Science.gov

Sample records for effective charges application

  1. Moving Space Charge Field Effects in Photoconductive Semiconductors and Their Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen-Chia

    1995-01-01

    Internal electric space charge fields are formed inside photoconductive semiconductors when they are illuminated by an optical interference pattern. This Thesis focuses on the effects of such space charge fields formed inside semiconductor materials which contain both donors and deep level traps for photo-excited charge carriers. The photon energies are less than the band gap of the photoconductive semiconductor. The space charge field arises from the migration of photo-excited charges from the brighter to darker regions of the optical interference pattern where they become trapped. If the center frequencies of the two mutually coherent optical fields which form the interference pattern are unequal, the interference pattern and consequently the internal space charge field move with identical velocity. The moving space charge field results in a net photocurrent output from the material even when no external electric bias field is present. The short-circuit photocurrents contain a wealth of information about the material characteristics of the photoconductive semiconductor which, once known, can be used to deduce information about the optical frequency spectrum of the optical fields which form the interference pattern. An approximate but very accurate mathematical characterization of the short-circuit photocurrents and their properties are presented. These properties were verified by direct experimental measurements performed in the photoconductive semiconductors InP:Fe, GaAs, GaAs:Cr, CdTe:V, and CdTe:V:Mn. If the two interfering optical fields are plane waves with negligible linewidth, a DC short-circuit photocurrent results whose properties can be used to determine the sign of the pre-dominant species of photo-excited charge carriers, their mobility-lifetime products, and some information about donor and trap concentrations if the mobilities are known. All experiments were performed with laser diode pumped Nd:YAG unidirectional ring oscillator lasers whose optical

  2. The Effective Mass of a Charged Carrier in a Nonpolar Liquid:. Applications to Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, Andrei; Chikina, Ioulia; Shikin, Valeriy

    The problem of a correct definition of the charged carrier effective mass in superfluid helium is revised. It is shown that the effective mass of such a quasi-particle can be introduced without Atkins's idea about the solidification of liquid He4 in the close vicinity of an ion (the so-called “snowball” model). Moreover, in addition to generalization of the Atkins's model, the charged carrier effective mass formation is considered within the framework of the two-fluid scenario. The physical reasons of the normal fluid contribution divergency and the way of corresponding regularization procedure are discussed. Agreement between the theory and the available experimental data is found in a wide range of temperatures.

  3. The Effective Mass of a Charged Carrier in a Nonpolar Liquid:. Applications to Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, Andrei; Chikina, Ioulia; Shikin, Valeriy

    2009-12-01

    The problem of a correct definition of the charged carrier effective mass in superfluid helium is revised. It is shown that the effective mass of such a quasi-particle can be introduced without Atkins's idea about the solidification of liquid He4 in the close vicinity of an ion (the so-called "snowball" model). Moreover, in addition to generalization of the Atkins's model, the charged carrier effective mass formation is considered within the framework of the two-fluid scenario. The physical reasons of the normal fluid contribution divergency and the way of corresponding regularization procedure are discussed. Agreement between the theory and the available experimental data is found in a wide range of temperatures.

  4. Effective Topological Charge Cancelation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mesarec, Luka; Góźdź, Wojciech; Iglič, Aleš; Kralj, Samo

    2016-01-01

    Topological defects (TDs) appear almost unavoidably in continuous symmetry breaking phase transitions. The topological origin makes their key features independent of systems’ microscopic details; therefore TDs display many universalities. Because of their strong impact on numerous material properties and their significant role in several technological applications it is of strong interest to find simple and robust mechanisms controlling the positioning and local number of TDs. We present a numerical study of TDs within effectively two dimensional closed soft films exhibiting in-plane orientational ordering. Popular examples of such class of systems are liquid crystalline shells and various biological membranes. We introduce the Effective Topological Charge Cancellation mechanism controlling localised positional assembling tendency of TDs and the formation of pairs {defect, antidefect} on curved surfaces and/or presence of relevant “impurities” (e.g. nanoparticles). For this purpose, we define an effective topological charge Δmeff consisting of real, virtual and smeared curvature topological charges within a surface patch Δς identified by the typical spatially averaged local Gaussian curvature K. We demonstrate a strong tendency enforcing Δmeff → 0 on surfaces composed of Δς exhibiting significantly different values of spatially averaged K. For Δmeff ≠ 0 we estimate a critical depinning threshold to form pairs {defect, antidefect} using the electrostatic analogy. PMID:27250777

  5. Surface Charging Application Tests for Geosynchronous Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilmer, R. V.; Cooke, D. L.; Roth, C. J.; Davis, V. A.; Mandell, M. J.; Kuharski, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    The testing of a geosynchronous spacecraft surface charging application that combines the charged particle environment (~ 1 eV to 200 keV electron and proton fluxes) of the Magnetospheric Specification Model (MSM) with algorithms from the NASCAP-2K surface charging program is described. Spacecraft frame charging (chassis potential) is determined from low energy ion data collected by the Charge Control System (CCS) on a DSCS III B- 7 spacecraft at 307° E. Longitude. Several simple descriptions of satellite geometry and materials are employed, including one which approximates features of the DSCS satellite [i.e., Mandell and Cooke, AIAA-2004-986, 42nd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, Nevada, Jan. 5-8, 2004]. Preliminary tests compared modeled and observed chassis potentials for three days when observed peak charging levels ranged from -200 to -600 volts [Hilmer et al. (2005), EOS Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract SM41A-1169]. While the electron and proton spectra generated by the MSM proved to be suitable for the charging calculation, the MSM does not produce all of the low energy electrons (< 20 eV) usually present in geosynchronous orbit to keep spacecraft from charging positive so only negative charging is assumed. Frame charging details vary greatly with MSM input parameter selection. The charging application works best with MSM spectra generated using the input parameter set that statistically produces the best electron fluxes in the midnight-dawn local time sector where surface charging is most often observed. Comparisons in the present study will concentrate on utilizing MSM particle fluxes generated using this "best set" of the input parameters. These tests will help us refine the MSM and NASCAP-2K algorithm configurations needed to best address spacecraft surface charging.

  6. Surface Charging Application Tests for Geosynchronous Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilmer, R. V.; Cooke, D. L.; Tautz, M.; Davis, V. A.; Mandell, M. J.; Kuharski, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    The testing of a geosynchronous spacecraft surface charging application that combines the charged particle environment (~ 1 eV to 200 keV electron and proton fluxes) of the Magnetospheric Specification Model (MSM) with algorithms from the NASCAP-2K surface charging program is described. Spacecraft frame charging (chassis potential) is determined from low energy ion data collected by the Charge Control System (CCS) on a DSCS III B-7 spacecraft at 307° E. Longitude. Several simple descriptions of satellite geometry and materials are employed, including one which approximates features of the DSCS satellite [i.e., Mandell and Cooke, AIAA-2004-986, 42nd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, Nevada, Jan. 5-8, 2004]. Preliminary tests compared modeled and observed chassis potentials for three days when observed peak charging levels ranged from -200 to -600 volts [Hilmer et al. (2005), EOS Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract SM41A-1169]. While the electron and proton spectra generated by the MSM proved to be suitable for the charging calculation, the MSM does not produce all of the low energy electrons (< 20 eV) usually present in geosynchronous orbit to keep spacecraft from charging positive so only negative charging is assumed. Frame charging details vary greatly with MSM input parameter selection. The charging application works best with MSM spectra generated using the input parameter set that statistically produces the best electron fluxes in the midnight-dawn local time sector where surface charging is most often observed. Comparisons in the present study will concentrate on utilizing MSM particle fluxes generated using this "best set" of the input parameters and testing will cover an extended period of up to several months. These tests will help us refine the MSM and NASCAP-2K algorithm configurations needed to best address spacecraft surface charging.

  7. A multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model for charge transport: Application to organic field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Thilo; Jäger, Christof M.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.; Clark, Timothy

    2015-07-28

    We have developed a multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model to describe the spatial dynamics of multiple majority charge carriers during conduction of electric current in the channel of organic field-effect transistors. The charge carriers are treated by a neglect of diatomic differential overlap Hamiltonian using a lattice of hydrogen-like basis functions. The local ionization energy and local electron affinity defined previously map the bulk structure of the transistor channel to external potentials for the simulations of electron- and hole-conduction, respectively. The model is designed without a specific charge-transport mechanism like hopping- or band-transport in mind and does not arbitrarily localize charge. An electrode model allows dynamic injection and depletion of charge carriers according to source-drain voltage. The field-effect is modeled by using the source-gate voltage in a Metropolis-like acceptance criterion. Although the current cannot be calculated because the simulations have no time axis, using the number of Monte Carlo moves as pseudo-time gives results that resemble experimental I/V curves.

  8. Modeling charge transport in C{sub 60}-based self-assembled monolayers for applications in field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Leitherer, S. E-mail: Michael.Thoss@physik.uni-erlangen.de; Thoss, M. E-mail: Michael.Thoss@physik.uni-erlangen.de; Halik, M.

    2014-05-28

    We have investigated the conductance properties of C{sub 60}-containing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), which are used in organic field-effect transistors, employing a combination of molecular-dynamics simulations, semiempirical electronic structure calculations, and Landauer transport theory. The results reveal the close relation between the transport characteristics and the structural and electronic properties of the SAM. Furthermore, both local pathways of charge transport in the SAMs and the influence of structural fluctuations are analyzed.

  9. Improving Charging-Breeding Simulations with Space-Charge Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Ryan; Kwiatkowski, Ania; Steinbrügge, René

    2016-09-01

    Rare-isotope-beam facilities use Highly Charged Ions (HCI) for accelerators accelerating heavy ions and to improve measurement precision and resolving power of certain experiments. An Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is able to create HCI through successive electron impact, charge breeding trapped ions into higher charge states. CBSIM was created to calculate successive charge breeding with an EBIT. It was augmented by transferring it into an object-oriented programming language, including additional elements, improving ion-ion collision factors, and exploring the overlap of the electron beam with the ions. The calculation is enhanced with the effects of residual background gas by computing the space charge due to charge breeding. The program assimilates background species, ionizes and charge breeds them alongside the element being studied, and allows them to interact with the desired species through charge exchange, giving fairer overview of realistic charge breeding. Calculations of charge breeding will be shown for realistic experimental conditions. We reexamined the implementation of ionization energies, cross sections, and ion-ion interactions when charge breeding.

  10. Sound propagation in narrow tubes including effects of viscothermal and turbulent damping with application to charge air coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutsson, Magnus; Åbom, Mats

    2009-02-01

    Charge air coolers (CACs) are used on turbocharged internal combustion engines to enhance the overall gas-exchange performance. The cooling of the charged air results in higher density and thus volumetric efficiency. It is also important for petrol engines that the knock margin increases with reduced charge air temperature. A property that is still not very well investigated is the sound transmission through a CAC. The losses, due to viscous and thermal boundary layers as well as turbulence, in the narrow cooling tubes result in frequency dependent attenuation of the transmitted sound that is significant and dependent on the flow conditions. Normally, the cross-sections of the cooling tubes are neither circular nor rectangular, which is why no analytical solution accounting for a superimposed mean flow exists. The cross-dimensions of the connecting tanks, located on each side of the cooling tubes, are large compared to the diameters of the inlet and outlet ducts. Three-dimensional effects will therefore be important at frequencies significantly lower than the cut-on frequencies of the inlet/outlet ducts. In this study the two-dimensional finite element solution scheme for sound propagation in narrow tubes, including the effect of viscous and thermal boundary layers, originally derived by Astley and Cummings [Wave propagation in catalytic converters: Formulation of the problem and finite element scheme, Journal of Sound and Vibration 188 (5) (1995) 635-657] is used to extract two-ports to represent the cooling tubes. The approximate solutions for sound propagation, accounting for viscothermal and turbulent boundary layers derived by Dokumaci [Sound transmission in narrow pipes with superimposed uniform mean flow and acoustic modelling of automobile catalytic converters, Journal of Sound and Vibration 182 (5) (1995) 799-808] and Howe [The damping of sound by wall turbulent shear layers, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 98 (3) (1995) 1723-1730], are

  11. Charged drop levitators and their applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Chung, S. K.; Hyson, M. T.; Elleman, D. D.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the charged drop levitation characteristics of two different devices: (1) a feedback-controlled electrostatic levitator able to lift a several mm-diameter drop in 1g conditions, which is applicable to drop dynamics, crystal growth, and supercooling/solidification experiments; and (2) a linear quadrupole levitator, whose advantages are demonstrated in light of the results obtained for the charged drop instability experiment. The cause of the premature drop burstings observed is suggested to be an electron avalanche in the surrounding gaseous medium rather than the Rayleigh limit.

  12. Configuration effects on satellite charging response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.

    1980-01-01

    The response of various spacecraft configurations to a charging environment in sunlight was studied using the NASA Charging Analyzer Program code. The configuration features geometry, type of stabilization, and overall size. Results indicate that sunlight charging response is dominated by differential charging effects. Shaded insulation charges negatively result in the formation of potential barriers which suppress photoelectron emission from sunlit surfaces. Sunlight charging occurs relatively slowly: with 30 minutes of charging simulations, in none of the configurations modeled did the most negative surface cell reach half its equilibrium potential in eclipse.

  13. Effects of granular charge on flow and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, T.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2008-12-01

    Sandstorms in the desert have long been reported to produce sparks and other electrical disturbances - indeed as long ago as 1850, Faraday commented on the peculiarities of granular charging during desert sandstorms. Similarly, lightning strikes within volcanic dust plumes have been repeatedly reported for over half a century, but remain unexplained. The problem of granular charging has applied, as well as natural, implications, for charged particle clouds frequently generate spectacularly devastating dust explosions in granular processing plants, and sand becomes strongly electrified by helicopters traveling in desert environments. The issue even has implications for missions to the Moon and to Mars, where charged dust degrades solar cells viability and clings to spacesuits, limiting the lifetime of their joints. Despite the wide-ranging importance of granular charging, even the simplest aspects of its causes remain elusive. To take one example, sand grains in the desert manage to charge one another despite having only similar materials to rub against over expanses of many miles - thus existing theories of charging due to material differences fail entirely to account for the observed charging of desert sands. In this talk, we describe recent progress made in identifying underlying causes of granular charging, both in desert-like environments and in industrial applications, and we examine effects of granular charging on flow, mixing and separation of common granular materials. We find that charging of identical grains can occur under simple laboratory conditions, and we make new predictions for the effects of this charging on granular behaviours.

  14. Effect of charging methods on battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBreen, J.

    The effect of modified charging methods on the structure and behavior of several battery electrodes are reviewed. These include the alkaline cadmium, zinc, silver oxide and nickel oxide electrodes. Also included are recent results obtained for pasted zinc electrodes and in acidic zinc chloride electrolytes. Modified charging methods can greatly affect electrodes particularly when the charging reaction involving the nucleation, and growth of a new phase. Many of the observed morphological effects are described with regard to nucleation and orientation effects.

  15. Effects of disorder on the vortex charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lages, J.; Sacramento, P. D.

    2006-04-01

    We study the influence of disorder on the vortex charge, both due to random pinning of the vortices and due to scattering off nonmagnetic impurities. In the case when there are no impurities present, but the vortices are randomly distributed, the effect is very small, except when two or more vortices are close by. When impurities are present, they have a noticeable effect on the vortex charge. This, together with the effect of temperature, changes appreciably the vortex charge. In the case of an attractive impurity potential the sign of the charge naturally changes.

  16. Effect of Charge Patterning on the Phase Behavior of Polymer Coacervates for Charge Driven Self Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Sing, Charles E.

    Oppositely charged polymers can undergo associative liquid-liquid phase separation when mixed under suitable conditions of ionic strength, temperature and pH to form what are known as `polymeric complex coacervates'. Polymer coacervates find use in diverse array of applications like microencapsulation, drug delivery, membrane filtration and underwater adhesives. The similarity between complex coacervate environments and those in biological systems has also found relevance in areas of bio-mimicry. Our previous works have demonstrated how local charge correlations and molecular connectivity can drastically affect the phase behavior of coacervates. The precise location of charges along the chain therefore dramatically influences the local charge correlations, which consequently influences the phase behavior of coacervates. We investigate the effect of charge patterning along the polymer chain on the phase behavior of coacervates in the framework of the Restricted Primitive Model using Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show that charge patterning dramatically changes the phase behavior of polymer coacervates, which contrasts with the predictions of the classical Voorn-Overbeek theory. This provides the basis for designing new materials through charge driven self assembly by controlling the positioning of the charged monomers along the chain.

  17. Effective charge of photons and plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Serbeto, A.; Ali, S.

    2010-08-01

    We review the concept of photon effective charge in a plasma, and extend it to the case of longitudinal photons or plasmons. A simple electrostatic fluid model is considered in a non-magnetized and non-relativistic plasma. The contribution of the ions to the plasmon charge is also considered.

  18. Droplet Charging Effects in the Space Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Thomas B.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.

    2011-05-20

    Several applications exist for transiting liquid droplets through the near-Earth space environment. Numerical results are presented for the charging of liquid droplets of trimethyl pentaphenyl siloxane (DC705) in three different plasma environments: ionosphere, auroral, and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Nominal and high geomagnetic activity cases are investigated. In general, high levels of droplet charging (>100 V) exist only in GEO during periods of high geomagnetic or solar activity. An experiment was conducted to assess the charging of silicon-oil droplets due to photoemission. The photoemission yield in the 120-200 nm wavelength range was found to be approximately 0.06.

  19. LONGITUDINAL SPACE CHARGE EFFECT FOR SNS

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.Y.; WENG,W.T.

    1998-06-22

    One of performance requirements of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is to keep the uncontrolled beam loss in the storage ring to less than 2 x 10{sup {minus}4} per pulse. For 2 MW SNS, the maximum beam intensity is N = 2 x 10{sup 14} protons per ring. Since the bunch lengthening has impact on both the extraction beam loss and the lowering of e-p instability threshold, the longitudinal space charge effect requires attentions. Such a space charge effect has been studied both analytically and using computer simulations. The longitudinal space charge effect, which is a defocusing force below transition, is a plausible source of the bunch leakage. In this article, the total RF potential, which takes into account the space charge effect together with the RF power, is used to provide analytical predictions for the bunch lengthening. The prediction is confirmed by the computer simulation. It is found that for 2 MW SNS storage ring, the longitudinal space charge induced bunch leakage into the interbunch gap is not significant. Therefore, corrections to the longitudinal space charge impedance, such as the proposed ferrite insertion in the PSR ring, are probably not necessary. Applying an RF voltage ramping from 20 KV to 40 KV during the multiturn injection can further cut the bunch leakage to a negligible degree. The same approach applied to the PSR shows that the longitudinal space charge effect does cause sizable bunch leakage at the intensity limit encountered there.

  20. Space charge effect in isochronous rings

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Marti, F.; York, R.

    2008-08-25

    Cyclotrons, rings for precise nuclear mass spectrometry, and some light sources with extremely short bunches are operated or planned to be operated in the isochronous or almost isochronous regime. Also, many hadron synchrotrons run in the isochronous regime for a short period of time during transition crossing. The longitudinal motion is frozen in the isochronous regime that leads to accumulation of the integral of the longitudinal space charge force. In low-gamma hadron machines, this can cause a fast growth of the beam energy spread even at modest beam intensities. Additionally, the transverse component of the space charge effectively modifies the dispersion function and the slip factor shifting the isochronous (transition) point. In this paper, we discuss space charge effects in the isochronous regime and present experimental results obtained in the Small Isochronous Ring, developed at Michigan State University specifically for studies of space charge in the isochronous regime.

  1. High temperature charge amplifier for geothermal applications

    DOEpatents

    Lindblom, Scott C.; Maldonado, Frank J.; Henfling, Joseph A.

    2015-12-08

    An amplifier circuit in a multi-chip module includes a charge to voltage converter circuit, a voltage amplifier a low pass filter and a voltage to current converter. The charge to voltage converter receives a signal representing an electrical charge and generates a voltage signal proportional to the input signal. The voltage amplifier receives the voltage signal from the charge to voltage converter, then amplifies the voltage signal by the gain factor to output an amplified voltage signal. The lowpass filter passes low frequency components of the amplified voltage signal and attenuates frequency components greater than a cutoff frequency. The voltage to current converter receives the output signal of the lowpass filter and converts the output signal to a current output signal; wherein an amplifier circuit output is selectable between the output signal of the lowpass filter and the current output signal.

  2. Optical effects of charges in colloidal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Railing; Chung, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chih-Wei; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Leung, P. T.

    2017-04-01

    The optical response of charged polymeric and metallic colloids is investigated using effective medium theories for composite systems of nanoparticles. Based on the Bohren-Hunt theory for generalized Mie scattering from charged particles, an effective quasi-static dielectric function previously obtained is applied to the present study to characterize the response from the various colloidal particles. It is found that such effects are more prominent for polymeric and nonmetallic colloidal solutions in general. In addition, the effects of clustering among the colloidal particles are also studied via a fractal model available from the literature. Detailed numerical studies of the dependence of these effects on the amount of extraneous charge, as well as on the geometry and volume fraction of the colloidal particles are presented.

  3. Nonperturbative comparison of QCD effective charges

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A. C.; Binosi, D.; Papavassiliou, J.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2009-10-15

    We study the nonperturbative behavior of two versions of the QCD effective charge, one obtained from the pinch technique gluon self-energy, and one from the ghost-gluon vertex. Despite their distinct theoretical origin, due to a fundamental identity relating various ingredients appearing in their respective definitions, the two effective charges are almost identical in the entire range of physical momenta, and coincide exactly in the deep infrared, where they freeze at a common finite value. Specifically, the dressing function of the ghost propagator is related to the two form factors in the Lorentz decomposition of a certain Green's function, appearing in a variety of field-theoretic contexts. The central identity, which is valid only in the Landau gauge, is derived from the Schwinger-Dyson equations governing the dynamics of the aforementioned quantities. The renormalization procedure that preserves the validity of the identity is carried out, and various relevant kinematic limits and physically motivated approximations are studied in detail. A crucial ingredient in this analysis is the infrared finiteness of the gluon propagator, which is inextricably connected with the aforementioned freezing of the effective charges. Some important issues related to the consistent definition of the effective charge in the presence of such a gluon propagator are resolved. We finally present a detailed numerical study of a special set of Schwinger-Dyson equations, whose solutions determine the nonperturbative dynamics of the quantities composing the two effective charges.

  4. Cathode Sheath Charge Transfer Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    Hess, G. G. .nd F. W. Lampe: lenic Reactions in Gaseous Monosilane . Journal of Chemical Physics, 4.4, p. 2257, 1968. 9. Garscadden, A.: Effects Due...Lampe: An Elec.tron Impact Study of Ionization and Dissociation of Monosilane and Disilane. Journal of Physical Chemistry, 73, p. 3912, 1969. 89...Walsh: Kinetics of the Gas-Phase Reaction Between Iodine and Monosilane and the Bond Dissociation Energy D(H 3Si-H). International Journal of

  5. Effective Charge Carrier Utilization in Photocatalytic Conversions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Tuo; Chang, Xiaoxia; Gong, Jinlong

    2016-05-17

    Continuous efforts have been devoted to searching for sustainable energy resources to alleviate the upcoming energy crises. Among various types of new energy resources, solar energy has been considered as one of the most promising choices, since it is clean, sustainable, and safe. Moreover, solar energy is the most abundant renewable energy, with a total power of 173 000 terawatts striking Earth continuously. Conversion of solar energy into chemical energy, which could potentially provide continuous and flexible energy supplies, has been investigated extensively. However, the conversion efficiency is still relatively low since complicated physical, electrical, and chemical processes are involved. Therefore, carefully designed photocatalysts with a wide absorption range of solar illumination, a high conductivity for charge carriers, a small number of recombination centers, and fast surface reaction kinetics are required to achieve a high activity. This Account describes our recent efforts to enhance the utilization of charge carriers for semiconductor photocatalysts toward efficient solar-to-chemical energy conversion. During photocatalytic reactions, photogenerated electrons and holes are involved in complex processes to convert solar energy into chemical energy. The initial step is the generation of charge carriers in semiconductor photocatalysts, which could be enhanced by extending the light absorption range. Integration of plasmonic materials and introduction of self-dopants have been proved to be effective methods to improve the light absorption ability of photocatalysts to produce larger amounts of photogenerated charge carriers. Subsequently, the photogenerated electrons and holes migrate to the surface. Therefore, acceleration of the transport process can result in enhanced solar energy conversion efficiency. Different strategies such as morphology control and conductivity improvement have been demonstrated to achieve this goal. Fine-tuning of the

  6. Effective dynamics of a classical point charge

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, Janos

    2014-03-15

    The effective Lagrangian of a point charge is derived by eliminating the electromagnetic field within the framework of the classical closed time path formalism. The short distance singularity of the electromagnetic field is regulated by an UV cutoff. The Abraham–Lorentz force is recovered and its similarity to quantum anomalies is underlined. The full cutoff-dependent linearized equation of motion is obtained, no runaway trajectories are found but the effective dynamics shows acausality if the cutoff is beyond the classical charge radius. The strength of the radiation reaction force displays a pole in its cutoff-dependence in a manner reminiscent of the Landau-pole of perturbative QED. Similarity between the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance and dynamical symmetry breaking is pointed out. -- Highlights: •Extension of the classical action principle for dissipative systems. •New derivation of the Abraham–Lorentz force for a point charge. •Absence of a runaway solution of the Abraham–Lorentz force. •Acausality in classical electrodynamics. •Renormalization of classical electrodynamics of point charges.

  7. Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes: Effect of charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingtian; Zhou, Jihan; Su, Cuicui; Niu, Lin; Liang, Dehai; Li, Baohui

    2015-05-01

    Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in a solution is investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experiments, focusing on the influence of polyelectrolyte charge distributions along the chains on the structure of the polyelectrolyte complexes. The simulations are performed using Monte Carlo with the replica-exchange algorithm for three model systems where each system is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged model polyelectrolyte chains (EGEG)5/(KGKG)5, (EEGG)5/(KKGG)5, and (EEGG)5/(KGKG)5, in a solution including explicit solvent molecules. Among the three model systems, only the charge distributions along the chains are not identical. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated as a function of temperature (or ionic strength), and the microscopic structures of complexes are examined. It is found that the three systems have different transition temperatures, and form complexes with different sizes, structures, and densities at a given temperature. Complex microscopic structures with an alternating arrangement of one monolayer of E/K monomers and one monolayer of G monomers, with one bilayer of E and K monomers and one bilayer of G monomers, and with a mixture of monolayer and bilayer of E/K monomers in a box shape and a trilayer of G monomers inside the box are obtained for the three mixture systems, respectively. The experiments are carried out for three systems where each is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged peptide chains. Each peptide chain is composed of Lysine (K) and glycine (G) or glutamate (E) and G, in solution, and the chain length and amino acid sequences, and hence the charge distribution, are precisely controlled, and all of them are identical with those for the corresponding model chain. The complexation behavior and complex structures are characterized through laser light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. The order of the apparent weight-averaged molar

  8. Stability of charge inversion, Thomson problem, and application to electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Michael; Patriarca, Marco; Karttunen, Mikko

    2003-03-01

    We analyze charge inversion in colloidal systems at zero temperature using stability concepts, and connect this to the classical Thomson problem of arranging electrons on sphere. We show that for a finite microion charge, the globally stable, lowest-energy state of the complex formed by the colloid and the oppositely charged microions is always overcharged. This effect disappears in the continuous limit. Additionally, a layer of at least twice as many microions as required for charge neutrality is always locally stable. In an applied external electric field the stability of the microion cloud is reduced. Finally, this approach is applied to a system of two colloids at low but finite temperature.

  9. Conference on Charge-Coupled Device Technology and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Papers were presented from the conference on charge coupled device technology and applications. The following topics were investigated: data processing; infrared; devices and testing; electron-in, x-ray, radiation; and applications. The emphasis was on the advances of mutual relevance and potential significance both to industry and NASA's current and future requirements in all fields of imaging, signal processing and memory.

  10. Shaped Charge Liner Materials: Resources, Processes, Properties, Costs, and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Shaped Charge Liner Materials: Resources, Processes, Properties, Costs, and Applications 2 6. AUTHOC Steven M. Buc 7...summaries of the mineral availability, Cq prmarymetal refinement processeb, material costs in raw form and as finished shaped charge liners , relevant... liner materials. 94-11479 gI 14, SUBJECT TERMS iSt NUMBER OF PAGIS 13chrg wrhad :xplosively formed penetrators material R. PRCE COEV" processing

  11. Studies of the pulse charge of lead-acid batteries for PV applications. Part III. Electrolyte concentration effects on the electrochemical performance of the positive plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Delaille, A.; Karoui, F.; Perrin, M.; Lemaire, E.; Mattera, F.

    2008-05-01

    In the third part of this work the effects of the sulphuric acid concentration on the positive plate discharge capacity, impedance and oxygen overvoltage are discussed. It has been found that the full discharge capacity of the positive plate is available down to electrolyte concentrations of 3 mol l-1 (s.g. 1.18 g ml-1). At further acid dilution, capacity of the positive plate declines, keeping the utilization of the sulphuric acid about 50%. Decreasing the acid concentration, the oxygen overvoltage decreases with a factor of 12-18 mV M-1, excluding the effect of the equilibrium potential of the oxygen electrode as a function of pH. The capacitance of the electrical double layer decrease linearly with the dilution of the sulphuric acid suggesting strong adsorption effects. This suggestion has been confirmed from the measurements of potential of the zero charge of the positive plate, which increases from 1.11 to 1.34 V vs. Ag/Ag2SO4 in the region 1.11-4.60 M H2SO4. From the measurement of the time constant of the electronic transfer through the gel part of the lead dioxide (Tgel) as a function of the acid concentration and the applied potential, a change in the mechanism of the lead dioxide hydration has been estimated-below 1 M H2SO4Tgel increases sharply, showing sharp increases of the extent of the hydration. The dilution of the electrolyte increases substantially the value of average double layer current in the beginning of the charge. During the pulse overcharge at the employed frequency of 1 Hz, the average double layer current is equal to the pulse amplitude, suggesting that the maximal efficiency of the pulse charge is reached.

  12. Image Charge Effects on the Formation of Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Singh, Virendra; Behrens, Sven Holger

    2012-10-18

    Vigorous mixing of an aqueous particle dispersion with oil usually produces a particle-stabilized emulsion (a "Pickering emulsion"), the longevity of which depends on the particles' wetting properties. A known exception occurs when particles fail to adsorb to the oil-water interface created during mixing because of a strong repulsion between charges on the particle surface and similar charges on the oil-water interface; in this case, no Pickering emulsion is formed. Here, we present experimental evidence that the rarely considered electrostatic image force can cause a much bigger hindrance to particle adsorption and prevent the formation of Pickering emulsions even when the particle interaction with the interface charge is attractive. A simple theoretical estimate confirms the observed magnitude of this effect and points at an important limitation of Pickering emulsification, a technology with widespread industrial applications and increasing popularity in materials research and development.

  13. Improvement of charge-pumping electrically detected magnetic resonance and its application to silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Toshiaki; Ono, Yukinori

    2017-01-01

    Charge-pumping electrically detected magnetic resonance (CP EDMR), or EDMR in the CP mode, is improved and applied to a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Real-time monitoring of the CP process reveals that high-frequency transient currents are an obstacle to signal amplification for EDMR. Therefore, we introduce cutoff circuitry, leading to a detection limit for the number of spins as low as 103 for Si MOS interface defects. With this improved method, we demonstrate that CP EDMR inherits one of the most important features of the CP method: the gate control of the energy window of the detectable interface defects for spectroscopy.

  14. The role of effective charges in the electrophoresis of highly charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Apratim; Horbach, Jürgen

    2010-12-15

    We study the variation of electrophoretic mobility μ of highly charged spherical colloidal macroions for varying surface charge density σ on the colloid using computer simulations of the primitive model for charged colloids. Hydrodynamic interactions between ions are incorporated by coupling the primitive model of charged colloids to the lattice Boltzmann model (LB) of the fluid. In the highly charged regime, the mobility μ of the colloid is known to decrease with the increase of bare charge Q of the colloid; the aim of this paper is to investigate the cause of this. We have identified that the two main factors contributing to the decrease of μ are counterion charge condensation on the highly charged colloid and an increase in effective friction of the macroion-counterion complex due to the condensed counterions. Thus the established O'Brien and White theory, which identified the dipolar force originating from distortion of the electric double layer as the cause of decreasing μ, seems to break down for the case of highly charged colloids with σ in the range of 30-400 µC cm (- 2). To arrive at our conclusions, we counted the number of counterions q0 moving along with the spherical macroion. We observe in our simulations that q0 increases with the increase of bare charge Q, such that the effective charge Qeff = Q - q0 remains approximately constant. Interestingly for our nanometer-sized charged colloid, we observe that, if surface charge density σ of the colloid is increased by decreasing the radius RM of the colloid but fixed bare charge Q, the effective charge Q - q0 decreases with the increase of σ. This behavior is qualitatively different when σ is increased by increasing Q keeping RM fixed. Our observations address a controversy about the effective charge of a strongly charged macroion: some studies claim that effective charge is independent of the bare charge (Alexander et al 1984 J. Chem. Phys. 80 5776; Trizac et al 2003 Langmuir 19 4027) whereas

  15. Interaction of linear polyamines with negatively charged phospholipids: the effect of polyamine charge distance.

    PubMed

    Finger, Sebastian; Schwieger, Christian; Arouri, Ahmad; Kerth, Andreas; Blume, Alfred

    2014-07-01

    The binding of cationic polyamines to negatively charged lipid membranes is driven by electrostatic interactions and additional hydrophobic contributions. We investigated the effect of polyamines with different number of charges and charge separation on the phase transition behavior of vesicles of phosphatidylglycerols (dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) to differentiate between effects caused by the number of charges, the charge distance, and the hydrophobicity of the methylene spacer. Using differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy complemented with monolayer experiments, we found that the binding constant of polyamines to negatively charged lipid vesicles depends as expected on the number of charges. However, for diamines, the effect of binding on the main phase transition of phosphatidylglycerols (PGs) is also strongly influenced by the charge distance between the ammonium groups in the backbone. Oligoamines with charges separated by two or three methylene groups bind more strongly and have larger stabilizing effects on the lipid gel phase of PGs. With multivalent polyamines, the appearance of several transition peaks points to effects of molecular crowding on the surface, i.e., binding of only two or three charges to the surface in the case of spermine, and possible concomitant domain formation.

  16. Effect of charge memory in organic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogorokhov, I. A.; Kotova, M. S.; Donskov, A. A.; Dronov, M. A.; Belogorokhova, L. I.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of charge memory in composites based on polymer molecules has been investigated. Resistive switchings in sandwich samples prepared by lamination from commercially available polymers (polystyrene and poly(2,3-dihydrothieno-1,4-dioxine)-poly(styrene sulphonate) are analyzed. It is shown that the characteristic switching times in the composite samples reach several nanoseconds and the number of switchings exceeds 106. Switchings are observed in electric fields much below the breakdown threshold, which indicates the absence of destructive processes in the polymer.

  17. Effect of the surface charge distribution on the fluid phase behavior of charged colloids and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Marco A.; Shen, Vincent K.

    2016-10-01

    A generic but simple model is presented to evaluate the effect of the heterogeneous surface charge distribution of proteins and zwitterionic nanoparticles on their thermodynamic phase behavior. By considering surface charges as continuous "patches," the rich set of surface patterns that is embedded in proteins and charged patchy particles can readily be described. This model is used to study the fluid phase separation of charged particles where the screening length is of the same order of magnitude as the particle size. In particular, two types of charged particles are studied: dipolar fluids and protein-like fluids. The former represents the simplest case of zwitterionic particles, whose charge distribution can be described by their dipole moment. The latter system corresponds to molecules/particles with complex surface charge arrangements such as those found in biomolecules. The results for both systems suggest a relation between the critical region, the strength of the interparticle interactions, and the arrangement of charged patches, where the critical temperature is strongly correlated to the magnitude of the dipole moment. Additionally, competition between attractive and repulsive charge-charge interactions seems to be related to the formation of fluctuating clusters in the dilute phase of dipolar fluids, as well as to the broadening of the binodal curve in protein-like fluids. Finally, a variety of self-assembled architectures are detected for dipolar fluids upon small changes to the charge distribution, providing the groundwork for studying the self-assembly of charged patchy particles.

  18. Photoinduced ultrafast charge-order melting: Charge-order inversion and nonthermal effects

    DOE PAGES

    van Veenendaal, Michel

    2016-09-01

    The effect of photoexcitation is studied for a system with checkerboard charge order induced by displacements of ligands around a metal site. The motion of the ligands is treated classically and the electronic charges are simplified to two-level molecular bond charges. The calculations are done for a checkerboard charge-ordered system with about 100 000 ligand oscillators coupled to a fixed-temperature bath. The initial photoexcitation is followed by a rapid decrease in the charge-order parameter within 50–100 femtoseconds while leaving the correlation length almost unchanged. Depending on the fluence, a complete melting of the charge order occurs in less than amore » picosecond. While for low fluences, the system returns to its original state, for full melting, it recovers to its broken-symmetry state leading to an inversion of the charge order. Finally, for small long-range interactions, recovery can be slow due to domain formation.« less

  19. Photoinduced ultrafast charge-order melting: Charge-order inversion and nonthermal effects

    SciTech Connect

    van Veenendaal, Michel

    2016-09-01

    The effect of photoexcitation is studied for a system with checkerboard charge order induced by displacements of ligands around a metal site. The motion of the ligands is treated classically and the electronic charges are simplified to two-level molecular bond charges. The calculations are done for a checkerboard charge-ordered system with about 100 000 ligand oscillators coupled to a fixed-temperature bath. The initial photoexcitation is followed by a rapid decrease in the charge-order parameter within 50–100 femtoseconds while leaving the correlation length almost unchanged. Depending on the fluence, a complete melting of the charge order occurs in less than a picosecond. While for low fluences, the system returns to its original state, for full melting, it recovers to its broken-symmetry state leading to an inversion of the charge order. For small long-range interactions, recovery can be slow due to domain formation.

  20. Photoinduced ultrafast charge-order melting: Charge-order inversion and nonthermal effects

    SciTech Connect

    van Veenendaal, Michel

    2016-09-01

    The effect of photoexcitation is studied for a system with checkerboard charge order induced by displacements of ligands around a metal site. The motion of the ligands is treated classically and the electronic charges are simplified to two-level molecular bond charges. The calculations are done for a checkerboard charge-ordered system with about 100 000 ligand oscillators coupled to a fixed-temperature bath. The initial photoexcitation is followed by a rapid decrease in the charge-order parameter within 50–100 femtoseconds while leaving the correlation length almost unchanged. Depending on the fluence, a complete melting of the charge order occurs in less than a picosecond. While for low fluences, the system returns to its original state, for full melting, it recovers to its broken-symmetry state leading to an inversion of the charge order. Finally, for small long-range interactions, recovery can be slow due to domain formation.

  1. The effect of space charges on conduction current in polymer by modified PEA method

    SciTech Connect

    Hwangbo, S.; Yun, D.H.; Yi, D.Y.; Han, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Direct measurement of space charge and conduction current was carried out on low-density polyethylene degraded by ultra-violet using a pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method. Dominant hetero-charges were formed near both electrodes by high voltage application and was found to be deeply trapped. In this paper, the effect of temperature and electric field reversal on the detrapping and trapping of space charges was investigated and the role of space charge in electrical conduction was discussed quantitatively. The main mechanism for detrapping and trapping of space charges was Poole-Frenkel model.

  2. Charge detection mass spectrometry: Instrumentation & applications to viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierson, Elizabeth E.

    For over three decades, electrospray ionization (ESI) has been used to ionize non-covalent complexes and subsequently transfer the intact ion into the gas phase for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. ESI generates a distribution of multiple charged ions, resulting in an m/z spectrum comprised of a series of peaks, known as a charge state envelope. To obtain mass information, the number of charges for each peak must be deduced. For smaller biological analytes like peptides, the charge states are sufficiently resolved and this process is straightforward. For macromolecular complexes exceeding ~100 kDa, this process is complicated by the broadening and shifting of charge states due to incomplete desolvation, salt adduction, and inherent mass heterogeneity. As the analyte mass approaches the MDa regime, the m/z spectrum is often comprised of a broad distribution of unresolved charge states. In such cases, mass determination is precluded. Charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) is an emerging MS technique for determining the masses of heterogeneous, macromolecular complexes. In CDMS, the m/z and z of single ions are measured concurrently so that mass is easily calculated. With this approach, deconvolution of an m/z spectrum is unnecessary. This measurement is carried out by passing macroions through a conductive cylinder. The induced image charge on the cylindrical detector provides information about m/z and z: the m/z is related to its time-of-flight through the detector, and the z is related to the intensity of the image charge. We have applied CDMS to study the self-assembly of virus capsids. Late-stage intermediates in the assembly of hepatitis B virus, a devastating human pathogen, have been identified. This is the first time that such intermediates have been detected and represent a significant advancement towards understanding virus capsid assembly. CDMS has also been used to identify oversized, non-icosahedral polymorphs in the assembly of woodchuck hepatitis

  3. Design guidelines for assessing and controlling spacecraft charging effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.; Garrett, H. B.; Whittlesey, A. C.; Stevens, N. J.

    1984-01-01

    The need for uniform criteria, or guidelines, to be used in all phases of spacecraft design is discussed. Guidelines were developed for the control of absolute and differential charging of spacecraft surfaces by the lower energy space charged particle environment. Interior charging due to higher energy particles is not considered. A guide to good design practices for assessing and controlling charging effects is presented. Uniform design practices for all space vehicles are outlined.

  4. Charge Transport in Hybrid Halide Perovskite Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurchescu, Oana

    Hybrid organic-inorganic trihalide perovskite (HTP) materials exhibit a strong optical absorption, tunable band gap, long carrier lifetimes and fast charge carrier transport. These remarkable properties, coupled with their reduced complexity processing, make the HTPs promising contenders for large scale, low-cost thin film optoelectronic applications. But in spite of the remarkable demonstrations of high performance solar cells, light-emitting diodes and field-effect transistor devices, all of which took place in a very short time period, numerous questions related to the nature and dynamics of the charge carriers and their relation to device performance, stability and reliability still remain. This presentation describes the electrical properties of HTPs evaluated from field-effect transistor measurements. The electrostatic gating of provides an unique platform for the study of intrinsic charge transport in these materials, and, at the same time, expand the use of HTPs towards switching electronic devices, which have not been explored previously. We fabricated FETs on SiO2 and polymer dielectrics from spin coating, thermal evaporation and spray deposition and compare their properties. CH3NH3PbI3-xClx can reach balanced electron and hole mobilities of 10 cm2/Vs upon tuning the thin-film microstructure, injection and the defect density at the semiconductor/dielectric interface. The work was performed in collaboration with Yaochuan Mei (Wake Forest University), Chuang Zhang, and Z. Valy Vardeny (University of Utah). The work is supported by ONR Grant N00014-15-1-2943.

  5. Boundary effects of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations on charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiang, J.-T.; Wu, T.-H.; Leet, D.-S.

    2008-10-10

    The nature of electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations in the presence of the boundary is investigated from their effects on the dynamics of charged particles. These effects may be observable via the velocity fluctuations of the charge particles near the conducting plate, where the effects of vacuum fluctuations are found to be anisotrpoic. The corresponding stochastic equation of motion for the charged particle is also derived under the semiclassical approximation.

  6. Morphology Effects on Space Charge Characteristics of Low Density Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou; Yuanxiang; Wang; Yunshan; Zahn, Markus; Wang; Ninghua; Sun; Qinghua; Liang; Xidong; Guan; Zhichen

    2011-01-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) film samples with different morphology were prepared by three kinds of annealing methods which were different in cooling rates in this study. A pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) space charge measurement system was improved to solve the surface discharge problems for small samples applied with a high voltage. Negative direct current (DC) fields from 50 to above 220 kV/mm were applied to the samples. The influences of morphologies on space charge and space charge packet characteristics were measured by the improved high voltage withstand (HVW) PEA system. Mobility and trap depth of released charges were calculated by space charge decay. It was found that there is a different probability of space charge packet initiation under applied field from -60 to -100 kV/mm. Average velocity and mobility of the space charge packets were calculated by space charge packet dynamics. It was found that the lower cooling rate samples have higher crystallinity, more homo-charge accumulation, lower mobility and deeper trap depth. The mechanism of morphological effects on space charge phenomena have been presumed to give a plausible explanation for their inherent relationships. The morphology in the metal-dielectric interface and in the bulk is convincingly suggested to be responsible for the injection and propagation processes of space charge. A model of positive space charge initiation in LDPE samples was also suggested and analyzed. The mechanism of morphological effects and the charge injection model are well fit with the injection and propagation processes of space charge. The different effects of morphology in the metal-dielectric interface and in the bulk of polymers are stressed.

  7. Optimizing small wind turbine performance in battery charging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Drouilhet, S; Muljadi, E; Holz, R; Gevorgian, V

    1995-05-01

    Many small wind turbine generators (10 kW or less) consist of a variable speed rotor driving a permanent magnet synchronous generator (alternator). One application of such wind turbines is battery charging, in which the generator is connected through a rectifier to a battery bank. The wind turbine electrical interface is essentially the same whether the turbine is part of a remote power supply for telecommunications, a standalone residential power system, or a hybrid village power system, in short, any system in which the wind generator output is rectified and fed into a DC bus. Field experience with such applications has shown that both the peak power output and the total energy capture of the wind turbine often fall short of expectations based on rotor size and generator rating. In this paper, the authors present a simple analytical model of the typical wind generator battery charging system that allows one to calculate actual power curves if the generator and rotor properties are known. The model clearly illustrates how the load characteristics affect the generator output. In the second part of this paper, the authors present four approaches to maximizing energy capture from wind turbines in battery charging applications. The first of these is to determine the optimal battery bank voltage for a given WTG. The second consists of adding capacitors in series with the generator. The third approach is to place an optimizing DC/DC voltage converter between the rectifier and the battery bank. The fourth is a combination of the series capacitors and the optimizing voltage controller. They also discuss both the limitations and the potential performance gain associated with each of the four configurations.

  8. Effective interaction in asymmetric charged binary mixtures: the non-monotonic behaviour with the colloidal charge.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Fernández, M; Callejas-Fernández, J; Moncho-Jordá, A

    2012-11-01

    In this work we study the effective force between charged spherical colloids induced by the presence of smaller charged spheres using Monte Carlo simulations. The analysis is performed for two size ratios, q = R(s)/R(b), two screened direct repulsions, κ, and two small particle packing fractions, Ø(s). We specially focus on the effect of the charge of the big colloids (Z(b)), and observe that the repulsion between big particles shows a non-monotonic behaviour: for sufficiently small charge, we find an anomalous regime where the total repulsion weakens by increasing the big colloid charge. For larger charges, the system recovers the usual behaviour and the big-big interaction becomes more repulsive increasing Z(b). This effect is linked to the existence of strong attractive depletion interactions caused by the small-big electrostatic repulsion. We have also calculated the effective force using the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the HNC closure. In general, this theory agrees with the simulation results, and is able to capture this non-monotonic behaviour.

  9. Understanding the effect of space charge on instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Chao, A.; Chin, Y. H.

    2015-05-03

    The combined effect of space charge and wall impedance on transverse instabilities is an important consideration in the design and operation of high intensity hadron machines as well as an intrinsic academic interest. This study explores the combined effects of space charge and wall impedance using various simplified models in an attempt to produce a better understanding of their interplay.

  10. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Aramesh, M; Shimoni, O; Ostrikov, K; Prawer, S; Cervenka, J

    2015-03-19

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.

  11. Effects of Charged Particles on Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathryn D.; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Kaminuma, Takuya; Paz, Athena Evalour S.; Yoshida, Yukari; Liu, Qi; Willers, Henning; Takahashi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects, including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors, and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors, such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions, and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles. PMID:26904502

  12. Review on charge transfer and chemical activity of TiO2: Mechanism and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yongqing; Feng, Yuan Ping

    2016-12-01

    Charge separation and transfer at the interface between two materials play a significant role in various atomic-scale processes and energy conversion systems. In this review, we present the mechanism and outcome of charge transfer in TiO2, which is extensively explored for photocatalytic applications in the field of environmental science. We list several experimental and computational methods to estimate the amount of charge transfer. The effects of the work function, defects and doping, and employment of external electric field on modulating the charge transfer are presented. The interplay between the band bending and carrier transport across the surface and interface consisting of TiO2 is discussed. We show that the charge transfer can also strongly affect the behavior of deposited nanoparticles on TiO2 through built-in electric field that it creates. This review encompasses several advances of composite materials where TiO2 is combined with two-dimensional materials like graphene, MoS2, phosphorene, etc. The charge transport in the TiO2-organohalide perovskite with respect to the electron-hole separation at the interface is also discussed.

  13. Effect of positively and negatively charged liposomes on skin permeation of drugs.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, T; Yamaguchi, T; Iwaki, M; Tanino, T; Miyake, Y

    2001-01-01

    To clarify the effect of the surface charge of liposomes on percutaneous absorption, the permeation of liposomal drugs through rat skin was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Liposomes were prepared using egg yolk lecithin (EPC, phase transition temperature, -15 to -17 degrees C), cholesterol and dicetylphosphate (DP) or stearylamine (SA) (10:1:1, mol/mol). Also examined was the penetration behavior of positively and negatively charged liposomes, using a fluorescent probe (Nile Red). The in vitro penetration rate of melatonin (MT) entrapped in negatively charged liposomes was higher than that of positively charged ones (p<0.05). When the percutaneous absorption of ethosuximide (ES) encapsulated was estimated in vivo, the absorption of ES from negatively charged liposomes was slightly higher than that from positively charged liposomes. Additionally, the absorption of ES from both types of liposomes was superior to that from the lipid mixtures consisting of the same composition as the vesicles. The percutaneous absorption of betahistine (BH) from a gel formulation containing negatively charged liposomes of BH was much more than that from the formulation with positively charged ones, with 2-fold higher AUC (p<0.05). Histological studies revealed that the negatively charged liposomes diffused to the dermis and the lower portion of hair follicles through the stratum corneum and the follicles much faster than the positive vesicles at the initial time stage after application. Thus, the rapid penetration of negatively charged liposomes would contribute to the increased permeation of drugs through the skin.

  14. Effects of polarization-charge shielding in microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M. S.; Lin, S. M.; Chiang, W. Y.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.

    2015-08-15

    Heating of dielectric objects by radio frequency (RF) and microwaves has long been a method widely employed in scientific research and industrial applications. However, RF and microwave heating are often susceptible to an excessive temperature spread due to uneven energy deposition. The current study elucidates an important physical reason for this difficulty and proposes an effective remedy. Non-spherical samples are placed in an anechoic chamber, where it is irradiated by a traveling microwave wave with 99% intensity uniformity. Polarization charges induced on the samples tend to partially cancel the incident electric field and hence reduce the heating rate. The polarization-charge shielded heating rate is shown to be highly dependent on the sample's shape and its orientation relative to the wave electric field. For samples with a relatively high permittivity, the resultant uneven heating can become a major cause for the excessive temperature spread. It is also demonstrated that a circularly polarized wave, with its rapidly rotating electric field, can effectively even out the heating rate and hence the temperature spread.

  15. Longitudinal space charge effects near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Marti, F.; York, R.C.

    2009-05-04

    Experimental and numerical studies of the longitudinal beam dynamics in the Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) at Michigan State University revealed a fast, space-charge driven instability that did not fit the model of the negative mass instability. This paper proposes a simple analytical model explaining these results. Also, the paper compares the model to result s of experimental and numerical studies of the longitudinal beam dynamics in SIR.

  16. Multilayers of oppositely charged SiO2 nanoparticles: effect of surface charge on multilayer assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daeyeon; Gemici, Zekeriyya; Rubner, Michael F; Cohen, Robert E

    2007-08-14

    The growth behavior of all-silica nanoparticle multilayer thin films assembled via layer-by-layer deposition of oppositely charged SiO2 nanoparticles was studied as a function of assembly conditions. Amine-functionalized SiO2 nanoparticles were assembled into multilayers through the use of three different sizes of negatively charged SiO2 nanoparticles. The assembly pH of the nanoparticle suspensions needed to achieve maximum growth for each system was found to be different. However, the surface charge /z/ of the negatively charged silica nanoparticles at the optimal assembly pH was approximately the same, indicating the importance of this parameter in determining the growth behavior of all-nanoparticle multilayers. When /z/ of the negatively charged nanoparticles lies between 0.6z(0) and 1.2z(0) (where z(0) is the pH-independent value of the zeta-potential of the positively charged nanoparticles used in this study), the multilayers show maximum growth for each system. The effect of particle size on the film structure was also investigated. Although nanoparticle size significantly influenced the average bilayer thickness of the multilayers, the porosity and refractive index of multilayers made from nanoparticles of different sizes varied by a small amount. For example, the porosity of the different multilayer systems ranged from 42 to 49%. This study further demonstrates that one-component all-nanoparticle multilayers can be assembled successfully by depositing nanoparticles of the same material but with opposite surface charge.

  17. High resolution field effect sensing of ferroelectric charges.

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, H.; Ryu, K.; Park, H.; Park, C.; Jeon, D.; Kim, Y. K.; Jung, J.; Min, D.-K.; Kim, Y.; Lee, H. N.; Park, Y.; Shin, H.; Hong, S.

    2011-03-04

    Nanoscale manipulation of surface charges and their imaging are essential for understanding local electronic behaviors of polar materials and advanced electronic devices. Electrostatic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy have been extensively used to probe and image local surface charges responsible for electrodynamics and transport phenomena. However, they rely on the weak electric force modulation of cantilever that limits both spatial and temporal resolutions. Here we present a field effect transistor embedded probe that can directly image surface charges on a length scale of 25 nm and a time scale of less than 125 {micro}s. On the basis of the calculation of net surface charges in a 25 nm diameter ferroelectric domain, we could estimate the charge density resolution to be as low as 0.08 {micro}C/cm{sup 2}, which is equivalent to 1/20 electron per nanometer square at room temperature.

  18. High-Resolution Field Effect Sensing of Ferroelectric Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Hyoungsoo; Ryu, Kyunghee; Park, Hongsik; Park, Chulmin; Jeon, Daeyoung; Kim, Yong Kwan; Jung, Juhwan; Min, Dong-Ki; Kim, Yunseok; Lee, Ho Nyung; Park, Yoondong; Shin, Hyunjung; Hong, Seungbum

    2011-01-01

    Nanoscale manipulation of surface charges and their imaging are essential for understanding local electronic behaviors of polar materials and advanced electronic devices. Electrostatic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy have been extensively used to probe and image local surface charges responsible for electrodynamics and transport phenomena. However, they rely on the weak electric force modulation of cantilever that limits both spatial and temporal resolutions. Here we present a field effect transistor embedded probe that can directly image surface charges on a length scale of 25 nm and a time scale of less than 125 {micro}s. On the basis of the calculation of net surface charges in a 25 nm diameter ferroelectric domain, we could estimate the charge density resolution to be as low as 0.08 {micro}C/cm{sup 2}, which is equivalent to 1/20 electron per nanometer square at room temperature.

