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Sample records for effective hepa pre-filtration

  1. Cost and waste volume reduction in HEPA filter trains by effective pre-filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Chris

    2007-07-01

    Data published elsewhere (Moore, et al., 1992; Bergman et al., 1997) suggests that the then costs of disposable type Glass Fibre HEPA filtration trains to the DOE was $55 million per year (based on an average usage of HEPA panels of 11,748 pieces per year between 1987 and 1990), $50 million of which was attributable to installation, testing, removal and disposal. The same authors suggest that by 1995 the number of HEPA panels being used had dropped to an estimated 4000 pieces per year due to the ending of the Cold War. The yearly cost to the DOE of 4000 units per year was estimated to be $29.5 million using the same parameters that previously suggested the $55 million figure. Within that cost estimate, $300 each was the value given to the filter and $4,450 was given to peripheral activity per filter. Clearly, if the $4,450 component could be reduced, tremendous saving could result, in addition to a significant reduction in the legacy burden of waste volumes. This same cost is applied to both the 11,748 and 4000 usage figures. The work up to now has focussed on the development of a low cost, long life (cleanable), direct replacement of the traditional filter train. This paper will review an alternative strategy, that of preventing the contaminating dust from reaching and blinding the HEPA filters, and thereby removing the need to replace them. What has become clear is that 'low cost' and 'Metallic HEPA' are not compatible terms. The original Bergman et al., 1997 work suggested that 1000 cfm (cubic feet per minute) (1690 m{sup 3}/hr) stainless HEPAs could be commercially available for $5000 each after development (although the $70,000 development unit may be somewhat exaggerated - the authors own company have estimated development units able to be retrofitted into strengthened standard housings would be available for perhaps $30,000). The likely true cost of such an item produced industrially in significant numbers may be closer to $15,000 each. That being the case

  2. Effect of DOP heterodispersion on HEPA-filter-penetration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.

    1984-08-09

    The accuracy of the standard US test method for certifying High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters has been in question since the finding by Hinds, et al. that the dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol used in the test is not monodisperse as had been assumed and that particle-size analyzers, or owls, could not distinguish between different particle-size distributions with the same owl reading. We have studied theoretically and experimentally the filter efficiency for different DOP size distributions with the same owl reading. Our studies show that the effect of varying DOP size distributions on the measured HEPA-filter penetration depends on the light-scattering-photometer response and on the HEPA-filter penetration curve, both measured as a function of particle size. HEPA-filter penetration for a heterodisperse DOP aerosol may be increased, decreased, or remain the same when compared to the filter penetration for monodisperse aerosols. Using experimental HEPA-filter penetration and photometer response curves, we show that heterodisperse DOP aerosols (D/sub cmd/ 0.19 and sigma g = 1.4) yield 24% lower penetrations than that for monodisperse DOP aerosols (D/sub cmd/ = 0.3 and sigma g = 1.0). This surprisingly small effect of the DOP heterodispersion on HEPA-filter penetration is due to the response function of the owl that is similar to the response of the photometer. Changes in the particle-size distribution are therefore seen in a similar fashion by both the photometer and the owl. We also show that replacing the owl with modern particle-size spectrometers may lead to large errors in filter penetration because the particle-size spectrometers do not provide measurements that correspond to the photometer measurements. 15 references, 16 figures.

  3. Synergistic anticancer effects of curcumin and resveratrol in Hepa1-6 hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Qin; Hu, Bing; An, Hong-Mei; Shen, Ke-Ping; Xu, Ling; Deng, Shan; Wei, Meng-Meng

    2013-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma remains one of the most prevalent malignancies worldwide. Curcuma aromatica and Polygonum cuspidatum are one of the commonly used paired-herbs for liver cancer treatment. Curcumin and resveratrol are the major anticancer constituents of Curcuma aromatica and Polygonum cuspidatum, respectively. Curcumin and resveratrol have been found to exhibit a synergistic anticancer effect in colon cancer. However, the combined effect of curcumin and resveratrol against hepatocellular carcinoma remains unknown. In the present study, we evaluated the combined effects of curcumin and resveratrol in hepatocellular carcinoma Hepa1-6 cells. The results showed that curcumin and resveratrol significantly inhibited the proliferation of Hepa1-6 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The combination treatment of curcumin and resveratrol elicited a synergistic antiproliferative effect in Hepa1-6 cells. The apoptosis of Hepa1-6 cells induced by the combination treatment with curcumin and resveratrol was accompanied by caspase-3, -8 and -9 activation, which was completely abrogated by a pan caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. Combination of curcumin and resveratrol upregulated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in Hepa1-6 cells. The ROS scavenger, NAC, partially attenuated the apoptosis and caspase activation induced by the combination treatment of curcumin and resveratrol. In addition, the combination of curcumin and resveratrol downregulated XIAP and survivin expression. These data suggest that the combination treatment of curcumin and resveratrol is a promising novel anticancer strategy for liver cancer. The present study also provides new insights into the effective mechanism of paired-herbs in traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:23446753

  4. The effect of age on the structural integrity of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.S.; Beason, D.G.; Smith, P.R.; Gregory, W.S.

    1988-08-17

    All of the controls on high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are based on rigid manufacturing standards with regard to filtration efficiency, temperature performance, pressure integrity, and strength. Third-party inspection and testing by the US Department of Energy increases the reliability of new HEPA filters, but only routine in-place testing is used to assure that an aging filter performs adequately. In 1980 the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory initiated a small evaluation to determine if age has a significant effect on the structural integrity of HEPA filters. A series of used uncontaminated filters dating back to 1965 was obtained for these tests. Tensile strength tests on the old media indicated a decrease in strength. To provide additional measurement of the filters' overall strength, several of these aged filters were subjected to pressure pulses equivalent to the NRC Region I tornado pulses and shock wave overpressures. Data from these tests indicate a decrease in breaking pressure of from 25/endash/50%. A large increase in complete filter pack blow-out during the simulated NRC Region I tornado tests was also observed. The preliminary results indicate the need for an administrative lifetime for HEPA filters used in critical nuclear facilities. Due to the unique conditions in each facility, different administrative lifetimes may be necessary.

  5. Evaluation of the effect of media velocity on HEPA filter performance

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, Steven; Parsons, Michael; Hogancamp, Kristina; Norton, O. Perry; Waggoner, Charles

    2007-07-01

    Section FC of the ASME AG-1 Code addresses glass fiber HEPA filters and restricts the media velocity to a maximum of 2.54 cm/s (5 ft/min). Advances in filter media technology allow glass fiber HEPA filters to function at significantly higher velocities and still achieve HEPA performance. However, diffusional capture of particles < 100 nm is reduced at higher media velocities due to shorter residence times within the media matrix. Therefore, it is unlikely that higher media velocities for HEPA filters will be allowed without data to demonstrate the effect of media velocity on removal of particles in the smaller size classes. In order to address this issue, static testing has been conducted to generate performance related data and a range of dynamic testing has provided data regarding filter lifetimes, loading characteristics, changes in filter efficiency and the most penetrating particle size over time. Testing was conducted using 31 cm x 31 cm x 29 cm deep pleat HEPA filters supplied from two manufacturers. Testing was conducted at media velocities ranging from 2.0-4.5 cm/s with a solid aerosol challenge composed of potassium chloride. Two set of media velocity data were obtained for each filter type. In one set of evaluations, the maximum aerosol challenge particle size was limited to 3 {mu}m, while particles above 3 {mu}m were not constrained in the second set. This provided for considerable variability in the challenge mass mean diameter and overall mass loading rate. Results of this testing will be provided to the ASME AG-1 FC Committee for consideration in future versions of the HEPA standard. In general, the initial filter efficiency decreased with increasing media velocity. However, initial filter efficiencies were generally good in all cases. Filter efficiency values averaged over the first ten minute of the loading cycle ranged from 99.970 to 99.996 %. Additionally, the most penetrating particle size was observed to decrease with increasing media velocity

  6. The effect of media area on the dust holding capacity of deep pleat HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Dyment, J.; Loughborough, D.

    1997-08-01

    The high potential cost of storage, treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes places a premium on the longevity of installed HEPA filters in situations in radioactive processing facilities where dust capacity is a life determining factor. Previous work investigated the dust holding capacity v pressure drop characteristics of different designs of HEPA filter and also the effect of using graded density papers. This paper records an investigation of the effect of media area variation on the dust holding capacity of the {open_quotes}deep-pleat{close_quotes} design of HEPA filter. As in the previously reported work two test dusts (carbon black and sub micron sodium chloride) in the range (0.15 - 0.4{mu}m) were used. Media area adjustment was effected by varying the number of separators within the range 60 - 90. Results with the coarser dust allowed an optimum media area to be identified. Media areas greater or smaller than this optimum retained less dust than the optimum for the same terminal pressure drop. Conversely with the finer sodium chloride aerosol the dust holding capacity continued to increase up to the maximum area investigated. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  7. HEPA Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2006-01-01

    Poor indoor air quality in school facilities can detract from the health and productivity of students, teachers and other employees. Asthma--often triggered or aggravated by dust--is the No. 1 cause of chronic absenteeism in schools. Using vacuum cleaners equipped with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to clean education institutions…

  8. HEPA and PARSE

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qing-Wen; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xiao-Song

    2013-01-01

    The effective discovery of tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) holds the key for the development of new diagnostic assays and immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. Here, we discuss our recently developed technologies, HEPA and PARSE, which allow for the systematic identification of TSAs, generating a reservoir of immunologically and clinically relevant targets. PMID:23802073

  9. [Synergistic inhibitory effect of static magnetic field and antitumor drugs on Hepa1-6 cells].

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingling; Guo, Wei; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Xueqing; Yu, Juntao; Wu, Wencai; Zhao, Tiejun

    2015-09-01

    Chemotherapy as a routine method for clinical treatment of cancer has disadvantages such as significant toxicity and strong resistance. In order to improve the efficacy of the drugs and reduce the by-effects, we tried to combine static magnetic field (SMF) with cisplatin or adriamycin. The growth of Hepa1-6 cells treated with the static magnetic field (SMF) combined with cisplatin or adriamycin was significantly inhibited, as detected with MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) test. Combined treatment group cells underwent significant morphological changes as observed by HE (Hematoxylin and eosin) staining under optical microscope. Cell cycle analysis indicated that SMF increased the ratio of cells arrested in G2/M phase caused by cisplatin, and when treated with SMF combined with adriamycin, cells were almost arrested in G1 and G2/M phase. SCGE test showed that SMF can enhance the ability of cisplatin or adriamycin to promote cell DNA damage. Atomic force microscope observation found that the combination of antitumor drugs and magnetic field treatment induced larger and deeper holes on the cell membrane, and surface structure damage is serious. The combination of antitumor drugs and magnetic field technology effectively inhibits the growth of tumor cells, and reduces drug doses. The results implicate this method as potential cancer therapy. PMID:26955714

  10. Effect of Circulation Parameters on Functional Status of HepaRG Spheroids Cultured in Microbioreactor.

    PubMed

    Semenova, O V; Petrov, V A; Gerasimenko, T N; Aleksandrova, A V; Burmistrova, O A; Khutornenko, A A; Osipyants, A I; Poloznikov, A A; Sakharov, D A

    2016-07-01

    We studied the relationship between microcirculation parameters and functional status of HepaRG cells in spheroids and chose an optimal regimen within the physiologically permissible limits of mechanical impact for the cells that maintains the expression of functional genes of the liver. PMID:27496037

  11. Interactions between hepatitis B virus and aflatoxin B(1): effects on p53 induction in HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Lereau, Myriam; Gouas, Doriane; Villar, Stéphanie; Besaratinia, Ahmad; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Berthillon, Pascale; Martel-Planche, Ghislaine; Nogueira da Costa, André; Ortiz-Cuaran, Sandra; Hantz, Olivier; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Hainaut, Pierre; Chemin, Isabelle

    2012-03-01

    Infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and dietary exposure to aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) are the main risk factors for the development of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). How these factors cooperate is still largely unknown. AFB(1) activation leads to DNA adduction and mutagenesis, with a specific mutation at codon 249 in TP53 (p.R249S). So far, only limited studies have addressed the effects of AFB(1) on HBV replication. We have analysed the effects of both risk factors on p53 induction during HBV infection in HepaRG, a cell line with hepatocyte-like morphology that metabolizes AFB(1) and supports HBV infection. Exposure to AFB(1) up to 5 µM induced a downregulation of HBV replication after 48 h, as measured by a decrease in viral antigens in the culture medium (HBsAg, HBeAg and large envelope protein) and in intracellular levels of HBV transcripts, DNA and HBsAg. Conversely, HBV infection did not significantly modify AFB(1)-DNA adduct formation or repair as assessed by immunodot-blot assay, and the induction of p53 in response to AFB(1) was similar in infected and non-infected HepaRG cells. Overall, our results suggest that AFB(1) exposure decreases HBV replication, whereas DNA damage by AFB(1) and subsequent p53 induction is not affected by the presence of the virus. Thus, in HepaRG cell line, AFB(1) and HBV do not cooperate to increase DNA damage by AFB(1). Further studies on the effects of both factors in a context of chronicity are needed to better understand synergistic effects. PMID:22113009

  12. Dose- and time-dependent effects of phenobarbital on gene expression profiling in human hepatoma HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Carine B.; Spire, Catherine Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, Andre

    2009-02-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) induces or represses a wide spectrum of genes in rodent liver. Much less is known about its effects in human liver. We used pangenomic cDNA microarrays to analyze concentration- and time-dependent gene expression profile changes induced by PB in the well-differentiated human HepaRG cell line. Changes in gene expression profiles clustered at specific concentration ranges and treatment times. The number of correctly annotated genes significantly modulated by at least three different PB concentration ranges (spanning 0.5 to 3.2 mM) at 20 h exposure amounted to 77 and 128 genes (p {<=} 0.01) at 2- and 1.8-fold filter changes, respectively. At low concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM), PB-responsive genes included the well-recognized CAR- and PXR-dependent responsive cytochromes P450 (CYP2B6, CYP3A4), sulfotransferase 2A1 and plasma transporters (ABCB1, ABCC2), as well as a number of genes critically involved in various metabolic pathways, including lipid (CYP4A11, CYP4F3), vitamin D (CYP24A1) and bile (CYP7A1 and CYP8B1) metabolism. At concentrations of 3.2 mM or higher after 20 h, and especially 48 h, increased cytotoxic effects were associated with disregulation of numerous genes related to oxidative stress, DNA repair and apoptosis. Primary human hepatocyte cultures were also exposed to 1 and 3.2 mM PB for 20 h and the changes were comparable to those found in HepaRG cells treated under the same conditions. Taken altogether, our data provide further evidence that HepaRG cells closely resemble primary human hepatocytes and provide new information on the effects of PB in human liver. These data also emphasize the importance of investigating dose- and time-dependent effects of chemicals when using toxicogenomic approaches.

  13. Protective effect of Porphyra yezoensis glycoprotein on D-galactosamine‑induced cytotoxicity in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Wook; Kim, Young-Min; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-05-01

    The present study aimed to examine the signaling pathways and enzyme activity associated with the protective effect of Porphyra yezoensis glycoprotein (PYGP) on D‑galactosamine (D‑GaIN)‑induced cytotoxicity in Hepa 1c1c7 cells. D‑GaIN is commonly used to induce hepatic injury models in vivo as well as in vitro. PYGP was extracted from Porphyra yezoensis, a red algae distributed along the coasts of Republic of Korea, China and Japan. In the present study, Hepa 1c1c7 cells were pre‑treated with PYGP (20 and 40 µg/ml) for 24 h and then the media was replaced with D‑GaIN (20 mM) and PYGP (20 and 40 µg/ml). The results demonstrated that D‑GaIN induced Hepa 1c1c7 cell death and pretreatment with PYGP was found to attenuate D‑GaIN toxicity. In addition, D‑GaIN decreased the antioxidant activity and increased lipid peroxidation processes; however, pre‑treatment with PYGP reduced the generation of lipid peroxidation products, such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, as well as increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione‑s‑transferase (GST). PYGP was shown to suppress the overexpression of extracellular signal‑regulated kinase, c‑jun N‑terminal kinase and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation induced by D‑GaIN. Furthermore, PYGP increased the protein expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2‑related factor 2 (Nrf2), quinine oxidoreductase 1, GST and heme oxygenase 1 protein expression. These results suggested that PYGP had cytoprotective effects against D‑GaIN‑induced cell damage, which may be associated with MAPKs and the Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:25626067

  14. Effects of HEPA Air Cleaners on Unscheduled Asthma Visits and Asthma Symptoms for Children Exposed to Secondhand Tobacco Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Hornung, Richard W.; Khoury, Jane; Yolton, Kimberly; Lierl, Michelle; Kalkbrenner, Amy

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal was to test the effects of high-efficiency, particulate-arresting (HEPA) air cleaners on unscheduled asthma visits and symptoms among children with asthma exposed to secondhand smoke. METHODS: We enrolled 225 eligible children who were 6 to 12 years of age, had physician-diagnosed asthma, and were exposed to ≥5 cigarettes per day. We conducted a double-blind, randomized trial. Children were assigned randomly to receive 2 active or inactive HEPA air cleaners. RESULTS: Of 225 enrolled children, 110 (49%) were assigned to the intervention group and 115 (51%) to the control group; 215 (95%) completed the trial. During the trial, there were 42 fewer unscheduled asthma visits among children in the intervention group (18.5% [95% confidence interval: 1.25%–82.75%]; P = .043), compared with those in the control group, after adjustment for baseline differences. There was a significant difference in the reductions of levels of particles of >0.3 μm according to group assignment; there was a 25% reduction in particle levels in the intervention group, compared with a 5% reduction in the control group (P = .026). There were no significant differences in parent-reported asthma symptoms, exhaled nitric-oxide levels, air nicotine levels, or cotinine levels according to group assignment. CONCLUSIONS: These results hold promise for using HEPA air cleaners as part of a multifaceted strategy to reduce asthma morbidity, but further research is necessary before they can be recommended routinely for the medical management of asthma. PMID:21149427

  15. γ-Tocotrienol attenuates triglyceride through effect on lipogenic gene expressions in mouse hepatocellular carcinoma Hepa 1-6.

    PubMed

    Burdeos, Gregor Carpentero; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Watanabe, Akio; Kimura, Fumiko; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin E is the generic name for tocopherol (Toc) and tocotrienol (T3), which have saturated and unsaturated side chains, respectively. Such differences allow T3 to be different from Toc in terms of their functions. T3 has been known to attenuate cholesterol (Cho) level by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR). Recent reports also showed the efficacy of T3 in improving triglyceride (TG) profiles in both in vivo and in vitro studies. However the mechanism involved in this biological activity is still unclear and needs to be further investigated. In the present study, we elucidated the effect of γ-T3 on lipid levels and lipogenic gene expressions in mouse hepatocellular carcinoma Hepa 1-6. γ-T3 showed attenuation of TG through effect on fatty acid synthase, sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1, stearoyl CoA desaturase 1, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A gene expression in Hepa 1-6. In contrast, the Cho level remained unchanged. These results expanded our previous finding of lipid-lowering effects of T3, especially for TG. Therefore, T3 is a potential lipid-lowering compound candidate with realistic prospects for its use as a therapy for lipid-related diseases in humans. PMID:23727646

  16. Study of the effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of glass fiber HEPA filters has been studied. At humidifies above the deliquescent point, the pressure drop across the HEPA filter increased non-linearly with the areal loading density (mass collected/filtration area) of NaCl aerosol, thus significantly reducing the mass loading capacity of the filter compared to dry hygroscopic or non-hygroscopic particle mass loadings. The specific cake resistance, K{sub 2}, has been computed for different test conditions and used as a measure of the mass loading capacity. K. was found to decrease with increasing humidity for the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide particles and the hygroscopic NaCl particles (at humidities below the deliquescent point). It is postulated that an increase in humidity leads to the formation of a more open particulate cake which lowers the pressure drop for a given mass loading. A formula for predicting K{sub 2} for lognormally distributed aerosols (parameters obtained from impactor data) is derived. The resistance factor, R, calculated using this formula was compared to the theoretical R calculated using the Rudnick-Happel expression. For the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide the agreement was good but for the hygroscopic sodium chloride, due to large variation in the cake porosity estimates, the agreement was poor.

  17. Study of the effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.

    1992-09-01

    The effect of humidity, particle hygroscopicity and size on the mass loading capacity of glass fiber HEPA filters has been studied. At humidifies above the deliquescent point, the pressure drop across the HEPA filter increased non-linearly with the areal loading density (mass collected/filtration area) of NaCl aerosol, thus significantly reducing the mass loading capacity of the filter compared to dry hygroscopic or non-hygroscopic particle mass loadings. The specific cake resistance, K{sub 2}, has been computed for different test conditions and used as a measure of the mass loading capacity. K. was found to decrease with increasing humidity for the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide particles and the hygroscopic NaCl particles (at humidities below the deliquescent point). It is postulated that an increase in humidity leads to the formation of a more open particulate cake which lowers the pressure drop for a given mass loading. A formula for predicting K{sub 2} for lognormally distributed aerosols (parameters obtained from impactor data) is derived. The resistance factor, R, calculated using this formula was compared to the theoretical R calculated using the Rudnick-Happel expression. For the non-hygroscopic aluminum oxide the agreement was good but for the hygroscopic sodium chloride, due to large variation in the cake porosity estimates, the agreement was poor.

  18. HEPA filter dissolution process

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  19. Hepa filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, Ken N.; Murphy, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  20. HEPA filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1994-02-22

    A process is described for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal. 4 figures.

  1. Effective protection of allogeneic stem cell recipients against Aspergillosis by HEPA air filtration during a period of construction--a prospective survey.

