 ± 17 ng/g(ww) in worms exposed for 28 d to the two soils amended with biosolids at agronomic rates. The 28-d organic carbon and lipid-normalized biota soil accumulation factors (BSAFs) were calculated for TCC and ranged from 0.22 ± 0.12 to 0.71 ± 0.13. These findings suggest that TCC bioaccumulation is somewhat consistent with the traditional hydrophobic organic contaminant (HOC) partitioning paradigm. However, these data also suggest substantially reduced bioavailability of TCC in biosolids-amended soils compared with HOC partitioning theory. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  15. Occurrence of triclocarban and triclosan in an agro-ecosystem following application of biosolids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherburne, Jessica J.; Anaya, Amanda M.; Fernie, Kimberly J; Forbey, Jennifer S.; Furlong, Edward T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Dufty, Alfred M.; Kinney, Chad A.

    2016-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS), two of the most commonly used antimicrobial compounds, can be introduced into ecosystems by applying wastewater treatment plant biosolids to agricultural fields. Concentrations of TCC and TCS were measured in different trophic levels within a terrestrial food web encompassing land-applied biosolids, soil, earthworms (Lumbricus), deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), and eggs of European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) and American kestrels (Falco sparverius) at an experimental site amended with biosolids for the previous 7 years. The samples from this site were compared to the same types of samples from a reference (biosolids-free) agricultural site. Inter-site comparisons showed that concentrations of both antimicrobials were higher on the experimental site in the soil, earthworms, mice (livers), and European starling eggs, but not American kestrel eggs, compared to the control site. Inter-species comparisons on the experimental site indicated significantly higher TCC concentrations in mice (TCC: 12.6–33.3 ng/g) and in starling eggs (TCC: 15.4–31.4 ng/g) than in kestrel eggs (TCC: 3.6 ng/g). Nesting success of kestrels only was significantly lower on the experimental site compared to the reference site due to nest abandonment. This study demonstrates that biosolids-derived TCC and TCS are present throughout the terrestrial food web, including secondary (e.g., starlings) and tertiary (i.e., kestrels) consumers, after repeated, long-term biosolids application.

  16. Biochar for the mitigation of nitrate leaching from soil amended with biosolids.

    PubMed

    Knowles, O A; Robinson, B H; Contangelo, A; Clucas, L

    2011-08-01

    Countries with sewage treatment plants produce on average 27 kg of dried biosolids/person/yr. Concerns about nitrate leaching limit the rate at which biosolids are added to soil. We sought to determine whether biochar, a form of charcoal that is added to soil, could reduce nitrate leaching from biosolids amended soil. We set up 24 (0.5 m × 0.75 m) lysimeters, filled with two soil types (Templeton Silt Loam and Ashley Dene silt loam) and amended with combinations of biochar (102 t/ha equivalent) and biosolids (600 and 1200 kg N/ha equivalent). Pasture and leachates were sampled over 5 months. Nitrate leaching from biochar plus biosolids amended soils were reduced to levels at or below the control treatments. Pasture N concentrations were similarly affected by biochar addition. Future research should focus on unravelling the mechanism responsible for the change in the nitrogen cycle in soils amended with biosolids and biochar. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Occurrence and distribution of brominated flame retardants and perfluoroalkyl substances in Australian landfill leachate and biosolids.

    PubMed

    Gallen, C; Drage, D; Kaserzon, S; Baduel, C; Gallen, M; Banks, A; Broomhall, S; Mueller, J F

    2016-07-15

    The levels of perfluroalkyl substances (PFASs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDDs) were studied in Australian landfill leachate and biosolids. Leachate was collected from 13 landfill sites and biosolids were collected from 16 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), across Australia. Perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA) (12-5700ng/L) was the most abundant investigated persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) chemical in leachate. With one exception, mean concentrations of PFASs were higher in leachate of operating landfills compared to closed landfills. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane isomers (HBCDDs) were detected typically at operating landfills in comparatively lower concentrations than the PFASs. Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) (<0.4-2300ng/g) and perfluoroctanesulfonate (PFOS) (biosolids. Using data provided by sites, the volume of leachate discharged to WWTPs for treatment was small (<1% total inflow), and masses of PBTs transferred reached a maximum of 16g/yr (PFHxA). A national estimate of masses of PBTs accumulated in Australian biosolids reached 167kg/yr (BDE-209), a per capita contribution of 7.2±7.2mg/yr. Nationally, approximately 59% of biosolids are repurposed and applied to agricultural land. To our knowledge this study presents the first published data of PFASs and HBCDDs in Australian leachate and biosolids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Measured physicochemical characteristics and biosolids-borne concentrations of the antimicrobial Triclocarban (TCC).

    PubMed

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A; McAvoy, Drew C

    2010-06-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an active ingredient in antibacterial bar soaps, a common constituent of domestic wastewater, and the subject of recent criticism by consumer advocate groups and academic researchers alike. Activated sludge treatment readily removes TCC from the liquid waste stream and concentrates the antimicrobial in the solid fraction, which is often processed to produce biosolids intended for land application. Greater than half of the biosolids generated in the US are land-applied, resulting in a systematic release of biosolids-borne TCC into the terrestrial and, potentially, the aquatic environment. Multiple data gaps in the TCC literature (including basic physicochemical properties and biosolids concentrations) prevent an accurate, quantitative risk assessment of biosolids-borne TCC. We utilized the USEPA Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) harmonized test guidelines to measure TCC solubility and log K(ow) values as 0.045 mg L(-1) and 3.5, respectively. The measured physicochemical 2 properties differed from computer model predictions. The mean concentration of TCC in 23 biosolids representative of multiple sludge processing methods was 19+/-11 mg kg(-1).

  19. Field dissipation and risk assessment of typical personal care products TCC, TCS, AHTN and HHCB in biosolid-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Ma, Yi-Bing; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Lai, Hua-Jie; Peng, Feng-Jiao

    2014-02-01

    The antimicrobial agents triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) and synthetic musks AHTN (Tonalide) and HHCB (Galaxolide) are widely used in many personal care products. These compounds may release into the soil environment through biosolid application to agricultural land and potentially affect soil organisms. This paper aimed to investigate accumulation, dissipation and potential risks of TCC, TCS, AHTN and HHCB in biosolid-amended soils of the three field trial sites (Zhejiang, Hunan and Shandong) with three treatments (CK: control without biosolid application, T1: single biosolid application, T2: repeated biosolid application every year). The one-year monitoring results showed that biosolids application could lead to accumulation of these four chemicals in the biosolid-amended soils, with the residual concentrations in the following order: TCC>TCS>AHTN>HHCB. Dissipation of TCC, TCS, AHTN and HHCB in the biosolid-amended soils followed the first-order kinetics model. Half-lives for TCC, TCS, AHTN and HHCB under the field conditions of Shandong site were 191, 258, 336 and 900 days for T1, and 51, 106, 159 and 83 days for T2, respectively. Repeated applications of biosolid led to accumulation of these personal care products and result in higher ecological risks. Based on the residual levels in the trial sites and limited toxicity data, high risks to soil organisms are expected for TCC and TCS, while low-medium risks for AHTN and HHCB.

  20. Application of WWTP biosolids and resulting perfluorinated compound contamination of surface and well water in Decatur, Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Andrew B; Strynar, Mark J; Delinsky, Amy D; Nakayama, Shoji F; McMillan, Larry; Libelo, E Laurence; Neill, Michael; Thomas, Lee

    2011-10-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been produced and used in a wide range of industrial and consumer products for many decades. Their resistance to degradation has led to their widespread distribution in the environment, but little is known about how humans become exposed. Recent studies have demonstrated that the application of PFC contaminated biosolids can have important effects on local environments, ultimately leading to demonstrable human exposures. This manuscript describes a situation in Decatur, Alabama where PFC contaminated biosolids from a local municipal wastewater treatment facility that had received waste from local fluorochemical facilities were used as a soil amendment in local agricultural fields for as many as twelve years. Ten target PFCs were measured in surface and groundwater samples. Results show that surface and well water in the vicinity of these fields had elevated PFC concentrations, with 22% of the samples exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Provisional Health Advisory level for PFOA in drinking water of 400 ng/L. Water/soil concentration ratios as high as 0.34 for perfluorohexanoic acid, 0.17 for perfluoroheptanoic acid, and 0.04 for PFOA verify decreasing mobility from soils with increasing chain length while indicating that relatively high transport from soils to surface and well water is possible.

  1. Improving productivity through more effective time management.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin; Pulich, Marcia

    2004-01-01

    Effective time management has become increasingly important for managers as they seek to accomplish objectives in today's organizations, which have been restructured for efficiency while employing fewer people. Managers can improve their ability to manage time effectively by examining their attitudes toward time, analyzing time-wasting behaviors, and developing better time management skills. Managers can improve their performance and promotion potential with more effective time utilization. Strategies for improving time management skills are presented.

  2. Evaluation of quicklime incorporation in bench-scale and full-scale lime stabilized biosolids using a flat surface pH electrode.

    PubMed

    Burns, Benjamin; Krach, Kenneth; Cole, Charles; Mangus, Jessica; Butler, Howard; Li, Baikun

    2007-07-01

    Uniform lime incorporation into sewage sludge is critical for biosolid lime stabilization processes. There is no class B biosolids regulation for lime incorporation. The slurry method is currently used to evaluate the pH of limed biosolids, but this method homogenizes the biosolids and potentially masks poor lime mixing. In this study, a flat-surface pH electrode was used in bench-scale and full-scale experiments to measure the pH of lime-stabilized biosolids without creating slurries. The standard deviation of 15 pH measurements at different locations in a biosolid sample was used to assess mixing quality. The bench-scale experimental study showed that well-mixed limed biosolids had consistently high pHs (approximately 12) with low standard deviations (< 0.5 pH units), whereas poorly mixed biosolids had areas with low pH (< 10) and high standard deviations (> 2 pH units). Poorly mixed biosolids exhibited rapid and marked pH reduction, as well as offensive odor generation, whereas well-mixed biosolids resisted pH reduction and offensive odor generation. The full-scale study aimed at improving lime incorporation and biosolids quality confirmed the use of a flat surface pH electrode to capture low pH regions in biosolids that were masked by the current slurry method.

  3. Predicting the concentration range of unmonitored chemicals in wastewater-dominated streams and in run-off from biosolids-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Chari, Bipin P; Halden, Rolf U

    2012-12-01

    Organic compounds such as sterols and hormones have been detected in surface waters at ecologically relevant concentrations with sources including effluent discharged from publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) as well as leachate and runoff from land amended with municipal sludge (biosolids). Greater than 20% of regulated effluents discharged into U.S. surface waters experience in-stream dilution of <10-fold and potential impacts are particularly likely in receiving waters dominated by POTW effluents. The increasing use of biosolids on agricultural land exerts additional stress, thereby necessitating environmental monitoring for potential ecological and human health effects. Alternatively or in addition to monitoring efforts, screening for potentially hazardous chemicals can be performed using empirical models that are scalable and can deliver results rapidly. The present study makes use of data from U.S. EPA's Targeted National Sewage Sludge Survey (TNSSS) to predict the aqueous-phase concentrations and removal efficiencies of 10 sterols (campesterol, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, β-stigmastanol, cholesterol, desmosterol, cholestanol, coprostanol, epicoprostanol, and ergosterol) as well as the putative toxicity posed by four specific hormones based on their reported biosolids concentrations using published empirical models. Model predictions indicate that removal efficiencies for sterols are uniformly high (~99%) and closely match removal rates calculated from chemical monitoring at POTWs (paired t-test; p=0.01). Results from toxicity modeling indicate that the hormones estrone, estradiol and estriol had the highest leaching potentials amongst the compounds considered here and that 17 β-ethinylestradiol was found to pose a potentially significant threat to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) via run-off or leaching from biosolids-amended fields. This study exemplifies the use of in silico analysis to (i) identify potentially problematic organic compounds in

  4. Ecological impacts of the N-viro biosolids land-application for wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium. Ait) production in Nova Scotia.

    PubMed

    Farooque, Aitazaz A; Zaman, Qamar U; Madani, Ali; Abbas, Farhat; Percival, David C; Esau, Travis J

    2011-01-01

    Land application of biosolids from processed sewage sludge may deteriorate soil, water, and plants. We investigated the impact of the N-Viro biosolids land-application on the quality of the soil water that moved through Orthic Humo-Ferric Podzols soil of Nova Scotia (NS) at the Wild Blueberry Research Institute, Debert, NS Canada. In addition, the response of major soilproperties and crop yield was also studied. Wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium. Ait) was grown under irrigated and rainfed conditions in 2008 and 2009. Four experimental treatments including (i) NI: N-Viro irrigated, (ii) NR: N-Viro rainfed, (iii) FI: inorganic fertilizer irrigated, and (iv) FR: inorganic fertilizer rainfed (control) were replicated 4 times under randomized complete block design. Soil samples were collected at the end of each year and analyzed for changes in cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil organic matter (SOM), and pH.Soil water samples were collected four times during the study period from the suction cup lysimeters installed within and below crop root zone at 20 and 40 cm depths, respectively. The samples were analyzed for a range of water quality parameters including conductance, hardness, pH, macro- and micronutrients, and the infectious pathogens Escherichia coli (E. coli) and salmonella. Berries were harvested for fruit yield estimates. Irrigation significantly increased CEC during 2008 and the soil pH decreased from 4.93 (2008) to 4.79 (2009). There were significant influences of irrigation, fertilizer, and their interaction, in some cases, on most of the soil water quality parameters except on the infectious bacteria. No presence of E. coli or salmonella were observed in soil and water samples, reflecting the absence of these bacteria in biosolids used in this experiment. Nutrient concentration in the soil water samples collected from the four treatments were higher in the sequence NI > NR > FI > FR. The irrigation treatment had significant effect on the unripe

  5. Comparative study of hotplate wet digestion methods for the determination of mercury in biosolids.

    PubMed

    Lomonte, Cristina; Gregory, David; Baker, Alan J M; Kolev, Spas D

    2008-08-01

    The re-use of biosolids is becoming increasingly popular for land applications. However, biosolids may contain elevated levels of metals and metalloids (including mercury) relative to background environmental concentrations. Consequently, reliable mercury analysis is important to allow classification of biosolids and to determine appropriate options for beneficial uses. This paper reports on a comparative study of 12 hotplate wet digestion methods for their suitability for the determination of mercury in biosolids. The methods were applied to mercury biosolids samples from four localities of two different sewage treatment plants in the State of Victoria, Australia. Samples were also spiked with methylmercury chloride and mercury sulphide to evaluate the Hg recovery in each hotplate digestion method. Aqua regia (HCl:HNO(3)=3:1), reverse aqua regia (HCl:HNO(3)=1:3), nitric, hydrochloric, sulphuric acid and their combinations with or without hydrogen peroxide were studied as wet digestion solutions. The method providing the best mercury recoveries was optimized. Under optimal conditions the corresponding analytical procedure consisted of 1h pre-digestion of 0.4 g biosolids sample with 10 ml reverse aqua regia with temperature increasing to 110 degrees C and 3h digestion at this temperature. In the last 10 min of the digestion step, 2 ml hydrogen peroxide were added to ensure complete decomposition of all mercury containing compounds. After filtering and dilution with deionised water (1:10), the concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. It is expected, that the wet acid digestion method developed in this study will be also applicable to biosolids from other sewage treatment plants and to other types of solid mercury samples with elevated levels of organic matter.