  19. From electrode charges on dielectric elastomers to trapped charges and electric dipoles in electrets and ferroelectrets: fundamental and applications-relevant aspects of diversity in electroactive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Reimund

    2016-04-01

    Some recent developments in the areas of soft and basically incompressible electro-electrets (dielectric elastomers) with large strains, of anisotropic polymer ferro- or piezo-electrets with quasi-ferroelectric behavior, of moleculardipole electrets with significant ferro-, pyro- and piezo-electricity, and of space-charge polymer electrets with locally stabilised charges are described. Such materials may be applied, e.g., in soft actuators, energy harvesters and flexible and stretchable sensors for devices such as artificial muscles, electrically controllable refractive and diffractive optics, flexible pyroelectric detectors, motion and displacement sensors, earphones and microphones, ultrasonic transducers, air filters, radiation dosimeters, etc. The performance of dielectric elastomers for actuator, energy-harvester and sensor applications relies on a high relative permittivity and a low elastic modulus. High densities of electric charges in the electrodes are required in order to provide large Maxwell stresses or high energy densities. Significant amounts of localised or trapped charges, as well as electric dipoles from pairs of charges, lead to useful electro-mechanical and mechano-electrical effects (or inverse and direct piezoelectricity, respectively) if they are properly arranged in dielectric materials with extremely low conductivities. Space-charge electret films and ferroelectret systems should exhibit thermal and long-term stability of the trapped charges within the respective materials. Ferroelectric polymers and other polar polymers show useful piezo- and pyroelectric properties if their polymer-chain conformations allow for parallel packing of the molecular dipoles. Space-charge and molecular-dipole electrets are widely applied, e.g. in microphones, air filters, radiation dosimeters, ultrasonic transducers, etc. Basically, the performance of all electro-active polymers relies on the attraction (and repulsion) of electric charges and thus directly on

  20. The effects of fixed electrical charge on chondrocyte behavior.

    PubMed

    Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Pumberger, Matthias; Casper, Michelle E; Shogren, Kristin; Giuliani, Melissa; Ruesink, Terry; Hefferan, Theresa E; Currier, Bradford L; Yaszemski, Michael J

    2011-05-01

    In this study we have compared the effects of negative and positive fixed charges on chondrocyte behavior in vitro. Electrical charges have been incorporated into oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF) using small charged monomers such as sodium methacrylate (SMA) and (2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl)-trimethyl ammonium chloride (MAETAC) to produce negatively and positively charged hydrogels, respectively. The physical and electrical properties of the hydrogels were characterized by measuring and calculating the swelling ratio and zeta potential, respectively. Our results revealed that the properties of these OPF modified hydrogels varied according to the concentration of charged monomers. Zeta potential measurements demonstrated that the electrical properties of the OPF hydrogel surfaces changed on incorporation of SMA and MAETAC and that these changes in electrical properties were dose-dependent. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the hydrogel surface composition. To assess the effects of surface properties on chondrocyte behavior primary chondrocytes isolated from rabbit ears were seeded as a monolayer on top of the hydrogels. We demonstrated that the cells remained viable over 7 days and began to proliferate while seeded on top of the hydrogels. Collagen type II staining was positive in all samples, however, the staining intensity was higher on negatively charged hydrogels. Similarly, glycosaminoglycan production was significantly higher on negatively charged hydrogels compared with a neutral hydrogel. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed up-regulation of collagen type II and down-regulation of collagen type I on the negatively charged hydrogels. These findings indicate that charge plays an important role in establishing an appropriate environment for chondrocytes and, hence, in the engineering of cartilage. Thus, further investigations into charged hydrogels for cartilage tissue

  1. Charge trapping properties of the HfO2 layer with various thicknesses for charge trap flash memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Hee-Wook; Cho, Won-Ju

    2010-03-01

    MHOS (metal-HfO2-SiO2-Si) structure capacitors were fabricated to investigate the charge trapping properties of HfO2 layer with various thicknesses for the applications of charge trap flash (CTF) memory devices. Also, the centroid of charge trap in HfO2 layer was extracted by constant current stress method and compared with that of conventional Si3N4 layer. The gate leakage current of MHOS capacitor due to tunneling was significantly reduced by stacking the HfO2 trap layer on thin SiO2 tunnel layer. The MHOS capacitors showed a larger memory window than the MNOS (metal-Si3N4-SiO2-Si) capacitors at the same trap layer thickness, because the HfO2 layer has better charge trapping efficiency than the Si3N4 layer. It is found that ultrathin HfO2 trap layer with a thickness of 2 nm stored almost the same charges with Si3N4 layer with a thickness of 7 nm. Consequently, the application of ultrathin HfO2 to charge storage layer can considerably improve the performance and enhance the high density of CTF memory.

  2. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins

  3. Quantum gravity effects on charged microblack holes thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasvandi, Niloofar; Soleimani, M. J.; Radiman, Shahidan; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-08-01

    The charged black hole thermodynamics is corrected in terms of the quantum gravity effects. Most of the quantum gravity theories support the idea that near the Planck scale, the standard Heisenberg uncertainty principle should be reformulated by the so-called Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) which provides a perturbation framework to perform required modifications of the black hole quantities. In this paper, we consider the effects of the minimal length and maximal momentum as GUP type I and the minimal length, minimal momentum and maximal momentum as GUP type II on thermo dynamics of the charged TeV-scale black holes. We also generalized our study to the universe with the extra dimensions based on the ADD model. In this framework, the effect of the electrical charge on thermodynamics of the black hole and existence of the charged black hole remnants as a potential candidate for the dark matter particles are discussed.

  4. Anomalously large Born effective charges in cubic WO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detraux, F.; Ghosez, Ph.; Gonze, X.

    1997-07-01

    Within density-functional theory, we compute the Born effective charges of tungsten trioxyde in its reference cubic phase (defect-perovskite structure). For the tungsten atom, the effective charge tensor is isotropic, with Z*W=+12.51. For the oxygen atoms, the two independent components of the tensor, corresponding, respectively, to a displacement of the atom parallel or perpendicular to the W-O bond, have the values Z*O||=-9.13 and Z*O⊥=-1.68. Z*W and Z*O|| are anomalously large with respect to the nominal ionic charges (+6 on W and -2 on O), but compatible with the Born effective charges found in related ABO3-perovskite compounds.

  5. Microfluidic applications of induced-charge electro-osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitan, Jeremy; Bazant, Martin; Devanesathipathy, Shankar; Sun, Hongwei; Thorsen, Todd

    2004-11-01

    Motivated by recent work on AC electro-osmosis, a general theory of ``induced-charge electro-osmosis'' (ICEO) has been developed, and a variety of ICEO-based pumping and mixing strategies for micro-fluidics have been proposed, using both DC and AC applied voltages [1,2]. As in the electrophoresis of metal colloids (e.g. studied by Murtsovkin, Dukhin), ICEO slip of a liquid electrolyte occurs at polarizable (metal or dielectric) surfaces in response to applied electric fields. Due to the nonlinear coupling of the applied field and its nonuniform and time-dependent induced surface charge, the ICEO slip velocity depends on the field amplitude squared, and thus it provides electrohydrodynamic rectification of AC forcing, especially in asymmetric geometries. Although many theoretical predictions have been made, however, experimental evidence of ICEO in microfluidic devices has only recently been clearly demonstrated. Here, we describe on-going experiments on ICEO pumping around metallic posts and patterned surfaces in polymer microchannels to study the effect of AC frequency, field strength, and geometry. We will also consider the applicabilty of ICEO as a ``fast'' mixer in specific microfluidic geometries. 1. M. Z. Bazant and T. M. Squires, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 066101 (2004). 2. T. M. Squires and M. Z. Bazant, J. Fluid. Mech. 509, 217 (2004).

  6. Impact of charging efficiency variations on the effectiveness of variable-rate-based charging strategies for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Francesco A.; Cappuccino, Gregorio

    The huge energy demand coming from the increasing diffusion of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) poses a significant challenge to electricity utilities and vehicle manufacturers in developing smart charging systems interacting in real time with distribution grids. These systems will have to implement smart charging strategies for PEV batteries on the basis of negotiation phases between the user and the electric utility regarding information about battery chemistries, tariffs, required energy and time available for completing the charging. Strategies which adapt the charging current to grid load conditions are very attractive. Indeed, they allow full exploitation of the grid capacity, with a consequent greater final state of charge and higher utility financial profits with respect to approaches based on a fixed charging rate. The paper demonstrates that the charging current should be chosen also taking into account the effect that different charging rates may have on the charging efficiency. To this aim, the performances of two smart variable-rate-based charging strategies, taken as examples, are compared by considering possible realistic relationships between the charging efficiency and the charging rate. The analysis gives useful guidelines for the development of smart charging strategies for PEVs as well as for next-generation battery charging and smart grid management systems.

  7. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 micrometer2 and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(-3) micrometer2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(-5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  8. Charged-particle mutagenesis 2. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/micrometer to 975 KeV/micrometer with particle energy (on the cells) between 94-603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/micrometer. The inactivation cross-section (alpha i) and the action cross-section for mutant induction (alpha m) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 sq micrometer and 0.09 to 5.56 x 10(exp -3) sq micrometer respectively. The maximum values were obtained by Fe-56 with an LET of 200 keV/micrometer. The mutagenicity (alpha m/alpha i) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 x 10(exp -5) with the maximum value at 150 keV/micrometer. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  9. Charged-particle mutagenesis II. Mutagenic effects of high energy charged particles in normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. J.; Tsuboi, K.; Nguyen, T.; Yang, T. C.

    1994-10-01

    The biological effects of high LET charged particles are a subject of great concern with regard to the prediction of radiation risk in space. In this report, mutagenic effects of high LET charged particles are quantitatively measured using primary cultures of human skin fibroblasts, and the spectrum of induced mutations are analyzed. The LET of the charged particles ranged from 25 KeV/μm to 975 KeV/gmm with particle energy (on the cells) between 94 - 603 MeV/u. The X-chromosome linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus was used as the target gene. Exposure to these high LET charged particles resulted in exponential survival curves; whereas, mutation induction was fitted by a linear model. The Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for cell-killing ranged from 3.73 to 1.25, while that for mutant induction ranged from 5.74 to 0.48. Maximum RBE values were obtained at the LET of 150 keV/μm. The inactivation cross-section (αi) and the action-section for mutant induction (αm) ranged from 2.2 to 92.0 μm2 and 0.09 to 5.56 × 10-3 μm2, respectively. The maximum values were obtained by 56Fe with an LET of 200 keV/μm. The mutagenicity (αm/αi) ranged from 2.05 to 7.99 × 10-5 with the maximum value at 150 keV/μm. Furthermore, molecular analysis of mutants induced by charged particles indicates that higher LET beams are more likely to cause larger deletions in the hprt locus.

  10. Effect of Charge Density on the Taylor Cone in Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanger, Jonathan; Tucker, Nick; Kirwan, Kerry; Staiger, Mark P.

    A detailed understanding of charge density and its origins during the electrospinning process is desirable for developing new electrospinnable polymer-solvent systems and ensuring mathematical models of the process are accurate. In this work, two different approaches were taken to alter the charge density in order to measure its effect on the Taylor cone, mass deposition rate and initial jet diameter. It was found that an increase in charge density results in a decrease in the mass deposition rate and initial jet diameter. A theory is proposed for this behaviour in that an increase in charge density leads to the tip of the Taylor cone forming a smaller radius of curvature resulting in the concentration of electric stresses at the tip. This leads to the electrostatic forces drawing the initial jet from a smaller effective area or "virtual orifice".

  11. DC electric field effects during measurements of monopolar charge density and net space charge density near HVDC power lines

    SciTech Connect

    Misakian, M.; McKnight, R.H. )

    1989-10-01

    The influence of a dc electric field on the measurement of monopolar charge densities using an aspirator-type ion counter and the measurement of net space charge density using a Faraday cage or filter is examined. Optimum configurations which minimize the effect of the electric field are identified for each type of instrumentation. Key Words: Electric field, Faraday cage, filter, ion counter, measurement, measurement errors, monopolar charge density, net space charge.

  12. Photoinduced charge-transfer materials for nonlinear optical applications

    DOEpatents

    McBranch, Duncan W.

    2006-10-24

    A method using polyelectrolyte self-assembly for preparing multi-layered organic molecular materials having individual layers which exhibit ultrafast electron and/or energy transfer in a controlled direction occurring over the entire structure. Using a high molecular weight, water-soluble, anionic form of poly-phenylene vinylene, self-assembled films can be formed which show high photoluminescence quantum efficiency (QE). The highest emission QE is achieved using poly(propylene-imine) (PPI) dendrimers as cationic binders. Self-quenching of the luminescence is observed as the solid polymer film thickness is increased and can be reversed by inserting additional spacer layers of transparent polyelectrolytes between each active conjugated layer, such that the QE grows with thickness. A red shift of the luminescence is also observed as additional PPV layers are added. This effect persists as self-quenching is eliminated. Charge transfer superlattices can be formed by additionally incorporating C.sub.60 acceptor layers.

  13. Space Charge Effect in the Sheet and Solid Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ho Young; Kim, Hyoung Suk; Ahn, Saeyoung

    1998-11-01

    We analyze the space charge effect of two different types of electron beam ; sheet and solid electron beam. Electron gun simulations are carried out using shadow and control grids for high and low perveance. Rectangular and cylindrical geometries are used for sheet and solid electron beam in planar and disk type cathode. The E-gun code is used to study the limiting current and space charge loading in each geometries.

  14. Effect of random charge fluctuation on strongly coupled dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Issaad, M.; Rouiguia, L.; Djebli, M.

    2008-09-07

    Modeling the interaction between particles is an open issue in dusty plasma. We dealt with strongly coupled dust particles in two dimensional confined system. For small number of clusters, we investigate the effect of random charge fluctuation on background configuration. The study is conducted for a short rang as well as a long rang potential interaction. Numerical simulation is performed using Monte-Carlo simulation in the presence of parabolic confinement and at low temperature. We have studied the background configurations for a dust particles with constant charge and in the presence of random charge fluctuation due to the discrete nature of charge carriers. The latter is studied for a positively charged dust when the dominant charging process is due to photo-emission from the dust surface. It is found, for small classical cluster consisting of small number of particles, short rang potential gives the same result as long rang one. It is also found that the random charge fluctuation affect the background configurations.

  15. Weak nonlinear surface-charging effects in electrolytic films.

    PubMed

    Dean, D S; Horgan, R R

    2003-11-01

    A simple model of soap films with nonionic surfactants stabilized by added electrolyte is studied. The model exhibits charge regularization due to the incorporation of a physical mechanism responsible for the formation of a surface charge. We use a Gaussian field theory in the film but the full nonlinear surface terms which are then treated at a one-loop level by calculating the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann solution and then the fluctuations about this solution. We carefully analyze the renormalization of the theory and apply it to a triple-layer model for a thin film with Stern layer of thickness h. For this model we give expressions for the surface charge sigma(L) and the disjoining pressure P(d)(L) and show their dependence on the parameters. The influence of image charges naturally arises in the formalism, and we show that predictions depend strongly on h because of their effects. In particular, we show that the surface charge vanishes as the film thickness L-->0. The fluctuation terms in this class of theories contribute a Casimir-like attraction across the film. Although this attraction is well known to be negligible compared with the mean-field component for model electrolytic films with no surface-charge regulation, in the model studied here these fluctuations also affect the surface-charge regulation leading to a fluctuation component in the disjoining pressure which has the same behavior as the mean-field component even for large film thickness.

  16. Effect of the Surface Charge of Artificial Chaperones on the Refolding of Thermally Denatured Lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fan; Shen, Liangliang; Wang, Jianzu; Qu, Aoting; Yang, Huiru; Zhang, Zhenkun; An, Yingli; Shi, Linqi

    2016-02-17

    Artificial chaperones are of great interest in fighting protein misfolding and aggregation for the protection of protein bioactivity. A comprehensive understanding of the interaction between artificial chaperones and proteins is critical for the effective utilization of these materials in biomedicine. In this work, we fabricated three kinds of artificial chaperones with different surface charges based on mixed-shell polymeric micelles (MSPMs), and investigated their protective effect for lysozymes under thermal stress. It was found that MSPMs with different surface charges showed distinct chaperone-like behavior, and the neutral MSPM with PEG shell and PMEO2MA hydrophobic domain at high temperature is superior to the negatively and positively charged one, because of the excessive electrostatic interactions between the protein and charged MSPMs. The results may benefit to optimize this kind of artificial chaperone with enhanced properties and expand their application in the future.

  17. Environmental charging effects monitors for operational satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1981-04-01

    A set of three instruments has been developed that can provide early detection of potentially dangerous geomagnetic substorm conditions, and monitor the spacecraft response. The set consists of three instruments: (1) a 'surface voltage sensor' that measures the characteristic energy of collected electrons or ions from +100 to -20,000 volts; (2) a 'nanoammeter' or logarithmic current density sensor that measures local electron flux by measuring currents from 10 to the -9th to 10 to the -5th A; and (3) a 'transient events counter' that counts the spurious pulses from electrostatic discharges that are coupled into the spacecraft wiring harness. Performance characteristics, specifications, and application of these instruments are discussed.

  18. The effect of induced charges on low-energy particle trajectories near conducting and semiconducting plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the induced charge was found on particles less than 1 eV as they passed through simulated parallel, grounded channels that are comparable in dimension to those that are presently in space plasma instruments which measure the flux of low-energy ions. Applications were made to both conducting and semiconducting channels that ranged in length from 0.1 to 50 mm and in aspect ratio from 1 to 100. The effect of the induced charge on particle trajectories from simple straight lines. Several configurations of channel aspect ratio and detector locations are considered. The effect is important only at very low energies with small dimensions.

  19. The effect of reagent charge state on the charge inversion efficiency of singly charged polyatomic ions in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Hassell, Kerry M; Hilger, Ryan T; McLuckey, Scott A

    2011-11-07

    A variety of combinations of oppositely charged ions have been reacted to examine the role of the charge state from a multiply protonated or multiply deprotonated reagent ion on the efficiency of conversion of a singly charged ion of opposite polarity to a singly charged ion of the same polarity as the reagent. Maximum efficiencies on the order of tens of percent were observed. A threshold for charge inversion was noted in all cases and, with one exception, a clear decrease in efficiency was also noted at high charge states. A model was developed to predict charge inversion efficiency based on charge states, cross-sections of the reactants, and relevant thermodynamic ion affinity values for the reactants and products. The model predicts a threshold for charge inversion, although the prediction does not match the observed threshold quantitatively. This discrepancy is likely due to a simplifying assumption that is not justified on a quantitative basis but which does reproduce the qualitative trend. The model does not predict the major decrease in efficiency at high charge states. However, calculations show that the kinetic energies of the charge inversion products can lead to significant scattering losses at high charge states of the ion-ion collision complex.

  20. Field effect and charge injection in hybrid nanorod heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, H. L.; Li, Weicong

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies on organic/inorganic heterostructures have indicated that interface morphology plays an important role in determining the charge transport properties. Hybrid heterostructure light-emitting diodes mixing donor and acceptor semiconductors appear to offer the best opportunity in achieving superior performance and there are indications that a network of percolated heterojunctions can be very effective in promoting light absorption/emission. Charge transport however can be more complex in a nanorod heterostructure as the charge flow at the interface will depend on the injection mechanism(s) as well as the interface field strength. In this work, we examined the current density-voltage characteristics of the hybrid NPB (N, N‧-di(napth-2-yl)-N-N‧-diphenylbenzidine)-ZnO nanorod heterostructure and attempted to identify the transport mechanism(s) close to the tips of the nanorods. Our study indicated that charge flow essentially followed the conventional pattern changing from a linear regime (emission-limited) to a quadratic regime (space-charge limited) and possibly to a rapid rise in current (trap-free injection). Detailed evaluation of the changes in the reported conductivity data further suggested the conduction mechanism (up to a p-layer thickness of 400 nm) was dominated by space-charge limited current in the NPB layer, which also resulted in substantial charge pile-up near the tips of the nanorods. An interface charge layer responsible for the barrier height modification effect could be used to explain the observed “blue-shift” in the emission spectra of the nanorod heterostructure light-emitting diode as reported by Sun et al. [2].

  1. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin F.; Summers, Chris J.

    1992-01-01

    In this report we present the progress during the second six month period of the project. This includes both experimental and theoretical work on the acoustic charge transport (ACT) portion of the chip, the theoretical program modelling of both the avalanche photodiode (APD) and the charge transfer and overflow transistor and the materials growth and fabrication part of the program.

  2. 42 CFR 447.53 - Applicability; specification; multiple charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... categorically or medically needy individuals for the following: (1) Children. Services furnished to individuals..., such as hypertension, diabetes, urinary tract infection, and services furnished during the postpartum... charges. For any service, the plan may not impose more than one type of charge referred to in paragraph...

  3. Charging effects, forces, and conduction in molecular wire systems.

    PubMed

    Emberly, Eldon G; Kirczenow, George

    2002-04-01

    Recently, experiments have shown that effects arising from charging and conformational changes in a molecular wire due to an applied voltage bias can have a significant influence on the transport characteristics of the system. We introduce a tractable theoretical approach based on Landauer theory and total energy methods that treats transport nonlinearities, conformational changes, and charging effects in molecular wires in a unified way. We apply this approach to molecular wires consisting of short chain molecules with different electronic and structural properties bonded to metal contacts. We find that the nonlinear conductance characteristics of these systems are remarkably similar and can be understood in terms of a single physical mechanism. We predict that negative differential resistance should occur at high bias in such molecular wires due to the combined effects of charging and conformational changes on their electronic structure.

  4. Large Seebeck effect by charge-mobility engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peijie; Wei, Beipei; Zhang, Jiahao; Tomczak, Jan M.; Strydom, A. M.; Søndergaard, M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Steglich, Frank

    2015-06-01

    The Seebeck effect describes the generation of an electric potential in a conducting solid exposed to a temperature gradient. In most cases, it is dominated by an energy-dependent electronic density of states at the Fermi level, in line with the prevalent efforts towards superior thermoelectrics through the engineering of electronic structure. Here we demonstrate an alternative source for the Seebeck effect based on charge-carrier relaxation: a charge mobility that changes rapidly with temperature can result in a sizeable addition to the Seebeck coefficient. This new Seebeck source is demonstrated explicitly for Ni-doped CoSb3, where a marked mobility change occurs due to the crossover between two different charge-relaxation regimes. Our findings unveil the origin of pronounced features in the Seebeck coefficient of many other elusive materials characterized by a significant mobility mismatch. When utilized appropriately, this effect can also provide a novel route to the design of improved thermoelectric materials.

  5. Large Seebeck effect by charge-mobility engineering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peijie; Wei, Beipei; Zhang, Jiahao; Tomczak, Jan M; Strydom, A M; Søndergaard, M; Iversen, Bo B; Steglich, Frank

    2015-06-25

    The Seebeck effect describes the generation of an electric potential in a conducting solid exposed to a temperature gradient. In most cases, it is dominated by an energy-dependent electronic density of states at the Fermi level, in line with the prevalent efforts towards superior thermoelectrics through the engineering of electronic structure. Here we demonstrate an alternative source for the Seebeck effect based on charge-carrier relaxation: a charge mobility that changes rapidly with temperature can result in a sizeable addition to the Seebeck coefficient. This new Seebeck source is demonstrated explicitly for Ni-doped CoSb3, where a marked mobility change occurs due to the crossover between two different charge-relaxation regimes. Our findings unveil the origin of pronounced features in the Seebeck coefficient of many other elusive materials characterized by a significant mobility mismatch. When utilized appropriately, this effect can also provide a novel route to the design of improved thermoelectric materials.

  6. Large Seebeck effect by charge-mobility engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peijie; Wei, Beipei; Zhang, Jiahao; Tomczak, Jan M.; Strydom, A.M.; Søndergaard, M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Steglich, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The Seebeck effect describes the generation of an electric potential in a conducting solid exposed to a temperature gradient. In most cases, it is dominated by an energy-dependent electronic density of states at the Fermi level, in line with the prevalent efforts towards superior thermoelectrics through the engineering of electronic structure. Here we demonstrate an alternative source for the Seebeck effect based on charge-carrier relaxation: a charge mobility that changes rapidly with temperature can result in a sizeable addition to the Seebeck coefficient. This new Seebeck source is demonstrated explicitly for Ni-doped CoSb3, where a marked mobility change occurs due to the crossover between two different charge-relaxation regimes. Our findings unveil the origin of pronounced features in the Seebeck coefficient of many other elusive materials characterized by a significant mobility mismatch. When utilized appropriately, this effect can also provide a novel route to the design of improved thermoelectric materials. PMID:26108283

  7. Effect of charge distribution on RDX adsorption in IRMOF-10

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Ruichang; Keffer, David J.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Nicholson, Don M; Michalkova, Andrea; Petrova, Tetyana; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; Doss, Bryant; Lewis, James

    2010-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, classical grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations, and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to test the effect of charge distribution on hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) adsorption and diffusion in IRMOF-10. Several different methods for mapping QM electron distributions onto atomic point charges are explored, including the electrostatic potential (ESP) method, Mulliken population analysis, L{sub 0}wdin population analysis, and natural bond orbital analysis. Classical GCMC and MD simulations of RDX in IRMOF-10 are performed using 15 combinations of charge sources of RDX and IRMOF-10. As the charge distributions vary, interaction potential energies, the adsorption loading, and the self-diffusivities are significantly different. None of the 15 combinations are able to quantitatively capture the dependence of the energy of adsorption on local configuration of RDX as observed in the QM calculations. We observe changes in the charge distributions of RDX and IRMOF-10 with the introduction of an RDX molecule into the cage. We also observe a large dispersion contribution to the interaction energy from QM calculations that is not reproduced in the classical simulations, indicating that the source of discrepancy may not lie exclusively with the assignment of charges.

  8. Environmental charging effects monitors for operational satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    A set of three instruments was developed that can provide early detection of potentially dangerous geomagnetic substorm conditions, and monitor the spacecraft response. The set consists of three instruments: A Surface Voltage Sensor that measures the characteristic energy of collected electrons or ions from +100 to -20,000 volts; a logarithmic current density sensor or Nanoammeter that measures local electron flux by measuring currents from 10 to the minus 9th power to 10 to the minus 5th power A; and a Transient Events Counter that counts the spurious pulses from electrostatic discharges that are coupled into the spacecraft wiring harness. An amplitude threshold can be set to count only pulses that are large enough to cause circuit malfunction. Performance characteristics, specifications, and application of these instruments are discussed. Size, weight, and power requirements were minimized. The Surface Voltage Sensor and Nanoammeter are packaged together in a box that is 10.1 by 11.3 by 9.5 cm and weighs 0.82 kg. The transient Events Counter measures 10.1 by 11.3 by 5.4 cm and weighs 0.55 kg. Both operate from a nominal 28 V dc input and require a total of 3/4 watt for both. Although designed for flight use, these instruments are also suitable for laboratory use.

  9. Emotionally charged earcons reveal affective congruency effects.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, P M C; De Haan, A; Van Galen, G P; Meulenbroek, R G J

    2007-12-01

    In the present study, the affective impact of earcons on stimulus classification is investigated. We show, using a picture-categorization task, that the affective connotation of earcons in major and minor mode (representing positive and negative valence, respectively) can be congruent or incongruent with response valence. Twenty participants classified pictures of animals and instruments in 256 trials, using positive and negative Yes or No responses. Together with the pictures, either a chord in major mode or minor mode was played. The affective valence of the chords either did or did not match the valence of responses. Response-time latencies show congruency effects of the matching and non matching sound and response valences, indicating that it is important to carefully investigate human-computer interfaces for potential affective congruency effects, as these can either facilitate or inhibit user performance.

  10. Effect of water on the space charge formation in XLPE

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Ayako; Takahashi, Tohru; Yamamaoto, Syuji

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the authors describe the effect of water on the space charge in crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE). In order to study the effects of water and by-products of crosslinking, they prepared two types of samples. The water in the first one (Type A) is controlled by immersing in water after removing the by-products, and the water in the other type (Type B) of samples is controlled by the water from the decomposition of cumyl-alcohol by heating. The authors measured the space charge formation by pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method. A large difference was observed between Type A and Type B. In Type A samples (containing only water) the space charge distribution changes from homogeneous to heterogeneous as the water content increases, whereas in Type B (containing water and by-product) all samples exhibit heterogeneous space charge distribution. However, merely the effect of water for both types was almost the same, including peculiar space charge behavior near the water solubility limit.

  11. Space charge effects in ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng; Zhang, He; Duxbury, P. M.; Berz, Martin; Ruan, Chong-Yu

    2012-02-01

    Understanding space charge effects is central for the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy techniques for imaging material transformation with atomic scale detail at the fs to ps timescales. We present methods and results for direct ultrafast photoelectron beam characterization employing a shadow projection imaging technique to investigate the generation of ultrafast, non-uniform, intense photoelectron pulses in a dc photo-gun geometry. Combined with N-particle simulations and an analytical Gaussian model, we elucidate three essential space-charge-led features: the pulse lengthening following a power-law scaling, the broadening of the initial energy distribution, and the virtual cathode threshold. The impacts of these space charge effects on the performance of the next generation high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging systems are evaluated.

  12. Signal processing applications of massively parallel charge domain computing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Barhen, Jacob (Inventor); Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is embodied in a charge coupled device (CCD)/charge injection device (CID) architecture capable of performing a Fourier transform by simultaneous matrix vector multiplication (MVM) operations in respective plural CCD/CID arrays in parallel in O(1) steps. For example, in one embodiment, a first CCD/CID array stores charge packets representing a first matrix operator based upon permutations of a Hartley transform and computes the Fourier transform of an incoming vector. A second CCD/CID array stores charge packets representing a second matrix operator based upon different permutations of a Hartley transform and computes the Fourier transform of an incoming vector. The incoming vector is applied to the inputs of the two CCD/CID arrays simultaneously, and the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier transform are produced simultaneously in the time required to perform a single MVM operation in a CCD/CID array.

  13. Interfacial charge transfer absorption: Application to metal molecule assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutz, Carol; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Sutin, Norman

    2006-05-01

    Optically induced charge transfer between adsorbed molecules and a metal electrode was predicted by Hush to lead to new electronic absorption features, but has been only rarely observed experimentally. Interfacial charge transfer absorption (IFCTA) provides information concerning the barriers to charge transfer between molecules and the metal/semiconductor and the magnitude of the electronic coupling and could thus provide a powerful tool for understanding interfacial charge-transfer kinetics. Here, we utilize a previously published model [C. Creutz, B.S. Brunschwig, N. Sutin, J. Phys. Chem. B 109 (2005) 10251] to predict IFCTA spectra of metal-molecule assemblies and compare the literature observations to these predictions. We conclude that, in general, the electronic coupling between molecular adsorbates and the metal levels is so small that IFCTA is not detectable. However, few experiments designed to detect IFCTA have been done. We suggest approaches to optimizing the conditions for observing the process.

  14. Solving the charging effect in insulating materials probed by a variable monoenergy slow positron beam.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Song; De Guzman, Manuel; An, Quanfu; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Jean, Yan-Ching; Lai, Juin-Yih

    2011-03-15

    A variable monoenergy slow positron beam (VMSPB) operating at a high vacuum on insulating materials encounters a problem of significant surface charging effect with time. As a result, positronium formation is inhibited, and the positron annihilation radiation counting rate is reduced; these consequently distorted the experimental positron annihilation and results. To solve such problems, a technique of depositing an ultrathin layer of sputtering noble metals on insulators is developed. We report a successful method of sputtering a few atomic layers of platinum (∼1 nm) on a polyamide membrane to completely remove the charging effect for VMSPB applications in insulators.

  15. The effect of carrier gas contaminants on the charging probability of aerosols under bipolar charging conditions

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Gerhard; Reischl, Georg P.

    2012-01-01

    This work concentrates on the experimental determination of the properties of ionic molecular clusters that are produced in the bipolar ionic atmosphere of a radioactivity based 241Am charger. The main scope of this study was to investigate the dependency of the ions' properties on carrier gas contaminants caused by the evaporation of trace gases from different kinds of frequently encountered tubing materials. A recently developed high resolution mobility spectrometer allows the precise determination of the ions' electrical mobility; an empirical mass-mobility relationship was used to approximate the corresponding ion masses. It was found that impurities in the carrier gas dramatically change the pattern of the ion mobility/size distribution, resulting in very different ion properties that strongly depend on the carrier gas composition. Since the ion properties control the charging process of aerosols, it was further investigated how the different ion properties affect the calculation of the charging probabilities of aerosols. The results show that despite large variations of the ions' properties, only a minor effect on the calculated charging probabilities can be found. PMID:23209330

  16. Effective charges and virial pressure of concentrated macroion solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Boon, Niels; Guerrero-García, Guillermo Ivan; van Roij, René; ...

    2015-07-13

    The stability of colloidal suspensions is crucial in a wide variety of processes, including the fabrication of photonic materials and scaffolds for biological assemblies. The ionic strength of the electrolyte that suspends charged colloids is widely used to control the physical properties of colloidal suspensions. The extensively used two-body Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) approach allows for a quantitative analysis of the effective electrostatic forces between colloidal particles. DLVO relates the ionic double layers, which enclose the particles, to their effective electrostatic repulsion. Nevertheless, the double layer is distorted at high macroion volume fractions. Therefore, DLVO cannot describe the many-body effects that arisemore » in concentrated suspensions. In this paper, we show that this problem can be largely resolved by identifying effective point charges for the macroions using cell theory. This extrapolated point charge (EPC) method assigns effective point charges in a consistent way, taking into account the excluded volume of highly charged macroions at any concentration, and thereby naturally accounting for high volume fractions in both salt-free and added-salt conditions. We provide an analytical expression for the effective pair potential and validate the EPC method by comparing molecular dynamics simulations of macroions and monovalent microions that interact via Coulombic potentials to simulations of macroions interacting via the derived EPC effective potential. The simulations reproduce the macroion-macroion spatial correlation and the virial pressure obtained with the EPC model. Finally, our findings provide a route to relate the physical properties such as pressure in systems of screened Coulomb particles to experimental measurements.« less

  17. Effective charges and virial pressure of concentrated macroion solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Boon, Niels; Guerrero-García, Guillermo Ivan; van Roij, René; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-07-13

    The stability of colloidal suspensions is crucial in a wide variety of processes, including the fabrication of photonic materials and scaffolds for biological assemblies. The ionic strength of the electrolyte that suspends charged colloids is widely used to control the physical properties of colloidal suspensions. The extensively used two-body Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) approach allows for a quantitative analysis of the effective electrostatic forces between colloidal particles. DLVO relates the ionic double layers, which enclose the particles, to their effective electrostatic repulsion. Nevertheless, the double layer is distorted at high macroion volume fractions. Therefore, DLVO cannot describe the many-body effects that arise in concentrated suspensions. In this paper, we show that this problem can be largely resolved by identifying effective point charges for the macroions using cell theory. This extrapolated point charge (EPC) method assigns effective point charges in a consistent way, taking into account the excluded volume of highly charged macroions at any concentration, and thereby naturally accounting for high volume fractions in both salt-free and added-salt conditions. We provide an analytical expression for the effective pair potential and validate the EPC method by comparing molecular dynamics simulations of macroions and monovalent microions that interact via Coulombic potentials to simulations of macroions interacting via the derived EPC effective potential. The simulations reproduce the macroion-macroion spatial correlation and the virial pressure obtained with the EPC model. Finally, our findings provide a route to relate the physical properties such as pressure in systems of screened Coulomb particles to experimental measurements.

  18. Molecular Design and Device Application of Radical Polymers for Improved Charge Extraction in Organic Photovoltaic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-29

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0218 Molecular Design and Device Application of Radical Polymers for Improved Charge Extraction in Organic Photovoltaic Cells... APPLICATION OF RADICAL POLYMERS FOR IMPROVED CHARGE EXTRACTION IN ORGANIC PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS" 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA-9550-12-1...radical polymers and offered a perspective of their potential organic electronic applications moving forward. This work cemented our group as a world

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on charge-coupled imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killiany, J. M.; Baker, W. D.; Saks, N. S.; Barbe, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on three different charge coupled imagers have been investigated. Device performance was evaluated as a function of total gamma ray dose. The principal failure mechanisms have been identified for each particular device structure. The clock and bias voltages required for high total dose operation of the devices are presented.

  20. Modelling of charging effects in plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, William; Cheung, Nathan W.

    1995-03-01

    The charging effects of plasma immersion ion implantation on several device structures is simulated. The simulations use an analytical model which couples the interaction of the plasma and IC devices during plasma implantation. The plasma model is implemented within the circuit simulator SPICE, which allows the model to uses all of the IC device models existing within SPICE. The model of the Fowler-Nordheim tunneling current through thin gate oxides of MOS devices is demonstrated, and shown how it can be used to quantify the damage induced. Charging damage is shown to be strongly affected by the device structure.

  1. Longitudinal emittance growth due to nonlinear space charge effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. Y.; Yu, Simon S.; Barnard, John J.; Seidl, Peter A.

    2012-03-01

    Emittance posts limits on the key requirements of final pulse length and spot size on target in heavy ion fusion drivers. In this paper, we show studies on the effect of nonlinear space charge on longitudinal emittance growth in the drift compression section. We perform simulations, using the 3D PIC code WARP, for a high current beam under conditions of bends and longitudinal compression. The linear growth rate for longitudinal emittance turns out to depend only on the peak line charge density, and is independent of pulse length, velocity tilt, and/or the pipe and beam size. This surprisingly simple result is confirmed by simulations and analytic calculations.

  2. Electron cloud and space charge effects in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space charge making Landau damping appear impossible. Simulations reveal a substantial buildup of electron cloud in the whole Booster ramping cycle, both inside the unshielded combined-function magnets and the beam pipes joining the magnets, whenever the secondary-emission yield (SEY) is larger than {approx}1.6. The implication of the electron-cloud effects on the space charge and collective instabilities of the beam is investigated.

  3. Secondary Electron Emission from Dust and Its Effect on Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, B. K.; Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-11-01

    Hydrogen plasma is produced in a plasma chamber by striking discharge between incandescent tungsten filaments and the permanent magnetic cage [1], which is grounded. The magnetic cage has a full line cusped magnetic field geometry used to confine the plasma elements. A cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to study the plasma parameters in various discharge conditions. The charge accumulated on the dust particles is calculated using the capacitance model and the dust current is measured by the combination of a Faraday cup and an electrometer at different discharge conditions. It is found Secondary electron emission from dust having low emission yield effects the charging of dust particles in presence of high energetic electrons.

  4. Secondary Electron Emission from Dust and Its Effect on Charging

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, B. K.; Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-11-29

    Hydrogen plasma is produced in a plasma chamber by striking discharge between incandescent tungsten filaments and the permanent magnetic cage [1], which is grounded. The magnetic cage has a full line cusped magnetic field geometry used to confine the plasma elements. A cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to study the plasma parameters in various discharge conditions. The charge accumulated on the dust particles is calculated using the capacitance model and the dust current is measured by the combination of a Faraday cup and an electrometer at different discharge conditions. It is found Secondary electron emission from dust having low emission yield effects the charging of dust particles in presence of high energetic electrons.

  5. Charge effect in point projection images of carbon fibres

    PubMed

    Prigent; Morin

    2000-09-01

    Nanometre-sized carbon fibres across holes have been observed in a lensless point projection field-emission microscope operating between 100 and 300 eV. At sufficiently high magnification fringe patterns appear; with the help of simulations we show that they are strongly dependent on the charge density of the fibres. These patterns are characterized by an odd number of fringes with a central fringe that becomes very bright as the charge increases. Average diameter and linear charge density have been obtained with remarkable precision from analysis of fringes. Charge distribution from the middle to the edge of fibres has been investigated as well as narrowings at localized places on the fringe pattern. From these two examples, the limits of the models used for the simulations and those of the data acquisition system are discussed. Finally, this work emphasizes the fact that the fringe pattern masks the actual form of the fibre and that it is necessary to take account of the charge effect to interpret this diffraction pattern.

  6. Effect of dilute strongly pinning impurities on charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Jun-ichi; Millis, Andrew J.

    2015-05-01

    We study theoretically the effects of strong pinning centers on a charge density wave in the limit that the charge density wave coherence length is shorter than the average interimpurity distance. An analysis based on a Ginzburg-Landau model shows that long-range forces arising from the elastic response of the charge density wave induce a kind of collective pinning which suppresses impurity-induced phase fluctuations, leading to a long-range ordered ground state. The correlations induced by impurities are characterized by a length scale parametrically longer than the average interimpurity distance. Long-wavelength fluctuations are found to be gapped, implying the stability of the ground state. We also present Monte Carlo simulations that confirm the basic features of the analytical results.

  7. The effectiveness of Hong Kong's Construction Waste Disposal Charging Scheme.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jane L; Hills, Martin J; Tam, Vivian W Y

    2008-12-01

    The Hong Kong Government introduced the Construction Waste Disposal Charging Scheme in December 2005 to ensure that disposal of construction and demolition (C&D) waste is properly priced to reduce such waste. The charging scheme is not only intended to provide an economic incentive for contractors and developers to reduce waste but also to encourage reuse and recycling of waste material thereby slowing down the depletion of limited landfill and public filling capacities. This paper examines the effectiveness of the charging scheme 1 year after implementation. A survey was conducted at Tseung Kwan O Area 137 and Tuen Mun Area 38, and daily C&D waste records were collected from landfills and public filling facilities between January 2006 and December 2006. The results of the survey show that waste has been reduced by approximately 60% in landfills, by approximately 23% in public fills, and by approximately 65% in total waste between 2005 and 2006. Suggestions for improving the scheme are provided.

  8. Effect of Aperiodicity on the Charge Transfer Through DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Angsula; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab

    The effect of aperiodicity on the charge transfer process through DNA molecules is investigated using a tight-binding model. Single-stranded aperiodic Fibonacci polyGC and polyAT sequences along with aperiodic Rudin-Shapiro poly(GCAT) sequences are used in the study. Based on the tight-binding model, molecular orbital calculations of the DNA chains are performed and ionization potentials compared, as this might be relevant to understanding the charge transfer process. Charges migrate through the sequences in a multistep hopping process. Results for current conduction through aperiodic sequences are compared with those for the corresponding periodic sequences. We find that dinucleotide aperiodic Fibonacci sequences decrease the current while tetranucleotide aperiodic Rudin-Shapiro sequences increase the current when compared with the corresponding periodic sequences. The conductance in all cases decays exponentially as the sequence length increases.

  9. Space charge effects in the SSC Low Energy Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Mahale, N.K.; Mehta, N.; Pilat, F.; Talman, R.; York, R.C.

    1991-05-01

    By means of multi-particle tracking, we explore space charge effects in the Low Energy Booster (LEB) which has a strong requirement for small transverse emittance. Macro-particles are tracked in a self-consistent manner in six dimensional phase space with transverse space charge kicks so that the emittance evolution as well as the particle distribution are simulated as a function of time. Among recent improvements of the code, the longitudinal motion, i.e. synchrotron oscillations as well as acceleration, makes it possible to simulate the capture process of linac microbunches. The code was calibrated by comparing with the experimental results at the Fermilab Booster. Preliminary results of the LEB show slow emittance growth due to the space charge. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Wurstbauer, U; Wójs, A; Pinczuk, A; Jain, J K

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  11. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  12. Wake effect in graphene due to moving charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radović, I.; Borka, D.; Mišković, Z. L.

    2014-12-01

    We study the wake effect in a supported graphene layer induced by external charged particles moving parallel to it by using the dynamic polarization function of graphene within the random phase approximation for its π electrons described as Dirac's fermions. We explore the effects of a substrate assuming that graphene is supported by an insulating substrate, such as SiO2, and a strongly polar substrate, such as SiC, under the gating conditions. Strong effects are observed in the wake pattern in the induced density of charge carriers in supported graphene due to finite size of the graphene-substrate gap, as well as due to strong coupling effects, and plasmon damping of graphene's π electrons. We find that the excitation of surface phonons in the substrate may exert quite strong influences on the wake effect in the total electrostatic potential in the graphene plane at low particle speeds.

  13. Specific salt effects on thermophoresis of charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Eslahian, Kyriakos A; Majee, Arghya; Maskos, Michael; Würger, Alois

    2014-03-28

    We study the Soret effect of charged polystyrene particles as a function of temperature and electrolyte composition. As a main result we find that the Soret coefficient is determined by charge effects, and that non-ionic contributions are small. In view of the well-known electric-double layer interactions, our thermal field-flow fractionation data lead us to the conclusion that the Soret effect originates to a large extent from diffusiophoresis in the salt gradient and from the electrolyte Seebeck effect, both of which show strong specific-ion effects. Moreover, we find that thermophoresis of polystyrene beads is fundamentally different from proteins and aqueous polymer solutions, which show a strong non-ionic contribution.

  14. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, W. D.; Brennan, K. F.; Summers, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a solid-state television (HDTV) imager chip operating at a frame rate of about 170 frames/sec at 2 Megapixels/frame. This imager will offer an order of magnitude improvements in speed over CCD designs and will allow for monolithic imagers operating from the IR to UV. The technical approach of the project focuses on the development of the three basic components of the imager and their subsequent integration. The camera chip can be divided into three distinct functions: (1) image capture via an array of avalanche photodiodes (APD's); (2) charge collection, storage, and overflow control via a charge transfer transistor device (CTD); and (3) charge readout via an array of acoustic charge transport (ACT) channels. The use of APD's allows for front end gain at low noise and low operating voltages while the ACT readout enables concomitant high speed and high charge transfer efficiency. Currently work is progressing towards the optimization of each of these component devices. In addition to the development of each of the three distinct components, work towards their integration and manufacturability is also progressing. The component designs are considered not only to meet individual specifications but to provide overall system level performance suitable for HDTV operation upon integration. The ultimate manufacturability and reliability of the chip constrains the design as well. The progress made during this period is described in detail.

  15. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, W. D.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a solid-state high definition television (HDTV) imager chip operating at a frame rate of about 170 frames/sec at 2 Megapixels per frame. This imager offers an order of magnitude improvement in speed over CCD designs and will allow for monolithic imagers operating from the IR to the UV. The technical approach of the project focuses on the development of the three basic components of the imager and their integration. The imager chip can be divided into three distinct components: (1) image capture via an array of avalanche photodiodes (APD's), (2) charge collection, storage and overflow control via a charge transfer transistor device (CTD), and (3) charge readout via an array of acoustic charge transport (ACT) channels. The use of APD's allows for front end gain at low noise and low operating voltages while the ACT readout enables concomitant high speed and high charge transfer efficiency. Currently work is progressing towards the development of manufacturable designs for each of these component devices. In addition to the development of each of the three distinct components, work towards their integration is also progressing. The component designs are considered not only to meet individual specifications but to provide overall system level performance suitable for HDTV operation upon integration. The ultimate manufacturability and reliability of the chip constrains the design as well. The progress made during this period is described in detail in Sections 2-4.

  16. Space charge effects on the current-voltage characteristics of gated field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K. L.; Kodis, M. A.; Murphy, R. A.; Zaidman, E. G.

    1997-07-01

    Microfabricated field emitter arrays (FEAs) can provide the very high electron current densities required for rf amplifier applications, typically on the order of 100 A/cm2. Determining the dependence of emission current on gate voltage is important for the prediction of emitter performance for device applications. Field emitters use high applied fields to extract current, and therefore, unlike thermionic emitters, the current densities can exceed 103A/cm2 when averaged over an array. At such high current densities, space charge effects (i.e., the influence of charge between cathode and collector on emission) affect the emission process or initiate conditions which can lead to failure mechanisms for field emitters. A simple model of a field emitter will be used to calculate the one-dimensional space charge effects on the emission characteristics by examining two components: charge between the gate and anode, which leads to Child's law, and charge within the FEA unit cell, which gives rise to a field suppression effect which can exist for a single field emitter. The predictions of the analytical model are compared with recent experimental measurements designed to assess space charge effects and predict the onset of gate current. It is shown that negative convexity on a Fowler-Nordheim plot of Ianode(Vgate) data can be explained in terms of field depression at the emitter tip in addition to reflection of electrons by a virtual cathode created when the anode field is insufficient to extract all of the current; in particular, the effects present within the unit cell constitute a newly described effect.

  17. Physiochemical charge stabilization of silver nanoparticles and its antibacterial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanitha, G.; Rajavel, K.; Boopathy, G.; Veeravazhuthi, V.; Neelamegam, P.

    2017-02-01

    Environmental standardization and stabilization of surface charges of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is important in biological systems and interest in bio-interfacial interaction. Different synthesized AgNPs in chemical reduced (AgNO3 (0.01, 0.1 and 0.5 M); NaBH4 and Na3C6H5O7) garnered for analysis of physico-chemical charge stabilization by means of different pH (1-13) and ionic interferences (NaCl, Ca(NO3)2, Na2CO3 and NaNO3). The uniform sized (size: ∼22 nm) and highly charged (zeta potential: -37.9 mV) AgNPs with uniform dispersion remains unaltered in high ionic interferences. Highest antifungal activity of AgNPs against Candida albicans and moderate activity against Staphylococcus aureus are correlated.

  18. Charged Particle Effects on Solar Sails - An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Program is currently sponsoring a comprehensive look at the effects of the charged particle environment on the first generation of Solar Sail propulsion systems. As part of this, a joint NASA MSFC/JPL team is investigating the effects of spacecraft charging on the preliminary ISP Solar Sail mission designs. This paper will begin by reviewing the plasma environments being proposed for such missions-these range from the ambient solar wind at approximately 1 AU in the ecliptic plane, approximately 0.5 AU solar-polar orbit, and geosynchronous orbit. Following a discussion of the critical design issues associated with Solar Sails from a charging standpoint, a simple Sail configuration for modeling purposes will be presented. Results for the various environments will be illustrated in terms of the estimated surface potentials for the Solar Sail using the NASCAP-2K charging analysis program. Based on these potentials, representative plasma flow fields and potential contours surrounding the Solar Sail will then be presented. The implications of these results--the surface potentials and plasma flow--will be discussed in the context of their effects on Solar Sail operations and structural configurations.

  19. Krypton charge exchange cross sections for Hall effect thruster models

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, Michael L.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J.

    2013-04-28

    Following discharge from a Hall effect thruster, charge exchange occurs between ions and un-ionized propellant atoms. The low-energy cations produced can disturb operation of onboard instrumentation or the thruster itself. Charge-exchange cross sections for both singly and doubly charged propellant atoms are required to model these interactions. While xenon is the most common propellant currently used in Hall effect thrusters, other propellants are being considered, in particular, krypton. We present here guided-ion beam measurements and comparisons to semiclassical calculations for Kr{sup +} + Kr and Kr{sup 2+} + Kr cross sections. The measurements of symmetric Kr{sup +} + Kr charge exchange are in good agreement with both the calculations including spin-orbit effects and previous measurements. For the symmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr reaction, we present cross section measurements for center-of-mass energies between 1 eV and 300 eV, which spans energies not previously examined experimentally. These cross section measurements compare well with a simple one-electron transfer model. Finally, cross sections for the asymmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr {yields} Kr{sup +} + Kr{sup +} reaction show an onset near 12 eV, reaching cross sections near constant value of 1.6 A{sup 2} with an exception near 70-80 eV.

  20. Materials Characterization at Utah State University: Facilities and Knowledge-base of Electronic Properties of Materials Applicable to Spacecraft Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Thomson, C. D.; Kite, J.; Zavyalov, V.; Corbridge, Jodie

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to improve the reliability and versatility of spacecraft charging models designed to assist spacecraft designers in accommodating and mitigating the harmful effects of charging on spacecraft, the NASA Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program has funded development of facilities at Utah State University for the measurement of the electronic properties of both conducting and insulating spacecraft materials. We present here an overview of our instrumentation and capabilities, which are particularly well suited to study electron emission as related to spacecraft charging. These measurements include electron-induced secondary and backscattered yields, spectra, and angular resolved measurements as a function of incident energy, species and angle, plus investigations of ion-induced electron yields, photoelectron yields, sample charging and dielectric breakdown. Extensive surface science characterization capabilities are also available to fully characterize the samples in situ. Our measurements for a wide array of conducting and insulating spacecraft materials have been incorporated into the SEE Charge Collector Knowledge-base as a Database of Electronic Properties of Materials Applicable to Spacecraft Charging. This Database provides an extensive compilation of electronic properties, together with parameterization of these properties in a format that can be easily used with existing spacecraft charging engineering tools and with next generation plasma, charging, and radiation models. Tabulated properties in the Database include: electron-induced secondary electron yield, backscattered yield and emitted electron spectra; He, Ar and Xe ion-induced electron yields and emitted electron spectra; photoyield and solar emittance spectra; and materials characterization including reflectivity, dielectric constant, resistivity, arcing, optical microscopy images, scanning electron micrographs, scanning tunneling microscopy images, and Auger electron spectra. Further

  1. 42 CFR 405.507 - Illustrations of the application of the criteria for determining reasonable charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Illustrations of the application of the criteria for determining reasonable charges. 405.507 Section 405.507 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... THE AGED AND DISABLED Criteria for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.507 Illustrations of...

  2. 42 CFR 405.507 - Illustrations of the application of the criteria for determining reasonable charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Illustrations of the application of the criteria for determining reasonable charges. 405.507 Section 405.507 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... THE AGED AND DISABLED Criteria for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.507 Illustrations of...

  3. 42 CFR 405.507 - Illustrations of the application of the criteria for determining reasonable charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Illustrations of the application of the criteria for determining reasonable charges. 405.507 Section 405.507 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... THE AGED AND DISABLED Criteria for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.507 Illustrations of...

  4. 42 CFR 405.507 - Illustrations of the application of the criteria for determining reasonable charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Illustrations of the application of the criteria for determining reasonable charges. 405.507 Section 405.507 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... THE AGED AND DISABLED Criteria for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.507 Illustrations of...

  5. 42 CFR 405.507 - Illustrations of the application of the criteria for determining reasonable charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Illustrations of the application of the criteria for determining reasonable charges. 405.507 Section 405.507 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... THE AGED AND DISABLED Criteria for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.507 Illustrations of...

  6. 76 FR 64162 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) Application 10-16-U-00-OAK To Use PFC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ...-16-U-00-OAK To Use PFC Revenue, Collected at Metropolitan Oakland International Airport, Oakland, CA... following is a brief overview of the use application No. 11-16- U-00-OAK: Proposed charge effective...

  7. Nonlinear effects on electrophoresis of a charged dielectric nanoparticle in a charged hydrogel medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; De, Simanta

    2016-09-01

    The impact of the solid polarization of a charged dielectric particle in gel electrophoresis is studied without imposing a weak-field or a thin Debye length assumption. The electric polarization of a dielectric particle due to an external electric field creates a non-uniform surface charge density, which in turn creates a non-uniform Debye layer at the solid-gel interface. The solid polarization of the particle, the polarization of the double layer, and the electro-osmosis of mobile ions within the hydrogel medium create a nonlinear effect on the electrophoresis. We have incorporated those nonlinear effects by considering the electrokinetics governed by the Stokes-Brinkman-Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations. We have computed the governing nonlinear coupled set of equations numerically by adopting a finite volume based iterative algorithm. Our numerical method is tested for accuracy by comparing with several existing results on free-solution electrophoresis as well as results based on the Debye-Hückel approximation. Our computed result shows that the electrophoretic velocity decreases with the rise of the particle dielectric permittivity constant and attains a saturation limit at large values of permittivity. A significant impact of the solid polarization is found in gel electrophoresis compared to the free-solution electrophoresis.

  8. Peltier effect in multilayered nanopillars under high density charge current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravier, L.; Fukushima, A.; Kubota, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yuasa, S.

    2006-12-01

    From the basic equations of thermoelectricity, we model the thermal regimes that develop in multilayered nanopillar elements experiencing continuous charge currents. The energy conservation principle was applied to all layer-layer and layer-electrode junctions. The obtained set of equations was solved to derive the temperature of each junction. The contribution of the Peltier effect is included in an effective resistance. This model gives satisfactory fits to experimental data obtained on a series of reference nanopillar elements.

  9. Space-charge Effect on Electroresistance in Metal-Ferroelectric-Metal capacitors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bo Bo; Liu, Yang; Chen, Liu Fang; Wang, Jian Lu; Sun, Shuo; Shen, Hong; Sun, Jing Lan; Yuan, Guo Liang; Fusil, Stéphane; Garcia, Vincent; Dkhil, Brahim; Meng, Xiang Jian; Chu, Jun Hao

    2015-01-01

    Resistive switching through electroresistance (ER) effect in metal-ferroelectric-metal (MFM) capacitors has attracted increasing interest due to its potential applications as memories and logic devices. However, the detailed electronic mechanisms resulting in large ER when polarisation switching occurs in the ferroelectric barrier are still not well understood. Here, ER effect up to 1000% at room temperature is demonstrated in C-MOS compatible MFM nanocapacitors with a 8.8 nm-thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) homopolymer ferroelectric, which is very promising for silicon industry integration. Most remarkably, using theory developed for metal-semiconductor rectifying contacts, we derive an analytical expression for the variation of interfacial barrier heights due to space-charge effect that can interpret the observed ER response. We extend this space-charge model, related to the release of trapped charges by defects, to MFM structures made of ferroelectric oxides. This space-charge model provides a simple and straightforward tool to understand recent unusual reports. Finally, this work suggests that defect-engineering could be an original and efficient route for tuning the space-charge effect and thus the ER performances in future electronic devices. PMID:26670138

  10. Space-charge Effect on Electroresistance in Metal-Ferroelectric-Metal capacitors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bo Bo; Liu, Yang; Chen, Liu Fang; Wang, Jian Lu; Sun, Shuo; Shen, Hong; Sun, Jing Lan; Yuan, Guo Liang; Fusil, Stéphane; Garcia, Vincent; Dkhil, Brahim; Meng, Xiang Jian; Chu, Jun Hao

    2015-12-16

    Resistive switching through electroresistance (ER) effect in metal-ferroelectric-metal (MFM) capacitors has attracted increasing interest due to its potential applications as memories and logic devices. However, the detailed electronic mechanisms resulting in large ER when polarisation switching occurs in the ferroelectric barrier are still not well understood. Here, ER effect up to 1000% at room temperature is demonstrated in C-MOS compatible MFM nanocapacitors with a 8.8 nm-thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) homopolymer ferroelectric, which is very promising for silicon industry integration. Most remarkably, using theory developed for metal-semiconductor rectifying contacts, we derive an analytical expression for the variation of interfacial barrier heights due to space-charge effect that can interpret the observed ER response. We extend this space-charge model, related to the release of trapped charges by defects, to MFM structures made of ferroelectric oxides. This space-charge model provides a simple and straightforward tool to understand recent unusual reports. Finally, this work suggests that defect-engineering could be an original and efficient route for tuning the space-charge effect and thus the ER performances in future electronic devices.

  11. Effect of charge imbalance parameter on LEKW in ion-implanted quantum semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Sandhya; Yadav, Nishchhal; Ghosh, S.

    2015-07-31

    In this study we present an analytical investigation on the propagation characteristics of electro-kinetic wave modified through quantum correction term and charge imbalance parameter using quantum hydrodynamic model for an ion-implanted semiconductor plasma. The dispersion relation has been analyzed in two distinct velocity regimes. We found that as the number of negative charges resides on the colloids increases, their role become increasing effective. The present investigation is important for understanding of wave and instability phenomena and can be put to various interesting applications.