    PubMed

    Krüger, William H; Zöllner, Bernhard; Kaulfers, Paul-Michael; Zander, Axel R

    2003-06-01

    High incidence of aspergillosis on transplant units or hematological wards without HEPA air conditioning during periods of demolishing or construction has been reported by several investigators. Here we report monitoring of fungal air contamination during a period of construction on a stem cell transplantation ward using the gravity air-setting plate (GASP) method. Fungal air contamination in HEPA-conditioned patient rooms was constantly low, independent from construction activity. Outside of the patient rooms at the ward's corridor, the fungal load was significantly higher with some peak values. Outside the transplant unit measures of construction led to a significant increase of fungal spore concentration in air. Transplant activity was not reduced during construction and patients were nursed strictly under HEPA conditions. Patients were monitored prospectively for incidence of infections since 1990 and data of patients grafted during construction (n = 28) were compared to those grafted outside building activity (n = 652). An increase of aspergillosis during construction could be clearly excluded. It can be concluded: Nursing of patients undergoing stem cell transplantation in HEPA-conditioned rooms is an effective protection against acquisition of aspergillus-infection, even under environmental conditions with increased air contamination by conidia. The gravity air-setting plate (GASP) method is not expensive and easy to use and allows reliable and quantitative aerobiological spore monitoring. PMID:12857371

  2. Effects of rutaecarpine on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in murine hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Hyunjin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Mar, Woongchon

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of rutaecarpine on DNA strand breaks and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Oxidative DNA damage was estimated by nuclear condensation assessment, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and Comet assay. Rutaecarpine inhibited cell death induced by 500 μM H2O2, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Treatment with rutaecarpine reduced the number of DNA strand breaks induced by H2O2, as assessed by DAPI staining and Comet assay, and increased quinone reductase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and pAkt protein levels, as assessed by western blotting. PMID:24009839

  3. Effects of Rutaecarpine on Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Murine Hepa-1c1c7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Hyunjin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Mar, Woongchon

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of rutaecarpine on DNA strand breaks and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Oxidative DNA damage was estimated by nuclear condensation assessment, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and Comet assay. Rutaecarpine inhibited cell death induced by 500 μM H2O2, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Treatment with rutaecarpine reduced the number of DNA strand breaks induced by H2O2, as assessed by DAPI staining and Comet assay, and increased quinone reductase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and pAkt protein levels, as assessed by western blotting. PMID:24009839

  4. Validation of the integrity of a HEPA filter system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Hsung

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a delayed air sampling method to verify the integrity of an existing HEPA filter system in a ventilated fume hood. (238U,232Th)O2 microspheres were generated to fabricate cement nuclear fuel pellets in a HEPA-filtered hood. To comply with the air effluent concentration limits by NRC, the capture efficiency of the HEPA filter was examined. An in-line isokinetic air sampling system was installed downstream of the HEPA filter. Utilizing a gas flow proportional counter, 212Pb was used as a surrogate to indicate any possible penetration of the (238U,232Th)O2 particles through the HEPA filter. Based on the experimental results, this delayed sampling method proved to be an easy and effective way to validate the integrity of the HEPA filter. PMID:14570263

  5. HEPA air filter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pet dander and other irritating allergens from the air. Along with other methods to reduce allergens, such ... controlling the amount of allergens circulating in the air. HEPA filters can be found in most air ...

  6. Effects of benzyl isothiocyanate and its N-acetylcysteine conjugate on induction of detoxification enzymes in hepa1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun-Sun

    2014-12-01

    The induction of detoxification enzymes by benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) and its synthetic N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) conjugate (NAC-BITC) was examined in Hepa1c1c7 murine hepatoma cells. BITC and NAC-BITC inhibited Hepa1c1c7 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. Cell growth was 4.5~57.2% lower in Hepa1c1c7 cells treated with 0.1~10 μM BITC than in control-treated Hepa1c1c7 cells. The NAC-BITC treatment had a similar inhibitory pattern on Hepa1c1c7 cell growth; 0.5 μM and 10 μM NAC-BITC decreased cell growth by 13.6% and 47.4%, respectively. Treatment of Hepa1c1c7 cells with 0.1~2.0 μM BITC also elicited a dose-response effect on the induction of quinone reductase quinone reductase (QR) activity and QR mRNA expression. Treatment with 1 μM and 2 μM BITC caused 1.8- and 2.8-fold inductions of QR mRNA, respectively. By comparison, treatment with 1 μM and 2 μM NAC-BITC caused 1.6- and 1.9-fold inductions of QR mRNA, respectively. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP2E1 induction were lower in 0.1~2 μM BITC-treated cells than in control-treated cells. CYP2E1 activity was 1.2-fold greater in 0.1 μM NAC-BITC-treated cells than in control-treated cells. However, the CYP2E1 activity of cells treated with higher concentrations (i.e., 1~2 μM) of NAC-BITC was similar to the activity of control-treated cells. Considering the potential of isothiocyanatesto prevent cancer, these results provide support for the use of BITC and NAC-BITC conjugates as chemopreventive agents. PMID:25580390

  7. Effects of Benzyl Isothiocyanate and Its N-Acetylcysteine Conjugate on Induction of Detoxification Enzymes in Hepa1c1c7 Mouse Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eun-Sun

    2014-01-01

    The induction of detoxification enzymes by benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) and its synthetic N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) conjugate (NAC-BITC) was examined in Hepa1c1c7 murine hepatoma cells. BITC and NAC-BITC inhibited Hepa1c1c7 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. Cell growth was 4.5~57.2% lower in Hepa1c1c7 cells treated with 0.1~10 μM BITC than in control-treated Hepa1c1c7 cells. The NAC-BITC treatment had a similar inhibitory pattern on Hepa1c1c7 cell growth; 0.5 μM and 10 μM NAC-BITC decreased cell growth by 13.6% and 47.4%, respectively. Treatment of Hepa1c1c7 cells with 0.1~2.0 μM BITC also elicited a dose-response effect on the induction of quinone reductase quinone reductase (QR) activity and QR mRNA expression. Treatment with 1 μM and 2 μM BITC caused 1.8- and 2.8-fold inductions of QR mRNA, respectively. By comparison, treatment with 1 μM and 2 μM NAC-BITC caused 1.6- and 1.9-fold inductions of QR mRNA, respectively. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP2E1 induction were lower in 0.1~2 μM BITC-treated cells than in control-treated cells. CYP2E1 activity was 1.2-fold greater in 0.1 μM NAC-BITC-treated cells than in control-treated cells. However, the CYP2E1 activity of cells treated with higher concentrations (i.e., 1~2 μM) of NAC-BITC was similar to the activity of control-treated cells. Considering the potential of isothiocyanatesto prevent cancer, these results provide support for the use of BITC and NAC-BITC conjugates as chemopreventive agents. PMID:25580390

  8. Fire tests to evaluate the potential fire threat and its effects on HEPA filter integrity in cell ventilation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Building 7920

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, H.K.; Staggs, K.J.; Doughty, S.M.

    1992-12-01

    As a result of a DOE (Tiger Team) Technical Safety Appraisal (November 1990) of the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), ORNL Building 7920, a number of fire protection concerns were identified. The primary concern was the perceived loss of ventilation system containment due to the thermal destruction and/or breaching of the prefilters and/or high-efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA `s) and the resultant radioactive release to the external environment. The following report describes the results of an extensive fire test program performed by the Fire Research Discipline (FRD) of the Special Projects Division of Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) and funded by ORNL to address these concerns. Full scale mock-ups of a REDC hot cell tank pit, adjacent cubicle pit, and associated ventilation system were constructed at LLNL and 13 fire experiments were conducted to specifically answer the questions raised by the Tiger Team. Our primary test plan was to characterize the burning of a catastrophic solvent spill (kerosene) of 40 liters and its effect on the containment ventilation system prefilters and HEPA filters. In conjunction with ORNL and Lockwood Greene we developed a test matrix that assessed the fire performance of the prefilters and HEPA filters; evaluated the fire response of the fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) epoxy ventilation duct work; the response and effectiveness of the fire protection system, the effect of fire in a cubicle on the vessel off-gas (VOG) elbow, and other fire safety questions.

  9. DOE HEPA filter test program

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This standard establishes essential elements of a Department of Energy (DOE) program for testing HEPA filters to be installed in DOE nuclear facilities or used in DOE-contracted activities. A key element is the testing of HEPA filters for performance at a DOE Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. Other key elements are (1) providing for a DOE HEPA filter procurement program, and (2) verifying that HEPA filters to be installed in nuclear facilities appear on a Qualified Products List (QPL).

  10. Effects of ceiling-mounted HEPA-UV air filters on airborne bacteria concentrations in an indoor therapy pool building.

    PubMed

    Kujundzic, Elmira; Zander, David A; Hernandez, Mark; Angenent, Largus T; Henderson, David E; Miller, Shelly L

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a new generation of high-volume, ceiling-mounted high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-ultraviolet (UV) air filters (HUVAFs) for their ability to remove or inactivate bacterial aerosol. In an environmentally controlled full-scale laboratory chamber (87 m3), and an indoor therapy pool building, the mitigation ability of air filters was assessed by comparing concentrations of total bacteria, culturable bacteria, and airborne endotoxin with and without the air filters operating under otherwise similar conditions. Controlled chamber tests with pure cultures of aerosolized Mycobacterium parafortuitum cells showed that the HUVAF unit tested provided an equivalent air-exchange rate of 11 hr(-1). Using this equivalent air-exchange rate as a design basis, three HUVAFs were installed in an indoor therapy pool building for bioaerosol mitigation, and their effectiveness was studied over a 2-year period. The HUVAFs reduced concentrations of culturable bacteria by 69 and 80% during monitoring periods executed in respective years. The HUVAFs reduced concentrations of total bacteria by 12 and 76% during the same monitoring period, respectively. Airborne endotoxin concentrations were not affected by the HUVAF operation. PMID:15796111

  11. HEPA filter encapsulation

    DOEpatents

    Gates-Anderson, Dianne D.; Kidd, Scott D.; Bowers, John S.; Attebery, Ronald W.

    2003-01-01

    A low viscosity resin is delivered into a spent HEPA filter or other waste. The resin is introduced into the filter or other waste using a vacuum to assist in the mass transfer of the resin through the filter media or other waste.

  12. The effect of SAMe and betaine on Hepa 1-6, C34 and E47 liver cell survival in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Joan; Zhong, Jin; Buslon, Virgil S; French, Samuel W

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, methyl one-carbon metabolism has received a great deal of attention because the disruption of methyl balance in a variety of genetically modified mice is associated with the development of various forms of liver injury, namely fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In addition, patients with liver disease often have an abnormal expression of key genes involved in methionine metabolism as well as elevated serum levels of methionine and homocysteine (Hcy). S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) has rapidly moved from being a methyl donor to a key metabolite that regulates hepatocyte proliferation, necrosis and differentiation. Biosynthesis of SAMe occurs in all mammalian cells as the first step in methionine catabolism in a reaction catalyzed by methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). Decreased hepatic SAMe biosynthesis is a consequence of numerous forms of chronic liver injury. In an animal model of chronic liver SAMe deficiency, the liver is predisposed to further injury and develops spontaneous steatohepatitis and HCC. SAMe treatment in experimental animal models of liver injury shows hepatoprotective properties. Meta-analyses also showed that it is effective in the treatment of patients with cholestatic liver diseases. We studied the survival of liver cells treated with SAMe and betaine using Hepa 1-6 and E47/C34 cell lines. We showed that exogenous SAMe decreased the number of Hepa 1-6 and E47/C34 cells, and increased the number of dead cells in vitro. Betaine had no significant effect on the number of surviving cells and the number of dead cells. The combination of both methyl donors significantly increased the survival of liver cells and reduced necrosis, compared to SAMe alone. This study showed the inhibition of the proliferation and increased necrosis in response to SAMe on liver cancer cell lines Hepa 1-6 and C34. PMID:22032937

  13. THE EFFECT OF SAMe AND BETAINE ON HEPA 1-6, C34 AND E47 LIVER CELL SURVIVAL IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Joan; Zhong, Jin; Buslon, Virgil S.; French, Samuel W.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, methyl one-carbon metabolism has received a great deal of attention because the disruption of methyl balance in a variety of genetically modified mice is associated with the development of various forms of liver injury, namely fatty liverdisease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In addition, patients with liver disease often have an abnormal expression of key genes involved in methionine metabolism as well as elevated serum levels of methionine and homocysteine (Hcy). S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) has rapidly moved from being a methyl donor to a key metabolite that regulates hepatocyte proliferation, necrosis and differentiation. Biosynthesis of SAMe occurs in all mammalian cells as the first step in methionine catabolism in a reaction catalyzed by methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). Decreased hepatic SAMe biosynthesis is a consequence of numerous forms of chronic liver injury. In an animal model of chronic liver SAMe deficiency, the liver is predisposed to further injury and develops spontaneous steatohepatitis and HCC. SAMe treatment in experimental animal models of liver injury shows that its hepatoprotective properties. Meta-analyses also showed that it is effective in the treatment of patients with cholestatic liver diseases. We studied the survival of liver cells treated with SAMe and betaine using Hepa 1–6 and E47/C34 cell lines. We showed that exogenous SAMe decreased the number of Hepa 1–6 and E47/C34 cells, and increased the number of dead cells in vitro. Betaine had no significant effect on the number of surviving cells and the number of dead cells. The combination of both methyl donors significantly increased the survival of liver cells and reduced necrosis, compare to SAMe alone. This study showed the inhibition of the proliferatino and increased necrosis in response to SAMe on liver cancer cell lines Hepa 1–6 and C34. PMID:22032937

  14. Technology development: HEPA filter service life test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, K.N.; Cummings, K.G.; Leck, W.C.; Fretthold, J.K.

    1995-05-31

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site) has approximately 10,000 High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters installed in a variety of filter plenums. These ventilation/filtration plenum systems are used to control the release of airborne particulate contaminates to the environment during normal operations and also during potential design-based accidents. The operational integrity of the HEPA filter plenums is essential to maintaining the margins of safety as required by building specific Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARS) for protection of the public and environment. An Unreviewed Safety Question Determination (USQD), USDQ-RFP94.0615-ARS, was conducted in 1994 addressing the potential inadequacy of the safety envelope for Protected Area building HEPA plenums. While conducting this USQD, questions were raised concerning the maximum service life criteria for HEPA filters. Accident scenarios in existing FSARs identify conditions that could potentially cause plugging or damage of down stream HEPA filters as a result of impaction from failed filters. Additionally, available data indicates that HEPA filters experience structural degradation due to the effects of age. The Unresolved Safety Question (USQ) compensatory measures thus require testing and analysis of used HEPA filters in order to determine and implement service life criteria.

  15. HEPA filter monitoring program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, K. N.; Johnson, C. M.; Aiken, W. F.; Lucerna, J. J.; Barnett, R. L.; Jensen, R. T.

    1986-07-01

    The testing and replacement of HEPA filters, widely used in the nuclear industry to purify process air, are costly and labor-intensive. Current methods of testing filter performance, such as differential pressure measurement and scanning air monitoring, allow determination of overall filter performance but preclude detection of incipient filter failure such as small holes in the filters. Using current technology, a continual in-situ monitoring system was designed which provides three major improvements over current methods of filter testing and replacement. The improvements include: cost savings by reducing the number of intact filters which are currently being replaced unnecessarily; more accurate and quantitative measurement of filter performance; and reduced personnel exposure to a radioactive environment by automatically performing most testing operations.

  16. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  17. The effect of hyperthermia on DNA in mouse HepA cells--an analysis with computer and observation with EM.

    PubMed

    Yu, D; Liu, R; Zhou, J; Liu, Y

    2000-01-01

    A computer analysis system, automated imaging cytometry (AIC), flow cytometry (FCM) and EM, were used to study the relationship of apoptosis and the change of DNA in mouse HepA cells subjected to hyperthermia. Our results showed that pyknotic rate in the 44 degrees C group was significantly increased (P < 0.01) when compared with that in the 37 degrees C group, both the diploid rate and aneuploid rate in the 44 degrees C group were significantly decreased (P < 0.01) when compared with that in the 37 degrees C group. The pyknotic rate determined by ALC was in conformity with the apoptotic index (AI) determined by FCM. Under EM, ultrastructures of HapA cells appeared typical apoptosis changes in the 44 degrees C group. We are led to conclude that (1) when the temperature is 42 degrees C or 44 degrees C for 2 h, it did not promote the necrosis of HepA cells; (2) when the temperature is 42 degrees C for 2 h, it did not obviously induce the apoptosis of HepA cells, and the 44 degrees C for 2 h obviously induced the apoptosis of HepA cells; (3) AIC method can be used as an aid for the measurement of apoptotic index. Further study is needed to established it as a novel, simple and convenient method for determining the apoptosis. PMID:12840908

  18. HEPA Filter Use at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kriskovich, J. R.

    2002-02-28

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are relied upon at the Hanford site to support several different activities. Each facility relies upon the filters to provide the same function; remove radioactive particulate from various air streams. However, HEPA filters are operated in differing environmental conditions from one facility to another and the constituents in the air streams also differ. In addition, some HEPA filters at the Hanford site have been in service for several years. As a result, an assessment was performed which evaluated the service life and conditions of the HEPA filters at the Hanford site.

  19. Water washable stainless steel HEPA filter

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Terrance D.

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a high efficiency particulate (HEPA) filter apparatus and system, and method for assaying particulates. The HEPA filter provides for capture of 99.99% or greater of particulates from a gas stream, with collection of particulates on the surface of the filter media. The invention provides a filter system that can be cleaned and regenerated in situ.

  20. A review of DOE HEPA filter component test activities

    SciTech Connect

    Slawski, J.W.; Bresson, J.F.; Scripsick, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    All HEPA filters purchased for installation in DOE nuclear facilities are required to be tested at a Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. The number of HEPA filters purchased by DOE has been reduced so much that the Hanford FTF was closed. From Fiscal Year (FY) 1992 to 1994, funding was not provided to the FTF Technical Support Group (TSG) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. As a consequence, Round Robin Tests (RRTs), performed twice each year by the FTFs to assess constituency of test results among the FTFs, were not performed in FY 1992 and FY 1993. The Annual Reports of FTF test activities were not prepared for FY 1992 - 1995. Technical support provided to the FTFs was minimal. There is talk of closing a second FTF, and ongoing discussions as to whether DOE will continue to fund operation of the FTFs. In FY 1994, DOE Defense Programs commenced funding the TSG. RRT data for FY 1994 and 1995 have been entered into the database; the FY 1994 RRT report has been issued; and the FY 1995 RRT report is in progress. Data from semiannual reports have been retrieved and entered into the database. Standards related to HEPA filter test and procurement activities are now scheduled for issuance by FY 1996. Continuation of these activities depends on whether DOE will continue to support the HEPA filter test program. The history and activities of the FTFs and the TSG at Los Alamos have been reported at previous Air Cleaning Conferences. Data from the FY 1991 Annual Report of FTF activities was presented at the 1992 Air Cleaning Conference. Preparation of the Annual Reports was temporarily suspended in 1992. However, all of the FTF Semiannual report data have been retrieved and entered into the data base. This paper focuses primarily on the results of HEPA filter tests conducted by FTFs during FY 1992 - FY 1995, and the possible effects of the DOE program uncertainties on the quality of HEPA filters for installation at the DOE sites. 15 refs., 13 tabs.

  1. Development of a Pulp Process Treating Contaminated HEPA Filters (III)

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J. S.; Ramer, J.; Argyle, M. D.; Demmer, R. L.

    2002-02-28

    The Pulp Process (PP) Treatment option was conceived as a replacement for the current Filter Leaching System (FLS). The FLS has operated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory since 1995 to treat radioactive, mixed waste HEPA filters. In recent years, the FLS has exhibited difficulty in removing mercury from the HEPA filters as the concentration of mercury in the spent HEPA filters has increased. The FLS leaches and washes the whole filter without any preparation or modification. The filter media and the trapped calcine particles are confined in a heavy filter housing that contributes to poor mixing zones around the edges of the filter, low media permeability, channeling of the liquid through cracks and tears in the filter media, and liquid retention between leach and rinse cycles. In the PP, the filter media and the trapped calcine particles are separated from the filter housing and treated as a pulp, taking advantage of improved contact with the leach solution that cannot be achieved when the media is still in the HEPA filter housing. In addition to removing the mercury more effectively, the PP generates less volume of liquid waste, requires a shorter leach cycle time, and possesses the versatility for treating filters of different sizes. A series of tests have been performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the advantages of the PP concept. These tests compare the PP with the FLS under controlled conditions that simulate the current operating parameters. A prior study using blended feed, a mixture of shredded clean HEPA filter media and non-radioactive calcine particles, indicated that the PP would significantly increases the calcine dissolution percentages. In this study, hazardous-metal contaminated HEPA filter media was studied. The results of side-by-side tests indicated that the PP increased the mercury removal percentage by 80% and might be a solution to the mercury removal

  2. Response of HEPA filters to simulated-accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.; Smith, P.R.; Fenton, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters have been subjected to simulated accident conditions to determine their response to abnormal operating events. Both domestic and European standard and high-capacity filters have been evaluated to determine their response to simulated fire, explosion, and tornado conditions. The HEPA filter structural limitations for tornado and explosive loadings are discussed. In addition, filtration efficiencies during these accident conditions are reported for the first time. Our data indicate efficiencies between 80% and 90% for shock loadings below the structural limit level. We describe two types of testing for ineffective filtration - clean filters exposed to pulse-entrained aerosol and dirty filters exposed to tornado and shock pulses. Efficiency and material loss data are described. Also, the resonse of standard HEPA filters to simulated fire conditions is presented. We describe a unique method of measuring accumulated combustion products on the filter. Additionally, data relating to pressure drop vs accumulated mass during plugging are reported for simulated combustion aerosols. The effects of concentration and moisture levels on filter plugging were evaluated. We are obtaining all of the above data so that mathematical models can be developed for fire, explosion, and tornado accident analysis computer codes. These computer codes can be used to assess the response of nuclear air cleaning systems to accident conditions.

  3. Performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Frankum, D.P.; Costigan, G.

    1995-02-01

    Accidents in nuclear facilities involving fires may have implications upon the ventilation systems where high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are used to minimise the airborne release of radioactive or toxic particles. The Filter Development Section at Harwell Laboratory has been investigating the effect of temperature on the performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions[{sub 1}] for a number of years. The test rig is capable of delivering air flows of 10001/s (at ambient conditions) at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C, where measurements of the penetration and pressure drop across the filter are obtained. This paper reports the experiments on different constructions of HEPA filters; rectangular and circular. The filters were tested at an air temperature of 200{degrees}C for up to 48 hours at the rated airflow to assess their performance. The penetration measurements for rectangular filters were observed to be below 0.021% after prolonged operation. In a number of cases, holes appeared along the pleat creases of circular filters although the penetration remained below 1%. The sealing gasket for these filters was noted to deform with temperature, permitting a leakage path. A prototype high strength circular filter was evaluated at temperatures of up to 400{degrees}C with a penetration less than 0.65%.

  4. Effects of o,p'-DDT on the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 expression in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hye Gwang; Kim, Ji Young

    2002-11-01

    Cultured mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells were treated with o,p'-DDT and/or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to assess the role of o,p'-DDT on CYP1A1 expression. o,p'-DDT alone did not affect CYP1A1-specific 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity. In contrast, TCDD-inducible EROD activities were markedly reduced on concomitant treatment with TCDD and o,p'-DDT in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with ICI 182.780, an estrogen-receptor antagonist, did not affect the suppressive effects of o,p'-DDT on TCDD-inducible EROD activity. TCDD-inducible CYP1A1 mRNA levels were markedly suppressed on treatment with TCDD and o,p'-DDT, and this was consistent with their effects on EROD activity. A transient transfection assay using dioxin-response element (DRE)-linked luciferase and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that o,p'-DDT reduced the transformation of the aryl hydrocarbons (Ah) receptor to a form capable of specifically binding to the DRE sequence in the promoter region of the CYP1A1 gene. These results suggest that the downregulation of CYP1A1 gene expression by o,p'-DDT in Hepa-1c1c7 cells might be an antagonism of the DRE binding potential of the nuclear Ah receptor but is not mediated through the estradiol receptor. PMID:12176094

  5. HEPA Filter Performance under Adverse Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Michael; Hogancamp, Kristina; Alderman, Steven; Waggoner, Charles

    2007-07-01

    This study involved challenging nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under a variety of conditions that can arise in Department of Energy (DOE) applications such as: low or high RH, controlled and uncontrolled challenge, and filters with physically damaged media or seals (i.e., leaks). Reported findings correlate filter function as measured by traditional differential pressure techniques in comparison with simultaneous instrumental determination of up and down stream PM concentrations. Additionally, emission rates and failure signatures will be discussed for filters that have either failed or exceeded their usable lifetime. Significant findings from this effort include the use of thermocouples up and down stream of the filter housing to detect the presence of moisture. Also demonstrated in the moisture challenge series of tests is the effect of repeated wetting of the filter. This produces a phenomenon referred to as transient failure before the tensile strength of the media weakens to the point of physical failure. An evaluation of the effect of particle size distribution of the challenge aerosol on loading capacity of filters is also included. Results for soot and two size distributions of KCl are reported. Loading capacities for filters ranged from approximately 70 g of soot to nearly 900 g for the larger particle size distribution of KCl. (authors)

  6. Evaluation of HEPA filter service life

    SciTech Connect

    Fretthold, J.K.; Stithem, A.R.