  6. Occurrence and dissipation of benzotriazoles and benzotriazole ultraviolet stabilizers in biosolid-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hua-Jie; Ying, Guang-Guo; Ma, Yi-Bing; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Chen, Feng; Liu, You-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    Benzotriazoles (BTs) and benzotriazole ultraviolet (UV) stabilizers (BUVSs) are commonly used industrial and household chemicals, but little is known about their dissipation behavior in the soil environment associated with biosolid application. The authors investigated the occurrence and dissipation of 4 BTs (BT, 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole [5-TT], 5-chloro-1H-benzotriazole [CBT], and 5,6-dimethyl-1H-benzotriazole [XT]) and 5 BUVSs (UV-326, UV-327, UV-328, UV-329, and UV-P) in biosolid-amended soil of 3 trial sites (Zhejiang, Hunan, and Shandong) in China following 2 treatments (treatment 1: a single application of biosolid; treatment 2: repeated application of biosolid). The results showed that except for CBT and XT, the other 7 compounds could be detected in most of the biosolid and biosolid-amended soils at levels of a few to tens of nanograms per gram and that the concentrations of the 7 compounds for treatment 2 were obviously higher than those for treatment 1. In the 1-yr monitoring of the Shandong site, 2 BTs (BT and 5-TT) and 5 BUVSs (UV-326, UV-327, UV-328, UV-329, and UV-P) were significantly dissipated in the biosolid-amended soils. The field half-lives of BT and 5-TT ranged from 217 d to 345 d, while those for the BUVSs ranged between 75 d and 218 d. The field half-lives of target compounds in soil were found to be comparable to the modeling results. The results suggest the persistence of BTs and BUVSs in soil environments with quite slow dissipation rates.

  7. Managing Performance for Effective Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreland, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This paper takes the form of a discussion document. A number of ideas surrounding the topics of continuing professional development (CPD), performance management (PM) and effective classrooms in secondary schools are outlined. The paper draws on some of the recent literature in these areas and refers to some current trials within a UK-based…

  8. Growth and cadmium uptake of Swiss chard, Thlaspi caerulescens and corn in pH adjusted biosolids amended soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Before regulations were established, some biosolids applications added higher Cd levels than presently permitted. Cadmium phytoextraction from such soils would alleviate constraints on land use. Unamended farm soil, and biosolids amended farm soil and mine soil were obtained from Fulton County, Il...

  9. Water treatment residuals and biosolids co-applications affect phosphatases in a semi-arid rangeland soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosolids and water treatment residuals (WTR) land co-application has not been extensively studied, but may be beneficial by sorbing excess biosolids-borne or soil P onto WTR, reducing the likelihood of off-site movement. Reduction of excess soil P may affect the role of specific P-cleaving enzymes...

  10. Uptake of pharmaceuticals, hormones and parabens into vegetables grown in soil fertilized with municipal biosolids.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Lyne; Duenk, Peter; Bonte-Gelok, Shelly; Payne, Michael; Lapen, David R; Topp, Edward

    2012-08-01

    Several recent greenhouse studies have established the potential for uptake of human pharmaceuticals from soil fertilized with municipal biosolids into a variety of crops. In the present study, a field experiment was undertaken to evaluate the uptake of organic micropollutants from soil fertilized with municipal biosolids at a regulated application rate into tomatoes, carrots, potatoes and sweet corn produced under normal farming conditions. The vegetables were grown according to farming practices mandated by the province of Ontario Canada, the key feature being a one-year offset between biosolid application and the harvest of crops for human consumption. Biosolids at application, and crop samples following harvest were analyzed for 118 pharmaceuticals and transformation products, 17 hormones or hormone transformation products, and 6 parabens. Analyte concentrations in the biosolids were consistent with those detected in other surveys. Eight of the 141 analytes were detected in one or two crop replicates at concentrations ranging from 0.33 to 6.25 ng/g dry weight, but no analytes were consistently detected above the detection limit in all triplicate treated plots. Overall, this study suggests that the potential for micropollutant uptake into crops under normal farming conditions is low.

  11. Persistence of Ascaris spp. Ova in Tropical Soil Cultivated with Eucalyptus and Fertilized with Municipal Biosolids.

    PubMed

    de Faria, Marianne F; Guerrini, Iraê A; Oliveira, Fernando C; Sato, Maria Inês Z; Hachich, Elayse M; Passos, José Raimundo S; Goulart, Lívia M L; Silva, Thiago T de S; Gava, José L; Furches, Joel C; James, Jason; Harrison, Robert B

    2017-05-01

    In many countries, the main reason for severely restricting or outright banning the land application of class B biosolids is the lack of risk assessment for adverse human health impacts. Among pathogens that are not often studied are helminth ova, including that of the spp. Almost all of the knowledge about the persistence of spp. ova in soils fertilized with biosolids is based on studies developed in North America, Europe, and Asia. These studies have almost always been conducted under temperate climate conditions, which may cause erroneous interpretations when the conclusions are extrapolated to tropical regions such as those found in Brazil. This team evaluated the persistence of viable spp. ova in a sandy Quartzipsamment tropical soil, previously planted with × hybrid () and fertilized with biosolids, over a 52-wk period. During the reporting period, the average temperature of soil and biosolids fluctuated between 15 and 30°C, and the average moisture of biosolids fluctuated between 60 and 90%. The estimated persistence time of viable spp. ova after land application was estimated at close to 7 wk, indicating that ova may not be viable for as long as it has been shown to be in studies of more temperate areas. The relationship of temperature with persistence of viable spp. ova in a tropical soil was stronger than moisture content, suggesting that temperature substantially contributed to their nonviability over the course of the experiment. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. Field dissipation of four personal care products in biosolids-amended soils in North China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Ma, Yi-Bing; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Lai, Hua-Jie

    2014-11-01

    The present study investigated the dissipation behaviors of 4 typical personal care products (PCPs)-triclocarban (TCC), triclosan (TCS), tonalide (AHTN), and galaxolide (HHCB)- in soils amended with biosolids under field conditions in North China. The results showed that the 4 target compounds were detected in all biosolids-amended soils at levels of a few nanograms per gram to thousands of nanograms per gram (dry wt). The residual concentrations of the 4 PCPs were found in the following order: TCC > TCS > AHTN > HHCB. Significant dissipation of the 4 PCPs was observed in the biosolids-amended soils, with half-lives ranging from 26 d to 133 d. Furthermore, repeated biosolids applications and a higher biosolids application rate could lead to higher accumulation of the 4 PCPs in the agricultural soils. Based on the detected concentrations in the field trial and limited ecotoxicity data, high risks to soil organisms are expected for TCC, whereas low to medium risks are expected in most cases for AHTN, HHCB, and TCS.

  13. Steroid hormone runoff from agricultural test plots applied with municipal biosolids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, Yun-Ya; Gray, James L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Davis, Jessica G.; ReVollo, Rhiannon C.; Borch, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The potential presence of steroid hormones in runoff from sites where biosolids have been used as agricultural fertilizers is an environmental concern. A study was conducted to assess the potential for runoff of seventeen different hormones and two sterols, including androgens, estrogens, and progestogens from agricultural test plots. The field containing the test plots had been applied with biosolids for the first time immediately prior to this study. Target compounds were isolated by solid-phase extraction (water samples) and pressurized solvent extraction (solid samples), derivatized, and analyzed by gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Runoff samples collected prior to biosolids application had low concentrations of two hormones (estrone -1 and androstenedione -1) and cholesterol (22.5 ± 3.8 μg L-1). In contrast, significantly higher concentrations of multiple estrogens (-1), androgens (-1), and progesterone (-1) were observed in runoff samples taken 1, 8, and 35 days after biosolids application. A significant positive correlation was observed between antecedent rainfall amount and hormone mass loads (runoff). Hormones in runoff were primarily present in the dissolved phase (<0.7-μm GF filter), and, to a lesser extent bound to the suspended-particle phase. Overall, these results indicate that rainfall can mobilize hormones from biosolids-amended agricultural fields, directly to surface waters or redistributed to terrestrial sites away from the point of application via runoff. Although concentrations decrease over time, 35 days is insufficient for complete degradation of hormones in soil at this site.

  14. Emission factor of exhaust gas constituents during the pyrolysis of zinc chloride immersed biosolid.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hung-Lung; Lin, Kuo-Hsiung; Chiu, Hua-Hsien

    2013-08-01

    Pyrolysis enables ZnCl2 immersed biosolid to be reused, but some hazardous air pollutants are emitted during this process. Physical characteristics of biosolid adsorbents were investigated in this work. In addition, the constituents of pyrolytic exhaust were determined to evaluate the exhaust characteristics. Results indicated that the pyrolytic temperature was higher than 500 °C, the specific surface area was >900 m(2)/g, and the total pore volume was as much as 0.8 cm(3)/g at 600 °C. For non-ZnCl2 immersed biosolid pyrolytic exhaust, VOC emission factors increased from 0.677 to 3.170 mg-VOCs/g-biosolid with the pyrolytic temperature increase from 400 to 700 °C, and chlorinated VOCs and oxygenated VOCs were the dominant fraction of VOC groups. VOC emission factors increased about three to seven times, ranging from 1.813 to 21.448 mg/g for pyrolytic temperatures at 400-700 °C, corresponding to the mass ratio of ZnCl2 and biosolid ranging from 0.25-2.5.

  15. Preliminary assessment of sources of nitrogen in groundwater at a biosolids-application area near Deer Trail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Tracy J.B.; McMahon, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved nitrite plus nitrate increased fairly steadily in samples from four shallow groundwater monitoring wells after biosolids applications to nonirrigated farmland began in 1993. The U.S. Geological Survey began a preliminary assessment of sources of nitrogen in shallow groundwater at part of the biosolids-application area near Deer Trail, Colorado, in 2005 in cooperation with the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District. Possible nitrogen sources in the area include biosolids, animal manure, inorganic fertilizer, atmospheric deposition, and geologic materials (bedrock and soil). Biosolids from the Metro Wastewater Reclamation District plant in Denver and biosolids, cow manure, geologic materials (bedrock and soil), and groundwater from the study area were sampled to measure nitrogen content and nitrogen isotopic compositions of nitrate or total nitrogen. Biosolids also were leached, and the leachates were analyzed for nitrogen content and other concentrations. Geologic materials from the study area also were sampled to determine mineralogy. Estimates of nitrogen contributed from inorganic fertilizer and atmospheric deposition were calculated from other published reports. The nitrogen information from the study indicates that each of the sources contain sufficient nitrogen to potentially affect groundwater nitrate concentrations. Natural processes can transform the nitrogen in any of the sources to nitrate in the groundwater. Load calculations indicate that animal manure, inorganic fertilizer, or atmospheric deposition could have contributed the largest nitrogen load to the study area in the 13 years before biosolids applications began, but biosolids likely contributed the largest nitrogen load to the study area in the 13 years after biosolids applications began. Various approaches provided insights into sources of nitrate in the groundwater samples from 2005. The isotopic data indicate that, of the source materials considered, biosolids and (or

  16. Coding for effective denial management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jackie; Lineberry, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Nearly everyone will agree that accurate and consistent coding of diagnoses and procedures is the cornerstone for operating a compliant practice. The CPT or HCPCS procedure code tells the payor what service was performed and also (in most cases) determines the amount of payment. The ICD-9-CM diagnosis code, on the other hand, tells the payor why the service was performed. If the diagnosis code does not meet the payor's criteria for medical necessity, all payment for the service will be denied. Implementation of an effective denial management program can help "stop the bleeding." Denial management is a comprehensive process that works in two ways. First, it evaluates the cause of denials and takes steps to prevent them. Second, denial management creates specific procedures for refiling or appealing claims that are initially denied. Accurate, consistent and compliant coding is key to both of these functions. The process of proactively managing claim denials also reveals a practice's administrative strengths and weaknesses, enabling radiology business managers to streamline processes, eliminate duplicated efforts and shift a larger proportion of the staff's focus from paperwork to servicing patients--all of which are sure to enhance operations and improve practice management and office morale. Accurate coding requires a program of ongoing training and education in both CPT and ICD-9-CM coding. Radiology business managers must make education a top priority for their coding staff. Front office staff, technologists and radiologists should also be familiar with the types of information needed for accurate coding. A good staff training program will also cover the proper use of Advance Beneficiary Notices (ABNs). Registration and coding staff should understand how to determine whether the patient's clinical history meets criteria for Medicare coverage, and how to administer an ABN if the exam is likely to be denied. Staff should also understand the restrictions on use of

  17. Effective teamwork in trauma management.

    PubMed

    Frakes, Patricia; Neely, Iain; Tudoe, Robert

    2009-12-01

    The emergency department (ED) education team at the Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, has developed a process to promote effective teamwork in major trauma management. To introduce this process to ED staff, the team developed a multiprofessional education and training programme. This article describes the development process, explains how and why it was undertaken, and provides details of the education and training programme. It also highlights the challenges met by the education team during implementation.

  18. Characteristics of effective health care managers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sherryl W

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of traditional and contemporary management theories. Concerns, characteristics, and skills of effective managers are also presented. Further, a self-assessment (survey) of 7 highly effective health care managers in a South Georgia community was conducted to determine their ratings on 6 management indices. The assessment or Scale of Transformational Leadership uses a Likert-type scale to allow for the evaluation of managers. The scale contains 6 management elements for assessment: attention, meaning, trust, self, vision, and feeling. Individual ratings and group summary skills rating are presented. Findings revealed the order of managerial importance of the elements as follows (from highest to lowest): Management of Trust, Management of Attention, Management of Self, Management of Feeling, Management of Meaning, and Management of Risk. As a second tier, the final ratings are corroborated by health care management interns.

  19. [Effectiveness of managing styles of nursing management staff].

    PubMed

    Stychno, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    There are many possibilities of the division of the managing styles. In theory one can distinguish two basic styles: directive and integrative. Generalisations describing both styles result in the fact that they do not reflect reality taking place at work. Because of it they cannot be applied in such a form. Therefore, it is necessary to build up the theoretical concept of the managing styles through decreasing their generality and adjusting them to the reality requirements at the same time. For the reality of management Reddin concept seems to be useful. It describes the organizational behaviour of managers. He noticed that the managing style is effective when it fits into the manager's situation whereas it is ineffective in such a situation, when the manager cannot select and adjust the managing techniques to the circumstances of the concrete decision-taking situation. Putting together 3 handling ways: orientation on assignments, orientation on staff, effectiveness, 8 managing can be differentiated. The aim of the paper was an attempt to check what managing styles are used by the nursing management staff working in hospitals. To determine the managing style a questionnaire consisting of 64 statements divided into 8 groups was applied. The examined persons were assigned to distribute 10 points among the statements belonging to each group of tasks which are supposed to specify their solution in the best way. The nursing management staff prefer the styles belonging to the more effective one in which there is a high orientation on staff.