  12. Amplified effect of surface charge on cell adhesion by nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Shuaitao; Ma, Xinlei; Wang, Shutao

    2016-06-01

    Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration.Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, KFM AFM, chemical modification and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00649c

  13. Giant Born effective charges in cubic WO_3.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detraux, Francois; Ghosez, Philippe; Gonze, Xavier

    1997-03-01

    WO3 crystallizes in many different phases. It is also sometimes considered in a reference idealized simple cubic structure (defect-perovskite) where the tungsten is at the center of the cell and the oxygens at the middle of each face. Using a variational formulation of the density functional perturbation theory and a planewave-pseudopotential approach, we compute the Born effective charges for this idealized cubic structure, with an optimized lattice parameter of 3.73 ÅThe values obtained are anomalously large with respect to the nominal ionic charge (+6 on W and -2 on O). For the tungsten atom, the effective charge tensor is isotropic and Z_W= +12.43. For the oxygen, we must consider two different elements corresponding respectively to a displacement of the atom parallel or perpendicular to the W-O bond: Z^*O allel= -9.07 and Z^*O ⊥= -1.66. The giant anomalous contributions to Z^*W and Z^*O allel can be explained by transfer of charge produced by dynamic changes of hybridization between the O-2p and W-5d orbitals.

  14. Air Purification Effect of Positively and Negatively Charged Ions Generated by Discharge Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Kazuo; Nojima, Hideo

    2001-08-01

    In this paper, the air purification effect of positively and negatively charged ions generated by discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure is reported. We have developed a novel ion generation device which consists of a cylindrical glass tube and attached inner and outer mesh electrodes. With the application of AC voltage between the electrodes, positively charged ions and negatively charged ions have been generated at atmospheric pressure. The ion densities of 3.0× 104--7.0× 104 counts/cm3 have been obtained with the AC voltage of 1.8-2.3 kV (effective value). We have examined the air purification properties of this device. By the operation of this device, the initial oxygen nitride (NO) density of 10 ppm in 1 m3 (in cigarette smoke) was decreased to 1 ppm after 30 min. The number of suspended germs in air has been significantly reduced by the use of this type of ion generation device.

  15. Semiconductor drift chamber: an application of a novel charge transport scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, E.; Rehak, P.

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel charge tranport scheme in semiconductors in which the field responsible for the charge transport is independent of the depletion field. The application of the novel charge transport scheme leads to the following new semiconductor detectors: (1) Semiconductor Draft Chamber; (2) Ultra low capacitance - large semiconductor x-ray spectrometers and photodiodes; and (3) Fully depleted thick CCD. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Semiconductor Draft Chamber as a position sensing detector for high energy charged particles. Position resolution limiting factors are considered, and the values of the resolutions are given.

  16. The role of acid-base effects on particle charging in apolar media.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Matthew Michael; Berg, John C

    2015-06-01

    charging in the context of the many other factors that are important to the phenomenon, including the presence of water, of other components (e.g., synergists and contaminants), and of electric field effects. The goal is the construction of a road map describing the anticipated particle charging behavior in a wide variety of systems, assisting in the choice or development of materials for specific applications.

  17. Effect of surface charge of immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell monolayer on transport of charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Li, Guanglei; Gil, Eun Seok; Lowe, Tao Lu; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-04-01

    Charge carried by the surface glycocalyx layer (SGL) of the cerebral endothelium has been shown to significantly modulate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to charged solutes in vivo. The cultured monolayer of bEnd3, an immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell line, is becoming a popular in vitro BBB model due to its easy growth and maintenance of many BBB characteristics over repeated passages. To test whether the SGL of bEnd3 monolayer carries similar charge as that in the intact BBB and quantify this charge, which can be characterized by the SGL thickness (L(f)) and charge density (C(mf)), we measured the solute permeability of bEnd3 monolayer to neutral solutes and to solutes with similar size but opposite charges: negatively charged alpha-lactalbumin (-11) and positively charged ribonuclease (+3). Combining the measured permeability data with a transport model across the cell monolayer, we predicted the L(f) and the C(mf) of bEnd3 monolayer, which is approximately 160 nm and approximately 25 mEq/L, respectively. We also investigated whether orosomucoid, a plasma glycoprotein modulating the charge of the intact BBB, alters the charge of bEnd3 monolayer. We found that 1 mg/mL orosomucoid would increase SGL charge density of bEnd3 monolayer to approximately 2-fold of its control value.

  18. Membrane Permeabilization Induced by Sphingosine: Effect of Negatively Charged Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; Sot, Jesús; Viguera, Ana R.; Collado, M. Isabel; Torrecillas, Alejandro; Gómez-Fernández, J.C.; Goñi, Félix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine [(2S, 3R, 4E)-2-amino-4-octadecen-1, 3-diol] is the most common sphingoid long chain base in sphingolipids. It is the precursor of important cell signaling molecules, such as ceramides. In the last decade it has been shown to act itself as a potent metabolic signaling molecule, by activating a number of protein kinases. Moreover, sphingosine has been found to permeabilize phospholipid bilayers, giving rise to vesicle leakage. The present contribution intends to analyze the mechanism by which this bioactive lipid induces vesicle contents release, and the effect of negatively charged bilayers in the release process. Fluorescence lifetime measurements and confocal fluorescence microscopy have been applied to observe the mechanism of sphingosine efflux from large and giant unilamellar vesicles; a graded-release efflux has been detected. Additionally, stopped-flow measurements have shown that the rate of vesicle permeabilization increases with sphingosine concentration. Because at the physiological pH sphingosine has a net positive charge, its interaction with negatively charged phospholipids (e.g., bilayers containing phosphatidic acid together with sphingomyelins, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol) gives rise to a release of vesicular contents, faster than with electrically neutral bilayers. Furthermore, phosphorous 31-NMR and x-ray data show the capacity of sphingosine to facilitate the formation of nonbilayer (cubic phase) intermediates in negatively charged membranes. The data might explain the pathogenesis of Niemann-Pick type C1 disease. PMID:24940775

  19. Dynamic Charge Carrier Trapping in Quantum Dot Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Qian; Alivisatos, A Paul; Salmeron, Miquel

    2015-07-08

    Noncrystalline semiconductor materials often exhibit hysteresis in charge transport measurements whose mechanism is largely unknown. Here we study the dynamics of charge injection and transport in PbS quantum dot (QD) monolayers in a field effect transistor (FET). Using Kelvin probe force microscopy, we measured the temporal response of the QDs as the channel material in a FET following step function changes of gate bias. The measurements reveal an exponential decay of mobile carrier density with time constants of 3-5 s for holes and ∼10 s for electrons. An Ohmic behavior, with uniform carrier density, was observed along the channel during the injection and transport processes. These slow, uniform carrier trapping processes are reversible, with time constants that depend critically on the gas environment. We propose that the underlying mechanism is some reversible electrochemical process involving dissociation and diffusion of water and/or oxygen related species. These trapping processes are dynamically activated by the injected charges, in contrast with static electronic traps whose presence is independent of the charge state. Understanding and controlling these processes is important for improving the performance of electronic, optoelectronic, and memory devices based on disordered semiconductors.

  20. Large piezoelectric effects in charged, heterogeneous fluoropolymer electrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugschwandtner, G. S.; Schwödiauer, R.; Bauer-Gogonea, S.; Bauer, S.

    Large piezoelectric d33 coefficients around 600 pC/N are found in corona-charged non-uniform electrets consisting of elastically ``soft'' (microporous polytetrafluoroethylene PTFE) and ``stiff'' (perfluorinated cyclobutene PFCB) polymer layers. The piezoelectric activity of the two-layer fluoropolymer stack exceeds the d33 coefficient of the ferroelectric ceramic lead zirconate titanate (PZT) by more than a factor of two and that of the ferroelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) by a factor of 20. Soft piezoelectric materials may become interesting for a large number of sensor and transducer applications, in areas such as security systems, medical diagnostics, and nondestructive testing.

  1. Universal Charge Diffusion and the Butterfly Effect in Holographic Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Mike

    2016-08-01

    We study charge diffusion in holographic scaling theories with a particle-hole symmetry. We show that these theories have a universal regime in which the diffusion constant is given by Dc=C vB2/(2 π T ), where vB is the velocity of the butterfly effect. The constant of proportionality C depends only on the scaling exponents of the infrared theory. Our results suggest an unexpected connection between transport at strong coupling and quantum chaos.

  2. Long-lived charge separation and applications in artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi

    2014-05-20

    Researchers have long been interested in replicating the reactivity that occurs in photosynthetic organisms. To mimic the long-lived charge separations characteristic of the reaction center in photosynthesis, researchers have applied the Marcus theory to design synthetic multistep electron-transfer (ET) systems. In this Account, we describe our recent research on the rational design of ET control systems, based on models of the photosynthetic reaction center that rely on the Marcus theory of ET. The key to obtaining a long-lived charge separation is the careful choice of electron donors and acceptors that have small reorganization energies of ET. In these cases, the driving force of back ET is located in the Marcus inverted region, where the lifetime of the charge-separated state lengthens as the driving force of back ET increases. We chose porphyrins as electron donors and fullerenes as electron acceptors, both of which have small ET reorganization energies. By linking electron donor porphyrins and electron acceptor fullerenes at appropriate distances, we achieved charge-separated states with long lifetimes. We could further lengthen the lifetimes of charge-separated states by mixing a variety of components, such as a terminal electron donor, an electron mediator, and an electron acceptor, mimicking both the photosynthetic reaction center and the multistep photoinduced ET that occurs there. However, each step in multistep ET loses a fraction of the initial excitation energy during the long-distance charge separation. To overcome this drawback in multistep ET systems, we used designed new systems where we could finely control the redox potentials and the geometry of simple donor-acceptor dyads. These modifications resulted in a small ET reorganization energy and a high-lying triplet excited state. Our most successful example, 9-mesityl-10-methylacridinium ion (Acr(+)-Mes), can undergo a fast photoinduced ET from the mesityl (Mes) moiety to the singlet excited state

  3. Charge expulsion and Spin Meissner effect in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, J. E.

    2010-03-01

    I argue that the Meissner effect (expulsion of magnetic field from the interior of a metal going into the superconducting state) cannot be explained by the conventional BCS-London theory, hence that BCS-London theory is incorrect[1]. The theory of hole superconductivity explains the Meissner effect as arising from the expulsion of negative charge from the interior of the superconductor towards the surface, resulting in a non-homogeneous charge distribution, a macroscopic electric field in the interior, and a spin current near the surface (Spin Meissner effect). Electrodynamic equations describing this scenario will be discussed[2]. In the charge sector, these equations are related to electrodynamic equations originally proposed by the London brothers[3] but shortly thereafter discarded by them[4]. [1] J.E. Hirsch, Physica Scripta 80, 035702 (2009). [2] J.E. Hirsch, Ann. Phys. (Berlin) 17, 380 (2008). [3] F. London and H. London, Proc. R. Soc. London A149, 71 (1935). [4] H. London, Proc. R. Soc. London A155, 102 (1936).

  4. Doping effect on photoabsorption and charge-separation dynamics in light-harvesting organic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Tsuruta, Kenji; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Nakano, Aiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Using ab-initio theoretical methods, we demonstrate possible enhancement of photo-conversion efficiency of an organic solar cell via intentional doping in molecular graphene-fullerene heterojunction [the hexabenzocoronene (HBC)-triethylene glycol (TEG)-C60 molecule]. Photoabsorption analysis indicates oxygen substitution into HBC leads to an extension of the spectra up to an infrared regime. A quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation incorporating nonadiabatic electronic transitions reveals that a dissociated charge state (D+ and A-) in the O-doped system is more stable than the pristine case due to the presence of an effective barrier by the TEG HOMO/LUMO level. We also find that oxygen doping in HBC enhances the intermolecular carrier mobility after charge separation. On the other hand, the pristine molecule undergoes rapid recombination between donor and acceptor charges at the interface. These analyses suggest that the graphene oxidation opens a new window in the application of organic super-molecules to solar cells.

  5. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Yi, H T; Gartstein, Y N; Podzorov, V

    2016-03-30

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force acting on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor.

  6. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, H. T.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-30

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force acting on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Lastly, our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor.

  7. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Yi, H. T.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force acting on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor. PMID:27025354

  8. Compensation for rapid contrast variations and correction for charging effects in scanning ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sam T.

    1995-09-01

    Focused ion beam systems are now widely used tools at several stages of semiconductor device production and are finding applications in many other areas. Frequently, it is necessary to combine processing by micromachining or microdeposition with the intrinsic scanning ion microscope function of focused ion beam instruments. A problem in so doing is that image quality can change rapidly during processing as a result of changing secondary electron or secondary ion yields. Moreover, when milling insulating materials, charging effects can give rise to both spatial and temporal variations in contrast. This paper describes a method of achieving closed-loop, automated, compensation for image contrast variations which is also applicable to reducing image degradation due to charging effects in scanning ion microscopy.

  9. Effect of Charge Relaxation in Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Primary Atomization of Electrically Charged Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtine, Emilien; van Poppel, Bret; Daily, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    Electrohydrodynamics (EHD) is an interdisciplinary topic that describes the complex interaction between fluid mechanics and electric fields. In the context of combustion applications, EHD may enable improved spray control and finer atomization so that fuel injection schemes can be inexpensively developed for small engines. Moreover, EHD may provide efficient enhancements to hydrocarbon fuel atomization that could benefit a much broader range of engines and non-combustion applications. In this work, high-fidelity numerical simulations of an electrically charged kerosene jet undergoing turbulent atomization are presented. The simulations make use of first-principle-based methods designed to accurately represent the interfacial stresses and discontinuities. Under the assumption of a large electric Reynolds number, it can be appropriate to assume that the charges do not have time to relax to the liquid-gas interface, and that they do not drift within the liquid volume. Alternatively, one can solve a free charge conservation equation to fully account for charge drift. These two approaches are compared in details, and the role of charge drift in EHD atomization is analyzed. The implementation of the charge transport equation, which is discontinuous in nature, is discussed as well.

  10. [Progress in charge-coupled device and its applications].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Liu, H; He, J

    2000-04-01

    Charge-coupled device (CCD) is a photosensitive element based on the metal-oxidesemiconductor technology. Currently, it has a number of benefits; broad spectral range response, low detection limit, wide dynamic range, minimal dark current and readout noise as well as abilities of signal integration, simultaneous multichannel detection and real-time detection. In this paper, the operational principle, features and performance characterization of CCD are introduced and its applicaton in spectral detection and spectral imaging are veiwed. The development of CCD technique has brought a revolutionary progress in the spectroscopic areas. Its future developments are also outlooked.

  11. Cost-effective electric vehicle charging infrastructure siting for Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Gopal, Anand R.; Harris, Andrew; Jacobson, Arne

    2016-06-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) represent a substantial opportunity for governments to reduce emissions of both air pollutants and greenhouse gases. The Government of India has set a goal of deploying 6-7 million hybrid and PEVs on Indian roads by the year 2020. The uptake of PEVs will depend on, among other factors like high cost, how effectively range anxiety is mitigated through the deployment of adequate electric vehicle charging stations (EVCS) throughout a region. The Indian Government therefore views EVCS deployment as a central part of their electric mobility mission. The plug-in electric vehicle infrastructure (PEVI) model—an agent-based simulation modeling platform—was used to explore the cost-effective siting of EVCS throughout the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi, India. At 1% penetration in the passenger car fleet, or ˜10 000 battery electric vehicles (BEVs), charging services can be provided to drivers for an investment of 4.4 M (or 440/BEV) by siting 2764 chargers throughout the NCT of Delhi with an emphasis on the more densely populated and frequented regions of the city. The majority of chargers sited by this analysis were low power, Level 1 chargers, which have the added benefit of being simpler to deploy than higher power alternatives. The amount of public infrastructure needed depends on the access that drivers have to EVCS at home, with 83% more charging capacity required to provide the same level of service to a population of drivers without home chargers compared to a scenario with home chargers. Results also depend on the battery capacity of the BEVs adopted, with approximately 60% more charging capacity needed to achieve the same level of service when vehicles are assumed to have 57 km versus 96 km of range.

  12. Effect of Size Polydispersity on Melting of Charged Colloidal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong

    2003-09-01

    We introduce simple prescriptions of the Yukawa potential to describe the effect of size polydispersity and macroion shielding effect in charged colloidal systems. The solid-liquid phase boundaries were presented with the Lindemann criterion based on molecular dynamics simulations. Compared with the Robbins-Kremer-Grest simulation results, a deviation of melting line is observed at small lambda, which means large macroion screening length. This deviation of phase boundary is qualitatively consistent with the simulation result of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation with full many-body interactions. It is found that this deviation of the solid-liquid phase behaviour is sensitive to the screening parameter.

  13. Subbanding, Charge Transport and Related Applications in Semiconductor Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    These devices use a p-n homo -junction to confine the free electronic charge in the semiconductor to conducting regions so narrow as to exhibit...27.172 Table 6A ~0 ENERGY IN MILLI-ELECTRON VOLTS WC IN ANGSTROMS WC EC(6) ECC 7) EC(8) EC(9) ECC 10) 1.2 3669047 432.986 499.951 566.937 633.941 1.5...VC IN ANGSTROMS (6 ECC ) ECC7) EC(s) EC(9) ECCIS) 3t 236.132 279.167 322.269 365.257 418.319 1,’ 235;907 275;922 321� 364;976 408.013 I. 235,;635

  14. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin F.; Summers, Christopher J.

    1993-09-01

    This report covers: (1) invention of a new, ultra-low noise, low operating voltage APD which is expected to offer far better performance than the existing volume doped APD device; (2) performance of a comprehensive series of experiments on the acoustic and piezoelectric properties of ZnO films sputtered on GaAs which can possibly lead to a decrease in the required rf drive power for ACT devices by 15dB; (3) development of an advanced, hydrodynamic, macroscopic simulator used for evaluating the performance of ACT and CTD devices and aiding in the development of the next generation of devices; (4) experimental development of CTD devices which utilize a p-doped top barrier demonstrating charge storage capacity and low leakage currents; (5) refinements in materials growth techniques and in situ controls to lower surface defect densities to record levels as well as increase material uniformity and quality.

  15. An acoustic charge transport imager for high definition television applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin F.; Summers, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    This report covers: (1) invention of a new, ultra-low noise, low operating voltage APD which is expected to offer far better performance than the existing volume doped APD device; (2) performance of a comprehensive series of experiments on the acoustic and piezoelectric properties of ZnO films sputtered on GaAs which can possibly lead to a decrease in the required rf drive power for ACT devices by 15dB; (3) development of an advanced, hydrodynamic, macroscopic simulator used for evaluating the performance of ACT and CTD devices and aiding in the development of the next generation of devices; (4) experimental development of CTD devices which utilize a p-doped top barrier demonstrating charge storage capacity and low leakage currents; (5) refinements in materials growth techniques and in situ controls to lower surface defect densities to record levels as well as increase material uniformity and quality.

  16. Effect of sample preparation on charged impurities in graphene substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, K. M.; Dean, C. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Hone, J.; Kim, P.; Cullen, W. G.; Fuhrer, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    The mobility of graphene as fabricated on SiO2 has been found to vary widely depending on sample preparation conditions. Additionally, graphene mobility on SiO2 appears to be limited to ~20,000 cm2/Vs, likely due to charged impurities in the substrate. Here we present a study of the effect of fabrication procedures on substrate charged impurity density (nimp) utilizing ultrahigh-vacuum Kelvin probe force microscopy. We conclude that even minimal SEM exposure, as from e-beam lithography, induces an increased impurity density, while heating reduces the number of charges for sample substrates which already exhibit a higher impurity density. We measure both SiO2 and h-BN and find that all nimp values observed for SiO2 are higher than those observed for h-BN; this is consistent with the observed improvement in mobility for graphene devices fabricated on h-BN over those fabricated on SiO2 substrates. This work was supported by the US ONR MURI program, and the University of Maryland NSF-MRSEC under Grant No. DMR 05-20471.

  17. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    DOE PAGES

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; ...

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeemanmore » energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.« less

  18. Effect of pulsed current charging on the performance of nickel-cadium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedrossian, A. A.; Cheh, H. Y.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of pulsed current charging on the charge acceptance of NiCd cells in terms of mass transfer, kinetic, and structural considerations was investigated. A systemic investigation on the performance of Ni-Cd cells by pulsed current charging was conducted under a variety of well-defined charge-discharge conditions. Experiments were carried out with half cells and film electrodes. The system behavior was studied by charge acceptance, mechanistic, and structural measurements.

  19. Absence of the Electric Aharonov-Bohm Effect due to Induced Charges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Feng

    2015-09-22

    This paper states that the induced charge should not be neglected in the electric Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) effect. If the induced charge is taken into account, the interference pattern of the moving charge will not change with the potential difference between the two metal tubes. It means that the scalar potential itself can not affect the phase of the moving charge, and the true factor affecting the phase of the moving charge is the energy of the system including the moving charge and the induced charge.

  20. Absence of the Electric Aharonov-Bohm Effect due to Induced Charges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Feng

    2015-01-01

    This paper states that the induced charge should not be neglected in the electric Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) effect. If the induced charge is taken into account, the interference pattern of the moving charge will not change with the potential difference between the two metal tubes. It means that the scalar potential itself can not affect the phase of the moving charge, and the true factor affecting the phase of the moving charge is the energy of the system including the moving charge and the induced charge. PMID:26392302

  1. Space charge effects for multipactor in coaxial lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sorolla, E.

    2015-03-15

    Multipactor is a hazardous vacuum discharge produced by secondary electron emission within microwave devices of particle accelerators and telecommunication satellites. This work analyzes the dynamics of the multipactor discharge within a coaxial line for the mono-energetic electron emission model taking into account the space charge effects. The steady-state is predicted by the proposed model and an analytical expression for the maximum number of electrons released by the discharge presented. This could help to link simulations to experiments and define a multipactor onset criterion.

  2. Charging of heated colloidal particles using the electrolyte Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Majee, Arghya; Würger, Alois

    2012-03-16

    We propose a novel actuation mechanism for colloids, which is based on the Seebeck effect of the electrolyte solution: Laser heating of a nonionic particle accumulates in its vicinity a net charge Q, which is proportional to the excess temperature at the particle surface. The corresponding long-range thermoelectric field E is proportional to 1/r(2) provides a tool for controlled interactions with nearby beads or with additional molecular solutes. An external field E(ext) drags the thermocharged particle at a velocity that depends on its size and absorption properties; the latter point could be particularly relevant for separating carbon nanotubes according to their electronic band structure.

  3. Re+e- and an effective QCD charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, J. D.; Natale, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the electron-positron annihilation process into hadrons Re+e- up to O (αs3), and we adopt the smearing method suggest by Poggio, Quinn, and Weinberg to confront the experimental data with theory. As a theoretical model, we use a QCD coupling constant frozen in the low-energy regime, where this coupling can be parametrized in terms of an effective dynamical gluon mass (mg) which is determined through Schwinger-Dyson equations. In order to find the best fit between experimental data and theory, we perform a χ2 study, that, within the uncertainties of the approach, has a minimum value when mg/ΛQCD is in the range 1.2-1.4. These values are in agreement with other phenomenological determinations of this ratio and lead to an infrared effective charge αs(0 )≈0.7 . We comment how this effective charge may affect the global duality mass scale that indicates the frontier between perturbative and nonperturbative physics.

  4. Applicability of micro-channel plate followed by phosphor screen to charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himura, H.; Nakata, S.; Sanpei, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the applicability of a micro-channel plate (MCP) followed by a phosphor screen to charged particles along with a calibration method for estimating the acceptable limit of input particle flux and appropriate operation parameters of a particular MCP. For the first time, plasmas consisting of only lithium ions are injected into the MCP. Despite large ion numbers (Ni) on the order of ≃107, no deterioration in the effective gain (αG) of the MCP owing to an excess amount of the extracted charge occurs in a certain range of the amplifier voltage (ΔUM) applied to the MCP. The measured αG nearly agrees with the expected value. However, once ΔUM exceeds a limit value, αG eventually begins to saturate. This is also verified in experiments using pure electron plasmas. An appropriate range of ΔUM is presented to avoid saturation and, finally, derive Ni directly from the secondary electron current outputted from the MCP only after the indispensable calibration.

  5. [Galactic heavy charged particles damaging effect on biological structures].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Krasavin, E A; Ostrovskiĭ, M A

    2013-03-01

    A concept of the radiation risk of the manned interplanetary flights is proposed and substantiated. Heavy charged particles that are a component of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have a high damaging effect on the biological structures as great amount of energy is deposited in heavy particle tracks. The high biological effectiveness of heavy ions is observed in their action on cell genetic structures and the whole organism, including the brain structures. The hippocampus is the part of the central nervous system that is the most sensitive to radiation--first of all, to heavy charged particles. Irradiation of animals with accelerated iron ions at doses corresponding to the real fluxes of GCR heavy nuclei, to which Mars mission crews can be exposed, leads to marked behavioral function disorders in the post-irradiation period. To evaluate the radiation risk for the interplanetary flight crews, the concept of successful mission accomplishment is introduced. In these conditions, the central nervous system structures can be the critical target of GCR heavy nuclei. Their damage can modify the higher integrative functions of the brain and cause disorders in the crew members' operator performances.

  6. Charge state separation for protein applications using a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chernushevich, I V; Fell, L M; Bloomfield, N; Metalnikov, P S; Loboda, A V

    2003-01-01

    A novel method for separating ions according to their charge state using a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer is presented. The benefits of charge state separation are particularly apparent in protein identification applications at low femtomole concentration levels, where in conventional TOF MS spectra peptide ions are often lost in a sea of chemical noise. When doubly and triply charged tryptic peptide ions need to be filtered from singly charged background ions, the latter are suppressed by two to three orders of magnitude, while from 10-50% of multiply charged ions remain. The suppression of chemical noise reduces the need for chromatography and can make this experimental approach the electrospray equivalent of conventional MALDI peptide maps. If unambiguous identification cannot be achieved, MS/MS experiments are performed on the precursor ions identified through charge separation, while the previously described Q2-trapping duty cycle enhancement is tuned for approximately 1.4 of the precursor m/z to enhance intensities of ions with m/z values above that of the precursor. The resulting product ion spectra contain few fragments of impurities and provide quick and unambiguous identification through database search. The multiple charge separation technique requires minimal tuning and may become a useful tool for analysis of complex mixtures.

  7. Charge/mass dynamic structure factors of water and applications to dielectric friction and electroacoustic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Shadkhoo, Shahriar; Bruinsma, Robijn; Netz, Roland R.

    2014-02-01

    We determine time correlation functions and dynamic structure factors of the number and charge density of liquid water from molecular dynamics simulations. Using these correlation functions we consider dielectric friction and electro-acoustic coupling effects via linear response theory. From charge-charge correlations, the drag force on a moving point charge is derived and found to be maximal at a velocity of around 300 m/s. Strong deviations in the resulting friction coefficients from approximate theory employing a single Debye relaxation mode are found that are due to non-Debye-like resonances at high frequencies. From charge-mass cross-correlations the ultrasonic vibration potential is derived, which characterizes the conversion of acoustic waves into electric time-varying potentials. Along the dispersion relation for normal sound waves in water, the ultrasonic vibration potential is shown to strongly vary and to increase for larger wavelengths.

  8. Charge/mass dynamic structure factors of water and applications to dielectric friction and electroacoustic conversion.

    PubMed

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Shadkhoo, Shahriar; Bruinsma, Robijn; Netz, Roland R

    2014-02-07

    We determine time correlation functions and dynamic structure factors of the number and charge density of liquid water from molecular dynamics simulations. Using these correlation functions we consider dielectric friction and electro-acoustic coupling effects via linear response theory. From charge-charge correlations, the drag force on a moving point charge is derived and found to be maximal at a velocity of around 300 m/s. Strong deviations in the resulting friction coefficients from approximate theory employing a single Debye relaxation mode are found that are due to non-Debye-like resonances at high frequencies. From charge-mass cross-correlations the ultrasonic vibration potential is derived, which characterizes the conversion of acoustic waves into electric time-varying potentials. Along the dispersion relation for normal sound waves in water, the ultrasonic vibration potential is shown to strongly vary and to increase for larger wavelengths.

  9. Particle Emission and Charging Effects Induced by Fracture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-15

    recombination with mobile charge carriers). These processes are initiated by bond breaking resulting in the creation of localized departures from...subsequendy decay to yield after-emission. Thermally stimulated relaxation involving mobile charge carriers releasing energy at appropriate recombination...region of contact. This flow of charge is slow because of the poor charge mobility in the rubber. In addition, any oxide layer on the metal also

  10. Spacecraft Charging Effects on Satellites Following STARFISH Event

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-17

    Spacecraft Charging by Magnetospheric Plasmas , ed. Alan Rosen, Vol. 47, Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics, AIDA, New York (1975). 5. D... Magnetospheric Plasmas , Vol. 47, Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics, AIAA, New York (1975). 7. R. R. Lovell et al., " Spacecraft Charging Investigation: A...Joint Research and Technology Program," Spacecraft Charging 1y Magnetospheric Plasmas , Vol. 47,

  11. Charge carrier coherence and Hall effect in organic semiconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Yi, H. T.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-30

    Hall effect measurements are important for elucidating the fundamental charge transport mechanisms and intrinsic mobility in organic semiconductors. However, Hall effect studies frequently reveal an unconventional behavior that cannot be readily explained with the simple band-semiconductor Hall effect model. Here, we develop an analytical model of Hall effect in organic field-effect transistors in a regime of coexisting band and hopping carriers. The model, which is supported by the experiments, is based on a partial Hall voltage compensation effect, occurring because hopping carriers respond to the transverse Hall electric field and drift in the direction opposite to the Lorentz force actingmore » on band carriers. We show that this can lead in particular to an underdeveloped Hall effect observed in organic semiconductors with substantial off-diagonal thermal disorder. Lastly, our model captures the main features of Hall effect in a variety of organic semiconductors and provides an analytical description of Hall mobility, carrier density and carrier coherence factor.« less

  12. Charge Transport in Field-Effect Transistors based on Layered Materials and their Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jatinder

    In the quest for energy efficiency and device miniaturization, the research in using atomically thin materials for device applications is gaining momentum. The electronic network in layered materials is different from 3D counterparts. It is due to the interlayer couplings and density of states because of their 2D nature. Therefore, understanding the charge transport in layered materials is fundamental to explore the vast opportunities these ultra-thin materials offer. Hence, the challenges targeted in the thesis are: (1) understanding the charge transport in layered materials based on electronic network of quantum and oxide capacitances, (2) studying thickness dependence, ranging from monolayer to bulk, of full range-characteristics of field-effect transistor (FET) based on layered materials, (3) investigating the total interface trap charges to achieve the ultimate subthreshold slope (SS) theoretically possible in FETs, (4) understanding the effect of the channel length on the performance of layered materials, (5) understanding the effect of substrate on performance of the TMDC FETs and studying if the interface of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs)/hexagonalboron nitride (h-BN) can have less enough trap charges to observe ambipolar behavior, (6) Exploring optoelectronic properties in 2D heterostructures that includes understanding graphene/WS2 heterostructure and its optoelectronic applications by creating a p-n junction at the interface. The quality of materials and the interface are the issues for observing and extracting clean physics out of these layered materials and heterostructures. In this dissertation, we realized the use of quantum capacitance in layered materials, substrate effects and carrier transport in heterostructure.

  13. Anomalous Shrinking-Swelling of Nanoconfined End-Charged Polyelectrolyte Brushes: Interplay of Confinement and Electrostatic Effects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2016-07-14

    In this article, we model the structure and configuration of the end-charged polyelectrolyte (PE) brushes grafted on the inner walls of a nanochannel. When the confinement effect is weak, that is, d0 < h/2 (d0 is the PE brush height without electrostatic effects and h is the nanochannel half-height), d < d0 (d is the brush height with the electrostatic effects), that is, the brushes shrink due to the electrostatic effects. Furthermore, for this case, an increase in salt concentration increases d. On the contrary, for the case in which the confinement effect is strong (i.e., d0 > h/2), d > d0 (i.e., the electrostatic effects swell the brushes), and an increase in salt concentration decreases the brush height. These findings reveal that the behavior of the end-charged brushes shows three unique differences when compared to that of the standard PE brushes with charges along their entire backbone. These differences are (a) the presence of a distinct role of the confinement in dictating how the electrostatic effects mediated by the electric double layer govern the height of end-charged brushes, (b) electrostatic-effect-driven shrinking of end-charged brushes for d0 < h/2 (for backbone-charged brushes, the electrostatic effects always swell the brushes), and (c) swelling of end-charged brushes with an increase in salt concentration for d0 < h/2 (backbone-charged brushes always shrink with an increase in salt concentration). Such unique effects of confinement and electrostatics on PE brushes have not been reported previously, and we anticipate that these findings will shed new light on the structure and properties of PE-brush-functionalized nanochannels with implications in applications such as fabrication of functionalized-nanochannel-based nanofluidic diodes, valves, biosensors, current rectifiers, and so forth.

  14. Electrolyte distribution around two like-charged rods: their effective attractive interaction and angular dependent charge reversal.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Angeles, Felipe; Odriozola, Gerardo; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2006-04-07

    A simple model for two like-charged parallel rods immersed in an electrolyte solution is considered. We derived the three point extension (TPE) of the hypernetted chain/mean spherical approximation (TPE-HNC/MSA) and Poisson-Boltzmann (TPE-PB) integral equations. We numerically solve these equations and compare them to our results of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The effective interaction force, F(T), the charge distribution profiles, rho(el)(x,y), and the angular dependent integrated charge function, P(theta), are calculated for this system. The analysis of F(T) is carried out in terms of the electrostatic and entropic (depletion) contributions, F(E) and F(C). We studied several cases of monovalent and divalent electrolytes, for which the ionic size and concentration are varied. We find good qualitative agreement between TPE-HNC/MSA and MC in all the cases studied. The rod-rod force is found to be attractive when immersed in large size, monovalent or divalent electrolytes. In general, the TPE-PB has poor agreement with the MC. For large monovalent and divalent electrolytes, we find angular dependent charge reversal charge inversion and polarizability. We discuss the intimate relationship between this angular dependent charge reversal and rod-rod attraction.

  15. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T; Sun, Yujie; Božović, Ivan

    2016-04-19

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4(LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point atx∼ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear belowTCG∼ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps,Δx∼ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state.

  16. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T.; Sun, Yujie; Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point at x ∼ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear below TCG ∼ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps, Δx ∼ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state. PMID:27044081

  17. Influence of the shell thickness and charge distribution on the effective interaction between two like-charged hollow spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Daniel G.; Caragheorgheopol, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The mean-force and the potential of the mean force between two like-charged spherical shells were investigated in the salt-free limit using the primitive model and Monte Carlo simulations. Apart from an angular homogeneous distribution, a discrete charge distribution where point charges localized on the shell outer surface followed an icosahedral arrangement was considered. The electrostatic coupling of the model system was altered by the presence of mono-, trivalent counterions or small dendrimers, each one bearing a net charge of 9 e. We analyzed in detail how the shell thickness and the radial and angular distribution of the shell charges influenced the effective interaction between the shells. We found a sequence of the potential of the mean force similar to the like-charged filled spheres, ranging from long-range purely repulsive to short-range purely attractive as the electrostatic coupling increased. Both types of potentials were attenuated and an attractive-to-repulsive transition occurred in the presence of trivalent counterions as a result of (i) thinning the shell or (ii) shifting the shell charge from the outer towards the inner surface. The potential of the mean force became more attractive with the icosahedrally symmetric charge model, and additionally, at least one shell tended to line up with 5-fold symmetry axis along the longest axis of the simulation box at the maximum attraction. The results provided a basic framework of understanding the non-specific electrostatic origin of the agglomeration and long-range assembly of the viral nanoparticles.

  18. Three dimensional simulations of space charge dominated heavy ion beams with applications to inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, David Peter

    1994-11-01

    Heavy ion fusion requires injection, transport and acceleration of high current beams. Detailed simulation of such beams requires fully self-consistent space charge fields and three dimensions. WARP3D, developed for this purpose, is a particle-in-cell plasma simulation code optimized to work within the framework of an accelerator`s lattice of accelerating, focusing, and bending elements. The code has been used to study several test problems and for simulations and design of experiments. Two applications are drift compression experiments on the MBE-4 facility at LBL and design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector for the proposed ILSE facility. With aggressive drift compression on MBE-4, anomalous emittance growth was observed. Simulations carried out to examine possible causes showed that essentially all the emittance growth is result of external forces on the beam and not of internal beam space-charge fields. Dominant external forces are the dodecapole component of focusing fields, the image forces on the surrounding pipe and conductors, and the octopole fields that result from the structure of the quadrupole focusing elements. Goal of the design of the electrostatic quadrupole injector is to produce a beam of as low emittance as possible. The simulations show that the dominant effects that increase the emittance are the nonlinear octopole fields and the energy effect (fields in the axial direction that are off-axis). Injectors were designed that minimized the beam envelope in order to reduce the effect of the nonlinear fields. Alterations to the quadrupole structure that reduce the nonlinear fields further were examined. Comparisons were done with a scaled experiment resulted in very good agreement.

  19. Simulation of impulse effects from explosive charges containing metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, K.; Nance, D. V.; Menon, S.

    2010-06-01

    The propagation of an explosive blast wave containing inert metal particles is investigated numerically using a robust two-phase methodology with appropriate models to account for real gas behavior, inter-phase interactions, and inter-particle collisions to study the problem of interest. A new two-phase Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation is proposed that can handle the dense nature of the flow-field. The velocity and momentum profiles of the gas and particle phases are analyzed and used to elucidate the inter-phase momentum transfer, and its effect on the impulsive aspects of heterogeneous explosive charges. The particles are found to pick up significant amounts of momentum and kinetic energy from the gas, and by virtue of their inertia, are observed to sustain it for a longer time. The impulse characteristics of heterogeneous explosives are compared with a homogeneous explosive containing the same amount of high explosive, and it is observed that the addition of solid particles augments the impulsive loading significantly in the near-field, and to a smaller extent in the far-field. The total impulsive loading is found to be insensitive to the particle size added to the explosive charge above a certain cut-off radius, but the individual impulse components are found to be sensitive, and particles smaller than this cut-off size deliver about 8% higher total impulse than the larger ones. Overall, this study provides crucial insights to understand the impulsive loading characteristics of heterogeneous explosives.

  20. Interactions of human hemoglobin with charged ligand-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and effect of counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Goutam; Panicker, Lata

    2014-12-01

    Human hemoglobin is an important metalloprotein. It has tetrameric structure with each subunit containing a `heme' group which carries oxygen and carbon dioxide in blood. In this work, we have investigated the interactions of human hemoglobin (Hb) with charged ligand-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and the effect of counterions, in aqueous medium. Several techniques like DLS and ζ-potential measurements, UV-vis, fluorescence, and CD spectroscopy have been used to characterize the interaction. The nanoparticle size was measured to be in the range of 20-30 nm. Our results indicated the binding of Hb with both positively as well as negatively charged ligand-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles in neutral aqueous medium which was driven by the electrostatic and the hydrophobic interactions. The electrostatic binding interaction was not seen in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4. We have also observed that the `heme' groups of Hb remained unaffected on binding with charged nanoparticles, suggesting the utility of the charged ligand-functionalized nanoparticles in biomedical applications.

  1. Proximity effects in cold gases of multiply charged atoms (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikina, I.; Shikin, V.

    2016-07-01

    Possible proximity effects in gases of cold, multiply charged atoms are discussed. Here we deal with rarefied gases with densities nd of multiply charged (Z ≫ 1) atoms at low temperatures in the well-known Thomas-Fermi (TF) approximation, which can be used to evaluate the statistical properties of single atoms. In order to retain the advantages of the TF formalism, which is successful for symmetric problems, the external boundary conditions accounting for the finiteness of the density of atoms (donors), nd ≠ 0, are also symmetrized (using a spherical Wigner-Seitz cell) and formulated in a standard way that conserves the total charge within the cell. The model shows that at zero temperature in a rarefied gas of multiply charged atoms there is an effective long-range interaction Eproxi(nd), the sign of which depends on the properties of the outer shells of individual atoms. The long-range character of the interaction Eproxi is evaluated by comparing it with the properties of the well-known London dispersive attraction ELond(nd) < 0, which is regarded as a long-range interaction in gases. For the noble gases argon, krypton, and xenon Eproxi>0 and for the alkali and alkaline-earth elements Eproxi < 0. At finite temperatures, TF statistics manifests a new, anomalously large proximity effect, which reflects the tendency of electrons localized at Coulomb centers to escape into the continuum spectrum. The properties of thermal decay are interesting in themselves as they determine the important phenomenon of dissociation of neutral complexes into charged fragments. This phenomenon appears consistently in the TF theory through the temperature dependence of the different versions of Eproxi. The anomaly in the thermal proximity effect shows up in the following way: for T ≠ 0 there is no equilibrium solution of TS statistics for single multiply charged atoms in a vacuum when the effect is present. Instability is suppressed in a Wigner-Seitz model under the assumption that

  2. Partial Dissolution of Charge Order Phase Observed in β-(BEDT-TTF)2PF6 Single Crystal Field Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Masatoshi; Moritoshi, Norifumi; Kuniyoshi, Shigekazu; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kudo, Kazuhiro; Masu, Hyuma

    2016-04-01

    The effect of an applied gate electric field on the charge-order phase in β-(BEDT-TTF)2PF6 single-crystal field-effect transistor structure was observed at around room temperature by technical improvement with respect to sample preparation and electrical measurements. A relatively slight but systematic increase of the electrical conductance induced by the applied gate electric field and its temperature dependence was observed at around the metal-insulator transition temperature (TMI). The temperature dependence of the modulated electrical conductance demonstrated that TMI was shifted toward the lower side by application of a gate electric field, which corresponds to partial dissolution of the charge-order phase. The thickness of the partially dissolved charge order region was estimated to be several score times larger than the charge accumulation region.

  3. Effects of surface charges of gold nanoclusters on long-term in vivo biodistribution, toxicity, and cancer radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Ying; Chen, Jie; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hao; Shen, Xiu; Sun, Yuan-Ming; Guo, Meili; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) have exhibited great advantages in medical diagnostics and therapies due to their efficient renal clearance and high tumor uptake. The in vivo effects of the surface chemistry of Au NCs are important for the development of both nanobiological interfaces and potential clinical contrast reagents, but these properties are yet to be fully investigated. In this study, we prepared glutathione-protected Au NCs of a similar hydrodynamic size but with three different surface charges: positive, negative, and neutral. Their in vivo biodistribution, excretion, and toxicity were investigated over a 90-day period, and tumor uptake and potential application to radiation therapy were also evaluated. The results showed that the surface charge greatly influenced pharmacokinetics, particularly renal excretion and accumulation in kidney, liver, spleen, and testis. Negatively charged Au NCs displayed lower excretion and increased tumor uptake, indicating a potential for NC-based therapeutics, whereas positively charged clusters caused transient side effects on the peripheral blood system. PMID:27555769

  4. Charge Transfer and Support Effects in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hervier, Antoine

    2011-12-21

    the band bending at the interface, gives rise to a steady-state flow of hot holes to the surface. This leads to a decrease in turnover on the surface, an effect which is enhanced when a reverse bias is applied to the diode. Similar experiments were carried out for CO oxidation. On Pt/Si diodes, the reaction rate was found to increase when a forward bias was applied. When the diode was exposed to visible light and a reverse bias was applied, the rate was instead decreased. This implies that a flow of negative charges to the surface increases turnover, while positive charges decrease it. Charge flow in an oxide supported metal catalyst can be modified even without designing the catalyst as a solid state electronic device. This was done by doping stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric TiO2 films with F, and using the resulting oxides as supports for Pt films. In the case of stoichiometric TiO2, F was found to act as an n-type dopant, creating a population of filled electronic states just below the conduction band, and dramatically increasing the conductivity of the oxide film. The electrons in those states can transfer to surface O, activating it for reaction with CO, and leading to increased turnover for CO oxidation. This reinforces the hypothesis that CO oxidation is activated by a flow of negative charges to the surface. The same set of catalysts was used for methanol oxidation. The electronic properties of the TiO2 films again correlated with the turnover rates, but also with selectivity. With stoichiometric TiO2 as the support, F-doping caused an increase in selectivity toward the formation of partial oxidation products, formaldehyde and methyl formate, versus the total oxidation product, CO2. With non-stoichiometric TiO2, F-doping had the reverse effect. Ambient Pressure X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to investigate this F-doping effect in reaction conditions. In O2 alone, and in

  5. 47 CFR 1.1104 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for media services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... filings for media services. 1.1104 Section 1.1104 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... of charges for applications and other filings for media services. Remit manual filings and/or payment for these services to the: Federal Communications Commission, Media Bureau Services, P.O. Box...

  6. 12 CFR 226.5a - Credit and charge card applications and solicitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Credit and charge card applications and solicitations. 226.5a Section 226.5a Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Open-End Credit § 226.5a Credit and...

  7. 22 CFR 202.6 - Application for reimbursement of freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... International Development, Attention: Banking and Finance Division, Office of Financial Management, Washington... charges. 202.6 Section 202.6 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OVERSEAS SHIPMENTS OF... programs, projects, and services in accordance with § 202.5. (2) The application for reimbursement...

  8. The Effect of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Surface Charge on Antigen Cross-Presentation.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yongbin; Xing, Yun; Ren, Hongyan; Cui, Zhihua; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Guangjie; Urba, Walter J; Hu, Qingang; Hu, Hongming

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) have been explored for different kinds of applications in biomedicine, mechanics, and information. Here, we explored the synthetic SPIO NPs as an adjuvant on antigen cross-presentation ability by enhancing the intracellular delivery of antigens into antigen presenting cells (APCs). Particles with different chemical modifications and surface charges were used to study the mechanism of action of antigen delivery. Specifically, two types of magnetic NPs, γFe2O3/APTS (3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane) NPs and γFe2O3/DMSA (meso-2, 3-Dimercaptosuccinic acid) NPs, with the same crystal structure, magnetic properties, and size distribution were prepared. Then, the promotion of T-cell activation via dendritic cells (DCs) was compared among different charged antigen coated NPs. Moreover, the activation of the autophagy, cytosolic delivery of the antigens, and antigen degradation mediated by the proteasome and lysosome were measured. Our results indicated that positive charged γFe2O3/APTS NPs, but not negative charged γFe2O3/DMSA NPs, enhanced the cross-presentation ability of DCs. Increased cross-presentation ability induced by γFe2O3/APTS NPs was associated with increased cytosolic antigen delivery. On the contrary, γFe2O3/DMSA NPs was associated with rapid autophagy. Overall, our results suggest that antigen delivered in cytoplasm induced by positive charged particles is beneficial for antigen cross-presentation and T-cell activation. NPs modified with different chemistries exhibit diverse biological properties and differ greatly in their adjuvant potentials. Thus, it should be carefully considered many different effects of NPs to design effective and safe adjuvants.

  9. The Effect of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Surface Charge on Antigen Cross-Presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Yongbin; Xing, Yun; Ren, Hongyan; Cui, Zhihua; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Guangjie; Urba, Walter J.; Hu, Qingang; Hu, Hongming

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) have been explored for different kinds of applications in biomedicine, mechanics, and information. Here, we explored the synthetic SPIO NPs as an adjuvant on antigen cross-presentation ability by enhancing the intracellular delivery of antigens into antigen presenting cells (APCs). Particles with different chemical modifications and surface charges were used to study the mechanism of action of antigen delivery. Specifically, two types of magnetic NPs, γFe2O3/APTS (3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane) NPs and γFe2O3/DMSA (meso-2, 3-Dimercaptosuccinic acid) NPs, with the same crystal structure, magnetic properties, and size distribution were prepared. Then, the promotion of T-cell activation via dendritic cells (DCs) was compared among different charged antigen coated NPs. Moreover, the activation of the autophagy, cytosolic delivery of the antigens, and antigen degradation mediated by the proteasome and lysosome were measured. Our results indicated that positive charged γFe2O3/APTS NPs, but not negative charged γFe2O3/DMSA NPs, enhanced the cross-presentation ability of DCs. Increased cross-presentation ability induced by γFe2O3/APTS NPs was associated with increased cytosolic antigen delivery. On the contrary, γFe2O3/DMSA NPs was associated with rapid autophagy. Overall, our results suggest that antigen delivered in cytoplasm induced by positive charged particles is beneficial for antigen cross-presentation and T-cell activation. NPs modified with different chemistries exhibit diverse biological properties and differ greatly in their adjuvant potentials. Thus, it should be carefully considered many different effects of NPs to design effective and safe adjuvants.

  10. Signal modeling of charge sharing effect in simple pixelated CdZnTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Cheon; Kaye, William R.; He, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    In order to study the energy resolution degradation in 3D position-sensitive pixelated CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, a detailed detector system modeling package has been developed and used to analyze the detector performance. A 20 × 20 × 15 mm3 CZT crystal with an 11 × 11 simple-pixel anode array and a 1.72 mm pixel pitch was modeled. The VAS UM/TAT4 Application Specific Integrated Circuitry (ASIC) was used for signal read-out. Components of the simulation package include gamma-ray interactions with the CZT crystal, charge induction, electronic noise, pulse shaping, and ASIC triggering procedures. The charge induction model considers charge drift, trapping, diffusion, and sharing between pixels. This system model is used to determine the effects of electron cloud sharing, weighting potential non-uniformity, and weighting potential cross-talk which produce non-uniform signal responses for different gamma-ray interaction positions and ultimately degrade energy resolution. The effect of the decreased weighting potential underneath the gap between pixels on the total pulse amplitude of events has been studied. The transient signals induced by electron clouds collected near the gap between pixels may generate false signals, and the measured amplitude can be even greater than the photopeak. As the number of pixels that collect charge increases, the probability of side-neighbor events due to charge sharing significantly increases. If side-neighbor events are not corrected appropriately, the energy resolution of pixelated CZT detectors in multiple-pixel events degrades rapidly.

  11. A Two-Dimensional One Component Plasma and a Test Charge: Polarization Effects and Effective Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Téllez, Gabriel; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    We study the effective interactions between a test charge Q and a one-component plasma, i.e. a complex made up of mobile point particles with charge q, and a uniform oppositely charged background. The background has the form of a flat disk, in which the mobile charges can move. The test particle is approached perpendicularly to the disk, along its axis of symmetry. All particles interact by a logarithmic potential. The long and short distance features of the effective potential—the free energy of the system for a given distance between Q and the disk—are worked out analytically in detail. They crucially depend on the sign of Q/q, and on the global charge borne by the discotic complex, that can vanish. While most results are obtained at the intermediate coupling Γ≡βq 2=2 (β being the inverse temperature), we have also investigated situations with stronger couplings: Γ=4 and 6. We have found that at large distances, the sign of the effective force reflects subtle details of the charge distribution on the disk, whereas at short distances, polarization effects invariably lead to effective attractions.

  12. Nonvolatile memory with graphene oxide as a charge storage node in nanowire field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, David J.; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Choi, Sung-Jin; Moon, Dong-Il; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2012-02-01

    Through the structural modification of a three-dimensional silicon nanowire field-effect transistor, i.e., a double-gate FinFET, a structural platform was developed which allowed for us to utilize graphene oxide (GO) as a charge trapping layer in a nonvolatile memory device. By creating a nanogap between the gate and the channel, GO was embedded after the complete device fabrication. By applying a proper gate voltage, charge trapping, and de-trapping within the GO was enabled and resulted in large threshold voltage shifts. The employment of GO with FinFET in our work suggests that graphitic materials can potentially play a significant role for future nanoelectronic applications.

  13. The effect of surface charge on the boundary slip of various oleophilic/phobic surfaces immersed in liquids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifan; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-10-14

    The reduction of fluid drag is an important issue in many fluid flow applications at the micro/nanoscale. Boundary slip is believed to affect fluid drag. Slip length has been measured on various surfaces with different degrees of hydrophobicity and oleophobicity immersed in various liquids of scientific interest. Surface charge has been found to affect slip length in water and electrolytes. However, there are no studies on the effect of surface charge on slip at solid-oil interfaces. This study focuses on the effect of surface charge on the boundary slip of superoleophilic, oleophilic, oleophobic, and superoleophobic surfaces immersed in deionized (DI) water and hexadecane and ethylene glycol, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface charge was changed by applying a positive electric field to the solid-liquid interface, and by using liquids with different pH values. The results show that slip length increases with an increase in applied positive electric field voltage. Slip length also increases with a decrease in the pH of the solutions. The change in slip length is dependent on the absolute value of the surface charge, and a larger surface charge density results in a smaller slip length. In addition, the surface charge density at different solid-liquid interfaces is related to the dielectric properties of the surface. The underlying mechanisms are analyzed.

  14. Effect of antenna structures on charging damage in PIII

    SciTech Connect

    En, W.G.; Cheung, N.W.

    1996-12-31

    Antenna structures are shown to enhance charging damage in MOSFET devices during Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII). The antenna structure increases the total charge per pulse induced on the floating gate oxide, enhancing the charge by up to several orders of magnitude. Using a coupled analytical model of the plasma, device structure and substrate bias, the dependence of the antenna structure on the induced charge per pulse is found. From the simulation, the phase space of antenna ratio and charge per pulse is mapped into three regions: no charging damage, device degradation, and oxide failure. Experimental results using three different antenna ratios (5k:1, 11k:1, 44k:1) correlate well with simulation results.

  15. Charge diffusion and the butterfly effect in striped holographic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Andrew; Steinberg, Julia

    2016-10-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that the butterfly velocity — a speed at which quantum information propagates — may provide a fundamental bound on diffusion constants in dirty incoherent metals. We analytically compute the charge diffusion constant and the butterfly velocity in charge-neutral holographic matter with long wavelength "hydrodynamic" disorder in a single spatial direction. In this limit, we find that the butterfly velocity does not set a sharp lower bound for the charge diffusion constant.

  16. Simulation study of spheroidal dust gains charging: Applicable to dust grain alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Zahed, H.; Sobhanian, S.; Mahmoodi, J.; Khorram, S.

    2006-09-15

    The charging process of nonspherical dust grains in an unmagnetized plasma as well as in the presence of a magnetic field is studied. It is shown that unlike the spherical dust grain, due to nonhomogeneity of charge distribution on the spheroidal dust surface, the resultant electric forces on electrons and ions are different. This process produces some surface charge density gradient on the nonspherical grain surface. Effects of a magnetic field and other plasma parameters on the properties of the dust particulate are studied. It has been shown that the alignment direction could be changed or even reversed with the magnetic field and plasma parameters. Finally, the charge distribution on the spheroidal grain surface is studied for different ambient parameters including plasma temperature, neutral collision frequency, and the magnitude of the magnetic field.

  17. Kinetic and fluid descriptions of charged particle swarms in gases and nonpolar fluids: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujko, Sasa

    2016-09-01

    In this work we review the progress achieved over the last few decades in the fundamental kinetic theory of charged particle swarms with the focus on numerical techniques for the solution of Boltzmann's equation for electrons, as well as on the development of fluid models. We present a time-dependent multi term solution of Boltzmann's equation valid for electrons and positrons in varying configurations of electric and magnetic fields. The capacity of a theory and associated computer code will be illustrated by considering the heating mechanisms for electrons in radio-frequency electric and magnetic fields in a collision-dominated regime under conditions when electron transport is greatly affected by non-conservative collisions. The kinetic theory for solving the Boltzmann equation will be followed by a fluid equation description of charged particle swarms in both the hydrodynamic and non-hydrodynamic regimes, highlighting (i) the utility of momentum transfer theory for evaluating collisional terms in the balance equations and (ii) closure assumptions and approximations. The applications of this theory are split into three sections. First, we will present our 1.5D model of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) which are used for timing and triggering purposes in many high energy physics experiments. The model is employed to study the avalanche to streamer transition in RPCs under the influence of space charge effects and photoionization. Second, we will discuss our high-order fluid model for streamer discharges. Particular emphases will be placed on the correct implementation of transport data in streamer models as well as on the evaluation of the mean-energy-dependent collision rates for electrons required as an input in the high-order fluid model. In the last segment of this work, we will present our model to study the avalanche to streamer transition in non-polar fluids. Using a Monte Carlo simulation technique we have calculated transport coefficients for electrons in

  18. Parton Charge Symmetry Violation: Electromagnetic Effects and W Production Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Londergan; D.P. Murdock; A.W. Thomas

    2006-04-14

    Recent phenomenological work has examined two different ways of including charge symmetry violation in parton distribution functions. First, a global phenomenological fit to high energy data has included charge symmetry breaking terms, leading to limits on the magnitude of parton charge symmetry breaking. In a second approach, two groups have included the coupling of partons to photons in the QCD evolution equations. One possible experiment that could search for isospin violation in parton distributions is a measurement of the asymmetry in W production at a collider. In this work we include both of the postulated sources of parton charge symmetry violation. We show that, given charge symmetry violation of a magnitude consistent with existing high energy data, the expected W production asymmetries would be quite small, generally less than one percent.