    1997-07-14

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), has approximately 10,000 High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters installed in a variety of filter plenums. These ventilation/filtration plenum systems are used to control the release of airborne particulate contaminates to the environment during normal operations and potential accidents. This report summarizes the results of destructive and non-destructive tests on HEPA filters obtained from a wide variety of ages and service conditions. These tests were performed to determine an acceptable service life criteria for HEPA filters used at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). A total of 140 filters of various ages (1972 to 1996) and service history (new, aged unused, used) were tested. For the purpose of this report, filter age from manufacture date/initial test date to the current sample date was used, as opposed to the actual time a filter was installed in an operating system.

  7. The effect of aromatic hydrocarbon receptor on the phenotype of the Hepa 1c1c7 murine hepatoma cells in the absence of dioxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Zhang, Ruixue; Shi, Shengli; Hankinson, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates biological responses to certain exogenous ligands, such as the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and has also been demonstrated to modulate the cell cycle and differentiated state of several cell lines independently of exogenous ligands. In this study, we used DNA microarray analysis to elucidate the profile of genes responsive to the expression of unliganded AhR by re-introducing AhR into an AhR-deficient mouse derivative (c19) of the mouse hepatoma cell line Hepa 1c1c7. 22 gene products were up-regulated and 8 were down-regulated two-fold or more in c19 cells infected with a retroviral vector expressing mouse AhR. Surprisingly, expression of genes involved in cell proliferation or differentiation were not affected by introduction of AhR. AhR also did not restore expression of the albumin gene in c19 cells. Introduction of AhR into c12, a similar AhR-defective mouse hepatoma cell line, also did not restore albumin expression, and furthermore, did not lead to changes in cellular morphology or cell cycle parameters. These observations fail to support the notion that unliganded AhR regulates proliferation and differentiation of liver-derived cells. PMID:19936078

  8. The Effect of Aromatic Hydrocarbon Receptor on the Phenotype of the Hepa 1c1c7 Murine Hepatoma Cells in the Absence of Dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Zhang, Ruixue; Shi, Shengli; Hankinson, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates biological responses to certain exogenous ligands, such as the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and has also been demonstrated to modulate the cell cycle and differentiated state of several cell lines independently of exogenous ligands. In this study, we used DNA micorarray analysis to elucidate the profile of genes responsive to the expression of unliganded AhR by re-introducing AhR into an AhR-deficient mouse derivative (c19) of the mouse hepatoma cell line Hepa1c1c7. 22 gene products were up-regulated and 8 were down-regulated two-fold or more in c19 cells infected with a retroviral vector expressing mouse AhR. Surprisingly, expression of genes involved in cell proliferation or differentiation were not affected by introduction of AhR. AhR also did not restore expression of the albumin gene in c19 cells. Introduction of AhR into c12, a similar AhR-defective mouse hepatoma cell line, also did not restore albumin expression, and furthermore, did not lead to changes in cellular morphology or cell cycle parameters. These observations fail to support the notion that unliganded AhR regulates proliferation and differentiation of liver-derived cells. PMID:19936078

  9. HEPA filter fire (and subsequent unfiltered release)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: HEPA Filter Failure - Exposure to High Temperature or Pressure. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  10. In-place HEPA filter penetration test

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Elliott, J.

    1997-08-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of conducting penetration tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters as installed in nuclear ventilation systems. The in-place penetration test, which is designed to yield equivalent penetration measurements as the standard DOP efficiency test, is based on measuring the aerosol penetration of the filter installation as a function of particle size using a portable laser particle counter. This in-place penetration test is compared to the current in-place leak test using light scattering photometers for single HEPA filter installations and for HEPA filter plenums using the shroud method. Test results show the in-place penetration test is more sensitive than the in-place leak test, has a similar operating procedure, but takes longer to conduct. Additional tests are required to confirm that the in-place penetration test yields identical results as the standard dioctyl phthalate (DOP) penetration test for HEPA filters with controlled leaks in the filter and gasket and duct by-pass leaks. Further development of the procedure is also required to reduce the test time before the in-place penetration test is practical. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. HEPA filter fire (and subsequent unfiltered release)

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.B.

    1996-09-27

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: HEPA Filter Failure - Exposure to High Temperature or Pressure. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  12. Comparison of human hepatoma HepaRG cells with human and rat hepatocytes in uptake transport assays in order to predict a risk of drug induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Monika; Veres, Zsuzsa; Baranyai, Zsolt; Jakab, Ferenc; Jemnitz, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    Human hepatocytes are the gold standard for toxicological studies but they have several drawbacks, like scarce availability, high inter-individual variability, a short lifetime, which limits their applicability. The aim of our investigations was to determine, whether HepaRG cells could replace human hepatocytes in uptake experiments for toxicity studies. HepaRG is a hepatoma cell line with most hepatic functions, including a considerable expression of uptake transporters in contrast to other hepatic immortalized cell lines. We compared the effect of cholestatic drugs (bosentan, cyclosporinA, troglitazone,) and bromosulfophthalein on the uptake of taurocholate and estrone-3-sulfate in human and rat hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. The substrate uptake was significantly slower in HepaRG cells than in human hepatocytes, still, in the presence of drugs we observed a concentration dependent decrease in uptake. In all cell types, the culture time had a significant impact not only on the uptake process but on the inhibitory effect of drugs too. The most significant drug effect was measured at 4 h after seeding. Our report is among the first concerning interactions of the uptake transporters in the HepaRG, at the functional level. Results of the present study clearly show that concerning the inhibition of taurocholate uptake by cholestatic drugs, HepaRG cells are closer to human hepatocytes than rat hepatocytes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that HepaRG cells may provide a suitable tool for hepatic uptake studies. PMID:23516635

  13. HEPA and PARSE: Systematic discovery of clinically relevant tumor-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing-Wen; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xiao-Song

    2013-03-01

    The effective discovery of tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) holds the key for the development of new diagnostic assays and immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. Here, we discuss our recently developed technologies, HEPA and PARSE, which allow for the systematic identification of TSAs, generating a reservoir of immunologically and clinically relevant targets. PMID:23802073

  14. Further development of the cleanable steel HEPA filter, cost/benefit analysis, and comparison with competing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Lopez, R.; Wilson, K.

    1997-08-01

    We have made further progress in developing a cleanable steel fiber HEPA filter. We fabricated a pleated cylindrical cartridge using commercially available steel fiber media that is made with 1 {mu}m stainless steel fibers and sintered into a sheet form. Test results at the Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Station at Oak Ridge show the prototype filter cartridge has 99.99% efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols and a pressure drop of 1.5 inches. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned using reverse air pulses. Our analysis of commercially optimized filters suggest that cleanable steel HEPA filters need to be made from steel fibers less than 1{mu}m, and preferably 0.5 {mu}m, to meet the standard HEPA filter requirements in production units. We have demonstrated that 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers can be produced using the fiber bundling and drawing process. The 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers are then sintered into small filter samples and tested for efficiency and pressure drop. Test results on the sample showed a penetration of 0.0015 % at 0.3 {mu}m and a pressure drop of 1.15 inches at 6.9 ft/min (3.5 cm/s) velocity. Based on these results, steel fiber media can easily meet the requirements of 0.03 % penetration and 1.0 inch of pressure drop by using less fibers in the media. A cost analysis of the cleanable steel HEPA filter shows that, although the steel HEPA filter costs much more than the standard glass fiber HEPA filter, it has the potential to be very cost effective because of the high disposal costs of contaminated HEPA filters. We estimate that the steel HEPA filter will save an average of $16,000 over its 30 year life. The additional savings from the clean-up costs resulting from ruptured glass HEPA filters during accidents was not included but makes the steel HEPA filter even more cost effective. 33 refs., 28 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Preliminary studies to determine the shelf life of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.; Fretthold, J.K.; Rainer, F.

    1995-02-01

    We have completed a preliminary study using filter media tests and filter qualification tests to investigate the effect of shelf-life on HEPA filter performance. Our media studies showed that the tensile strength decreased with age, but the data were not sufficient to establish a shelf-life. Thermogravimetric analyses demonstrated that one manufacturer had media with low tensile strength due to insufficient binder. The filter qualification tests (heated air and overpressure) conducted on different aged filters showed that filter age is not the primary factor affecting filter performance; materials and the construction design have a greater effect. An unexpected finding of our study was that sub-standard HEPA filters have been installed in DOE facilities despite existing regulations and filter qualification tests. We found that the filter with low tensile strength failed the overpressure test. The same filter had passed the heated air test, but left the filter so structurally weak, it was prone to blow-out. We recommend that DOE initiate a filter qualification program to prevent this occurrence.

  16. Preliminary studies to determine the shelf life of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.; Fretthold, J.K.; Rainer, F.; Bergman, W.; Beason, D.

    1994-07-18

    We have completed a preliminary study using filter media tests and filter qualification tests to investigate the effect of shelf-life on HEPA filter performance. Our media studies showed that the tensile strength decreased with age, but the data were not sufficient to establish a shelf-life. Thermogravimetric analyses demonstrated that one manufacturer had media with low tensile strength due to insufficient binder. The filter qualification tests (heated air and overpressure) conducted on different aged filters showed that filter age is not the primary factor affecting filter performance; materials and the construction design have a greater effect. An unexpected finding of our study was that sub-standard HEPA filters have been installed in DOE facilities despite existing regulations and filter qualification tests. We found that the filter with low tensile strength failed the overpressure test. The same filter had passed the heated air test, but left the filter so structurally weak, it was prone to blowout. We recommend that DOE initiate a filter qualification program to prevent this occurrence.

  17. DOE standard: Quality assurance inspection and testing of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    This standard establishes essential elements for the quality assurance inspection and testing of HEPA filters by US Department of Energy (DOE)-accepted Filter Test Facilities (FTF). The standard specifies HEPA filter quality assurance inspection and testing practices established in DOE-STD-3022-98, DOE HEPA Filter Test Program, and provides a basis for the preparation of written operating procedures for primary FTF functions.

  18. INEEL HEPA Filter Leach System: A Mixed Waste Solution

    SciTech Connect

    K. Archibald; K. Brewer; K. Kline; K. Pierson; K. Shackelford; M. Argyle; R. Demmer

    1999-02-01

    Calciner operations and the fuel dissolution process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have generated many mixed waste high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)filters. The HEPA Filter Leach System located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center lowers radiation contamination levels and reduces cadmium, chromium, and mercury concentrations on spent HEPA filter media to below disposal limits set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The treated HEPA filters are disposed as low-level radioactive waste. The technical basis for the existing system was established and optimized in initial studies using simulants in 1992. The treatment concept was validated for EPA approval in 1994 by leaching six New Waste Calcining Facility spent HEPA filters. Post-leach filter media sampling results for all six filters showed that both hazardous and radiological constituent levels were reduced so the filters could be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. Since the validation tests the HEPA Filter Leach System has processed 78 filters in 1997 and 1998. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory HEPA Filter Leach System is the only mixed waste HEPA treatment system in the DOE complex. This process is of interest to many of the other DOE facilities and commercial companies that have generated mixed waste HEPA filters but currently do not have a treatment option available.

  19. INEEL HEPA Filter Leach System: A Mixed Waste Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Argyle, Mark Don; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Archibald, Kip Ernest; Brewer, Ken Neal; Pierson, Kenneth Alan; Shackelford, Kimberlee Rene; Kline, Kelli Suzanne

    1999-03-01

    Calciner operations and the fuel dissolution process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have generated many mixed waste high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The HEPA Filter Leach System located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center lowers radiation contamination levels and reduces cadmium, chromium, and mercury concentrations on spent HEPA filter media to below disposal limits set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The treated HEPA filters are disposed as low-level radioactive waste. The technical basis for the existing system was established and optimized in initial studies using simulants in 1992. The treatment concept was validated for EPA approval in 1994 by leaching six New Waste Calcining Facility spent HEPA filters. Post-leach filter media sampling results for all six filters showed that both hazardous and radiological constituent levels were reduced so the filters could be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. Since the validation tests the HEPA Filter Leach System has processed 78 filters in 1997 and 1998. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory HEPA Filter Leach System is the only mixed waste HEPA treatment system in the DOE complex. This process is of interest to many of the other DOE facilities and commercial companies that have generated mixed waste HEPA filters but currently do not have a treatment option available.

  20. Further development of the cleanable steel HEPA filter, cost/benefit analysis, and comparison with competing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; Wilson, K.; Witherell, C.; McGregor, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have made further progress in developing a cleanable steel fiber HEPA filter. We fabricated a pleated cylindrical cartridge using commercially available steel fiber media that is made with 1 {mu}m stainless steel fibers and sintered into a sheet form. Test results at the Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Station at Oak Ridge show the prototype filter cartridge has 99.99% efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols and a pressure drop of 1.5 inches. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned using reverse air pulses. Our analysis of commercially optimized filters suggest that cleanable steel HEPA filters need to be made from steel fibers less than 1 {mu}m, and preferably 0.5 {mu}m, to meet the standard HEPA filter requirements in production units. We have demonstrated that 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers can be produced using the fiber bundling and drawing process. The 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers are then sintered into small filter samples and tested for efficiency and pressure drop. Test results on the sample showed a penetration of 0.0015% at 0.3 {mu}m and a pressure drop of 1.15 inches at 6.9 ft/min (3.5 cm/s) velocity. Based on these results, steel fiber media can easily meet the requirements of 0.03% penetration and 1.0 inch of pressure drop by using less fibers in the media. A cost analysis of the cleanable steel HEPA filter shows that, although the steel HEPA filter costs much more than the standard glass fiber HEPA filter, it has the potential to be very cost effective because of the high disposal costs of contaminated HEPA filters. We estimate that the steel HEPA filter will save an average of $16,000 over its 30 year life. The additional savings from the clean-up costs resulting from ruptured glass HEPA filters during accidents was not included but makes the steel HEPA filter even more cost effective. We also present the results of our evaluation of competing technologies with metallic and

  1. Degradation of HEPA filters exposed to DMSO

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Larsen, G.

    1995-02-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sprays are being used to remove the high explosive (HE) from nuclear weapons in the process of their dismantlement. A boxed 50 cmf HEPA filter with an integral prefilter was exposed to DMSO vapor and aerosols that were generated by a spray nozzle to simulate conditions expected in the HE dissolution operation. After 198 hours of operation, the pressure drop of the filter had increased form 1.15 inches to 2,85 inches, and the efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl sebacate (DOS) aerosols decreased form 99.992% to 98.6%. Most of the DMSO aerosols had collected as a liquid pool inside the boxed HEPA. The liquid was blown out of the filter exit with 100 cmf air flow at the end of the test. Since the filter still met the minimum allowed efficiency of 99.97% after 166 hours of exposure, we recommend replacing the filter every 160 hours of operation or sooner if the pressure drop increases by 50%. Examination of the filter showed that visible cracks appeared at the joints of the wooden frame and a portion of the sealant had pulled away from the frame. Since all of the DMSO will be trapped in the first HEPA filter, the second HEPA filter should not suffer from DMSO degradation. Thus the combined efficiency for the first filter (98.6%) and the second filter (99.97%) is 99.99996% for 0.3 {mu}m particles. If the first filter is replaced prior to its degradation, each of the filters will have 99.97% efficiency, and the combined efficiency will be 99.999991%. The collection efficiency for DMSO/HE aerosols will be much higher because the particle size is much greater.

  2. Degradation of HEPA filters exposed to DMSO

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; LeMay, J.

    1994-07-11

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sprays are being used to remove the high explosive (HE) from nuclear weapons in the process of their dismantlement. A boxed 50 cfm HEPA filter with an integral prefilter was exposed to DMSO vapor and aerosols that were generated by a spray nozzle to simulate conditions expected in the HE dissolution operation. After 198 hours of operation, the pressure drop of the filter had increased from 1.15 inches to 2.85 inches, and the efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl sebacate (DOS) aerosols decreased from 99.992% to 98.6%. Most of the DMSO aerosols had collected as a liquid pool inside the boxed HEPA. The liquid was blown out of the filter exit with 100 cfm air flow at the end of the test. Since the filter still met the minimum allowed efficiency of 99.97% after 166 hours of exposure, we recommend replacing the filter every 160 hours of operation or sooner if the pressure drop increases by 50%. Examination of the filter showed that visible cracks appeared at the joints of the wooden frame and a portion of the sealant had pulled away from the frame. Since all of the DMSO will be trapped in the first HEPA filter, the second HEPA filter should not suffer from DMSO degradation. Thus the combined efficiency for the first filter (98.6%) and the second filter (99.97%) is 99.99996% for 0.3{mu}m particles. If the first filter is replaced prior to its degradation, each of the filters will have 99.97% efficiency, and the combined efficiency will be 99.999991%. The collection efficiency for DMSO/HE aerosols will be much higher because the particle size is much greater.

  3. Contextualizing Hepatocyte Functionality of Cryopreserved HepaRG Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jonathan P; Li, Linhou; Chamberlain, Erica D; Wang, Hongbing; Ferguson, Stephen S

    2016-09-01

    Over the last decade HepaRG cells have emerged as a promising alternative to primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and have been featured in over 300 research publications. Most of these reports employed freshly differentiated HepaRG cells that require time-consuming culture (∼28 days) for full differentiation. Recently, a cryopreserved, predifferentiated format of HepaRG cells (termed here "cryo-HepaRG") has emerged as a new model that improves global availability and experimental flexibility; however, it is largely unknown whether HepaRG cells in this format fully retain their hepatic characteristics. Therefore, we systematically investigated the hepatocyte functionality of cryo-HepaRG cultures in context with the range of interindividual variation observed with PHH in both sandwich-culture and suspension formats. These evaluations uncovered a novel adaptation period for the cryo-HepaRG format and demonstrated the impact of extracellular matrix on cryo-HepaRG functionality. Pharmacologically important drug-metabolizing alleles were genotyped in HepaRG cells and poor metabolizer alleles for CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP3A5 were identified and consistent with higher frequency alleles found in individuals of Caucasian decent. We observed liver enzyme inducibility with aryl hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and pregnane X receptor activators comparable to that of sandwich-cultured PHH. Finally, we show for the first time that cryo-HepaRG supports proper CAR cytosolic sequestration and translocation to hepatocyte nuclei in response to phenobarbital treatment. Taken together, these data reveal important considerations for the use of this cell model and demonstrate that cryo-HepaRG are suitable for metabolism and toxicology screening. PMID:27338863

  4. Predicting mass loading as a function of pressure difference across prefilter/HEPA filter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, V.J.; Klassen, J.F. ); Monson, P.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a methodology for predicting the mass loading and pressure drop effects on a prefilter/ HEPA filter system. The methodology relies on the use of empirical equations for the specific resistance of the aerosol loaded filter as a function of the particle diameter. These correlations relate the pressure difference across a filter to the mass loading on the filter and accounts for aerosol particle density effects. These predictions are necessary for the efficient design of new filtration systems and for risk assessment studies of existing filter systems. This work specifically addresses the prefilter/HEPA filter Airborne Activity Confinement Systems (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. In order to determine the mass loading on the system, it is necessary to establish the efficiency characteristics for the prefilter, the mass loading characteristics of the prefilter measured as a function of pressure difference across the prefilter, and the mass loading characteristics of the HEPA filter as a function of pressure difference across the filter. Furthermore, the efficiency and mass loading characteristics need to be determined as a function of the aerosol particle diameter. A review of the literature revealed that no previous work had been performed to characterize the prefilter material of interest. In order to complete the foundation of information necessary to predict total mass loadings on prefilter/HEPA filter systems, it was necessary to determine the prefilter efficiency and mass loading characteristics. The measured prefilter characteristics combined with the previously determined HEPA filter characteristics allowed the resulting pressure difference across both filters to be predicted as a function of total particle mass for a given particle distribution. These predictions compare favorably to experimental measurements ({plus minus}25%).

  5. Evaluation of the Hepa Wash® treatment in pigs with acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mortality of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is still unacceptably high. Available liver support systems are still of limited success at improving survival. A new type of albumin dialysis, the Hepa Wash® system, was newly introduced. We evaluated the new liver support system as well as the Molecular Adsorbent Recycling System (MARS) in an ischemic porcine model of ALF. Methods In the first study animals were randomly allocated to control (n=5) and Hepa Wash (n=6) groups. In a further pilot study, two animals were treated with the MARS-system. All animals received the same medical and surgical procedures. An intraparenchymal intracranial pressure was inserted. Hemodynamic monitoring and goal-directed fluid therapy using the PiCCO system was done. Animals underwent functional end-to-side portacaval shunt and ligation of hepatic arteries. Treatment with albumin dialysis was started after fall of cerebral perfusion pressure to 45 mmHg and continued for 8 h. Results All animals in the Hepa Wash group survived the 13-hour observation period, except for one that died after stopping treatment. Four of the control animals died within this period (p=0.03). Hepa Wash significantly reduced impairment of cerebral perfusion pressure (23±2 vs. 10±3 mmHg, p=0.006) and mean arterial pressure (37±1 vs. 24±2 mmHg, p=0.006) but had no effect on intracranial pressure (14±1 vs. 15±1 mmHg, p=0.72). Hepa Wash also enhanced cardiac index (4.94±0.32 vs. 3.36±0.25 l/min/m2, p=0.006) and renal function (urine production, 1850 ± 570 vs. 420 ± 180 ml, p=0.045) and eliminated water soluble (creatinine, 1.3±0.2 vs. 3.2±0.3 mg/dl, p=0.01; ammonia 562±124 vs. 1382±92 μg/dl, p=0.006) and protein-bound toxins (nitrate/nitrite 5.54±1.57 vs. 49.82±13.27 μmol/l, p=0.01). No adverse events that could be attributed to the Hepa Wash treatment were observed. Conclusions Hepa Wash was a safe procedure and improved multiorgan system failure in pigs with ALF. The survival

  6. Qualification of box HEPA filters for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Wilson, K.; Rainer, F.

    1995-03-01

    We have successfully completed qualification tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters that are encapsulated within a box and manufactured by American Air Filters. The qualification tests are required by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Standard ASME N509 and the U.S. Military Standard MIL-F-51068 for HEPA filters to be used in nuclear applications. The qualification tests specify minimum filter efficiencies following exposure to heated air, overpressure, and rough handling. Prior to this study, no box HEPA filters from any manufacturer had been qualified despite their wide-spread use in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Box HEPA filters are not addressed in any of the existing HEPA standards and only briefly discussed in the Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook.