  20. Sport Management Graduate Programs: Characteristics of Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ming; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the characteristics that enable graduate sport management programs to achieve their objectives. Surveys of sport management educators found they agreed on 11 characteristics that indicated a sport management program's effectiveness. Respondents believed an effective program should produce sport managers, not…

  1. Negative Effects of Learning Spreadsheet Management on Learning Database Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vágner, Anikó; Zsakó, László

    2015-01-01

    A lot of students learn spreadsheet management before database management. Their similarities can cause a lot of negative effects when learning database management. In this article, we consider these similarities and explain what can cause problems. First, we analyse the basic concepts such as table, database, row, cell, reference, etc. Then, we…

  2. Determination of pharmaceuticals in biosolids using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yunjie; Zhang, Weihao; Gu, Cheng; Xagoraraki, Irene; Li, Hui

    2011-01-07

    An analytical method was developed to quantitatively determine pharmaceuticals in biosolid (treated sewage sludge) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The collected biosolid samples were initially freeze dried, and grounded to obtain relatively homogenized powders. Pharmaceuticals were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) under the optimized conditions. The optimal operation parameters, including extraction solvent, temperature, pressure, extraction time and cycles, were identified to be acetonitrile/water mixture (v/v 7:3) as extraction solvent with 3 extraction cycles (15 min for each cycle) at 100 °C and 100 bars. The extracts were cleaned up using solid-phase extraction followed by determination by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. For the 15 target pharmaceuticals commonly found in the environment, the overall method recoveries ranged from 49% to 68% for tetracyclines, 64% to 95% for sulfonamides, and 77% to 88% for other pharmaceuticals (i.e. acetaminophen, caffeine, carbamazepine, erythromycin, lincomycin and tylosin). The developed method was successfully validated and applied to the biosolid samples collected from WWTPs located in six cities in Michigan. Among the 15 target pharmaceuticals, 14 pharmaceuticals were detected in the collected biosolid samples. The average concentrations ranged from 2.6 μg/kg for lincomycin to 743.6 μg/kg for oxytetracycline. These results indicated that pharmaceuticals could survive wastewater treatment processes, and accumulate in sewage sludge and biosolids. Subsequent land application of the contaminated biosolids could lead to the dissemination of pharmaceuticals in soil and water environment, which poses potential threats to at-risk populations in the receiving ecosystems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Transformation of triclosan and triclocarban in soils and biosolids-applied soils.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeong-Wook; Armbrust, Kevin L; Xia, Kang

    2010-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC), widely used as antibacterial agents, have been frequently detected in biosolids. Biosolids land application may introduce pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) such as TCS and TCC into the environment. Microcosm studies were conducted to investigate TCS and TCC transformation in Marietta fine loam and McLaurin coarse loam. Both compounds were spiked into the soils with and without biosolids amendment under non-sterilized and sterilized conditions and incubated aerobically at 30 degrees C for up to 100 d. In both soils, transformation of TCS followed second-order reaction kinetics, with estimated reaction rate constants of (5.27 +/- 0.920) x 10(-1) and (9.13 +/- 1.58) x 10(-2) (mg kg(-1))(-1) d(-1) for Marietta fine loam and McLaurin coarse loam, respectively. Transformation of TCC in both soils was slower than that for TCS. After 100 d, 53 +/- 1% and 71 +/- 2% of the initially added TCC and only 2.8 +/- 0.35% and 6.2 +/- 0.80% of initially added TCS remained in Marietta fine loam and McLaurin coarse loam, respectively. The transformation of both compounds were faster in the Marietta fine loam (pH 7.8; 1.8% organic matter) than in the McLaurin coarse loam (pH 4.7; 0.65% organic matter). Our result suggests that biotic processes are more of a controlling factor affecting TCS transformation, whereas abiotic processes may affect TCC transformation more significantly. Addition of biosolids to the two soils slowed the transformation of both compounds, indicating interactions between both compounds and biosolids may adversely affect their transformation in soils, an important factor that must be included in models predicting environmental fate of biosolids-associated PPCPs.

  4. Characterization of phosphorus species in biosolids and manures using XANES spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shober, Amy L; Hesterberg, Dean L; Sims, J Thomas; Gardner, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    Identification of the chemical P species in biosolids or manures will improve our understanding of the long-term potential for P loss when these materials are land applied. The objectives of this study were to determine the P species in dairy manures, poultry litters, and biosolids using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and to determine if chemical fractionation techniques can provide useful information when interpreted based on the results of more definitive P speciation studies. Our XANES fitting results indicated that the predominant forms of P in organic P sources included hydroxylapatite, PO(4) sorbed to Al hydroxides, and phytic acid in lime-stabilized biosolids and manures; hydroxylapatite, PO(4) sorbed on ferrihydrite, and phytic acid in lime- and Fe-treated biosolids; and PO(4) sorbed on ferrihydrite, hydroxylapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), and often PO(4) sorbed to Al hydroxides in Fe-treated and digested biosolids. Strong relationships existed between the proportions of XANES PO(4) sorbed to Al hydroxides and NH(4)Cl- + NH(4)F-extractable P, XANES PO(4) sorbed to ferrihydrite + phytic acid and NaOH-extractable P, and XANES hydroxylapatite + beta-TCP and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)- + H(2)SO(4)-extractable P (r(2) = 0.67 [P = 0.01], 0.78 [P = 0.01], and 0.89 [P = 0.001], respectively). Our XANES fitting results can be used to make predictions about long-term solubility of P when biosolids and manures are land applied. Fractionation techniques indicate that there are differences in the forms of P in these materials but should be interpreted based on P speciation data obtained using more advanced analytical tools.

  5. Characterization of Phosphorus Species in Biosolids and Manures Using XANES Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shober,A.; Hesterberg, D.; Sims, J.; Gardner, S.

    2006-01-01

    Received for publication March 10, 2006. Identification of the chemical P species in biosolids or manures will improve our understanding of the long-term potential for P loss when these materials are land applied. The objectives of this study were to determine the P species in dairy manures, poultry litters, and biosolids using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and to determine if chemical fractionation techniques can provide useful information when interpreted based on the results of more definitive P speciation studies. Our XANES fitting results indicated that the predominant forms of P in organic P sources included hydroxylapatite, PO{sub 4} sorbed to Al hydroxides, and phytic acid in lime-stabilized biosolids and manures; hydroxylapatite, PO{sub 4} sorbed on ferrihydrite, and phytic acid in lime- and Fe-treated biosolids; and PO{sub 4} sorbed on ferrihydrite, hydroxylapatite, {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP), and often PO{sub 4} sorbed to Al hydroxides in Fe-treated and digested biosolids. Strong relationships existed between the proportions of XANES PO{sub 4} sorbed to Al hydroxides and NH{sub 4}Cl- + NH{sub 4}F-extractable P, XANES PO{sub 4} sorbed to ferrihydrite + phytic acid and NaOH-extractable P, and XANES hydroxylapatite + {beta}-TCP and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)- + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-extractable P ({gamma}{sup 2} = 0.67 [P = 0.01], 0.78 [P = 0.01], and 0.89 [P = 0.001], respectively). Our XANES fitting results can be used to make predictions about long-term solubility of P when biosolids and manures are land applied. Fractionation techniques indicate that there are differences in the forms of P in these materials but should be interpreted based on P speciation data obtained using more advanced analytical tools.

  6. Phosphorus runoff from waste water treatment biosolids and poultry litter applied to agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    White, John W; Coale, Frank J; Sims, J Thomas; Shober, Amy L

    2010-01-01

    Differences in the properties of organic phosphorus (P) sources, particularly those that undergo treatment to reduce soluble P, can affect soil P solubility and P transport in surface runoff. This 2-yr field study investigated soil P solubility and runoff P losses from two agricultural soils in the Mid-Atlantic region after land application of biosolids derived from different waste water treatment processes and poultry litter. Phosphorus speciation in the biosolids and poultry litter differed due to treatment processes and significantly altered soil P solubility and dissolved reactive P (DRP) and bioavailable P (FeO-P) concentrations in surface runoff. Runoff total P (TP) concentrations were closely related to sediment transport. Initial runoff DRP and FeO-P concentrations varied among the different biosolids and poultry litter applied. Over time, as sediment transport declined and DRP concentrations became an increasingly important component of runoff FeO-P and TP, total runoff P was more strongly influenced by the type of biosolids applied. Throughout the study, application of lime-stabilized biosolids and poultry litter increased concentrations of soil-soluble P, readily desorbable P, and soil P saturation, resulting in increased DRP and FeO-P concentrations in runoff. Land application of biosolids generated from waste water treatment processes that used amendments to reduce P solubility (e.g., FeCl(3)) did not increase soil P saturation and reduced the potential for DRP and FeO-P transport in surface runoff. These results illustrate the importance of waste water treatment plant process and determination of specific P source coefficients to account for differential P availability among organic P sources.

  7. Phytostabilization of copper mine tailings with biosolids: implications for metal uptake and productivity of Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Santibáñez, Claudia; Verdugo, Cesar; Ginocchio, Rosanna

    2008-05-20

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using biosolids and Lolium perenne for the phytostabilization of copper mine tailings and to evaluate the patterns of metal accumulation and translocation in plants. Biosolids were applied either on the surface or mixed with the tailings at rates of 0, 6, and 12% w/w. All pots were seeded with L. perenne and after six months, the plants were harvested and separated into roots and shoots for metal concentrations analyses as well as some physiological characteristics of the plants. In order to correlate the metal content in plant tissues with some chemical properties, the pore-water of the substrates was analyzed for metals, pH and dissolved organic carbon. Results showed that biosolids application increased the dry biomass production of L. perenne and the shoot concentrations of N and chlorophyll. On the other hand, biosolids increased the concentration of Cu and Zn in the pore-water and in plant tissues. Despite this, there were no evident symptoms of phytotoxicity and the concentration of metals was within the normal ranges described for plants and below the maximum tolerable level for animals. In addition, plant tissue analysis showed that the application of biosolids could significantly reduce Mo uptake and shoot accumulation in plants. The metals were taken up by plants in the following order: Cu>Zn>Mo>Cd. The distribution patterns of metals in plants showed that metals were mainly accumulated in the roots and only a small amount of them were transported to the shoots. These results suggest that mixed application of biosolids (6%) and the use of L. perenne could be appropriate for use in programs of phytostabilization of copper mine tailings. However, these results should be tested under field conditions in order to confirm their efficacy under semi-arid Mediterranean climate conditions.

  8. Effective planning for managed care.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, L L; Mess, M A; Trott, K J

    1995-11-01

    In response to the changing healthcare market, many providers are forming networks for managed care contracting. These networks may fail, however, if planning focuses on maintaining business practices of the past rather than responding to market forces of the future. Effective planning for managed care requires that network executives establish a vision of the future that is not shackled by experiences of the past, articulate a mission that outlines what the network's role will be in the future, and create strategies that will help the network fulfill its mission. Although financial data are necessary to measure a network's progress toward fulfilling its mission, data on past performance should not be used to shape a vision of the future.

  9. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Memory Changes What is causing these changes? Your doctor ... thinking or remembering things Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes Get help to remember things. Write down ...

  10. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid Retention)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Swelling (Fluid retention) “My hands and feet were ... too much at one time. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid retention) Weigh yourself. l Weigh yourself ...

  11. Odour reduction strategies for biosolids produced from a Western Australian wastewater treatment plant: results from Phase I laboratory trials.

    PubMed

    Gruchlik, Yolanta; Heitz, Anna; Joll, Cynthia; Driessen, Hanna; Fouché, Lise; Penney, Nancy; Charrois, Jeffrey W A

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated sources of odours from biosolids produced from a Western Australian wastewater treatment plant and examined possible strategies for odour reduction, specifically chemical additions and reduction of centrifuge speed on a laboratory scale. To identify the odorous compounds and assess the effectiveness of the odour reduction measures trialled in this study, headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS SPME-GC-MS) methods were developed. The target odour compounds included volatile sulphur compounds (e.g. dimethyl sulphide, dimethyl disulphide and dimethyl trisulphide) and other volatile organic compounds (e.g. toluene, ethylbenzene, styrene, p-cresol, indole and skatole). In our laboratory trials, aluminium sulphate added to anaerobically digested sludge prior to dewatering offered the best odour reduction strategy amongst the options that were investigated, resulting in approximately 40% reduction in the maximum concentration of the total volatile organic sulphur compounds, relative to control.

  12. Investigation of biosolids degradation under flooded environments for use in underwater cover designs for mine tailing remediation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu; Nason, Peter; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena; Öhlander, Björn

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the potential suitability of digested sewage sludge (frequently termed biosolids) for use as underwater cover material for mine waste tailings, the degradability of biosolids at 20 - 22 °C under flooded anaerobic conditions was evaluated during incubation for 230 days. Leaching of elements from the flooded anaerobic system was also evaluated. Biosolid degradation was confirmed by the generation and accumulation of CH4 and CO2. Specifically, approximately 1.65 mmoL gas/g biosolids was generated as a result of incubation, corresponding to degradation of 7.68% of the organic matter, and the residue was stable at the end of the laboratory experiment. Under field conditions in northern Sweden, it is expected that the degradation rate will be much slower than that observed in the present study (Nason et al. Environ Earth Sci 70:30933105, 2013). Although the majority of biosolid fractions (>92%) were shown to be recalcitrant during the incubation period, long-term monitoring of further degradability of residue is necessary. The leaching results showed that most of the metals and metalloids leached from the biosolids at day 230 were below the limit value for non-hazardous waste, although Ni was the only element approximately three times higher than the limit value for inert material at the landfill site. In conclusion, biosolids have potential for use as covering material for underwater storage of tailings based on their biodegradability and leaching of elements.

  13. Chemical immobilization of lead, zinc, and cadmium in smelter-contaminated soils using biosolids and rock phosphate.

    PubMed

    Basta, N T; Gradwohl, R; Snethen, K L; Schroder, J L

    2001-01-01

    Chemical immobilization, an in situ remediation method where inexpensive chemicals are used to reduce contaminant solubility in contaminated soil, has gained attention. We investigated the effectiveness of lime-stabilized biosolid (LSB), N-Viro Soil (NV), rock phosphate (RP), and anaerobic biosolid (AB) to reduce extractability and plant and gastrointestinal (GI) bioavailability in three Cd-, Pb-, and Zn-contaminated soils from smelter sites. Treated (100 g kg(-1) soil) and control soils were incubated at 27 degrees C and -0.033 MPa (0.33 bar) water content for 90 d. The effect of soil treatment on metal extractability was evaluated by sequential extraction, on phytoavailability by a lettuce bioassay (Lactuca sativa L.), on human GI availability of Pb from soil ingestion by the Physiologically Based Extraction Test. The largest reductions in metal extractability and phytoavailability were from alkaline organic treatments (LSB and NV). Phytotoxic Zn [1188 mg Zn kg(-1) extracted with 0.5 M Ca(NO3)2] in Blackwell soil (disturbed soil) was reduced by LSB, NV, and RP to 166, 25, and 784 mg Zn kg(-1), respectively. Rock phosphate was the only treatment that reduced GI-available Pb in both gastric and intestinal solutions, 23 and 92%, respectively. Alkaline organic treatments (LSB, NV) decreases Cd transmission through the food chain pathway, whereas rock phosphate decreases risk from exposure to Pb via the soil ingestion pathway. Alkaline organic treatments can reduce human exposure to Cd and Pb by reducing Zn phytotoxicity and revegetation of contaminated sites.

  14. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Loss Potential from Biosolids-Amended Soils and Biotic Response in the Receiving Water.