  19. The effect of the charging protocol on the cycle life of a Li-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng Shui

    The effect of the charging protocol on the cycle life of a commercial 18650 Li-ion cell was studied using three methods: (1) constant current (CC) charging, (2) constant power (CP) charging, and (3) multistage constant current (MCC) charging. The MCC-charging consists of two CC steps, which starts with a low current to charge the initial 10% capacity followed by a high current charging until the cell voltage reaches 4.2 V. Using these methods, respectively, the cell was charged to 4.2 V followed by a constant voltage (CV) charging until the current declined to 0.05 C. Results showed that the cycle life of the cell strongly depended on the charging protocol even if the same charging rate was used. Among these three methods, the CC-method was found to be more suitable for slow charging (0.5 C) while the CP-method was better for fast charging (1 C). Impedance analyses indicated that the capacity loss during cycling was mainly attributed to the increase of charge-transfer resistance as a result of the progressive growth of surface layers on the surface of two electrodes. Fast charging resulted in an accelerated capacity fading due to the loss of Li + ions and the related growth of a surface layer, which was associated with metallic lithium plating onto the anode and a high polarization at the electrolyte-electrode interface. Analyses of the cell electrochemistry showed that use of a reduced current to charge the initial 10% capacity and near the end of charge, respectively, was favorable for long cycle life.

  20. Screening effects on structure and diffusion in confined charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Kittner, Madeleine; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2007-04-21

    Using molecular dynamics computer simulations we investigate structural and dynamic (diffusion) properties of charged colloidal suspension confined to narrow slit pores with structureless, uncharged walls. The system is modeled on an effective level involving only the macroions, which interact via a combination of a soft-sphere and a screened Coulomb potential. The aim of our study is to identify the role of the range of the macroion-macroion interaction controlled by the inverse Debye screening length, kappa. We also compare to bulk properties at the same chemical potential as determined in parallel grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Our results reveal a significant influence of the interaction range which competes, however, with the influence of density. At liquidlike densities a decrease of range yields a decreasing mobility (and a corresponding enhancement of local structure) in the bulk system, whereas the reverse effect occurs in narrow slits with thickness of a few particle diameter. These differences can be traced back to the confinement-induced, and kappa-dependent, reduction of overall density compared to the bulk reservoir. We also show that an increase of kappa softens the oscillations in the normal pressure as function of the wall separation, which is consistent with experimental observations concerning the influence of addition of salt.

  1. Systematics of Effective Charge, Electric and Spin Vibrations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Syed Afsar

    A "multipole condition" is defined to determine the strength parameter in delta interaction. This then is used to study the isoscalar effective charge and various electric multipole resonances in TDA and RPA models. Various forms of the Skyrme interaction are used to study the various multipole modes. The lowest isoscalar Octopole mode appears collapsed for various N=Z nuclei in our "shell-model" RPA calculations. A fully self consistent RPA calculation leads to the conclusion that in general there is no collapse of the lowest 3('-) T=O state in nuclei. It is however found not to vary smoothly with mass number A. Recently a great deal of attention is being paid to "spin" vibrations in nuclei. We make a detailed study of magnetic dipole resonance in various N=Z nuclei. A spin dependent delta interaction is used to evaluate M1 energy weighted sum rule taking into account the ground state correlations. Tensor interaction is also used to evaluate the required sum rule. It is found that there is significant M1 strength at high energies. The effect of core polarization in nuclei can be considered within the context of a full Hartree-Fock calculation on these nuclei. So far Hartree-Fock calculations have been mostly done on even-even nuclei. We generalize this formalism to odd-even nuclei like ('17)O, ('41)Ca. Our calculations here show a close correspondence with the RPA results.

  2. Comment on ‘The effect of single-particle charge limits on charge distributions in dusty plasmas’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijmans, L. C. J.; van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-09-01

    It was recently suggested that the electron affinity may pose an additional upper limit on the charge of a single particle in a plasma, in addition to the electron field emission limit. Here we will, however, show that these two limits both rely on the same physical process and that the limit is only relevant for small particles, because it relies on electron tunneling. Plasma-produced particles of only several nanometres (≲ 10~\\text{nm} ) in size are actively studied, for example in the application of quantum dots and the implications of the proposed charge limit are certainly significant there. However, care must be taken to extend the results to larger particles, which are also actively studied in the field of dusty plasma physics, where typically the limit can be neglected, as we will also show.

  3. Positively charged and bipolar layered poly(ether imide) nanofiltration membranes for water softening applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassara, S.; Abdelkafi, A.; Quémener, D.; Amar, R. Ben; Deratani, A.

    2015-07-01

    Poly(ether imide) (PEI) ultrafiltration membranes were chemically modified with branched poly(ethyleneimine) to obtain nanofiltration (NF) membrane Cat PEI with a positive charge in the pH range below 9. An oppositely charged polyelectrolyte layer was deposited on the resulting membrane surface by using sodium polystyrene sulfonate (PSSNa) and sodium polyvinyl sulfonate (PVSNa) to prepare a bipolar layered membrane NF Cat PEI_PSS and Cat PEI_PVS having a negatively charged surface and positively charged pores. Cat PEI exhibited good performance to remove multivalent cations (more than 90% of Ca2+) from single salt solutions except in presence of sulfate ions. Adding an anionic polyelectrolyte layer onto the positively charged surface resulted in a significant enhancement of rejection performance even in presence of sulfate anions. Application of the prepared membranes in water softening of natural complex mixtures was successful for the different studied membranes and a large decrease of hardness was obtained. Moreover, Cat PEI_PSS showed a good selectivity for nitrate removal. Fouling experiments were carried out with bovine serum albumin, as model protein foulant. Cat PEI_PSS showed much better fouling resistance than Cat PEI with a quantitative flux recovery ratio.

  4. Study the Effects of Charged Particle Radiation on Gravitational Sensors in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Space-flight charging of free floating masses poses an unusual problem-- how can one control charge on the object without exerting a significant force on it? One approach is to make contact to the object with a fine wire. However, for many precision applications no physical contact is permissible, so charge must be conveyed in, a more sophisticated manner. One method has already been developed: Gravitational Probe B (GP-B) uses an ultraviolet photo-emission system described in ref 1. This system meets the experiment requirements, yet poses a number of constraints, including high power dissipation (approximately 10 W peak, approximately 1 W average), low current output (approximately 10(exp -13) A), and potential reliability problems associated with fiber optics system and the UV source. The aim of the current research is to improve this situation and, if possible, develop a more rugged and lower power alternative, usable in a wide range of situations. An potential alternative to the UV electron source is a Spindt-type field emission cathode. These consist of an array of extremely sharp silicon tips mounted in a standard IC package with provision for biasing them relative to the case potential. They are attractive as electron sources for space applications due to their low power consumption (10(exp -5) W), high current levels (10(exp -9) to 10(exp -5) A), and the absence of mechanical switching. Unfortunately, existing cathodes require special handling to avoid contamination and gas absorption. These contaminants can cause severe current fluctuations and eventual destruction of the cathode tips. Another potential drawback is the absence of any data indicating the possibility of bipolar current flow. This capability is needed because of the large uncertainties in the net charge transfer from cosmic rays to a free floating mass in space. More recent devices reduce the current fluctuations and destructive arcing by mounting the tips on a resistive substrate rather than

  5. Charging of small grains in a space plasma: Application to Jovian stream particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhanoev, A. R.; Schmidt, J.; Liu, X.; Spahn, F.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Most theoretical investigations of dust charging processes in space have treated the current balance condition as independent of grain size. However, for small grains, since they are often observed in space environments, a dependence on grain size is expected owing to secondary electron emission (SEE). Here, by the term "small" we mean a particle size comparable to the typical penetration depth for given primary electron energy. The results are relevant for the dynamics of small, charged dust particles emitted by the volcanic moon Io, which forms the Jovian dust streams. Aims: We revise the theory of charging of small (submicron sized) micrometeoroids to take into account a high production of secondary electrons for small grains immersed in an isotropic flux of electrons. We apply our model to obtain an improved estimate for the charge of the dust streams leaving the Jovian system, detected by several spacecraft. Methods: We apply a continuum model to describe the penetration of primary electrons in a grain and the emission of secondary electrons along the path. Averaging over an isotropic flux of primaries, we derive a new expression for the secondary electron yield, which can be used to express the secondary electron current on a grain. Results: For the Jupiter plasma environment we derive the surface potential of grains composed of NaCl (believed to be the major constituent of Jovian dust stream particles) or silicates. For small particles, the potential depends on grain size and the secondary electron current induces a sensitivity to material properties. As a result of the small particle effect, the estimates for the charging times and for the fractional charge fluctuations of NaCl grains obtained using our general approach to SEE give results qualitatively different from the analogous estimates derived from the traditional approach to SEE. We find that for the charging environment considered in this paper field emission does not limit the charging of

  6. Effective atomic number, energy loss and radiation damage studies in some materials commonly used in nuclear applications for heavy charged particles such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Commonly used nuclear physics materials such as water, concrete, Pb-glass, paraffin, freon and P 10 gases, some alloys such as brass, bronze, stainless-steel and some scintillators such as anthracene, stilbene and toluene have been investigated with respect to the heavy charged particle interaction as means of projected range and effective atomic number (Zeff) in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. Calculations were performed for heavy ions such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U. Also, the energy loss and radiation damage were studied using SRIM Monte Carlo code for anthracene for different heavy ions of 100 keV kinetic energy. It has been observed that the variation in Zeff becomes less when the atomic number of the ions increase. Glass-Pb, bronze, brass, stainless-steel and Freon gas were found to vary less than 10% in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. For total proton interaction, discrepancies up to 10% and 18% between two databases namely PSTAR and SRIM were noted in mass stopping power and Zeff of water, respectively. The range calculations resulted with a conclusion that the metal alloys and glass-Pb have lowest values of ranges confirming best shielding against energetic heavy ions whereas freon and P 10 gases have the highest values of ranges in the entire energy region. The simulation results showed that the energy loss (%) to target electrons decreases as the Z of the incident ion increases. Also, it was observed that the radiation damage first increases with Z of the ion and then keeps almost constant for ions with Z≥52.

  7. Preliminary test results of electrical charged particle generator for application to fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1982-01-01

    A charged particle generator for use in fog dispersal applications was built and preliminary tests were carried out. The parameter used as a measure of performance was the current measured with a needle probe positioned in the charged jet connected to ground through an ammeter. The needle was movable and allowed the current profile throughout the jet to be determined. The measured current is referred to as the current output. The major independent parameters were liquid water injection rate, plenum pressure, and corona voltage. Optimum current output was achieved at the approximate pressure of 30 psig, corona voltage of 5600 volts, and liquid water injection rate of 6 cc/min. The results of the test with the prototype charged particle generator clearly demonstrate that a current on the order of 20 microamperes can be routinely achieved with the system. This measurement of current does not necessarily represent the total issuing from the nozzle current which is expected to be larger. From these results, confidence was established that a charged particle generator which will operate continuously and consistently can be designed, constructed, and operated. Further work is required, however, to better understand the physical mechanisms involved and to optimize the system for fog dispersal application.

  8. Transparent and Flexible Self-Charging Power Film and Its Application in a Sliding Unlock System in Touchpad Technology.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianjun; Tang, Wei; Fan, Feng Ru; Liu, Chaofeng; Pang, Yaokun; Cao, Guozhong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-08-23

    Portable and wearable personal electronics and smart security systems are accelerating the development of transparent, flexible, and thin-film electronic devices. Here, we report a transparent and flexible self-charging power film (SCPF) that functions either as a power generator integrated with an energy storage unit or as a self-powered information input matrix. The SCPF possesses the capability of harvesting mechanical energy from finger motions, based on the coupling between the contact electrification and electrostatic induction effects, and meanwhile storing the generated energy. Under the fast finger sliding, the film can be charged from 0 to 2.5 V within 2094 s and discharge at 1 μA for approximately 1630 s. Furthermore, the film is able to identify personal characteristics during a sliding motion by recording the electric signals related to the person's individual bioelectricity, applied pressing force, sliding speed, and so on, which shows its potential applications in security systems in touchpad technology.

  9. Mechano-chemical effects in weakly charged porous media.

    PubMed

    Zholkovskij, Emiliy K; Yaroshchuk, Andriy E; Koval'chuk, Volodymyr I; Bondarenko, Mykola P

    2015-08-01

    The paper is concerned with mechano-chemical effects, namely, osmosis and pressure-driven separation of ions that can be observed when a charged porous medium is placed between two electrolyte solutions. The study is focused on porous systems with low equilibrium interfacial potentials (about 30 mV or lower). At such low potentials, osmosis and pressure-driven separation of ions noticeably manifest themselves provided that the ions in the electrolyte solutions have different diffusion coefficients. The analysis is conducted by combining the irreversible thermodynamic approach and the linearized (in terms of the normalized equilibrium interfacial potential) version of the Standard Electrokinetic Model. Osmosis and the pressure-driven separation of ions are considered for an arbitrary mixed electrolyte solution and various porous space geometries. It is shown that the effects under consideration are proportional to a geometrical factor which, for all the considered geometries of porous space, can be expressed as a function of porosity and the Λ- parameter of porous medium normalized by the Debye length. For all the studied geometries, this function turns out to be weakly dependent on both the porosity and the geometry type. The latter allows for a rough evaluation of the geometrical factor from experimental data on electric conductivity and hydraulic permeability without previous knowledge of the porous space geometry. The obtained results are used to illustrate how the composition of electrolyte solution affects the mechano-chemical effects. For various examples of electrolyte solution compositions, the obtained results are capable of describing positive, negative and anomalous osmosis, positive and negative rejection of binary electrolytes, and pressure-driven separation of binary electrolyte mixtures.

  10. Hall effect in charged conducting ferroelectric domain walls.

    PubMed

    Campbell, M P; McConville, J P V; McQuaid, R G P; Prabhakaran, D; Kumar, A; Gregg, J M

    2016-12-12

    Enhanced conductivity at specific domain walls in ferroelectrics is now an established phenomenon. Surprisingly, however, little is known about the most fundamental aspects of conduction. Carrier types, densities and mobilities have not been determined and transport mechanisms are still a matter of guesswork. Here we demonstrate that intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) can detect the Hall effect in conducting domain walls. Studying YbMnO3 single crystals, we have confirmed that p-type conduction occurs in tail-to-tail charged domain walls. By calibration of the AFM signal, an upper estimate of ∼1 × 10(16) cm(-3) is calculated for the mobile carrier density in the wall, around four orders of magnitude below that required for complete screening of the polar discontinuity. A carrier mobility of∼50 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) is calculated, about an order of magnitude below equivalent carrier mobilities in p-type silicon, but sufficiently high to preclude carrier-lattice coupling associated with small polarons.

  11. Double Photoionization of Helium Atom using effective Charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Hari P.

    2012-06-01

    We will report the results of our investigation on double photoionization of helium atom using the recently extended MCHF method [1] for double photoionization of atoms. Calculation will be performed using wave functions for the initial and the final states with and without the electron correlation. The initial state wave function will be calculated using both the HF and MCHF methods The final state wave functions will be obtained using the asymptotic effective charge [2,3] to represent the electron correlation between the two final state continuum electrons. Using these wave functions, the triple differential cross sections will be calculated for 30 eV excess photon energy. The single and total integral cross sections will be obtained for photon energies from threshold to 300 eV. The results will be compared with the available experimental and the theoretical data. [4pt] [1] Hari P. Saha, J.Phys. B (submitted) [0pt] [2] M.R.H. Rudge, Rev. Mod. Phys. 40, 564 (1968) [0pt] [3] C.Pan and A.F Starace, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 185 (1991); Phys. Rev. A45, 4588 (1992)

  12. Hall effect in charged conducting ferroelectric domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, M. P.; McConville, J.P.V.; McQuaid, R.G.P.; Prabhakaran, D.; Kumar, A.; Gregg, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced conductivity at specific domain walls in ferroelectrics is now an established phenomenon. Surprisingly, however, little is known about the most fundamental aspects of conduction. Carrier types, densities and mobilities have not been determined and transport mechanisms are still a matter of guesswork. Here we demonstrate that intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) can detect the Hall effect in conducting domain walls. Studying YbMnO3 single crystals, we have confirmed that p-type conduction occurs in tail-to-tail charged domain walls. By calibration of the AFM signal, an upper estimate of ∼1 × 1016 cm−3 is calculated for the mobile carrier density in the wall, around four orders of magnitude below that required for complete screening of the polar discontinuity. A carrier mobility of∼50 cm2V−1s−1 is calculated, about an order of magnitude below equivalent carrier mobilities in p-type silicon, but sufficiently high to preclude carrier-lattice coupling associated with small polarons. PMID:27941794

  13. Doping effect on photoabsorption and charge-separation dynamics in light-harvesting organic molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Tsuruta, Kenji; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Nakano, Aiichiro

    2016-01-15

    Using ab-initio theoretical methods, we demonstrate possible enhancement of photo-conversion efficiency of an organic solar cell via intentional doping in molecular graphene-fullerene heterojunction [the hexabenzocoronene (HBC)-triethylene glycol (TEG)–C{sub 60} molecule]. Photoabsorption analysis indicates oxygen substitution into HBC leads to an extension of the spectra up to an infrared regime. A quantum-mechanical molecular dynamics simulation incorporating nonadiabatic electronic transitions reveals that a dissociated charge state (D{sup +} and A{sup -}) in the O-doped system is more stable than the pristine case due to the presence of an effective barrier by the TEG HOMO/LUMO level. We also find that oxygen doping in HBC enhances the intermolecular carrier mobility after charge separation. On the other hand, the pristine molecule undergoes rapid recombination between donor and acceptor charges at the interface. These analyses suggest that the graphene oxidation opens a new window in the application of organic super-molecules to solar cells.

  14. Kinetic Spraying Deposition of Reactive-Enhanced Al-Ni Composite for Shaped Charge Liner Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Gyeongjun; Kim, Jaeick; Lee, Changhee; Kim, See Jo; Lee, Seong

    2016-02-01

    Liners used in shaped charges (SC) must possess good penetration ability and explosive power. Producing the reactive layer (i.e., the Al-Ni composite) on a well-penetrating liner (i.e., Cu) via spray coating is a novel method; the exothermic reaction of this reactive layer can be enhanced by controlling the structure of the feedstock material. However, preceding studies have been unable to completely succeed in achieving this goal. There is still an opportunity to improve the performance of reactive layers in SC liner applications. In order to address this problem, a reactive Al-Ni composite powder was produced via arrested reactive milling (ARM) and deposited by a kinetic spray process. Afterward, the deposition state and self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction behavior of the ARMed Al-Ni deposit were investigated. The deposition state was degraded by the ARM process due to the remaining solid lubricant and the strain-hardening effect, but the practically estimated bond strength was not poor (~40 MPa). No SHS reactions were induced by the ARM and kinetic spray process, which resulted in the quantitative maximization of the exothermic reaction. It is noteworthy that the initiation temperature of the SHS reaction was highly advanced (~300 °C) relative to preceding studies (~500 °C); this change is due to the additional mechanical activation initiated by the kinetic spray deposition.

  15. Effects of dielectric charging on fundamental forces and reliability in capacitive microelectromechanical systems radio frequency switch contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Steven T.; Zabinski, Jeffrey S.

    2006-05-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) radio frequency switches hold great promise in a myriad of commercial, aerospace, and military applications. In particular, capacitive-type switches with metal-to-dielectric contacts (typically gold-on-silicon nitride) are suitable for high frequency (>=10 GHz) applications. However, the devices are known to be unstable in their performance due to parasitic dielectric charging. Although several authors have previously reported the switch failure along with shifts in pull-down and release voltages due to charging, there is some disagreement and lack of understanding among the various reports. This study uses a switch simulator capable of measuring microscale electrostatic and adhesive forces to investigate charging and its effect on reliability and fundamental forces acting within MEMS capacitive switches. An important advantage of the switch simulator is that it can be actuated with or without a bias voltage. Electrostatic force and dielectric charging increased as surfaces were worn smooth by cycling. This is because the surface smoothening decreases separation and increases the electric field strength inside the dielectric. A simple analytical model was developed using electromagnetic theory for the electrostatic force in terms of bias voltage and the areal density of parasitic charge. Using the model and experimental data, it was determined that ``charging'' (net charge is zero) with the same polarity as the bias voltage resulted in reduced electrostatic force (under bias voltage) when a worn-in switch was actuated repeatedly at constant bias voltage >=40 V. Small electrostatic force under bias voltage can explain failure in the ``up'' position (failure to actuate and self-release). Reversing the polarity of the bias voltage between actuations prevented charge buildup and doubled the electrostatic force, which can help explain the effectiveness of bipolar actuation. The charging time constant for parasitic dielectric charge

  16. Effect of surface topography and morphology on space charge packets in polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanxiang, Zhou; Yunshan, Wang; Ninghua, Wang; Qinghua, Sun

    2009-08-01

    Polyethylene (PE) is a major kind of internal insulating material. With great progresses of space charge measurement technologies in the last three decades, lots of researches are focused on space charge in PE. The heat pressing and annealing condition of polyethylene affect its morphology obviously. During the heat pressing, the surface of PE forms different surface topographies because of different substrate materials. Surface topography has great relation to the epitaxial crystallization layer and influences the space charge characteristic of PE dramatically. This paper studied the formation process of different surface topographies and their micrographic characters in low density polyethylene (LDPE). pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method was used to measure the space charge distribution of samples with different surface topographies and morphologies in LDPE. The effect of surface topography and morphology to space charge packet were studied. The surface topography has great influence on space charge packet polarity and morphology has influence on both movement speed rate and polarity of space charge packet.

  17. Effect of positive pulse charge waveforms on the energy efficiency of lead-acid traction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of four different charge methods on the energy conversion efficiency of 300 ampere hour lead acid traction cells were investigated. Three of the methods were positive pulse charge waveforms; the fourth, a constant current method, was used as a baseline of comparison. The positive pulse charge waveforms were: 120 Hz full wave rectified sinusoidal; 120 Hz silicon controlled rectified; and 1 kHz square wave. The constant current charger was set at the time average pulse current of each pulse waveform, which was 150 amps. The energy efficiency does not include charger losses. The lead acid traction cells were charged to 70 percent of rated ampere hour capacity in each case. The results of charging the cells using the three different pulse charge waveforms indicate there was no significant difference in energy conversion efficiency when compared to constant current charging at the time average pulse current value.

  18. Effects of electrically charged dark matter on cosmic microwave background anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Ayuki; Kohri, Kazunori; Takahashi, Tomo; Yoshida, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    We examine the possibility that dark matter consists of charged massive particles (CHAMPs) in view of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. The evolution of cosmological perturbations of CHAMPs with other components is followed in a self-consistent manner, without assuming that CHAMPs and baryons are tightly coupled. We incorporate for the first time the "kinetic recoupling" of the Coulomb scattering, which is characteristic of heavy CHAMPs. By a direct comparison of the predicted CMB temperature/polarization autocorrelations in CHAMP models and the observed spectra in the Planck mission, we show that CHAMPs leave sizable effects on them if it is lighter than 1 011 GeV . Our result can be applicable to any CHAMP as long as its lifetime is much longer than the cosmic time at the recombination (˜4 ×1 05 yr ). An application to millicharged particles is also discussed.

  19. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  20. Mechanisms of nanoparticle internalization and transport across an intestinal epithelial cell model: effect of size and surface charge.

    PubMed

    Bannunah, Azzah M; Vllasaliu, Driton; Lord, Jennie; Stolnik, Snjezana

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of nanoparticle size (50 and 100 nm) and surface charge on their interaction with Caco-2 monolayers as a model of the intestinal epithelium, including cell internalization pathways and the level of transepithelial transport. Initially, toxicity assays showed that cell viability and cell membrane integrity were dependent on the surface charge and applied mass, number, and total surface area of nanoparticles, as tested in two epithelial cell lines, colon carcinoma Caco-2 and airway Calu-3. This also identified suitable nanoparticle concentrations for subsequent cell uptake experiments. Nanoparticle application at doses below half maximal effective concentration (EC₅₀) revealed that the transport efficiency (ratio of transport to cell uptake) across Caco-2 cell monolayers is significantly higher for negatively charged nanoparticles compared to their positively charged counterparts (of similar size), despite the higher level of internalization of positively charged systems. Cell internalization pathways were hence probed using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors aiming to establish whether the discrepancy in transport efficiency is due to different uptake and transport pathways. Vesicular trans-monolayer transport for both positively and negatively charged nanoparticles was confirmed via inhibition of dynamin (by dynasore) and microtubule network (via nocodazole), which significantly reduced the transport of both nanoparticle systems. For positively charged nanoparticles a significant decrease in internalization and transport (46% and 37%, respectively) occurred in the presence of a clathrin pathway inhibitor (chlorpromazine), macropinocytosis inhibition (42%; achieved by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyi)-amiloride), and under cholesterol depletion (38%; via methyl-β-cyclodextrin), but remained unaffected by the inhibition of lipid raft associated uptake (caveolae) by genistein. On the contrary, the most prominent reduction in

  1. Effects of Tailed Pulse-Bias on Ion Energy Distributions and Charging Effects on Insulating Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zeng; Dai, Zhongling; He, Caiqiang; Wang, Younian

    2015-07-01

    A hybrid sheath model, including a fluid model and a Monte Carlo (MC) method, is proposed to study ion energy distributions (IEDs) driven by a radiofrequency (RF) with a tailed pulse-bias on an insulating substrate, where a charging effect is obviously caused by the ions accumulated. This surface charging effect will significantly affect the IEDs on the insulating substrate. In this paper, a voltage compensation method is employed to eliminate the charging effect by making the pulse-bias waveform have a certain gradient. Furthermore, we investigate the IEDs under the condition of different pulse-bias duty ratios, waveforms, amplitudes, and cycle proportions. It is found that the parameters of the pulsed source can effectively modulate the IEDs on the insulating substrate and the charging effect, and more desired IEDs are obtained by using the voltage compensation method with modulations of pulse parameters. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11375040) and the Important National Science & Technology Specific Project of China (No. 2011ZX02403-001)

  2. Effects of electrostatic charge on the pathogenicity of chrysotile asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J M; Bolton, R E; Douglas, A N; Jones, A D; Smith, T

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of 48 rats of the AF/HAN strain were exposed for one year to respirable dust clouds of UICC chrysotile asbestos at a dose level of 10 mg/m3. One group was treated with dust carrying the normal electrostatic charge produced during dust generation, whereas the other was exposed to dust discharged by exposure to ionising radiation from a thallium-204 source. After dusting most animals were retained for their full life span. At the end of the dusting period those animals treated with normally charged dust had significantly more chrysotile retained in their lungs than animals exposed to discharged dust. Subsequently, animals treated with normally charged dust developed more pulmonary fibrosis and more pulmonary tumours. These findings suggest that the charge carried by airborne fibres should be taken into account when considering the health risks from exposure to chrysotile. Highly charged fibres are more likely to be deposited in lung tissue and thus constitute a greater hazard. Images PMID:2837270

  3. Effects of charge on antibody tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Boswell, C Andrew; Tesar, Devin B; Mukhyala, Kiran; Theil, Frank-Peter; Fielder, Paul J; Khawli, Leslie A

    2010-12-15

    Antibody pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are often governed by biological processes such as binding to antigens and other cognate receptors. Emphasis must also be placed, however, on fundamental physicochemical properties that define antibodies as complex macromolecules, including shape, size, hydrophobicity, and charge. Electrostatic interactions between anionic cell membranes and the predominantly positive surface charge of most antibodies can influence blood concentration and tissue disposition kinetics in a manner that is independent of antigen recognition. In this context, the deliberate modification of antibodies by chemical means has been exploited as a valuable preclinical research tool to investigate the relationship between net molecular charge and biological disposition. Findings from these exploratory investigations may be summarized as follows: (I) shifts in isoelectric point of approximately one pI unit or more can produce measurable changes in tissue distribution and kinetics, (II) increases in net positive charge generally result in increased tissue retention and increased blood clearance, and (III) decreases in net positive charge generally result in decreased tissue retention and increased whole body clearance. Understanding electrostatic interactions between antibodies and biological matrices holds relevance in biotechnology, especially with regard to the development of immunoconjugates. The guiding principles and knowledge gained from preclinical evaluation of chemically modified antibodies will be discussed and placed in the context of therapeutic antibodies that are currently marketed or under development, with a particular emphasis on pharmacokinetic and disposition properties.

  4. Effect of surfactant hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB) value on mineral oxide charging in apolar media.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Matthew Michael; Berg, John C

    2015-07-01

    The current work examines the role of surfactant hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB) on the ability for surfactant reverse micelles to impart charge to particles dispersed in an apolar medium, a study motivated by a number of applications that seek to maximize particle charge in such systems. Previous investigations have shown that relative acid-base properties of the particles and surfactants, as well as surfactant concentration and trace water content, all play a major role in the particle charge obtained. However, the ability of a surfactant to stabilize charge in reverse micelles is also an important aspect of creating charge on a particle surface. It has been previously shown that surfactant HLB value is an important parameter in assessing the size of the polar core of the reverse micelles, thereby impacting the total charge that is generated in the bulk solution as determined by conductivity. In the current study, this theory is extended to investigate the impact on particle charging. To accomplish this, the electrophoretic mobility is determined for a series of mineral oxides dispersed in Isopar-L with either Span 20, Span 80, or Span 85. These three surfactants all have the same head group chemistry, but their HLB value ranges from 1.8 to 8.6. It is found that the maximum observed particle electrophoretic mobility does scale directly with the HLB of the accompanying surfactant. This indicates that there is a direct correlation between a surfactant's ability to stabilize charge and its ability to impart charge to a particle. However, the largest HLB surfactant, Span 20, also exhibited a large amount of charge screening or neutralization at larger surfactant concentrations. This highlights the competition between particle charging and micelle-micelle charging that remains one of the largest obstacles to maximizing particle charge in apolar systems.

  5. Colloidal Brazil-nut effect in sediments of binary charged suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esztermann, A.; Löwen, H.

    2004-10-01

    Equilibrium sedimentation density profiles of charged binary colloidal suspensions are calculated by computer simulations and density-functional theory. For deionized samples, we predict a colloidal "Brazil nut" effect: heavy colloidal particles sediment on top of the lighter ones provided that their mass per charge is smaller than that of the lighter ones. This effect is verifiable in settling experiments.

  6. Effects of mixed discrete surface charges on the electrical double layer.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ángeles, Felipe

    2012-08-01

    Adsorption of surface coions and charge reversal are induced at the electrical double layer of a wall charged with positive and negative surface sites next to an electrolyte solution. While for the considered surface charge density these effects are found over a wide range of conditions, they are not observed for the typically employed surface models in equivalent conditions. Important consequences in electrophoresis experiments for different colloids with equal effective surface charge density are foreseen. This study is carried out by means of molecular dynamics simulations.

  7. Understanding charge transport in organometal halide field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senanayak, Satyaprasad P.; Yang, Bingyan; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard, Prof. _., Sir; Sirrnighaus, Henning, , Prof.

    Organometal halide based perovskite are emerging materials for wide range of electronic applications. A range of optoelectronic applications like high efficiency solar cells, color pure LEDs and optical pumped lasers have been demonstrated. Here, we report the demonstration of a high performance field effect transistor fabricated from iodide perovskite material at room temperature. The devices exhibit clean saturation behavior with electron μFET >3 cm2V-1s-1 and current modulation in the range of 106 - 107 which are till date the best performance achieved with these class of materials. This high performance is attributed to a combination of novel film fabrication technique and device engineering strategies. Detailed understanding of the observed band-like transport phenomenon is developed by tuning the different sources of dynamic and static disorder prevalent in the system. These finding are expected to pave way for developing next generation electronic application from perovskite materials. Authors acknowledge EPSRC for funding and SPS acknowledges Royal Society Newton Fellowship.

  8. Study on temperature distribution effect on internal charging by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Internal charging (or deep dielectric charging) is a great threaten to spacecraft. Dielectric conductivity is an important parameter for internal charging and it is sensitive to temperature. Considering the exposed dielectric outside a spacecraft may experience a relatively large temperature range, temperature effect can't be ignored in internal charging assessment. We can see some reporters on techniques of computer simulation of internal charging, but the temperature effect has not been taken into accounts. In this paper, we realize the internal charging simulation with consideration of temperature distribution inside the dielectric. Geant4 is used for charge transportation, and a numerical method is proposed for solving the current reservation equation. The conductivity dependences on temperature, radiation dose rate and intense electric field are considered. Compared to the case of uniform temperature, the internal charging with temperature distribution is more complicated. Results show that temperature distribution can cause electric field distortion within the dielectric. This distortion refers to locally considerable enlargement of electric field. It usually corresponds to the peak electric field which is critical for dielectric breakdown judgment. The peak electric field can emerge inside the dielectric, or appear on the boundary. This improvement of internal charging simulation is beneficial for the assessment of internal charging under multiple factors.

  9. Solvation Effects on Structure and Charge Distribution in Anionic Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. Mathias

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of ions with solvent molecules modifies the properties of both solvent and solute. Solvation generally stabilizes compact charge distributions compared to more diffuse ones. In the most extreme cases, solvation will alter the very composition of the ion itself. We use infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions to probe how solvation affects the structures and charge distributions of metal-CO2 cluster anions. We gratefully acknowledge the National Science Foundation for funding through Grant CHE-0845618 (for graduate student support) and for instrumentation funding through Grant PHY-1125844.

  10. Effects of arcing due to spacecraft charging on spacecraft survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, A.; Sanders, N. L.; Ellen, J. M., Jr.; Inouye, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of the hazard associated with spacecraft charging and arcing on spacecraft systems is presented. A literature survey on arc discharge thresholds and characteristics was done and gaps in the data and requirements for additional experiments were identified. Calculations of coupling of arc discharges into typical spacecraft systems were made and the susceptibility of typical spacecraft to disruption by arc discharges was investigated. Design guidelines and recommended practices to reduce or eliminate the threat of malfunction and failures due to spacecraft charging/arcing were summarized.

  11. Effects of charging and electric field on graphene functionalized with titanium.

    PubMed

    Gürel, H Hakan; Ciraci, S

    2013-07-10

    Titanium atoms are adsorbed to graphene with a significant binding energy and render diverse functionalities to it. Carrying out first-principles calculations, we investigated the effects of charging and static electric field on the physical and chemical properties of graphene covered by Ti adatoms. When uniformly Ti covered graphene is charged positively, its antiferromagnetic ground state changes to ferromagnetic metal and attains a permanent magnetic moment. Static electric field applied perpendicularly causes charge transfer between Ti and graphene, and can induce metal-insulator transition. While each Ti adatom adsorbed to graphene atom can hold four hydrogen molecules with a weak binding, these molecules can be released by charging or applying electric field perpendicularly. Hence, it is demonstrated that charging and applied static electric field induce quasi-continuous and side specific modifications in the charge distribution and potential energy of adatoms absorbed to single-layer nanostructures, resulting in fundamentally crucial effects on their physical and chemical properties.

  12. Directly resolving particles in an electric field: local charge, force, torque, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianlong

    2011-11-01

    Prosperetti's seminal Physalis method for fluid flows with suspended particles is extended to electric fields to directly resolve finite-sized particles and to investigate accurately the mutual fluid-particle, particle-particle, and particle-boundary interactions. The method can be used for uncharged/charged dielectrics, uncharged/charged conductors, conductors with specified voltage, and general weak and strong discontinuous interface conditions. These interface conditions can be in terms of field variable, its gradients, and surface integration which has not been addesed by other numerical methods. In addition, for the first time, we rigorously derive the force and torque on the finite-sized particles resulting from the interactions between harmonics. The method, for the first time, directly resolves the particles with accurate local charge distribution, force, and torque on the particles, making many applications in engineering, mechanics, physics, chemistry, and biology possible, such as heterogeneous materials, microfluidics, electrophotography, electric double layer capacitors, and microstructures of nanodispersions. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated with up to one hundred thousand 3D particles, which suggests that the method can be used for many important engineering applications of broad interest. This research is supported by the Department of Energy under funding for an EFRC (the HeteroFoaM Center), grant no. DE-SC0001061.

  13. Lattice summations for spread out particles: Applications to neutral and charged systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.; Brańka, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    This work is concerned with the lattice energy of periodic assemblies of mass and charge distributions of the form, exp (-αp2), where α is an adjustable positive variable and {p} is the vector from the lattice site or average position. The energy of interaction between two distributions is the density-weighted integral of the interactions between the volume elements of each distribution. Reciprocal space lattice summation formulas derived for particles represented by gaussian smeared-out density distributions are applied to the gaussian potential and a bounded version of the soft-sphere potential for a range of exponents. Two types of spatial broadening are considered, continuous or physical broadening (PB) and broadening resulting from the time average of point particle positions, so-called "time" broadening (TB). For neutral mass distributions a reciprocal space lattice summation formula is derived which is applied to the bounded soft-sphere potential. For the charged systems, the methodology described in Heyes [J. Chem. Phys. 74, 1924 (1981), 10.1063/1.441285] is used, which for the PB case gives the Ewald-like formulas derived by Gingrich and Wilson [Chem. Phys. Lett. 500, 178 (2010), 10.1016/j.cplett.2010.10.010] using a different method. Another expression for the lattice energy of the spread out charge distributions is derived which is cast entirely in terms of a summation over the reciprocal lattice vectors, without the arbitrary charge spreading function used in the Ewald method. The effects of charge spreading on a generalized definition of the Madelung constant (M) for a selection of crystal lattices are shown to be insignificant for route mean square displacements up to values typical of melting of an ionic crystal. When the length scale of the charge distribution becomes comparable to or greater than the mean inter particle spacing, however, the effects of charge broadening on the lattice energy are shown to be significant. In the PB case, M → 0

  14. Charging process of polyurethane based composites under electronic irradiation: Effects of cellulose fiber content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjadj, Aomar; Jbara, Omar; Tara, Ahmed; Gilliot, Mickael; Dellis, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-01

    The study deals with the charging effect of polyurethanes-based composites reinforced with cellulose fibers, under electronic beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the leakage current and the trapped charge as well as the kinetics of charging process significantly change beyond a critical concentration of 10% cellulose fibers. These features are correlated with the cellulose concentration-dependence of the electrical properties, specifically resistivity and capacitance, of the composite.

  15. Charging process of polyurethane based composites under electronic irradiation: Effects of cellulose fiber content

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjadj, Aomar; Jbara, Omar; Tara, Ahmed; Gilliot, Mickael; Dellis, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-23

    The study deals with the charging effect of polyurethanes-based composites reinforced with cellulose fibers, under electronic beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the leakage current and the trapped charge as well as the kinetics of charging process significantly change beyond a critical concentration of 10% cellulose fibers. These features are correlated with the cellulose concentration-dependence of the electrical properties, specifically resistivity and capacitance, of the composite.

  16. Self-assembly of patterned nanoparticles on cellular membranes: effect of charge distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Xianren; Cao, Dapeng

    2013-06-06

    Nanoparticle-assisted drug delivery has been emerging as an active research area. Achieving high drug loading is only one facet of drug delivery issues; it is also important to investigate the effect of surface charge distribution on self-assembly of nanoparticles on cellular membranes. By considering the electrostatic distribution of patterned nanoparticles, we used dissipative particle dynamics simulations to investigate the self-assembly of pattern charged nanoparticles with five different surface charged patterns. It is found that both surface charged pattern and nanoparticle size significantly affect the self-assembly of nanoparticles on cellular membranes. Results indicate that 1/2 pattern charged small nanoparticles can self-assemble into dendritic structures, while those with a 1/4 pattern self-assemble into clusters. As the nanoparticle size increases, 1/2 pattern charged medium nanoparticles can self-assemble into linear structures, while those with a 1/4 pattern self-assemble into clusters. For very large nanoparticles, both 1/2 pattern and 1/4 pattern charged nanoparticles self-assemble into flaky structures with different connections. By considering the effects of surface charged pattern and nanoparticle size on self-assembly, we found that nanoparticle self-assembly requires a minimum effective charged area. When the local charged area of nanoparticles is less than the threshold, surface charge cannot induce nanoparticle self-assembly; that is, the surface charged pattern of a nanoparticle would determine effectively the self-assembly structure. It is expected that this work will provide guidance for nanoparticle-assisted drug delivery.

  17. The Effect of Variable End of Charge Battery Management on Small-Cell Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Simmons, Nick; Bennetti, Andrea; Pearson, Chris; Reid, Concha

    2007-01-01

    ABSL Space Products is the world leading supplier of Lithium-ion batteries for space applications and has pioneered the use of small capacity COTS cells within large arrays. This small-cell approach has provided many benefits to space application designers through increased flexibility and reliability over more traditional battery designs. The ABSL 18650HC cell has been used in most ABSL space battery applications to date and has a recommended End Of Charge Voltage (EOCV) of 4.2V per cell. For all space applications using the ABSL 18650HC so far, this EOCV has been used at all stages of battery life from ground checkout to in orbit operations. ABSL and NASA have identified that, by using a lower EOCV for the same equivalent Depth Of Discharge (DOD), battery capacity fade could be reduced. The intention of this paper is to compare battery performance for systems with fixed and variable EOCV. In particular, the effect of employing the blanket value of 4.2V per cell versus utilizing a lower EOCV at Beginning Of Life (BOL) before gradually increasing it (as the effects of capacity fade drive the End Of Discharge Voltage closer to the acceptable system level minimum) is analyzed. Data is compared from ABSL in-house and NASA GRC tests that have been run under fixed and variable EOCV conditions. Differences in capacity fade are discussed and projections are made as to potential life extension capability by utilizing a variable EOCV strategy.

  18. Looping charged elastic rods: applications to protein-induced DNA loop formation.

    PubMed

    Cherstvy, A G

    2011-01-01

    We analyze looping of thin charged elastic filaments under applied torques and end forces, using the solution of linear elasticity theory equations. In application to DNA, we account for its polyelectrolyte character and charge renormalization, calculating electrostatic energies stored in the loops. We argue that the standard theory of electrostatic persistence is only valid when the loop's radius of curvature and close-contact distance are much larger than the Debye screening length. We predict that larger twist rates are required to trigger looping of charged rods as compared with neutral ones. We then analyze loop shapes formed on charged filaments of finite length, mimicking DNA looping by proteins with two DNA-binding domains. We find optimal loop shapes at different salt amounts, minimizing the sum of DNA elastic, DNA electrostatic, and protein elastic energies. We implement a simple model where intercharge repulsions do not affect the loop shape directly but can choose the energy-optimized shape from the allowed loop types. At low salt concentrations more open loops are favored due to enhanced repulsion of DNA charges, consistent with the results of computer simulations on formation of DNA loops by lac repressor. Then, we model the precise geometry of DNA binding by the lac tetramer and explore loop shapes, varying the confined DNA length and protein opening angle. The characteristics of complexes obtained, such as the total loop energy, stretching forces required to maintain its shape, and the reduction of electrostatic energy with increment of salt, are in good agreement with the outcomes of more elaborate numerical calculations for lac-repressor-induced DNA looping.

  19. Optimization of thermoelectric performance in semiconducting polymers for understanding charge transport and flexible thermoelectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaudell, Anne; Chabinyc, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Organic electronic materials have been widely considered for a variety of energy conversion applications, from photovoltaics to LEDs. Only very recently have organic materials been considered for thermoelectric applications - converting between temperature gradients and electrical potential. The intrinsic disorder in semiconducting polymers leads to an inherently low thermal conductivity, a key parameter in thermoelectric performance. The ability to solution deposit on flexible substrates opens up niche applications including personal cooling and conformal devices. Here work is presented on the electrical conductivity and thermopower of thin film semiconducting polymers, including P3HT and PBTTT-C14. Thermoelectric properties are explored over a wide range of conductivities, from nearly insulating to beyond 100 S/cm, enabled by employing different doping mechanisms, including molecular charge-transfer doping with F4TCNQ and vapor doping with a fluoroalkyl trichlorosilane (FTS). Temperature-dependent measurements suggest competing charge transport mechanisms, likely due to the mixed ordered/disordered character of these polymers. These results show promise for organic materials for thermoelectric applications, and recent results on thin film devices will also be presented.

  20. Design and application of carbon nanomaterials for photoactive and charge transport layers in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sunghwan; Jun, Gwang Hoon; Jeon, Seokwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-04-01

    Commercialization of organic solar cell (OSC) has faltered due to their low power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to inorganic solar cell. Low electrical conductivity, low charge mobility, and short-range light absorption of most organic materials limit the PCE of OSCs. Carbon nanomaterials, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphenes, are of great interest for use in OSC applications due to their high electrical conductivity, mobility, and unique optical properties for enhancing the performance of OSCs. In this review, recent progress toward the integration of carbon nanomaterials into OSCs is described. The role of carbon nanomaterials and strategies for their integration into various layers of OSCs, including the photoactive layer and charge transport layer, are discussed. Based on these, we also discuss the prospects of carbon nanomaterials for specific OSC layers to maximize the PCE.

  1. Design and application of carbon nanomaterials for photoactive and charge transport layers in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sunghwan; Jun, Gwang Hoon; Jeon, Seokwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Commercialization of organic solar cell (OSC) has faltered due to their low power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to inorganic solar cell. Low electrical conductivity, low charge mobility, and short-range light absorption of most organic materials limit the PCE of OSCs. Carbon nanomaterials, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphenes, are of great interest for use in OSC applications due to their high electrical conductivity, mobility, and unique optical properties for enhancing the performance of OSCs. In this review, recent progress toward the integration of carbon nanomaterials into OSCs is described. The role of carbon nanomaterials and strategies for their integration into various layers of OSCs, including the photoactive layer and charge transport layer, are discussed. Based on these, we also discuss the prospects of carbon nanomaterials for specific OSC layers to maximize the PCE.

  2. Emittance growth in heavy ion rings due to effects of space charge and dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J., LLNL

    1998-06-03

    We review the derivation of moment equations which include the effects of space charge and dispersion in bends first presented in ref [1]. These equations generalize the familiar envelope equations to include the dispersive effects of bends. We review the application of these equations to the calculation of the change in emittance resulting from a sharp transition from a straight section to a bend section, using an energy conservation constraint. Comparisons of detailed 2D and 3D simulations of intense beams in rings using the WARP code (refs [2,3]) are made with results obtained from the moment equations. We also compare the analysis carried out in ref [1], to more recent analyses, refs [4,5]. We further examine self-consistent distributions of beams in bends and discuss the relevance of these distributions to the moment equation formulation.

  3. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOEpatents

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  4. Piezotronic Effect: An Emerging Mechanism for Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Kory; Nguyen, Vu; Zhu, Ren; Yang, Rusen

    2015-01-01

    Strain-induced polarization charges in a piezoelectric semiconductor effectively modulate the band structure near the interface and charge carrier transport. Fundamental investigation of the piezotronic effect has attracted broad interest, and various sensing applications have been demonstrated. This brief review discusses the fundamentals of the piezotronic effect, followed by a review highlighting important applications for strain sensors, pressure sensors, chemical sensors, photodetectors, humidity sensors and temperature sensors. Finally, the review offers some perspectives and outlook for this new field of multi-functional sensing enabled by the piezotronic effect. PMID:26378536

  5. Effect of net surface charge on physical properties of the cellulose nanoparticles and their efficacy for oral protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongbo; Chen, Lingyun

    2015-05-05

    Both net positively and negatively charged cellulose-based nanoparticles were prepared from oppositely charged carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and quaternized cellulose (QC). Effect of surface charge on efficacy of cellulose nanoparticles for delivering both positively and negatively charged proteins was investigated. Lysozyme (LYS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which possess positive and negative charge at physiological pH respectively, were used as models. The results revealed that high encapsulation efficiency (67.7% and 85.1%) could be achieved when negatively charged protein was encapsulated in positively charged nanoparticles, or positively charged protein was encapsulated in negatively charged nanoparticles. Proteins encapsulated in optimal cellulose nanoparticles could be sustainably released and no obvious protein denaturation was detected. Both net positively and negatively charged nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity due to cellulose's good biocompatibility. Not only net positively charged nanoparticles demonstrated high cellular uptake efficiency, but also net negatively charged nanoparticles showed somewhat efficient cellular uptake.

  6. The effect of dc poling duration on space charge relaxation in virgin XLPE cable peelings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzimas, Antonios; Rowland, Simon M.; Dissado, Leonard A.; Fu, Mingli; Nilsson, Ulf H.

    2010-06-01

    The effect of dc poling time upon the time-dependent decay of space charge in insulation peelings of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable that had not previously experienced either electrical or thermal stressing is investigated. Two dc poling durations were used, 2 h and 26 h at an electric field of 50 kV mm-1 and at ambient temperature. Space charge was measured in the two samples investigated both during space charge accumulation and throughout its subsequent decay. The results show that the length of dc poling plays an important role in the subsequent decay. Despite the fact that both samples have had the same amount of space charge by the end of both short and long poling durations the time dependence of the space charge decay is different. Most of the charge stored in the sample that had experienced the short time poling decays rapidly after voltage removal. On the other hand, the charge that is stored in the sample with the long dc poling duration decays slowly and its decay occurs in two stages. The data, which are analysed by means of the de-trapping theory of space charge decay, imply that the charge stored in the material has occupied energy states with different trap depth ranges. The two poling durations lead to different relative amounts of charge in each of the two trap depth ranges. Possible reasons for this are discussed.

  7. Modeling of the cranking and charging processes of conventional valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries in micro-hybrid applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Jun; Lee, Anson; Pyko, Jan

    2014-10-01

    The cranking and charging processes of a VRLA battery during stop-start cycling in micro-hybrid applications were simulated by one dimensional mathematical modeling, to study the formation and distribution of lead sulfate across the cell and analyze the resulting effect on battery aging. The battery focused on in this study represents a conventional VRLA battery without any carbon additives in the electrodes or carbon-based electrodes. The modeling results were validated against experimental data and used to analyze the "sulfation" of negative electrodes - the common failure mode of lead acid batteries under high-rate partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling. The analyses were based on two aging mechanisms proposed in previous studies and the predictions showed consistency with the previous teardown observations that the sulfate formed at the negative interface is more difficult to be converted back than anywhere else in the electrodes. The impact of cranking pulses during stop-start cycling on current density and the corresponding sulfate layer production was estimated. The effects of some critical design parameters on sulfate formation, distribution and aging over cycling were investigated, which provided guidelines for developing models and designing of VRLA batteries in micro-hybrid applications.

  8. Particle and substrate charge effects on colloidal self-assembly in a sessile drop.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qingfeng; Gao, Li; Sharma, Vyom; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Wong, C C

    2008-10-21

    By direct video monitoring of dynamic colloidal self-assembly during solvent evaporation in a sessile drop, we investigated the effect of surface charge on the ordering of colloidal spheres. The in situ observations revealed that the interaction between charged colloidal spheres and substrates affects the mobility of colloidal spheres during convective self-assembly, playing an important role in the colloidal crystal growth process. Both ordered and disordered growth was observed depending on different chemical conditions mediated by surface charge and surfactant additions to the sessile drop system. These different self-assembly behaviors were explained by the Coulombic and hydrophobic interactions between surface-charged colloidal spheres and substrates.

  9. Charging system using solar panels and a highly resonant wireless power transfer model for small UAS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallman, Sydney N.; Huck, Robert C.; Sluss, James J.

    2016-05-01

    The use of a wireless charging system for small, unmanned aircraft system applications is useful for both military and commercial consumers. An efficient way to keep the aircraft's batteries charged without interrupting flight would be highly marketable. While the general concepts behind highly resonant wireless power transfer are discussed in a few publications, the details behind the system designs are not available even in academic journals, especially in relation to avionics. Combining a highly resonant charging system with a solar panel charging system can produce enough power to extend the flight time of a small, unmanned aircraft system without interruption. This paper provides an overview of a few of the wireless-charging technologies currently available and outlines a preliminary design for an aircraft-mounted battery charging system.

  10. Charge stripper effects on beam dynamics in the 180-degree bending section of the RISP linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ji-Ho; Jin, Hyunchang; Song, Jeong Seog

    2016-09-01

    The RAON, a superconducting linear accelerator for RISP (Rare Isotope Science Project), will use a charge stripper in order to increase the charge states of the heavy ions for effective acceleration in the higher energy part of the linac. The charge stripper affects the beam distribution by scattering the heavy ions as they go through the charge stripper. Moreover we have to select and accelerate proper charge states between 77+ and 81+ for the case of a uranium beam in order to satisfy the beam-power requirement at an IF (inflight fragmentation) target. This work focuses on how the beam dynamics are affected by the charge stripper in the 180-dgree bending section.

  11. Role of surface charge in determining the biological effects of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiangqiang; Li, Hongxia; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Xiao, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The growing potential of quantum dots (QDs) in biomedical applications has provoked the urgent need to thoroughly address their interaction with biological systems. However, only limited studies have been performed to explore the effects of surface charge on the biological behaviors of QDs. In the present study, three commercially available QDs with different surface coatings were used to systematically evaluate the effects of surface charge on the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and in vivo biodistribution of QDs. Our results demonstrated that charged QDs entered both cancer cells and macrophages more efficiently than neutral ones, while negative QDs internalized mostly. Upon entry into cells, QDs were localized in different subcellular compartments (eg, cytoplasm and lysosomes) depending on the surface charge. Interestingly, inconsistent with the result of internalization, positive QDs but not negative QDs exhibited severe cytotoxicity, which was likely due to their disruption of cell membrane integrity, and production of reactive oxygen species. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that negative and neutral QDs preferentially distributed in the liver and the spleen, whereas positive QDs mainly deposited in the kidney with obvious uptake in the brain. In general, surface charge plays crucial roles in determining the biological interactions of QDs.

  12. Role of surface charge in determining the biological effects of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiangqiang; Li, Hongxia; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Xiao, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The growing potential of quantum dots (QDs) in biomedical applications has provoked the urgent need to thoroughly address their interaction with biological systems. However, only limited studies have been performed to explore the effects of surface charge on the biological behaviors of QDs. In the present study, three commercially available QDs with different surface coatings were used to systematically evaluate the effects of surface charge on the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and in vivo biodistribution of QDs. Our results demonstrated that charged QDs entered both cancer cells and macrophages more efficiently than neutral ones, while negative QDs internalized mostly. Upon entry into cells, QDs were localized in different subcellular compartments (eg, cytoplasm and lysosomes) depending on the surface charge. Interestingly, inconsistent with the result of internalization, positive QDs but not negative QDs exhibited severe cytotoxicity, which was likely due to their disruption of cell membrane integrity, and production of reactive oxygen species. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that negative and neutral QDs preferentially distributed in the liver and the spleen, whereas positive QDs mainly deposited in the kidney with obvious uptake in the brain. In general, surface charge plays crucial roles in determining the biological interactions of QDs. PMID:26604757

  13. Charge neutral MoS2 field effect transistors through oxygen plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhall, Rohan; Li, Zhen; Kosmowska, Ewa; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2016-11-01

    Lithographically fabricated MoS2 field effect transistors suffer from several critical imperfections, including low sub-threshold swings, large turn-on gate voltages (VT), and wide device-to-device variability. The large magnitude and variability of VT stems from unclean interfaces, trapped charges in the underlying substrate, and sulfur vacancies created during the mechanical exfoliation process. In this study, we demonstrate a simple and reliable oxygen plasma treatment, which mitigates the effects of unintentional doping created by surface defect sites, such as S vacancies, and surface contamination. This plasma treatment restores charge neutrality to the MoS2 and shifts the threshold turn-on voltage towards 0 V. Out of the 10 devices measured, all exhibit a shift of the FET turn-on voltage from an average of -18 V to -2 V. The oxygen plasma treatment passivates these defects, which reduces surface scattering, causing increased mobility and improved subthreshold swing. For as-prepared devices with low mobilities (˜0.01 cm2/V s), we observe up to a 190-fold increase in mobility after exposure to the oxygen plasma. Perhaps the most important aspect of this oxygen plasma treatment is that it reduces the device-to-device variability, which is a crucial factor in realizing any practical application of these devices.

  14. Spin-charge order and excitonic effects in sawtooth-like graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sha; Lu, Wengang; Qi, Jingshan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we systematically study electronic structures and excitonic effects in one type of the sawtooth-like graphene nanoribbons. A main feature is that the local magnetism is developed for the certain width and changes with the increase of width. A variety of magnetic orders root in the competition of the short range interaction between the same spin-electrons and long range exchange interaction between opposite spin-electrons. For excitonic effects, the binding energy of degenerate spin-triplets T1 and T-1 is higher than that of T0 for all studied nanoribbons and is size dependent. We reveal the underlying physical mechanism from the charge distributions of excitons and its correlation with the spin-resolved charge density distributions in the ground state. We find that the electrons and holes in degenerate spin-triplets T1 and T-1 are closer together and thus the interaction between them is more strong, while the distribution of electrons and holes is relatively more disperse for T0, indicating the weaker interaction. We hope that these interesting results are able to be detected in the experiment and these multi-performance samples are better utilized in future device applications.

  15. Polyvinylidene fluoride/nickel composite materials for charge storing, electromagnetic interference absorption, and shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargama, H.; Thakur, A. K.; Chaturvedi, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the composites of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/nickel (Ni) prepared through simple blending and hot-molding process have been investigated for dielectric, electromagnetic shielding, and radar absorbing properties. In order to study complex permittivity of the composites in 40 Hz-20 MHz frequency range, impedance spectroscopy (IS) technique is used. Besides, the complex permittivity and permeability in addition to shielding effectiveness (SE), reflection coefficient (backed by air), and loss factor are calculated using scattering parameters measured in X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) by waveguide method. Further, in X-band, a theoretical analysis of single layer absorbing structure backed by perfect electrical conductor is then performed. A flanged coaxial holder has also been designed, fabricated, calibrated, and tested for electromagnetic interference SE measurement in the broad frequency range (50 MHz-18 GHz). The IS results indicate large enhancement in dielectric constant as a function of Ni loading in the polymer-metal composite (PMC) phase. This result has been explained using interfacial polarization and percolation theory. The frequency dependent response of ac conductivity has been analyzed by fitting the experimental data to the "Johnscher's universal dielectric response law" model. The results obtained for SE (in X-band over broad frequency range) and reflection coefficient indicate that PVDF/Ni composites give better electromagnetic interference shielding and radar absorption properties at filler concentration (fcon) ≥ fc in the PMC, whereas at fc < fcon, the charge storage mechanism dominates in the insulator regime of the composite phase. Therefore, the range of PMC compositions below and above percolation threshold has been observed to have different variety of applications.