  7. Health hazards associated with the use of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (commonly referred to as DOP) in HEPA filter test

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), commonly referred to as di-octyl phthalate, is an important production chemical in the US. In addition to its major use as an additive in plastics, DEHP is widely used to evaluate the effectiveness of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Historically, DEHP was also used in quantitative fit testing for respirators. Evaluations of this compound a decade ago showed that it can induce hepatocellular carcinomas in laboratory animals. Although most Department of Energy (DOE) facilities have since discontinued using DEHP in respirator fit testing, DEHP continues to be used for evaluating HEPA filters. This report summarizes available information on the toxicity, mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and other hazards and problems posed by DEHP, specifically with reference to HEPA filter testing. Information on work practice improvements as well as the availability and suitability of DEHP substitutes are also presented. This material should assist the DOE in the safe use of this material.

  8. Differential effects of mercury, lead and copper on the constitutive and inducible expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-regulated genes in cultured hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Korashy, Hesham M; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2004-09-01

    Both simultaneous and sequential exposure to heavy metals and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-ligands potentially occur in human populations, yet there have been relatively few studies of combined effects of heavy metals and AHR-ligands on AHR-regulated genes. To investigate the effects of heavy metals on AHR-regulated genes; cytochrome P450 1a1 (cyp1a1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QOR) and glutathione S-transferase Ya (GST Ya), murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of Hg2+ (2.5-10 microM), Pb2+ (10-100 microM), and Cu2+ (1-100 microM) alone or with the AHR-ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (0.1 nM), 3-methylcholanthrene (0.25 microM), beta-naphthoflavone (10 microM), or benzo[a]pyrene (1 microM). The results clearly showed that metals alone did not significantly alter the cyp1a1 activity and protein levels but increased its mRNA expression, whereas a significant reduction in AHR ligand-mediated induction of cyp1a1 activity was observed by all metals. The decrease in cyp1a1 activity was associated with an increase, no change, or decrease in cyp1a1 mRNA and protein levels by Hg2+, Pb2+ and Cu2+ respectively, suggesting pre- and post-transcription mechanisms are involved. With respect to QOR, the activity and mRNA levels were increased by all metals in the absence or presence of an AHR-ligand, with the exception of Cu2+ which significantly decreased the induction of QOR. Differently, GST Ya activity was significantly increased by Cu2+ and Pb2+ and inhibited by Hg2+, while its mRNA was increased by Hg2+ and Pb2+ and decreased by Cu2+. All metals significantly increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1, which coincided with the changes in the phase I and phase II enzyme activities. These results demonstrate that heavy metals differentially modulate the constitutive and the inducible expression of AHR-regulated genes. PMID:15297030

  9. Experience in the quality-assurance testing of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Burchsted, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The DOE HEPA filter quality-assurance test program was initiated in 1960 to ensure the supply of adequate filters for environmental control applications in DOE operations. The program has played a significant role in the development and improvement of HEPA filters, and has more than paid for itself. However, the receipt of large numbers of filters which require repair or waiver of specification requirements, even as recent as 1980 and 1981, indicates that there are problems in the HEPA filter manufacturing industry. It is clear that DOE users are receiving the cream of the crop of HEPA filters, but that other users who do not avail themselves of the DOE testing service are receiving filters of lesser quality.

  10. Specification for HEPA filters used by DOE contractors

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This standard establishes specification and testing requirements for High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters procured to provide personnel and environmental protection when installed in DOE nuclear facilities. The standard specifies minimum requirements to be included in contractor specifications.

  11. 5-azacytidine inhibits the proliferation of bladder cancer cells via reversal of the aberrant hypermethylation of the hepaCAM gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaorong; Chen, E; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yin; Quan, Zhen; Wu, Xiaohou; Luo, Chunli

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocyte cell adhesion molecule (hepaCAM), a tumor-suppressor gene, is rarely expressed in bladder carcinoma. However, little is known concerning the mechanisms of low hepaCAM expression in bladder cancer. Abnormal hypermethylation in the promoter plays a crucial role in cancer by silencing tumor-suppressor genes, which is catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). In the present study, a total of 31 bladder cancer and 22 adjacent tissues were assessed by immunohistochemistry to detect DNMT3A/3B and hepaCAM expression. Methylation of hepaCAM was determined by methylation‑specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). The mRNA and protein levels of DNMT3A/3B and hepaCAM were determined by RT-PCR and western blot analysis after treatment with 5-azacytidine (AZAC). Following AZAC treatment, the proliferation of bladder cancer cells was detected by CCK-8 and colony formation assays. Cell cycle distribution was examined by flow cytometry. To further evaluate the tumor‑suppressive roles of AZAC and the involved mechanisms, the anti-tumorigenicity of AZAC was tested in vivo. The expression of DNMT3A/3B protein was markedly increased in the bladder carcinoma tissues (P<0.05), and had a negative linear correlation with hepaCAM expression in the same patients according to Pearson's analysis (r=-0.7176/-0.7127, P<0.05). The MSP results indicated that the hepaCAM gene was hypermethylated in three bladder cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we found that downregulation of DNMT3A/3B expression, after treatment with AZAC, reversed the hypermethylation and expression of hepaCAM in bladder cancer cells. In addition, AZAC inhibited the proliferation of bladder cancer cells and arrested cells at the G0/G1 phase. The in vivo results showed that expression of DNMT3A/3B and hepaCAM as well as tumor growth of nude mice were markedly altered which corresponded with the in vitro results. Due to the ability to reactivate expression of hepaCAM and inhibit growth of bladder cancer cells

  12. Comparison of MERV 16 and HEPA filters for cab filtration of underground mining equipment

    PubMed Central

    Cecala, A.B.; Organiscak, J.A.; Noll, J.D.; Zimmer, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Significant strides have been made in optimizing the design of filtration and pressurization systems used on the enclosed cabs of mobile mining equipment to reduce respirable dust and provide the best air quality to the equipment operators. Considering all of the advances made in this area, one aspect that still needed to be evaluated was a comparison of the efficiencies of the different filters used in these systems. As high-efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA) filters provide the highest filtering efficiency, the general assumption would be that they would also provide the greatest level of protection to workers. Researchers for the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) speculated, based upon a previous laboratory study, that filters with minimum efficiency reporting value, or MERV rating, of 16 may be a more appropriate choice than HEPA filters in most cases for the mining industry. A study was therefore performed comparing HEPA and MERV 16 filters on two kinds of underground limestone mining equipment, a roof bolter and a face drill, to evaluate this theory. Testing showed that, at the 95-percent confidence level, there was no statistical difference between the efficiencies of the two types of filters on the two kinds of mining equipment. As the MERV 16 filters were less restrictive, provided greater airflow and cab pressurization, cost less and required less-frequent replacement than the HEPA filters, the MERV 16 filters were concluded to be the optimal choice for both the roof bolter and the face drill in this comparative-analysis case study. Another key finding of this study is the substantial improvement in the effectiveness of filtration and pressurization systems when using a final filter design. PMID:27524838

  13. Evaluation of genotoxicity using automated detection of γH2AX in metabolically competent HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Quesnot, Nicolas; Rondel, Karine; Audebert, Marc; Martinais, Sophie; Glaise, Denise; Morel, Fabrice; Loyer, Pascal; Robin, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    The in situ detection of γH2AX was recently reported to be a promising biomarker of genotoxicity. In addition, the human HepaRG hepatoma cells appear to be relevant for investigating hepatic genotoxicity since they express most of drug metabolizing enzymes and a wild type p53. The aim of this study was to determine whether the automated in situ detection of γH2AX positive HepaRG cells could be relevant for evaluation of genotoxicity after single or long-term repeated in vitro exposure compared to micronucleus assay. Metabolically competent HepaRG cells were treated daily with environmental contaminants and genotoxicity was evaluated after 1, 7 and 14 days. Using these cells, we confirmed the genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 and benzo(a)pyrene and demonstrated that dimethylbenzanthracene, fipronil and endosulfan previously found genotoxic with comet or micronucleus assays also induced γH2AX phosphorylation. Furthermore, we showed that fluoranthene and bisphenol A induced γH2AX while no effect had been previously reported in HepG2 cells. In addition, induction of γH2AX was observed with some compounds only after 7 days, highlighting the importance of studying long-term effects of low doses of contaminants. Together, our data demonstrate that automated γH2AX detection in metabolically competent HepaRG cells is a suitable high-through put genotoxicity screening assay. PMID:26282955

  14. Advantageous use of HepaRG cells for the screening and mechanistic study of drug-induced steatosis.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Laia; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Jiménez, Nuria; Hervás, David; Jover, Ramiro; Donato, M Teresa

    2016-07-01

    Only a few in vitro assays have been proposed to evaluate the steatotic potential of new drugs. The present study examines the utility of HepaRG cells as a cell-based assay system for screening drug-induced liver steatosis. A high-content screening assay was run to evaluate multiple toxicity-related cell parameters in HepaRG cells exposed to 28 compounds, including drugs reported to cause steatosis through different mechanisms and non-steatotic compounds. Lipid content was the most sensitive parameter for all the steatotic drugs, whereas no effects on lipid levels were produced by non-steatotic compounds. Apart from fat accumulation, increased ROS production and altered mitochondrial membrane potential were also found in the cells exposed to steatotic drugs, which indicates that all these cellular events contributed to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. These findings are of clinical relevance as most effects were observed at drug concentrations under 100-fold of the therapeutic peak plasmatic concentration. HepaRG cells showed increased lipid overaccumulation vs. HepG2 cells, which suggests greater sensitivity to drug-induced steatosis. An altered expression profile of transcription factors and the genes that code key proteins in lipid metabolism was also found in the cells exposed to drugs capable of inducing liver steatosis. Our results generally indicate the value of HepaRG cells for assessing the risk of liver damage associated with steatogenic compounds and for investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in drug-induced steatosis. PMID:27089845

  15. Evaluation of HEPA vacuum cleaning and dry steam cleaning in reducing levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and house dust mite allergens in carpets

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chang Ho; Yiin, Lih-Ming; Fan, Zhi-Hua (Tina); Rhoads, George G.

    2014-01-01

    Dry steam cleaning, which has gained recent attention as an effective method to reduce house dust mite (HDM) allergen concentration and loading in carpets, was evaluated in this study for its efficacy in lowering levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as HDM allergens. Fifty urban homes with wail-to-wall carpets, mostly low-income and with known lead contamination, were studied in 2003 and 2004. Two carpet-cleaning interventions were compared: Repeated HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air filtered) vacuuming alone and repeated HEPA vacuuming supplemented with dry steam cleaning. Vacuum samples were collected to measure carpet loading of dust and contaminants immediately before and after cleaning. Paired comparisons were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the cleaning protocols in reducing the levels of PAHs and HDM allergens in carpets. The results indicated that both cleaning methods substantially reduced the loading of PAHs and HDM allergens as well as dust in carpets (p < 0.0001). The reductions in loading of dust (64.4%), PAHs (69.1%), and HDM allergens (85.5%), by dry steam cleaning plus repetitive HEPA vacuuming were larger than the reductions by regular HEPA vacuuming alone: dust (55.5%), PAHs (58.6%), and HDM allergens (80.8%), although the difference was statistically significant only for dust and PAHs. We conclude that intensive HEPA vacuum cleaning substantially reduced the loading of PAHs and HDM allergens in carpets in these urban homes and that dry steam cleaning added modestly to cleaning effectiveness. PMID:19137159

  16. Evaluation of HEPA vacuum cleaning and dry steam cleaning in reducing levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and house dust mite allergens in carpets.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Yiin, Lih-Ming; Tina Fan, Zhi-Hua; Rhoads, George G

    2009-01-01

    Dry steam cleaning, which has gained recent attention as an effective method to reduce house dust mite (HDM) allergen concentration and loading in carpets, was evaluated in this study for its efficacy in lowering levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as well as HDM allergens. Fifty urban homes with wall-to-wall carpets, mostly low-income and with known lead contamination, were studied in 2003 and 2004. Two carpet-cleaning interventions were compared: Repeated HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air filtered) vacuuming alone and repeated HEPA vacuuming supplemented with dry steam cleaning. Vacuum samples were collected to measure carpet loading of dust and contaminants immediately before and after cleaning. Paired comparisons were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the cleaning protocols in reducing the levels of PAHs and HDM allergens in carpets. The results indicated that both cleaning methods substantially reduced the loading of PAHs and HDM allergens as well as dust in carpets (p < 0.0001). The reductions in loading of dust (64.4%), PAHs (69.1%), and HDM allergens (85.5%), by dry steam cleaning plus repetitive HEPA vacuuming were larger than the reductions by regular HEPA vacuuming alone: dust (55.5%), PAHs (58.6%), and HDM allergens (80.8%), although the difference was statistically significant only for dust and PAHs. We conclude that intensive HEPA vacuum cleaning substantially reduced the loading of PAHs and HDM allergens in carpets in these urban homes and that dry steam cleaning added modestly to cleaning effectiveness. PMID:19137159

  17. Differential sensitivity of metabolically competent and non-competent HepaRG cells to apoptosis induced by diclofenac combined or not with TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Al-Attrache, Houssein; Sharanek, Ahmad; Burban, Audrey; Burbank, Matthew; Gicquel, Thomas; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Morel, Isabelle; Guillouzo, André

    2016-09-01

    The role of reactive metabolites and inflammatory stress has been largely evoked in idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of diclofenac (DCF); however mechanisms remain poorly understood. We aimed to evaluate the influence of liver cell phenotype on the hepatotoxicity of DCF combined or not with TNF-α using differentiated and undifferentiated HepaRG cells, and for comparison, HepG2 cells. Our results demonstrate that after a 24h-treatment metabolizing HepaRG cells were less sensitive to DCF than their undifferentiated non-metabolizing counterparts as shown by lower oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses and lower activation of caspase 9. Differentiated HepaRG cells were also less sensitive than HepG2 cells. Their lower sensitivity to DCF was related to their high content in glutathione transferases. DCF-induced apoptotic effects were potentiated by TNF-α only in death receptor-expressing differentiated HepaRG and HepG2 cells and were associated with marked activation of caspase 8. TNF-α co-treatment did not aggravate DCF-induced cholestatic features. Altogether, our results demonstrate that (i) lower sensitivity to DCF of differentiated HepaRG cells compared to their non-metabolically active counterparts was related to their high detoxifying capacity, giving support to the higher sensitivity of nonhepatic tissues than liver to this drug; (ii) TNF-α-potentiation of DCF cytotoxicity occurred only in death receptor-expressing cells. PMID:27313093

  18. HEPA filter leaching concept validation trials at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravartty, A.C.

    1995-04-01

    The enclosed report documents six New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) HEPA filter leaching trials conducted at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant using a filter leaching system to validate the filter leaching treatment concept. The test results show that a modified filter leaching system will be able to successfully remove both hazardous and radiological constituents to RCRA disposal levels. Based on the success of the filter leach trials, the existing leaching system will be modified to provide a safe, simple, effective, and operationally flexible filter leaching system.

  19. HEPA/vaccine plan for indoor anthrax remediation.

    PubMed

    Wein, Lawrence M; Liu, Yifan; Leighton, Terrance J

    2005-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to compare 2 indoor remediation strategies in the aftermath of an outdoor release of 1.5 kg of anthrax spores in lower Manhattan. The 2 strategies are the fumigation approach used after the 2001 postal anthrax attack and a HEPA/vaccine plan, which relies on HEPA vacuuming, HEPA air cleaners, and vaccination of reoccupants. The HEPA/vaccine approach leads to few anthrax cases among reoccupants if applied to all but the most heavily contaminated buildings, and recovery is much faster than under the decades-long fumigation plan. Only modest environmental sampling is needed. A surge capacity of 10,000 to 20,000 Hazmat workers is required to perform remediation within 6 to 12 months and to avoid permanent mass relocation. Because of the possibility of a campaign of terrorist attacks, serious consideration should be given to allowing or encouraging voluntary self-service cleaning of lightly contaminated rooms by age-appropriate, vaccinated, partially protected (through masks or hoods) reoccupants or owners. PMID:15705325

  20. ALTERNATE HIGH EFFICIENCY PARTICULATE AIR (HEPA) FILTRATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bishop; Robert Goldsmith; Karsten Nielsen; Phillip Paquette

    2002-08-16

    In Phase IIA of this project, CeraMem has further developed and scaled up ceramic HEPA filters that are appropriate for use on filtration of vent gas from HLW tanks at DOE sites around the country. This work included procuring recrystallized SiC monoliths, developing membrane and cement materials, and defining a manufacturing process for the production of prototype full sizes HEPA filters. CeraMem has demonstrated that prototype full size filters can be manufactured by producing 9 full size filters that passed DOP aerosol testing at the Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility. One of these filters was supplied to the Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) for process tests using simulated HLW tank waste. SRTC has reported that the filter was regenerable (with some increase in pressure drop) and that the filter retained its HEPA retention capability. CeraMem has also developed a Regenerable HEPA Filter System (RHFS) design and acceptance test plan that was reviewed by DOE personnel. The design and acceptance test plan form the basis of the system proposal for follow-on work in Phase IIB of this project.

  1. QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF HEPA FILTRATION UNITS AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to determine-the filtering efficiencies of 31 high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units in use at asbestos-abatement projects. article-removal efficiencies for these units ranged from 90.53 to > 99.99 percent. ineteen (61%) of the units tested ...

  2. HEPA/Vaccine Plan for Indoor Anthrax Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yifan; Leighton, Terrance J.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to compare 2 indoor remediation strategies in the aftermath of an outdoor release of 1.5 kg of anthrax spores in lower Manhattan. The 2 strategies are the fumigation approach used after the 2001 postal anthrax attack and a HEPA/vaccine plan, which relies on HEPA vacuuming, HEPA air cleaners, and vaccination of reoccupants. The HEPA/vaccine approach leads to few anthrax cases among reoccupants if applied to all but the most heavily contaminated buildings, and recovery is much faster than under the decades-long fumigation plan. Only modest environmental sampling is needed. A surge capacity of 10,000 to 20,000 Hazmat workers is required to perform remediation within 6 to 12 months and to avoid permanent mass relocation. Because of the possibility of a campaign of terrorist attacks, serious consideration should be given to allowing or encouraging voluntary self-service cleaning of lightly contaminated rooms by age-appropriate, vaccinated, partially protected (through masks or hoods) reoccupants or owners. PMID:15705325

  3. Modulation of CYP3A4 activity alters the cytotoxicity of lipophilic phycotoxins in human hepatic HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Ferron, P J; Hogeveen, K; De Sousa, G; Rahmani, R; Dubreil, E; Fessard, V; Le Hegarat, L

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate (i) the cytotoxic effects of lipophilic phycotoxins, including okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxin-1 and -2 (DTX-1 and DTX-2), pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2), yessotoxin (YTX), spirolide (SPX), and azaspiracids-1, -2 and -3 (AZA-1, AZA-2 and AZA-3), in human HepaRG cells using a multiparametric high content analysis approach, (ii) the ability of nine lipophilic phycotoxins to act as PXR agonists in a HepG2-PXR cell line, (iii) their potential to induce CYP450 activity, and (iv) the role of CYP3A4 in cytotoxicity induced by lipophilic phycotoxins. Our results indicate that while OA, DTX-1 and DTX-2 activated PXR-dependent transcriptional activity in HepG2 cells, no increase of CYP450 (1A2, 3A4, 2C9, 2C19) activities were observed in HepaRG cell following a 72h treatment with these toxins. Multiparametric analysis showed that OA, DTX-1, DTX-2, and PTX-2 were highly cytotoxic in HepaRG cells; inducing cell loss, activation of caspase-3 and γ-H2AX formation. However, no toxicity was observed for YTX, SPX, and AZAs. Moreover, we found that inhibition of CYP3A4 activity by ketoconazole enhances the toxic effects of OA, DTX-1, DTX-2, and PTX-2 in HepaRG cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of some lipophilic phycotoxins decreases their in vitro toxicity. PMID:26956883

  4. 3D spheroid cultures improve the metabolic gene expression profiles of HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yu; Hori, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tomohisa; Urashima, Toshiki; Ohara, Yasunori; Tanaka, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    3D (three-dimensional) cultures are considered to be an effective method for toxicological studies; however, little evidence has been reported whether 3D cultures have an impact on hepatocellular physiology regarding lipid or glucose metabolism. In the present study, we conducted physiological characterization of hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and HepaRG cells cultured in 3D conditions using a hanging drop method to verify the effect of culture environment on cellular responses. Apo (Apolipoprotein)B as well as albumin secretion was augmented by 3D cultures. Expression of genes related to not only drug, but also glucose and lipid metabolism were significantly enhanced in 3D cultured HepaRG spheroids. Furthermore, mRNA levels of CYP (cytochrome P450) enzymes following exposure to corresponding inducers increased under the 3D condition. These data suggest that this simple 3D culture system without any special biomaterials can improve liver-specific characteristics including lipid metabolism. Considering that the system enables high-throughput assay, it may become a powerful tool for compound screening concerning hepatocellular responses in order to identify potential drugs. PMID:26182370

  5. Preliminary studies to determine the shelf life of HEPA filters. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.; Fretthold, J.K.; Rainer, F.; Bergman, W.; Beason, D.

    1995-02-01

    We have completed a preliminary study using filter media tests and filter qualification tests to investigate the effect of shelf-life on HEPA filter performance. Our media studies showed that the tensile strength decreased with age, but the data were not sufficient to establish a shelf-life. Thermogravimetric analyses demonstrated that one manufacturer had media with low tensile strength due to insufficient binder. The filter qualification tests (heated air and overpressure) conducted on different aged filters showed that filter age is not the primary factor affecting filter performance; materials and the construction design have a greater effect. An unexpected finding of our study was that sub-standard HEPA filters have been installed in DOE facilities despite existing regulations and filter qualification tests. We found that the filter with low tensile strength failed the overpressure test. The same filter had passed the heated air test, but left the filter so structurally weak, it was prone to blow-out. We recommend that DOE initiate a filter qualification program to prevent this occurrence.

  6. Overhead robot system for remote HEPA filter replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesener, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    A high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system for facility exhaust air filtraction of radioactive particles has been designed that utilizes a modified industrial gantry robot to remotely replace filter elements. The system filtration design capacity can be readily changed by increasing or decreasing the number of plenums, which only affects the cell length and robot bridge travel. The parallel flow plenum design incorporates remote HEPA filter housings, which are commercially available. Filter removal and replacement is accomplished with the robot under sequenced program control. A custom-designed robot control console, which interfaces with the standard gantry robot power center controller, minimizes operator training. Critical sequence steps are operator verified, using closed-circuit television (CCTV), before proceeding to the next programmed stop point. The robot can be operated in a teleoperator mode to perform unstructured maintenance tasks, such as replacing filter housing components and cell lights.