    PubMed

    Hanief, Aslam; Matiichine, Denis; Laursen, Andrew E; Bostan, I Vadim; McCarthy, Lynda H

    2015-07-01

    Application of municipal biosolids to agricultural soil can improve soil quality and improve crop yields. However, runoff or tile leachate from biosolids-applied fields may contribute to localized eutrophication of surface water. A laboratory experiment was conducted to determine loss potential of nutrients from soils amended with two different biosolids (anaerobically digested and chemically stabilized) relative to loss from a reference soil and to determine response in freshwater microcosms to nutrients lost from soils. Total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) were measured in runoff, and equivalent amounts were added to reference microcosms to determine if aquatic systems would respond similarly to TN and TP loading in bioavailable forms (PO, NH, NO) simulating loading related to inorganic fertilizer application. Nutrient concentrations (TP, TN, PO, NH, NO, and organic P and N) were similar in the runoff from the two biosolids-amended soils and higher than those in the runoff from the reference soil. Runoff from biosolids-amended soils stimulated algal growth and production (chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen) relative to runoff from reference soil, but the response was weaker than in microcosms receiving equivalent amounts of inorganic N and P. Nutrient runoff from land-applied biosolids does have potential to increase algal production in receiving waters; however, this experiment suggests receiving waters may absorb a single large nutrient loading event associated with runoff from biosolids-amended soil without substantial impact. Moreover, the response to N and P in biosolids versus inorganic nutrient additions suggests biosolids may contribute relatively less to eutrophication than inorganic fertilizers, assuming equivalent TN and TP loading to aquatic systems. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  15. Assessing the impact of land-applied biosolids from a thermomechanical (TMP) pulp mill to a suite of terrestrial and aquatic bioassay organisms under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Vadim; McCarthy, Lynda H; Liss, Steven N

    2005-01-01

    The potential impact on a variety of bioassay organisms when pulp-mill biosolids from a thermomechanical pulp mill (western Canada) were applied to a reference soil has been investigated in a laboratory setup. The current research assessed acute, chronic, and reproductive impacts using a battery of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Terrestrial organisms were exposed to soil amended with different concentrations of biosolids, while aquatic organisms were used to assess the impact of biosolids' runoff into receiving waters. The former bioassays showed that an application rate of 20 tonneshectare(-1) (tha(-1)) "bone-dry" biosolids applied to reference soil produced no observable adverse impact on the terrestrial organisms. In the latter assays, undiluted (100%) and 50% diluted biosolids' runoff into receiving water had a detrimental impact on the aquatic organisms. However, concentrations not exceeding 25% (environmentally relevant concentrations) had neither an acute nor chronic impact compared to reference populations. The organisms' abilities to reproduce were also unaltered. While this study only examined the biosolids from one mill, there is the potential that land-application of characteristically well-defined pulp mill biosolids may constitute an acceptable way of disposing of pulp and paper mill biosolid residues. However, the biosolids coming from different mills, with differing processes, must be dealt with on a case-by-case situation. Each series of biosolids must be rigorously tested for toxicological impact in the laboratory under tightly controlled conditions. Subsequently, field experimentation must be conducted before definitive conclusions can be made.

  16. Quantification of Enteric Viruses, Pathogen Indicators, and Salmonella Bacteria in Class B Anaerobically Digested Biosolids by Culture and Molecular Methods ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin; Onan, Brandon M.; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2010-01-01

    The most common class B biosolids in the United States are generated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD), and MAD biosolids have been used for land application. However, the pathogen levels in MAD biosolids are still unclear, especially with respect to enteric viruses. In this study, we determined the occurrence and the quantitative levels of enteric viruses and indicators in 12 MAD biosolid samples and of Salmonella enterica in 6 MAD biosolid samples. Three dewatered biosolid samples were also included in this study for purposes of comparison. Human adenoviruses (HAdV) had the highest gene levels and were detected more frequently than other enteric viruses. The gene levels of noroviruses (NV) reported were comparable to those of enteroviruses (EV) and human polyomaviruses (HPyV). The occurrence percentages of HAdV, HAdV species F, EV, NV GI, NV GII, and HPyV in MAD samples were 83, 83, 42, 50, 75, and 58%, respectively. No hepatitis A virus was detected. Infectious HAdV was detected more frequently than infectious EV, and all infectious HAdV were detected when samples were propagated in A549 cells. Based on most-probable-number (MPN) analysis, A549 cells were more susceptible to biosolid-associated viruses than BGM cells. All indicator levels in MAD biosolids were approximately 104 MPN or PFU per gram (dry), and the dewatered biosolids had significantly higher indicator levels than the MAD biosolids. Only two MAD samples tested positive for Salmonella enterica, where the concentration was below 1.0 MPN/4 g. This study provides a broad comparison of the prevalence of different enteric viruses in MAD biosolids and reports the first detection of noroviruses in class B biosolids. The observed high quantitative and infectivity levels of adenoviruses in MAD biosolids indicate that adenovirus is a good indicator for the evaluation of sludge treatment efficiency. PMID:20693452

  17. Sustainable biosolids--welcomed practice through community partnership and the consequential economic benefits.

    PubMed

    Evans, T; Lowe, N; Matthews, P

    2004-01-01

    Technically, most people agree that conserving soil organic matter and completing nutrient cycles by applying animal manures, treated organic wastes and biosolids to land is the most sustainable option in the majority of situations. It is also generally the least expensive. There has been a huge amount of research into the hazards, and this has concluded that the risks can be managed to acceptable levels. But there has been insufficient attention to communicating this knowledge, as so often in the scientific and technological arena. Perception is reality. Nowadays compliance with regulations (whilst essential) is not enough; public and stakeholder attitudes can be of decisive importance. Sometimes policy-makers speculate what public attitudes might be without really asking them. This paper will describe an initiative to create a partnership open to anybody with an interest in the use of organic materials on land to develop consensus on good practice and to share knowledge. It summarises an attitude survey of more than 140 organisations, which was then debated at a workshop in July 2002. The conclusion from this study was that all parties considered a partnership is essential to share knowledge, build mutual trust and agree practices that are welcomed by all in the food chain. The paper will describe the steps to establishing a partnership organisation, its aims and objectives, the work to date and the plans for the future. The Environment Agency considers this very important and has largely funded the work to date. The consequences of failing to establish welcomed practices would be loss of the facility to use organic resources on land.

  18. Mapping the total phosphorus concentration of biosolid amended surface soils using LANDSAT TM data.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, B B Maruthi; Vincent, Robert K; Witter, Jason D; Spongberg, Alison L

    2009-04-01

    Conventional methods for soil sampling and analysis for soil variability in chemical characteristics are too time-consuming and expensive for multi-seasonal monitoring over large-scale areas. Hence, the objectives of this study are: 1) to determine changes in chemical concentrations of soils that are amended with treated sewage sludge; and 2) to determine if LANDSAT TM data can be used to map surface chemical characteristics of such amended soils. For this study, we selected two fields in NW Ohio, designated as F34 and F11, that had been applied with 34 and 11 ton acre(-1) of biosolids, respectively. Soil samples from a total of 70 sampling locations across the two fields were collected one day prior to LANDSAT 5 overpass and were analyzed for several elemental concentrations. The accumulation of Ba, Cd, Cu, S and P were found to be significantly higher in the surface soils of field F34, compared to field F11. Regression equations were established to search for algorithms that could map these five elemental concentrations in the surface soils using six, dark-object-subtracted (DOS) LANDSAT TM bands and the 15 non-reciprocal spectral ratios derived from these six bands for the May 20, 2005, LANDSAT 5 TM image. Phosphorus (P) had the highest R(2) adjusted value (67.9%) among all five elements considered, and the resulting algorithm employed only spectral ratios. This model was successfully tested for robustness by applying it to another LANDSAT TM image obtained on June 5, 2005. Our results enabled us to conclude that LANDSAT TM imagery of bare-soil fields can be used to quantify and map the spatial variation of total phosphorous concentration in surface soils. This research has significant implications for identification and mapping of areas with high P, which is important for implementing and monitoring the best phosphorous management practices across the region.

  19. Impact of Joule Heating and pH on Biosolids Electro-Dewatering.

    PubMed

    Navab-Daneshmand, Tala; Beton, Raphaël; Hill, Reghan J; Frigon, Dominic

    2015-05-05

    Electro-dewatering (ED) is a novel technology to reduce the overall costs of residual biosolids processing, transport, and disposal. In this study, we investigated Joule heating and pH as parameters controlling the dewaterability limit, dewatering rate, and energy efficiency. Temperature-controlled electrodes revealed that Joule heating enhances water removal by increasing evaporation and electro-osmotic flow. High temperatures increased the dewatering rate, but had little impact on the dewaterability limit and energy efficiency. Analysis of horizontal layers after 15-min ED suggests electro-osmotic flow reversal, as evidenced by a shifting of the point of minimum moisture content from the anode toward the cathode. This flow reversal was also confirmed by the pH at the anode being below the isoelectric point, as ascertained by pH titration. The important role of pH on ED was further studied by adding acid/base solutions to biosolids prior to ED. An acidic pH reduced the biosolids charge while simultaneously increasing the dewatering efficiency. Thus, process optimization depends on trade-offs between speed and efficiency, according to physicochemical properties of the biosolids microstructure.

  20. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF METHODS FOR ENUMERATION OF FECAL COLIFORM AND SALMONELLA IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current federal regulations required monitoring for fecal coliforms or Salmonella in biosolids destined for land application. Methods used for analysis of fecal coliforms and Salmonella were reviewed and a standard protocol was developed. The protocols were then...

  1. [The characterization of biosolids produced by the San Fernando wastewater treatment plant in Itagui, Antioquia, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Bedoya-Urrego, Katherine; Acevedo-Ruíz, José M; Peláez-Jaramillo, Carlos A; Agudelo-López, Sonia Del Pilar

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study was aimed at evaluating pertinent physicochemical and microbiological (bacteria and parasites) parameters regarding the biosolids produced by the San Fernando wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Itagui, Antioquia, Colombia. Methods Twelve samples were collected and evaluated every month from January to December during 2010. The chemical, physical and microbiological tests followed the protocol described in Colombian technical guideline 5167. The protocol described in Mexican official Norm 004 (with some modifications) was used for identifying helminth ova and assessing their viability. Results All samples proved positive for Ascarislumbricoides, viable ova count ranging from 4 to 22 eggs/2gTS. Both Salmonella and Enterobacteriawere detected in all samples evaluated, the latter having 3,000 colony forming unit (CFU)/g minimum concentration. Biosolid sample values met the heavy metal concentration requirement established by national guidelines. There was no statistical association between rainfall and the pathogen's presence in the biosolids. Conclusion Our results suggested that the biosolids being produced by the San Fernando wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) could be used as organic fertilizer; however they should be treated/sanitized to meet the stipulations in Colombian technical guideline 5167.

  2. INTERLABORATORY VALIDATION OF USEPA METHOD 1680: FECAL COLIFORMS IN BIOSOLIDS BY MULTIPLE-TUBE FERMENTATION PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States, the use and disposal of biosolids (including domestic septage) are regulated under 40 CFR Part 503. Subpart D of this regulation protects public health and the environment through requirements designed to reduce the potential for contact with pathogens in bi...

  3. EVALUATION OF BIOSOLID SAMPLE PROCESSING TECHNIQUES TO MAXIMIZE RECOVERY OF BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current federal regulations (40 CFR 503) require enumeration of fecal coliform or Salmoella prior to land application of Class A biosolids. This regulation specifies use of enumeration methods included in "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater 18th Edition,...

  4. Influence of long-term land application of class B biosolids on soil bacterial diversity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This project evaluated the influence of annual land applications of Class B biosolids on soil bacterial diversity monitored over a 20 year period. Each annual land application was followed by a cotton crop. The study was initiated in 1986 at the University of Arizona Marana Agricultural Center, 21 m...

  5. VOLATILE ORGANO-METALLOIDS IN BIO-SOLID MATERIALS: ANALYSIS BY VACUUM DISTILLATION-GC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method based on vacuum distillation-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (VD-GC-MS)

    was developed for determining volatile organo-metalloid contaminants in bio-solid materials. Method

    performance was evaluated for dimethylselenide (DMSe), dimethyldisel...

  6. Measurement of biosolids compost odor emissions from a windrow, static pile, and biofilter.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Paul; Grey, Mark; Sellew, Paul

    2004-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted to compare odor emissions from a windrow process and an aerated static pile and to determine the odor reduction efficiency of a pilot two-phase biofilter for odor control of biosolids composting. Chemical compounds identified as responsible for odors from biosolids composting include ammonia, dimethyl disulfide, carbon disulfide, formic acid, acetic acid, and sulfur dioxide (or carbonyl sulfide). Aeration was found to reduce the concentration of ammonia, formic acid, and acetic acid by 72, 57, and 11%, respectively, compared with a nearby windrow, while dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and sulfur dioxide (or carbonyl sulfide) concentrations were below detection limits. Using dilution-to-threshold olfactometry, aeration followed by biofiltration was found to reduce the odor from biosolids composting by 98%. Biofiltration also altered the character of odor emissions from biosolids composting, producing a less offensive odor with an earthy character. Biofiltration was found to reduce the concentration of ammonia, dimethyl disulfide, carbon disulfide, formic acid, acetic acid, and sulfur dioxide (or carbonyl sulfide) by 99, 90, 32, 100, 34, and 100%, respectively. The concentrations of those odorants were estimated to be 3700, 110000, 26,37,5, and 1.2 times reported human detection limits before the two-phase biofilter, respectively, and 42,9600,18,0,3, and 0 times human detection limits after the biofilter, respectively.

  7. USE OF A MOLECULAR PROBE ASSAY FOR MONITORING SALMONELLA SPP. IN BIOSOLIDS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current federal regulations (40 CFR 503) require enumeration of fecal coliform or salmonellae prior to land application of biosolids. This regulation specifies use of enumeration methods included in "Standard methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater 18th Edition," (SM)...

  8. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that...

  9. A BETTER INDICATOR STUDY EXAMINES ALTERNATIVE BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF DISINFECTION IN LIME-TREATED BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the current regulations (CFR 503), Class B biosolids may be land applied with certain site restrictions. One method for achieving Class B status is to raise the pH of the sludge to >12 for a minimum of 2 hours with an alkaline material (normally lime). Alternately, a Clas...

  10. Temporal trends of perfluoroalkyl substances in limed biosolids from a large municipal water resource recovery facility

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While the recycling of wastewater biosolids via land-application is a commonly used practice for nutrient recovery and soil reclamation, concerns remain that they may become sources of toxic, persistent organic pollutants to the environment. This study concentrates on assessing the presence and the...

  11. A BETTER INDICATOR STUDY EXAMINES ALTERNATIVE BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF DISINFECTION IN LIME-TREATED BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the current regulations (CFR 503), Class B biosolids may be land applied with certain site restrictions. One method for achieving Class B status is to raise the pH of the sludge to >12 for a minimum of 2 hours with an alkaline material (normally lime). Alternately, a Clas...

  12. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that...

  13. STANDARDIZATION AND VALIDATION OF METHODS FOR ENUMERATION OF FECAL COLIFORM AND SALMONELLA IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current federal regulations required monitoring for fecal coliforms or Salmonella in biosolids destined for land application. Methods used for analysis of fecal coliforms and Salmonella were reviewed and a standard protocol was developed. The protocols were then...