  16. Effect of dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degree}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE).

  17. EFFECT OF LOADING DUST TYPE ON THE FILTRATION EFFICIENCY OF ELECTROSTATICALLY CHARGED FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an evaluation of the effect of loading dust type on the filtration efficiency of electrostatically charged filters. Three types of filters were evaluated: a rigid-cell filter charged using an electrodynamic spinning process, a pleated-panel filter cha...

  18. Effect of volume and surface charges on discharge structure of glow dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shao-Wei; He, Feng; Wang, Yu; Li, Lulu; Ouyang, Ji-Ting

    2013-08-01

    The effect of volume and surface charges on the structure of glow dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been investigated numerically by using two-dimensional (2D) fluid modeling. The local increase of volume or surface charges induces a kind of activation-inhibition effect, which enhances the local volume discharge and inhibits the discharge in neighborhoods, resulting in non-uniform discharge. The activation-inhibition effect due to the non-uniform volume and/or surface charges depends on the non-uniformity itself and the applied voltage. The activation-inhibition of non-uniform charges has different effects on the volume charges and the accumulated surface charges. The distribution of remaining free charges (seed electrons) in volume at the beginning of voltage pulse plays a key role for the glow DBD structure, resulting in a patterned DBD, when the seed electrons are non-uniform at higher frequency and moderate voltage or uniform DBD, when the seed electrons are uniform at lower frequency or high voltage. The distribution of surface charges is not the determining factor but a result of the formed DBD structure.

  19. Interfacial Charge Effects on Sticky Bubble Morphology in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Jonathan; Huang, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Many multiphase fluidic processes in small conduits, such as petroleum extraction and biochemical analysis, can encounter disastrous flow blockages due to the lodging of immiscible bubbles or droplets. The complete drainage of a thin-film lubrication layer surrounding an adhered bubble demands a significantly higher threshold pressure gradient in order to reinitiate bulk flows. In this work, we investigate bubble morphology due to the lubrication layer drainage process that results in bubble adhesion and study how an electrostatically charged bubble interface and charged channel wall may affect bubble morphology in preventing bubble adhesion. We report on our multiphysics computational analysis of an oversized gas bubble in a water-filled microchannel under the influence of surface tension and interfacial electrostatic forces. Acknowledgment is made to the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for support of this research.

  20. Charge Control of Geosynchronous Spacecraft Using Field Effect Emitters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    conductivity of cold coverglasses are likely ingredients leading to ESD . However, the emitter maintains a normal gradient potential on the solar arrays, so the...potential of about +5 volts, leading to a " normal gradient " differential potential of about 40 volts. Because kilovolt potentials are required to cause...electrostatic discharges in the " normal gradient " configuration, the coverglass differential potential is not cause for concern. The shaded OSRs are charged

  1. Numerical study on the effect of charge separation at low cloud temperature and effective water content on thunderstorm electrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsenova, Boryana Dimitrova; Barakova, Denitsa; Mitzeva, Rumjana

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, a numerical model is used to evaluate the effects of low effective water content and low cloud temperature on graupel charging, charge structure and lightning activity in regions of thunderstorms. Two idealized cloud cases were simulated with MesoNH using different configurations of the main known parameterizations for noninductive charging involving ice crystal/graupel rebounding collisions. Simulations in regions with very low effective cloud water content were performed with the parameterization proposed in Mitzeva et al. (2006) based on the "Relative Growth Rate" hypothesis, while for simulations in regions with low cloud temperature, charge values from Avila et al. (2011) were used. Results showed that the inclusion of the charge separation at very low effective water content influences more the simulated cloud charge structure than does the inclusion of the charge separated at low temperatures. Also, the effect of the charge separated at very low effective water content is more significant when the original parameterization for non-inductive charging is based on the effective water content rather than on the rime accretion rate.

  2. Effective mass of a charged carrier in a nonpolar liquid: Snowball effect in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikina, I.; Shikin, V.; Varlamov, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    The problem of a correct definition of the charged carrier effective mass in superfluid helium is revised. It is shown that the effective mass of such a quasiparticle can be introduced without Atkins’s idea about the solidification of liquid He4 in the close vicinity of an ion (the so-called “snowball” model). Moreover, in addition to the generalization of Atkins’s model, the charged carrier effective mass formation is considered within the framework of the two-fluid scenario. The physical reasons of the normal-fluid contribution divergency and the way of the corresponding regularization procedure are discussed. Agreement between the theory and the available experimental data is found in a wide range of temperatures.

  3. Effective mass of a charged carrier in a nonpolar liquid: Snowball effect in superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Chikina, I.; Varlamov, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    The problem of a correct definition of the charged carrier effective mass in superfluid helium is revised. It is shown that the effective mass of such a quasiparticle can be introduced without Atkins's idea about the solidification of liquid He{sup 4} in the close vicinity of an ion (the so-called ''snowball'' model). Moreover, in addition to the generalization of Atkins's model, the charged carrier effective mass formation is considered within the framework of the two-fluid scenario. The physical reasons of the normal-fluid contribution divergency and the way of the corresponding regularization procedure are discussed. Agreement between the theory and the available experimental data is found in a wide range of temperatures.

  4. Effect of charge on the ferroelectric field effect in strongly correlated oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuegang; Xiao, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Zhang, Le; Zhao, Weiwei; Xu, Xiaoshan; Hong, Xia

    We present a systematic study of the effect of charge on the ferroelectric field effect modulation of various strongly correlated oxide materials. We have fabricated high quality epitaxial heterostructures composed of a ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) gate and a correlated oxide channel, including Sm0.5Nd0.5NiO3 (SNNO), La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO), SNNO/LSMO bilayers, and NiCo2O4 (NCO). The Hall effect measurements reveal a carrier density of ~4 holes/u.c. (0.4 cm2V-1s-1) for SNNO to ~2 holes/u.c. (27 cm2V-1s-1) for NCO. We find the magnitude of the field effect is closely related to both the intrinsic carrier density and carrier mobility of the channel material. For devices employing the SNNO/LSMO bilayer channel, we believe the charge transfer between the two correlated oxides play an important role in the observed resistance modulation. The screening capacitor of the channel materials and the interfacial defect states also have significant impact on the retention characteristics of the field effect. Our study reveals the critical role of charge in determining the interfacial coupling between ferroelectric and magnetic oxides, and has important implications in developing ferroelectric-controlled Mott memory devices.

  5. Conjugated ionomers for photovoltaic applications: electric field driven charge separation in organic photovoltaics. Final Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lonergan, Mark

    2015-05-29

    Final technical report for Conjugated ionomers for photovoltaic applications, electric field driven charge separation in organic photovoltaics. The central goal of the work we completed was been to understand the photochemical and photovoltaic properties of ionically functionalized conjugated polymers (conjugated ionomers or polyelectrolytes) and energy conversion systems based on them. We primarily studied two classes of conjugated polymer interfaces that we developed based either upon undoped conjugated polymers with an asymmetry in ionic composition (the ionic junction) or doped conjugated polymers with an asymmetry in doping type (the p-n junction). The materials used for these studies have primarily been the polyacetylene ionomers. We completed a detailed study of p-n junctions with systematically varying dopant density, photochemical creation of doped junctions, and experimental and theoretical work on charge transport and injection in polyacetylene ionomers. We have also completed related work on the use of conjugated ionomers as interlayers that improve the efficiency or organic photovoltaic systems and studied several important aspects of the chemistry of ionically functionalized semiconductors, including mechanisms of so-called "anion-doping", the formation of charge transfer complexes with oxygen, and the synthesis of new polyfluorene polyelectrolytes. We also worked worked with the Haley group at the University of Oregon on new indenofluorene-based organic acceptors.

  6. High temperature thermocline TES - effect of system pre-charging on thermal stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavattoni, Simone A.; Barbato, Maurizio C.; Zanganeh, Giw; Pedretti, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate, by means of a computational fluid dynamics approach, the effect of performing an initial charging, or pre-charging, on thermal stratification of an industrial-scale thermocline TES unit, based on a packed bed of river pebbles. The 1 GWhth TES unit under investigation is exploited to fulfill the energy requirement of a reference 80 MWe concentrating solar power plant which uses air as heat transfer fluid. Three different scenarios, characterized by 4 h, 6 h and 8 h of pre-charging, were compared with the reference case of TES system operating without pre-charging. For each of these four scenarios, a total of 30 consecutive charge/discharge cycles, of 12 h each, were simulated and the effect of TES pre-charging on thermal stratification was qualitatively evaluated, by means of a stratification efficiency, based on the second-law of thermodynamics. On the basis of the simulations results obtained, the effect of pre-charging, more pronounced during the first cycles, is not only relevant in reducing the time required by the TES to achieve a stable thermal stratification into the packed bed but also to improve the performance at startup when the system is charged for the first time.

  7. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T.

    2008-05-14

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  8. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Bell, Alexis T; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-14

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  9. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Bell, Alexis T.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  10. Test results of modified electrical charged particle generator for application to fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Huang, K. H.

    1983-01-01

    Modifications to a charged particle generator for use in fog dispersal applications were made and additional testing carried out. The modified nozzle, however, did not work as planned, and reported results are the unmodified nozzle. The addition of a positive displacement pump to supply the liquid water was highly successful. Measurements of the generator output current were made with a cylindrical collector system as well as with the needle probe used in previous studies. Measurements with the cylindrical collector and the needle probe showed identical agreement within the variability of the experiment. A high-voltage prove was purchased, and measurements of the corona voltage as well as the voltage variation in the charged particle jet were made. Electric fields in the vertical direction on the order of 1,000,000 v/m were measured. The voltage distribution along the centerline of the jet was compared with the numerical solutions of the Poisson equation and showed very good agreement. Velocity measurements using a pitot tube were made. The resulting measurements were compared with theoretical and other reported experimental results. The measured data showed the appropriate trends and agreed well with reported results. Based on the measured current-to-mass ratio from the charged particle generator, a calculation of the average droplet size was made. Droplet sizes were estimated to range between 0.8 and 0.4 microns. Using measured data, an analysis of the height to which the droplet can be dispersed by the charged particle generator was made. Although the mathematical model is highly simplified, the results indicated that particles would achieve heights on the order of 80 m.

  11. Effects of hydration on steric and electric charge-induced interstitial volume exclusion--a model.

    PubMed

    Øien, Alf H; Justad, Sigrid R; Tenstad, Olav; Wiig, Helge

    2013-09-03

    The presence of collagen and charged macromolecules like glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the interstitial space limits the space available for plasma proteins and other macromolecules. This phenomenon, known as interstitial exclusion, is of importance for interstitial fluid volume regulation. Physical/mathematical models are presented for calculating the exclusion of electrically charged and neutral macromolecules that equilibrate in the interstitium under various degrees of hydration. Here, a central hypothesis is that the swelling of highly electrically charged GAGs with increased hydration shields parts of the neutral collagen of the interstitial matrix from interacting with electrically charged macromolecules, such that exclusion of charged macromolecules exhibits change due to steric and charge effects. GAGs are also thought to allow relatively small neutral, but also charged macromolecules neutralized by a very high ionic strength, diffuse into the interior of GAGs, whereas larger macromolecules may not. Thus, in the model, relatively small electrically charged macromolecules, such as human serum albumin, and larger neutral macromolecules such as IgG, will have quite similar total volume exclusion properties in the interstitium. Our results are in agreement with ex vivo and in vivo experiments, and suggest that the charge of GAGs or macromolecular drugs may be targeted to increase the tissue uptake of macromolecular therapeutic agents.

  12. The effect of surface transport on water desalination by porous electrodes undergoing capacitive charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shocron, Amit N.; Suss, Matthew E.

    2017-03-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is a technology in which water is desalinated by ion electrosorption into the electric double layers (EDLs) of charging porous electrodes. In recent years significant advances have been made in modeling the charge and salt dynamics in a CDI cell, but the possible effect of surface transport within diffuse EDLs on these dynamics has not been investigated. We here present theory which includes surface transport in describing the dynamics of a charging CDI cell. Through our numerical solution to the presented models, the possible effect of surface transport on the CDI process is elucidated. While at some model conditions surface transport enhances the rate of CDI cell charging, counter-intuitively this additional transport pathway is found to slow down cell charging at other model conditions.

  13. The effect of surface transport on water desalination by porous electrodes undergoing capacitive charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shocron, Amit N.; Suss, Matthew E.

    2016-07-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is a technology in which water is desalinated by ion electrosorption into the electric double layers (EDLs) of charging porous electrodes. In recent years significant advances have been made in modeling the charge and salt dynamics in a CDI cell, but the possible effect of surface transport within diffuse EDLs on these dynamics has not been investigated. We here present theory which includes surface transport in describing the dynamics of a charging CDI cell. Through our numerical solution to the presented models, the possible effect of surface transport on the CDI process is elucidated. While at some model conditions surface transport enhances the rate of CDI cell charging, counter-intuitively this additional transport pathway is found to slow down cell charging at other model conditions.

  14. A Cost-Effective Electric Vehicle Charging Method Designed For Residential Homes with Renewable Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, T. T.; Liang, Xiuli; Haque, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    Most of the electrical infrastructure in use around the world today is decades old, and may be illsuited to widespread proliferation of personal Electric Vehicles (EVs) whose charging requirements will place increasing strain on grid demand. In order to reduce the pressure on the grid and taking benefits of off peak charging, this paper presents a smart and cost effective EV charging methodology for residential homes equipped with renewable energy resources such as Photovoltaic (PV) panels and battery. The proposed method ensures slower battery degradation and prevents overcharging. The performance of the proposed algorithm is verified by conducting simulation studies utilizing running data of Nissan Altra. From the simulation study results, the algorithm is shown to be effective and feasible which minimizes not only the charging cost but also can shift the charging time from peak value to off-peak time.

  15. ~3-nm ZnO Nanoislands Deposition and Application in Charge Trapping Memory Grown by Single ALD Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Chowdhury, Farsad; Ulusoy, Turkan Gamze; Ghobadi, Amir; Nazirzadeh, Amin; Okyay, Ali K.; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2016-12-01

    Low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are of great interest in high performance electronic and photonic devices. ZnO is considered to be a multifunctional material due to its unique properties with potential in various applications. In this work, 3-nm ZnO nanoislands are deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) and the electronic properties are characterized by UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The results show that the nanostructures show quantum confinement effects in 1D. Moreover, Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitor (MOSCAP) charge trapping memory devices with ZnO nanoislands charge storage layer are fabricated by a single ALD step and their performances are analyzed. The devices showed a large memory window at low operating voltages with excellent retention and endurance characteristics due to the additional oxygen vacancies in the nanoislands and the deep barrier for the trapped holes due to the reduction in ZnO electron affinity. The results show that the ZnO nanoislands are promising in future low power memory applications.

  16. ~3-nm ZnO Nanoislands Deposition and Application in Charge Trapping Memory Grown by Single ALD Step

    PubMed Central

    El-Atab, Nazek; Chowdhury, Farsad; Ulusoy, Turkan Gamze; Ghobadi, Amir; Nazirzadeh, Amin; Okyay, Ali K.; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2016-01-01

    Low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are of great interest in high performance electronic and photonic devices. ZnO is considered to be a multifunctional material due to its unique properties with potential in various applications. In this work, 3-nm ZnO nanoislands are deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) and the electronic properties are characterized by UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The results show that the nanostructures show quantum confinement effects in 1D. Moreover, Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitor (MOSCAP) charge trapping memory devices with ZnO nanoislands charge storage layer are fabricated by a single ALD step and their performances are analyzed. The devices showed a large memory window at low operating voltages with excellent retention and endurance characteristics due to the additional oxygen vacancies in the nanoislands and the deep barrier for the trapped holes due to the reduction in ZnO electron affinity. The results show that the ZnO nanoislands are promising in future low power memory applications. PMID:27991492

  17. Fabrication and characterization of a charge-biased CMOS-MEMS resonant gate field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, C. H.; Li, C. S.; Li, M. H.; Wang, Y. L.; Li, S. S.

    2014-09-01

    A high-frequency charge-biased CMOS-MEMS resonant gate field effect transistor (RGFET) composed of a metal-oxide composite resonant-gate structure and an FET transducer has been demonstrated utilizing the TSMC 0.35 μm CMOS technology with Q > 1700 and a signal-to-feedthrough ratio greater than 35 dB under a direct two-port measurement configuration. As compared to the conventional capacitive-type MEMS resonators, the proposed CMOS-MEMS RGFET features an inherent transconductance gain (gm) offered by the FET transduction capable of enhancing the motional signal of the resonator and relaxing the impedance mismatch issue to its succeeding electronics or 50 Ω-based test facilities. In this work, we design a clamped-clamped beam resonant-gate structure right above a floating gate FET transducer as a high-Q building block through a maskless post-CMOS process to combine merits from the large capacitive transduction areas of the large-width beam resonator and the high gain of the underneath FET. An analytical model is also provided to simulate the behavior of the charge-biased RGFET; the theoretical prediction is in good agreement with the experimental results. Thanks to the deep-submicrometer gap spacing enabled by the post-CMOS polysilicon release process, the proposed resonator under a purely capacitive transduction already attains motional impedance less than 10 kΩ, a record-low value among CMOS-MEMS capacitive resonators. To go one step further, the motional signal of the proposed RGFET is greatly enhanced through the FET transduction. Such a strong transmission and a sharp phase transition across 0° pave a way for future RGFET-type oscillators in RF and sensor applications. A time-elapsed characterization of the charge leakage rate for the floating gate is also carried out.

  18. Sweeter but deadlier: decoupling size, charge and capping effects in carbohydrate coated bactericidal silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luciane França; Gonçalves, Julianna de Oliveira; Gonçalves, Kaliandra de Almeida; Kobarg, Jörg; Cardoso, Mateus Borba

    2013-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles are widely used due to their biomedical-antibacterial applications. At the same time, the stabilization of these nanoparticles is challenging and may be made using polymeric carbohydrates, based on the practice of avoiding toxic chemicals and undesirable residues. In this study, we synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) which were stabilized by carbohydrates (potato starch and chitosan) and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Bactericidal efficiency of AgNPs capped with different carbohydrates was tested demonstrating that the synthesized materials were able to inhibit the growth of two clinical/medical relevant bacteria strains (Escherichia coil and Staphylococcus aureus). AgNPs stabilized by chitosan presented enhanced bactericidal activity if compared to the ones synthesized in presence of potato starch. This difference is mainly attributed to the known antibacterial properties of chitosan associated to overall positive charge of the nanoparticles capped by this polymer. Those nanoparticles obtained in presence of starch presented minor bactericidal effects since the starch-capping agent is not able to contribute to the avoidance of bacteria growth and confers a quasi-neutral charge to the nanoparticle.

  19. Listeria monocytogenes cell wall constituents exert a charge effect on electroporation threshold

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, Alex; Rae, Chris S.; Rubinsky, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Genetically engineered cells with mutations of relevance to electroporation, cell membrane permeabilization by electric pulses, can become a promising new tool for fundamental research on this important biotechnology. Listeria monocytogenes mutants lacking DltA or MprF and assayed for sensitivity to the cathelicidin like anti-microbial cationic peptide (mCRAMP), were developed to study the effect of cell wall charge on electroporation. Working in the irreversible electroporation regime (IRE), we found that application of a sequence of 50 pulses, each 50 μs duration, 12.5 kV/cm field, delivered at 2 Hz led to 2.67±0.29 log reduction in wild-type L. monocytogenes, log 2.60±0.19 in the MprF-minus mutant, and log 1.33±0.13 in the DltA-minus mutant. The experimental observation that the DltA-minus mutant was highly susceptible to cationic mCRAMP and resistant to IRE suggests that the charge on the bacterial cell wall affects electroporation and shows that this approach may be promising for fundamental studies on electroporation. PMID:22100748

  20. Calibration function for the Orbitrap FTMS accounting for the space charge effect.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Mikhail V; Good, David M; Lyutvinskiy, Yaroslav; Yang, Hongqian; Zubarev, Roman A

    2010-11-01

    Ion storage in an electrostatic trap has been implemented with the introduction of the Orbitrap Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FTMS), which demonstrates performance similar to high-field ion cyclotron resonance MS. High mass spectral characteristics resulted in rapid acceptance of the Orbitrap FTMS for Life Sciences applications. The basics of Orbitrap operation are well documented; however, like in any ion trap MS technology, its performance is limited by interactions between the ion clouds. These interactions result in ion cloud couplings, systematic errors in measured masses, interference between ion clouds of different size yet with close m/z ratios, etc. In this work, we have characterized the space-charge effect on the measured frequency for the Orbitrap FTMS, looking for the possibility to achieve sub-ppm levels of mass measurement accuracy (MMA) for peptides in a wide range of total ion population. As a result of this characterization, we proposed an m/z calibration law for the Orbitrap FTMS that accounts for the total ion population present in the trap during a data acquisition event. Using this law, we were able to achieve a zero-space charge MMA limit of 80 ppb for the commercial Orbitrap FTMS system and sub-ppm level of MMA over a wide range of total ion populations with the automatic gain control values varying from 10 to 10(7).

  1. Sintering behaviour of feldspar and influence of electric charge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallala, W.; Gaied, M. E.

    2011-04-01

    The characterization of feldspar for electric porcelain and the behaviour of these materials after heating at 1230°C were studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) were used to identify the present phases and the densification level. Feldspar sand was treated by flotation. The floated feldspar is constituted by microcline, quartz, and minor amounts of albite. The microstructure of sintered feldspar at 1230°C is essentially vitreous with open microporosities. The dielectrical properties of composites were characterized by using the induced courant method (ICM), which indicates that the charge trapping capacity depends on the mineralogical and chemical composition of feldspar.

  2. The effects of charge transfer on the aqueous solvation of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W.

    2012-07-28

    Ab initio-based charge partitioning of ionic systems results in ions with non-integer charges. This charge-transfer (CT) effect alters both short- and long-range interactions. Until recently, the effects of CT have been mostly neglected in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The method presented in this paper for including charge transfer between ions and water is consistent with ab initio charge partitioning and does not add significant time to the simulation. The ions of sodium, potassium, and chloride are parameterized to reproduce dimer properties and aqueous structures. The average charges of the ions from MD simulations (0.900, 0.919, and -0.775 for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -}, respectively) are consistent with quantum calculations. The hydration free energies calculated for these ions are in agreement with experimental estimates, which shows that the interactions are described accurately. The ions also have diffusion constants in good agreement with experiment. Inclusion of CT results in interesting properties for the waters in the first solvation shell of the ions. For all ions studied, the first shell waters acquire a partial negative charge, due to the difference between water-water and water-ion charge-transfer amounts. CT also reduces asymmetry in the solvation shell of the chloride anion, which could have important consequences for the behavior of chloride near the air-water interface.

  3. Application of Gauss's law space-charge limited emission model in iterative particle tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altsybeyev, V. V.; Ponomarev, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    The particle tracking method with a so-called gun iteration for modeling the space charge is discussed in the following paper. We suggest to apply the emission model based on the Gauss's law for the calculation of the space charge limited current density distribution using considered method. Based on the presented emission model we have developed a numerical algorithm for this calculations. This approach allows us to perform accurate and low time consumpting numerical simulations for different vacuum sources with the curved emitting surfaces and also in the presence of additional physical effects such as bipolar flows and backscattered electrons. The results of the simulations of the cylindrical diode and diode with elliptical emitter with the use of axysimmetric coordinates are presented. The high efficiency and accuracy of the suggested approach are confirmed by the obtained results and comparisons with the analytical solutions.

  4. Prediction of Charge Mobility in Amorphous Organic Materials through the Application of Hopping Theory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choongkeun; Waterland, Robert; Sohlberg, Karl

    2011-08-09

    The application of hopping theory to predict charge (hole) mobility in amorphous organic molecular materials is studied in detail. Application is made to amorphous cells of N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis-(3-methylphenylene)-1,1'-diphenyl-4,4'-diamine (TPD), 1,1-bis-(4,4'-diethylaminophenyl)-4,4-diphenyl-1,3,butadinene (DEPB), N4,N4'-di(biphenyl-3-yl)-N4,N4'-diphenylbiphenyl-4,4'-diamine (mBPD), N1,N4-di(naphthalen-1-yl)-N1,N4-diphenylbenzene-1,4-diamine (NNP), and N,N'-bis[9,9-dimethyl-2-fluorenyl]-N,N'-diphenyl-9,9-dimethylfluorene-2,7-diamine (pFFA). Detailed analysis of the computation of each of the parameters in the equations for hopping rate is presented, including studies of their convergence with respect to various numerical approximations. Based on these convergence studies, the most robust methodology is then applied to investigate the dependence of mobility on such parameters as the monomer reorganization energy, the monomer-monomer coupling, and the material density. The results give insight into what will be required to improve the accuracy of predictions of mobility in amorphous organic materials, and what factors should be controlled to develop materials with higher (or lower) charge (hole) mobility.

  5. Trajectory effects in multiply charged ion-surface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lebius, H.; Huang, W.; Schuch, R.

    1999-06-10

    Ar ions of 4.3 keV q{sub in} were scattered at large angles ({theta}=75 degree sign ) from a clean oriented surface. By selecting Ar projectiles having a large ionization potential and by using a large scattering angle only ions scattered at the first atomic layer of the surface were detected. Scattered ion energy spectra show peaks of single scattering and double scattering of the Ar projectile ions from one or two surface Au atoms, and the distribution attributed to double collisions splits into two peaks when the scattering plane coincides with a crystallographic plane. Simulations with a MARLOWE code allowed for interpretation of the structure in the double collision peak by in-plane and zig-zag double collisions. Differences in the relative peak heights between the experiment and a MARLOWE simulation were partly explained by different neutralization probabilities with varying trajectories. Yield changes with increasing charge states show interesting possibilities for future experiments with highly charged ions.

  6. Effect of electric charge on the adhesion of human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Lowkis, B; Szymonowicz, M

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research into the effect of the size and depth of the implanted electric charge on the adhesion of human blood platelets. The experiments were carried out on polyethylene terephthalate PET foil of 36 microns thickness. The electret formation process was carried out in an electron-beam device. The electrization conditions were such that electrets with the excess electric charge accumulated at various depths were obtained. The selection of conditions was verified by investigating the space charge distribution with the use of the virtual electrode method. The microscopic observation of non-electrified foils and electrets as well as the quantitative examination of the adhesion of human blood platelets has explicitly confirmed the positive influence of the electret effect on the thrombogenesis of PET foil. This made it possible to define the optimum electrization conditions. The research has additionally indicated that the relationship between the amount of adherent blood platelets and the size of the electric charge is not a simple relation of the kind: the larger negative charge, the more thrombogenic material. The decisive and positive effect of the space charge has been confirmed by analysing the effectiveness of the surface and space charge.

  7. Event-driven charge-coupled device design and applications therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, John P. (Inventor); Ricker, Jr., George R. (Inventor); Burke, Barry E. (Inventor); Prigozhin, Gregory Y. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An event-driven X-ray CCD imager device uses a floating-gate amplifier or other non-destructive readout device to non-destructively sense a charge level in a charge packet associated with a pixel. The output of the floating-gate amplifier is used to identify each pixel that has a charge level above a predetermined threshold. If the charge level is above a predetermined threshold the charge in the triggering charge packet and in the charge packets from neighboring pixels need to be measured accurately. A charge delay register is included in the event-driven X-ray CCD imager device to enable recovery of the charge packets from neighboring pixels for accurate measurement. When a charge packet reaches the end of the charge delay register, control logic either dumps the charge packet, or steers the charge packet to a charge FIFO to preserve it if the charge packet is determined to be a packet that needs accurate measurement. A floating-diffusion amplifier or other low-noise output stage device, which converts charge level to a voltage level with high precision, provides final measurement of the charge packets. The voltage level is eventually digitized by a high linearity ADC.

  8. Anomalous effect of trench-oxide depth on alpha-particle-induced charge collection

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.; Kim, N.M.

    1999-06-01

    The effect of trench-oxide depth on the alpha-particle-induced charge collection is analyzed for the first time. From the simulation results, it was found that the depth of trench oxide has a considerable influence on the amount of collected charge. The confining of generated charge by the trench oxide was identified as a cause of this anomalous effect. Therefore, the tradeoff between soft error rate and cell to cell isolation characteristics should be considered in optimizing the depth of trench oxide.

  9. The effect of switched array battery charge control on CRRES spacecraft: 3 + month data summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olbert, Phil

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are covered in viewgraph format: Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) orbit parameters; battery charge control; battery description; battery current and voltage output during one orbit; and battery reconditioning discharge profile.

  10. Effects of Emotionally Charged Auditory Stimulation on Gait Performance in the Elderly: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, John-Ross; Raghavan, Preeti; McCrery, J.R.; Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Verghese, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of a novel divided attention task—walking under auditory constraints—on gait performance in older adults and to determine whether this effect was moderated by cognitive status. Design Validation cohort. Setting General community. Participants Ambulatory older adults without dementia (N=104). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures In this pilot study, we evaluated walking under auditory constraints in 104 older adults who completed 3 pairs of walking trials on a gait mat under 1 of 3 randomly assigned conditions: 1 pair without auditory stimulation and 2 pairs with emotionally charged auditory stimulation with happy or sad sounds. Results The mean age of subjects was 80.6±4.9 years, and 63% (n=66) were women. The mean velocity during normal walking was 97.9±20.6cm/s, and the mean cadence was 105.1±9.9 steps/min. The effect of walking under auditory constraints on gait characteristics was analyzed using a 2-factorial analysis of variance with a 1-between factor (cognitively intact and minimal cognitive impairment groups) and a 1-within factor (type of auditory stimuli). In both happy and sad auditory stimulation trials, cognitively intact older adults (n=96) showed an average increase of 2.68cm/s in gait velocity (F1.86,191.71=3.99; P=.02) and an average increase of 2.41 steps/min in cadence (F1.75,180.42=10.12; P<.001) as compared with trials without auditory stimulation. In contrast, older adults with minimal cognitive impairment (Blessed test score, 5–10; n=8) showed an average reduction of 5.45cm/s in gait velocity (F1.87,190.83=5.62; P=.005) and an average reduction of 3.88 steps/min in cadence (F1.79,183.10=8.21; P=.001) under both auditory stimulation conditions. Neither baseline fall history nor performance of activities of daily living accounted for these differences. Conclusions Our results provide preliminary evidence of the differentiating effect of emotionally charged auditory stimuli on gait

  11. Topological Effects of Charge Transfer in Telomere G-Quadruplex Mechanism on Telomerase Activation and Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Liang, Shi-Dong

    2013-02-01

    We explore the charge transfer in the telomere G-Quadruplex (TG4) DNA theoretically by the nonequilibrium Green's function method, and reveal the topological effect of the charge transport in TG4 DNA. The consecutive TG4 (CTG4) is semiconducting with 0.2 0.3 eV energy gap. Charges transfer favorably in the CTG4, but are trapped in the nonconsecutive TG4 (NCTG4). The global conductance is inversely proportional to the local conductance for NCTG4. The topological structure transition from NCTG4 to CTG4 induces abruptly 3nA charge current, which provide a microscopic clue to understand the telomerase activated or inhibited by TG4. Our findings reveal the fundamental property of charge transfer in TG4 and its relationship with the topological structure of TG4.

  12. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B. Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-28

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  13. Multi-frequency inversion-charge pumping for charge separation and mobility analysis in high-k/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Djara, V.; Cherkaoui, K.; Negara, M. A.; Hurley, P. K.

    2015-11-28

    An alternative multi-frequency inversion-charge pumping (MFICP) technique was developed to directly separate the inversion charge density (N{sub inv}) from the trapped charge density in high-k/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). This approach relies on the fitting of the frequency response of border traps, obtained from inversion-charge pumping measurements performed over a wide range of frequencies at room temperature on a single MOSFET, using a modified charge trapping model. The obtained model yielded the capture time constant and density of border traps located at energy levels aligned with the InGaAs conduction band. Moreover, the combination of MFICP and pulsed I{sub d}-V{sub g} measurements enabled an accurate effective mobility vs N{sub inv} extraction and analysis. The data obtained using the MFICP approach are consistent with the most recent reports on high-k/InGaAs.

  14. Stochastic charging of dust grains in planetary rings: Diffusion rates and their effects on Lorentz resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, L.; Burns, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Dust grains in planetary rings acquire stochastically fluctuating electric charges as they orbit through any corotating magnetospheric plasma. Here we investigate the nature of this stochastic charging and calculate its effect on the Lorentz resonance (LR). First we model grain charging as a Markov process, where the transition probabilities are identified as the ensemble-averaged charging fluxes due to plasma pickup and photoemission. We determine the distribution function P(t;N), giving the probability that a grain has N excess charges at time t. The autocorrelation function tau(sub q) for the strochastic charge process can be approximated by a Fokker-Planck treatment of the evolution equations for P(t; N). We calculate the mean square response to the stochastic fluctuations in the Lorentz force. We find that transport in phase space is very small compared to the resonant increase in amplitudes due to the mean charge, over the timescale that the oscillator is resonantly pumped up. Therefore the stochastic charge variations cannot break the resonant interaction; locally, the Lorentz resonance is a robust mechanism for the shaping of etheral dust ring systems. Slightly stronger bounds on plasma parameters are required when we consider the longer transit times between Lorentz resonances.

  15. New Density Estimation Methods for Charged Particle Beams With Applications to Microbunching Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Gabriele Bassi

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we discuss representations of charge particle densities in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, analyze the sources and profiles of the intrinsic numerical noise, and present efficient methods for their removal. We devise two alternative estimation methods for charged particle distribution which represent significant improvement over the Monte Carlo cosine expansion used in the 2d code of Bassi, designed to simulate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in charged particle beams. The improvement is achieved by employing an alternative beam density estimation to the Monte Carlo cosine expansion. The representation is first binned onto a finite grid, after which two grid-based methods are employed to approximate particle distributions: (i) truncated fast cosine transform (TFCT); and (ii) thresholded wavelet transform (TWT). We demonstrate that these alternative methods represent a staggering upgrade over the original Monte Carlo cosine expansion in terms of efficiency, while the TWT approximation also provides an appreciable improvement in accuracy. The improvement in accuracy comes from a judicious removal of the numerical noise enabled by the wavelet formulation. The TWT method is then integrated into Bassi's CSR code, and benchmarked against the original version. We show that the new density estimation method provides a superior performance in terms of efficiency and spatial resolution, thus enabling high-fidelity simulations of CSR effects, including microbunching instability.

  16. Spacecraft power system architecture to mitigate spacecraft charging effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manner, David B. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A power system architecture for a spacecraft and a method of a power supply for a spacecraft are presented which take advantage of the reduced plasma interaction associated with positive ground high voltage photovoltaic arrays and provide a negative ground power supply for electrical loads of the spacecraft. They efficiently convert and regulate power to the load bus and reduce power system mass and complexity. The system and method ground the positive terminal of the solar arrays to the spacecraft hull, and using a power converter to invert the electric sign, permit a negative ground for the electrical distribution bus and electrical components. A number of variations including a load management system and a battery management system having charging and recharging devices are presented.

  17. Effects of dielectric charging on the output voltage of a capacitive accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Hao; Yu, Huijun; Zhou, Wu; Peng, Bei; Peng, Peng; He, Xiaoping

    2016-11-01

    Output voltage drifting observed in one typical capacitive microelectromechanical system (MEMS) accelerometer is discussed in this paper. Dielectric charging effect is located as one of the major determinants of this phenomenon through a combination of experimental and theoretical studies. A theoretical model for the electromechanical effects of the dielectric surface charges within the electrode gap is established to analyze the dielectric charge effect on the output voltage. Observations of output voltage drift against time are fitted to this model in order to estimate the possible dielectric layer thickness. Meanwhile, Auger electron spectroscopy is carried out to analyze the electrode surface material composition and confirms a mixture layer of dielectric SiO2 and Si with a thickness about 5 nm, which is very close to the model estimation. In addition, observation of time-varing output drift in the variable bias voltage experiment indicates the movement of dielectric charge can be controlled by the applied electric field.

  18. The effect of charge separation on the phase behavior of dipolar colloidal rods.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, David M; Velev, Orlin D; Klapp, Sabine H L; Hall, Carol K

    2016-06-14

    Colloids with anisotropic shape and charge distribution can assemble into a variety of structures that could find use as novel materials for optical, photonic, electronic and structural applications. Because experimental characterization of the many possible types of multi-shape and multipolar colloidal particles that could form useful structures is difficult, the search for novel colloidal materials can be enhanced by simulations of colloidal particle assembly. We have simulated a system of dipolar colloidal rods at fixed aspect ratio using discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD) to investigate how the charge separation of an embedded dipole affects the types of assemblies that occur. Each dipolar rod is modeled as several overlapping spheres fixed in an elongated shape to represent excluded volume and two smaller, embedded spheres to represent the charges that make up the extended dipole. Large charge separations predominately form structures where the rods link head-to-tail while small charge separations predominately form structures where the rods stack side-by-side. Rods with small charge separations tend to form dense aggregates while rods with large charge separations tend to form coarse gel-like structures. Structural phase boundaries between fluid, string-fluid, and "gel" (networked) phases are mapped out and characterized as to whether they have global head-to-tail or global side-by-side order. A structural coarsening transition is observed for particles with large charge separations in which the head-tail networks thicken as temperature is lowered due to an increased tendency to form side-by-side structures. Triangularly connected networks form at small charge separations; these may be useful for encapsulating smaller particles.

  19. Photovoltaic battery & charge controller market & applications survey. An evaluation of the photovoltaic system market for 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, R.L.; Turpin, J.F.; Corey, G.P.

    1996-12-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Battery Analysis and Evaluation Department and the Photovoltaic System Assistance Center of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) initiated a U.S. industry-wide PV Energy Storage System Survey. Arizona State University (ASU) was contracted by SNL in June 1995 to conduct the survey. The survey included three separate segments tailored to: (a) PV system integrators, (b) battery manufacturers, and (c) PV charge controller manufacturers. The overall purpose of the survey was to: (a) quantify the market for batteries shipped with (or for) PV systems in 1995, (b) quantify the PV market segments by battery type and application for PV batteries, (c) characterize and quantify the charge controllers used in PV systems, (d) characterize the operating environment for energy storage components in PV systems, and (e) estimate the PV battery market for the year 2000. All three segments of the survey were mailed in January 1996. This report discusses the purpose, methodology, results, and conclusions of the survey.

  20. Multi-dimensional modeling of the application of catalytic combustion to homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wen; Xie, Maozhao

    2006-12-01

    The detailed surface reaction mechanism of methane on rhodium catalyst was analyzed. Comparisons between numerical simulation and experiments showed a basic agreement. The combustion process of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine whose piston surface has been coated with catalyst (rhodium and platinum) was numerically investigated. A multi-dimensional model with detailed chemical kinetics was built. The effects of catalytic combustion on the ignition timing, the temperature and CO concentration fields, and HC, CO and NOx emissions of the HCCI engine were discussed. The results showed the ignition timing of the HCCI engine was advanced and the emissions of HC and CO were decreased by the catalysis.

  1. Theory and modeling of a relativistic klystron amplifier with high space charge for microsecond applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.; Faehl, R.J.; Kwan, T.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss basic Relativistic Klystron Amplifier physics. We show that in the intense space-charge regime the maximum power extraction does not coincide with the maximum harmonic bunching. In addition, we show that as the beam is bunched, the additional power stored in the Coulomb fields does not add significantly to the overall power extraction. Because of these effects, the power extraction at 1.3 GHz for a 500 kV, 5 kA beam with reasonable beam-to-wall spacing is limited to around 35%. 3 refs., 17 figs.

  2. Synthesis and mannose receptor-mediated uptake of clustered glycomimetics by human dendritic cells: effect of charge.

    PubMed

    Angyalosi, Gerhild; Grandjean, Cyrille; Lamirand, Mélanie; Auriault, Claude; Gras-Masse, Hélène; Melnyk, Oleg

    2002-10-07

    Effect of charge and shape of multivalent lysine-based cluster glycomimetics on their mannose receptor-mediated uptake by human dendritic cells has been evaluated: The capture is strongly affected by the shape of the ligands. The effect of charge is less pronounced although positive charges on the ligands seem to favor non-specific endocytosis capture.

  3. Effects of Charge Build-up of Underlying Layer by High Aspect Ratio Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, Kazumasa; Kiritani, Masahide; Sakamori, Shigenori; Yokoi, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Nobuo; Miyatake, Hiroshi

    1998-04-01

    The effects of the “electron shading” charge build-up at the bottom of holes are investigated using fluorocarbon gas plasma. The etch rates of the electrically conductive films such as phosphorus-doped polysilicon at the bottom of the holes change depending on whether the films are patterned or not. This is caused by the decrease of the low-energy ions which reach the bottom of the holes due to positive charging of the underlying layers. Furthermore, the potential at the bottom of the contact holes is investigated using metal-nitride-oxide-silicon (MNOS) capacitors. The positive charging due to the electron shading effect is measured. In order to reduce the electron shading charge build-up, the pulse-modulated plasma is investigated. The selectivity to the underlying layer increases upon using pulse-modulated plasma.

  4. Effective electrostatic interactions among charged thermo-responsive microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    González-Mozuelos, P.

    2016-02-07

    This work explores the nature and thermodynamic behavior of the effective electrostatic interactions among charged microgels immersed in a simple electrolyte, taking special interest in the effects due to the thermally induced variation of the microgel size while the remaining parameters (microgel charge and concentration, plus the amount of added salt) are kept constant. To this end, the rigorous approach obtained from applying the precise methodology of the dressed ion theory to the proper definition of the effective direct correlation functions, which emerge from tracing-out the degrees of freedom of the microscopic ions, is employed to provide an exact description of the parameters characterizing such interactions: screening length, effective permittivity, and renormalized charges. A model solution with three components is assumed: large permeable anionic spheres for the microgels, plus small charged hard spheres of equal size for the monovalent cations and anions. The two-body correlations among the components of this model suspension, used as the input for the determination of the effective interaction parameters, are here calculated by using the hyper-netted chain approximation. It is then found that at finite microgel concentrations the values of these parameters change as the microgel size increases, even though the ionic strength of the supporting electrolyte and the bare charge of the microgels remain fixed during this process. The variation of the screening length, as well as that of the effective permittivity, is rather small, but still interesting in view of the fact that the corresponding Debye length stays constant. The renormalized charges, in contrast, increase markedly as the microgels swell. The ratio of the renormalized charge to the corresponding analytic result obtained in the context of an extended linear response theory allows us to introduce an effective charge that accounts for the non-linear effects induced by the short

  5. Design of a phytosphingosine-containing, positively-charged nanoemulsion as a colloidal carrier system for dermal application of ceramides.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erol; Borchert, Hans-Hubert

    2005-05-01

    Positively charged oil/water (o/w) nanoemulsions (PN) are effective vehicles to change the permeability of the skin. This study focused on the preparation and characterisation of phytosphingosine (PS) containing PN (PPN) which serve as colloidal carriers for the dermal application of ceramide IIIB (CIIIB) and the stratum corneum (SC) lipids (PPNSC) such as ceramide III (CIII), cholesterol, and palmitic acid. The investigations were conducted using appropriate emulsification and homogenisation processing conditions to optimise PPNSC with regard to droplet size, physical stability, and solubility of PS, CIII and CIIIB. A decrease in droplet size was observed through eight homogenisation cycles at a pressure of 500 bar and a temperature of 50 degrees C. Above these optimal values, an increase in droplet size was observed. PS and ceramides have low solubilities in oil and water. When Lipoid E-80 (LE80) was added to the oil phase, the solubility of PS and ceramides increased, indicating some interactions shown by DSC measurements. SC lipids and CIIIB could be successfully incorporated in PPN without producing any physical instability. The high stability of PPNSC is probably due to the presence of a hydrophilic (Tween 80) and a lipophilic surfactant (LE80), supported by the lipophilic cosurfactant PS, at the o/w interface. It was shown that PS was responsible for the positive charge and thus supported the high physical stability of PPNSC. This optimised emulsion was selected for further skin absorption evaluation.

  6. Application of multipolar charge models and molecular dynamics simulations to study stark shifts in inhomogeneous electric fields.

    PubMed

    Devereux, Michael; Plattner, Nuria; Meuwly, Markus

    2009-11-26

    Atomic multipole moments are used to investigate vibrational frequency shifts of CO and H(2) in uniform and inhomogeneous electric fields using ab initio calculations and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The importance of using atomic multipole moments that can accurately represent both molecular electrostatics and the vibrational response of the molecule to changes in the local electric field is highlighted. The vibrational response of CO to applied uniform and inhomogeneous electric fields is examined using Density Functional Theory calculations for a range of test fields, and the results are used to assess the performance of different atomic multipole models. In uniform fields, the calculated Stark tuning rates of Deltamu = 0.52 cm(-1)/(MV/cm) (DFT), Deltamu = 0.55 cm(-1)/(MV/cm) (fluctuating three-point charge model), and Deltamu = 0.64 cm(-1)/(MV/cm) (Multipole model up to octupole), compare favorably with the experimentally measured value of 0.67 cm(-1)/(MV/cm). For H(2), which has no permanent dipole moment, CCSD(T) calculations demonstrate the importance of bond-weakening effects in force fields in response to the applied inhomogeneous electric field. Finally, CO in hexagonal ice is considered as a test system to highlight the performance of selected multipolar models in MD simulations. The approach discussed here can be applied to calibrate a range of multipolar charge models for diatomic probes, with applications to interpret Stark spectroscopy measurements in protein active sites.

  7. Effect of charge trapping on effective carrier lifetime in compound semiconductors: High resistivity CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Kamieniecki, Emil

    2014-11-21

    The dominant problem limiting the energy resolution of compound semiconductor based radiation detectors is the trapping of charge carriers. The charge trapping affects energy resolution through the carrier lifetime more than through the mobility. Conventionally, the effective carrier lifetime is determined using a 2-step process based on measurement of the mobility-lifetime product (μτ) and determining drift mobility using time-of-flight measurements. This approach requires fabrication of contacts on the sample. A new RF-based pulse rise-time method, which replaces this 2-step process with a single non-contact direct measurement, is discussed. The application of the RF method is illustrated with high-resistivity detector-grade CdZnTe crystals. The carrier lifetime in the measured CdZnTe, depending on the quality of the crystals, was between about 5 μs and 8 μs. These values are in good agreement with the results obtained using conventional 2-step approach. While the effective carrier lifetime determined from the initial portion of the photoresponse transient combines both recombination and trapping in a manner similar to the conventional 2-step approach, both the conventional and the non-contact RF methods offer only indirect evaluation of the effect of charge trapping in the semiconductors used in radiation detectors. Since degradation of detector resolution is associated not with trapping but essentially with detrapping of carriers, and, in particular, detrapping of holes in n-type semiconductors, it is concluded that evaluation of recombination and detrapping during photoresponse decay is better suited for evaluation of compound semiconductors used in radiation detectors. Furthermore, based on previously reported data, it is concluded that photoresponse decay in high resistivity CdZnTe at room temperature is dominated by detrapping of carriers from the states associated with one type of point defect and by recombination of carriers at one type of

  8. Charge carrier transport in polycrystalline organic thin film based field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Varsha; Sharma, Akanksha; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-05-01

    The charge carrier transport mechanism in polycrystalline thin film based organic field effect transistors (OFETs) has been explained using two competing models, multiple trapping and releases (MTR) model and percolation model. It has been shown that MTR model is most suitable for explaining charge carrier transport in grainy polycrystalline organic thin films. The energetic distribution of traps determined independently using Mayer-Neldel rule (MNR) is in excellent agreement with the values obtained by MTR model for copper phthalocyanine and pentacene based OFETs.

  9. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  10. Finite-size effect on the charging free energy of protein in explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Ekimoto, Toru; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2015-01-13

    The finite-size effect in periodic system is examined for the charging free energy of protein in explicit solvent over a variety of charged states. The key to the finite-size correction is the self-energy, which is defined as the interaction energy of the solute with its own periodic images and the neutralizing background. By employing the thermodynamic-integration method with systematically varied sizes of the unit cell of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we show for ubiquitin that the self-energy corrects the finite-size effect on the charging free energy within 1 kcal/mol at total charges of -5e, -1e, neutral, and +1e and within 5 kcal/mol even for a highly charged state with +8e. We then sought the additional correction from the solvation effect using the numerical solution to the Poisson equation of the protein with implicit solvent. This correction reduces the cell-size dependence of the charging free energy at +8e to 3 kcal/mol and is well expressed as the self-energy divided by the dielectric constant of solvent water.

  11. Evaluating Born and Local Effective Charges in Nanoscale MnO

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qi; Xu, Xiaoshan; Baker, Sheila N; Christianson, Andrew D; Musfeldt, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Phonons are exquisitely sensitive to finite-length scale effects in complex materials because they are intimately connected to charge, polarizability, and structure, and a quantitative analysis of their behavior can reveal microscopic aspects of chemical bonding. To investigate these effects in a model correlated oxide, we measured the infrared vibrational properties of 8-nm particles of MnO, compared the results with the analogous bulk material, and quantified the phonon confinement with a calculation of the Born effective charge. Our analysis reveals that the Born effective charge decreases by {approx}20%, compared to the bulk material. Moreover, this change impacts both ionicity and polarizability. Specifically, we find that MnO nanoparticles are {approx}12% less ionic than the corresponding bulk. This discovery is important for understanding finite-length scale effects in this simple binary oxide and the more complicated functional oxides that emanate from this parent compound.

  12. The effect of dust charge fluctuations in the near-Enceladus plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, Victoria; Luehr, Hermann

    The geologically active moon Enceladus feeds the most extended, Saturns’ E ring by dust particles and creates a specific multispecies plasma environment -the Enceladus plasma torus. The key process of dust-plasma interactions is dust charging. The grain electrostatic potential in space is usually calculated from the so called orbit-motion limited (OML) model [1]. It is valid for a single particle immersed into collisionless plasmas with Maxwellian electron and ion distributions. Such a parameter regime cannot be directly applied to the conditions relevant for the Enceladus plasma environment and especially, for the dense plume region, where the dust density is high, sometimes even exceeding the plasma number density. Generalizing the OML formalism, we examine several new factors that can significantly affect the equilibrium grain charging: (a) multispecies composition of the core plasma, including hot electrons and newborn cold ions; (b) effect of high dust number density (c) the role of dust size distributions. We also focus on such a specific peculiarity of dust charging as charge fluctuations. Since the grain charges are not fixed and can fluctuate, this introduces the crucial difference between ordinary plasma species (electrons and ions) and charged dust particles. There are two reasons for such fluctuations. The charging of the grains depends on the local plasma characteristics, and thus some temporal or spatial variations in the plasma parameters ultimately modify numbers of charges acquired by a grain. Some of these effects related to the near-Enceladus plasma environment have recently been discussed [2]. A second reason for charge fluctuations is the discrete nature of the charge carriers. Electrons and ions are absorbed or emitted by the grain surface randomly thus leading to stochastic fluctuations of the dust net charge. These fluctuations exist always even in a steady-state uniform plasma, and we discuss the statistical characteristics of random dust

  13. Photovoltaic Effects and Charge Transport Studies in Phycobiliproteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-30

    phycobilins are shown in Figure 1. Phycoerythrin (PE). phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC) are the individual biliproteins that self-assemble to form... phycocyanin and (b) phycocrythrin. thin films. The dark current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of ihc Au-proicin-Au samples were determined prior to optical...understanding of the potcnial or thc.sc proteins in device applications and may lead to a more fundamental appreciation of the biochemistry and photophysics of

  14. Charge integration successive approximation analog-to-digital converter for focal plane applications using a single amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Zhimin (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An analog-to-digital converter for on-chip focal-plane image sensor applications. The analog-to-digital converter utilizes a single charge integrating amplifier in a charge balancing architecture to implement successive approximation analog-to-digital conversion. This design requires minimal chip area and has high speed and low power dissipation for operation in the 2-10 bit range. The invention is particularly well suited to CMOS on-chip applications requiring many analog-to-digital converters, such as column-parallel focal-plane architectures.

  15. Electrical charging effects on the sliding friction of a model nano-confined ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Capozza, R.; Vanossi, A.; Benassi, A.; Tosatti, E.

    2015-10-14

    Recent measurements suggest the possibility to exploit ionic liquids (ILs) as smart lubricants for nano-contacts, tuning their tribological and rheological properties by charging the sliding interfaces. Following our earlier theoretical study of charging effects on nanoscale confinement and squeezout of a model IL, we present here molecular dynamics simulations of the frictional and lubrication properties of that model under charging conditions. First, we describe the case when two equally charged plates slide while being held together to a confinement distance of a few molecular layers. The shear sliding stress is found to rise strongly and discontinuously as the number of IL layers decreases stepwise. However, the shear stress shows, within each given number of layers, only a weak dependence upon the precise value of the normal load, a result in agreement with data extracted from recent experiments. We subsequently describe the case of opposite charging of the sliding plates and follow the shear stress when the charging is slowly and adiabatically reversed in the course of time, under fixed load. Despite the fixed load, the number and structure of the confined IL layers change with changing charge, and that in turn drives strong friction variations. The latter involves first of all charging-induced freezing of the IL film, followed by a discharging-induced melting, both made possible by the nanoscale confinement. Another mechanism for charging-induced frictional changes is a shift of the plane of maximum shear from mid-film to the plate-film interface, and vice versa. While these occurrences and results invariably depend upon the parameters of the model IL and upon its specific interaction with the plates, the present study helps identifying a variety of possible behavior, obtained under very simple assumptions, while connecting it to an underlying equilibrium thermodynamics picture.

  16. Electrical charging effects on the sliding friction of a model nano-confined ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Capozza, R; Benassi, A; Vanossi, A; Tosatti, E

    2015-10-14

    Recent measurements suggest the possibility to exploit ionic liquids (ILs) as smart lubricants for nano-contacts, tuning their tribological and rheological properties by charging the sliding interfaces. Following our earlier theoretical study of charging effects on nanoscale confinement and squeezout of a model IL, we present here molecular dynamics simulations of the frictional and lubrication properties of that model under charging conditions. First, we describe the case when two equally charged plates slide while being held together to a confinement distance of a few molecular layers. The shear sliding stress is found to rise strongly and discontinuously as the number of IL layers decreases stepwise. However, the shear stress shows, within each given number of layers, only a weak dependence upon the precise value of the normal load, a result in agreement with data extracted from recent experiments. We subsequently describe the case of opposite charging of the sliding plates and follow the shear stress when the charging is slowly and adiabatically reversed in the course of time, under fixed load. Despite the fixed load, the number and structure of the confined IL layers change with changing charge, and that in turn drives strong friction variations. The latter involves first of all charging-induced freezing of the IL film, followed by a discharging-induced melting, both made possible by the nanoscale confinement. Another mechanism for charging-induced frictional changes is a shift of the plane of maximum shear from mid-film to the plate-film interface, and vice versa. While these occurrences and results invariably depend upon the parameters of the model IL and upon its specific interaction with the plates, the present study helps identifying a variety of possible behavior, obtained under very simple assumptions, while connecting it to an underlying equilibrium thermodynamics picture.

  17. Electrical charging effects on the sliding friction of a model nano-confined ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozza, R.; Benassi, A.; Vanossi, A.; Tosatti, E.

    2015-10-01

    Recent measurements suggest the possibility to exploit ionic liquids (ILs) as smart lubricants for nano-contacts, tuning their tribological and rheological properties by charging the sliding interfaces. Following our earlier theoretical study of charging effects on nanoscale confinement and squeezout of a model IL, we present here molecular dynamics simulations of the frictional and lubrication properties of that model under charging conditions. First, we describe the case when two equally charged plates slide while being held together to a confinement distance of a few molecular layers. The shear sliding stress is found to rise strongly and discontinuously as the number of IL layers decreases stepwise. However, the shear stress shows, within each given number of layers, only a weak dependence upon the precise value of the normal load, a result in agreement with data extracted from recent experiments. We subsequently describe the case of opposite charging of the sliding plates and follow the shear stress when the charging is slowly and adiabatically reversed in the course of time, under fixed load. Despite the fixed load, the number and structure of the confined IL layers change with changing charge, and that in turn drives strong friction variations. The latter involves first of all charging-induced freezing of the IL film, followed by a discharging-induced melting, both made possible by the nanoscale confinement. Another mechanism for charging-induced frictional changes is a shift of the plane of maximum shear from mid-film to the plate-film interface, and vice versa. While these occurrences and results invariably depend upon the parameters of the model IL and upon its specific interaction with the plates, the present study helps identifying a variety of possible behavior, obtained under very simple assumptions, while connecting it to an underlying equilibrium thermodynamics picture.