  7. Drug-metabolising enzymes are down-regulated by hypoxia in differentiated human hepatoma HepaRG cells: HIF-1alpha involvement in CYP3A4 repression.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Claire; Hori, Tamaki; Loyer, Pascal; Aninat, Caroline; Ishida, Seiichi; Glaise, Denise; Lucas-Clerc, Catherine; Boudjema, Karim; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Corlu, Anne; Morel, Fabrice

    2009-11-01

    Weak blood irrigation within solid tumours including hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) plays an important role in resistance to anticancer drugs by decreasing accessibility of cytotoxic agents to tumour cells. Reduced oxygen levels, or hypoxia, also contribute to drug resistance because many anticancer drugs require molecular oxygen to be cytotoxic. Our aim was to develop a new in vitro model mimicking hypoxic cells within HCCs in order to further explore the molecular responses to hypoxia, including regulation of drug-metabolising enzymes (DMEs) expression. For this purpose, we used the highly differentiated human hepatoma HepaRG cells cultured under either normoxic or hypoxic (24h at 1% O(2)) conditions. Gene and protein expressions were investigated by quantitative PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. We showed that HepaRG cells adapt to prolonged moderate hypoxia by a switch from aerobic to anaerobic glycolysis and a repression of critical genes involved in amino acid, lipid and ethanol metabolisms. Importantly, expression of several DMEs (particularly cytochromes P450 (CYPs) and phase II enzymes) and xenosensors (CAR, PXR and AhR) was down-regulated and CYPs activities (using testosterone and paclitaxel as substrates) were decreased during hypoxia. In addition, a new role for HIF-1alpha in the repression of CYP3A4 is demonstrated in cells treated with chemical inducers of HIF-1alpha, cobalt chloride or desferrioxamine, and by transfecting untreated HepaRG cells with HIF-1alpha expression vector. In conclusion, HepaRG cells cultured under hypoxia might mimic metabolic changes occurring within poorly irrigated differentiated HCCs. Furthermore, hypoxia down-regulates hepatic DMEs, a phenomenon that might compromise chemotherapy effectiveness in HCC treatment. Thus, HepaRG cells might represent a new in vitro model to test anticancer agents in hypoxic versus normoxic conditions. PMID:19695866

  8. Cellular impact of combinations of endosulfan, atrazine, and chlorpyrifos on human primary hepatocytes and HepaRG cells after short and chronic exposures.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad; Razpotnik, Andrej; Rouimi, Patrick; de Sousa, Georges; Cravedi, Jean Pierre; Rahmani, Roger

    2014-02-01

    Chronic exposure to low doses of pesticides present in the environment is increasingly suspected to cause major health issues to humans. Toxicological evaluations become more complex when the exposure concerns chemical combinations. Atrazine, chlorpyrifos, and endosulfan are pesticides used worldwide in agriculture and are therefore currently found at residual levels in food and the environment, even in countries in which they are now banned. Our study aimed to use Real-Time Cell Impedance Analyzer to investigate changes in phenotypical status of primary human hepatocytes and differentiated HepaRG cells induced by short and chronic exposures to these three chemicals. In contrast to the traditionally used endpoint cytotoxicity test, this technology allows kinetic measurements in real-time throughout the entire experiment. Our data show significantly higher cytotoxic effects of mixtures as compared to individual pesticides and a greater susceptibility of human hepatocytes as compared to HepaRG to short-term exposure (24 h). Repeated exposure over 2 weeks to endosulfan and endosulfan-containing mixture induced HepaRG cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Of the typical genes involved in metabolism and cell-response to xenobiotics, we found an exposure time- and condition-dependent deregulation of the expression of CYP3A4 and UGT1A in HepaRG cells exposed to low doses of pesticides and mixtures. Our data demonstrate the usefulness of real-time cell monitoring in long-term toxicological evaluations of co-exposure to xenobiotics. In addition, they support but at the same time highlight certain limitations in the use of HepaRG cells as the gold standard liver cell model in toxicity studies. PMID:24343343

  9. Requirements for a cleanable steel HEPA filter derived from a systems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.

    1996-06-01

    A systems analysis was conducted to determine customer requirements for a cleanable high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter in DOE Environmental Management (EM) facilities. The three principal drivers for cleanable steel HEPA are large cost savings, improved filter reliability, and new regulations; they produce a strong incentive to DOE customers to use cleanable steel HEPA filters. Input for customer requirements were obtained from field trips to EM sites and from discussions. Most existing applications require that cleanable steel HEPA filters meet size/performance requirements of standard glass HEPA filters; applications in new facilities can relax size/weight/pressure drop requirements on a case-by-case basis. We then obtained input from commercial firms on availability of cleanable steel HEPA filters. Systems analysis then showed that currently available technology was only able to meet customer needs in a limited number of cases. Further development is needed to meet requirements of EM customers. For cleanable steel HEPA to be retrofitted into existing systems, pressure drop and weight must be reduced. Pressure drop can be reduced by developing steel fiber media from 0.5 {mu}m dia steel fibers. Weight can be reduced by packaging the steel fiber media in one of the standard HEPA configurations. Although most applications will be able to use standard 304 or 316L alloys, an acid resistant alloy such as Hastelloy or Inconel will be needed for incinerator and other thermal processes.

  10. PPAR agonists reduce steatosis in oleic acid-overloaded HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Anthérieu, Sébastien; Vluggens, Aurore; Umbdenstock, Thierry; Claude, Nancy; Moureyre-Spire, Catherine de la; Weaver, Richard J.; Guillouzo, André

    2014-04-01

    Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common form of chronic liver disease there is no pharmacological agent approved for its treatment. Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are closely associated with hepatic lipid metabolism, they seem to play important roles in NAFLD. However, the effects of PPAR agonists on steatosis that is a common pathology associated with NAFLD, remain largely controversial. In this study, the effects of various PPAR agonists, i.e. fenofibrate, bezafibrate, troglitazone, rosiglitazone, muraglitazar and tesaglitazar on oleic acid-induced steatotic HepaRG cells were investigated after a single 24-hour or 2-week repeat treatment. Lipid vesicles stained by Oil-Red O and triglycerides accumulation caused by oleic acid overload, were decreased, by up to 50%, while fatty acid oxidation was induced after 2-week co-treatment with PPAR agonists. The greatest effects on reduction of steatosis were obtained with the dual PPARα/γ agonist muraglitazar. Such improvement of steatosis was associated with up-regulation of genes related to fatty acid oxidation activity and down-regulation of many genes involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, modulation of expression of some nuclear receptor genes, such as FXR, LXRα and CAR, which are potent actors in the control of lipogenesis, was observed and might explain repression of de novo lipogenesis. Conclusion: Altogether, our in vitro data on steatotic HepaRG cells treated with PPAR agonists correlated well with clinical investigations, bringing a proof of concept that drug-induced reversal of steatosis in human can be evaluated in in vitro before conducting long-term and costly in vivo studies in animals and patients. - Highlights: • There is no pharmacological agent approved for the treatment of NAFLD. • This study demonstrates that PPAR agonists can reduce fatty acid-induced steatosis. • Some nuclear receptors appear to be potent actors in the control

  11. Chemical characterization of challenge aerosols for HEPA filter penetration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Strandberg, S.W.

    1985-04-01

    Quality assurance penetration testing of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters use oil mists as challenge aerosols. Concern over the carcinogenic risk associated with the use of di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) has led to the investigation of alternative materials and generation methods for these aerosols. Since several commonly used generation methods for quality assurance testing of HEPA filters utilize heating of the starting material, it was determined essential to evaluate the starting material and the resultant aerosol which might contain thermal degradation by-products. A penetrometer utilizing flash vaporization has been developed by A.D. Little, Inc., for the US Government as a possible alternative generation method to the Q-127 thermally generated DEHP penetrometer. Tetraethylene glycol, oleic acid, and DEHP aerosols were generated in this unit, and particulate and vapor samples were collected and identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. Thermally generated DEHP by-products were also sampled and identified using a Q-107 penetrometer used in the testing of large HEPA filters. Determination of the toxicological hazards of starting materials and all of the identified compounds was made by reviewing available literature obtained on the Toxline system of the National Library of Medicine. No major degradation products were found in the flash vaporization penetrometer although a number of thermally generated by-products were found in the Q-107 penetrometer. Toxicologically, no hazards were found to preclude the use of either tetraethylene glycol or oleic acid as tested in the A.D. Little penetrometer. 133 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Method of treating contaminated HEPA filter media in pulp process

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian S.; Argyle, Mark D.; Demmer, Ricky L.; Mondok, Emilio P.

    2003-07-29

    A method for reducing contamination of HEPA filters with radioactive and/or hazardous materials is described. The method includes pre-processing of the filter for removing loose particles. Next, the filter medium is removed from the housing, and the housing is decontaminated. Finally, the filter medium is processed as pulp for removing contaminated particles by physical and/or chemical methods, including gravity, flotation, and dissolution of the particles. The decontaminated filter medium is then disposed of as non-RCRA waste; the particles are collected, stabilized, and disposed of according to well known methods of handling such materials; and the liquid medium in which the pulp was processed is recycled.

  13. Cytokine-mediated down-regulation of CYP1A1 in Hepa1 cells.

    PubMed

    Paton, T E; Renton, K W

    1998-06-01

    The activation of host defense mechanisms down-regulates microsomal cytochrome P450 in cell culture, humans, and animals. Investigation into various aspects of this effect using in vivo models has yet to define clearly the role that cytokines play in this phenomenon. The mechanism of down-regulation by immunostimulants, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is explored with an in vitro model, utilizing a murine hepatoma (Hepa1) and a murine macrophage (IC-21) cell line. It is hypothesized that down-regulation of P450 activity by immunostimulants involves the activation of immune cells and the subsequent release of cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The effects of immunostimulation on P450 activity are assessed by ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase, an assay that measures CYP1A activity in Hepa1 cells. Initial studies demonstrated that LPS added directly to hepatoma cells had no effect on the levels of CYP1A1 activity. In contrast, a significant down-regulation in CYP1A1 activity occurred when hepatoma cells were incubated with monocyte conditioned medium obtained by incubating LPS with IC-21 cells. When pentoxifylline, a TNF-alpha synthesis inhibitor, was co-administered with LPS to macrophages, the down-regulation of CYP1A1 activity was prevented. The direct administration of murine recombinant TNF-alpha to hepatoma cells resulted in a down-regulation of CYP1A1 activity. These results implicated the release of TNF-alpha from macrophages as an important step in the down-regulation of CYP1A1 by LPS. PMID:9714297

  14. Impact of isomalathion on malathion cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Josse, Rozenn; Sharanek, Ahmad; Savary, Camille C; Guillouzo, Andre

    2014-02-25

    Isomalathion is a major impurity of technical grade malathion, one of the most abundantly applied insecticides; however little is known about its hepatotoxicity. In the present study, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of malathion and isomalathion either individually or in combination, were assessed using the metabolically competent human liver HepaRG cell line. Isomalathion reduced cell viability starting at a 100 μM concentration after a 24h exposure. It also significantly induced caspase-3 activity in a dose-dependent manner starting at 5 μM. On the contrary, even at concentrations as high as 500 μM malathion affected neither cell viability nor caspase-3 activity. Moreover, co-exposure of both compounds resulted in decreased toxicity of isomalathion. By contrast, malathion and isomalathion either separately or in combination, slightly induced micronuclei formation at low concentrations and had additive genotoxic effects when combined at 25 μM. Individually or combined isomalathion directly inhibited activity of carboxyesterases which are involved in detoxication of malathion. In addition, transcripts of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4, two CYPs responsible for malathion phase I metabolism, were strongly induced by the mixture while isomalathion alone only moderately decreased CYP1A2 and increased CYP2B6 transcripts. However, these CYPs were not altered at the protein or activity levels. Taken altogether, our results showed that isomalathion was much more cytotoxic than malathion while both compounds had comparable genotoxic effects in HepaRG hepatocytes at low concentrations and brought further support to the importance of considering impurities and interactions during evaluation of health risks of pesticides. PMID:24333466

  15. Potential for Hepa filter damage from water spray systems in filter plenums

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.; Slawsld, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The water spray systems in high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums that are used in nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for protection against fire was designed under the assumption that the HEPA filters would not be damaged by the water sprays. The most likely scenario for filter damage involves filter plugging by the water spray, followed by the fan blowing out the filter medium. A number of controlled laboratory tests that were previously conducted in the late 1980s are reviewed in this paper to provide a technical basis for the potential HEPA filter damage by the water spray system in HEPA filter plenums. In addition to the laboratory tests, the scenario for HEPA filter damage during fires has also occurred in the field. Afire in a four-stage, HEPA filter plenum at Rocky Flats in 1980 caused the first three stages of HEPA filters to blow out of their housing and the fourth stage to severely bow. Details of this recently declassified fire are presented in this paper. Although these previous findings suggest serious potential problems exist with the current water spray system in filter plenum , additional studies are required to confirm unequivocally that DOE`s critical facilities are at risk.

  16. Improved HEPA Filter Technology for Flexible and Rigid Containment Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Pinson, Paul Arthur

    1998-07-01

    Safety and reliability in glovebox operations can be significantly improved and waste packaging efficiencies can be increased by inserting flexible, lightweight, high capacity HEPA filters into the walls of plastic sheet barriers. This HEPA filter/barrier technology can be adapted to a wide variety of applications: disposable waste bags, protective environmental barriers for electronic equipment, single or multiple use glovebag assemblies, flexible glovebox wall elements, and room partitions. These reliable and inexpensive filtered barriers have many uses in fields such as radioactive waste processing, HVAC filter changeout, vapor or grit blasting, asbestos cleanup, pharmaceutical, medical, biological, and electronic equipment containment. The applications can result in significant cost savings, improved operational reliability and safety, and total waste volume reduction. This technology was developed at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in 1993 and has been used at ANL-W since then at the TRU Waste Characterization Chamber Gloveboxes. Another 1998 AGS Conference paper titled "TRU Waste Characterization Gloveboxes", presented by Mr. David Duncan of ANL-W, describes these boxes.

  17. The aromatic hydrocarbon receptor modulates the Hepa 1c1c7 cell cycle and differentiated state independently of dioxin.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Q; Whitlock, J P

    1996-01-01

    The aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been defined and characterized according to its ability to mediate biological responses to exogenous ligands, such as the synthetic environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The natural ligand(s) for AhR is unknown, and we know relatively little about AhR function in the absence of TCDD. Here, we have exploited the availability of AhR-defective (AhR-D) mouse hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells to analyze AhR's effects under conditions in which TCDD is not present. Our results reveal that AhR-D cells exhibit a different morphology, decreased albumin synthesis, and a prolonged doubling time compared with wild-type cells. Introduction of AhR cDNA into AhR-D cells by stable transfection alters these characteristics such that the cells resemble wild-type cells. Conversely, introduction of antisense AhR cDNA into wild-type cells changes their phenotype such that they resemble AhR-D cells. Fluorescence microscopy reveals that AhR-D cells do not exhibit an increased rate of death. Flow cytometric and biochemical analyses imply that the slowed growth rate of AhR-D cells reflects prolongation of G1. Our findings reveal a potential link between AhR and the G1 phase of the Hepa 1c1c7 cell cycle. These effects of AhR occur in the absence of TCDD. We speculate that they represent responses to an endogenous AhR ligand in Hepa 1c1c7 cells. PMID:8628281

  18. Reduction in MRSA environmental contamination with a portable HEPA-filtration unit.

    PubMed

    Boswell, T C; Fox, P C

    2006-05-01

    There is renewed interest in the hospital environment as a potentially important factor for cross-infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other nosocomial pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtration unit (IQAir Cleanroom H13, Incen AG, Goldach, Switzerland) at reducing MRSA environmental surface contamination within a clinical setting. The MRSA contamination rate on horizontal surfaces was assessed with agar settle plates in ward side-rooms of three patients who were heavy MRSA dispersers. Contamination rates were measured at different air filtration rates (60-235 m(3)/h) and compared with no air filtration using Poisson regression. Without air filtration, between 80% and 100% of settle plates were positive for MRSA, with the mean number of MRSA colony-forming units (cfu)/10-h exposure/plate ranging from 4.1 to 27.7. Air filtration at a rate of 140 m(3)/h (one patient) and 235 m(3)/h (two patients), resulted in a highly significant decrease in contamination rates compared with no air filtration (adjusted rate ratios 0.037, 0.099 and 0.248, respectively; P < 0.001 for each). A strong association was demonstrated between the rate of air filtration and the mean number of MRSA cfu/10-h exposure/plate (P for trend < 0.001). In conclusion, this portable HEPA-filtration unit can significantly reduce MRSA environmental contamination within patient isolation rooms, and this may prove to be a useful addition to existing MRSA infection control measures. PMID:16517004

  19. Biokinetics of chlorpromazine in primary rat and human hepatocytes and human HepaRG cells after repeated exposure.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Jessica J W; Parmentier, Céline; Truisi, Germaine L; Jossé, Rozenn; Alexandre, Eliane; Savary, Camille C; Hewitt, Philip G; Mueller, Stefan O; Guillouzo, André; Richert, Lysiane; van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Hermens, Joop L M; Blaauboer, Bas J

    2015-12-25

    Since drug induced liver injury is difficult to predict in animal models, more representative tests are needed to better evaluate these effects in humans. Existing in vitro systems hold great potential to detect hepatotoxicity of pharmaceuticals. In this study, the in vitro biokinetics of the model hepatotoxicant chlorpromazine (CPZ) were evaluated in three different liver cell systems after repeated exposure in order to incorporate repeated-dose testing into an in vitro assay. Primary rat and human hepatocytes, cultured in sandwich configuration and the human HepaRG cell line were treated daily with CPZ for 14 days. Samples were taken from medium, cells and well plastic at specific time points after the first and last exposure. The samples were analysed by HPLC-UV to determine the amount of CPZ in these samples. Based on cytotoxicity assays, the three models were tested at 1-2 μM CPZ, while the primary rat hepatocytes and the HepaRG cell line were in addition exposed to a higher concentration of 15-20 μM. Overall, the mass balance of CPZ decreased in the course of 24 h, indicating the metabolism of the compound within the cells. The largest decrease in parent compound was seen in the primary cultures; in the HepaRG cell cultures the mass balance only decreased to 50%. CPZ accumulated in the cells during the 14-day repeated exposure. Possible explanations for the accumulation of CPZ are a decrease in metabolism over time, inhibition of efflux transporters or binding to phospholipids. The biokinetics of CPZ differed between the three liver cell models and were influenced by specific cell properties as well as culture conditions. These results support the conclusion that in vitro biokinetics data are necessary to better interpret chemical-induced cytotoxicity data. PMID:25458484

  20. Results from Evaluation of Representative ASME AG-1 Section FK Radial Flow Dimple Pleated HEPA Filters Under Elevated Conditions - 12002

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rickert, Jaime G.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-07-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has recently added Section FK establishing requirements for radial flow HEPA filters to the Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1). Section FK filters are expected to be a major element in the HEPA filtration systems across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Radial flow filters have been used in Europe for some time, however a limited amount of performance evaluation data exists with respect to these new AG-1 Section FK units. In consultation with a technical working group, the Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University (MSU)has evaluated a series of representative AG-1 Section FK dimple pleated radial flow HEPA filters. The effects of elevated relative humidity and temperature conditions on these filters are particularly concerning. Results from the evaluation of Section FK filters under ambient conditions have been presented at the 2011 waste management conference. Additions to the previous test stand to enable high temperature and high humidity testing, a review of the equipment used, the steps taken to characterize the new additions, and the filter test results are presented in this study. Test filters were evaluated at a volumetric flow rate of 56.6 m{sup 3}/min (2000 cfm) and were challenged under ambient conditions with Alumina, Al(OH){sub 3}, until reaching a differential pressure of 1 kPa (4 in. w.c.), at which time the filters were tested, unchallenged with aerosol, at 54 deg. C (130 deg. F) for approximately 1 hour. At the end of that hour water was sprayed near the heat source to maximize vaporization exposing the filter to an elevated relative humidity up to 95%. Collected data include differential pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and volumetric flow rate versus time. (authors)

  1. Cytokine-mediated induction of metallothionein in Hepa-1c1c7 cells by oleanolic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Dong Hee; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Eung Seok; Choi, Young Muk; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2004-12-17

    Oleanolic acid (OA), a pentacyclic triterpene acid, has been reported to possess inducing activity of hepatic metallothionein (MT). However, the mechanism underlying its effects is unknown. This study investigated the effects of OA on the regulation of MT expression in an in vitro model. OA that was added directly to Hepa-1c1c7 cells had no effect on MT induction. However, MT and its mRNA levels increased markedly when the Hepa-1c1c7 cells were cultured with the OA-treated conditioned media from the RAW 264.7 cells. Co-treating the RAW 264.7 cells with OA and pentoxifylline, a TNF-alpha synthesis inhibitor, resulted in a decrease in the effects of OA on the MT induction. In the OA-exposed RAW 264.7 cell cultures, production and mRNA levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 were increased. However, the MT induction activity was inhibited when antibodies to TNF-alpha and/or IL-6 were added to the OA-treated conditioned media from the RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that the up-regulation of MT expression by OA was mediated by the TNF-alpha and IL-6 released from UA-activated macrophages. PMID:15541359

  2. Cytokine-mediated suppression of cytochrome P450 1A1 in Hepa-1c1c7 cells by pokeweed mitogen.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H G

    2001-02-28

    This study investigated the effects of pokeweed mitogen (PWM) on the regulation of cytochrome P450 (P450) 1A1 expression in an in vitro model, using murine hepatoma cell line Hepa-1c1c7 and murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cell cultures. PWM added directly to Hepa-1c1c7 cells had no effect on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced P450 1A1-specific 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity. However, TCDD-induced EROD activity and P450 1A1 mRNA levels were markedly suppressed when Hepa-1c1c7 cells were cultured with PWM-treated conditioned media from RAW 264.7 in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitant treatment with PWM and pentoxifylline, a TNFalpha synthesis inhibitor, to RAW 264.7 cells decreased the suppressive effects of PWM on TCDD-induced EROD activity. In PWM-exposed RAW 264.7 cell cultures, TNFalpha and IL-6 levels increased in a dose-dependent fashion. When antibodies to TNFalpha or/and IL-6 were added to PWM-treated conditioned media from RAW 264.7, the suppression of EROD activity was inhibited. These results suggested the suppression of P450 1A1 by PWM was mediated exclusively by TNFalpha and IL-6, released from macrophages. PMID:11311574

  3. Phase I characterization of the HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter media used in the airborne activity confinement system at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, V.J.; Higgins, P.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to characterize the HEPA filter media material. This work consisted of two major tasks. First, the pressure drop characteristics of the HEPA filter material were measured as a function of the aerosol mass loading. Particle size effects were studied by using three different particle size distributions to load the filter material. The second task was to determine the filtration efficiency spectrum for solid particles as a function of particle diameter. The filtration efficiency was measured at two different media velocities, one corresponding to the equivalent flow rate under normal operating conditions, the other corresponding to the minimum equivalent flow rate expected through the filter compartments. These tests were conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory between September 1988 and February 1989. 20 refs., 31 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters during and after design basis accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; First, M.W.; Anderson, W.L.; Gilbert, H.; Jacox, J.W.