  14. The feasibility study of using non-woven MBR for reduction of hydrolysed biosolids.

    PubMed

    Horng, R Y; Shao, H; Chang, W K; Chang, M C

    2006-01-01

    In this study, non-woven MBR was used to treat hydrolysed biosolids wasted from a biological treatment plant. The concentration of SS of hydrolysed biosolids in influent was 10,000 mg/L and the concentration of SS in effluent was less than 200 mg/L with/without discharging wasted sludge depending on different HRTs, i.e. 20, 15 and 10 d. The results indicated that the percentage of biosolids reduction in terms of SS removal efficiency in non-woven MBR was around 65, 60 and 35%, respectively, depending on different HRTs. Meanwhile, the ratio of VSS/SS was decreased from 0.78 to 0.50 and the number of smaller inorganic particle sizes increased due to extended SRT. The initial flux in the non-woven MBR was set at 0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 m3/m2/day and trans-membrane pressure (TMP) was less than 10 kPa. The permeate flux could be maintained quite stably due to lower TMP. The proposed non-woven MBR could be used to achieve the reduction of biosolids in the wastewater treatment plant.

  15. Perfluoroalkyl acid distribution in various plant compartments of edible crops grown in biosolids-amended soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crop uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) from biosolids-amended soil has been identified as a potential pathway for PFAA entry into the terrestrial food chain. This study compared the uptake of PFAAs in greenhouse-grown radish (Raphanus sativus), celery (Apium graveolens var.d...

  16. EVALUATION OF BIOSOLID SAMPLE PROCESSING TECHNIQUES TO MAXIMIZE RECOVERY OF BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current federal regulations (40 CFR 503) require enumeration of fecal coliform or Salmoella prior to land application of Class A biosolids. This regulation specifies use of enumeration methods included in "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater 18th Edition,...

  17. INTERLABORATORY VALIDATION OF USEPA METHOD 1680: FECAL COLIFORMS IN BIOSOLIDS BY MULTIPLE-TUBE FERMENTATION PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States, the use and disposal of biosolids (including domestic septage) are regulated under 40 CFR Part 503. Subpart D of this regulation protects public health and the environment through requirements designed to reduce the potential for contact with pathogens in bi...

  18. Perfluoroalkyl acid distribution in various plant compartments of edible crops grown in biosolids-amended soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crop uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) from biosolids-amended soil has been identified as a potential pathway for PFAA entry into the terrestrial food chain. This study compared the uptake of PFAAs in greenhouse-grown radish (Raphanus sativus), celery (Apium graveolens var.d...

  19. RESEARCH TOWARDS DEVELOPING METHODS FOR SELECTED PHARMACEUTICAL AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS (PPCPS) ADAPTED FOR BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development, standardization, and validation of analytical methods provides state-of-the-science

    techniques to evaluate the presence, or absence, of select PPCPs in biosolids. This research

    provides the approaches, methods, and tools to assess the exposures and redu...

  20. µ-XANES AND µ-XRF INVESTIGATIONS OF METAL BINDING MECHANISMS IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) microprobe analysis and micro-X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (µ-XANES) were employed to identify Fe and Mn phases and their association with selected toxic elements in two biosolids (limed composted and Nu-Earth) containing low ...

  1. Biochar from Pyrolysis of Biosolids for Nutrient Adsorption and Turfgrass Cultivation.

    PubMed

    Carey, D E; McNamara, P J; Zitomer, D H

    2015-12-01

    At water resource recovery facilities, nutrient removal is often required and energy recovery is an ever-increasing goal. Pyrolysis may be a sustainable process for handling wastewater biosolids because energy can be recovered in the py-gas and py-oil. Additionally, the biochar produced has value as a soil conditioner. The objective of this work was to determine if biochar could be used to adsorb ammonia from biosolids filtrate and subsequently be applied as a soil conditioner to improve grass growth. The maximum carrying capacity of base modified biochar for NH3-N was 5.3 mg/g. Biochar containing adsorbed ammonium and potassium was applied to laboratory planters simulating golf course putting greens to cultivate Kentucky bluegrass. Planters that contained nutrient-laden biochar proliferated at a statistically higher rate than planters that contained biosolids, unmodified biochar, peat, or no additive. Nutrient-laden biochar performed as well as commercial inorganic fertilizer with no statistical difference in growth rates. Biochar from digested biosolids successfully immobilized NH3-N from wastewater and served as a beneficial soil amendment. This process offers a means to recover and recycle nutrients from water resource recovery facilities.

  2. Problem Formulation for Human Health Risk Assessments of Pathogens in Land-Applied Biosolids (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Millions of tons of treated sewage sludges or “biosolids” are applied annually to farms, forests, rangelands, mine lands and other types of land in the United States. Biosolids are defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as “the primarily organic solid product ...

  3. µ-XANES AND µ-XRF INVESTIGATIONS OF METAL BINDING MECHANISMS IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) microprobe analysis and micro-X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (µ-XANES) were employed to identify Fe and Mn phases and their association with selected toxic elements in two biosolids (limed composted and Nu-Earth) containing low ...

  4. VOLATILE ORGANO-METALLOIDS IN BIO-SOLID MATERIALS: ANALYSIS BY VACUUM DISTILLATION-GC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method based on vacuum distillation-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (VD-GC-MS)

    was developed for determining volatile organo-metalloid contaminants in bio-solid materials. Method

    performance was evaluated for dimethylselenide (DMSe), dimethyldisel...

  5. Herbaceous vegetation productivity, persistence, and metals uptake on a biosolids-amended mine soil

    SciTech Connect

    Evanylo, G.K.; Abaye, A.O.; Dundas, C.; Zipper, C.E.; Lemus, R.; Sukkariyah, B.; Rockett, J.

    2005-10-01

    The selection of plant species is critical for the successful establishment and long-term maintenance of vegetation on reclaimed surface mined soils. A study was conducted to assess the capability of 16 forage grass and legume species in monocultures and mixes to establish and thrive on a reclaimed Appalachian surface mine amended with biosolids. The 0.15-ha coarse-textured, rocky, non-acid forming mined site was prepared for planting by grading to a 2% slope and amending sandstone overburden materials with a mixture of composted and dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids at a rate of 368 Mg ha{sup -1} (dry weight). The high rate of biosolids applied provided favorable soil chemical properties but could not overcome physical property limitations due to shallow undeveloped soil perched atop a compacted soil layer at 25 cm depth. The plant species whose persistence and biomass production were the greatest after a decade or more of establishment (i.e., switchgrass, sericea lespedeza, reed canarygrass, tall fescue, and crownvetch) shared the physiological and reproductive characteristics of low fertility requirements, drought and moisture tolerance, and propagation by rhizome and/or stolons. Of these five species, two (tall fescue and sericea lespedeza) are or have been seeded commonly on Appalachian coal surface mines, and often dominate abandoned pasture sites. Despite the high rates of heavy metal-bearing biosolids applied to the soil, plant uptake of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn were well within critical concentrations more than a decade after establishment of the vegetation.

  6. Manure- and Biosolids-Resident Murine Norovirus 1 Attachment to and Internalization by Romaine Lettuce▿

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jie; Jin, Yan; Sims, Tom; Kniel, Kalmia E.

    2010-01-01

    The attachment of murine norovirus 1 (MNV) in biosolids, swine manure, and dairy manure to Romaine lettuce and internalization of this virus were evaluated. The MNV in animal manures had behavior similar to that of pure MNV; however, MNV in biosolids had significantly higher levels of attachment and internalization than pure MNV or MNV in manures. The incubation time did not affect the attachment of MNV in biosolids or manure. Confocal microscopy was used to observe MNV on lettuce after SYBR gold-labeled MNV was added directly to lettuce or after lettuce was submersed in labeled virus. MNV was observed on the lettuce surface, inside open cuts, and occasionally within stomata. In general, lettuce pieces with a long cut on the edge and short cuts on the stem was more likely to contain internalized MNV than intact lettuce pieces, as observed by confocal microscopy; however, while the difference was visible, it was not statistically significant. This study showed that the presence of MNV in biosolids may increase the risk of fresh produce contamination and that the MNV in open cuts and stomata is likely to be protected from sanitization. PMID:19933344

  7. Uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids into edible crops via land applied biosolids: Field and greenhouse studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in biosolids destined for use in agriculture has raised concerns about their potential to enter the terrestrial food chain via bioaccumulation in edible plants. Uptake of PFAAs by greenhouse lettuce ( Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Lycope...

  8. RESEARCH TOWARDS DEVELOPING METHODS FOR SELECTED PHARMACEUTICAL AND PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS (PPCPS) ADAPTED FOR BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development, standardization, and validation of analytical methods provides state-of-the-science

    techniques to evaluate the presence, or absence, of select PPCPs in biosolids. This research

    provides the approaches, methods, and tools to assess the exposures and redu...

  9. Uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids into edible crops via land applied biosolids: Field and greenhouse studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in biosolids destined for use in agriculture has raised concerns about their potential to enter the terrestrial food chain via bioaccumulation in edible plants. Uptake of PFAAs by greenhouse lettuce ( Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Lycope...

  10. Problem Formulation for Human Health Risk Assessments of Pathogens in Land-Applied Biosolids (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Millions of tons of treated sewage sludges or “biosolids” are applied annually to farms, forests, rangelands, mine lands and other types of land in the United States. Biosolids are defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as “the primarily organic solid product ...

  11. Fate of microconstituents in biosolids composted in an aerated silage bag

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of silage bags for composting was evaluated as a means to produce Class A Biosolids while minimizing vector attraction and odor emissions. While most composting studies report pathogen concentrations, little is known about the fate of Endocrine Disruptor Chemicals (EDCs) during composting. ...

  12. Cd, Ni, Cr and Pb distribution in biosolid pellets used as soil amendment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán, Manuel M.; Rincón-Mora, Beatriz; Belén Almendro-Candel, María; Navarro Pedreño, Jose; Gómez Lucas, Ignacio; Bech, Jaume; Roca, Nuria; Pardo, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The application of biosolids to a soil is a method that offers important benefits (Navarro et al. 2003). The transport and application costs are quite low (mostly if they are dehydrated biosolids or pellets) if soils are located near a wastewater treatment plant. It is possible to recycle nutrients (N, P, and K) and organic matter by improving the physical and chemical characteristics of the soil and by reducing the fertilizer costs. However, the use of biosolids may also has several problems, such as the presence of quantities of metals that could be toxic for plants or could contaminate ground-waters after being leached. Heavy metals are one of the most serious environmental pollutants because of its high toxicity, abundance and easy accumulation by plant (Soriano-Disla et al. 2014; Rosen and Chen 2014). Contamination of soils by potentially toxic elements (e.g. Cd, Ni, Cr, Pb) from amendments of biosolids is subject to rigorous controls within the European Union. The present study was designed to examine the partition of selected heavy metals in biosolid pellets, and also to relate the distribution patterns of these metals. Samples were collected from the treatment of urban wastewater at the drying grounds of a wastewater processing plant. The samples correspond to biosolids with humidities below 20% and are representative of the three horizons within the pile: the isolation surface (H1), the mesophilous area (H2), and the thermophilous area (H3). Biosolid aggregates were placed in a pellet press and then compacted. Total content of metals was determined following microwave digestion and analysed by ICP/MS. Triplicate samples were weighed in polycarbonate centrifuge tubes and sequentially extracted. The distribution of chemical forms of Cd, Ni, Cr, and Pb in the biosolids was studied using a sequential extraction procedure that fractionates the metal into soluble-exchangeable, specifically sorbed-carbonate bound, oxidizable, reducible, and residual forms. The

  13. micro-XANES and micro-XRF investigations of metal binding mechanisms in biosolids.

    PubMed

    Hettiarachchi, G M; Scheckel, K G; Ryan, J A; Sutton, S R; Newville, M

    2006-01-01

    Micro-X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) microprobe analysis and micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (micro-XANES) spectroscopy were employed to identify Fe and Mn phases and their association with selected metals in two biosolids (limed composted [LC] and Nu-Earth) before and after treatment to remove organic carbon (OC). Spatial correlations derived from elemental mapping of XRF images showed strong correlations between Fe and Cd, Cr, Pb, or Zn (r2= 0.65-0.92) before and after removal of most of the OC. The strong correlation between Fe and Cu that was present in intact samples disappeared after OC removal, suggesting that Cu was associated with OC coatings that may have been present on Fe compounds. Except for Fe and Cr, the spatial correlations of metals with Mn were improved after treatment to remove OC, indicating that the treatment may have altered more than the OC in the system. The Fe micro-XANES spectra of the intact biosolids sample showed that every point had varying mixtures of Fe(II and III) species and no two points were identical. The lack of uniformity in Fe species in the biosolids sample illustrates the complexity of the materials and the difficulty of studying biosolids using conventional analytical tools or chemical extraction techniques. Still, these microscopic observations provide independent information supporting the previous laboratory and field hypothesis that Fe compounds play a major role in retention of environmentally important trace elements in biosolids. This could be due to co-precipitation of the metals with Fe, adsorption of metals by Fe compounds, or a combination of both mechanisms.

  14. Copper and zinc speciation in a biosolids-amended, semiarid grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, J A; Barbarick, K A; Brobst, R B

    2014-09-01

    Predicting trace-metal solid-phase speciation changes associated with long-term biosolids land application is important for understanding and improving environmental quality. Biosolids were surface-applied (no incorporation; 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 21, and 30 Mg ha) to a semiarid grassland in 1991 (single application) and 2002 (repeated application). In July 2003, soils were obtained from the 0- to 8-, 8- to15-, and 15- to 30-cm depths in all plots. Using soil pH, soluble anion and cation concentrations from 0.01 mol L CaCl extractions, dissolved organic C (DOC) content, and an estimate of solid phase humic and fulvic acids present, Cu and Zn associated with minerals, hydrous ferric oxides (HFO), organically complexed, electrostatically bound to organic matter (OM), or DOC phases was modeled using Visual Minteq. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDXRA) was also used to identify solid-phase metal associations present in single and repeated biosolids-amended soils. Based on soil solution chemistry in all depths, as modeled using Visual Minteq, >90% of the Cu and >95% of the Zn from the single or repeated biosolids-applied soils were sorbed electrostatically or as mono- or bidentate solid-phase OM complexes. Up to 10 and 5% of the Cu and Zn, respectively, was associated with HFO, with negligible amounts associated with DOC. The SEM-EDXRA of clay-sized separates from all soil depths led to direct observation of Fe-Cu and Fe-Zn associations. Results implied that after surface-applying biosolids either once or twice with up to 30 Mg ha, some shifts occurred in phases controlling Cu and Zn solubility, but solution concentrations remained below drinking water standards.

  15. Metagenomic Comparison of Antibiotic Resistance Genes Associated with Liquid and Dewatered Biosolids.

    PubMed

    McCall, Crystal A; Bent, Elizabeth; Jørgensen, Tue S; Dunfield, Kari E; Habash, Marc B

    2016-03-01

    Municipal biosolids (MBs) that are land-applied in North America are known to possess an active microbial population that can include human pathogens. Activated sludge is a hotspot for the accumulation of antibiotics and has been shown to be a selective environment for microorganisms that contain antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs); however, the prevalence of ARGs in MBs is not well characterized. In this study, we enriched the plasmid metagenome from raw sewage sludge and two CP2 MBs, a mesophilic anaerobic digestate and a dewatered digestate, to evaluate the presence of ARGs in mobile genetic elements. The CP2-class biosolids are similar to Class B biosolids in the United States. The CP2 biosolids must meet a microbiological cut off of 2 × 10 colony-forming units (CFU) per dry gram or 100 mL of biosolids. The enriched plasmid DNA was sequenced (Illumina MiSeq). Sequence matching against databases, including the Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database (CARD), MG-RAST, and INTEGRALL, identified potential genes of interest related to ARGs and their ability to transfer. The presence and abundance of different ARGs varied between treatments with heterogeneity observed among the same sample types. The MBs plasmid-enriched metagenomes contained ARGs associated with resistance to a variety of antibiotics, including β-lactams, rifampicin, quinolone, and tetracycline as well as the detection of extended spectrum β-lactamase genes. Cultured bacteria from CP2 MBs possessed antibiotic resistances consistent with the MBs metagenome data including multiantibiotic-resistant isolates. The results from this study provide a better understanding of the ARG and MGE profile of the plasmid-enriched metagenome of CP2 MBs.