  18. Removal of charged micropollutants from water by ion-exchange polymers -- effects of competing electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Bäuerlein, Patrick S; Ter Laak, Thomas L; Hofman-Caris, Roberta C H M; de Voogt, Pim; Droge, Steven T J

    2012-10-15

    A wide variety of environmental compounds of concern, e.g. pharmaceuticals or illicit drugs, are acids or bases that may predominantly be present as charged species in drinking water sources. These charged micropollutants may prove difficult to remove by currently used water treatment steps (e.g. UV/H(2)O(2), activated carbon (AC) or membranes). We studied the sorption affinity of some ionic organic compounds to both AC and different charged polymeric materials. Ion-exchange polymers may be effective as additional extraction phases in water treatment, because sorption of all charged compounds to oppositely charged polymers was stronger than to AC, especially for the double-charged cation metformin. Tested below 1% of the polymer ion-exchange capacity, the sorption affinity of charged micropollutants is nonlinear and depends on the composition of the aqueous medium. Whereas oppositely charged electrolytes do not impact sorption of organic ions, equally charged electrolytes do influence sorption indicating ion-exchange (IE) to be the main sorption mechanism. For the tested polymers, a tenfold increased salt concentration lowered the IE-sorption affinity by a factor two. Different electrolytes affect IE with organic ions in a similar way as inorganic ions on IE-resins, and no clear differences in this trend were observed between the sulphonated and the carboxylated cation-exchanger. Sorption of organic cations is five fold less in Ca(2+) solutions compared to similar concentrations of Na(+), while that of anionic compounds is three fold weaker in SO(4)(2-) solutions compared to equal concentrations of Cl(-).

  19. Large space system - Charged particle environment interaction technology. [effects on high voltage solar array performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.; Roche, J. C.; Grier, N. T.

    1979-01-01

    Large high-voltage space power systems proposed for future applications in both low earth orbit and geosynchronous altitudes must operate in the space charged-particle environment with possible interactions between this environment and the high-voltage surfaces. The paper reviews the ground experimental work to provide indicators for the interactions that could exist in the space power system. A preliminary analytical model of a large space power system is constructed using the existing NASA Charging Analyzer Program, and its performance in geosynchronous orbit is evaluated. The analytical results are used to illustrate the regions where detrimental interactions could exist and to establish areas where future technology is required.

  20. Relaxation of charge in monolayer graphene: Fast nonlinear diffusion versus Coulomb effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Straley, Joseph P.

    2017-01-01

    Pristine monolayer graphene exhibits very poor screening because the density of states vanishes at the Dirac point. As a result, charge relaxation is controlled by the effects of zero-point motion (rather than by the Coulomb interaction) over a wide range of parameters. Combined with the fact that graphene possesses finite intrinsic conductivity, this leads to a regime of relaxation described by a nonlinear diffusion equation with a diffusion coefficient that diverges at zero charge density. Some consequences of this fast diffusion are self-similar superdiffusive regimes of relaxation, the development of a charge depleted region at the interface between electron- and hole-rich regions, and finite extinction times for periodic charge profiles.

  1. Dot size effects of nanocrystalline germanium on charging dynamics of memory devices.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ling-Feng

    2013-01-10

    The dot size of nanocrystalline germanium (NC Ge) which impacts on the charging dynamics of memory devices has been theoretically investigated. The calculations demonstrate that the charge stored in the NC Ge layer and the charging current at a given oxide voltage depend on the dot size especially on a few nanometers. They have also been found to obey the tendency of initial increase, then saturation, and lastly, decrease with increasing dot size at any given charging time, which is caused by a compromise between the effects of the lowest conduction states and the capacitance of NC Ge layer on the tunneling. The experimental data from literature have also been used to compare and validate the theoretical analysis.

  2. Investigation of space charge distribution of low-density polyethylene/GO-GNF (graphene oxide from graphite nanofiber) nanocomposite for HVDC application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Jin; Ha, Son-Tung; Lee, Gun Joo; Nam, Jin Ho; Ryu, Ik Hyun; Nam, Su Hyun; Park, Cheol Min; In, Insik; Kim, Jiwan; Han, Chul Jong

    2013-05-01

    This paper reported a research on space charge distribution in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) nanocomposites with different types of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) at low filler content (0.05 wt%) under high DC electric field. Effect of addition of graphene oxide or graphene, its dispersion in LDPE polymer matrix on the ability to suppress space charge generation will be investigated and compared with MgO/LDPE nanocomposite at the same filler concentration. At an applied electric field of 80 kV/mm, a positive packet-like charge was observed in both neat LDPE, MgO/LDPE, and graphene/LDPE nanocomposites, whereas only little homogenous space charge was observed in GO/LDPE nanocomposites, especially with GO synthesized from graphite nano fiber (GNF) which is only -100 nm in diameter. Our research also suggests that dispersion of graphene oxide particles on the polymer matrix plays a significant role to the performance of nanocomposites on suppressing packet-like space charge. From these results, it is expected that nano-sized GO synthesized from GNF can be a promising filler material to LDPE composite for HVDC applications.

  3. Effect of refrigerant charge on the performance of air-conditioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, D.Y.; Ek, G.; Leung, M.; Jotshi, C.K.; Sherif, S.A.; Colacino, F.

    1997-12-31

    An air-conditioning system operates in an optimal condition if the system is fully charged with specified amount of refrigerant. Poor field maintenance or refrigerant leakage causes low level of charge resulting in a lower thermal performance and higher operating cost. An experimental investigation was conducted to study the effect of low charge level of R-22 on the performance of a 3-ton residential air-conditioning system. The experimental results show that if a system is undercharged to 90%, the effect is small, 3.5% reduction in cooling capacity and 2% increase in COP. However, the system performance suffers serious degradation if the level of charge drops below 80%. An ice layer formed on the outer cooling coil surface impedes the heat transfer between the warm air and cold refrigerant vapor. An economic analysis shows that the cost of properly charging a system which has otherwise gone down to 85% charge level can pay for itself in savings in a short period of 3 to 4 months.

  4. Investigation of charge transport and electromagnetic effects in advanced microelectronics and optoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.; Booth, T.; Gray, M.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The next generation of electronic microchips will utilize components with sub-micron feature size and optoelectronic devices with picosecond response time. Fundamental understanding of the device performance can only be obtained through first principles physics modeling of charge transport and electromagnetic effects in realistic geometries with material interfaces and dispersive properties. We have developed a general model incorporating important physics such as charge transport processes in materials with multilevel band structures and electromagnetic effects to simulate device characteristics. Accurate treatment of material interfaces and boundaries is included. The Monte Carlo charge transport is coupled self-consistently to Maxwell`s equations to accurately model scattering processes in the presence of an externally biased potential. This detailed multidimensional simulation capability is compared with and verified by experimental data, and could become an industrial standard for benchmarking and improving the {open_quotes}reduced model{close_quotes} codes used for semiconductor design. Specific tasks are the extension of existing capabilities in particle-in-cell plasma simulation technique and Monte Carlo charge transport to study the physics of charged particle dynamics in realistic microelectronic devices, such as bipolar semiconductors, heterojunction transistors, and optoelectronic switches. Our approach has been based on the coupled particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo technique, which can simultaneously treat both electromagnetic wave propagation and charged-particle transport.

  5. Charging effect simulation model used in simulations of plasma etching of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ishchuk, Valentyn; Volland, Burkhard E.; Hauguth, Maik; Rangelow, Ivo W.; Cooke, Mike

    2012-10-15

    Understanding the consequences of local surface charging on the evolving etching profile is a critical challenge in high density plasma etching. Deflection of the positively charged ions in locally varying electric fields can cause profile defects such as notching, bowing, and microtrenching. We have developed a numerical simulation model capturing the influence of the charging effect over the entire course of the etching process. The model is fully integrated into ViPER (Virtual Plasma Etch Reactor)-a full featured plasma processing simulation software developed at Ilmenau University of Technology. As a consequence, we show that local surface charge concurrently evolves with the feature profile to affect the final shape of the etched feature. Using gas chopping (sometimes called time-multiplexed) etch process for experimental validation of the simulation, we show that the model provides excellent fits to the experimental data and both, bowing and notching effects are captured-as long as the evolving profile and surface charge are simultaneously simulated. In addition, this new model explains that surface scallops, characteristic of gas chopping technique, are eroded and often absent in the final feature profile due to surface charging. The model is general and can be applied across many etching chemistries.

  6. The porous membrane with tunable performance for vanadium flow battery: The effect of charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuyue; Yuan, Zhizhang; Lu, Wenjing; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Huamin

    2017-02-01

    Porous membranes with different charge on the surface and internal pore walls are prepared via the solvent-responsive layer-by-layer (SR-LBL) method. The effect of charge on the transport properties of different ions through the membranes is investigated in detail. The charge property of prepared membranes is tuned by assembling different charged polyelectrolytes (PEs) on the pore walls and the surface of the porous membranes. The results show that in a vanadium flow battery (VFB), the PE layers assembled on the surfaces (including pore walls) are capable to construct excellent ion transport channels to increase proton conductivity and to tune the ion selectivity via Donnan exclusion effect. Compared with the porous membrane with negative charges (7 bilayers), a VFB single cell assembled with a positively charged membrane (7.5 bilayers) yields a higher coulombic efficiency (98%). The water and ion transfer behavior exhibits a similar tendency. In the negative half-cell, the amount of V3+ gradually increases as cycles proceed and the amount of V2+ stays at a low and stable level. In the positive half-cell, the amount of VO2+ decreases; while VO2+ is accumulated. The imbalance of vanadium ions at both sides induces the discharge capacity fade.

  7. A Procedure to Obtain the Effective Nuclear Charge from the Atomic Spectrum of Sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala*, O.; Araki, Koiti; Noda, L. K.

    1999-09-01

    The penetration of the valence electron orbitals of the alkali metals into their inner shells and its effect on the energy levels can be considered through two methods that take into account modifications of the hydrogen formula (one-electron system). One of them considers the quantum defect, modifying the quantum number n; the other considers the effective nuclear charge Z* replacing the nuclear charge Z. The method using the quantum defect is widely used because this quantity is practically constant for a given angular momentum quantum number l. However, the method using effective nuclear charge is more realistic because it explains many atomic and molecular properties - but the effective nuclear charge depends on l as well as on the principal quantum number n. This article describes a relatively simple graphical procedure to calculate the effective nuclear charges experienced by the sodium valence electron from its atomic spectrum. A relation of Z* with n for a given l is obtained and the Z* values for all states of the valence electron are found; the energy terms can also be determined. The calculations can be performed by using common spreadsheet software.

  8. Charge transfer in graphene oxide-dye system for photonic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bongu, Sudhakara Reddy Bisht, Prem B.; Thu, Tran V.; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2014-02-20

    The fluorescence of a standard dye Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in solution decreases on addition of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The absorption spectra and lifetime measurements confirm that no excited-state but a ground-state complex formation is responsible for this effect. For silver decorated rGO (Ag-rGO), the quenching efficiency and ground state complex formation process is small. Z-scan measurements have been done to study the optical nonlinearity at 532 nm under ps time scale. Remarkable reduction in the saturable absorption (SA) effect of R6G indicates no nonlinear contribution from the ground state complex. The results have been explained with varying charge transfer rates and non-fluorescence nature of the complex.

  9. Influence of surface charge on the transport characteristics of nanowire-field effect transistors in liquid environments

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Daijiro E-mail: research@nano.tu-dresden.de; Kunstmann, Jens; Zörgiebel, Felix; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-05-18

    One dimensional nanowire field effect transistors (NW-FETs) are a promising platform for sensor applications. The transport characteristics of NW-FETs are strongly modified in liquid environment due to the charging of surface functional groups accompanied with protonation or deprotonation. In order to investigate the influence of surface charges and ionic concentrations on the transport characteristics of Schottky-barrier NW-FETs, we have combined the modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory with the Landauer-Büttiker transport formalism. For a typical device, the model is able to capture the reduction of the sensitivity of NW-FETs in ionic solutions due to the screening from counter ions as well as a local gating from surface functional groups. Our approach allows to model, to investigate, and to optimize realistic Schottky-barrier NW-FET devices in liquid environment.

  10. Infrared light irradiation diminishes effective charge transfer in slow sodium channel gating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plakhova, Vera B.; Bagraev, Nikolai T.; Klyachkin, Leonid E.; Malyarenko, Anna M.; Romanov, Vladimir V.; Krylov, Boris V.

    2001-02-01

    Effects of infrared light irradiation (IR) on cultured dorsal root ganglia cells were studied by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The IR field is demonstrated to diminish the effective charge transfer in the activation system from 6.2 +-0.6 to 4.5 +-0.4 in units of electron charge per e-fold change in membrane potential. The effects was blocked with ouabain. Our data is the first indication that sodium pump might be the molecular sensor of infrared irradiation in animal kingdom.

  11. Infrared light irradiation diminishes effective charge transfer in slow sodium channel gating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plakhova, Vera B.; Bagraev, Nikolai T.; Klyachkin, Leonid E.; Malyarenko, Anna M.; Romanov, Vladimir V.; Krylov, Boris V.

    2000-02-01

    Effects of infrared light irradiation (IR) on cultured dorsal root ganglia cells were studied by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The IR field is demonstrated to diminish the effective charge transfer in the activation system from 6.2 +-0.6 to 4.5 +-0.4 in units of electron charge per e-fold change in membrane potential. The effects was blocked with ouabain. Our data is the first indication that sodium pump might be the molecular sensor of infrared irradiation in animal kingdom.

  12. Comparative Analysis and Approximations of Space -Charge Formation in Langmuir Electrodes Including Temperature Effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdeblànquez, Eder

    2001-10-01

    Eder Valdeblànquez,Universidad del Zulia,Apartado 4011-A 526,Maracaibo,Venezuela. ABSTRACT: In this paper by space charge effect in Langmuir probes are compared for different kind of symmetries; plane, cylindrical and spherical. A detailed analysis is performed here including temperature effects, and therefore kinetic theory is used instead of fluid equations as other authors. The strongly non-linear equations obtained here have been solved first by numerical analysis and later by approximations using Bessel functions. The accuracy of each approximaton is also discussed. Space Charge effects are important in plane geometries than in the case of cylindrical or spherical symmetries.

  13. Physical insights of body effect and charge degradation in floating-body DRAMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusi, Gino

    2014-05-01

    Floating Body one transistor Dynamic Random Access Memories (FBRAMs) have been widely studied and proposed in the literature as an alternative for conventional one transistor/one capacitor DRAMs. FBRAM performance depends on charge degradation during READ and HOLD operations and on the body effect during READ operation, the first setting the amount of the residual non-equilibrium charge during READ operation, and the second setting the effectiveness of this residual charge to modulate the source-body barrier during READ operation. In this work it is proposed a simple analytical charge-based compact model for the body-effect in FBRAMs which is able to reproduce device performance in terms of READ Sense Margin and current ratio. Physical insights of the body effect and charge degradation mechanisms, with particular emphasis to their bias dependence, are discussed in detail. Conclusions can be useful for the choice and the optimization of the bias in FBRAMs. All the discussion is supported by two-dimensional drift-diffusion device simulation on a template double-gate MOSFET.

  14. Influence of 90° charged domain walls on the electrocaloric effect in PbTiO3 ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Wang, J. B.; Li, B.; Zhong, X. L.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The electrocaloric (EC) effect in PbTiO3 ferroelectric thin films (FETFs) with an array of partially compensated head-to-head (HH) and tail-to-tail (TT) 90° charged domain walls (CDWs) has been studied by using a phase field method. The calculation results indicate that the magnitude of the adiabatic temperature change ΔT increases with the diminution of the charge density (ρ*), in which ρ* is provided by charged defects or band bending. In particular, a negative EC effect caused by the direction difference between the applied electric field and the dipole is found near the HH and TT domain walls when ρ* > 2.0. The EC strength | ΔT | /| ΔE | is 0.020 K cm kV-1 with the positive ΔT = 2.03 K at the external dimensionless electric field Eb*=0.08 (ΔE = 104 kV cm-1). These results indicate that the CDWs can provide an efficient way to adjust the EC effect of FETFs for refrigeration applications at room temperature.

  15. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1992-08-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 machine. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel efficiency of particle-tracking implementation on any parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  16. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-05-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 machine. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel efficiency of particle-tracking implementation on any parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  17. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-04-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 macene. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  18. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-04-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 macene. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  19. Time-resolved HAXPES using a microfocused XFEL beam: From vacuum space-charge effects to intrinsic charge-carrier recombination dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Oloff, Lars-Philip; Chainani, Ashish; Matsunami, Masaharu; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Togashi, Tadashi; Osawa, Hitoshi; Hanff, Kerstin; Quer, Arndt; Matsushita, Ryuki; Shiraishi, Ryutaro; Nagashima, Maki; Kimura, Ayato; Matsuishi, Kotaro; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Rossi, Giorgio; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Rossnagel, Kai; Oura, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (trHAXPES) using microfocused X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL, hν = 8 keV) pulses as a probe and infrared laser pulses (hν = 1.55 eV) as a pump is employed to determine intrinsic charge-carrier recombination dynamics in La:SrTiO3. By means of a combination of experiments and numerical N-body simulations, we first develop a simple approach to characterize and decrease XFEL-induced vacuum space-charge effects, which otherwise pose a serious limitation to spectroscopy experiments. We then show that, using an analytical mean-field model, vacuum space-charge effects can be counteracted by pump laser-induced photoholes at high excitation densities. This provides us a method to separate vacuum space-charge effects from the intrinsic charge-carrier recombination dynamics in the time domain. Our trHAXPES results thus open a route to studies of intrinsic charge-carrier dynamics on picosecond time scales with lateral spatial resolution on the micrometer scale. PMID:27731408

  20. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, Tania M.

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  1. Estimation of the ionic charge of non-metallic species into an electrical discharge through a web application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Gutiérrez, B. R.; Vera-Rivera, F. H.; Niño, E. D. V.

    2016-08-01

    Estimate the ionic charge generated in electrical discharges will allow us to know more accurately the concentration of ions implanted on the surfaces of nonmetallic solids. For this reason, in this research a web application was developed to allow us to calculate the ionic charge generated in an electrical discharge from the experimental parameters established in an ion implantation process performed in the JUPITER (Joint Universal Plasma and Ion Technologies Experimental Reactor) reactor. The estimated value of the ionic charge will be determined from data acquired on an oscilloscope, during startup and shutdown of electrical discharge, which will then be analyzed and processed. The study will provide best developments with regard to the application of ion implantation in various industrial sectors.

  2. Effects of radiation on charge-coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, J. E.; Cope, A. D.; Rockett, L. R.; Schlesier, K. M.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of 1 MeV electron irradiation upon the performance of two phase, polysilicon aluminum gate CCDs are reported. Both n- and p-surface channel and n-buried channel devices are investigated using 64- and 128-stage line arrays. Characteristics measured as a function of radiation dose include: Transfer inefficiency, threshold voltage, field effect mobility, interface state density, full well signal level and dark current. Surface channel devices are found to degrade considerably at less than 10 to the 5th power rads (Si) due to the large increase in fast interface state density caused by radiation. Buried channel devices maintain efficient operation to the highest dose levels used.

  3. Space-charge perturbation effects in photonic tubes under high irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalibjian, R.; Peterson, G.G.

    1982-06-01

    Potential perturbation effects at the cathode region of a photonic tube can occur at high intensity due to space-charge. Using appropriate photoelectron energy distribution functions, the electric field at the cathode is calculated and its effect upon the spatial/temporal resolution is examined.

  4. Effect of deformation and the neutron skin on RMS charge radii

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.; Schmidt, K.H.

    1981-05-01

    Droplet Model predictions for nuclear RMS charge radii are compared with measured values in order to determine whether or not there is any evidence for volume shell effects. After corrections for deformation, diffuseness, and the central depression have been applied, some evidence for such effects remains, but it is at about the same level as the experimental uncertainty.

  5. Gain length fitting formula for free-electron lasers with strong space-charge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, G.; Hemsing, E.; Rosenzweig, J.

    2011-08-01

    We present a power-fit formula, obtained from a variational analysis using three-dimensional free-electron laser theory, for the gain length of a high-gain free-electron laser’s fundamental mode in the presence of diffraction, uncorrelated energy spread, and longitudinal space-charge effects. The approach is inspired by the work of Xie [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 445, 59 (2000)NIMAER0168-900210.1016/S0168-9002(00)00114-5], and provides a useful shortcut for calculating the gain length of the fundamental Gaussian mode of a free-electron laser having strong space-charge effects in the 3D regime. The results derived from analytic theory are in good agreement with detailed numerical particle simulations that also include higher-order space-charge effects, supporting the assumptions made in the theoretical treatment and the variational solutions obtained in the single-mode limit.

  6. Calculating potential of mean force between like-charged nanoparticles: A comprehensive study on salt effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuan-Yan; Wang, Feng-Hua; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2013-10-01

    Ions are critical to the structure and stability of polyelectrolytes such as nucleic acids. In this work, we systematically calculated the potentials of mean force between two like-charged nanoparticles in salt solutions by Monte Carlo simulations. The pseudo-spring method is employed to calculate the potential of mean force and compared systematically with the inversed-Boltzmann method. An effective attraction is predicted between two like-charged nanoparticles in divalent/trivalent salt solution and such attraction becomes weakened at very high salt concentration. Our analysis reveals that for the system, the configuration of ion-bridging nanoparticles is responsible for the attraction, and the invasion of anions into the inter-nanoparticles region at high salt concentration would induce attraction weakening rather than the charge inversion effect. The present method would be useful for calculating effective interactions during nucleic acid folding.

  7. EFFECTIVE ACIDITY CONSTANT BEHAVIOR NEAR ZERO CHARGE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface site (>SOH group) acidity reactions require expressions of the form: Ka = [>SOHn-1(z-1)]aH+EXP(-DG/RT)/[>SOHnz] (where all variables have their usual meaning). One can rearrange this expression to generate an effective acidity constant historically defined as: Qa = Ka...

  8. Effect of substrate bias on deposition behaviour of charged silicon nanoparticles in ICP-CVD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Seung-Wan; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Seong, Dae-Jin; Seo, Byong-Hoon; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a substrate bias on the deposition behaviour of crystalline silicon films during inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) was analysed by consideration of non-classical crystallization, in which the building block is a nanoparticle rather than an individual atom or molecule. The coexistence of positively and negatively charged nanoparticles in the plasma and their role in Si film deposition are confirmed by applying bias voltages to the substrate, which is sufficiently small as not to affect the plasma potential. The sizes of positively and negatively charged nanoparticles captured on a carbon membrane and imaged using TEM are, respectively, 2.7-5.5 nm and 6-13 nm. The film deposited by positively charged nanoparticles has a typical columnar structure. In contrast, the film deposited by negatively charged nanoparticles has a structure like a powdery compact with the deposition rate about three times higher than that for positively charged nanoparticles. All the films exhibit crystallinity even though the substrate is at room temperature, which is attributed to the deposition of crystalline nanoparticles formed in the plasma. The film deposited by negatively charged nanoparticles has the highest crystalline fraction of 0.84.

  9. Computational investigation of the effects of perfluorination on the charge-transport properties of polyaromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardia, R.; Malloci, G.; Bosin, A.; Serra, G.; Cappellini, G.

    2016-10-01

    We present a systematic computational study of the effects of perfluorination on the charge-transport properties of three homologous classes of polyaromatic hydrocarbons of interest for molecular electronics: acenes, pyrenes, and circumacenes. By means of Density Functional Theory calculations we first obtained the key molecular properties for transport of both holes and electrons. We then used these parameters in the framework of Marcus theory to compare charge-transfer rates in the high temperatures regime for both unsubstituted and perfluorinated molecules. We additionally estimated the relative charge-mobility of each unsubstituted (perfluorinated) molecule with respect to unsubstituted (perfluorinated) pentacene. We found in all cases that perfluorination reduces the charge-transfer rate in absolute terms. This is largely due to the higher values of the molecular reorganization energies predicted for perfluorinated compounds. Interestingly, however, the charge-transfer rates for both holes and electrons of perfluorinated species are remarkably similar, especially for the larger species. In addition, in the case of the larger circumacenes the charge-mobility values relative to pentacene values are found to increase upon perfluorination.

  10. Effect of Conductive Inorganic Fillers on Space Charge Accumulation Characteristics in Cross-linked Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Nobuya; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Maeno, Takashi; Mizuno, Takehiko; Takahashi, Tohru

    We have observed space charge profiles in cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) under dc high electric field using the PEA (pulsed electro-acoustic) system to study the relationship between space charge behavior and dielectric breakdown. In our previous research work, we have found that a large amount of, so called, packet-like charge generates in low density polyethylene (LDPE) under high dc electric field of more than 100 kV/mm. The packet-like charge enhances the electric field locally in bulk of the sample, and then finally it leads a breakdown. On the other hand, a new type of XLPE which was made through adding conductive inorganic fillers, shows a good dc dielectric breakdown characteristic and high volume resistivity under dc stress. In this report, we tried to observe the space charge behavior under high dc electric field in this material. From the results, it is found that the charge injection is effectively suppressed by adding only a small amount of conductive inorganic fillers to XLPE.

  11. SU-E-I-99: Estimation of Effective Charge Distribution by Dual-Energy CT Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Sakata, D; Kida, S; Nakano, M; Masutani, Y; Nakagawa, K; Haga, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Computed Tomography (CT) is a method to produce slice image of specific volume from the scanned x-ray projection images. The contrast of CT image is correlated with the attenuation coefficients of the x-ray in the object. The attenuation coefficient is strongly dependent on the x-ray energy and the effective charge of the material. The purpose of this presentation is to show the effective charge distribution predicted by CT images reconstructed with kilovoltage(kV) and megavoltage(MV) x-ray energy. Methods: The attenuation coefficients of x-ray can be characterized by cross section of photoionization and Compton scattering for the specific xray energy. In particular, the photoionization cross section is strongly correlated with the effective charge of the object. Hence we can calculate effective charge by solving the coupled equation between the attenuation coefficient and the theoretical cross section. For this study, we use the megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) x-rays of Elekta Synergy as the dual source x-ray, and CT image of the Phantom Laboratory CatPhan is reconstructed by the filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative algorithm for cone-beam CT (CBCT). Results: We report attenuation coefficients of each component of the CatPhan specified by each x-ray source. Also the effective charge distribution is evaluated by the MV and kV dual x-ray sources. The predicted effective charges are comparable with the nominal ones. Conclusion: We developed the MV and kV dual-source CBCT reconstruction to yield the effective charge distribution. For more accuracy, it is critical to remove an effect of the scattering photon in the CBCT reconstruction algorithm. The finding will be fine reference of the effective charge of tissue and lead to the more realistic absorbed-dose calculation. This work was partly supported by the JSPS Core-to-Core Program(No. 23003), and this work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI 24234567.

  12. Charge-Separation Kinetics of Photoexcited Oxygen Vacancies in ZnO Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming-Pei; Chen, Chieh-Wei; Lu, Ming-Yen

    2016-11-01

    Photoinduced atomic structural transitions of negative-U defects: neutral oxygen vacancies (VO 0 ), accompanied by lattice relaxation, can form ionized 1 + and 2 + vacancy defects in ZnO materials, giving rise to an optoelectronic phenomenon named "persistent photoconductivity," thereby limiting the applications of ZnO materials in optoelectronic fields. Nevertheless, very little is known about the kinetics of the separation-recombination interactions between an electron and an ionized oxygen vacancy, constituting a photoexcited charge pair, in nanoscale ZnO material systems, especially when considering the effect of electric fields. In this report, we describe the charge-separation kinetics of photoexcited VO 0 defects in ZnO nanowire (NW) field-effect transistor (FET) systems, examined through modulation of the surface electric field of the ZnO NW. We apply oxygen plasma treatment to tailor the doping concentration within the ZnO NWs with the goal of modulating the electric field within their surface space-charge layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-frequency current-noise spectroscopy are applied to identify the change in the density of oxygen-vacancy defects near the NW surface after oxygen plasma treatment. A model describing the initial stage of the photoconductance responses associated with the formation of the photoinduced ionized 1 + state of the oxygen-vacancy defects (VO + ) in the fully depleted ZnO NW FETs in the low-photoconductance regime upon UV excitation is proposed to extract the charge-separation probabilities of the photoexcited electron/VO + pair. Accordingly, the charge-separation probability increases from approximately 0.0012 to 0.042 upon increasing the electric field at the NW surface from approximately 7.5 ×106 to 5.0 ×107 V m-1 . Moreover, we employ modified Braun empirical theory to model the effect of the electric field on the charge-separation behavior of photoexcited electron/VO + pairs in ZnO NWs, obtaining a

  13. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-02-05

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics.

  14. Unusual dimensionality effects and surface charge density in 2D Mg(OH)2

    PubMed Central

    Suslu, Aslihan; Wu, Kedi; Sahin, Hasan; Chen, Bin; Yang, Sijie; Cai, Hui; Aoki, Toshihiro; Horzum, Seyda; Kang, Jun; Peeters, Francois M.; Tongay, Sefaattin

    2016-01-01

    We present two-dimensional Mg(OH)2 sheets and their vertical heterojunctions with CVD-MoS2 for the first time as flexible 2D insulators with anomalous lattice vibration and chemical and physical properties. New hydrothermal crystal growth technique enabled isolation of environmentally stable monolayer Mg(OH)2 sheets. Raman spectroscopy and vibrational calculations reveal that the lattice vibrations of Mg(OH)2 have fundamentally different signature peaks and dimensionality effects compared to other 2D material systems known to date. Sub-wavelength electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations show that Mg(OH)2 is a 6 eV direct-gap insulator in 2D, and its optical band gap displays strong band renormalization effects from monolayer to bulk, marking the first experimental confirmation of confinement effects in 2D insulators. Interestingly, 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets possess rather strong surface polarization (charge) effects which is in contrast to electrically neutral h-BN materials. Using 2D-Mg(OH)2 sheets together with CVD-MoS2 in the vertical stacking shows that a strong change transfer occurs from n-doped CVD-MoS2 sheets to Mg(OH)2, naturally depleting the semiconductor, pushing towards intrinsic doping limit and enhancing overall optical performance of 2D semiconductors. Results not only establish unusual confinement effects in 2D-Mg(OH)2, but also offer novel 2D-insulating material with unique physical, vibrational, and chemical properties for potential applications in flexible optoelectronics. PMID:26846617

  15. Immobilization of bilirubin oxidase on graphene oxide flakes with different negative charge density for oxygen reduction. The effect of GO charge density on enzyme coverage, electron transfer rate and current density.

    PubMed

    Filip, Jaroslav; Andicsová-Eckstein, Anita; Vikartovská, Alica; Tkac, Jan

    2017-03-15

    Previously we showed that an effective bilirubin oxidase (BOD)-based biocathode using graphene oxide (GO) could be prepared in 2 steps: 1. electrostatic adsorption of BOD on GO; 2. electrochemical reduction of the BOD-GO composite to form a BOD-ErGO (electrochemically reduced GO) film on the electrode. In order to identify an optimal charge density of GO for BOD-ErGO composite preparation, several GO fractions differing in an average flake size and ζ-potential were prepared using centrifugation and consequently employed for BOD-ErGO biocathode preparation. A simple way to express surface charge density of these particular GO nanosheets was developed. The values obtained were then correlated with biocatalytic and electrochemical parameters of the prepared biocathodes, i.e. electrocatalytically active BOD surface coverage (Γ), heterogeneous electron transfer rate (kS) and a maximum biocatalytic current density. The highest bioelectrocatalytic current density of (597±25)μAcm(-2) and the highest Γ of (23.6±0.9)pmolcm(-2) were obtained on BOD-GO composite having the same moderate negative charge density, but the highest kS of (79.4±4.6)s(-1) was observed on BOD-GO composite having different negative charge density. This study is a solid foundation for others to consider the influence of a charge density of GO on direct bioelectrochemistry/bioelectrocatalysis of other redox enzymes applicable for construction of biosensors, bioanodes, biocathodes or biofuel cells.

  16. NASA's Technical Handbook for Avoiding On-Orbit ESD Anomalies Due to Internal Charging Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittlesey, Albert; Garrett, Henry B.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes NASA-HDBK-4002, "Avoiding Problems Caused by Spacecraft On-Orbit Internal Charging Effects". The handbook includes a description of internal charging and why it is of concern to spacecraft designers. It also suggests how to determine when a project needs to consider internal spacecraft charging, it contains an electron penetration depth chart, rationale for a critical electron flux criterion, a worst-case geosynchronous electron plasma spectrum, general design guidelines, quantitative design guidelines, and a typical materials characteristics list. Appendices include a listing of some environment codes, electron transport codes, a discussion of geostationary electron plasma environments, a brief description of electron beam and other materials tests, and transient susceptibility tests. The handbook will be in the web page, hftp://standards.nasa.gov. A prior document, NASA TP2361 "Design Guidelines for Assessing and controlling Spacecraft Charging Effects", 1984, is in use to describe mitigation techniques for the effects of surface charging of satellites in space plasma environments. HDBK-4002 is meant to complement 2361 and together, the pair of documents describe both cause and mitigation designs for problems caused by energetic space plasmas.

  17. Effect of mobile ions on the electric field needed to orient charged diblock copolymer thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghan, Ashkan; Shi, An-Chang; Schick, M.

    2015-10-07

    We examine the behavior of lamellar phases of charged/neutral diblock copolymer thin films containing mobile ions in the presence of an external electric field. We employ self-consistent field theory and focus on the aligning effect of the electric field on the lamellae. Of particular interest are the effects of the mobile ions on the critical field, the value required to reorient the lamellae from the parallel configuration favored by the surface interaction to the perpendicular orientation favored by the field. We find that the critical field depends strongly on whether the neutral or charged species is favored by the substrates. In the case in which the neutral species is favored, the addition of charges decreases the critical electric field significantly. The effect is greater when the mobile ions are confined to the charged lamellae. In contrast, when the charged species is favored by the substrate, the addition of mobile ions stabilizes the parallel configuration and thus results in an increase in the critical electric field. The presence of ions in the system introduces a new mixed phase in addition to those reported previously.

  18. Effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of anti-VEGF proteins determined by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Li, S Kevin; Liddell, Mark R; Wen, He

    2011-06-01

    Macromolecules such as therapeutic proteins currently serve an important role in the treatment of eye diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Particularly, bevacizumab and ranibizumab have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these diseases. Iontophoresis can be employed to enhance ocular delivery of these macromolecules, but the lack of information on the properties of these macromolecules has hindered its development. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and model compound polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) using capillary zone electrophoresis. Salicylate, lidocaine, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which have known electrophoretic mobilities in the literature, were also studied to validate the present technique. The hydrodynamic radii and diffusion coefficients of BSA, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and PSS were measured by dynamic light scattering. The effective charges were calculated using the Einstein relation between diffusion coefficient and electrophoretic mobility and the Henry equation. The results show that bevacizumab and ranibizumab have low electrophoretic mobilities and are net negatively charged in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 and 0.16M ionic strength. PSS has high negative charge but the electrophoretic mobility in PBS is lower than that expected from the polymer structure. The present study demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis could be used to characterize the mobility and charge properties of drug candidates in the development of iontophoretic drug delivery.

  19. Negative space charge effects in photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar converters

    SciTech Connect

    Segev, G.; Weisman, D.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Kribus, A.

    2015-07-06

    In thermionic energy converters, electrons in the gap between electrodes form a negative space charge and inhibit the emission of additional electrons, causing a significant reduction in conversion efficiency. However, in Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) solar energy converters, electrons that are reflected by the electric field in the gap return to the cathode with energy above the conduction band minimum. These electrons first occupy the conduction band from which they can be reemitted. This form of electron recycling makes PETE converters less susceptible to negative space charge loss. While the negative space charge effect was studied extensively in thermionic converters, modeling its effect in PETE converters does not account for important issues such as this form of electron recycling, nor the cathode thermal energy balance. Here, we investigate the space charge effect in PETE solar converters accounting for electron recycling, with full coupling of the cathode and gap models, and addressing conservation of both electric and thermal energy. The analysis shows that the negative space charge loss is lower than previously reported, allowing somewhat larger gaps compared to previous predictions. For a converter with a specific gap, there is an optimal solar flux concentration. The optimal solar flux concentration, the cathode temperature, and the efficiency all increase with smaller gaps. For example, for a gap of 3 μm the maximum efficiency is 38% and the optimal flux concentration is 628, while for a gap of 5 μm the maximum efficiency is 31% and optimal flux concentration is 163.

  20. Effective Electrophoretic Mobilities and Charges of Anti-VEGF Proteins Determined by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Liddell, Mark R.; Wen, He

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecules such as therapeutic proteins currently serve an important role in the treatment of eye diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Particularly, bevacizumab and ranibizumab have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these diseases. Iontophoresis can be employed to enhance ocular delivery of these macromolecules, but the lack of information on the properties of these macromolecules has hindered its development. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and model compound polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) using capillary zone electrophoresis. Salicylate, lidocaine, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which have known electrophoretic mobilities in the literature, were also studied to validate the present technique. The hydrodynamic radii and diffusion coefficients of BSA, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and PSS were measured by dynamic light scattering. The effective charges were calculated using the Einstein relation between diffusion coefficient and electrophoretic mobility and the Henry equation. The results show that bevacizumab and ranibizumab have low electrophoretic mobilities and are net negatively charged in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 and 0.16 M ionic strength. PSS has high negative charge but the electrophoretic mobility in PBS is lower than that expected from the polymer structure. The present study demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis could be used to characterize the mobility and charge properties of drug candidates in the development of iontophoretic drug delivery. PMID:21269789

  1. Effect of film nanostructure on in-plane charge transport in organic bulk heterojunction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Eric; Ooi, Zi-En; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2013-09-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells are a promising alternative energy technology, but a thorough understanding of charge transport behavior in BHJ materials is necessary in order to design devices with high power conversion efficiencies. Parameters such as carrier mobilities, carrier concentrations, and the recombination coefficient have traditionally been successfully measured using vertical structures similar to organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. We have developed a lateral BHJ device which complements these vertical techniques by allowing spatially resolved measurement along the transport direction of charge carriers. This is essential for evaluating the effect of nanoscale structure and morphology on these important charge transport parameters. Nanomorphology in organic BHJ films has been controlled using a variety of methods, but the effect of these procedures has been infrequently correlated with the charge transport parameter of the BHJ material. Electron beam lithography has been used to create lateral device structures with many voltage probes at a sub-micron resolution throughout the device channel. By performing in-situ potentiometry, we can calculate both carrier mobilities and determine the effect of solvent choice and annealing procedure on the charge transport in BHJ system. Spin coated P3HT:PCBM films prepared from solutions in chloroform and o-xylene are characterized using this technique.

  2. Gate-Sensing Coherent Charge Oscillations in a Silicon Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Zalba, M Fernando; Shevchenko, Sergey N; Barraud, Sylvain; Johansson, J Robert; Ferguson, Andrew J; Nori, Franco; Betz, Andreas C

    2016-03-09

    Quantum mechanical effects induced by the miniaturization of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology hamper the performance and scalability prospects of field-effect transistors. However, those quantum effects, such as tunneling and coherence, can be harnessed to use existing CMOS technology for quantum information processing. Here, we report the observation of coherent charge oscillations in a double quantum dot formed in a silicon nanowire transistor detected via its dispersive interaction with a radio frequency resonant circuit coupled via the gate. Differential capacitance changes at the interdot charge transitions allow us to monitor the state of the system in the strong-driving regime where we observe the emergence of Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana interference on the phase response of the resonator. A theoretical analysis of the dispersive signal demonstrates that quantum and tunneling capacitance changes must be included to describe the qubit-resonator interaction. Furthermore, a Fourier analysis of the interference pattern reveals a charge coherence time, T2 ≈ 100 ps. Our results demonstrate charge coherent control and readout in a simple silicon transistor and open up the possibility to implement charge and spin qubits in existing CMOS technology.

  3. Pairing of Fermions with Unequal Effective Charges in an Artificial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, F. Nur; Oktel, M. Ö.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial magnetic fields (AMFs) created for ultracold systems depend sensitively on the internal structure of the atoms. In a mixture, each component experiences a different AMF depending on its internal state. This enables the study of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing of fermions with unequal effective charges. In this Letter, we investigate the superconducting (SC) transition of a system formed by such pairs as a function of field strength. We consider a homogeneous two-component Fermi gas of unequal effective charges but equal densities with attractive interactions. We find that the phase diagram is altered drastically compared to the usual balanced charge case. First, for some AMFs there is no SC transition and isolated SC phases are formed, reflecting the discrete Landau level (LL) structure. SC phases become reentrant both in AMF and temperature. For extremely high fields where both components are confined to their lowest LLs, the effect of the charge imbalance is suppressed. Charge asymmetry reduces the critical temperature even in the low-field semiclassical regime. We discuss a pair breaking mechanism due to the unequal Lorentz forces acting on the components of the Cooper pairs to identify the underlying physics.

  4. History of the Shaped Charge Effect: The First 100 Years

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-22

    transferred, inasmuch as 10 Part 1 both originators of the effect were in proximiy - southern Gernmany and Switzerland border each other. Dr. Mohaupt’s...Mistel ( Mistletoe ) referred to the parasitic mounting of the top aircraft on the host aircraft. In the tactical version, the bomber’s nose was replaced...16) in the patents (Ref. 32) issued in France in 1940 and in Australia in 1941, wherein the inventors (Mohaupt and his two associates) had claimed the

  5. Charge Transfer Nanocomposites: The Effects of Scale-Hierarchy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-31

    Williams, D. L. Carroll, R. Czerw, E. Shishonok , Photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy in boron nitride nanotubes compared to microcrystalline h...Korsak, R. Krutohvostov, D. L. Carroll, K. B. Ucer and R. T. Williams, Exciton luminescence of boron nitride nanotubes and nano-arches Physica Status...optical effects, we note that, according to this model, the boron doped, nitrogen doped and pure nanotubes should each provide the same triplet

  6. 47 CFR 1.1108 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international telecommunication...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international telecommunication services. 1.1108 Section 1.1108 Telecommunication FEDERAL... telecommunication services. Remit payment (along with a copy of invoice) for these services to the:...

  7. 45 CFR 95.641 - Applicability of rules for charging equipment in Subpart G of this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability of rules for charging equipment in... STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS) Automatic Data Processing Equipment and Services-Conditions... equipment in Subpart G of this part. ADP equipment, as well as other equipment acquired under...

  8. 47 CFR 1.1108 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international telecommunication...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international telecommunication services. 1.1108 Section 1.1108 Telecommunication FEDERAL... telecommunication services. Remit payment (along with a copy of invoice) for these services to the:...

  9. 47 CFR 1.1108 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international telecommunication...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international telecommunication services. 1.1108 Section 1.1108 Telecommunication FEDERAL... international telecommunication services. Remit payment (along with a copy of invoice) for these services to...

  10. 47 CFR 1.1108 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international telecommunication...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international telecommunication services. 1.1108 Section 1.1108 Telecommunication FEDERAL... international telecommunication services. Remit payment (along with a copy of invoice) for these services to...

  11. 47 CFR 1.1108 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international telecommunication...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international telecommunication services. 1.1108 Section 1.1108 Telecommunication FEDERAL... international telecommunication services. Payment can be made electronically using the Commission's...

  12. Resistive Micromegas for sampling calorimetry, a study of charge-up effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefdeville, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Geralis, T.; Titov, M.

    2016-07-01

    Micromegas, as a proportional and compact gaseous detector, is well suited for sampling calorimetry. The limitation of occasional sparking has now been lifted by means of resistive electrodes but at the cost of current-dependent charge-up effects. These effects are studied in this contribution, with an emphasis on gain variations during operation at high particle rate and under heavy ionisation. Results are reproduced by a simple model of charging-up which will be used for detector design optimisation in the future.

  13. Photovoltaic effect and charge storage in single ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Zhimin; Xu Jun; Zhang Jingmin; Yu Dapeng

    2008-07-14

    Asymmetric Schottky barriers between ZnO nanowire and metal electrode have been fabricated at the two ends of the nanowire. An obvious photocurrent generated from the device at zero voltage bias can be switched on/off with quick response by controlling the light irradiation. Moreover, the device can still afford a current at zero bias after switching off light illumination, which is ascribed to the charge storage effect in single ZnO nanowires. The underlying mechanisms related to the photovoltaic effect and charge storage were discussed.

  14. Effect of space charge on the negative oxygen flux during reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, F.; Kalvas, T.; Van Steenberge, S.; Depla, D.

    2017-03-01

    Negative ions often play a distinctive role in the phase formation during reactive sputter deposition. The path of these high energetic ions is often assumed to be straight. In this paper, it is shown that in the context of reactive magnetron sputtering space charge effects are decisive for the energetic negative ion trajectories. To investigate the effect of space charge spreading, reactive magnetron sputter experiments were performed in compound mode with target materials that are expected to have a high secondary ion emission yield (MgO and CeO2). By the combination of energy flux measurements, and simulations, a quantitative value for the negative oxygen ion yield can be derived.

  15. Manipulation of charge transfer and transport in plasmonic-ferroelectric hybrids for photoelectrochemical applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijie; Cao, Dawei; Wen, Liaoyong; Xu, Rui; Obergfell, Manuel; Mi, Yan; Zhan, Zhibing; Nasori, Nasori; Demsar, Jure; Lei, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing plasmonic nanostructures for efficient and flexible conversion of solar energy into electricity or fuel presents a new paradigm in photovoltaics and photoelectrochemistry research. In a conventional photoelectrochemical cell, consisting of a plasmonic structure in contact with a semiconductor, the type of photoelectrochemical reaction is determined by the band bending at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface. The nature of the reaction is thus hard to tune. Here instead of using a semiconductor, we employed a ferroelectric material, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT). By depositing gold nanoparticle arrays and PZT films on ITO substrates, and studying the photocurrent as well as the femtosecond transient absorbance in different configurations, we demonstrate an effective charge transfer between the nanoparticle array and PZT. Most importantly, we show that the photocurrent can be tuned by nearly an order of magnitude when changing the ferroelectric polarization in PZT, demonstrating a versatile and tunable system for energy harvesting. PMID:26753764

  16. Manipulation of charge transfer and transport in plasmonic-ferroelectric hybrids for photoelectrochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijie; Cao, Dawei; Wen, Liaoyong; Xu, Rui; Obergfell, Manuel; Mi, Yan; Zhan, Zhibing; Nasori, Nasori; Demsar, Jure; Lei, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing plasmonic nanostructures for efficient and flexible conversion of solar energy into electricity or fuel presents a new paradigm in photovoltaics and photoelectrochemistry research. In a conventional photoelectrochemical cell, consisting of a plasmonic structure in contact with a semiconductor, the type of photoelectrochemical reaction is determined by the band bending at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface. The nature of the reaction is thus hard to tune. Here instead of using a semiconductor, we employed a ferroelectric material, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT). By depositing gold nanoparticle arrays and PZT films on ITO substrates, and studying the photocurrent as well as the femtosecond transient absorbance in different configurations, we demonstrate an effective charge transfer between the nanoparticle array and PZT. Most importantly, we show that the photocurrent can be tuned by nearly an order of magnitude when changing the ferroelectric polarization in PZT, demonstrating a versatile and tunable system for energy harvesting.

  17. Method for decomposing observed line shapes resulting from multiple causes - Application to plasma charge-exchange-neutral spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A method is given for decomposing the widths of observed spectral lines resulting from unresolved line splitting, additive kinetic processes of different types, instrumental broadening (slit function), Doppler broadening, etc. all superimposed. The second moments are used as measures of the various widths involved. The method is not applicable if dispersion type (Lorentz) broadening occurs. Application is made to plasma charge-exchange-neutral spectra of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium.

  18. Effects of external calcium concentration and pH on charge movement in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Shlevin, H H

    1979-01-01

    1. The effects of both external Ca2+ (1.8, 25, 50 and 100 mM) and external pH (pH 5.5, 7.15, and 9.0) on the voltage-dependence of charge movement in frog skeletal muscle were examined using the three intracellular micro-electrode voltage-clamp technique. 2. The two-state model of Schneider & Chandler (1973) was used to describe the voltage distribution of membrane charge. The parameters of this model are: Qmax, the maximum quantity of charge; V, the potential of equal distribution of charge; and k, a constant relating to the steepness of the charge vs. voltage relationship. 3. In 1.8 mM external Ca2+, alterations, in external pH shifted the transition potential, V, from a mean +/- S.E. of mean of -36.5 +/- 0.9 mV at pH 7.15 to -25.8 +/- 1.3 mV at pH 5.5 and to -42.5 +/- 1.8 mV at pH 9.0. These shifts are consistent with surface charge theory. No significant changes in Qmax or k were observed over the range of pH 5.5--9.0. 4. A reasonable fit of surface charge theory to the shifts in V over the range pH 5.5--9.0 could be obtained with surface charge densities and binding constants: sigma 1 = -1 e/165 A2, pK1 = 3.9 and sigma 2 = -1 e/400 A2, pK2 = 8. 5. However, at pH 7.15, both V and k changed with increasing external Ca2+ concentration. V shifted from -34.9 +/- 3.7 mV in 1.8 mM-Ca2+ to -13.8 +/- 5.1 mV, -19.3 +/- 3.6 mV and 3.3 +/- 9.3 mV in 25, 50 and 100 mM-Ca2+ respectively. k increased from 8.3 +/- 0.6 mV in 1.8 mM-Ca2+ to 15.3 +/- 1.4 mV, 14.6 +/- 1.6 mV and 20.0 +/- 2.9 mV in 25, 50 and 100 mM-Ca2+. Changes in k reflect decreases in the apparent charged particle valence from approximately 3 in 1.8 mM-Ca2+ to approximately 1.2 in 100 mM-Ca2+. As the external Ca2+ concentration was raised, Qmax was at least as large as that measured in 1.8 mM-Ca2+. The 43% decrease in the apparent valence of the charged groups cannot be explained by simple surface charge theory and may reflect a specific interaction between external Ca2+ and the charged groups. 6. Shifts in V

  19. Non-targeted effects induced by high LET charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom K.; Chai, Yunfei; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Uchihori, Yukio

    Radiation-induced non-targeted response represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation in that extranuclear and extracellular effects may also contribute to the final biological consequences of exposure to low doses of radiation. Using the gpt delta transgenic mouse model, there is evidence that irradiation of a small area (1 cm by 1 cm) of the lower abdominal area of animals with a 5 Gy dose of X-rays induced cyclooxygenase-2 as well as deletion mutations in the out-of-field lung tissues of the animals. The mutation correlated with an increase in prostaglandin levels in the bystander lung tissues and with an increase in the level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidative DNA damage marker. An increase in COX-2 level was also detected in the out-of-field lung tissues of animals similarly exposed to high LET argon and carbon ions accelerated at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These results provide the first evidence that the COX-2 -related pathway, which is essential in mediating cellular inflammatory response, is the critical signaling link for the non-targeted, bystander phenomenon. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the non-targeted, out of field phenomenon together with evidence of their occurrence in vivo will allow us to formulate a more accurate assessment of radiation risk.

  20. Polarization effects of dielectric nanoparticles in aqueous charge-asymmetric electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Guerrero García, Guillermo Iván; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2014-07-24

    Small nanoparticles, globular proteins, viral capsids, and other nanoscopic biomolecules usually display dielectric properties that are different from those of the medium in which they are dispersed. These dielectric heterogeneities can significantly influence the surrounding ion distribution, which determines the self-assembly and colloidal stability of these nanoparticles in solution. Here, we study the impact of a dielectric discontinuity in the structural and thermodynamic properties of a spherical nanoparticle made of different dielectric materials when it is immersed in a charge-asymmetric 1:z supporting electrolyte. The mean electrostatic potential, integrated charge, and ionic profiles are analyzed as a function of both the salt concentration and the nanoparticle's valence via Monte Carlo simulations and the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory. We observe that the electrostatic screening and charge neutralization near the surface of a nanoparticle increase when the nanoparticle's dielectric permittivity increases in all instances. For 1:1 salts, this effect is small and the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory displays a good agreement with simulation results. Nevertheless, significant deviations are displayed by the mean field scheme regarding simulation results in the presence of multivalent ions. In particular, for trivalent counterions we observe that increasing the dielectric permittivity or the valence of the nanoparticle decreases the critical salt concentration at which occurs a sign inversion of the mean electrostatic potential at the Helmholtz plane, which is closely related to the behavior of the ζ potential and the electrophoretic mobility. Moreover, we observe that the phenomenon of surface charge amplification, or the augmenting of the net charge of a nanoparticle by the adsorption of like-charged ions on its surface, can be promoted by polarization effects in weakly charged spherical nanoparticles with low dielectric permittivity.

  1. A one-wire'' battery monitoring system with applications to on-board charging for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, D. . Kenneth E. Johnson Research Center)

    1990-10-08

    A novel on-board charge system which utilizes a One-Wire'' system for voltage monitoring is discussed and test results obtained using the system are presented. The system consists of a 20 kHz high frequency charger, an algorithm for charging lead-acid batteries with gelled electrolyte, such that gassing is avoided, the control system to implement this charge algorithm and a one-wire battery monitoring system to provide cell/module voltage information to the battery charge controller. Prototype elements of the system have been tested and the system was installed into an EVA Pacer electric vehicle. Charge tests are performed and data taken with the system installed. All elements of the system functioned properly under user conditions. In particular, the charger demonstrated good efficiency, near unity power factor and full programmability. The charge controller functioned reliably and without flaw. The one-wire monitoring system which permits monitoring of cell/module voltages in a battery pack without an extensive conventional wire harness has proven effective and voltage measurements have taken fast enough for control of charging. It was found that for the purpose of voltage monitoring under driving conditions, the system in its present form is too slow.

  2. A one-wire battery monitoring system with applications to on-board charging for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Dieter

    1990-10-01

    A on-board charge system which utilizes a one-wire system for voltage monitoring is discussed and test results obtained using the system are presented. The system consists of the following: (1) a 20 kHz high frequency charger; (2) a charge algorithm for lead-acid batteries with gelled electrolyte, such that gassing is avoided; (3) the control system to implement this charge algorithm; and (4) a one-wire battery monitoring system to provide cell/module voltage information to the battery charge controller. Prototype elements of the system have been tested and the system was installed into an EVA Pacer electric vehicle. Charge tests are performed and data taken with the system installed. All elements of the system functioned properly under user conditions. In particular, the charger demonstrated good efficiency, near unity power factor and full programmability. The charge controller functioned reliably and without flaw. The one-wire monitoring system which permits monitoring of cell/module voltages in a battery pack without an extensive conventional wire harness has proven effective and voltage measurements were taken fast enough for control of charging. It was found that for the purpose of voltage monitoring under driving conditions, the system in its present form is too slow.

  3. Space-charge effects in ultra-high current electron bunches generated by laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Grinner, F. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Maier, A. R.; Becker, S.; Mikhailova, J. M.

    2009-02-11

    Recent advances in laser-plasma accelerators, including the generation of GeV-scale electron bunches, enable applications such as driving a compact free-electron-laser (FEL). Significant reduction in size of the FEL is facilitated by the expected ultra-high peak beam currents (10-100 kA) generated in laser-plasma accelerators. At low electron energies such peak currents are expected to cause space-charge effects such as bunch expansion and induced energy variations along the bunch, potentially hindering the FEL process. In this paper we discuss a self-consistent approach to modeling space-charge effects for the regime of laser-plasma-accelerated ultra-compact electron bunches at low or moderate energies. Analytical treatments are considered as well as point-to-point particle simulations, including the beam transport from the laser-plasma accelerator through focusing devices and the undulator. In contradiction to non-self-consistent analyses (i.e., neglecting bunch evolution), which predict a linearly growing energy chirp, we have found the energy chirp reaches a maximum and decreases thereafter. The impact of the space-charge induced chirp on FEL performance is discussed and possible solutions are presented.

  4. Spin-orbit coupling and electronic charge effects in Mott insulators

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Shan; Li, You -Quan; Batista, Cristian D.

    2014-11-04

    We derive the effective charge- and current-density operators for the strong-coupling limit of a single-band Mott insulator in the presence of spin-orbit coupling and show that the spin-orbit contribution to the effective charge density leads to novel mechanisms for multiferroic behavior. In some sense, these mechanisms are the electronic counterpart of the ionic-based mechanisms, which have been proposed for explaining the electric polarization induced by spiral spin orderings. In addition, the new electronic mechanisms are illustrated by considering cycloidal and proper-screw magnetic orderings on sawtooth and kagome lattices. As for the isotropic case, geometric frustration is crucial for achieving thismore » purely electronic coupling between spin and charge degrees of freedom.« less

  5. Spin-orbit coupling and electronic charge effects in Mott insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Shan; Li, You -Quan; Batista, Cristian D.

    2014-11-04

    We derive the effective charge- and current-density operators for the strong-coupling limit of a single-band Mott insulator in the presence of spin-orbit coupling and show that the spin-orbit contribution to the effective charge density leads to novel mechanisms for multiferroic behavior. In some sense, these mechanisms are the electronic counterpart of the ionic-based mechanisms, which have been proposed for explaining the electric polarization induced by spiral spin orderings. In addition, the new electronic mechanisms are illustrated by considering cycloidal and proper-screw magnetic orderings on sawtooth and kagome lattices. As for the isotropic case, geometric frustration is crucial for achieving this purely electronic coupling between spin and charge degrees of freedom.