    1994-12-01

    We have reviewed the literature on the performance of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be structurally damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. Despite the many studies on HEPA filter performance under adverse conditions, there are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen when there was insufficient data.

  5. Suppression of CYP1A1 expression by 4-nonylphenol in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H G; Kim, J Y; Choi, C Y; You, H J; Hahm, K

    2001-04-10

    This study investigated the effects that 4-nonylphenol (NP) has on CYP1A1 expression in Hepa-1c1c7 cell cultures. NP alone did not affect CYP1A1-specific 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity. In contrast, the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible EROD activities were markedly reduced upon concomitant treatment with TCDD and NP in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen that acts through the estrogen receptor, did not affect the suppressive effects that NP has on TCDD-inducible EROD activity. The TCDD-inducible CYP1A1 mRNA levels were markedly suppressed upon concomitant treatment with TCDD and NP that is consistent with their effects on EROD activity. A transient transfection assay using dioxin-response element (DRE)-linked luciferase and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that NP reduced the transformation of the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor to a form capable of binding specifically to the DRE sequence of the CYP1A1 gene promoter. These results suggest that the down-regulation of CYP1A1 gene expression by NP in Hepa-1c1c7 cells might be an antagonism of the DRE-binding potential of the nuclear Ah receptor, but is not mediated through the estradiol receptor. PMID:11248424

  6. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory HEPA filter box

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, J.C.

    1998-07-15

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the safe onsite transport of eight high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory HEPA Filter Box from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site to the Central Waste Complex and on to burial in the 200 West Area. Use of this SEP is authorized for 1 year from the date of release.

  7. Method for HEPA filter leak scanning with differentiating aerosol detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, B.J.; Banks, E.M.; Wikoff, W.O.

    1997-08-01

    While scanning HEPA filters for leaks with {open_quotes}Off the Shelf{close_quote} aerosol detection equipment, the operator`s scanning speed is limited by the time constant and threshold sensitivity of the detector. This is based on detection of the aerosol density, where the maximum signal is achieved when the scanning probe resides over the pinhole longer than several detector time-constants. Since the differential value of the changing signal can be determined by observing only the first small fraction of the rising signal, using a differentiating amplifier will speed up the locating process. The other advantage of differentiation is that slow signal drift or zero offset will not interfere with the process of locating the leak, since they are not detected. A scanning hand-probe attachable to any NUCON{reg_sign} Aerosol Detector displaying the combination of both aerosol density and differentiated signal was designed. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Induction of cytochrome P-450 1A2 by oxidized tryptophan in Hepa lclc7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, R K; Mitsuhashi, M; Kikkawa, Y

    2000-03-01

    Recent studies from this laboratory have demonstrated that L-tryptophan, after oxidation either by UV-irradiation or ozone, induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation and binding of the liganded AhR complex to its specific DNA recognition site, thereby initiating transcription of the cytochrome P-450 1a1 (Cyp1a1) gene with concomitant increase of CYP1A1 protein and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity in wild-type mouse hepatoma cells, Hepa lclc7 (Hepa-1), in culture. Temporary inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide resulted in superinduction of oxidized tryptophan-inducible CYP1A1 mRNA, protein, and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In the present communication, the results obtained by immunoblot analyses with monoclonal CYP1A1/1A2 antibody (NIH 1-7-1) demonstrate that both UV- or ozone-oxidized tryptophan also induce CYP1A2 protein in Hepa-1 cells. CYP1A2 mRNA, detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, was markedly induced in the UV- or ozone-oxidized tryptophan-treated cells. Temporary inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide further induced oxidized tryptophan-inducible CYP1A2 mRNA as well as the protein in Hepa-1 cells. This is the first report demonstrating the induction of CYP1A2 mRNA and protein in Hepa-1 cells. PMID:10688617

  9. Development and evaluation of a HEPA filter for increased strength and resistance to elevated temperature. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.; Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    We have completed a preliminary study of an improved HEPA filter for increased strength and resistance to elevated temperature to improve the reliability of the standard deep pleated HEPA filter under accident conditions. The improvements to the HEPA filter consist of a silicone rubber sealant and a new HEPA medium reinforced with a glass cloth. Three prototype filters were built and evaluated for temperature and pressure resistance and resistance to rough handling. The temperature resistance test consisted of exposing the HEPA filter to 1,000 scan (1,700 m{sup 3}/hr) at 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) for five minutes.The pressure resistance test consisted of exposing the HEPA filter to a differential pressure of 10 in. w.g. (2.5 kPa) using a water saturated air flow at 95{degrees}F (35{degrees}C). For the rough handling test, we used a vibrating machine designated the Q110. DOP filter efficiency tests were performed before and after each of the environmental tests. In addition to following the standard practice of using a separate new filter for each environmental test, we also subjected the same filter to the elevated temperature test followed by the pressure resistance test. The efficiency test results show that the improved HEPA filter is significantly better than the standard HEPA filter. Further studies are recommended to evaluate the improved HEPA filter and to assess its performance under more severe accident conditions.

  10. Changes in the protein expression profiles of the Hepa-T1 cell line when exposed to Cu2+.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong-Shi; Chan, King Ming

    2009-09-14

    Copper is an essential element in a variety of biological processes, but it can be toxic when present in excessive amounts. The central regulators of cellular copper metabolism include copper-binding proteins, copper transporters, metal membrane active transporters and copper-dependent enzymes. However, the way in which cupric ions (Cu(2+)) cause cellular changes in proteins and lead to toxic effects is less well-known. The aim of this study is to identify the proteins related to Cu(2+) toxicity or detoxification mechanisms in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) using a proteomic approach. A cell line derived from the liver of tilapia, Hepa-T1, was used as a model and exposed to two sub-lethal concentrations of waterborne copper for 96 h. The proteins expressed in Hepa-T1 were investigated by differential protein profiling using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). It was found that Cu(2+) (120 and 300 microM) caused the differential expression of 93 different proteins, 18 of which were further verified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Following analysis with ingenuity pathway software, several proteins were found to be involved in lipid metabolism, tissue connective development and cell cycle control, thus indicating that copper toxicity affects these cellular functions. PMID:19616320

  11. Suppression of CYP1A1 expression by naringenin in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Han, Eun Hee; Shin, Dong Weon; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Eung Seok; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2004-08-01

    Naringenin, dietary flavonoid, is antioxidant constituents of many citrus fruits. In the present study, we investigated the effect of naringenin on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible CYP1A1 gene expression in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Naringenin alone did not affect CYP1A1-specific 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity. In contrast, the TCDD-inducible EROD activities were markedly reduced upon concomitant treatment with TCDD and naringenin in a dose dependent manner. TCDD-induced CYP1A1 mRNA level was also markedly suppressed by naringenin. A transient transfection assay using dioxin-response element (DRE)-linked luciferase and electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that naringenin reduced transformation of the aryl hydrocarbons receptor(AhR) to a form capable of specifically binding to the DRE sequence in the promoter of the CYP1A1 gene. These results suggest the down regulation of the CYP1A1 gene expression by either naringenin in Hepa-1c1c7 cells might be antagonism of the DRE binding potential of nuclear AhR. PMID:15460448

  12. Filter Paper: Solution to High Self-Attenuation Corrections in HEPA Filter Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R.B.; Harold, N.B.; Gunn, C.A.; Brummett, M.; Chaing, L.G.

    2005-10-01

    An 8 by 8 by 6 inch High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter was measured as part of a uranium holdup survey in June of 2005 as it has been routinely measured every two months since 1998. Although the survey relies on gross gamma count measurements, this was one of a few measurements that had been converted to a quantitative measurement in 1998. The measurement was analyzed using the traditional Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) approach, using HMS3 software, with an area calibration and self-attenuation corrected with an empirical correction factor of 1.06. A result of 172 grams of {sup 235}U was reported. The actual quantity of {sup 235}U in the filter was approximately 1700g. Because of this unusually large discrepancy, the measurement of HEPA filters will be discussed. Various techniques for measuring HEPA filters will be described using the measurement of a 24 by 24 by 12 inch HEPA filter as an example. A new method to correct for self attenuation will be proposed for this measurement Following the discussion of the 24 by 24 by 12 inch HEPA filter, the measurement of the 8 by 8 by 6 inch will be discussed in detail.

  13. Survey of life-cycle costs of glass-paper HEPA filters. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.; Bergman, W.; Gilbert, H.

    1992-12-01

    We have conducted a survey of the major users of glass-paper HEPA filters in the DOE complex to ascertain the life cycle costs of these filters. Purchase price of the filters is only a minor portion of the costs; the major expenditures are incurred during the removal and disposal of contaminated filters. Through a combination of personal interviews, site visits and completion of questionnaires, we have determined the costs associated with the use of HEPA filters in the DOE complex. The total approximate, life-cycle cost for a glass-paper HEPA filter is $3,000 for one considered low-level waste (LLW), $11,780 for transuranic (TRU) and $15,000 for high-level waste (HLW). The weighted-average cost for a standard HEPA fitter in the complex is $4,753. Although the cost estimate represents an average for all sizes and types of HEPA filters used in DOE facilities, the majority of the fitters are 2 ft {times} 2 ft {times} l ft filters with wooden frames, deep pleated glass-fiber media, and an adhesive sealant.

  14. Survey of life-cycle costs of glass-paper HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.; Bergman, W.; Gilbert, H.

    1992-12-01

    We have conducted a survey of the major users of glass-paper HEPA filters in the DOE complex to ascertain the life cycle costs of these filters. Purchase price of the filters is only a minor portion of the costs; the major expenditures are incurred during the removal and disposal of contaminated filters. Through a combination of personal interviews, site visits and completion of questionnaires, we have determined the costs associated with the use of HEPA filters in the DOE complex. The total approximate, life-cycle cost for a glass-paper HEPA filter is $3,000 for one considered low-level waste (LLW), $11,780 for transuranic (TRU) and $15,000 for high-level waste (HLW). The weighted-average cost for a standard HEPA fitter in the complex is $4,753. Although the cost estimate represents an average for all sizes and types of HEPA filters used in DOE facilities, the majority of the fitters are 2 ft [times] 2 ft [times] l ft filters with wooden frames, deep pleated glass-fiber media, and an adhesive sealant.

  15. The HepaRG cell line, a superior in vitro model to L-02, HepG2 and hiHeps cell lines for assessing drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Geng, Xing-chao; Wang, Ju-feng; Miao, Yu-fa; Lu, Yan-li; Li, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a leading cause of discontinuation of new drug approval or withdrawal of marketed medicine based on safety due to organ vulnerability. The aim of this research is to investigate the potential abilities of four different in vitro cell models (L-02, HepG2, HepaRG, and hiHeps cell lines) in assessing marketed drugs labeled with apparently different types of liver injury. A total of 17 drugs with versatile pharmacological profiles were chosen, of which, 14 drugs are recognized as DILI agents and 3 drugs are DILI irrelevant. Preliminary cellular screening assays indicated that the HepaRG cell line had an advantage over other cell lines in predicting drugs associated with DILI in vitro as it had the highest Youden's index (71.4%). A multi-parametric screening assay showed that oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, and disorders of neutral lipid metabolism were changed notably in the HepaRG cell line after DILI-related drugs exposure, accounting for its high sensitivity in comparison with other three cell lines. In addition, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) all correlated with the cytotoxic effects of diclofenac sodium (p < 0.05), buspirone hydrochloride (p < 0.01), and danazol (p < 0.01) in the HepaRG cell line. We conclude that the HepaRG cell line is a superior in vitro cell model to other three cell lines for evaluating drugs with DILI potential. PMID:27027780

  16. Response of standard and high-capacity HEPA filters to simulated tornado and explosive transients

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, W.S.; Smith, P.R.

    1982-03-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the response of standard and high-capacity high-efficiency particulate air filters to simulated tornado and explosive transients. Most of the tests were directed toward evaluating the structural response of high-capacity filters to explosive transients. Selected tests were performed to evaluate the effects of particulate loading on filtration efficiencies. Also, several of the high-capacity filters were subjected to simulated toronado transients. The results indicate that the upper structural limits of high-capacity filters for explosive loading is 6.89-kPa (1-psi) peak pressure and 100-kPa-ms (14.51-psi-ms) impulse. These limits are below the approximately 13.78-kPa (2-psi) peak pressure loadings found for standard HEPA filters. Tests of high-capacity filters preloaded with aerosol indicated that the structural limits were further degraded by approximately 40%. The filtration efficiencies were degraded to approximately 70% when the filters were subjected to aerosol entrained within the shock pulse. The effect of simulated tornado transients on high-capacity filters resulted in an upper structural limit of 11.02 kPa (1.6 psi) for peak pressure.

  17. Aging assessment of nuclear air-treatment system HEPA filters and adsorbers. Volume 1, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Winegardner, W.K.

    1993-08-01

    A Phase I aging assessment of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and activated carbon gas adsorption units (adsorbers) was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Information concerning design features; failure experience; aging mechanisms, effects, and stressors; and surveillance and monitoring methods for these key air-treatment system components was compiled. Over 1100 failures, or 12 percent of the filter installations, were reported as part of a Department of Energy (DOE) survey. Investigators from other national laboratories have suggested that aging effects could have contributed to over 80 percent of these failures. Tensile strength tests on aged filter media specimens indicated a decrease in strength. Filter aging mechanisms range from those associated with particle loading to reactions that alter properties of sealants and gaskets. Low radioiodine decontamination factors associated with the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident were attributed to the premature aging of the carbon in the adsorbers. Mechanisms that can lead to impaired adsorber performance include oxidation as well as the loss of potentially available active sites as a result of the adsorption of pollutants. Stressors include heat, moisture, radiation, and airborne particles and contaminants.

  18. The histone deacetylase inhibiting drug Entinostat induces lipid accumulation in differentiated HepaRG cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, Abigail D. G.; Scopigno, Tullio; Pediconi, Natalia; Levrero, Massimo; Hagman, Henning; Kiskis, Juris; Enejder, Annika

    2016-06-01

    Dietary overload of toxic, free metabolic intermediates leads to disrupted insulin signalling and fatty liver disease. However, it was recently reported that this pathway might not be universal: depletion of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enhances insulin sensitivity alongside hepatic lipid accumulation in mice, but the mechanistic role of microscopic lipid structure in this effect remains unclear. Here we study the effect of Entinostat, a synthetic HDAC inhibitor undergoing clinical trials, on hepatic lipid metabolism in the paradigmatic HepaRG liver cell line. Specifically, we statistically quantify lipid droplet morphology at single cell level utilizing label-free microscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, supported by gene expression. We observe Entinostat efficiently rerouting carbohydrates and free-fatty acids into lipid droplets, upregulating lipid coat protein gene Plin4, and relocating droplets nearer to the nucleus. Our results demonstrate the power of Entinostat to promote lipid synthesis and storage, allowing reduced systemic sugar levels and sequestration of toxic metabolites within protected protein-coated droplets, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  19. The histone deacetylase inhibiting drug Entinostat induces lipid accumulation in differentiated HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Abigail D. G.; Scopigno, Tullio; Pediconi, Natalia; Levrero, Massimo; Hagman, Henning; Kiskis, Juris; Enejder, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Dietary overload of toxic, free metabolic intermediates leads to disrupted insulin signalling and fatty liver disease. However, it was recently reported that this pathway might not be universal: depletion of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enhances insulin sensitivity alongside hepatic lipid accumulation in mice, but the mechanistic role of microscopic lipid structure in this effect remains unclear. Here we study the effect of Entinostat, a synthetic HDAC inhibitor undergoing clinical trials, on hepatic lipid metabolism in the paradigmatic HepaRG liver cell line. Specifically, we statistically quantify lipid droplet morphology at single cell level utilizing label-free microscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, supported by gene expression. We observe Entinostat efficiently rerouting carbohydrates and free-fatty acids into lipid droplets, upregulating lipid coat protein gene Plin4, and relocating droplets nearer to the nucleus. Our results demonstrate the power of Entinostat to promote lipid synthesis and storage, allowing reduced systemic sugar levels and sequestration of toxic metabolites within protected protein-coated droplets, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27320682

  20. The histone deacetylase inhibiting drug Entinostat induces lipid accumulation in differentiated HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Abigail D G; Scopigno, Tullio; Pediconi, Natalia; Levrero, Massimo; Hagman, Henning; Kiskis, Juris; Enejder, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Dietary overload of toxic, free metabolic intermediates leads to disrupted insulin signalling and fatty liver disease. However, it was recently reported that this pathway might not be universal: depletion of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enhances insulin sensitivity alongside hepatic lipid accumulation in mice, but the mechanistic role of microscopic lipid structure in this effect remains unclear. Here we study the effect of Entinostat, a synthetic HDAC inhibitor undergoing clinical trials, on hepatic lipid metabolism in the paradigmatic HepaRG liver cell line. Specifically, we statistically quantify lipid droplet morphology at single cell level utilizing label-free microscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, supported by gene expression. We observe Entinostat efficiently rerouting carbohydrates and free-fatty acids into lipid droplets, upregulating lipid coat protein gene Plin4, and relocating droplets nearer to the nucleus. Our results demonstrate the power of Entinostat to promote lipid synthesis and storage, allowing reduced systemic sugar levels and sequestration of toxic metabolites within protected protein-coated droplets, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27320682

  1. Testing cleanable/reuseable HEPA prefilters for mixed waste incinerator air pollution control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.; Wong, A.; Walker, B.W.; Paul, J.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the US DOE Savannah River Site is undergoing preoperational testing. The CIF is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes from site operations and clean-up activities. The technologies selected for use in the air pollution control system (APCS) were based on reviews of existing incinerators, air pollution control experience, and recommendations from consultants. This approach resulted in a facility design using experience from other operating hazardous/radioactive incinerators. In order to study the CIF APCS prior to operation, a 1/10 scale pilot facility, the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), was constructed and has been in operation since late 1994. Its mission is to demonstrate the design integrity of the CIF APCS and optimize equipment/instrument performance of the full scale production facility. Operation of the pilot facility has provided long-term performance data of integrated systems and critical facility components. This has reduced facility startup problems and helped ensure compliance with facility performance requirements. Technical support programs assist in assuring all stakeholders the CIF can properly treat combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive wastes. High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are used to remove hazardous and radioactive particulates from the exhaust gas strewn before being released into the atmosphere. The HEPA filter change-out frequency has been a potential issue and was the first technical issue to be studied at the OCTF. Tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of HEPA filters under different operating conditions. These tests included evaluating the impact on HEPA life of scrubber operating parameters and the type of HEPA prefilter used. This pilot-scale testing demonstrated satisfactory HEPA filter life when using cleanable metal prefilters and high flows of steam and water in the offgas scrubber. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Summary of meeting on disposal of LET&D HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-21

    This report is a compilation of correspondence between Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company and the US EPA over a period of time from 1988 to 1992 (most from 1991-92) regarding waste management compliance with EPA regulations. Typical subjects include: compliance with satellite accumulation requirements; usage of ``Sure Shot`` containers in place of aerosol cans; notice of upcoming recyclable battery shipments; disposition of batteries; HEPA filter leach sampling and permit impacts; functional and operation requirements for the spent filter handling system; summary of meeting on disposal of LET and D HEPA filters; solvent substitution database report; and mercury vapor light analytical testing.

  3. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME`s) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump.

  4. Induction of quinone reductase activity by psoralidin isolated from Psoralea corylifolia in mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Mar, Woongchon

    2009-07-01

    Quinone reductase (QR) is a protective phase II enzyme against mutagens and carcinogens which is inducible by a number of chemical compounds in plants. This study was carried out to investigate effects of the fractions from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia on the induction of QR with Hepa 1c1c7 murine hepatoma cell line. The ethyl acetate-soluble fraction of the methanolic extract from the seeds was found to induce QR and the concentration of 1.5 fold QR induction (1.5 FIC) was 1.2 mug/mL. We obtained as an active compound, psoralidin, isolated from the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction after further sequential fractionation with column chromatography and 1.5 FIC of psoralidin was 0.5 mug/mL. The seeds of Psoralea corylifolia and psoralidin might be a candidate for developing QR inducers. PMID:19641888

  5. Differential toxicity of heterocyclic aromatic amines and their mixture in metabolically competent HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, Julie; Josse, Rozenn; Lambert, Carine; Antherieu, Sebastien; Le Hegarat, Ludovic; Aninat, Caroline; Robin, Marie-Anne; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane

    2010-06-01

    Human exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) usually occurs through mixtures rather than individual compounds. However, the toxic effects and related mechanisms of co-exposure to HAA in humans remain unknown. We compared the effects of two of the most common HAA, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), individually or in combination, in the metabolically competent human hepatoma HepaRG cells. Various endpoints were measured including cytotoxicity, apoptosis, oxidative stress and DNA damage by the comet assay. Moreover, the effects of PhIP and/or MeIQx on mRNA expression and activities of enzymes involved in their activation and detoxification pathways were evaluated. After a 24 h treatment, PhIP and MeIQx, individually and in combination, exerted differential effects on apoptosis, oxidative stress, DNA damage and cytochrome P450 (CYP) activities. Only PhIP induced DNA damage. It was also a stronger inducer of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression and activity than MeIQx. In contrast, only MeIQx exposure resulted in a significant induction of CYP1A2 activity. The combination of PhIP with MeIQx induced an oxidative stress and showed synergistic effects on apoptosis. However, PhIP-induced genotoxicity was abolished by a co-exposure with MeIQx. Such an inhibitory effect could be explained by a significant decrease in CYP1A2 activity which is responsible for PhIP genotoxicity. Our findings highlight the need to investigate interactions between HAA when assessing risks for human health and provide new insights in the mechanisms of interaction between PhIP and MeIQx.