  16. 76 FR 30705 - Problem Formulation for Human Health Risk Assessments of Pathogens in Land-Applied Biosolids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Problem Formulation for Human Health Risk Assessments of Pathogens in Land-Applied Biosolids AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing...

  17. Creating Competitive Advantage through Effective Management Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Clinton O.; Ariss, Sonny S.

    2002-01-01

    Managers trained in executive education programs (n=203) identified ways in which management education can increase an organization's competitive advantage: exposure to new ideas and practices, skill development, and motivation. Characteristics of effective management education included experience-based learning orientation, credible instructors,…

  18. Fate of flame retardants and the antimicrobial agent triclosan in planted and unplanted biosolid-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth F; Gunsch, Claudia K; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-05-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the fate of contaminant-laden biosolids is needed to fully evaluate the environmental impacts of biosolid land application. The present study examined the fate of several flame retardants and triclosan in biosolid-amended soil in a 90-d greenhouse experiment. Objectives included evaluating the persistence of these compounds in soil, their phytoaccumulation potential by alfalfa (Medicago sativa), and potential degradation reactions. Concentrations of the polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners BDE-47 and BDE-209 and the antimicrobial triclosan declined significantly over time in biosolid-amended soil planted with alfalfa and then reached a steady state by day 28. In contrast, no significant losses of those analytes were observed from soil in nonvegetated pots. The amount of an analyte lost from vegetated soil ranged from 43% for the flame retardant di(2-ethylhexyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate to 61% for triclosan and was significantly and negatively related to the log octanol-water partition coefficient. Alfalfa roots and shoots were monitored for the compounds, but no clear evidence of phytoaccumulation was observed. Methyl triclosan formation was observed in the biosolid-amended soils during the study period, indicating in situ biotransformation of triclosan. The present study demonstrates that, although they are highly recalcitrant, PBDEs, selected alternate brominated flame retardants, and triclosan are capable of undergoing dissipation from biosolid-amended soils in the presence of plants.

  19. Co-gasification of biosolids with biomass: Thermogravimetric analysis and pilot scale study in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ming Ming; Masnadi, Mohammad S; Grace, John R; Bi, Xiaotao T; Lim, C Jim; Li, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    This work studied the feasibility of co-gasification of biosolids with biomass as a means of disposal with energy recovery. The kinetics study at 800°C showed that biomass, such as switchgrass, could catalyze the reactions because switchgrass ash contained a high proportion of potassium, an excellent catalyst for gasification. However, biosolids could also inhibit gasification due to interaction between biomass alkali/alkaline earth metals and biosolids clay minerals. In the pilot scale experiments, increasing the proportion of biosolids in the feedstock affected gasification performance negatively. Syngas yield and char conversion decreased from 1.38 to 0.47m(3)/kg and 82-36% respectively as the biosolids proportion in the fuel increased from 0% to 100%. Over the same range, the tar content increased from 10.3 to 200g/m(3), while the ammonia concentration increased from 1660 to 19,200ppmv. No more than 25% biosolids in the fuel feed is recommended to maintain a reasonable gasification.

  20. National inventory of perfluoroalkyl substances in archived U.S. biosolids from the 2001 EPA National Sewage Sludge Survey

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Arjun K.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2013-01-01

    Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we determined the first nationwide inventories of 13 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in U.S. biosolids via analysis of samples collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the 2001 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Perfluorooctane sulfonate [PFOS; 403 ± 127 ng/g dry weight (dw)] was the most abundant PFAS detected in biosolids composites representing 32 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, followed by perfluorooctanoate [PFOA; 34 ± 22 ng/g dw] and perfluorodecanoate [PFDA; 26 ± 20 ng/g dw]. Mean concentrations in U.S. biosolids of the remaining ten PFASs ranged between 2 and 21 ng/g dw. Interestingly, concentrations of PFOS determined here in biosolids collected prior to the phase-out period (2002) were similar to levels reported in the literature for recent years. The mean load of ΣPFASs in U.S. biosolids was estimated at 2749–3450 kg/year, of which about 1375–2070 kg is applied on agricultural land and 467–587 kg goes to landfills as an alternative disposal route. This study informs the risk assessment of PFASs by furnishing national inventories of PFASs occurrence and environmental release via biosolids application on land. PMID:23562984

  1. Health risk assessment of heavy metals through the consumption of food crops fertilized by biosolids: A probabilistic-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Koupaie, E; Eskicioglu, C

    2015-12-30

    The objective of this study was to perform a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) to assess the health risk of Cadmium (Cd), Copper (Cu), and Zinc (Zn) through the consumption of food crops grown on farm lands fertilized by biosolids. The risk analysis was conducted using 8 years of historical heavy metal data (2005-2013) of the municipal biosolids generated by a nearby treatment facility considering one-time and long-term biosolids land application scenarios for a range of 5-100 t/ha fertilizer application rate. The 95th percentile of the hazard index (HI) increased from 0.124 to 0.179 when the rate of fertilizer application increased from 5 to 100 t/ha at one-time biosolids land application. The HI at long-term biosolids land application was also found 1.3 and 1.9 times greater than that of one-time land application at fertilizer application rates of 5 and 100 t/ha, respectively. Rice ingestion had more contribution to the HI than vegetable ingestion. Cd and Cu were also found to have more contribution to the health risk associated to vegetable and rice ingestion, respectively. Results indicated no potential risk to the human health even at long-term biosolids land application scenario at 100 t/ha fertilizer application rate.

  2. Restoration of high zinc and lead tailings with municipal biosolids and lime: a field study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sally; Svendsen, Alex; Henry, Chuck

    2009-01-01

    A field study was conducted to test the ability of biosolids (BS) and different types of lime to increase soil pH, neutralize subsoil acidity, and restore a vegetative cover to alluvial mine tailings in Leadville, CO. The tailings had soil pH of 5.2 and total Cd, Pb, and Zn of 75+/-20, 2600+/-1100, and 6700+/-1900 mg kg(-1). Types of lime included agricultural lime (AL), sugar beet lime (SBL), and lime kiln dust (LKD) applied at 224 Mg ha(-1) calcium carbonate equivalent. Plots were established in 2000 and monitored intermittently through 2007. All amendments increased pH in surface and subsurface depths, with LKD, LKD+BS, and SBL+BS being the most effective. Amendments also reduced 0.01 mol L(-1) Ca(NO3)2 extractable Zn and Cd compared to the control. Plant growth was sparse on all treatments with limited yield for three of four harvests. Poor growth may have been related to elevated electrical conductivity (EC). All amendments except LKD alone (5.79 dS m(-1)) increased EC compared to the control treatment (5.28 dS m(-1)). Electrical conductivity was highest in 2002 which had the lowest summer rainfall. In 2005 EC in all treatments except the SBL+BS was similar in the surface soil. Aboveground plant tissue concentrations of Zn and Cd were also elevated. Limited precipitation and high electrical conductivity may be responsible for poor plant growth. Higher rainfall for the last sampling period resulted in significant growth in the LKD+BS, SBL+BS, and LKD alone treatments.

  3. Creating Effective Enrollment Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossler, Don

    A guide to the development and operation of a college enrollment management system is presented for college administrators. After describing current issues that affect traditional student enrollments, the concept of enrollment management is defined, and its basic elements are introduced, along with broader organizational perspectives such as…

  4. Determination of lindane leachability in soil-biosolid systems and its bioavailability in wheat plants.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, Pamela; Schröder, Andrea; Ulrich, Nadin; Schröter, Uwe; Paschke, Albrecht; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Ahumada, Inés; Richter, Pablo

    2011-07-01

    The leachability of lindane from different biosolid amended soils was determined and compared to its bioavailability. Sand, soil, and a mixture of soil-sand (1:1 w/w) were spiked with lindane, blended with different amounts of biosolids, and subjected to a leaching process with water that lasted for 1-28 d. This procedure is in accordance with ISO/TS 21268-1: 2007. After these batch tests, lindane was extracted from the leachates using three different solvent-free microextraction techniques, including solid phase microextraction (SPME), stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), and silicone rod extraction (SRE). The amount of lindane was determined with thermal desorption and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The efficiencies of the three microextraction techniques were statistically different, and the efficiency could be related to the amount of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) in each extraction device. However, all of the techniques provide data that shows that the leachability of lindane is dependent on the amount of organic matter contained in the matrix. The results of the lindane leachability assay were compared to the bioavailability of lindane, which was determined by measuring the amount of lindane that accumulated in the roots of wheat plants grown in similar soil-biosolid systems. It was confirmed that the amount of organic matter in the matrix is a determining factor for lindane immobilization. The presence of biosolids decreases the mobility of lindane in all of the systems under study. Similarly, increasing biosolid concentrations in the soil significantly decreased the bioavailability of lindane and, consequently, plant absorption. The good correlation (R(2)=0.997) between the leachability of lindane from the matrix and plant absorption of lindane indicates that the proposed biomimetic methodology can predict the bioavailability of lindane in a time period as short as 7d. The results of this work confirm that amending contaminated soils

  5. Perfluoroalkyl acid distribution in various plant compartments of edible crops grown in biosolids-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Blaine, Andrea C; Rich, Courtney D; Sedlacko, Erin M; Hundal, Lakhwinder S; Kumar, Kuldip; Lau, Christopher; Mills, Marc A; Harris, Kimberly M; Higgins, Christopher P

    2014-07-15

    Crop uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) from biosolids-amended soil has been identified as a potential pathway for PFAA entry into the terrestrial food chain. This study compared the uptake of PFAAs in greenhouse-grown radish (Raphanus sativus), celery (Apium graveolens var. dulce), tomato (Lycopersicon lycopersicum), and sugar snap pea (Pisum sativum var. macrocarpon) from an industrially impacted biosolids-amended soil, a municipal biosolids-amended soil, and a control soil. Individual concentrations of PFAAs, on a dry weight basis, in mature, edible portions of crops grown in soil amended with PFAA industrially impacted biosolids were highest for perfluorooctanoate (PFOA; 67 ng/g) in radish root, perfluorobutanoate (PFBA; 232 ng/g) in celery shoot, and PFBA (150 ng/g) in pea fruit. Comparatively, PFAA concentrations in edible compartments of crops grown in the municipal biosolids-amended soil and in the control soil were less than 25 ng/g. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were calculated for the root, shoot, and fruit compartments (as applicable) of all crops grown in the industrially impacted soil. BAFs were highest for PFBA in the shoots of all crops, as well as in the fruit compartment of pea. Root-soil concentration factors (RCFs) for tomato and pea were independent of PFAA chain length, while radish and celery RCFs showed a slight decrease with increasing chain length. Shoot-soil concentration factors (SCFs) for all crops showed a decrease with increasing chain length (0.11 to 0.36 log decrease per CF2 group). The biggest decrease (0.54-0.58 log decrease per CF2 group) was seen in fruit-soil concentration factors (FCFs). Crop anatomy and PFAA properties were utilized to explain data trends. In general, fruit crops were found to accumulate fewer long-chain PFAAs than shoot or root crops presumably due to an increasing number of biological barriers as the contaminant is transported throughout the plant (roots to shoots to fruits). These data were

  6. Application of biosolids in mineral sands mine rehabilitation: use of stockpiled topsoil decreases trace element uptake by plants.

    PubMed

    Rate, Andrew W; Lee, Karen M; French, Peter A

    2004-02-01

    Mineral sands mining involves stripping topsoil to access heavy-mineral bearing deposits, which are then rehabilitated to their original state, commonly pasture in south-west Western Australia. Organic amendments such as biosolids (digested sewage sludge) can contribute organic carbon to the rehabilitating system and improve soil chemical fertility and physical conditions. Use of biosolids also introduces the risk of contamination of the soil-plant system with heavy metals, but may be a useful source of trace elements to plants if the concentrations of these elements are low in unamended soil. We expected that biosolids amendment of areas mined for mineral sands would result in increased concentrations of metals in soils and plants, and that metal uptake would be decreased by adding stockpiled topsoil or by liming. A glasshouse experiment growing a mixed annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum)-subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum) sward was conducted using two soil materials (residue sand/clay and conserved topsoil) from a mineral sands mine amended with different rates of biosolids (0, 10, 20, 50 dry t/ha), and including a liming treatment (2 t/ha). Total concentrations of metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil increased with increasing rate of biosolids application. Metal uptake was generally lower where topsoil was present and was decreased by liming. With increasing biosolids application, plant metal concentrations increased for Cd, Ni and Zn but decreased or were erratic for other elements. In clover, biosolids application removed the Zn deficiency observed where biosolids were not applied. Plant uptake of all elements increased with increasing biosolids application, suggesting dilution by increased plant biomass was responsible for erratic metal concentration results. Despite the observed increases in uptake of metals by plants, metal concentrations in both species were low and below food standard thresholds. It is unlikely that a single

  7. Thermophilic-anaerobic digestion to produce class A biosolids: initial full-scale studies at Hyperion Treatment Plant.