  6. Interplay of space-charge and beam-beam effects in a collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-09-27

    Operation of a collider at low energy or use of cooling techniques to increase beam density may result in luminosity limitation due to the space-charge effects. Understanding of such limitation became important for Low-Energy RHIC physics program with heavy ions at the center of mass energies of 5-20 GeV/nucleon. For a collider, we are interested in a long beam lifetime, which limits the allowable space-charge tune shift. An additional complication comes from the fact that ion beams are colliding, which requires careful consideration of the interplay of direct space-charge and beam-beam effects. This paper summarizes the initial observations during experimental studies in RHIC at low energies.

  7. Search for space charge effects in the ICARUS T600 LAr-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torti, Marta

    2016-11-01

    Space charge in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber is due to the accumu- lation of positive ions, produced by ionizing tracks crossing the detector, which slowly flow toward the cathode. As a consequence, electric field distortions may arise, thus hindering the possibility to produce faithful 3D images of the ionizing events. The presence of space charge becomes relevant for large TPCs operating at surface or at shallow depths, where cosmic ray flux is high. These effects could interest the next phase of the ICARUS T600 detector, which will be deployed at shallow depths as a Far Detector for Short Baseline Neutrino experiment at FNAL dedicated to sterile neutrino searches. In 2001, the first ICARUS T600 module (T300) operated at surface in Pavia (Italy), recording cosmic ray data. In this work, a sample of cosmic muon tracks from the 2001 run was analyzed and results on space charge effects in LAr-TPCs are shown.

  8. Zero-point fluctuations in naphthalene and their effect on charge transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, Joe J; Frost, Jarvist M; Kirkpatrick, James; Nelson, Jenny

    2008-09-25

    We calculate the effect of vibronic coupling on the charge transport parameters in crystalline naphthalene, between 0 and 400 K. We find that nuclear fluctuations can cause large changes in both the energy of a charge on a molecule and on the electronic coupling between molecules. As a result, nuclear fluctuations cause wide distributions of both energies and couplings. We show that these distributions have a small temperature dependence and that, even at high temperatures, vibronic coupling is dominated by the effect of zero-point fluctuations. Because of the importance of zero-point fluctuations, we find that the distributions of energies and couplings have substantial width, even at 0 K. Furthermore, vibronic coupling with high energy modes may be significant, even though these modes are never thermally activated. Our results have implications for the temperature dependence of charge mobilities in organic semiconductors.

  9. Probing inhibitory effects of nanocrystalline cellulose: inhibition versus surface charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Male, Keith B.; Leung, Alfred C. W.; Montes, Johnny; Kamen, Amine; Luong, John H. T.

    2012-02-01

    NCC derived from different biomass sources was probed for its plausible cytotoxicity by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS). Two different cell lines, Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells and Chinese hamster lung fibroblast V79, were exposed to NCC and their spreading and viability were monitored and quantified by ECIS. Based on the 50%-inhibition concentration (ECIS50), none of the NCC produced was judged to have any significant cytotoxicity on these two cell lines. However, NCC derived from flax exhibited the most pronounced inhibition on Sf9 compared to hemp and cellulose powder. NCCs from flax and hemp pre-treated with pectate lyase were also less inhibitory than NCCs prepared from untreated flax and hemp. Results also suggested a correlation between the inhibitory effect and the carboxylic acid contents on the NCC.

  10. Calculation of Dose, Dose Equivalent, and Relative Biological Effectiveness for High Charge and Energy Ion Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Reginatto, M.; Hajnal, F.; Chun, S. Y.

    1995-01-01

    The Green's function for the transport of ions of high charge and energy is utilized with a nuclear fragmentation database to evaluate dose, dose equivalent, and RBE for C3H1OT1/2 cell survival and neoplastic transformation as a function of depth in soft tissue. Such evaluations are useful to estimates of biological risk for high altitude aircraft, space operations, accelerator operations, and biomedical applications.

  11. Calculation of dose, dose equivalent, and relative biological effectiveness for high charge and energy ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Chun, S. Y.; Reginatto, M.; Hajnal, F.

    1995-01-01

    The Green's function for the transport of ions of high charge and energy is utilized with a nuclear fragmentation database to evaluate dose, dose equivalent, and RBE for C3H10T1/2 cell survival and neo-plastic transformation as function of depth in soft tissue. Such evaluations are useful to estimates of biological risk for high altitude aircraft, space operations, accelerator operations, and biomedical application.

  12. Effect of introduced charge in cellulose gels on surface interactions and the adsorption of highly charged cationic polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Notley, Shannon M

    2008-04-07

    The interaction between cellulose surfaces in aqueous solution has been measured using colloidal probe microscopy. Cellulose thin films with varying charge through carboxyl group substitution were used in this study with the surface forces fit to DLVO theory. It was found that the surface potential increased, as expected, with increasing carboxyl substitution. Furthermore, for a given degree of substitution, the surface potential increased as a function of increasing pH. At low pH, the surface forces interaction were attractive and could be fit to the non-retarded Hamaker equation using a constant of 3 x 10(-21) J. At pH greater than 5, the force interactions were monotonically repulsive, regardless of the ionic strength of the solution for all charge densities of the cellulose thin films. The adsorption of polyDADMAC to these charged cellulose films was also investigated using the quartz crystal microbalance. It was found that for the low charge film, a low surface excess of PDADMAC was sensed and that the adsorbed conformation was essentially flat. However for the higher charged cellulose film, a spontaneous de-swelling was observed resulting in no possibility of quantitatively determining the sensed mass using QCM.

  13. Analysis of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines for Cogeneration Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S; Martinez-Frias, J; Reistad, G

    2004-04-30

    This paper presents an evaluation of the applicability of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines (HCCI) for small-scale cogeneration (less than 1 MWe) in comparison to five previously analyzed prime movers. The five comparator prime movers include stoichiometric spark-ignited (SI) engines, lean burn SI engines, diesel engines, microturbines and fuel cells. The investigated option, HCCI engines, is a relatively new type of engine that has some fundamental differences with respect to other prime movers. Here, the prime movers are compared by calculating electric and heating efficiency, fuel consumption, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and capital and fuel cost. Two cases are analyzed. In Case 1, the cogeneration facility requires combined power and heating. In Case 2, the requirement is for power and chilling. The results show that the HCCI engines closely approach the very high fuel utilization efficiency of diesel engines without the high emissions of NOx and the expensive diesel fuel. HCCI engines offer a new alternative for cogeneration that provides a unique combination of low cost, high efficiency, low emissions and flexibility in operating temperatures that can be optimally tuned for cogeneration systems. HCCI engines are the most efficient technology that meets the oncoming 2007 CARB NOx standards for cogeneration engines. The HCCI engine appears to be a good option for cogeneration systems and merits more detailed analysis and experimental demonstration.

  14. Charge-coupled device /CCD/ trackers for high accuracy guidance applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    Recent advances in large area charge coupled device (CCD) imaging detectors and high speed microprocessors have prompted the development of a new class of electro-optical tracking instruments at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). These instruments are designed for standardized NASA-wide usage and are characterized by their extremely high pointing accuracy and stability and performance capabilities which are largely software defined and thus easily adapted to a variety of mission requirements. This paper presents an examination of the methods by which CCD detectors are being incorporated in star tracker instruments and the performance capabilities that can be expected from currently available devices. The multi-function sensor concept, in which a single sensor can function in a variety of guidance applications, is described. Software algorithms designed to provide efficient extraction of guidance information from both point and extended images are also presented. CCD star tracker implementations currently underway at JPL are described, and performance data obtained during laboratory testing is presented and discussed.

  15. Addition of Electrostatic Forces to EDEM with Applications to Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos; Curry, David

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carryout experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM Tm, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. In this paper we will present overview of the theoretical calculations and experimental data and their comparison to the results of the DEM simulations. We will also discuss current plans to revise the DEM software with advanced electrodynamic and mechanical algorithms.

  16. Probing Electronic, Structural, and Charge Transfer Properties of Organic Semiconductor/Inorganic Oxide Interfaces Using Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalenka, Josef Wade

    Interfaces between organic semiconductors and inorganic oxides provide the functionality for devices including field-effect transistors (FETs) and organic photovoltaics. Organic FETs are sensitive to the physical structure and electronic properties of the few molecular layers of material at the interface between the semiconducting channel and the gate dielectric, and provide quantitative information such as the field-effect mobility of charge carriers and the concentration of trapped charge. In this thesis, FET interfaces between organic small-molecule semiconductors and SiO2, and donor/acceptor interfaces between organic small-molecules and the wide bandgap semiconductor ZnO are studied using electrical measurements of field-effect transistor devices. Monolayer-scale films of dihexyl sexithiophene are shown to have higher hole mobility than other monolayer organic semiconductors, and the origin of the high mobility is discussed. Studies of the crystal structure of the monolayer using X-ray structural probes and atomic force microscopy reveal the crystal structure is different in the monolayer regime compared to thicker films and bulk crystals. Progress and remaining challenges are discussed for in situ X-ray diffraction studies of the dynamic changes in the local crystal structure in organic monolayers due to charge carriers generated during the application of electric fields from the gate electrode in working FETs. Studies were conducted of light sensitive organic/inorganic interfaces that are modified with organic molecules grafted to the surface of ZnO nanoparticles and thin films. These interfaces are models for donor/acceptor interfaces in photovoltaics. The process of exciton dissociation at the donor/acceptor interface was sensitive to the insulating or semiconducting molecules grafted to the ZnO, and the photoinduced charge transfer process is measured by the threshold voltage shift of FETs during illumination. Charge transfer between light sensitive donor

  17. Isotope effect in charge-transfer collisions of H with He{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Loreau, J.; Dalgarno, A.; Ryabchenko, S.

    2011-11-15

    We present a theoretical study of the isotope effect arising from the replacement of H by T in the charge-transfer collision H(n=2) + He{sup +}(1s) at low energy. Using a quasimolecular approach and a time-dependent wave-packet method, we compute the cross sections for the reaction including the effects of the nonadiabatic radial and rotational couplings. For H(2s) + He{sup +}(1s) collisions, we find a strong isotope effect at energies below 1 eV/amu for both singlet and triplet states. We find a much smaller isotopic dependence of the cross section for H(2p) + He{sup +}(1s) collisions in triplet states, and no isotope effect in singlet states. We explain the isotope effect on the basis of the potential energy curves and the nonadiabatic couplings, and we evaluate the importance of the isotope effect on the charge-transfer rate coefficients.

  18. Chlorin e6 sensitized photovoltaic cells: effect of co-adsorbents on cell performance, charge transfer resistance, and charge recombination dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightbourne, Sherard K. S.; Gobeze, Habtom B.; Subbaiyan, Navaneetha K.; D'Souza, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The effect of dye-aggregation-preventing co-adsorbents, cholic acid and deoxycholic acid, on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells constructed using a metal-free sensitizer, chlorin e6 adsorbed onto TiO2 surface is investigated. Absorption and fluorescence studies of chlorin e6 provided the spectral coverage, whereas electrochemical studies allowed estimation of the free energy of charge injection. B3LYP/6-31G* studies were performed to visualize location of the Frontier orbitals and their contribution to the charge injection when they were surface-modified on TiO2. The concentration of the co-adsorbent and soaking time was optimized for improved cell performance. Better dye regeneration efficiency for co-adsorbed cells compared to the cells with no co-adsorbent was revealed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Femtosecond transient absorption studies were performed to probe the kinetics of charge injection and charge recombination on the TiO2/chlorin e6/co-adsorbent electrodes. Such studies showed slower by an order of magnitude charge recombination rates for electrodes co-adsorbed either with cholic acid or deoxycholic acid while maintaining almost the same charge injection rates, thus rationalizing the importance of co-adsorbents on the overall cell performance.

  19. Synthetic high-charge organomica: effect of the layer charge and alkyl chain length on the structure of the adsorbed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Pazos, M Carolina; Castro, Miguel A; Orta, M Mar; Pavón, Esperanza; Valencia Rios, Jesús S; Alba, María D

    2012-05-15

    A family of organomicas was synthesized using synthetic swelling micas with high layer charge (Na(n)Si(8-n)Al(n)Mg(6)F(4)O(20)·XH(2)O, where n = 2, 3, and 4) exchanged with dodecylammonium and octadecylammonium cations. The molecular arrangement of the surfactant was elucidated on the basis on XRD patterns and DTA. The ordering conformation of the surfactant molecules into the interlayer space of micas was investigated by (13)C, (27)Al, and (29)Si MAS NMR. The arrangement of alkylammonium ions in these high-charge synthetic micas depends on the combined effects of the layer charge of the mica and the chain length of the cation. In the organomicas with dodecylammonium, a transition from a parallel layer to a bilayer-paraffin arrangement is observed when the layer charge of the mica increases. However, when octadecylammonium is the interlayer cation, the molecular arrangement of the surfactant was found to follow the bilayer-paraffin model for all values of layer charge. The amount of ordered conformation all-trans is directly proportional of layer charge.

  20. Charge Storage, Conductivity and Charge Profiles of Insulators as Related to Spacecraft Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Swaminathan, Prasanna; Frederickson, A. R.

    2004-01-01

    Dissipation of charges built up near the surface of insulators due to space environment interaction is central to understanding spacecraft charging. Conductivity of insulating materials is key to determine how accumulated charge will distribute across the spacecraft and how rapidly charge imbalance will dissipate. To understand these processes requires knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and charge transport within the insulator, and how the profile of trapped charge affects the transport and emission of charges from insulators. One must consider generation of mobile electrons and holes, their trapping, thermal de-trapping, mobility and recombination. Conductivity is more appropriately measured for spacecraft charging applications as the "decay" of charge deposited on the surface of an insulator, rather than by flow of current across two electrodes around the sample. We have found that conductivity determined from charge storage decay methods is 102 to 104 smaller than values obtained from classical ASTM and IEC methods for a variety of thin film insulating samples. For typical spacecraft charging conditions, classical conductivity predicts decay times on the order of minutes to hours (less than typical orbit periods); however, the higher charge storage conductivities predict decay times on the order of weeks to months leading to accumulation of charge with subsequent orbits. We found experimental evidence that penetration profiles of radiation and light are exceedingly important, and that internal electric fields due to charge profiles and high-field conduction by trapped electrons must be considered for space applications. We have also studied whether the decay constants depend on incident voltage and flux or on internal charge distributions and electric fields; light-activated discharge of surface charge to distinguish among differing charge trapping centers; and radiation-induced conductivity. Our

  1. Lost in the Shadow of Jupiter: The Effects of Ring Particle Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Jontof-Hutter, D.

    2012-05-01

    Micrometeoroid impacts onto tiny moonlets embedded in Jupiter's dusty rings replenish the rings with grains of all sizes. These grains become electrically charged from interactions with the ambient plasma and solar photons, and their orbital motions are dominated by gravity and the electromagnetic force arising from Jupiter's rotating magnetic field. For even the simplest case of constant electric charge, this combination of forces causes both radial and vertical dynamical instabilities. When the gravitational and electromagnetic forces are comparable, positively-charged dust grains are driven to either crash into Jupiter or escape from the planet depending on their launch distance. Some smaller grains of either charge are vertically unstable, climbing up local magnetic field lines to collide with Jupiter. We understand the origin of both instabilities and have derived the relevant stability boundaries analytically (Jontof-Hutter and Hamilton 2012). Further dynamical instabilities arise when charges vary with time due to, for example, a dust grain's periodic transit through Jupiter's shadow which temporarily interrupts photoelectric currents. The eccentricities of large grains, which react nearly instantly to changes in the charging environment, are excited enough to explain the faint outward extension of Jupiter's Thebe ring (Hamilton and Krueger 2008). We expand our investigation by exploring the effect of Jupiter's shadow on dust grains of all sizes, both inside and outside synchronous orbit. The shadow extends the radial instability zones discussed above to both larger and smaller dust grains. The removal of larger grains is limited by the few-year orbital precession timescale. Smaller grains, which react slowly to differing charging conditions, suffer forces that are alternatively stabilizing and destabilizing if their electric potentials change sign. These grains evolve chaotically and most eventually become unstable.

  2. Charge injection in solution-processed organic field-effect transistors: physics, models and characterization methods.

    PubMed

    Natali, Dario; Caironi, Mario

    2012-03-15

    A high-mobility organic semiconductor employed as the active material in a field-effect transistor does not guarantee per se that expectations of high performance are fulfilled. This is even truer if a downscaled, short channel is adopted. Only if contacts are able to provide the device with as much charge as it needs, with a negligible voltage drop across them, then high expectations can turn into high performances. It is a fact that this is not always the case in the field of organic electronics. In this review, we aim to offer a comprehensive overview on the subject of current injection in organic thin film transistors: physical principles concerning energy level (mis)alignment at interfaces, models describing charge injection, technologies for interface tuning, and techniques for characterizing devices. Finally, a survey of the most recent accomplishments in the field is given. Principles are described in general, but the technologies and survey emphasis is on solution processed transistors, because it is our opinion that scalable, roll-to-roll printing processing is one, if not the brightest, possible scenario for the future of organic electronics. With the exception of electrolyte-gated organic transistors, where impressively low width normalized resistances were reported (in the range of 10 Ω·cm), to date the lowest values reported for devices where the semiconductor is solution-processed and where the most common architectures are adopted, are ∼10 kΩ·cm for transistors with a field effect mobility in the 0.1-1 cm(2)/Vs range. Although these values represent the best case, they still pose a severe limitation for downscaling the channel lengths below a few micrometers, necessary for increasing the device switching speed. Moreover, techniques to lower contact resistances have been often developed on a case-by-case basis, depending on the materials, architecture and processing techniques. The lack of a standard strategy has hampered the progress of the

  3. Dynamic aperture and space charge effect studies for the Recycler ring for Project-X

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, M.; Vorobiev, L.G.; Johnson, D.E.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    A simplified Recycler lattice was created to fine tune injection straight, ring tune, and phase trombone. In this paper, we will present detailed modifications for further optimization of Recycler lattice which requires the investigation of tune footprint and dynamic aperture based on higher order momentum components of the magnetic fields, together with the space charge effects.

  4. Effects of oxide charge and surface recombination velocity on the excess base current of BJTs

    SciTech Connect

    Kosier, S.L.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Wei, A.; DeLaus, M.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Combs, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    The role of net positive oxide trapped charge and surface recombination velocity on excess base current in BJTs is identified. The effects of the two types of damage can be detected by plotting the excess base current versus base-emitter voltage. Differences and similarities between ionizing-radiation-induced and hot electron-induced degradation are discussed.

  5. Charged Particle Environments in Earth's Magnetosphere and their Effects on Space System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews information on space radiation environments important to magnetospheric missions including trapped radiation, solar particle events, cosmic rays, and solar winds. It also includes information about ion penetration of the magnetosphere, galactic cosmic rays, solar particle environments, CRRES internal discharge monitor, surface charging and radiation effects.

  6. Simulation of space charge effects and transition crossing in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, P.; MacLachlan, J.

    1987-03-01

    The longitudinal phase space program ESME, modified for space charge and wall impedance effects, has been used to simulate transition crossing in the Fermilab Booster. The simulations yield results in reasonable quantitative agreement with measured parameters. They further indicate that a transition jump scheme currently under construction will significantly reduce emittance growth, while attempts to alter machine impedance are less obviously beneficial. In addition to presenting results, this paper points out a serious difficulty, related to statistical fluctuations, in the space charge calculation. False indications of emittance growth can appear if care is not taken to minimize this problem.

  7. Shock wave in magnetized dusty plasmas with dust charging and nonthermal ion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Liping; Xue Jukui

    2005-04-15

    The effects of the external magnetized field, nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation, and nonthermally distributed ions on three-dimensional dust acoustic shock wave in dusty plasmas have been investigated. By using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) Burger equation governing the dust acoustic shock wave is derived. The results of numerical integrations of KdV Burger equation show that the external magnetized field, nonthermally distributed ions, and nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation have strong influence on the shock structures.

  8. Bactericidal Effects of Charged Silver Nanoparticles in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Urbina, Dulce; Velazquez-Salazar, J. Jesus; Lara, Humberto H.; Arellano-Jimenez, Josefina; Larios, Eduardo; Yuan, Tony T.; Hwang, Yoon; Desilva, Mauris N.; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    The increased number of infections due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major concern to society. The objective of this work is to determine the effect of positively charged AgNPs on methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) cell wall using advanced electron microscopy techniques. Positively charged AgNPs suspensions were synthesized via a microwave heating technique. The suspensions were then characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) showing AgNPs size range from 5 to 30 nm. MSSA and MRSA were treated with positively charged AgNPs concentrations ranging from 0.06 mM to 31 mM. The MIC50 studies showed that viability of MSSA and MRSA could be reduced by 50% at a positively charged AgNPs concentration of 0.12 mM supported by Scanning-TEM (STEM) images demonstrating bacteria cell wall disruption leading to lysis after treatment with AgNPs. The results provide insights into one mechanism in which positively charged AgNPs are able to reduce the viability of MSSA and MRSA. This research is supported by National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (G12MD007591) from NIH, NSF-PREM Grant No. DMR-0934218, The Welch Foundation and NAMRU-SA work number G1009.

  9. Electrolyte effects in a model of proton discharge on charged electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Johannes; Kravchenko, Kateryna; Spohr, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    We report results on the influence of NaCl electrolyte dissolved in water on proton discharge reactions from aqueous solution to charged platinum electrodes. We have extended a recently developed combined proton transfer/proton discharge model on the basis of empirical valence bond theory to include NaCl solutions with several different concentrations of cations and anions, both stoichiometric (1:1) compositions and non-stoichiometric ones with an excess of cations. The latter solutions partially screen the electrostatic potential from the surface charge of the negatively charged electrode. 500-1000 trajectories of a discharging proton were integrated by molecular dynamics simulations until discharge occurred, or for at most 1.5 ns. The results show a strong dependence on ionic strength, but only a weak dependence on the screening behavior, when comparing stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric solutions. Overall, the Na+ cations exert a more dominant effect on the discharge reaction, which we argue is likely due to the very rigid arrangements of the cations on the negatively polarized electrode surface. Thus, our model predicts, for the given and very high negative surface charge densities, the fastest discharge reaction for pure water, but obviously cannot take into account the fact that such high charge densities are even more out of reach experimentally than for higher electrolyte concentrations.

  10. Effect of Valence of Counterions on the Structure of Charged Membranes, a Computer Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Baofu; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2012-02-01

    Phospholipids have been investigated for a long period, due to its ability of self-assembling into bilayer structures which resemble biological membranes. But most of the studies have been limited on the neutral phosphatidylcholine based lipids. The understanding of charged membranes (e.g., phosphatidylserine) is very limited due to the repulsion between the charged groups on lipids. In the present work, we investigated the effect of different counter-ions on the structures of charged membranes formed by 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycoro-3-phospho-L-serine. Three kinds of counterions were investigated, from monovalent, to divalent, to trivalent ions. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed at all-atom level. We have calculated the area per lipid. And the interaction between counterions and COO^- groups was found to dominate over that between counterions and PO4^- groups.

  11. Formation of polyelectrolyte complexes with diethylaminoethyl dextran: charge ratio and molar mass effect.

    PubMed

    Le Cerf, Didier; Pepin, Anne Sophie; Niang, Pape Momar; Cristea, Mariana; Karakasyan-Dia, Carole; Picton, Luc

    2014-11-26

    The formation of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) between carboxymethyl pullulan and DEAE Dextran, was investigated, in dilute solution, with emphasis on the effect of charge density (molar ratio or pH) and molar masses. Electrophoretic mobility measurements have evidenced that insoluble PECs (neutral electrophoretic mobility) occurs for charge ratio between 0.6 (excess of polycation) and 1 (stoichiometry usual value) according to the pH. This atypical result is explained by the inaccessibility of some permanent cationic charge when screened by pH dependant cationic ones (due to the Hoffman alkylation). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) indicates an endothermic formation of PEC with a binding constant around 10(5) L mol(-1). Finally asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation coupled on line with static multi angle light scattering (AF4/MALS) evidences soluble PECs with very large average molar masses and size around 100 nm, in agreement with scrambled eggs multi-association between various polyelectrolyte chains.

  12. The effects of charge cloud size and digitisation on the SPAN anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeveld, A. A.; Edgar, M. L.; Lapington, J. S.; Smith, Alan

    1992-10-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) detectors are often used with charge division anode readouts, such as the spiral-anode (SPAN) anode, to provide high position resolution. This paper discusses the effect on image quality, of digitization (causing fixed patterning), electronic noise, pulse height distribution (PHD) and charge cloud size. The discussion is supported by experimental data obtained from a 1D SPAN anode. Results from a computer model of this detector, and from a charge cloud simulation model, are also included. The SPAN anode normally has three sinusoidal electrodes with phase differences of 120 deg. An alternative configuration is to use a phase difference of 90 deg. This paper compares the advantages and disadvantages of these arrangements.

  13. The electro-mechanical effect from charge dynamics on polymeric insulation lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Alghamdi, H.; Chen, G.; Vaughan, A. S.

    2015-12-15

    For polymeric material used as electrical insulation, the presence of space charges could be the consequence of material degradations that are thermally activated but increased by the application of an electric field. The dynamics of space charge, therefore, can be potentially used to characterize the material. In this direction, a new aging model in which parameters have clear physical meanings has been developed and applied to the material to extrapolate the lifetime. The kinetic equation has been established based on charge trapping and detrapping of the injected charge from the electrodes. The local electromechanical energy stored in the region surrounding the trap is able to reduce the trap-depth with a value related to the electric field. At a level where the internal electric field exceeds the detrapping field in the material, an electron can be efficiently detrapped and the released energy from detrapping process can cause a weak bond or chain scission i.e. material degradation. The model has been applied to the electro-thermally aged low density polyethylene film samples, showing well fitted result, as well as interesting relationships between parameter estimates and insulation morphology.

  14. The effect of charge on the release kinetics from polysaccharide-nanoclay composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Buffa, Stefano; Grifoni, Emanuele; Ridi, Francesca; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to integrate inorganic halloysite nanotubes (HNT) with chitosan and hyaluronic acid to obtain hybrid nanocomposites with opposing charges and to investigate their potential in the controlled release of drug model probes. Two oppositely charged polysaccharides, chitosan and hyaluronic acid, were selected for their biocompatibility and their importance in biomedical applications. The high surface area and the hollow nanometric-sized lumen of HNT allowed for the efficient loading of rhodamine 110 and carboxyfluorescein, used as models for oppositely charged drugs. In the case of chitosan, the preparation of the nanocomposite was carried out exploiting the electrostatic interaction between the polymer and HNT in water, while with hyaluronic acid, a covalent functionalization strategy was employed to couple the polymer with the clay. Nanocomposites were characterized with thermal, microscopic, and spectroscopic techniques, and the release kinetics of the model compounds was assessed by fluorescence measurements. The release curves were fitted with a model able to account for the desorption process from the external and the internal halloysite surfaces. The results show that both polymeric coatings alter the release of the probes, indicating a key role of both charge and coating composition on the initial and final amount of released dye, as well as on the rate of the desorption process.

  15. Space charge suppression effect of nano-size fillers added to polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayase, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Takada, T.; Murata, Y.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Reddy, C. C.

    2009-08-01

    Space charge suppression mechanism in nano-composite polymer material is studied using experimental results and numerical simulation. Recently, many kinds of nano-composite polymeric materials have been reported to have improved their characteristics under high electric field. For example, LDPE/MgO nano-composite, which is made up of low density polyethylene (LDPE) and nano size filler of magnesium oxide (MgO), exhibits high volume resistivity and high dielectric strength under dc electric field. Authors have investigated the space charge behaviour in LDPE/MgO nano-composite under high electric field using pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method. It has been found that, compared to LDPE, the space charge formation is also suppressed in the nano-composite material. As a reason for the suppression, we have suggested that the induced dipole polarization around MgO filler formed by dc stress application might play a role of carrier trap sites. From the numerical calculation, distortion of electric potential around MgO is seen to be much larger than that around naturally included dipole. It means that the MgO acts as a deep trap site as different from some defect or ions included in LDPE. Using the numerical calculation based on such electric potential distortion, we have tried to simulate the space charge distribution in LDPE/MgO under high dc electric field. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Swelling properties of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals from molecular simulation: Comparison of temperature interlayer cation, and charge location effects

    DOE PAGES

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; ...

    2015-08-27

    In this study, the swelling properties of smectite clay minerals are relevant to many engineering applications including environmental remediation, repository design for nuclear waste disposal, borehole stability in drilling operations, and additives for numerous industrial processes and commercial products. We used molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study the effects of layer charge location, interlayer cation, and temperature on intracrystalline swelling of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals. For a beidellite model with layer charge exclusively in the tetrahedral sheet, strong ion–surface interactions shift the onset of the two-layer hydrate to higher water contents. In contrast, for amore » montmorillonite model with layer charge exclusively in the octahedral sheet, weaker ion–surface interactions result in the formation of fully hydrated ions (two-layer hydrate) at much lower water contents. Clay hydration enthalpies and interlayer atomic density profiles are consistent with the swelling results. Water adsorption isotherms from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to relate interlayer hydration states to relative humidity, in good agreement with experimental findings.« less

  17. Swelling properties of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals from molecular simulation: Comparison of temperature interlayer cation, and charge location effects

    SciTech Connect

    Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2015-08-27

    In this study, the swelling properties of smectite clay minerals are relevant to many engineering applications including environmental remediation, repository design for nuclear waste disposal, borehole stability in drilling operations, and additives for numerous industrial processes and commercial products. We used molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study the effects of layer charge location, interlayer cation, and temperature on intracrystalline swelling of montmorillonite and beidellite clay minerals. For a beidellite model with layer charge exclusively in the tetrahedral sheet, strong ion–surface interactions shift the onset of the two-layer hydrate to higher water contents. In contrast, for a montmorillonite model with layer charge exclusively in the octahedral sheet, weaker ion–surface interactions result in the formation of fully hydrated ions (two-layer hydrate) at much lower water contents. Clay hydration enthalpies and interlayer atomic density profiles are consistent with the swelling results. Water adsorption isotherms from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to relate interlayer hydration states to relative humidity, in good agreement with experimental findings.

  18. Combined effects of space charge and energetic disorder on photocurrent efficiency loss of field-dependent organic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sangcheol; Park, Byoungchoo; Hwang, Inchan

    2015-11-01

    The loss of photocurrent efficiency by space-charge effects in organic solar cells with energetic disorder was investigated to account for how energetic disorder incorporates space-charge effects, utilizing a drift-diffusion model with field-dependent charge-pair dissociation and suppressed bimolecular recombination. Energetic disorder, which induces the Poole-Frenkel behavior of charge carrier mobility, is known to decrease the mobility of charge carriers and thus reduces photovoltaic performance. We found that even if the mobilities are the same in the absence of space-charge effects, the degree of energetic disorder can be an additional parameter affecting photocurrent efficiency when space-charge effects occur. Introducing the field-dependence parameter that reflects the energetic disorder, the behavior of efficiency loss with energetic disorder can differ depending on which charge carrier is subject to energetic disorder. While the energetic disorder that is applied to higher-mobility charge carriers decreases photocurrent efficiency further, the efficiency loss can be suppressed when energetic disorder is applied to lower-mobility charge carriers.

  19. Study of the impurity composition and effective plasma charge in the GOL-3 facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokina, N. V. Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Postupaev, V. V.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Shoshin, A. A.

    2015-07-15

    Heating and confinement of plasma in a multimirror magnetic configuration have been studied at the GOL-3 facility (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk). The experiments are aimed at estimating the densities and charge states of the main impurities in the GOL-3 plasma and determining their contribution to the effective plasma charge. Plasma with a density of ∼10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} was heated by a relativistic electron beam (1 MeV, 8 μs, ⩽200 kJ). At the end of electron beam injection, the plasma temperature reached 1 keV. The densities of impurities were determined using VUV and visible spectroscopy, as well as mass spectrometry of the residual vacuum. To determine the effective plasma charge, the experimental data were compared with the results of numerical simulations of the ionization balance of impurities. It is shown that the effective plasma charge calculated with allowance for the contributions from the main impurities does not exceed Z{sub eff} = 1.8, which cannot explain the experimentally observed improved confinement of low-density plasma.

  20. Effect of ion compensation of the beam space charge on gyrotron operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fokin, A. P.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2015-04-15

    In gyrotrons, the coherent radiation of electromagnetic waves takes place when the cyclotron resonance condition between the wave frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency or its harmonic holds. The voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field changes the relativistic cyclotron frequency and, hence, can play an important role in the beam-wave interaction process. In long pulse and continuous-wave regimes, the beam space charge field can be partially compensated by the ions, which appear due to the beam impact ionization of neutral molecules of residual gases in the interaction space. In the present paper, the role of this ion compensation of the beam space charge on the interaction efficiency is analyzed. We also analyze the effect of the electron velocity spread on the limiting currents and discuss some effects restricting the ion-to-beam electron density ratio in the saturation stage. It is shown that the effect of the ion compensation on the voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field can cause significant changes in the efficiency of gyrotron operation and, in some cases, even result in the break of oscillations.

  1. Multiphasic modeling of charged solute transport across articular cartilage: Application of multi-zone finite-bath model.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, Vahid; Pouran, Behdad; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-06-14

    Charged and uncharged solutes penetrate through cartilage to maintain the metabolic function of chondrocytes and to possibly restore or further breakdown the cartilage tissue in different stages of osteoarthritis. In this study the transport of charged solutes across the various zones of cartilage was quantified, taken into account the physicochemical interactions between the solute and the cartilage constituents. A multiphasic finite-bath finite element (FE) model was developed to simulate equine cartilage diffusion experiments that used a negatively charged contrast agent (ioxaglate) in combination with serial micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to measure the diffusion. By comparing the FE model with the experimental data both the diffusion coefficient of ioxaglate and the fixed charge density (FCD) were obtained. In the multiphasic model, cartilage was divided into multiple (three) zones to help understand how diffusion coefficient and FCD vary across cartilage thickness. The direct effects of charged solute-FCD interaction on diffusion were investigated by comparing the diffusion coefficients derived from the multiphasic and biphasic-solute models. We found a relationship between the FCD obtained by the multiphasic model and ioxaglate partitioning obtained from micro-CT experiments. Using our multi-zone multiphasic model, diffusion coefficient of the superficial zone was up to ten-fold higher than that of the middle zone, while the FCD of the middle zone was up to almost two-fold higher than that of the superficial zone. In conclusion, the developed finite-bath multiphasic model provides us with a non-destructive method by which we could obtain both diffusion coefficient and FCD of different cartilage zones. The outcomes of the current work will also help understand how charge of the bath affects the diffusion of a charged molecule and also predict the diffusion behavior of a charged solute across articular cartilage.

  2. Charge transfer effects in graphene-CdSe/ZnS quantum dots composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klekachev, Alexander V.; Asselberghs, Inge; Kuznetsov, Sergey N.; Cantoro, Mirco; Mun, Jeong Hun; Cho, Byung-Jin; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Hofkens, Johan; van der Veen, Marleen; Stesmans, André L.; Heyns, Marc M.; De Gendt, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    Graphene possesses unique physical properties, due to its specific energy bands configuration, substantially different from that of materials traditionally employed in solid-state optoelectronics. Among the variety of remarkable properties, strong field effect, high transparency in the visible-light range and low resistivity of graphene sheets are the most attractive ones for optoelectronic applications. Zero-dimensional colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, known as quantum dots (QDs), attract immense attention in the field of photonics due to their size-dependent tunable optical properties. By combining these two types of nanomaterials together, we demonstrate the role of graphene as an efficient charge transfer medium from- and to II-VI quantum dots. The optical excitation of II-VI quantum dots dispersed on single layer graphene results in an electron transfer from the nanocrystals to graphene. This is evidenced from photoluminescence imaging and confirmed by the electrical measurements on QDs-decorated single layer graphene field effect transistors (SLG-FET). In the second part of this paper we demonstrate an efficient hole injection from graphene into QDs-layered nanocrystalline structures and the operation of the corresponding graphene-based quantum dot light emitting diodes (QD-LED). We also benchmark graphene vs. indium-tin-oxide (ITO) based QD-LEDs in terms of device electroluminescence intensity performance. Our experimental results show better hole injection efficiency for graphenebased electrode at current densities as high as 200 mA/cm2 and suggest single layer graphene as a strong candidate to replace ITO in QD-LED technology.

  3. Spreading of Electrolyte Drops on Charged Surfaces: Electric Double Layer Effects on Drop Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kyeong; Sinha, Shayandev; Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Drop spreading is one of the most fundamental topics of wetting. Here we study the spreading of electrolyte drops on charged surfaces. The electrolyte solution in contact with the charged solid triggers the formation of an electric double layer (EDL). We develop a theory to analyze how the EDL affects the drop spreading. The drop dynamics is studied by probing the EDL effects on the temporal evolution of the contact angle and the base radius (r). The EDL effects are found to hasten the spreading behaviour - this is commensurate to the EDL effects causing a ``philic'' tendency in the drops (i.e., drops attaining a contact angle smaller than its equilibrium value), as revealed by some of our recent papers. We also develop scaling laws to illustrate the manner in which the EDL effects make the r versus time (t) variation deviate from the well known r ~tn variation, thereby pinpointing the attainment of different EDL-mediated spreading regimes.

  4. Application of nanoimprinting technology to organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Wei-Yang; Chang, Ming-Hua; Cheng, Horng-Long; Yu, Shih-Po; Lee, Yung-Chun; Chiu, Cheng-Yu; Lee, Chung-Yi; Shu, Dun-Ying

    2010-02-01

    The charge carrier transport efficiency and issues of patterning in organic semiconductors limit the potential range of microelectronic and optoelectronic applications of organic devices in nanoscale. We demonstrate high-performance organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with a mobility of approximately 2.5 cm2/V s using nanogroove gate-dielectrics formed by nanoimprinting. The preferred flow of charge carriers in OFETs parallel to the nanogrooves yields a high mobility anisotropic ratio (above 220), providing a built-in autopattern organic semiconductor function with nanoscale resolution. This nanostructure embedded device has great potential for use in the manufacture and lithography-free patterning of organic semiconductor films in integrated circuits.

  5. Spin depolarization effect induced by charge state conversion of nitrogen vacancy center in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang-Dong; Zhou, Lei-Ming; Zou, Chang-Ling; Li, Cong-Cong; Dong, Yang; Sun, Fang-Wen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-09-01

    The electron spin of the negatively charged the nitrogen vacancy center (NV- ) in diamond can be optically polarized through intersystem crossing, which enables the defect to be used for quantum computation and metrology. In this work, we studied the electron spin depolarization effect of the NV center induced by charge state conversion, which was proven to be a spin-independent process. The spin-state initialization fidelity was largely affected by the charge state conversion process. As a result, the optical polarization of the electron spin decreased about 14 %(31 % ) with a high-power continuous-wave (pulsed) green laser. Moreover, the undefined fluorescence anomalous saturation effect of the NV center was analyzed and explained in detail based on the spin depolarization. The results demonstrated that a weak laser should be used for initialization of the NV center. In addition, the power and polarization of a laser for NV spin detection should be carefully adjusted to obtain the highest fluorescence signal. Our work also provided information that can increase the understanding of the charge state conversion and spin polarization processes of the NV center for quantum information and sensing.

  6. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10-4 millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (˜pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  7. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-15

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10{sup −4} millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (∼pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  8. Infrared study of charge injection in organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiqiang

    2008-03-01

    We present a systematic infrared (IR) spectroscopic study of charge injection in organic field-effect transistors (FET). These experiments have revealed new unexpected aspects of both polymers and molecular crystals. IR spectromicroscopy was employed to image the charges in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) FETs. The charge density profile in the conducting channel uncovers a density-dependent mobility in P3HT due to disorder effects. Our IR studies of single crystal rubrene based FETs show that charge transport in these devices at room temperature is governed by light quasiparticles in molecular orbital bands. This result is at variance with the common beliefs of polaron formation in molecular solids. The above experiments have demonstrated the unique potential of IR spectroscopy for investigating physical phenomena at the nanoscale occurring at the semiconductor-insulator interface in FET devices. This work is in collaboration with G. M. Wang, D. Moses, A. J. Heeger (UCSB), V. Podzorov, M.E. Gershenson (Rutgers), Z. Hao, M. C. Martin (ALS), N. Sai, A. D. Meyertholen, M. M. Fogler, M. Di Ventra and D. N. Basov (UCSD).

  9. Lipid exchange between membranes: effects of membrane surface charge, composition, and curvature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Jiang, Zhongying; Ma, Yuqiang

    2012-09-01

    Intermembrane lipid exchange is critical to membrane functions and pharmaceutical applications. The exchange process is not fully understood and it is explored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitor method in this research. It is found that intermembrane lipid exchange is accelerated with the decrease of vesicle size and the increase of charge and liquid crystalline lipid composition ratio. Vesicle adsorption rate, membrane lateral pressure gradient, and lipid lateral diffusion coefficient are inferred to be critical in deciding the lipid exchange kinetics between membranes. Besides that, the membrane contact situation during lipid exchange is also studied. The maximum total membrane contact area is found to increase with the decrease of vesicle size, charged and liquid crystalline lipid composition ratio. A competition mechanism between the vesicle adsorption rate and the intermembrane lipid exchange rate was proposed to control the maximum total membrane contact area.

  10. Self-Assembling of Tetradecylammonium Chain on Swelling High Charge Micas (Na-Mica-3 and Na-Mica-2): Effect of Alkylammonium Concentration and Mica Layer Charge.

    PubMed

    Pazos, M Carolina; Cota, Agustín; Osuna, Francisco J; Pavón, Esperanza; Alba, María D

    2015-04-21

    A family of tetradecylammonium micas is synthesized using synthetic swelling micas with high layer charge (Na(n)Si(8-n)Al(n)Mg6F4O20·XH2O, where n = 2 and 3) exchanged with tetradecylammonium cations. The molecular arrangement of the surfactant is elucidated on the basis of XRD patterns and DTA. The ordering conformation of the surfactant molecules into the interlayer space of micas is investigated by IR/FT, (13)C, (27)Al, and (29)Si MAS NMR. The structural arrangement of the tetradecylammonium cation in the interlayer space of high-charge micas is more sensitive to the effect of the mica layer charge at high concentration. The surfactant arrangement is found to follow the bilayer-paraffin model for all values of layer charge and surfactant concentration. However, at initial concentration below the mica CEC, a lateral monolayer is also observed. The amount of ordered conformation all-trans is directly proportional to the layer charge and surfactant concentration.

  11. Two-dimensional analytical model of double-gate tunnel FETs with interface trapped charges including effects of channel mobile charge carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huifang; Dai, Yuehua

    2017-02-01

    A two-dimensional analytical model of double-gate (DG) tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) with interface trapped charges is proposed in this paper. The influence of the channel mobile charges on the potential profile is also taken into account in order to improve the accuracy of the models. On the basis of potential profile, the electric field is derived and the expression for the drain current is obtained by integrating the BTBT generation rate. The model can be used to study the impact of interface trapped charges on the surface potential, the shortest tunneling length, the drain current and the threshold voltage for varying interface trapped charge densities, length of damaged region as well as the structural parameters of the DG TFET and can also be utilized to design the charge trapped memory devices based on TFET. The biggest advantage of this model is that it is more accurate, and in its expression there are no fitting parameters with small calculating amount. Very good agreements for both the potential, drain current and threshold voltage are observed between the model calculations and the simulated results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61376106), the University Natural Science Research Key Project of Anhui Province (No. KJ2016A169), and the Introduced Talents Project of Anhui Science and Technology University.

  12. Chiral vortical effect from the compactified D4-branes with smeared D0-brane charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chao; Chen, Yidian; Huang, Mei

    2017-03-01

    By using the boundary derivative expansion formalism of fluid/gravity correspondence, we study the chiral vortical effect from the compactified D4-branes with smeared D0-brane charge. This background corresponds to a strongly coupled, nonconformal relativistic fluid with a conserved vector current. The presence of the chiral vortical effect is induced by the addition of a Chern-Simons term in the bulk action. Except that the non-dissipative anomalous viscous coefficient and the sound speed rely only on the chemical potential, most of the other thermal and hydrodynamical quantities of the first order depend both on the temperature and the chemical potential. According to our result, the way that the chiral vortical effect coefficient depends on the chemical potential seems irrelevant with whether the relativistic fluid is conformal or not. Stability analysis shows that this anomalous relativistic fluid is stable and the doping of the smeared D0-brane charge will slow down the sound speed.

  13. Effects of Electric Vehicle Fast Charging on Battery Life and Vehicle Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2015-04-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, four new 2012 Nissan Leaf battery electric vehicles were instrumented with data loggers and operated over a fixed on-road test cycle. Each vehicle was operated over the test route, and charged twice daily. Two vehicles were charged exclusively by AC level 2 EVSE, while two were exclusively DC fast charged with a 50 kW charger. The vehicles were performance tested on a closed test track when new, and after accumulation of 50,000 miles. The traction battery packs were removed and laboratory tested when the vehicles were new, and at 10,000-mile intervals. Battery tests include constant-current discharge capacity, electric vehicle pulse power characterization test, and low peak power tests. The on-road testing was carried out through 70,000 miles, at which point the final battery tests were performed. The data collected over 70,000 miles of driving, charging, and rest are analyzed, including the resulting thermal conditions and power and cycle demands placed upon the battery. Battery performance metrics including capacity, internal resistance, and power capability obtained from laboratory testing throughout the test program are analyzed. Results are compared within and between the two groups of vehicles. Specifically, the impacts on battery performance, as measured by laboratory testing, are explored as they relate to battery usage and variations in conditions encountered, with a primary focus on effects due to the differences between AC level 2 and DC fast charging. The contrast between battery performance degradation and the effect on vehicle performance is also explored.

  14. Communication: Nucleation of water on ice nanograins: Size, charge, and quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Marciante, Mathieu; Calvo, Florent

    2015-05-07

    The sticking cross sections of water molecules on cold size-selected water clusters have been simulated using classical and quantum (path-integral) molecular dynamics trajectories under realistic conditions. The integrated cross sections for charged clusters show significant size effects with comparable trends as in experiments, as well as essentially no sign effect. Vibrational delocalization, although it contributes to enlarging the geometric cross sections, leads to a counter-intuitive decrease in the dynamical cross section obtained from the trajectories. These results are interpreted based on the apparent reduction in the effective interaction between the projectile and the target owing to zero-point effects.

  15. The Effect of Surface Charge Saturation on Heat-induced Aggregation of Firefly Luciferase.

    PubMed

    Gharanlar, Jamileh; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Sajedi, Reza H; Yaghmaei, Parichehr

    2015-01-01

    We present here the effect of firefly luciferase surface charge saturation and the presence of some additives on its thermal-induced aggregation. Three mutants of firefly luciferase prepared by introduction of surface Arg residues named as 2R, 3R and 5R have two, three and five additional arginine residues substituted at their surface compared to native luciferase; respectively. Turbidimetric study of heat-induced aggregation indicates that all three mutants were reproducibly aggregated at higher rates relative to wild type in spite of their higher thermostability. Among them, 2R had most evaluated propensity to heat-induced aggregation. Therefore, the hydrophilization followed by appearing of more substituted arginine residues with positive charge on the firefly luciferase surface was not reduced its thermal aggregation. Nevertheless, at the same condition in the presence of charged amino acids, e.g. Arg, Lys and Glu, as well as a hydrophobic amino acid, e.g. Val, the heat-induced aggregation of wild type and mutants of firefly luciferases was markedly decelerated than those in the absence of additives. On the basis of obtained results it seems, relinquishment of variety in charge of amino acid side chains, they via local interactions with proteins cause to decrease rate and extent of their thermal aggregation.

  16. Charge Effect on the Quantum Dots-Peptide Self-Assembly Using Fluorescence Coupled Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhao; Li, Jingyan; Teng, Yiwan; Bi, Yanhua; Hu, Wei; Li, Jinchen; Wang, Cheli; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2016-04-01

    We present a molecular characterization of metal-affinity driven self-assembly between CdSe-ZnS quantum dots and a series of hexahistidine peptides with different charges. In particular, we uti- lized fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis to test the self-assembly process of quantum dots with peptides in solution. Four peptides with different charges can be efficiently separated by fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis. The migration time appeared to be influenced by the charges of the peptide. In addition, the kinetics of self-assembly process of quantum dots with one of the peptides manifested a bi-phasic kinetics followed by a saturating stage. This work revealed that there exist two types of binding sites on the surface of quantum dots for peptide 1: one type termed "high priority" binding site and a "low priority" site which is occupied after the first binding sites are fully occupied. The total self-assembly process finishes in solution within 80 s. Our work represents the systematic investigation of the details of self-assembly kinetics utilizing high-resolution fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis. The charge effect of peptide coating quantum dots provides a new way of preparing bioprobes.

  17. New effects of a long-lived negatively charged massive particle on big bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-01

    Primordial 7Li abundance inferred from observations of metal-poor stars is a factor of about 3 lower than the theoretical value of standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. One of the solutions to the Li problem is 7Be destruction during the BBN epoch caused by a long-lived negatively charged massive particle, X-. The particle can bind to nuclei, and X-bound nuclei (X-nuclei) can experience new reactions. The radiative X- capture by 7Be nuclei followed by proton capture of the bound state of 7Be and X- (7Bex) is a possible 7Be destruction reaction. Since the primordial abundance of 7Li originates mainly from 7Li produced via the electron capture of 7Be after BBN, the 7Be destruction provides a solution to the 7Li problem. We suggest a new route of 7Bex formation, that is the 7Be charge exchange at the reaction of 7Be3+ ion and X-. The formation rate depends on the ionization fraction of 7Be3+ ion, the charge exchange cross section of 7Be3+, and the probability that excited states 7Bex* produced at the charge exchange are converted to the ground state. We find that this reaction can be equally important as or more important than ordinary radiative recombination of 7Be and X-. The effect of this new route is shown in a nuclear reaction network calculation.

  18. Effect of extreme temperatures on battery charging and performance of electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Juuso; Lund, Peter D.

    2016-10-01

    Extreme temperatures pose several limitations to electric vehicle (EV) performance and charging. To investigate these effects, we combine a hybrid artificial neural network-empirical Li-ion battery model with a lumped capacitance EV thermal model to study how temperature will affect the performance of an EV fleet. We find that at -10 °C, the self-weighted mean battery charging power (SWMCP) decreases by 15% compared to standard 20 °C temperature. Active battery thermal management (BTM) during parking can improve SWMCP for individual vehicles, especially if vehicles are charged both at home and at workplace; the median SWMCP is increased by over 30%. Efficiency (km/kWh) of the vehicle fleet is maximized when ambient temperature is close to 20 °C. At low (-10 °C) and high (+40 °C) ambient temperatures, cabin preconditioning and BTM during parking can improve the median efficiency by 8% and 9%, respectively. At -10 °C, preconditioning and BTM during parking can also improve the fleet SOC by 3-6%-units, but this also introduces a "base" load of around 140 W per vehicle. Finally, we observe that the utility of the fleet can be increased by 5%-units by adding 3.6 kW chargers to workplaces, but further improved charging infrastructure would bring little additional benefit.

  19. Proliposome powders for enhanced intestinal absorption and bioavailability of raloxifene hydrochloride: effect of surface charge.

    PubMed

    Velpula, Ashok; Jukanti, Raju; Janga, Karthik Yadav; Sunkavalli, Sharath; Bandari, Suresh; Kandadi, Prabhakar; Veerareddy, Prabhakar Reddy

    2013-12-01

    The primary goal of the present study was to investigate the combined prospective of proliposomes and surface charge for the improved oral delivery of raloxifene hydrochloride (RXH). Keeping this objective, the present systematic study was focused to formulate proliposomes by varying the ratio of hydrogenated soyphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. Furthermore, to assess the role of surface charge on improved absorption of RXH, anionic and cationic vesicles were prepared using dicetyl phosphate and stearylamine, respectively. The formulations were characterized for size, zeta potential and entrapment efficiency. The improved dissolution characteristics assessed from dissolution efficiency, mean dissolution rate were higher for proliposome formulations. The solid state characterization studies indicate the transformation of native crystalline form of the drug to amorphous and/or molecular state. The higher effective permeability coefficient and fraction absorbed in humans extrapolated from in situ single-pass intestinal absorption study data in rats provide an insight on the potential of proliposomes and cationic surface charge for augment in absorption across gastro intestinal barrier. To draw the conclusions, in vivo pharmacokinetic study carried out in rats indicate a threefold enhancement in the rate and extent of absorption of RXH from cationic proliposome formulation which unfurl the potential of proliposomes and role of cationic charge for improved oral delivery of RXH.

  20. Peritoneal retention of liposomes: Effects of lipid composition, PEG coating and liposome charge.

    PubMed

    Dadashzadeh, S; Mirahmadi, N; Babaei, M H; Vali, A M

    2010-12-01

    In the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis, systemic chemotherapy is not quite effective due to the poor penetration of cytotoxic agents into the peritoneal cavity, whereas intraperitoneal administration of chemotherapeutic agents is generally accompanied by quick absorption of the free drug from the peritoneum. Local delivery of drugs with controlled-release delivery systems like liposomes could provide sustained, elevated drug levels and reduce local and systemic toxicity. In order to achieve an ameliorated liposomal formulation that results in higher peritoneal levels of the drug and retention, vesicles composed of different phospholipid compositions (distearoyl [DSPC]; dipalmitoyl [DPPC]; or dimiristoylphosphatidylcholine [DMPC]) and various charges (neutral; negative, containing distearoylphosphatidylglycerol [DSPG]; or positive, containing dioleyloxy trimethylammonium propane [DOTAP]) were prepared at two sizes of 100 and 1000nm. The effect of surface hydrophilicity was also investigated by incorporating PEG into the DSPC-containing neutral and charged liposomes. Liposomes were labeled with (99m)Tc and injected into mouse peritoneum. Mice were then sacrificed at eight different time points, and the percentage of injected radiolabel in the peritoneal cavity and the tissue distribution in terms of the percent of the injected dose/gram of tissue (%ID/g) were obtained. The ratio of the peritoneal AUC to the free label ranged from a minimum of 4.95 for DMPC/CHOL (cholesterol) 100nm vesicles to a maximum of 24.99 for DSPC/CHOL/DOTAP 1000nm (DOTAP 1000) vesicles. These last positively charged vesicles had the greatest peritoneal level; moreover, their level remained constant at approximately 25% of the injected dose from 2 to 48h. Among the conventional (i.e., without PEG) 100nm liposomes, the positively charged vesicles again showed the greatest retention. Incorporation of PEG at this size into the lipid structures augmented the peritoneal level, particularly

  1. Effect of Crystal Structure Fineness for Charge Alloy AK6M2 on Its Flux Treatment Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, K. V.; Nikitin, V. I.; Timoshkin, I. Yu.; Chikova, O. A.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of charge billet structure and form of fluxes on structure, density, and gas content of alloy AK6M2 (Al - Si - Cu system) is studied. Alloys prepared from finely crystalline charge billet have smaller phase component sizes, lower gas content, and increased solid state density, and use of coarsely crystalline charge billets for alloy preparation necessitates an increase in flux preparation consumption in the stage of alloy preparation for casting.

  2. DNA Immobilization and Hybridization Detection by the Intrinsic Molecular Charge Using Capacitive Field-Effect Sensors Modified with a Charged Weak Polyelectrolyte Layer.

    PubMed

    Bronder, Thomas S; Poghossian, Arshak; Scheja, Sabrina; Wu, Chunsheng; Keusgen, Michael; Mewes, Dieter; Schöning, Michael J

    2015-09-16

    Miniaturized setup, compatibility with advanced micro- and nanotechnologies, and ability to detect biomolecules by their intrinsic molecular charge favor the semiconductor field-effect platform as one of the most attractive approaches for the development of label-free DNA chips. In this work, a capacitive field-effect EIS (electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor) sensor covered with a layer-by-layer prepared, positively charged weak polyelectrolyte layer of PAH (poly(allylamine hydrochloride)) was used for the label-free electrical detection of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) immobilization and hybridization. The negatively charged probe single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules were electrostatically adsorbed onto the positively charged PAH layer, resulting in a preferentially flat orientation of the ssDNA molecules within the Debye length, thus yielding a reduced charge-screening effect and a higher sensor signal. Each sensor-surface modification step (PAH adsorption, probe ssDNA immobilization, hybridization with complementary target DNA (cDNA), reducing an unspecific adsorption by a blocking agent, incubation with noncomplementary DNA (ncDNA) solution) was monitored by means of capacitance-voltage and constant-capacitance measurements. In addition, the surface morphology of the PAH layer was studied by atomic force microscopy and contact-angle measurements. High hybridization signals of 34 and 43 mV were recorded in low-ionic strength solutions of 10 and 1 mM, respectively. In contrast, a small signal of 4 mV was recorded in the case of unspecific adsorption of fully mismatched ncDNA. The density of probe ssDNA and dsDNA molecules as well as the hybridization efficiency was estimated using the experimentally measured DNA immobilization and hybridization signals and a simplified double-layer capacitor model. The results of field-effect experiments were supported by fluorescence measurements, verifying the DNA-immobilization and hybridization event.