  6. FULL SCALE REGENERABLE HEPA FILTER DESIGN USING SINTERED METAL FILTER ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gil Ramos; Kenneth Rubow; Ronald Sekellick

    2002-11-27

    A Department of Energy funded contract involved the development of porous metal as a HEPA filter, and the subsequent design of a full-scale regenerable HEPA filtration system (RHFS). This RHFS could replace the glass fiber HEPA filters currently being used on the high level waste (HLW) tank ventilation system with a system that would be moisture tolerant, durable, and cleanable in place. The origins of the contract are a 1996 investigation at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) regarding the use of porous metal as a HEPA filter material. This contract was divided into Phases I, IIA and IIB. Phase I of the contract evaluated simple filter cylinders in a simulated High Level Waste (HLW) environment and the ability to clean and regenerate the filter media after fouling. Upon the successful completion of Phase I, Phase IIA was conducted, which included lab scale prototype testing and design of a full-scale system. The work completed under Phase IIA included development of a full-scale system design, development of a filter media meeting the HEPA filtration efficiency that would also be regenerable using prescribed cleaning procedures, and the testing of a single element system prototype at Savannah River. All contract objectives were met. The filter media selected was a nickel material already under development at Mott, which met the HEPA filtration efficiency standard. The Mott nickel media met and exceeded the HEPA requirement, providing 99.99% removal against a requirement of 99.97%. Double open-ended elements of this media were provided to the Savannah River Test Center for HLW simulation testing in the single element prototype filter. These elements performed well and further demonstrated the practicality of a metallic media regenerable HEPA filter system. An evaluation of the manufacturing method on many elements demonstrated the reproducibility to meet the HEPA filtration requirement. The full-scale design of the Mott RHFS incorporated several important

  7. Down-regulation of murine Cyp1a-1 in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells by bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H G; Kimand, J Y; Choi, C Y

    2000-11-01

    Cultured mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells were treated with either bisphenol A or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or in combination to assess the role of bisphenol A in the process of Cyp1a-1 induction. Treatment of Hepa-1c1c7 cultures with 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced Cyp1a-1, as determined by analysis of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activities. Bisphenol A alone did not affect the activity of Cyp1a-1-specific EROD; in contrast, TCDD-induced EROD activities were markedly reduced in the concomitant treatment of TCDD and bisphenol A in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with tamoxifen, an antiestrogen that acts through the estrogen receptor, did not affect the suppressive effects of bisphenol A on TCDD-induced EROD activity. TCDD-induced Cyp1a-1 mRNA levels were markedly suppressed in the concomitant treatment of TCDD and bisphenol A consistent with their effects on EROD activity. Transient transfection assay using dioxin-response element (DRE)-linked luciferase revealed that bisphenol A reduced transformation of the aryl hydrocarbons (Ah) receptor to a form capable of specifically binding to the DRE sequence in the promoter of the Cyp1a-1 gene. These results suggest the down-regulation of the Cyp1a-1 gene expression by bisphenol A in Hepa-1c1c7 cells might be antagonism of the DRE binding potential of nuclear Ah receptor but not mediated through estradiol receptor. PMID:11061999

  8. ASBESTOS FIBER RELEASE DURING CHANGE-OUT OF FILTER BAGS FROM HEPA-FILTERED VACUUM CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum cleaners are the primary tool used to clean up asbestos containing material during operations and maintenance (O&M) activities. he change-out of vacuum bags is a potential source of airborne asbestos contamination. n 1989 and...

  9. A Survey of Mixed-Waste HEPA Filters in the DOE Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, F. S.; Barber, D. B.; Carney, K. P.

    2002-02-28

    A brief investigation was made to determine the quantities of spent, mixed-waste HEPA filters within the DOE Complex. The quantities of both the mixed-waste filters that are currently being generated, as well as the legacy mixed-waste filters being stored and awaiting disposition were evaluated. Seven DOE sites representing over 89% of the recent HEPA filter usage were identified. These sites were then contacted to determine the number of these filters that were likely destined to become mixed waste and to survey the legacy-filter quantities. Inquiries into the disposition plans for the filters were also made. It was determined that the seven sites surveyed possess approximately 500 m3 of legacy mixed-waste HEPA filters that will require processing, with an annual generation rate of approximately 25 m3. No attempt was made to extrapolate the results of this survey to the entire DOE Complex. These results were simply considered to be the lower bound of the totality of mixed-waste HEPA filters throughout the Complex. The quantities determined encourage the development of new treatment technologies for these filters, and provide initial data on which an appropriate capacity for a treatment process may be based.

  10. Potential for HEPA filter damage from water spray systems in filter plenums

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.; Slawski, J.W.

    1997-08-01

    The water spray systems in high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums that are used in nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for protection against fire was designed under the assumption that the HEPA filters would not be damaged by the water sprays. The most likely scenario for filter damage involves filter plugging by the water spray, followed by the fan blowing out the filter medium. A number of controlled laboratory tests that were previously conducted in the late 1980s are reviewed in this paper to provide a technical basis for the potential HEPA filter damage by the water spray system in HEPA filter plenums. In addition to the laboratory tests, the scenario for BEPA filter damage during fires has also occurred in the field. A fire in a four-stage, BEPA filter plenum at Rocky Flats in 1980 caused the first three stages of BEPA filters to blow out of their housing and the fourth stage to severely bow. Details of this recently declassified fire are presented in this paper. Although these previous findings suggest serious potential problems exist with the current water spray system in filter plenums, additional studies are required to confirm unequivocally that DOE`s critical facilities are at risk. 22 refs., 15 figs.

  11. IN-PLACE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF HEPA-FILTRATION SYSTEMS AT ASBESTOS-ABATEMENT SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to assess the in-place performance of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration systems at asbestos-abatement siteS in New Jersey to determine each systems particle-removal efficiency. n air-generated dioctyl phthalate aerosol was used to challeng...

  12. Applied patent RFID systems for building reacting HEPA air ventilation system in hospital operation rooms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jesun; Pai, Jar-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2012-12-01

    RFID technology, an automatic identification and data capture technology to provide identification, tracing, security and so on, was widely applied to healthcare industry in these years. Employing HEPA ventilation system in hospital is a way to ensure healthful indoor air quality to protect patients and healthcare workers against hospital-acquired infections. However, the system consumes lots of electricity which cost a lot. This study aims to apply the RFID technology to offer a unique medical staff and patient identification, and reacting HEPA air ventilation system in order to reduce the cost, save energy and prevent the prevalence of hospital-acquired infection. The system, reacting HEPA air ventilation system, contains RFID tags (for medical staffs and patients), sensor, and reacting system which receives the information regarding the number of medical staff and the status of the surgery, and controls the air volume of the HEPA air ventilation system accordingly. A pilot program was carried out in a unit of operation rooms of a medical center with 1,500 beds located in central Taiwan from Jan to Aug 2010. The results found the air ventilation system was able to function much more efficiently with less energy consumed. Furthermore, the indoor air quality could still keep qualified and hospital-acquired infection or other occupational diseases could be prevented. PMID:22081235

  13. Software Verification and Validation Test Report for the HEPA filter Differential Pressure Fan Interlock System

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    2000-09-05

    The HEPA Filter Differential Pressure Fan Interlock System PLC ladder logic software was tested using a Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Test Plan as required by the ''Computer Software Quality Assurance Requirements''. The purpose of his document is to report on the results of the software qualification.

  14. Investigation of water accumulation in an offgas test facility HEPA housing

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, D.L.; Burns, D.B.; Van Pelt, W.B.; Burns, H.H.

    1997-06-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility, at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site, is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes generated by site operations and clean-up activities. During CIF`s pretrial burn campaigns in 1995, an appreciable amount of water was recovered from the HEPA housings. Questions were immediately raised as to the source of the water, and the degree of wetness of the filters during operation. There are two primary issues involved: Water could reduce the life expectancy and performance of the HEPA filters, housing, and associated ducting, and wet HEPAs also present radiological concerns for personnel during filter change-out. A similar phenomenon was noted at the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a 1/10 scale pilot of CIF`s air pollution control system. Tests at OCTF indicated the water`s most likely origin to be vapor condensing out from the flue gas stream due to excessive air in-leakage at housing door seals, ducting flanges, and actual holes in the ducting. The rate of accumulation bears no statistical correlation to such process parameters as steam flow, reheater outlet temperature and offgas velocity in the duct. Test results also indicated that the HEPA filter media is moistened by the initial process flow while the facility is being brought on line. However, even when the HEPA filters were manually drenched prior to startup, they became completely dry within four hours of the time steam was introduced to the reheater. Finally, no demonstrable relationship was found between the degree of filter media wetness and filter dP.

  15. Apoptosis in murine hepatoma hepa 1c1c7 wild-type, C12, and C4 cells mediated by bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Seubert, John M; Darmon, Alison J; El-Kadi, Ayman O S; D'Souza, Sudhir J A; Bend, John R

    2002-08-01

    Elevated serum and tissue bilirubin concentrations that occur in pathological conditions such as cholestasis, jaundice, and other liver diseases are known to stimulate cytotoxic responses. In preliminary studies, we noted that bilirubin seemed to cause apoptosis in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 wild-type (WT) cells. Consequently, we investigated apoptosis caused by bilirubin in WT, mutant C12 [aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-deficient], and C4 (AHR nuclear translocator-deficient) Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Three independent measures of apoptosis were used to quantify the effects of exogenous bilirubin (0, 1, 10, 25, 50, or 100 microM). Caspase-3 activity and cytochrome c release from mitochondria increased at 3 h post-treatment, before increased caspase-8 activity at 6 h, and nuclear condensation by 24 h after treatment with bilirubin. No differences in whole-cell lipid peroxidation were observed between the cell types; however, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was greater in WT cells than C12 or C4 cells 3 h after bilirubin exposure. Pretreatment of cells for 1 h with 1 or 10 microM alpha-naphthoflavone, an AHR antagonist, before bilirubin exposure resulted in decreased caspase-3 activity at 6 h and nuclear condensation at 24 h in WT cells. These results indicate that bilirubin, a potential AHR ligand, causes apoptosis in murine Hepa 1c1c7 WT cells by a mechanism(s) partially involving the AHR, disruption of membrane integrity, and increased intracellular ROS production. PMID:12130676

  16. The case for improved HEPA-filter mechanical performance standards revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, C.I.; Smith, P.R.

    1997-08-01

    Under benign operating conditions, High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter units serve as reliable and relatively economical components in the air cleaning systems of nuclear facilities worldwide. Despite more than four decades of filter-unit evaluation and improvements, however, the material strength characteristics of the glass fiber filter medium continue to ultimately limit filter functional reliability. In worst-case scenarios involving fire suppression, loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA`s), or exposure to shock waves or tornado induced flows, rupture of the filter medium of units meeting current qualification standards cannot be entirely ruled out. Even under so-called normal conditions of operation, instances of filter failure reported in the literature leave open questions of filter-unit reliability. Though developments of filter units with improved burst strengths have been pursued outside the United States, support for efforts in this country has been comparatively minimal. This despite user requests for filters with greater moisture resistance, for example. Or the fact that conventional filter designs result in not only the least robust component to be found in a nuclear air cleaning system, but also the one most sensitive to the adverse effects of conditions deviating from those of normal operation. Filter qualification-test specifications of current codes, standards, and regulatory guidelines in the United States are based primarily upon research performed in a 30-year period beginning in the 1950`s. They do not seem to reflect the benefits of the more significant developments and understanding of filter failure modes and mechanisms achieved since that time. One overseas design, based on such knowledge, has proven reliability under adverse operating conditions involving combined and serial challenges. Its widespread use, however, has faltered on a lack of consensus in upgrading filter performance standards. 34 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  18. Volatility and leachability of heavy metals and radionuclides in thermally treated HEPA filter media generated from nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Lee, Suk-Chol; Min, Byung-Youn; Yang, Hee-Chul; Lee, Kune-Woo

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of the present study was to apply thermal treatments to reduce the volume of HEPA filter media and to investigate the volatility and leachability of heavy metals and radionuclides during thermal treatment. HEPA filter media were transformed to glassy bulk material by thermal treatment at 900°C for 2h. The most abundant heavy metal in the HEPA filter media was Zn, followed by Sr, Pb and Cr, and the main radionuclide was Cs-137. The volatility tests showed that the heavy metals and radionuclides in radioactive HEPA filter media were not volatilized during the thermal treatment. PCT tests indicated that the leachability of heavy metals and radionuclides was relatively low compared to those of other glasses. XRD results showed that Zn and Cs reacted with HEPA filter media and were transformed into crystalline willemite (ZnO·SiO(2)) and pollucite (Cs(2)OAl(2)O(3)4SiO(2)), which are not volatile or leachable. The proposed technique for the volume reduction and transformation of radioactive HEPA filter media into glassy bulk material is a simple and energy efficient procedure without additives that can be performed at relatively low temperature compared with conventional vitrification process. PMID:22525481

  19. Histamine H2 receptor antagonism by T-593: studies on cAMP generation in Hepa cells expressing histamine H2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, T; Ono, K; Watanabe, T; Inoie, M; Arai, H; Kimura, S; Kurokawa, K

    1999-07-01

    Histamine H2 receptor antagonism by T-593 was investigated in Hepa cells expressing canine histamine H2 receptors. T-593 inhibited generation of cAMP in Hepa cells stimulated by 10(-5) mol/l histamine with an IC50 value of 2.3 x 10(-6) mol/l, (S)-(-)-T-593, one of the enantiomers comprising racemic T-593, inhibited cAMP generation with an IC50 value of 6.1 x 10(-7) mol/l. On the other hand, the other enantiomer (R)-(+)-T-593 exhibited only a negligible effect. Incubation of the cell with (S)-(-)-T-593 for 60 min depressed the maximal response of the concentration-response curve of histamine with a nonparallel rightward shift. The slope of a Schild plot was 1.27. In contrast, (S)-(-)-T-593 caused a parallel rightward shift of the curve, with a Schild plot slope that did not significantly differ from unity, by treating the cells for 15 min. The H2 receptor-blocking action of (S)-(-)-T-593 remained almost unaffected after washing out the drug, whereas the effect of ranitidine was reversible after washing. These results suggest that T-593 possesses a time-dependent insurmountable antagonistic action against histamine H2 receptor. T-593 may interact with the histamine H2 receptor molecule in a slowly associable and dissociable manner. PMID:10352421

  20. Regulation of hepA of Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 by Elements 5′ from the Gene and by hepK

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinsong; Kong, Renqiu; Wolk, C. Peter

    1998-01-01

    In Anabaena spp., synthesis of the heterocyst envelope polysaccharide, required if the cell is to fix dinitrogen under aerobic conditions, is dependent on the gene hepA. A transcriptional start site of hepA was localized 104 bp 5′ from its translational initiation codon. A 765-bp open reading frame, denoted hepC, was found farther upstream. Inactivation of hepC led to constitutive expression of hepA and prevented the synthesis of heterocyst envelope polysaccharide. However, the glycolipid layer of the heterocyst envelope was synthesized. A hepK mutation blocked both the synthesis of the heterocyst envelope polysaccharide and induction of hepA. The predicted product of hepK resembles a sensory protein-histidine kinase of a two-component regulatory system. Analysis of the region between hepC and hepA indicated that DNA sequences required for the induction of hepA upon nitrogen deprivation are present between bp −574 and −440 and between bp −340 and −169 relative to the transcriptional start site of hepA. Gel mobility shift assays provided evidence that one or more proteins bind specifically to the latter sequence. The Fox box sequence downstream from hepA appeared inessential for the induction of hepA. PMID:9696774

  1. Feasibility study for an additional HEPA filter leaching system in NWCF

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, W.D.

    1992-11-01

    This report documents the feasibility of installing a second high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter leaching system in the New Waste Calcining Facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). A large spent filter backlog already exists at the ICPP, and it has been uncertain whether the existing HEPA filter leaching system will have a throughput rate sufficient to work off the existing backlog in a timely manner. Three areas within the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) have been identified as possible locations for a second filter leaching system. This report examines the suitability of each location, identifies modifications that would be necessary-to install a filter leaching system at each location, examines the impact of modifying each location, and discusses recent efforts to estimate filter throughput using the existing filter leaching system. Based on all available information, installation of a second filter leaching system is not recommended at the present time.

  2. Particle size for greatest penetration of HEPA filters - and their true efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    da Roza, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    The particle size that most greatly penetrates a filter is a function of filter media construction, aerosol density, and air velocity. In this paper the published results of several experiments are compared with a modern filtration theory that predicts single-fiber efficiency and the particle size of maximum penetration. For high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used under design conditions this size is calculated to be 0.21 ..mu..m diam. This is in good agreement with the experimental data. The penetration at 0.21 ..mu..m is calculated to be seven times greater than at the 0.3 ..mu..m used for testing HEPA filters. Several mechanisms by which filters may have a lower efficiency in use than when tested are discussed.

  3. Differences in TCDD-elicited gene expression profiles in human HepG2, mouse Hepa1c1c7 and rat H4IIE hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant that elicits a broad spectrum of toxic effects in a species-specific manner. Current risk assessment practices routinely extrapolate results from in vivo and in vitro rodent models to assess human risk. In order to further investigate the species-specific responses elicited by TCDD, temporal gene expression responses in human HepG2, mouse Hepa1c1c7 and rat H4IIE cells were compared. Results Microarray analysis identified a core set of conserved gene expression responses across species consistent with the role of AhR in mediating adaptive metabolic responses. However, significant species-specific as well as species-divergent responses were identified. Computational analysis of the regulatory regions of species-specific and -divergent responses suggests that dioxin response elements (DREs) are involved. These results are consistent with in vivo rat vs. mouse species-specific differential gene expression, and more comprehensive comparative DRE searches. Conclusions Comparative analysis of human HepG2, mouse Hepa1c1c7 and rat H4IIE TCDD-elicited gene expression responses is consistent with in vivo rat-mouse comparative gene expression studies, and more comprehensive comparative DRE searches, suggesting that AhR-mediated gene expression is species-specific. PMID:21496263

  4. ASME AG-1 Section FC Qualified HEPA Filters; a Particle Loading Comparison - 13435

    SciTech Connect

    Stillo, Andrew; Ricketts, Craig I.

    2013-07-01

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters used to protect personnel, the public and the environment from airborne radioactive materials are designed, manufactured and qualified in accordance with ASME AG-1 Code section FC (HEPA Filters) [1]. The qualification process requires that filters manufactured in accordance with this ASME AG-1 code section must meet several performance requirements. These requirements include performance specifications for resistance to airflow, aerosol penetration, resistance to rough handling, resistance to pressure (includes high humidity and water droplet exposure), resistance to heated air, spot flame resistance and a visual/dimensional inspection. None of these requirements evaluate the particle loading capacity of a HEPA filter design. Concerns, over the particle loading capacity, of the different designs included within the ASME AG-1 section FC code[1], have been voiced in the recent past. Additionally, the ability of a filter to maintain its integrity, if subjected to severe operating conditions such as elevated relative humidity, fog conditions or elevated temperature, after loading in use over long service intervals is also a major concern. Although currently qualified HEPA filter media are likely to have similar loading characteristics when evaluated independently, filter pleat geometry can have a significant impact on the in-situ particle loading capacity of filter packs. Aerosol particle characteristics, such as size and composition, may also have a significant impact on filter loading capacity. Test results comparing filter loading capacities for three different aerosol particles and three different filter pack configurations are reviewed. The information presented represents an empirical performance comparison among the filter designs tested. The results may serve as a basis for further discussion toward the possible development of a particle loading test to be included in the qualification requirements of ASME AG-1

  5. In-place testing of tandem HEPA filter stages using fluorescent aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.C.; Kyle, T.G.; Tillery, M.I.; Ettinger, H.J.

    1981-04-01

    Fluorescent test aerosols have been incorporated into an in-place two-stage high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter test method to improve sensitivity and eliminate interference by background aerosol leaking into the downstream sampling location. The method has been demonstrated by field testing large two-stage HEPA systems, one with a flow rate of 22 m/sup 3//s (48,500 cfm) and a decontamination factor (DF) of approximately 10/sup 8/. Advantages of the method, such as DF measurement more representative of actual filter performance and potential savings in construction and testing costs, make the fluorescent particle method a useful test method. A laser fluorescent particle spectrometer suitable for testing by this method was developed in conjunction with an instrument manufacturer and is commercially available. An improved dilution system was developed to reduce upstream aerosol concentration into the operating range of the spectrometer. Generation of a fluorescent dye-tagged DOP aerosol was accomplished by high-capacity, gas-thermal generator. Aerosol concentration of approximately 2 x 10/sup 6/ particles per cm/sup 3/ was maintained in the plenum upstream of the first stage. Other in-place test methods using fluorescent particles collected on sampling filters were investigated with only limited success and could not be extended to two-stage testing. The potentially most sensitive method, counting of solid fluorescent particles on sample filters taken upstream and downstream of HEPA filter stages, was restricted by particle losses in the resuspension operation. Maximum DF measurable by a solid fluorescent particle method was predicted to be 3 x 10/sup 3/, which would be adequate for testing one high-quality HEPA filter stage without excessive filter loading.

  6. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction HEPA filtered vacuum radioactive air emission units

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, R.E.

    1999-09-01

    This notice of construction (NOC) requests a categorical approval for construction and operation of certain portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum radionuclide airborne emission units (HVUs). Approval of this NOC application is intended to allow operation of the HVUs without prior project-specific approval. This NOC does not request replacement or supersedence of any previous agreements/approvals by the Washington State Department of Health for the use of vacuums on the Hanford Site. These previous agreement/approvals include the approved NOCs for the use of EuroClean HEPA vacuums at the T Plant Complex (routine technical meeting 12/10/96) and the Kelly Decontamination System at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant (routine technical meeting 06/25/96). Also, this NOC does not replace or supersede the agreement reached regarding the use of HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners for routine cleanup activities conducted by the Environmental Restoration Project. Routine cleanup activities are conducted during the surveillance and maintenance of inactive waste sites (Radioactive Area Remedial Action Project) and inactive facilities. HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners are used to clean up spot surface contamination areas found during outdoor radiological field surveys, and to clean up localized radiologically contaminated material (e.g., dust, dirt, bird droppings, animal feces, liquids, insects, spider webs, etc.). This agreement, documented in the October 12, 1994 Routine Meeting Minutes, is based on routine cleanup consisting of spot cleanup of low-level contamination provided that, in each case, the source term potential would be below 0.1 millirem per year.

  7. Lack of antagonism of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin's (TCDDs) induction of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) by the putative selective aryl hydrocarbon receptor modulator 6-alkyl-1,3,8-trichlorodibenzofuran (6-MCDF) in the mouse hepatoma cell line Hepa-1c1c7.

    PubMed

    Fretland, Adrian J; Safe, Stephen; Hankinson, Oliver

    2004-11-20

    Regulation of gene expression by the aryl hydrocarbon (AHR) receptor is a much-studied pathway of molecular toxicology. Activation of AHR by the xenobiotic ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is hypothesized as the mechanism by which TCDD exerts its toxic and carcinogenic effects. Paradoxically, some studies have shown that TCDD acts as an antiestrogen. This has led to the hypothesis that so-called selective aryl hydrocarbon receptor modulators (SAhRMs), AHR ligands that retain the antiestrogenic effects but lack the transcriptional effects of TCDD associated with toxicity, may be utilized as cancer chemotherapeutics in conjunction with other antiestrogenic compounds such as tamoxifen. The present study attempts to further define the molecular mechanism of action of the putative SAhRMs, 6-alkyl-1,3,8-trichlorodibenzofuran (6-MCDF), and diindolylmethane (DIM), focusing particularly on the former. We tested 6-MCDF and DIM for the recruitment of AHR and RNA polymerase II (pol II) to the regulatory region of the AHR responsive gene, cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1), using the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay in the mouse hepatoma cell line Hepa-1c1c7 (Hepa-1). We also tested the level of CYP1A1 induction in Hepa-1 cells using quantitative real-time PCR. We show no difference in the recruitment of AHR or pol II to the regulatory region of CYP1A1 in response to TCDD, 6-MCDF, or co-treatment with both TCDD and 6-MCDF. Our results also show no antagonism of CYP1A1 induction with co-treatment of Hepa-1 cells with TCDD and 6-MCDF. These data suggest that 6-MCDF exhibits agonist activity with respect to induction of CYP1A1 in the Hepa-1 cell line. PMID:15535986

  8. Comparison of cryopreserved HepaRG cells with cryopreserved human hepatocytes for prediction of clearance for 26 drugs.