    PubMed

    Iranpour, R; Cox, H H J; Oh, S; Fan, S; Kearney, R J; Abkian, V; Haug, R T

    2006-02-01

    The highest quality of biosolids is called exceptional quality. To qualify for this classification, biosolids must comply with three criteria: (1) metal concentrations, (2) vector-attraction reduction, and (3) the Class A pathogen-density requirements. The City of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation Hyperion Treatment Plant (HTP) (Playa del Rey, California) meets the first two requirements. Thus, the objective of this study was to ensure that HTP's biosolids production would meet the Class A pathogen-reduction requirements following the time-temperature regimen for batch processing (U.S. EPA, 1993; Subsection 32, Alternative 1). Because regulations require the pathogen limits to be met at the last point of plant control, biosolids sampling was not limited to immediately after the digesters, i.e., the digester outflows. The sampling extended to several locations in HTP's postdigestion train, in particular, the last points of plant control, i.e., the truck loading facility and the farm for land application. A two-stage, thermophilic-continuous-batch process, consisting of a battery of six egg-shaped digesters, was established in late 2001 for phase I of this study and modified in early 2002 for phase II. As the biosolids were discharged from the second-stage digesters, the Salmonella sp. (pathogen) and fecal-coliform (indicator) densities were well below the limits for Class A biosolids, even though the second-stage-digester temperatures were a few degrees below the temperature required by Alternative 1. Salmonella sp. densities remained below the Class A limit at all postdigestion sampling locations. Fecal-coliform densities were also below the Class A limit at postdigestion-sampling locations, except the truck-loading facility (phases I and II) and the farm for final use of the biosolids (phase II). Although federal regulations require one of the limits for either fecal coliforms or Salmonella sp. to be met, local regulations in Kern County, California, where the

  8. Effects of Agent Transparency on Multi-Robot Management Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ARL-TR-7466 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Effects of Agent Transparency on Multi- Robot Management Effectiveness by...SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Effects of Agent Transparency on Multi- Robot Management Effectiveness by Joseph E Mercado Oak...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) October 2013–September 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effects of Agent Transparency on Multi- Robot Management

  9. Cost-Effective Stress Management Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Gordon F.

    1980-01-01

    Stress management training can be a cost effective way to improve productivity and job performance. Among many relaxation techniques, the most effective in terms of teachability, participant motivation, and profitability are self-hypnosis, progressive relaxation, and transcendental meditation. (SK)

  10. Cost-Effective Stress Management Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Gordon F.

    1980-01-01

    Stress management training can be a cost effective way to improve productivity and job performance. Among many relaxation techniques, the most effective in terms of teachability, participant motivation, and profitability are self-hypnosis, progressive relaxation, and transcendental meditation. (SK)

  11. Toward the conceptual and quantitative understanding of biosolids conditioning: the gel approach.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Derya; Dentel, Steven K

    2009-01-01

    Proper chemical conditioning of wastewater solids is crucial for both operational and economic reasons, but the process has defied satisfactory description to date, in either conceptual or quantitative terms. In this research, a new conceptual model of biosolids structure--likening it to a colloidal gel--was assessed as a means of interpreting conditioning mechanisms. The basis of the gel approach lies in the colligative properties that are altered by lowering of the solvent chemical potential by introducing a solute. Results indicate that inorganic conditioners form precipitates and complexes thus collapsing the gel network and forming particulates, whereas organic polymers lead to heterogeneous collapse with limited diffusion inside the gel. A gel model, based on the osmotic pressure, was found reasonably successful in defining the conditioning efficacy of biosolids. Beyond the model's fundamental value, these results validate a new way of understanding how conditioning and dewatering operate, which should help to improve the selection and optimization of these processes.

  12. Dynamic Modeling of Hydrogen Sulfide within Enclosed Environments in Biosolids Recovery Facilities.

    PubMed

    Matos, Rita Ventura; Matias, Natércia; Ferreira, Filipa; Matos, José Saldanha

    2016-12-01

      Hydrogen sulfide emissions from wastewater affect human health and equipment durability, thus presenting a complex issue for utilities. Several VOC emission models have been used before to predict H2S in collection systems and water resources recovery operations, even if with restrictions. By contrast, fewer studies focus on biosolids emissions and modelling. This paper presents a dynamic modelling approach to predict H2S concentration in a tank headspace of a wastewater biosolids recovery facility. Data from one of the largest Portuguese water resources recovery facilities was collected under different facility operating modes. The developed model adequately predicted H2S concentration, with R2 values of 0.89 and 0.78, for different periods of the year, thus showing how modelling may reliably contribute to utility operation decisions.

  13. A quantitative risk assessment for metals in surface water following the application of biosolids to grassland.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Rachel; Peyton, Dara; Healy, Mark G; Fenton, Owen; Cummins, Enda

    2016-10-01

    During episodic rainfall events, land application of treated municipal sludge ('biosolids') may give rise to surface runoff of metals, which may be potentially harmful to human health if not fully treated in a water treatment plant (WTP). This study used surface runoff water quality data generated from a field-scale study in which three types of biosolids (anaerobically digested (AD), lime stabilised (LS), and thermally dried (TD)) were spread on micro-plots of land and subjected to three rainfall events at time intervals of 24, 48 and 360h following application. Making the assumption that this water directly entered abstraction waters for a WTP without any grassed buffer zone being present, accounting for stream dilution, and modelling various performance scenarios within the WTP, the aim of this research was to conduct a human health risk assessment of metals (Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Cd and Cr), which may still be present in drinking water after the WTP. Different dose-response relationships were characterised for the different metals with reference to the lifetime average daily dose (LADD) and the Hazard Quotient (HQ). The results for the LADD show that child exposure concentrations were highest for Cu when the measured surface runoff concentrations from the LS biosolids treatment were used as input into the model. The results for the HQ showed that of all the scenarios considered, Cu had the highest HQ for children. However, values were below the threshold value of risk (HQ<0.01 - no existing risk). Under the conditions monitored, metal concentrations in the biosolids applied to grassland were not considered to result in a risk to human health in surface water systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of coal combustion byproducts in biosolids stabilization: The N-Viro process

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, T.J.

    1999-07-01

    The patented N-Viro process for alkaline stabilization of municipal sewage sludge (biosolids) is a 10-year old technology that utilizes a variety of alkaline byproducts. These include cement kiln dust, lime kiln dust, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts, fluidized-bed coal combustion ashes, and Class C and F fly ashes. The alkaline byproducts are used in the N-Viro process to raise pH ({gt}12), produce heat (52--62 C) and increase solids content of the biosolids (50--65% solids). Typical operations use a blend of reactive (produces heat) and non-reactive byproducts in the process, with selection of materials being driven by local availability and cost. There are 38 N-Viro facilities in the US, Canada, Australia, the UK, and Belgium, with the majority in the eastern US. Of these, 15 use coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) on a regular basis. These facilities process more than 250,000 dry tons of biosolids a year, utilize about 125,000 tons of CCBs annually, and produce more than 1,000,000 tons of the resulting product, N-Viro Soil, per year. The use of CCBs is expected to increase dramatically in the next few years. N-Viro Soil, regulated by US EPA as an EQ biosolids, is marketed and distributed as agricultural lime, fertilizer, and as a soil substitute for reclamation and horticulture. This paper discusses the properties of alkaline materials that are required in the N-Viro process, compares those properties to that of various CCBs, and discusses the potential benefit to coal-burning power plants of recycling CCBs to beneficial uses rather than disposal.

  15. Dynamics of carbon, nitrogen and hydrocarbons in diesel-contaminated soil amended with biosolids and maize.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Espinoza, Y; Dendooven, L

    2004-01-01

    Contamination of soil with hydrocarbons occurs frequently when petroleum ducts are damaged. Restoration of those contaminated soils might be achieved by applying readily available organic material. An uncontaminated clayey soil sampled in the vicinity of a duct carrying diesel which ruptured recently, was contaminated in the laboratory and amended with or without maize or biosolids while production of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), dynamics of ammonia (NH(4)(+)), nitrates (NO(3)(-)), and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were monitored. The fastest mineralization of diesel, as witnessed by production of CO(2), was found when biosolids were added, but the amount mineralized after 100 days, approximately 88%, was similar in all treatments. Approximately 5 mg of the 48 mg TPH kg(-1) found in the sterilized soil at the beginning of the experiment could not be accounted for after 100 days. The concentration of TPH in the unsterilized soil decreased rapidly in all treatments, but the rate of decrease was different between the treatments. The fastest decrease was found in the soil amended with biosolids and approximately 30 mg TPH kg(-1) or 60% could not be accounted for within 7 days. The decrease in concentration of TPH at the onset of the incubation was similar in the other treatments. After 100 days, the concentration of TPH was similar in all soils and appear to stabilize at 19 mg TPH kg(-1) soil. It was concluded that biosolids accelerated the decomposition of diesel and TPH due to its large nutrient content, but after 100 days the amount of diesel mineralized and the residual concentration of TPH was not affected by the treatment applied.

  16. Increases in fecal coliform bacteria resulting from centrifugal dewatering of digested biosolids.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yinan; Dentel, Steven K; Herson, Diane S

    2007-02-01

    In many countries, the classification of biosolids for disposal purposes can be based, in part, on fecal coliform levels, with alternative criteria also available based on the stabilization process used, such as anaerobic digestion. The assumption that these alternative criteria provide equivalent protection may be flawed. This paper demonstrates that fecal coliform levels determined after digestion do not always indicate the bacterial levels after the same biosolids have been dewatered by centrifugation. In samples from mesophilic digestion, half had significant increases in coliform numbers (P<0.05) with up to one order of magnitude increase during centrifugation, suggesting coliform regrowth. Thermophilically digested samples had significant increases of several orders of magnitude during dewatering, more likely from reactivation of viable but non-culturable coliforms than from regrowth. In other cases, centrifugation induced coliform regrowth or reactivation upon incubation and storage of dewatered samples, but not digested samples. These 2-3 order of magnitude increases occurred with both 25 and 37 degrees C incubations. Coliform increases continued for up to 5 days, then gradually declined. However, by day 20 coliform numbers were still 2 orders of magnitude greater than when originally sampled. The magnitude of the increases could be due either to regrowth or reactivation, but the nature of the longer-term increases--also seen in biosolids/soil mixtures--suggests regrowth. Differences in numbers between digested and dewatered samples could not be duplicated with high shear processing in lab-scale devices, with nitrogen purging to remove volatile or gaseous constituents, or with redilution using centrate. They could not be attributed to enumeration methods, to interference of Bacillus spp. on apparent coliform counts, or to temperature changes. The increases have practical implications in the use of fecal coliform or alternative criteria to define pathogen

  17. Land application of manure and Class B biosolids: an occupational and public quantitative microbial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Brooks, John P; McLaughlin, Michael R; Gerba, Charles P; Pepper, Ian L

    2012-01-01

    Land application is a practical use of municipal Class B biosolids and manure that also promotes soil fertility and productivity. To date, no study exists comparing biosolids to manure microbial risks. This study used quantitative microbial risk assessment to estimate pathogen risks from occupational and public exposures during scenarios involving fomite, soil, crop, and aerosol exposures. Greatest one-time risks were from direct consumption of contaminated soil or exposure to fomites, with one-time risks greater than 10. Recent contamination and high exposures doses increased most risks. and enteric viruses provided the greatest single risks for most scenarios, particularly in the short term. All pathogen risks were decreased with time, 1 d to14 mo between land application and exposure; decreases in risk were typically over six orders of magnitude beyond 30 d. Nearly all risks were reduced to below 10 when using a 4-mo harvest delay for crop consumption. Occupational, more direct risks were greater than indirect public risks, which often occur after time and dilution have reduced pathogen loads to tolerable levels. Comparison of risks by pathogen group confirmed greater bacterial risks from manure, whereas viral risks were exclusive to biosolids. A direct comparison of the two residual types showed that biosolids use had greater risk because of the high infectivity of viruses, whereas the presence of environmentally recalcitrant pathogens such as and maintained manure risk. Direct comparisons of shared pathogens resulted in greater manure risks. Overall, it appears that in the short term, risks were high for both types of residuals, but given treatment, attenuation, and dilution, risks can be reduced to near-insignificant levels. That being said, limited data sets, dose exposures, site-specific inactivation rates, pathogen spikes, environmental change, regrowth, and wildlife will increase risk and uncertainty and remain areas poorly understood.

  18. Temporal trends of perfluoroalkyl substances in limed biosolids from a large municipal water resource recovery facility.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Dana L; Lozano, Nuria; Rice, Clifford P; Ramirez, Mark; Torrents, Alba

    2016-01-01

    While the recycling of wastewater biosolids via land-application is a sustainable practice for nutrient recovery and soil reclamation that has become increasingly common worldwide, concerns remain that this practice may become a source of toxic, persistent organic pollutants to the environment. This study concentrates on assessing the presence and the temporal trends of 12 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), pollutants of global consequence, in limed Class B biosolids from a municipal water resource recovery facility (WRRF), also know as a wastewater treatment plant. PFASs are of significant concern due to their extensive presence and persistence in environmental and biotic samples worldwide, most notably human blood samples. Class B biosolids were collected from the WRRF, prior to land-application, approximately every two to three months, from 2005 to 2013. Overall, this study found that concentrations of the 7 detectable PFAS compounds remained unchanged over the 8-year period, a result that is consistent with other temporal studies of these compounds in sewage sludges. From these analyzed compounds, the highest mean concentrations observed over the study period were 25.1 ng/g dw, 23.5 ng/g dw, and 22.5 ng/g dw for perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), respectively, and these compounds were detected at concentrations 2.5-5 times higher than the remaining, detectable PFASs. Furthermore, it was observed that PFOS, while demonstrating no overall change during the study, exhibited a visible spike in concentration from late 2006 to early 2007. This study indicates that concentrations of PFASs in WRRFs have been stagnant over time, despite regulation. This study also demonstrates that the use of glass jars with polytetrafluoroethylene-lined lids, a common storage method for environmental samples, will not influence PFOA and PFNA concentrations in archived biosolids samples.

  19. Stem revenue losses with effective CDM management.

    PubMed

    Alwell, Michael

    2003-09-01

    Effective CDM management not only minimizes revenue losses due to denied claims, but also helps eliminate administrative costs associated with correcting coding errors. Accountability for CDM management should be assigned to a single individual, who ideally reports to the CFO or high-level finance director. If your organization is prone to making billing errors due to CDM deficiencies, you should consider purchasing CDM software to help you manage your CDM.

  20. Selective quantification of viable Escherichia coli bacteria in biosolids by quantitative PCR with propidium monoazide modification.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Bilgin; Gozen, Ayse Gul; Duran, Metin

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative differentiation of live cells in biosolids samples, without the use of culturing-based approaches, is highly critical from a public health risk perspective, as recent studies have shown significant regrowth and reactivation of indicator organisms. Persistence of DNA in the environment after cell death in the range of days to weeks limits the application of DNA-based approaches as a measure of live cell density. Using selective nucleic acid intercalating dyes like ethidium monoazide (EMA) and propidium monoazide (PMA) is one of the alternative approaches to detecting and quantifying viable cells by quantitative PCR. These compounds have the ability to penetrate only into dead cells with compromised membrane integrity and intercalate with DNA via their photoinducible azide groups and in turn inhibit DNA amplification during PCRs. PMA has been successfully used in different studies and microorganisms, but it has not been evaluated sufficiently for complex environmental samples such as biosolids. In this study, experiments were performed with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 as the model organism and the uidA gene as the target sequence using real-time PCR via the absolute quantification method. Experiments with the known quantities of live and dead cell mixtures showed that PMA treatment inhibits PCR amplification from dead cells with over 99% efficiency. The results also indicated that PMA-modified quantitative PCR could be successfully applied to biosolids when the total suspended solids (TSS) concentration is at or below 2,000 mg·liter(-1).

  1. Evaluation of an electronic nose for odorant and process monitoring of alkaline-stabilized biosolids production.

    PubMed

    Romero-Flores, Adrian; McConnell, Laura L; Hapeman, Cathleen J; Ramirez, Mark; Torrents, Alba

    2017-11-01

    Electronic noses have been widely used in the food industry to monitor process performance and quality control, but use in wastewater and biosolids treatment has not been fully explored. Therefore, we examined the feasibility of an electronic nose to discriminate between treatment conditions of alkaline stabilized biosolids and compared its performance with quantitative analysis of key odorants. Seven lime treatments (0-30% w/w) were prepared and the resultant off-gas was monitored by GC-MS and by an electronic nose equipped with ten metal oxide sensors. A pattern recognition model was created using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and principal component analysis (PCA) of the electronic nose data. In general, LDA performed better than PCA. LDA showed clear discrimination when single tests were evaluated, but when the full data set was included, discrimination between treatments was reduced. Frequency of accurate recognition was tested by three algorithms with Euclidan and Mahalanobis performing at 81% accuracy and discriminant function analysis at 70%. Concentrations of target compounds by GC-MS were in agreement with those reported in literature and helped to elucidate the behavior of the pattern recognition via comparison of individual sensor responses to different biosolids treatment conditions. Results indicated that the electronic nose can discriminate between lime percentages, thus providing the opportunity to create classes of under-dosed and over-dosed relative to regulatory requirements. Full scale application will require careful evaluation to maintain accuracy under variable process and environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Heavy metal displacement in EDTA-assisted phytoremediation of biosolids soil.