  3. Opposite counter-ion effects on condensed bundles of highly charged supramolecular nanotubes in water.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shenghui; Chen, Mingming; Wei, Chengsha; Huang, Ningdong; Li, Liangbin

    2016-07-20

    Although ion specificity in aqueous solutions is well known, its manifestation in unconventional strong electrostatic interactions remains implicit. Herein, the ionic effects in dense packing of highly charged polyelectrolytes are investigated in supramolecular nanotube prototypes. Distinctive behaviors of the orthorhombic arrays composed of supramolecular nanotubes in various aqueous solutions were observed by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), depending on the counter-ions' size and affiliation to the surface -COO(-) groups. Bigger tetra-alkyl ammonium (TAA(+)) cations weakly bonding to -COO(-) will compress the orthorhombic arrays, while expansion is induced by smaller alkaline metal (M(+)) ions with strong affiliation to -COO(-). Careful analysis of the changes in the SAXS peaks with different counter/co-ion combinations indicates dissimilar mechanisms underlying the two explicit types of ionic effects. The pH measurements are in line with the ion specificity by SAXS and reveal the strong electrostatic character of the system. It is proposed that the small distances between the charged surfaces, in addition to the selective adsorption of counter-ions by the surface charge, bring out the observed distinctive ionic effects. Our results manifest the diverse mechanisms and critical roles of counter-ion effects in strong electrostatic interactions.

  4. A simple method to increase the current range of the TERA chip in charged particle therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirio, R.; Fausti, F.; Fanola Guarachi, L.; Giordanengo, S.; Marchetto, F.; Mazza, G.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Talpacci, E.; Varasteh Anvar, M.; Vignati, A.

    2015-10-01

    The development of the next generation of accelerators for charged particle radiotherapy aims to reduce dimensions and operational complexity of the machines by engineering pulsed beams accelerators. The drawback is the increased difficulty to monitor the beam delivery. Within each pulse, instantaneous currents larger by two to three orders of magnitude than present applications are expected, which would saturate the readout of the monitor chambers. In this paper, we report of a simple method to increase by almost two orders of magnitude the current range of an Application Specific Integrated Circuit chip previously developed by our group to read out monitor ionization chambers.

  5. Understanding charge transport in lead iodide perovskite thin-film field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Senanayak, Satyaprasad P.; Yang, Bingyan; Thomas, Tudor H.; Giesbrecht, Nadja; Huang, Wenchao; Gann, Eliot; Nair, Bhaskaran; Goedel, Karl; Guha, Suchi; Moya, Xavier; McNeill, Christopher R.; Docampo, Pablo; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of the charge transport physics of hybrid lead halide perovskite semiconductors is important for advancing their use in high-performance optoelectronics. We use field-effect transistors (FETs) to probe the charge transport mechanism in thin films of methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3). We show that through optimization of thin-film microstructure and source-drain contact modifications, it is possible to significantly minimize instability and hysteresis in FET characteristics and demonstrate an electron field-effect mobility (μFET) of 0.5 cm2/Vs at room temperature. Temperature-dependent transport studies revealed a negative coefficient of mobility with three different temperature regimes. On the basis of electrical and spectroscopic studies, we attribute the three different regimes to transport limited by ion migration due to point defects associated with grain boundaries, polarization disorder of the MA+ cations, and thermal vibrations of the lead halide inorganic cages. PMID:28138550

  6. Charge Storage Effect on In2O3 Nanowires with Ruthenium Complex Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Insung; Lee, Junghyun; Jo, Gunho; Seo, Kyoungja; Choi, Nak-Jin; Lee, Takhee; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2009-01-01

    Charge storage effect on In2O3 nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) is controlled by a chemical gate, ruthenium(II) terpyridine (RuII-tpy) complex molecules. In2O3 nanowire FETs functionalized with a self-assembled monolayer of the molecules exhibit large hysteretic characteristics with regard to source-drain current vs gate voltage characteristics. The devices are operated with reversible switching behavior at gate voltage cycles of writing, reading, erasing, and reading, and their retention time is in excess of 1000 s. These results reveal that the reversible chemical reaction (i.e., oxidation and reduction of the molecules) of RuII-tpy complexes produces a charging/discharging process of In2O3 nanowire FETs.

  7. Tuning charge and correlation effects for a single molecule on a graphene device

    PubMed Central

    Wickenburg, Sebastian; Lu, Jiong; Lischner, Johannes; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Omrani, Arash A.; Riss, Alexander; Karrasch, Christoph; Bradley, Aaron; Jung, Han Sae; Khajeh, Ramin; Wong, Dillon; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Zettl, Alex; Neto, A.H. Castro; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to understand and control the electronic properties of individual molecules in a device environment is crucial for developing future technologies at the nanometre scale and below. Achieving this, however, requires the creation of three-terminal devices that allow single molecules to be both gated and imaged at the atomic scale. We have accomplished this by integrating a graphene field effect transistor with a scanning tunnelling microscope, thus allowing gate-controlled charging and spectroscopic interrogation of individual tetrafluoro-tetracyanoquinodimethane molecules. We observe a non-rigid shift in the molecule's lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (relative to the Dirac point) as a function of gate voltage due to graphene polarization effects. Our results show that electron–electron interactions play an important role in how molecular energy levels align to the graphene Dirac point, and may significantly influence charge transport through individual molecules incorporated in graphene-based nanodevices. PMID:27886170

  8. Tuning charge and correlation effects for a single molecule on a graphene device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenburg, Sebastian; Lu, Jiong; Lischner, Johannes; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Omrani, Arash A.; Riss, Alexander; Karrasch, Christoph; Bradley, Aaron; Jung, Han Sae; Khajeh, Ramin; Wong, Dillon; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Zettl, Alex; Neto, A. H. Castro; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Michael F.

    2016-11-01

    The ability to understand and control the electronic properties of individual molecules in a device environment is crucial for developing future technologies at the nanometre scale and below. Achieving this, however, requires the creation of three-terminal devices that allow single molecules to be both gated and imaged at the atomic scale. We have accomplished this by integrating a graphene field effect transistor with a scanning tunnelling microscope, thus allowing gate-controlled charging and spectroscopic interrogation of individual tetrafluoro-tetracyanoquinodimethane molecules. We observe a non-rigid shift in the molecule's lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (relative to the Dirac point) as a function of gate voltage due to graphene polarization effects. Our results show that electron-electron interactions play an important role in how molecular energy levels align to the graphene Dirac point, and may significantly influence charge transport through individual molecules incorporated in graphene-based nanodevices.

  9. Effect of energetic electrons on dust charging in hot cathode filament discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-03-01

    The effect of energetic electrons on dust charging for different types of dust is studied in hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma is produced by hot cathode filament discharge method in a dusty plasma device. A full line cusped magnetic field cage is used to confine the plasma elements. To study the plasma parameters for various discharge conditions, a cylindrical Langmuir probe having 0.15 mm diameter and 10.0 mm length is used. An electronically controlled dust dropper is used to drop the dust particles into the plasma. For different discharge conditions, the dust current is measured using a Faraday cup connected to an electrometer. The effect of secondary emission as well as discharge voltage on charging of dust grains in hydrogen plasma is studied with different dust.

  10. Effect of energetic electrons on dust charging in hot cathode filament discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-03-15

    The effect of energetic electrons on dust charging for different types of dust is studied in hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma is produced by hot cathode filament discharge method in a dusty plasma device. A full line cusped magnetic field cage is used to confine the plasma elements. To study the plasma parameters for various discharge conditions, a cylindrical Langmuir probe having 0.15 mm diameter and 10.0 mm length is used. An electronically controlled dust dropper is used to drop the dust particles into the plasma. For different discharge conditions, the dust current is measured using a Faraday cup connected to an electrometer. The effect of secondary emission as well as discharge voltage on charging of dust grains in hydrogen plasma is studied with different dust.

  11. Understanding charge transport in lead iodide perovskite thin-film field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Senanayak, Satyaprasad P; Yang, Bingyan; Thomas, Tudor H; Giesbrecht, Nadja; Huang, Wenchao; Gann, Eliot; Nair, Bhaskaran; Goedel, Karl; Guha, Suchi; Moya, Xavier; McNeill, Christopher R; Docampo, Pablo; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of the charge transport physics of hybrid lead halide perovskite semiconductors is important for advancing their use in high-performance optoelectronics. We use field-effect transistors (FETs) to probe the charge transport mechanism in thin films of methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3). We show that through optimization of thin-film microstructure and source-drain contact modifications, it is possible to significantly minimize instability and hysteresis in FET characteristics and demonstrate an electron field-effect mobility (μFET) of 0.5 cm(2)/Vs at room temperature. Temperature-dependent transport studies revealed a negative coefficient of mobility with three different temperature regimes. On the basis of electrical and spectroscopic studies, we attribute the three different regimes to transport limited by ion migration due to point defects associated with grain boundaries, polarization disorder of the MA(+) cations, and thermal vibrations of the lead halide inorganic cages.

  12. The Transverse Effective Charge of the IV-VI Compound Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Shindo, Koichi

    1981-10-01

    Littlewood’s assumption in the calculation of the transverse effective charge (TEC) of IV-VI compound semiconductors is studied by the simple calculation at W-point on the Jones zone surfaces based on the Heine-Jones model. It is shown that the main peak of optical absorption spectrum cannot be assigned only to (111) component of the effective charge in contrast with Littlewood’s assumption. The TEC is directly calculated by executing the band calculation with the potential obtained by the EPM in the framework of Vogl’s expression. The calculated result gives better agreement with experiment than Littlewood’s. The acoustic sum rule is also studied by using the similar formulation given by Vogl.

  13. Competition between Induced-Charge Electro-Osmosis and Electrothermal Effects at Low Frequencies around a Weakly Polarizable Microchannel Corner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehavi, Matan; Boymelgreen, Alicia; Yossifon, Gilad

    2016-04-01

    Sharp corners are an inherent component of most planar microfluidic systems, and thus their influence on flow within the microchannel is of significant interest. Here, we demonstrate that in electrokinetically driven devices, the presence of a sharp corner may result in localized vortices due to nonlinear induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) and/or electrothermal forces. Application of an alternating-current electric field enables quantification of the nonlinear ICEO ejection-flow effect by isolating it from linear electro-osmotic background flow which is present under dc forcing. The hydrodynamic flow in the vicinity of a sharp channel corner is analyzed using experimental micro-particle-image-velocimetry and numerical simulations for different buffer concentrations, frequencies, and applied voltages. Divergence from the purely ICEO flow with increasing buffer conductivity is shown to be a result of increasing electrothermal effects due to Joule heating.

  14. Study of the Effects of the Electric Field on Charging Measurements on Individual Micron-size Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging process in Astrophysical, Planetary, and the Lunar environments. Low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available theoretical models for the calculation of SEE yield applicable for neutral, planar or bulk surfaces are generally based on Sternglass Equation. However, viable models for charging of individual dust grains do not exist at the present time. Therefore, the SEE yields have to be obtained by some experimental methods at the present time. We have conducted experimental studies on charging of individual micron size dust grains in simulated space environments using an electrodynamic balance (EDB) facility at NASA-MSFC. The results of our extensive laboratory study of charging of individual micron-size dust grains by low energy electron impact indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a very complex process expected to be substantially different from the bulk materials. It was found that the incident electrons may lead to positive or negative charging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration. In this paper we give a more elaborate discussion about the possible effects of the AC field in the EDB on dust charging measurements by comparing the secondary electron emission time-period (tau (sub em) (s/e)) with the time-period (tau (sub ac) (ms)) of the AC field cycle in the EDB that we have briefly addressed in our previous publication.

  15. A Hall Thruster Performance Model Incorporating the Effects of a Multiply-Charged Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Jankovsky, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A Hall thruster performance model that predicts anode specific impulse, anode efficiency, and thrust is discussed. The model is derived as a function of a voltage loss parameter, an electron loss parameter, and the charge state of the plasma. Experimental data from SPT and TAL type thrusters up to discharge powers of 21.6 kW are used to determine the best fit for model parameters. General values for the model parameters are found, applicable to high power thrusters and irrespective of thruster type. Performance of a 50 kW thruster is calculated for an anode specific impulse of 2500 seconds or a discharge current of 100 A.

  16. Effect of Cation Rotation on Charge Dynamics in Hybrid Lead Halide Perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Gélvez-Rueda, María C.; Cao, Duyen H.; Patwardhan, Sameer; Renaud, Nicolas; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Schatz, George C.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.; Savenije, Tom J.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Grozema, Ferdinand C.

    2016-08-04

    Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskites are a promising class of materials for photovoltaic application with reported power efficiencies over similar to 22%. However, not much is known about the influence of the organic dipole rotation and phase transitions on charge carrier dynamics. Here, we report substantial changes in mobility and lifetime of charge carriers in CH3NH3PbI3 after the low-temperature tetragonal (beta) to orthorhombic (gamma) phase transition. By using microwave conductivity measurements, we observed that the mobility and lifetime of ionized charge carriers increase as the temperature decreases and a sudden increment is seen after the beta-gamma phase transition. For CH3NH3PbI3, the mobility and the half-lifetime increase by a factor of 36 compared with the values before the beta-gamma phase transition. We attribute the considerable change in the dynamics at low temperature to the decrease of the inherent dynamic disorder of the organic cation (CH3NH3+) inside the perovskite crystal structure.

  17. Enhanced memory effect with embedded graphene nanoplatelets in ZnO charge trapping layer

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Cimen, Furkan; Alkis, Sabri; Okyay, Ali K.

    2014-07-21

    A charge trapping memory with graphene nanoplatelets embedded in atomic layer deposited ZnO (GNIZ) is demonstrated. The memory shows a large threshold voltage V{sub t} shift (4 V) at low operating voltage (6/−6 V), good retention (>10 yr), and good endurance characteristic (>10{sup 4} cycles). This memory performance is compared to control devices with graphene nanoplatelets (or ZnO) and a thicker tunnel oxide. These structures showed a reduced V{sub t} shift and retention characteristic. The GNIZ structure allows for scaling down the tunnel oxide thickness along with improving the memory window and retention of data. The larger V{sub t} shift indicates that the ZnO adds available trap states and enhances the emission and retention of charges. The charge emission mechanism in the memory structures with graphene nanoplatelets at an electric field E ≥ 5.57 MV/cm is found to be based on Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. The fabrication of this memory device is compatible with current semiconductor processing, therefore, has great potential in low-cost nano-memory applications.

  18. Relationship of sea level muon charge ratio to primary composition including nuclear target effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goned, A.; Shalaby, M.; Salem, A. M.; Roushdy, M.

    1985-01-01

    The discrepancy between the muon charge ratio observed at low energies and that calculated using pp data is removed by including nuclear target effects. Calculations at high energies show that the primary iron spectrum is expected to change slope from 2 to 2.2 to 2.4 to 2.5 for energies approx. 4 x 10 to the 3 GeV/nucleon if scaling features continue to the highest energies.

  19. Charging and Discharging of Amorphous Solid Water Ice: Effects of Porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Caixia; Baragiola, Raul A.

    2015-11-01

    Introduction: Amorphous solid water (ASW) is abundant on Saturn’s icy satellites and rings [1,2], where it is subject to bombardment of energetic ions, electrons, and photons; together with secondary electron and ion emission, this may leave the surfaces charged. Surface potential can affect the flux of incoming charged particles, altering surface evolution. We examined the role of porosity [3] on electrostatic charging and discharging of ASW films at 30-140 K.Experiment: Experiments were performed in ultra-high vacuum [4]. ASW films were deposited at 30 K onto a liquid-He-cooled quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Film porosity was calculated from the areal mass via the QCM and thickness via a UV-visible interferometry. ASW films were charged at 30 K using 500 eV He+. Surface potentials (Vs) of the films were measured with a Kelvin probe, and infrared spectra were collected using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.Results: We measured Vs of the ASW film at 30 K as a function of ion fluence (F). The Vs(F) deviates from a straight line at low fluence, attributed to emitted secondary electrons due to the negative polarization voltage [5,6], and increases linearly when the Vs is positive. We also measured Vs as a function of annealing temperature. We prepared ASW films with various porosities by annealing the films to different temperatures (Ta) prior to irradiation or varying the vapor-beam incidence angle (θ). Upon heating, we observed sharp decreases of the Vs at temperatures that strongly depend on Ta and θ. Decreases of the infrared absorbance of the dangling OH bands of the charged film share similar trends as that of the Vs. We propose a model that includes porosity for electrostatic charging/discharging of ASW films at temperatures below 100 K. Results are applicable to the study of plasma-surface interactions of icy satellites and rings.References: [1] Jurac et al., J. Geophys. Res. 100, 14821 (1995); [2] A. L. Graps et al., Space Sci. Rev. 137, 435

  20. Molecular dynamics investigation into the electric charge effect on the operation of ion-based carbon nanotube oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.; Sadeghi, F.

    2015-10-01

    The fabrication of nanoscale oscillators working in the gigahertz (GHz) range and beyond has now become the focal center of interest to many researchers. Motivated by this issue, this paper proposes a new type of nano-oscillators with enhanced operating frequency in which both the inner core and outer shell are electrically charged. To this end, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the mechanical oscillatory behavior of ions, and in particular chloride ion, tunneling through electrically charged carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It is assumed that the electric charges with similar sign and magnitude are evenly distributed on two ends of nanotube. The interatomic interactions between carbon atoms and van der Waals (vdW) interactions between ion and nanotube are respectively modeled by Tersoff-Brenner and Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential functions, whereas the electrostatic interactions between ion and electric charges are modeled by Coulomb potential function. A comprehensive study is conducted to get an insight into the effects of different parameters such as sign and magnitude of electric charges, nanotube radius, nanotube length and initial conditions (initial separation distance and velocity) on the oscillatory behavior of chloride ion-charged CNT oscillators. It is shown that, the chloride ion frequency inside negatively charged CNTs is lower than that inside positively charged ones with the same magnitude of electric charge, while it is higher than that inside uncharged CNTs. It is further observed that, higher frequencies are generated at higher magnitudes of electric charges distributed on the nanotube.

  1. Long-range charge-density-wave proximity effect at cuprate/manganate interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frano, A.; Blanco-Canosa, S.; Schierle, E.; Lu, Y.; Wu, M.; Bluschke, M.; Minola, M.; Christiani, G.; Habermeier, H. U.; Logvenov, G.; Wang, Y.; van Aken, P. A.; Benckiser, E.; Weschke, E.; Le Tacon, M.; Keimer, B.

    2016-08-01

    The interplay between charge density waves (CDWs) and high-temperature superconductivity is currently under intense investigation. Experimental research on this issue is difficult because CDW formation in bulk copper oxides is strongly influenced by random disorder, and a long-range-ordered CDW state in high magnetic fields is difficult to access with spectroscopic and diffraction probes. Here we use resonant X-ray scattering in zero magnetic field to show that interfaces with the metallic ferromagnet La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 greatly enhance CDW formation in the optimally doped high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+δ (δ ~ 1), and that this effect persists over several tens of nanometres. The wavevector of the incommensurate CDW serves as an internal calibration standard of the charge carrier concentration, which allows us to rule out any significant influence of oxygen non-stoichiometry, and to attribute the observed phenomenon to a genuine electronic proximity effect. Long-range proximity effects induced by heterointerfaces thus offer a powerful method to stabilize the charge-density-wave state in the cuprates and, more generally, to manipulate the interplay between different collective phenomena in metal oxides.

  2. Charged Molecules Modulate the Volume Exclusion Effects Exerted by Crowders on FtsZ Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Monterroso, Begoña; Reija, Belén; Jiménez, Mercedes; Zorrilla, Silvia; Rivas, Germán

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the influence of protein crowders, either combined or individually, on the GTP-induced FtsZ cooperative assembly, crucial for the formation of the dynamic septal ring and, hence, for bacterial division. It was earlier demonstrated that high concentrations of inert polymers like Ficoll 70, used to mimic the crowded cellular interior, favor the assembly of FtsZ into bundles with slow depolymerization. We have found, by fluorescence anisotropy together with light scattering measurements, that the presence of protein crowders increases the tendency of FtsZ to polymerize at micromolar magnesium concentration, being the effect larger with ovomucoid, a negatively charged protein. Neutral polymers and a positively charged protein also diminished the critical concentration of assembly, the extent of the effect being compatible with that expected according to pure volume exclusion models. FtsZ polymerization was also observed to be strongly promoted by a negatively charged polymer, DNA, and by some unrelated polymers like PEGs at concentrations below the crowding regime. The influence of mixed crowders mimicking the heterogeneity of the intracellular environment on the tendency of FtsZ to assemble was also studied and nonadditive effects were found to prevail. Far from exactly reproducing the bacterial cytoplasm environment, this approach serves as a simplified model illustrating how its intrinsically crowded and heterogeneous nature may modulate FtsZ assembly into a functional Z-ring. PMID:26870947

  3. Long-range charge-density-wave proximity effect at cuprate/manganate interfaces.

    PubMed

    Frano, A; Blanco-Canosa, S; Schierle, E; Lu, Y; Wu, M; Bluschke, M; Minola, M; Christiani, G; Habermeier, H U; Logvenov, G; Wang, Y; van Aken, P A; Benckiser, E; Weschke, E; Le Tacon, M; Keimer, B

    2016-08-01

    The interplay between charge density waves (CDWs) and high-temperature superconductivity is currently under intense investigation. Experimental research on this issue is difficult because CDW formation in bulk copper oxides is strongly influenced by random disorder, and a long-range-ordered CDW state in high magnetic fields is difficult to access with spectroscopic and diffraction probes. Here we use resonant X-ray scattering in zero magnetic field to show that interfaces with the metallic ferromagnet La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 greatly enhance CDW formation in the optimally doped high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+δ (δ ∼ 1), and that this effect persists over several tens of nanometres. The wavevector of the incommensurate CDW serves as an internal calibration standard of the charge carrier concentration, which allows us to rule out any significant influence of oxygen non-stoichiometry, and to attribute the observed phenomenon to a genuine electronic proximity effect. Long-range proximity effects induced by heterointerfaces thus offer a powerful method to stabilize the charge-density-wave state in the cuprates and, more generally, to manipulate the interplay between different collective phenomena in metal oxides.

  4. Safe and fast-charging Li-ion battery with long shelf life for power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghib, K.; Dontigny, M.; Guerfi, A.; Charest, P.; Rodrigues, I.; Mauger, A.; Julien, C. M.

    We report a Li-ion battery that can be charged within few minutes, passes the safety tests, and has a very long shelf life. The active materials are nanoparticles of LiFePO 4 (LFP) and Li 4Ti 5O 12 (LTO) for the positive and negative electrodes, respectively. The LiFePO 4 particles are covered with 2 wt.% carbon to optimize the electrical conductivity, but not the Li 4Ti 5O 12 particles. The electrolyte is the usual carbonate solvent. The binder is a water-soluble elastomer. The "18650" battery prepared under such conditions delivers a capacity of 800 mAh. It retains full capacity after 20,000 cycles performed at charge rate 10C (6 min), discharge rate 5C (12 min), and retains 95% capacity after 30,000 cycles at charge rate 15C (4 mn) and discharge rate 5C both at 100% DOD and 100% SOC.

  5. Field-dependent charge trapping analysis of ONO inter-poly dielectrics for NAND flash memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Pyung; Lim, Jun Yeong; Youn, Tae-Un; Park, Sung-Kye; Yun, Ilgu

    2014-04-01

    The effect of the operation voltage on the leakage current of SiO2/Si3N4/SiO2 (ONO) stack is investigated which is used for the inter-poly dielectric (IPD) of the floating gate (FG) type NAND flash memory. In this work, the field dependent charge trapping mechanism of ONO stack and the effect of the trapped charges on the electrical characteristics are examined. The leakage current density-electric field (J-E) and the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics are measured for various test samples of ONO stack by varying the voltage sweep ranges. The charge trapping/detrapping mechanisms of ONO stack are observed as the range of the applied sweep voltage is increased and then decreased to a given voltage, which is corresponding to the given electric field. The numbers of trapped and detrapped charges are extracted from the difference of J-E curves using the same recursive voltage sweeps and the effects on the electrical characteristics of ONO stack are demonstrated. Moreover, the dominant trapping layer is also investigated by varying the thickness of ONO stack.

  6. Effect of Charge and Hydrophobicity on Adsorption of Modified Starches on Polyester.

    PubMed

    Samu; Moulee; Kumar

    1999-12-15

    Polyester fabric (poly(ethylene terephthalate)) is a hydrophobic polymer. Its hydrophobic nature can be a disadvantage for certain applications like dyeing, finishing, detergency, etc. Physical or chemical modification of the polyester to make it more hydrophilic is therefore desirable for certain performance characteristics. Surface modification of polyester to make it hydrophilic can be achieved by adsorbing polymers on the polyester surface. Starch is a commonly available, hydrophilic polymer used in many textile applications that can be used to modify polyester. However, it needs to be chemically modified so that it can adsorb on the polyester fabric and physically modify the fabric characteristics. The polymers used in this study are two different modified starches-cationic and anionic starches and mixtures of the two. The adsorption kinetics on a polyester substrate was studied. The effect of charge and hydrophobicity on adsorption was investigated. Cationic starches were shown to readily adsorb on polyester and this was attributed to electrostatic interactions. Hydrophobic substituents on the cationic moiety resulted in increased adsorption. This was attributed to the weak hydrophobic interaction between the polymer chains which could result in a more coiled polymer conformation. It is hypothesized that more starch molecules are required for surface coverage of the polyester, resulting in an increase in adsorption. Anionic starch was adsorbed on the substrate but at a slower rate than the cationic starches. It is likely that there is a H bonding between acid groups on the starch and the ester groups of the polyester. However, the anionic starch is desorbed when the polyester is placed in an aqueous medium. When a blend of cationic starch and anionic starch was used, a low concentration of anionic starch was seen to increase adsorption, indicating that the polyelectrolyte complex itself may be adsorbing on the substrate. Further increases cause a decrease in

  7. Charge Transfer Dissociation (CTD) Mass Spectrometry of Peptide Cations: Study of Charge State Effects and Side-Chain Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengfei; Jackson, Glen P.

    2017-01-01

    1+, 2+, and 3+ precursors of substance P and bradykinin were subjected to helium cation irradiation in a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer. Charge exchange with the helium cations produces a variety of fragment ions, the number and type of which are dependent on the charge state of the precursor ions. For 1+ peptide precursors, fragmentation is generally restricted to C-CO backbone bonds (a and x ions), whereas for 2+ and 3+ peptide precursors, all three backbone bonds (C-CO, C-N, and N-Cα) are cleaved. The type of backbone bond cleavage is indicative of possible dissociation channels involved in CTD process, including high-energy, kinetic-based, and ETD-like pathways. In addition to backbone cleavages, amino acid side-chain cleavages are observed in CTD, which are consistent with other high-energy and radical-mediated techniques. The unique dissociation pattern and supplementary information available from side-chain cleavages make CTD a potentially useful activation method for the structural study of gas-phase biomolecules.

  8. Revealing charge-transfer effects in gas-phase water chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, David; Ronca, Enrico; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2012-09-18

    An understanding of the interactions involving water and other small hydrogenated molecules such as H(2)S and NH(3) at the molecular level is an important and elusive scientific goal with potential implications for fields ranging from biochemistry to astrochemistry. One longstanding question about water's intermolecular interactions, and notably hydrogen bonding, is the extent and importance of charge transfer (CT) , which can have important implications for the development of reliable model potentials for water chemistry, among other applications. The weakly bound adducts, commonly regarded as pure van der Waals systems, formed by H(2)O, H(2)S, and NH(3) with noble gases or simple molecules such as H(2), provide an interesting case study for these interactions. Their binding energies are approximately 1 or 2 kJ/mol at most, and CT effects in these systems are thought to be negligible. Our laboratory has performed high-resolution molecular-beam scattering experiments that probe the (absolute scale) intermolecular potential of various types of these gas-phase binary complexes with extreme sensitivity. These experiments have yielded surprising and intriguing quantitative results. The key experimental measurable is the "glory" quantum interference shift that shows a systematic, anomalous energy stabilization for the water complexes and clearly points to a significant role for CT effects. To investigate these findings, we have performed very accurate theoretical calculations and devised a simple approach to study the electron displacement that accompanies gas-phase binary intermolecular interactions in extreme detail. These calculations are based on a partial progressive integration of the electron density changes. The results unambiguously show that water's intermolecular interactions are not typical van der Waals complexes. Instead, these interactions possess a definite, strongly stereospecific CT component, even when very weak, where a water molecule may act as

  9. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D., Startsev, E. A., Sefkow, A. B., Davidson, R. C.

    2008-10-10

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite- length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to infuence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ωce > ωpeβb, where ωce = eβ/mec is the electron gyrofrequency, ωpe is the electron plasma frequency, and βb = Vb/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  10. A 128-channel picoammeter system and its application on charged particle beam current distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Deyang Liu, Junliang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Mingwu; Cai, Xiaohong; Hu, Jianjun; Dong, Jinmei; Li, Xin

    2015-11-15

    A 128-channel picoammeter system is constructed based on instrumentation amplifiers. Taking advantage of a high electric potential and narrow bandwidth in DC energetic charged beam measurements, a current resolution better than 5 fA can be achieved. Two sets of 128-channel strip electrodes are implemented on printed circuit boards and are employed for ion and electron beam current distribution measurements. Tests with 60 keV O{sup 3+} ions and 2 keV electrons show that it can provide exact boundaries when a positive charged particle beam current distribution is measured.

  11. Charge pumping method for photosensor application by using amorphous indium-zinc oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Po-Tsun; Chou, Yi-Teh; Teng, Li-Feng

    2009-06-01

    The study investigated the photoreaction behavior of amorphous indium-zinc oxide thin film transistor (a-IZO TFT), which was thought to be insensitive to visible light. The obvious threshold voltage shift was observed after light illumination, and it exhibited slow recovery while returning to initial status. The photoreaction mechanism is well explained by the dynamic equilibrium of charge exchange reaction between O2(g) and O2- in a-IZO layer. A charge pumping technique is used to confirm the mechanism and accelerate recoverability. Using knowledge of photoreaction behavior, an operation scheme of photosensing elements consist of a-IZO TFT is also demonstrated in this work.

  12. Application of the Pugh, Eichelberg and Rostoker Theory to the MRL 38 mm Shaped Charge,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    66 m M72 LIA2 (LAW) and 84 mm Carl Gustaf anti-tank weapons, and there Is continuing interest in the 103 .’"’’ mm MILAN, a shaped charge warhead which...others are the DESC-1 code of Carleone et al of Dyna East Corp. [7], the JETFORM code at RARDE [8], and the TB/ISL code of Hennequin in France [9...38 mm shaped charge may be too small for exact scaling to-0 apply. The velocity of the tail end of the jet predicted from Fig. 8 is 0.18 mm/us and

  13. Phase Behavior of Charged Colloids and the Effect of External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynninen, A.-P.

    2005-12-01

    Colloids are particles with a size in the nano- to micrometer range that are dispersed in a solvent, and that due to collisions from the solvent molecules, undergo Brownian motion. In most cases, the surface of the colloid acquires a net charge due to dissociation of chemical groups at the surface. In this thesis, we present results of computer simulations on the phase behavior of charged colloidal suspensions using various levels of description: Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, DLVO theory with effective many-body interactions, and the primitive model. We make two attempts to amend the DLVO theory to include many-body interactions: (i) density-dependent truncation and (ii) three-body interactions. In the case of three-body interactions, we find at low salt concentration a very broad coexistence between a fluid and a dense face-centered-cubic (fcc) phase, while at intermediate salt concentration a broad body-centered-cubic (bcc)-fcc coexistence regime appears. However, in our primitive model calculations, we did not find any broad coexistence regions or any other manifestations of three-body interactions. Thus, the effective Hamiltonian of charged colloids seems to be better described by the standard pairwise DLVO potential, than by a Hamiltonian including a density-dependent truncation or three-body interactions. We study the gas-liquid critical point of asymmetric electrolyte mixtures consisting of large multivalent macroions and small monovalent co- and counterions. The system can be seen as a binary mixture of colloids with their counterions and salt at strong electrostatic coupling. We calculate the critical point locus that connects the salt-free state consisting of macroions and counterions with the pure salt state. We calculate the ground-state phase diagram of a mixture of large and small (size ratio 0.31) oppositely charged colloids. The phase diagram displays novel structures, but also colloidal analogs of simple-salt structures and of

  14. Adsorption of DNA on colloidal Ag nanoparticles: effects of nanoparticle surface charge, base content and length of DNA.

    PubMed

    Abbasian, Sara; Moshaii, Ahmad; Nikkhah, Maryam; Farkhari, Nahid

    2014-04-01

    The adsorption of single and double stranded DNA on colloidal silver nanoparticles has been studied to investigate the effects of surface charge of the nanoparticles, the composition of the oligonucleotide and its length on the adsorption characteristics. The results explain that the nanoparticle surface charge is a key parameter determining the propensity of oligonucleotides to adsorb on nanoparticles. The adsorption also depends on the length and composition of oligonucleotide. The protective effects of both single and double stranded DNA against salt-induced aggregation dramatically increase as the DNA length increases. In contrast to other available reports, we observed that long oligonucleotides (single-stranded and double stranded) can well be adsorbed on the nanoparticles as the short ones leading to almost complete protection of nanoparticles against salt induced aggregation and hence are not suitable for the sensing applications. Finally, the light scattering from the Ag nanoparticles has been simulated and the results compared with the experiments. Our understanding should improve development of colorimetric assays for DNA detection based on aggregation of unmodified metallic nanoparticles.

  15. Effects of Cylindrical Charge Geometry and Secondary Combustion Reactions on the Internal Blast Loading of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Matthew A.

    2005-05-01

    An understanding of the detonation phenomenon and airblast behavior for cylindrical high-explosive charges is essential in developing predictive capabilities for tests and scenarios involving these charge geometries. Internal tests on reinforced concrete structures allowed for the analysis of cylindrical charges and the effect of secondary reactions occurring in confined structures. The pressure profiles that occur close to a cylindrical explosive charge are strongly dependent on the length-to-diameter ratio (L/D) of the charge. This study presents a comparison of finite-element code models (i.e., AUTODYN) to empirical methods for predicting airblast behavior from cylindrical charges. Current finite element analysis (FEA) and blast prediction codes fail to account for the effects of secondary reactions (fireballs) that occur with underoxidized explosives. Theoretical models were developed for TNT and validated against literature. These models were then applied to PBX 9501 for predictions of the spherical fireball diameter and time duration. The following relationships for PBX 9501 were derived from this analysis (units of ft, lb, s). Comparison of centrally located equivalent weight charges using cylindrical and spherical geometries showed that the average impulse on the interior of the structure is ~3%–5% higher for the spherical charge. Circular regions of high impulse that occur along the axial direction of the cylindrical charge must be considered when analyzing structural response.

  16. Closed-form solution of mid-potential between two parallel charged plates with more extensive application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiang-Yu; Yang, Chen; Zhou, Guo-Qing

    2015-10-01

    Efficient calculation of the electrostatic interactions including repulsive force between charged molecules in a biomolecule system or charged particles in a colloidal system is necessary for the molecular scale or particle scale mechanical analyses of these systems. The electrostatic repulsive force depends on the mid-plane potential between two charged particles. Previous analytical solutions of the mid-plane potential, including those based on simplified assumptions and modern mathematic methods, are reviewed. It is shown that none of these solutions applies to wide ranges of inter-particle distance from 0 to 10 and surface potential from 1 to 10. Three previous analytical solutions are chosen to develop a semi-analytical solution which is proven to have more extensive applications. Furthermore, an empirical closed-form expression of mid-plane potential is proposed based on plenty of numerical solutions. This empirical solution has extensive applications, as well as high computational efficiency. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB026103), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51009136), and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK2011212).

  17. Importance of temperature effect on the electrophoretic behavior of charge-regulated particles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jyh-Ping; Tai, Yi-Hsuan; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Tseng, Shiojenn

    2012-01-10

    The Joule heating effect is inevitable in electrophoresis operations. To assess its influence on the performance of electrophoresis, we consider the case of a charge-regulated particle in a solution containing multiple ionic species at temperatures ranging from 298 to 308 K. Using an aqueous SiO(2) dispersion as an example, we show that an increase in the temperature leads to a decrease in both the dielectric constant and the viscosity of the liquid phase, and an increase in both the diffusivity of ions and the particle surface potential. For a particle having a constant surface potential, its electrophoretic mobility is most influenced by the variation in the liquid viscosity as the temperature varies, but for a charged-regulated particle both the liquid viscosity and the surface potential can play an important role. Depending upon the level of pH, the degree of increase in the mobility can be on the order of 40% for a 5 K increase in the temperature. The presence of double-layer polarization, which is significant when the surface potential is sufficiently high, has the effect of inhibiting that increase in the mobility. This implies that the influence of the temperature on the mobility of the particle is most significant when the pH is close to the point of zero charge.

  18. Quantum effects in energy and charge transfer in an artificial photosynthetic complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu.; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of energy and charge transfer in a wheel-shaped artificial photosynthetic antenna-reaction center complex. This complex consists of six light-harvesting chromophores and an electron-acceptor fullerene. To describe quantum effects on a femtosecond time scale, we derive the set of exact non-Markovian equations for the Heisenberg operators of this photosynthetic complex in contact with a Gaussian heat bath. With these equations we can analyze the regime of strong system-bath interactions, where reorganization energies are of the order of the intersite exciton couplings. We show that the energy of the initially excited antenna chromophores is efficiently funneled to the porphyrin-fullerene reaction center, where a charge-separated state is set up in a few picoseconds, with a quantum yield of the order of 95%. In the single-exciton regime, with one antenna chromophore being initially excited, we observe quantum beatings of energy between two resonant antenna chromophores with a decoherence time of ˜100 fs. We also analyze the double-exciton regime, when two porphyrin molecules involved in the reaction center are initially excited. In this regime we obtain pronounced quantum oscillations of the charge on the fullerene molecule with a decoherence time of about 20 fs (at liquid nitrogen temperatures). These results show a way to directly detect quantum effects in artificial photosynthetic systems.

  19. Jahn-Teller effects in transition-metal compounds with small charge-transfer energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizokawa, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    We have studied Jahn-Teller effects in Cs2Au2Br6, ACu3Co4O12(A=Ca or Y), and IrTe2 in which the ligand p-to-transition-metal d charge-transfer energy is small or negative. The Au+/Au3+ charge disproportionation of Cs2Au2Br6 manifests in Au 4f photoemission spectra. In Cs2Au2Br6 with negative Δ and intermediate U, the charge disproportionation can be described using effective d orbitals constructed from the Au 5d and Br 4p orbitals and is stabilized by the Jahn-Teller distortion of the Au3+ site with low-spin d8 configuration. In ACu3Co4O12, Δs for Cu3+ and Co4+ are negative and Us are very large. The Zhang-Rice picture is valid to describe the electronic state, and the valence change from Cu2+/Co4+ to Cu3+/Co3+ can be viewed as the O 2p hole transfer from Co to Cu or d9 + d6L → d9L + d6. In IrTe2, both Δ and U are small and the Ir 5d and Te 5p electrons are itinerant to form the multi-band Fermi surfaces. The ideas of band Jahn-Teller transition and Peierls transition are useful to describe the structural instabilities.

  20. Arsenic removal from groundwater using iron electrocoagulation: effect of charge dosage rate.

    PubMed

    Amrose, Susan; Gadgil, Ashok; Srinivasan, Venkat; Kowolik, Kristin; Muller, Marc; Huang, Jessica; Kostecki, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes can reduce arsenic below 10 μg/L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater and in real groundwater from Bangladesh and Cambodia, while investigating the effect of operating parameters that are often overlooked, such as charge dosage rate. We measure arsenic removal performance over a larger range of current density than in any other single previous EC study (5000-fold: 0.02 - 100 mA/cm(2)) and over a wide range of charge dosage rates (0.060 - 18 Coulombs/L/min). We find that charge dosage rate has significant effects on both removal capacity (μg-As removed/Coulomb) and treatment time and is the appropriate parameter to maintain performance when scaling to different active areas and volumes. We estimate the operating costs of EC treatment in Bangladesh groundwater to be $0.22/m(3). Waste sludge (~80 - 120 mg/L), when tested with the Toxic Characteristic Leachate Protocol (TCLP), is characterized as non-hazardous. Although our focus is on developing a practical device, our results suggest that As[III] is mostly oxidized via a chemical pathway and does not rely on processes occurring at the anode. Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A, to view the free supplemental file.

  1. Exploring relativistic many-body recoil effects in highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Orts, R Soria; Harman, Z; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Artemyev, A N; Bruhns, H; Martínez, A J González; Jentschura, U D; Keitel, C H; Lapierre, A; Mironov, V; Shabaev, V M; Tawara, H; Tupitsyn, I I; Ullrich, J; Volotka, A V

    2006-09-08

    The relativistic recoil effect has been the object of experimental investigations using highly charged ions at the Heidelberg electron beam ion trap. Its scaling with the nuclear charge Z boosts its contribution to a measurable level in the magnetic-dipole (M1) transitions of B- and Be-like Ar ions. The isotope shifts of 36Ar versus 40Ar have been detected with sub-ppm accuracy, and the recoil effect contribution was extracted from the 1s(2)2s(2)2p 2P(1/2) - 2P(3/2) transition in Ar13+ and the 1s(2)2s2p 3P1-3P2 transition in Ar14+. The experimental isotope shifts of 0.00123(6) nm (Ar13+) and 0.00120(10) nm (Ar14+) are in agreement with our present predictions of 0.00123(5) nm (Ar13+) and 0.00122(5) nm (Ar14+) based on the total relativistic recoil operator, confirming that a thorough understanding of correlated relativistic electron dynamics is necessary even in a region of intermediate nuclear charges.

  2. Relationship between the adjuvant and cytotoxic effects of the positive charges and polymerization in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Gasparri, Julieta; Speroni, Lucía; Chiaramoni, Nadia Silvia; del Valle Alonso, Silvia

    2011-06-01

    Vaccine development today encounters a main obstacle, which is the need for effective adjuvants suitable for clinical trials. Aluminum salts, discovered 70 years ago and, very recently, MF59, are the only types of adjuvants currently used in vaccines licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Liposomes represent an alternative approach to vaccine adjuvants. In this article, we describe the inflammatory response and biological effect of polymerization and the addition of positive charges in liposome formulations. Nonpolymerized cationic (NP(+)) liposomes significantly reduce metabolism in Vero cells after 24 hours. Correspondingly, both NP(+) and polymerized cationic (P(+)) liposomes reduce cell viability following a 48-hour incubation. Similar results were obtained with cells from the peritoneal cavities of mice. Paradoxically, those liposomes that presented clearly cytostatic or cytotoxic effects in vitro stimulated metabolism and had a mitogenic effect in vivo. Finally, the adjuvant effect was tested by immunization in BALB/c mice. The major effect was obtained with NP(+) liposomes. Accordingly, we also demonstrated that NP(+) liposomes injected into the dermis produced an outstanding inflammatory reaction, showing the histopathological characteristics of an inoculation granuloma. Thus, positive charge would play an important role in the immunoadjuvant effect of liposomes by conferring them cytotoxic capacity.

  3. Statistical mechanics of charged objects: General method and applications to simple systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Y.; Blum, L.

    1986-05-01

    Real fluids are composed of molecules that are objects of complex geometries and charge distributions. By studying the asymptotic high density limit (AHDL) and the asymptotic strong coupling limit (ASCL) one is able to reduce the problem of computing the thermodynamics and correlation functions of the system to a geometrical calculation involving overlap integrals between the objects. In previous work a simple geometrical, physically intuitive meaning of the direct correlation functions (dcf) I for point charges in a background (as interactions between smeared charges) and hard sphere (as overlap volumes) within the mean spherical approximation (MSA) was given, thus also revealing its analytic structure. A general variational approach to study a system composed of complex charged molecules is discussed. In this approach the variational trial functions for the free energy functional are constructed from the asymptotic limiting (AL) forms of the direct correlation functions. A number of examples are discussed, and in each case the variational form of the direct correlation is given explicitly. The relation to Onsager's procedure of immersing the system in a infinite conducting fluid of obtaining an energy bound is discussed in detail.

  4. Statistical Mechanics of Charged Objects: General Method and Applications to Simple Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-27

    geometries and charge distributions. In a previous note I we have shown that, by studying the asymptotic high density limit ( AHDL ) and the asymptotic...correlation function in the asymptotic limits (AL = either AHDL , ASCL) provides such a simple intructive basis. The approximate solutions also provide

  5. Means for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1980-09-23

    Apparatus for focusing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The array may be assembled from a single component which comprises a support plate containing uniform rows of poles. Each pole is separated by a hole through the plate designed to pass a beam. Two such plates may be positioned with their poles intermeshed to form a plurality of quadrupoles.

  6. 12 CFR 226.5a - Credit and charge card applications and solicitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

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  7. Development of a biodegradable nanoparticle platform for sildenafil: formulation optimization by factorial design analysis combined with application of charge-modified branched polyesters.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Schmehl, Thomas; Gessler, Tobias; Seeger, Werner; Kissel, Thomas

    2012-02-10

    Biodegradable nanoparticles have gained tremendous attraction as carriers for controlled drug delivery to the lung. Despite numerous advances in the field, e.g. development of suitable methods for pulmonary administration of polymeric nanoparticles, a sufficient association of the therapeutic agent with the carrier system as well as drug release in a controlled fashion remain considerable challenges. Hence, this study examines the optimization of biodegradable sildenafil-loaded nanoparticle formulations intended for aerosol treatment of pulmonary hypertension. A factorial design analysis was employed to identify the important experimental factors involved in the preparation of nanoparticles by the solvent evaporation technique. The effect of tailored charge-modified branched polyesters on drug loading and in vitro drug release from nanoparticles was also evaluated. Moreover, colloidal stability of obtained nanoparticles was assessed, and stabilization of nanoparticles by lyophilization was accomplished without additional excipients. Essential experimental factors were identified and optimized to allow the preparation of nanoparticles composed of linear polyesters with a sildenafil content of ~5 wt.%. The in vitro drug release profile from these nanoparticles demonstrated a sustained release of sildenafil over ~90 min. Application of charge-modified branched polyesters enhanced the drug content in nanoparticles and drug release profile, according to the charge-density present in the employed polymer. Accordingly an increase in drug loading by a factor of ~1.4, a prolonged drug release profile from nanoparticles over ~240 min was achieved. Sildenafil release from nanoparticles made of linear and charge-modified branched polyesters was governed by a diffusion process. The obtained drug diffusion coefficients were decreased as the charge-density present in the applied polymer was increased, which promotes the strategy to improve drug loading and release rates by

  8. Numerical Study of Three Dimensional Effects in Longitudinal Space-Charge Impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-06-01

    Longitudinal space-charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as detrimental in free-electron lasers as they can seed instabilities. Such “microbunching instabilities” were recently shown to be potentially useful to support the generation of broadband coherent radiation pulses [1, 2]. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beamlines capable of sustaining this LSC instability as a mechanism to produce a coherent light source. To date most of these studies have been carried out with a one-dimensional impedance model for the LSC. In this paper we use a N-body “Barnes-Hut” algorithm [3] to simulate the 3D space charge force in the beam combined with elegant [4] and explore the limitation of the 1D model often used

  9. Charge storage mechanisms in electrochemical capacitors: Effects of electrode properties on performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Madeleine F.; Donne, Scott W.

    2016-09-01

    The capacitive behaviour of four commonly studied electrochemical capacitor systems has been analyzed using the step potential electrochemical spectroscopy (SPECS) method. Electrode-electrolyte combinations with different charge storage mechanisms were characterized, including activated carbon in aqueous (H2SO4) and organic (TEABF4 in acetonitrile) electrolytes, manganese dioxide (Na2SO4) and anhydrous ruthenium oxide (H2SO4). The SPECS method was used to separate the charge storage contributions from double layer capacitance (CDL) and diffusion-limited pseudo-capacitance (CD) at scan rates ranging from 0.08 to 125 mV/s. The relative contributions from each process are related to the physicochemical properties of the electrode. Additionally, the effects of these electrode properties on the overall performance of each system, in terms of specific power and energy, are identified.

  10. Double layer effects in a model of proton discharge on charged electrodes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report first results on double layer effects on proton discharge reactions from aqueous solutions to charged platinum electrodes. We have extended a recently developed combined proton transfer/proton discharge model on the basis of empirical valence bond theory to include specifically adsorbed sodium cations and chloride anions. For each of four studied systems 800–1000 trajectories of a discharging proton were integrated by molecular dynamics simulations until discharge occurred. The results show significant influences of ion presence on the average behavior of protons prior to the discharge event. Rationalization of the observed behavior cannot be based solely on the electrochemical potential (or surface charge) but needs to resort to the molecular details of the double layer structure. PMID:25161833

  11. Installation and Characterization of Charged Particle Sources for Space Environmental Effects Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skevington, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Charged particle sources are integral devices used by Marshall Space Flight Center s Environmental Effects Branch (EM50) in order to simulate space environments for accurate testing of materials and systems. By using these sources inside custom vacuum systems, materials can be tested to determine charging and discharging properties as well as resistance to sputter damage. This knowledge can enable scientists and engineers to choose proper materials that will not fail in harsh space environments. This paper combines the steps utilized to build a low energy electron gun (The "Skevington 3000") as well as the methods used to characterize the output of both the Skevington 3000 and a manufactured Xenon ion source. Such characterizations include beam flux, beam uniformity, and beam energy. Both sources were deemed suitable for simulating environments in future testing.

  12. Environment effect on spectral and charge distribution characteristics of some drugs of folate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadem Sadigh, M.; Zakerhamidi, M. S.; Seyed Ahmadian, S. M.; Johari-Ahar, M.; Zare Haghighi, L.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular surrounding media as an important factor can effect on the operation of wide variety of drugs. For more study in this paper, spectral properties of Methotrexate and Folinic acid have been studied in various solvents. Our results show that the photo-physical of solute molecules depend strongly on solute-solvent interactions and active groups in their chemical structures. In order to investigate the contribution of specific and nonspecific interactions on the various properties of drug molecules, the linear solvation energy relationships concept is used. Moreover, charge distribution characteristics of used samples with various resonance structures in solvent environments were calculated by means of solvatochromic method. The high value of dipole moments in excited state show that local intramolecular charge transfer can occur by excitation. These results about molecular interactions can be extended to biological systems and can indicate completely the behaviors of Methotrexate and Folinic acid in polar solvents such as water in body system.

  13. Estimation of charge effects of ultrafine channel utilizing junctionless transistor with nanodot-type floating gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Takahiko; Migita, Shinji; Uenuma, Mutsunori; Okamoto, Naofumi; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Yamashita, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Shin-ichi

    2017-03-01

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in junctionless field-effect transistors (JL-FETs) with a channel length of about sub-10-nm are fabricated and demonstrated. The anisotropic wet etching of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate was utilized to form V-grooves and define a nanometer-scale channel. Metal NPs are selectively placed onto the bottom of a V-groove using a bio nano process (BNP). A JL-FET is applied to a floating gate memory and used to study the impacts of charges close to the short channel. Low-voltage operation and memory behavior of broad threshold voltage appear. It is estimated by simulation that positive and negative charges equivalent to approximately 10 electrons are accumulated in one NP. It is expected that the JL-FETs can overcome the scaling limitations of floating gate memories.

  14. Effect of polymer matrices on hopping charge transport in molecularly doped polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Einami, Jiro

    1990-08-01

    We have studied the effect of polymer matrices on time-of-flight (TOF) photocurrent pulse shape and the drift mobility of holes in polymers doped with 2-(p-dipropylaminophenyl)-4-(p-dimethylaminophenyl)-5-(o-chlorophenyl)-1, 3-oxazole in order to understand the nature of hopping charge transport in molecularly doped polymers (MDPs). The TOF pulse shapes in oxazole-doped polymers are classed into two groups: near rectangular or dispersive shapes. The drift mobility of holes in MDPs exhibiting near-rectangular TOF shape is large compared with that exhibiting dispersive. Moreover, the drift mobility of holes depends on the dielectric constant and the glass transition temperature of polymers. These results show that the polarization and phonon mode of polymers play an important role in hopping charge transport in MDPs.

  15. Longitudinal Space Charge Effects in Bunched Electron Beams Travelling through a Malmberg-Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Rome, M.; Cavaliere, F.; De Luca, F.; Pozzoli, R.; Cavenago, M.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.

    2010-06-16

    Nanosecond pulsed electron beams in the 1-10 keV energy range have been characterized by means of an electrostatic diagnostic in the Malmberg-Penning trap ELTRAP. The beam length has been inferred through the numerical analysis of the signals measured across the overall load impedance of a planar charge collector. The presence of space charge effects leading to a longitudinal spread of the beam during its transport are evidenced at low injection energies. This feature has also been tested with the use of a one-dimensional fluid model and with two-dimensional, cylindrically-symmetric Particle-In-Cell simulations, whose results are compared to the experimental observations.

  16. Charge-Transfer Effects in Ligand Exchange Reactions of Au25 Monolayer-Protected Clusters.

    PubMed

    Carducci, Tessa M; Blackwell, Raymond E; Murray, Royce W

    2015-04-16

    Reported here are second-order rate constants of associative ligand exchanges of Au25L18 nanoparticles (L = phenylethanethiolate) of various charge states, measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature and below. Differences in second-order rate constants (M(-1) s(-1)) of ligand exchange (positive clusters ∼1.9 × 10(-5) versus negative ones ∼1.2 × 10(-4)) show that electron depletion retards ligand exchange. The ordering of rate constants between the ligands benzeneselenol > 4-bromobenzene thiol > benzenethiol reveals that exchange is accelerated by higher acidity and/or electron donation capability of the incoming ligand. Together, these observations indicate that partial charge transfer occurs between the nanoparticle and ligand during the exchange and that this is a rate-determining effect in the process.

  17. Charge Dependent Effects in Double-Photo-Ionization of Helium-Like Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Matt; Colgan, James

    2006-10-01

    A study is made of triple differential cross sections (TDCS) for double-photo-ionization (DPI) of helium-like ions. The angular distribution between the equal energy outgoing electrons is examined as a function of the nuclear target charge. Time-dependent close-coupling theory (TDCC) will be used to solve the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation for both outgoing electrons. The TDCC method treats the correlation between the electrons without approximation. Previous theoretical models that have calculated the TDCS for helium-like ions have only included the electron-electron interaction through approximate perturbative methods. We will analyze the effects of the electron correlation and its dependence relative to the nuclear charge. We will compare our calculations with previous experimental and theoretical work, where available.

  18. Simulation of space-charge effects in an ungated GEM-based TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhmer, F. V.; Ball, M.; Dørheim, S.; Höppner, C.; Ketzer, B.; Konorov, I.; Neubert, S.; Paul, S.; Rauch, J.; Vandenbroucke, M.

    2013-08-01

    A fundamental limit to the application of Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) in high-rate experiments is the accumulation of slowly drifting ions in the active gas volume, which compromises the homogeneity of the drift field and hence the detector resolution. Conventionally, this problem is overcome by the use of ion-gating structures. This method, however, introduces large dead times and restricts trigger rates to a few hundred per second. The ion gate can be eliminated from the setup by the use of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foils for gas amplification, which intrinsically suppress the backflow of ions. This makes the continuous operation of a TPC at high rates feasible. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations of the buildup of ion space charge in a GEM-based TPC and the correction of the resulting drift distortions are discussed, based on realistic numbers for the ion backflow in a triple-GEM amplification stack. A TPC in the future P¯ANDA experiment at FAIR serves as an example for the experimental environment. The simulations show that space charge densities up to 65 fC cm-3 are reached, leading to electron drift distortions of up to 10 mm. The application of a laser calibration system to correct these distortions is investigated. Based on full simulations of the detector physics and response, we show that it is possible to correct for the drift distortions and to maintain the good momentum resolution of the GEM-TPC.

  19. Charge effect of a liposomal delivery system encapsulating simvastatin to treat experimental ischemic stroke in rats

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Martorell, Mireia; Cano-Sarabia, Mary; Simats, Alba; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Rosell, Anna; Maspoch, Daniel; Montaner, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Although the beneficial effects of statins on stroke have been widely demonstrated both in experimental studies and in clinical trials, the aim of this study is to prepare and characterize a new liposomal delivery system that encapsulates simvastatin to improve its delivery into the brain. Materials and methods In order to select the optimal liposome lipid composition with the highest capacity to reach the brain, male Wistar rats were submitted to sham or transitory middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAOt) surgery and treated (intravenous [IV]) with fluorescent-labeled liposomes with different net surface charges. Ninety minutes after the administration of liposomes, the brain, blood, liver, lungs, spleen, and kidneys were evaluated ex vivo using the Xenogen IVIS® Spectrum imaging system to detect the load of fluorescent liposomes. In a second substudy, simvastatin was assessed upon reaching the brain, comparing free and encapsulated simvastatin (IV) administration. For this purpose, simvastatin levels in brain homogenates from sham or MCAOt rats at 2 hours or 4 hours after receiving the treatment were detected through ultra-high-protein liquid chromatography. Results Whereas positively charged liposomes were not detected in brain or plasma 90 minutes after their administration, neutral and negatively charged liposomes were able to reach the brain and accumulate specifically in the infarcted area. Moreover, neutral liposomes exhibited higher bioavailability in plasma 4 hours after being administered. The detection of simvastatin by ultra-high-protein liquid chromatography confirmed its ability to cross the blood–brain barrier, when administered either as a free drug or encapsulated into liposomes. Conclusion This study confirms that liposome charge is critical to promote its accumulation in the brain infarct after MCAOt. Furthermore, simvastatin can be delivered after being encapsulated. Thus, simvastatin encapsulation might be a promising

  20. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects—surface charge convection and shape deformation—towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.