    PubMed

    Liphadzi, S; Kirkham, M B

    2006-01-01

    Chelating agents are added to soil to solubilise the metals for enhanced phytoextraction. Yet no studies follow the displacement and leaching of heavy metals in soil with biosolids following solubilisation with chelates. The objective of this work was to determine the mobility of heavy metals in biosolids in a soil from a sludge farm that had received biosolids for 25 years. The soil was placed in columns in a greenhouse. Columns either had a plant (poplar) or no plant. After the poplar seedlings had grown for 144 d, the tetrasodium salt of the chelating agent EDTA was irrigated onto the surface of the soil at a rate of 1 g per kg of soil. Drainage water was analysed for three toxic heavy metals and four essential heavy metals. Without EDTA, concentrations of the seven heavy metals in the leachate from columns with or without plants were low or below detection limits. With or without plants, the EDTA mobilised all heavy metals and increased their concentration in drainage water. Without plants, the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, and Zn in the leachate from columns with EDTA were above drinking-water standards. The presence of poplar plants in the soil reduced the concentrations of Cu, Fe, and Zn in the leachate so it fell within drinking-water standards. Concentrations of Cd and Pb in the leachate remained above drinking-water standards with or without plants.

  3. Establishment and growth of experimental grass species mixtures on coal mine sites reclaimed with municipal biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    Halofsky, J.E.; McCormick, L.H.

    2005-05-01

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 requires that coal mine sites in the United States be reclaimed to establish vegetative cover that is diverse, native, and capable of plant succession. However, there is a question as to whether vegetation established on coal mine sites reclaimed with biosolids is diverse and capable of plant succession. The influx of nutrients with the addition of biosolids leads to long-term dominance by early-successional species, most notably grasses, and consequently, a low establishment of woody and volunteer species. Additionally, many grass species commonly planted in reclamation have aggressive growth habits that lead to their dominance in coal mine plant communities. The establishment and growth of selected grass mixes was evaluated to determine whether alternative grass mixes would be less competitive with woody and volunteer species as compared to commonly used grass mixes. Percent vegetative cover, species richness, and the survival of direct-seeded woody species were assessed for each treatment grass mixture. It was found that Poa compress and a mixture of P. compress, Panicum virgatum, and Trifolium repens provided adequate coverage while still allowing the highest species richness and survival of woody species. Use of these species mixtures in coal mine reclamation with biosolids in the eastern United States would likely lead to establishment of a more species-rich plant community with a greater woody species component while still providing erosion control and site protection.

  4. Crystallization of silver through reduction process using Elaeis guineensis biosolid extract.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Palanivel; Shim, Jaehong; Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Lee, Kui-Jae; Oh, Byung-Taek; Balachandar, Vellingiri; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a special, economically valuable, unprecedented eco-friendly green process for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The silver nanoparticles were obtained from a waste material with oil palm biosolid extract as the reducing agent. The use of the oil palm biosolid extract for the nanoparticle synthesis offers the benefit of amenability for large-scale production. An aqueous solution of silver (Ag(+) ) ions was treated with the oil palm biosolid extract for the formation of Ag nanoparticles. The nanometallic dispersion was characterized by surface plasmon absorbance measuring 428 nm. Transmission electron microscopy showed the formation of silver nanoparticles in the range of 5-50 nm. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis of the freeze-dried powder confirmed the formation of metallic silver nanoparticles. Moreover, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy provided evidence of phenolics or proteins as the biomolecules that were likely responsible for the reduction and capping agent, which helps to increase the stability of the synthesized silver nanoparticles. In addition, we have optimized the production with various parameters. Copyright © 2010 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  5. Pathogen risk assessment of land applied wastewater and biosolids: A fuzzy set approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dahab, M.F.; Fuerhacker, M.; Zibuschka, F.

    1998-07-01

    There are major concerns associated with land application of wastewater and biosolids including the potential risk to public health from water-borne pollutants that may enter the food chain and from pathogens that may be present in the wastewater. These risks are of particular concern when wastewater is applied to land where crops are grown as part of the human food chain or when direct human contact with the wastewater may occur. In many communities, toxic chemicals may not be present in the biosolids, or their concentrations may be reduced through source control measures. However, pathogens that enter wastewater from infected individuals cannot be controlled at the source and are often found in wastewater or biosolids applied to land. Public health officials have emphasized that microbial pathogens (or pathogen indicators) should not occur in areas where exposure to humans is likely. Under this criteria, the concept of risk assessment which requires the characterization of the occurrence of pathogens, almost seems to be contradictory to basic public health goals. As the understanding of pathogen and pathogen indicator occurrence becomes better refined, the arguments for finding practical application of risk assessment for pathogenic organisms become more compelling.

  6. Loss and in situ production of perfluoroalkyl chemicals in outdoor biosolids-soil mesocosms

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Arjun K.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2014-01-01

    An outdoor mesocosm study was conducted in Baltimore, Maryland, to explore the fate of thirteen perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) over the course of three years in biosolids/soil mixtures (1:2) exposed to ambient outdoor conditions. Analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry showed perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) to be the most abundant analyte found early in the soil weathering experiment at 24.1 ng/g dry weight (dw), followed by perfluoroundecanoate (PFUnDA) and perfluorodecanoate (PFDA) at 18.4 and 17.4 ng/g dw, respectively. Short-chain perfluorinated carboxylates (PFCAs; C4-C8) showed observable loss from biosolids/soil mixtures, with experimentally determined first-order half-lives in soil ranging from 385 to 866 days. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorononaoate (PFNA) and PFUnDA levels in biosolids/soil mixtures remained stable, while other long-chain PFCAs [PFDA, perfluorododecanoate (PFDoDA)] and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) levels increased over time, presumably due to the breakdown of unidentified precursors in a process analogous to that reported previously for wastewater treatment plants. This study informs risk assessment initiatives by furnishing data on the environmental persistence of PFASs while also constituting the first report on in situ production of long-chained PFASs in terrestrial environments. PMID:24834828

  7. Steroid hormones in biosolids and poultry litter: a comparison of potential environmental inputs.

    PubMed

    Bevacqua, Christine E; Rice, Clifford P; Torrents, Alba; Ramirez, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Steroid hormones can act as potent endocrine disruptors when released into the environment. The main sources of these chemicals are thought to be wastewater treatment plant discharges and waste from animal feeding operations. While these compounds have frequently been found in wastewater effluents, few studies have investigated biosolids or manure, which are routinely land applied, as potential sources. This study assessed the potential environmental contribution of steroid hormones from biosolids and chicken litter. Hormone concentrations in samples of limed biosolids collected at a waste treatment plant over a four year period ranged from <2.5 to 21.7ng/g dry weight for estrone (E1) and <2.5 to 470ng/g dry weight for progesterone. Chicken litter from 12 mid-Atlantic farms had averages of 41.4ng/g dry weight E1, 63.4ng/g dry weight progesterone, and 19.2ng/g dry weight E1-sulfate (E1-S). Other analytes studied were 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), testosterone, E2-3-sulfate (E2-3-S), and E2-17-sulfate (E2-17-3). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Barriers to effective symptom management in hospice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Daniel C; Kassner, Cordt T; Houser, Janet; Kutner, Jean S

    2005-01-01

    The barriers to effective symptom management in hospice are not well described. We surveyed nurses of hospices affiliated with the Population-based Palliative Care Research Network (PoPCRN) to identify barriers to the effective management of common symptoms in terminally ill patients. 867/1710 (51%) nurses from 67 hospices in 25 U.S. States returned surveys. Of 32 symptoms, nurses reported agitation (45%), pain (40%), and dyspnea (34%) as the 'most difficult to manage.' The most common perceived barriers to effective symptom management were inability of family care providers to implement or maintain recommended treatments (38%), patients or families not wanting recommended treatments (38%), and competing demands from other distressing symptoms (37%). Patterns of barriers varied by symptom. These nurses endorsed multiple barriers contributing to unrelieved symptom distress in patients receiving hospice care. Interventions to improve symptom management in hospice may need to account for these differing barrier patterns.

  9. Detection and occurrence of N-nitrosamines in archived biosolids from the targeted national sewage sludge survey of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arjun K; Pycke, Benny F G; Halden, Rolf U

    2014-05-06

    The occurrence of eight carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in biosolids from 74 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the contiguous United States was investigated. Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, seven nitrosamines [(N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomethylethylamine, N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (NDPA), N-nitrosodibutylamine, N-nitrosopyrrolidine, N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA)] were detected with varying detection frequency (DF) in 88% of the biosolids samples (n = 80), with five of the seven being reported here for the first time in biosolids. While rarely detected (DF 3%), NDMA was the most abundant compound at an average concentration of 504 ± 417 ng/g dry weight of biosolids. The most frequently detected nitrosamine was NDPhA (0.7-147 ng/g) with a DF of 79%, followed by NDPA (7-505 ng/g) and NPIP (51-1185 ng/g) at 21% and 11%, respectively. The DF of nitrosamines in biosolids was positively correlated with their respective n-octanol-water partition coefficients (R(2) = 0.65). The DF and sum of mean concentrations of nitrosamines in biosolids increased with the treatment capacity of WWTPs. Given their frequent occurrence in nationally representative samples and the amount of U.S. biosolids being applied on land as soil amendment, this study warrants more research into the occurrence and fate of nitrosamines in biosolids-amended soils in the context of crop and drinking water safety.

  10. Detection and Occurrence of N-Nitrosamines in Archived Biosolids from the Targeted National Sewage Sludge Survey of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of eight carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in biosolids from 74 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the contiguous United States was investigated. Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, seven nitrosamines [(N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomethylethylamine, N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (NDPA), N-nitrosodibutylamine, N-nitrosopyrrolidine, N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA)] were detected with varying detection frequency (DF) in 88% of the biosolids samples (n = 80), with five of the seven being reported here for the first time in biosolids. While rarely detected (DF 3%), NDMA was the most abundant compound at an average concentration of 504 ± 417 ng/g dry weight of biosolids. The most frequently detected nitrosamine was NDPhA (0.7—147 ng/g) with a DF of 79%, followed by NDPA (7–505 ng/g) and NPIP (51–1185 ng/g) at 21% and 11%, respectively. The DF of nitrosamines in biosolids was positively correlated with their respective n-octanol–water partition coefficients (R2 = 0.65). The DF and sum of mean concentrations of nitrosamines in biosolids increased with the treatment capacity of WWTPs. Given their frequent occurrence in nationally representative samples and the amount of U.S. biosolids being applied on land as soil amendment, this study warrants more research into the occurrence and fate of nitrosamines in biosolids-amended soils in the context of crop and drinking water safety. PMID:24697330

  11. Influence of thermal hydrolysis-anaerobic digestion treatment of wastewater solids on concentrations of Triclosan, Triclocarban, and their transformation products in biosolids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The growing concern worldwide regarding the presence of emerging contaminants in biosolids calls for a better understanding of how different treatment technologies at water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) can influence concentrations prior to biosolids land application. This study focuses on t...

  12. MICRO SCALE INVESTIGATIONS TO UNDERSTAND BINDING MECHANISMS OF METALS IN BIOSOLIDS USING SYNCHROTRON BASED X-RAY FLUORESCENCE AND X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental impact of metals in biosolids to plants, animals and the human food chain has been studied for decades. From the related literature, it can be concluded that, by addition of biosolids to soil, the overall chemical reactivity in the soil system is altered beyond ...

  13. Quantitative determination of antidepressants and their select degradates by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in biosolids destined for land application.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Lydia M; Stencel, Katherine A; Murphy, Madigan J; Schultz, Melissa M

    2013-08-06

    Antidepressants are one of the most widely dispensed classes of pharmaceuticals in the United States. As wastewater treatment plants are a primary source of pharmaceuticals in the environment, the use of biosolids as fertilizer is a potential route for antidepressants to enter the terrestrial environment. A microsolvent extraction method, utilizing green chemistry, was developed for extraction of the target antidepressants and degradation products from biosolids, or more specifically lagoon biosolids. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used for quantitative determination of antidepressants in the lagoon biosolid extracts. Recoveries from matrix spiking experiments for the individual antidepressants had an average of 96%. The limits of detection for antidepressant pharmaceuticals and degradates ranged from 0.36 to 8.0 ng/kg wet weight. The method was applied to biosolids destined for land application. A suite of antidepressants was consistently detected in the lagoon biosolid samples, and thus antidepressants are being introduced to terrestrial environments through the land application of these biosolids. Sertraline and norsertraline were the most abundant antidepressant and degradation product detected in the biosolid samples. Detected, individual antidepressant concentrations ranged from 8.5 ng/kg (norfluoxetine) to 420 ng/kg wet weight (norsertraline).

  14. MICRO SCALE INVESTIGATIONS TO UNDERSTAND BINDING MECHANISMS OF METALS IN BIOSOLIDS USING SYNCHROTRON BASED X-RAY FLUORESCENCE AND X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental impact of metals in biosolids to plants, animals and the human food chain has been studied for decades. From the related literature, it can be concluded that, by addition of biosolids to soil, the overall chemical reactivity in the soil system is altered beyond ...

  15. Understanding the Effectiveness of Performance Management Practices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    performance management practices are identified because OB literature, HR consultants, or research data highlights a favorable individual quality of...originating research, which links only the individual quality to a positive work-related outcome. The relationship between the performance...management practice, the individual quality or effect, and the job-related outcome was not established. This research focused on establishing that three

  16. Assessing Institutional Effectiveness: Issues, Methods, and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron, Ed.

    This collection of 12 papers was presented at a 1987 conference at which speakers presented personal perspectives on institutional effectiveness. Papers are organized under three major headings: "Managing Quality: Methods and Outcomes,""Institutional Response," and "Special Issues." Titles include: (1) "Managing the Meaning of Institutional…

  17. Improving the Effectiveness of Program Managers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-03

    Improving the Effectiveness of Program Managers Systems and Software Technology Conference Salt Lake City, Utah May 3, 2006 Presented by GAO’s...and total ownership costs Collection of metrics data to improve software reliability Technology readiness levels and design maturity Statistical...Companies’ best practices Motorola Caterpillar Toyota FedEx NCR Teradata Boeing Hughes Space and Communications Disciplined software and management

  18. Quantifying effectiveness in emergency management.

    PubMed

    Weaver, John Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study looked at the relationship between the Departments of Defense (DOD) and Homeland Security (DHS). Moreover, it reviewed the interface between their two subordinate organizations (Northern Command under DOD and the Federal Emergency Management Agency under DHS) with primacy over domestic disasters. Understanding the importance of intergovernmental relations (IGRs), the article dissected the interrelatedness of these organizations regarding hurricanes and the subsequent involvement of federal preparation and response efforts. The informal networked relationships were evaluated using regression analysis focusing on secondary sources of data and several variables. The vitality of collaborative networks is grounded in literature and has been espoused by Waugh and Streib in the world of emergency management; this study expanded on their premise.

  19. Bioavailability of polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants in biosolids and spiked sediment to the aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Ciparis, Serena; Ha