    PubMed

    Zanelli, Ugo; Caradonna, Nicola Pasquale; Hallifax, David; Turlizzi, Elisa; Houston, J Brian

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of clearance in drug discovery currently relies on human primary hepatocytes, which can vary widely in drug-metabolizing enzyme activity. Potential alternative in vitro models include the HepaRG cell (from immortalized hepatoma cells), which in culture can express drug-metabolizing enzymes to an extent comparable to that of primary hepatocytes. Utility of the HepaRG cell will depend on robust performance, relative to that of primary hepatocytes, in routine high-throughput analysis. In this study, we compared intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) in the recently developed cryopreserved HepaRG cell system with CL(int) in human cryopreserved pooled hepatocytes and with CL(int) in vivo for 26 cytochrome P450 substrate drugs. There was quantitative agreement between CL(int) in HepaRG cells and human hepatocytes, which was linear throughout the range of CL(int) (1-2000 ml · min(-1) · kg(-1)) and not dependent on particular cytochrome P450 involvement. Prediction of CL(int) in HepaRG cells was on average within 2-fold of in vivo CL(int) (using the well stirred liver model), but average fold error was clearance-dependent with greater underprediction (up to at least 5-fold) for the more highly cleared drugs. Recent reporting of this phenomenon in human hepatocytes was therefore confirmed with the hepatocytes used in this study, and hence the HepaRG cell system appears to share an apparently general tendency of clearance-limited CL(int) in cell models. This study shows the cryopreserved HepaRG cell system to be quantitatively comparable to human hepatocytes for prediction of clearance of drug cytochrome P450 substrates and to represent a promising alternative in vitro tool. PMID:21998403

  9. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for HEPA filtered vacuum radioactive air emission units

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.E.

    1997-10-27

    This notice of construction (NOC) requests a categorical approval for construction and operation of certain portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum radionuclide airborne emission units (HVUs). Approval of this NOC application is intended to allow operation of the HVUs without prior project-specific approval. This NOC does not request replacement or supersedence of any previous agreements/approvals by the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) for the use of vacuums on the Hanford Site. These previous agreements/approvals include the approved NOCs for the use of EuroClean HEPA vacuums at the T Plant Complex and the Kelly Decontamination System at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. Also, this NOC does not replace or supersede the agreement reached regarding the use of HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners for routine cleanup activities conducted by the Environmental Restoration Project. Routine cleanup activities are conducted during the surveillance and maintenance of inactive waste sites (Radioactive Area Remedial Action Project) and inactive facilities. HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners are used to clean up spot surface contamination areas found during outdoor radiological field surveys, and to clean up localized radiologically contaminated material (e.g., dust, dirt, bird droppings, animal feces, liquids, insects, spider webs, etc.). This agreement, documented in the October 12, 1994 Routine Meeting Minutes, is based on routine cleanup consisting of spot cleanup of low-level contamination provided that, in each case, the source term potential would be below 0.1 millirem per year. This application is intended to request sitewide approval for the new activities, and provide an option for any facility on the site to use this approval, within the terms of this NOC. The HVUs used in accordance with this NOC will support reduction of radiological contamination at various locations on the Hanford Site. Radiation Protection Air

  10. Highly efficient gene transfer into hepatocyte-like HepaRG cells: new means for drug metabolism and toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Veronique; Fraix, Aurore; Montier, Tristan; Cammas-Marion, Sandrine; Ribault, Catherine; Benvegnu, Thierry; Jaffres, Paul-Alain; Loyer, Pascal

    2010-03-01

    HepaRG progenitor cells are capable of differentiating into hepatocyte-like cells that express a large set of liver-specific functions. These cells, however, only express small amounts of an important cytochrome P450, the CYP2E1, which limits their use for toxicological studies of drugs metabolized by this pathway. Our aim was to establish an efficient transfection protocol to increase CYP2E1 expression in HepaRG cells. Transfection protocols of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene were evaluated using electroporation and cationic lipids belonging to the lipophosphonates, lipophosphoramidates and lipids derived from glycine betaine. Following optimization of the charge ratios, plasmid DNA and formulations with neutral co-lipids, the lipophosphoramidate compounds KLN47 and BSV10, allowed expression of the GFP in approximately 50% of adherent progenitor HepaRG cells, while electroporation targeted GFP expression in approximately 85% of both progenitor and differentiated cells in suspension. Transient enforced expression of active CYP2E1 was also achieved in progenitors and/or differentiated HepaRG cells using the electroporation and the lipophosphoramidate compound BSV10. Importantly, in electroporated cells, CYP2E1 expression level was correlated with a significant increase in CYP2E1-specific enzymatic activity, which opens new perspectives for this CYP-dependent drug metabolism and toxicity studies using HepaRG cells. PMID:20213646

  11. Altered Hepa1-6 cells by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-treatment induce anti-tumor immunity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhengyu; Zhang, Hongxia; Wang, Ye; Yu, Bin; Wang, Chen; Liu, Changcheng; Lu, Juan; Chen, Fei; Wang, Minjun; Yu, Xinlu; Lin, Jiahao; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Pin; Zhu, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is the use of the immune system to treat cancer. Our current research proposed an optional strategy of activating immune system involving in cancer immunotherapy. When being treated with 2% DMSO in culture medium, Hepa1-6 cells showed depressed proliferation with no significant apoptosis or decreased viability. D-hep cells, Hepa1-6 cells treated with DMSO for 7 days, could restore to the higher proliferation rate in DMSO-free medium, but alteration of gene expression profile was irreversible. Interestingly, tumors from D-hep cells, not Hepa1-6 cells, regressed in wild-type C57BL/6 mice whereas D-hep cells exhibited similar tumorigenesis as Hep1–6 cells in immunodeficient mice. As expected, additional Hepa1-6 cells failed to form tumors in the D-hep-C57 mice in which D-hep cells were eliminated. Further research confirmed that D-hep-C57 mice established anti-tumor immunity against Hepa1-6 cells. Our research proposed viable tumor cells with altered biological features by DMSO-treatment could induce anti-tumor immunity in vivo. PMID:26824185

  12. Criteria for calculating the efficiency of deep-pleated HEPA filters with aluminum separators during and after design basis accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; First, M.W.; Anderson, W.L.; Gilbert, H.; Jacox, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    The authors have reviewed the literature on the performance of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). This study is only applicable to the standard deep-pleated HEPA filter with aluminum separators as specified in ASME N509. The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be structurally damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. Despite the many studies on HEPA filter performance under adverse conditions, there are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen when there was insufficient data.

  13. A Custom Robotic System for Inspecting HEPA Filters in the Payload Changeout Room at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, James E., Jr.; Looney, Joe

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the prime objective is to describe a custom 4-dof (degree-of-freedom) robotic arm capable of autonomously or telerobotically performing systematic HEPA filter inspection and certification in the Shuttle Launch Pad Payload Changeout Rooms (PCR's) on pads A and B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. This HEPA filter inspection robot (HFIR) has been designed to be easily deployable and is equipped with the necessary sensory devices, control hardware, software and man-machine interfaces needed to implement HEPA filter inspection reliably and efficiently without damaging the filters or colliding with existing PCR structures or filters. The main purpose of the HFIR is to implement an automated positioning system to move special inspection sensors in pre-defined or manual patterns for the purpose of verifying filter integrity and efficiency. This will ultimately relieve NASA Payload Operations from significant problems associated with time, cost and personnel safety, impacts realized during non-automated PCR HFIR filter certification.

  14. Criteria for calculating the efficiency of deep-pleated HEPA filters with aluminum separators during and after design basis accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; First, M.W.; Anderson, W.L.

    1995-02-01

    We have reviewed the literature on the performance of HEPA filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). This study is only applicable to the standard deep-pleated HEPA filter with aluminum separators as specified in ASME N509[1]. Other HEPA filter designs such as the mini-pleat and separatorless filters are not included in this study. The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. There are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen. The estimation of the efficiency of the HEPA filters under DBA conditions involves three steps: (1) The filter pressure drop and environmental parameters are determined during and after the DBA, (2) Comparing the filter pressure drop to a set of threshold values above which the filter is damaged. There is a different threshold value for each combination of environmental parameters, and (3) Determining the filter efficiency. If the filter pressure drop is greater than the threshold value, the filter is damaged and is assigned 0% efficiency. If the pressure drop is less, then the filter is not damaged and the efficiency is determined from literature values of the efficiency at the environmental conditions.

  15. In-place HEPA (high efficiency, particulate air) filter testing at Hanford: Operating experiences, calibrations, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, D.S.; Decelis, D.G.

    1989-10-01

    High Efficiency, Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters provide a minimum of 99.97% removal efficiency for particles greater than or equal to .3 microns in diameter. Each HEPA filter installation at Hanford is, at specified intervals, functionally tested for leaks. The test procedure involves a dioctylphthalate (DOP) smoke generator and a calibrated airborne particle detector. The DOP generator produces smoke of a known quantitative particle size distribution upstream of the filter. The airborne particle detector is first placed upstream, and then downstream of the filter to determine percent penetration. The smoke generator is characterized using a calibrated laser spectrometer, and the particle detector is calibrated using a calibrated picoammeter. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Intervention study of airborne fungal spora in homes with portable HEPA filtration units.

    PubMed

    Cheong, C D; Neumeister-Kemp, H G; Dingle, P W; Hardy, G St J

    2004-11-01

    The concentrations and composition of airborne fungal spores in homes fitted with portable HEPA filtration units were examined to provide information to evaluate the importance of varying levels of fungal spores in residential environments in Perth, Australia. A novel method for simulating activity/impaction on carpeted environments was also investigated. Reductions in fungal (35%) and particulate (38%) levels were achieved in the air filter homes. Penicillium, Cladosporium and yeasts were the most common and widespread fungi recovered indoors and outdoors. Fungal range decreased over the study period but this could be due to an overall reduced dissemination of spores (less spores in the air). PMID:15536499

  17. Performance Evaluation of Axial Flow AG-1 FC and Prototype FM (High Strength) HEPA Filters - 13123

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Wilson, John A.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2013-07-01

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are routinely used in DOE nuclear containment activities. The Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook (NACH) stipulates that air cleaning devices and equipment used in DOE nuclear applications must meet the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) standard. This testing activity evaluates two different axial flow HEPA filters, those from AG-1 Sections FC and FM. Section FM is under development and has not yet been added to AG-1 due to a lack of qualification data available for these filters. Section FC filters are axial flow units that utilize a fibrous glass filtering medium. The section FM filters utilize a similar fibrous glass medium, but also have scrim backing. The scrim-backed filters have demonstrated the ability to endure pressure impulses capable of completely destroying FC filters. The testing activities presented herein will examine the total lifetime loading for both FC and FM filters under ambient conditions and at elevated conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Results will include loading curves, penetration curves, and testing condition parameters. These testing activities have been developed through collaborations with representatives from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), New Mexico State University, and Mississippi State University. (authors)

  18. Metabolomic signatures in lipid-loaded HepaRGs reveal pathways involved in steatotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Brown, MV; Compton, SA; Milburn, MV; Lawton, KA; Cheatham, B

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) describes a spectrum of disorders including simple steatosis, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. With the increased prevalence of obesity, and consequently NAFLD, there is a need for novel therapeutics in this area. To facilitate this effort, we developed a cellular model of hepatic steatosis using HepaRG cells and determined the resulting biochemical alterations. Design and methods Using global metabolomic profiling, by means of a novel metabolite extraction procedure, we examined the metabolic profiles in response to the saturated fatty acid palmitate, and a mixture of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, palmitate and oleate (1:2). Results We observed elevated levels of the branched chain amino acids, TCA cycle intermediates, sphingosine and acylcarnitines, and reduced levels of carnitine in the steatotic HepaRG model with both palmitate and palmitate:oleate treatments. In addition, palmitate-induced steatotic cells selectively displayed elevated levels of diacylglycerols and monoacylglycerols, as well as altered bile acid metabolism. Conclusion This global metabolomics approach reveals biochemical changes in pathways important in the transition to hepatic steatosis including insulin resistance, altered mitochondrial metabolism, and oxidative stress. Moreover, our data demonstrate the utility of this in vitro model for investigating mechanisms of steatotic progression, insulin resistance and lipotoxicity in NAFLD. PMID:23512965

  19. Replacement of HEPA Filters at the LANL CMR Facility: Risks Reduced by Comprehensive Waste Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Corpion, J.; Barr, A.; Martinez, P.; Bader, M.

    2002-02-28

    In March 2001, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) completed the replacement of 720 radioactively contaminated HEPA filters for $5.7M. This project was completed five months ahead of schedule and $6.0M under budget with no worker injuries or contaminations. Numerous health and safety, environmental, and waste disposal problems were overcome, including having to perform work in a radioactively contaminated work environment, that was also contaminated with perchlorates (potential explosive). High waste disposal costs were also an issue. A project risk analysis and government cost estimate determined that the cost of performing the work would be $11.8M. To reduce risk, a $1.2M comprehensive condition assessment was performed to determine the degree of toxic and radioactive contamination trapped on the HEPA filters; and to determine whether explosive concentrations of perchlorates were present. Workers from LANL and personnel from Waldheim International of Knoxville, TN collected hundreds of samples wearing personnel protective gear against radioactive, toxic, and explosive hazards. LANL also funded research at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology to determine the explosivity of perchlorates. The data acquired from the condition assessment showed that toxic metals, toxic organic compounds, and explosive concentrations of perchlorates were absent. The data also showed that the extent of actinide metal contamination was less than expected, reducing the potential of transuranic waste generation by 50%. Consequently, $4.2M in cost savings and $1.8M in risk reduction were realized by increased worker productivity and waste segregation.

  20. Performance of HEPA filters at LLNL following the 1980 and 1989 earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Elliott, J.; Wilson, K.

    1994-11-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National laboratory has experienced two significant earthquakes for which data is available to assess the ability of HEPA filters to withstand seismic conditions. A 5.9 magnitude earthquake with an epicenter 10 miles from LLNL struck on January 24, 1980. Estimates of the peak ground accelerations ranged from 0.2 to 0.3 g. A 7.0 magnitude earthquake with an epicenter about 50 miles from LLNL struck on October 17, 1989. Measurements of the ground accelerations at LLNL averaged 0.1 g. The results from the in-place filter tests obtained after each of the earthquakes were compiled and studied to determine if the earthquakes had caused filter leakage. Our study showed that only the 1980 earthquake resulted in a small increase in the number of HEPA filters developing leaks. In the 12 months following the 1980 and 1989 earthquakes, the in-place filter tests showed 8.0% and 4.1% of all filters respectively developed leaks . The average percentage of filters developing leaks from 1980 to 1993 was 3.3% {plus_minus} 1.79%. The increase in the filter leaks is significant for the 1980 earthquake, but not for the 1989 earthquake. No contamination was detected following the earthquakes that would suggest transient releases from the filtration system.

  1. Replacement of HEPA Filters at the LANL CMR Facility : risk reduced by comprehensive waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Corpion, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    In March 2001, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) completed the replacement of 720 radioactively contaminated HEPA filters for $5.7M. This project was completed five months ahead of schedule and $6.0M under budget with no worker injuries or contaminations. Numerous health and safety, environmental, and waste disposal problems were overcome, including having to perform work in a radioactively contaminated work environment, that was also contaminated with perchlorates (potential explosive). High waste disposal costs were also an issue. A project risk analysis and government cost estimate determined that the cost of performing the work would be $11.8M. To reduce risk, a $1.2M comprehensive condition assessment was performed to determine the degree of toxic and radioactive contamination trapped on the HEPA filters; and to determine whether explosive concentrations of perchlorates were present. Workers from LANL and personnel from Waldheim International of Knoxville, TN collected hundreds of samples wearing personnel protective gear against radioactive, toxic, and explosive hazards. LANL also funded research at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology to determine the explosivity of perchlorates. The data acquired from the condition assessment showed that toxic metals, toxic organic compounds, and explosive concentrations of perchlorates were absent. The data also showed that the extent of actinide metal contamination was less than expected, reducing the potential of transuranic waste generation by 50%. Consequently, $4.2M in cost savings and $1.8M in risk reduction were realized by increased worker productivity and waste segregation.

  2. Disruption of BSEP Function in HepaRG Cells Alters Bile Acid Disposition and Is a Susceptive Factor to Drug-Induced Cholestatic Injury.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xi; Zhang, Yueping; Liu, Tongtong; Shen, Hong; Xiao, Yongling; Bourner, Maureen J; Pratt, Jennifer R; Thompson, David C; Marathe, Punit; Humphreys, W Griffith; Lai, Yurong

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, we characterized in vitro biosynthesis and disposition of bile acids (BAs) as well as hepatic transporter expression followed by ABCB11 (BSEP) gene knockout in HepaRG cells (HepaRG-KO cells). BSEP KO in HepaRG cells led to time-dependent BA accumulation, resulting in reduced biosynthesis of BAs and altered BA disposition. In HepaRG-KO cells, the expression of NTCP, OATP1B1, OATP2B1, BCRP, P-gp, and MRP2 were reduced, whereas MRP3 and OCT1 were up-regulated. As a result, BSEP KO altered the disposition of BAs and subsequently underwent adaptive regulations of BA synthesis and homeostasis to enable healthy growth of the cells. Although BSEP inhibitors caused no or slight increase of BAs in HepaRG wild type cells (HepaRG-WT cells), excessive intracellular accumulation of BAs was observed in HepaRG-KO cells exposed to bosentan and troglitazone, but not dipyridamole. LDH release in the medium was remarkably increased in HepaRG-KO cultures exposed to troglitazone (50 μM), suggesting drug-induced cellular injury. The results revealed that functional impairment of BSEP predisposes the cells to altered BA disposition and is a susceptive factor to drug-induced cholestatic injury. In total, BSEP inhibition might trigger the processes but is not a sole determinant of cholestatic cellular injury. As intracellular BA accumulation is determined by BSEP function and the subsequent adaptive gene regulation, assessment of intracellular BA accumulation in HepaRG-KO cells could be a useful approach to evaluate drug-induced liver injury (DILI) potentials of drugs that could disrupt other BA homeostasis pathways beyond BSEP inhibition. PMID:26910619

  3. Methoxychlor suppresses the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible CYP1A1 expression in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Hee; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2007-08-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is a pesticide that was developed as a replacement for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The influence of MXC on CYP1A1 expression or the functions of mouse hepatoma Hepa-1clc7 remain unclear. Cultured Hepa-1c1c7 cells were treated with MXC with or without 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to assess the role of MXC on CYP1A1 expression. MXC alone did not affect CYP1A1-specific 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity. In contrast, TCDD-inducible EROD activities were markedly reduced upon concomitant treatment with TCDD and MXC in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with ICI 182.780, an estrogen-receptor antagonist, did not affect the suppressive effects of MXC on TCDD-inducible EROD activity. TCDD-inducible CYP1A1 mRNA levels were markedly suppressed upon treatment with TCDD and MXC, and this is consistent with their effects on EROD activity. A transient transfection assay using dioxin-response element (DRE)-linked luciferase and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that MXC reduced the transformation of the aryl hydrocarbons (Ah) receptor to a form capable of specifically binding to the DRE sequence in the promoter region of the CYP1A1 gene. These results suggest that the downregulation of CYP1A1 gene expression by MXC in Hepa-1c1c7 cells might be an antagonism of the DRE binding potential of the nuclear Ah receptor but is not mediated through the estradiol receptor. PMID:17654248

  4. Acetaminophen inhibits NF-kappaB activation by interfering with the oxidant signal in murine Hepa 1-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Boulares, A H; Giardina, C; Inan, M S; Khairallah, E A; Cohen, S D

    2000-06-01

    A toxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) reduces the activity of NF-kappaB in mouse liver. NF-kappaB inactivation may be important for APAP toxicity, as this transcription factor can play a central role in maintaining hepatic viability. We recently reported that APAP likewise inhibits serum growth factor activation of NF-kappaB in a mouse hepatoma cell line (Hepa 1-6 cells). Here we present evidence that APAP's antioxidant activity may be involved in this NF-kappaB inhibition in Hepa 1-6 cells. Like the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC), APAP was found to suppress the H(2)O(2)-induced oxidation of an intracellular reactive oxygen species probe (dihydrodichlorofluorescein) in Hepa 1-6 cells. Treatment of Hepa 1-6 cells with H(2)O(2) was sufficient for NF-kappaB activation and IkappaBalpha degradation, and APAP was able to block both of these events. The APAP inhibition of NF-kappaB activation by serum growth factors may also be due to APAP's antioxidant activity, as the antioxidants NAC and PDTC likewise inhibit this activation. The potential role of NF-kappaB and oxidant-based growth factor signal transduction in APAP toxicity is discussed. PMID:10828269

  5. Use of the HepaRG Cell Line to Assess Potential Human Hepatotoxicity of ToxCast™ Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HepaRG cell line is a promising model system for predicting human hepatotoxicity in part because of the greater capacity to metabolize chemicals than other cell models. We hypothesized that this cell line would be a relevant model for toxicity testing of industrial chemicals....

  6. Comparative evaluation of N-acetylcysteine and N-acetylcysteineamide in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in human hepatoma HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Tobwala, Shakila; Khayyat, Ahdab; Fan, Weili; Ercal, Nuran

    2015-02-01

    Acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) is one of the most widely used over-the-counter antipyretic analgesic medications. Despite being safe at therapeutic doses, an accidental or intentional overdose can result in severe hepatotoxicity; a leading cause of drug-induced liver failure in the U.S. Depletion of glutathione (GSH) is implicated as an initiating event in APAP-induced toxicity. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a GSH precursor, is the only currently approved antidote for an APAP overdose. Unfortunately, fairly high doses and longer treatment times are required due to its poor bioavailability. In addition, oral and intravenous administration of NAC in a hospital setting are laborious and costly. Therefore, we studied the protective effects of N-acetylcysteineamide (NACA), a novel antioxidant, with higher bioavailability and compared it with NAC in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in a human-relevant in vitro system, HepaRG. Our results indicated that exposure of HepaRG cells to APAP resulted in GSH depletion, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction (assessed by JC-1 fluorescence), and lactate dehydrogenase release. Both NAC and NACA protected against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by restoring GSH levels, scavenging ROS, inhibiting lipid peroxidation, and preserving mitochondrial membrane potential. However, NACA was better than NAC at combating oxidative stress and protecting against APAP-induced damage. The higher efficiency of NACA in protecting cells against APAP-induced toxicity suggests that NACA can be developed into a promising therapeutic option for treatment of an APAP overdose. PMID:25245075

  7. A Quasi-Experimental Study Analyzing the Effectiveness of Portable High-Efficiency Particulate Absorption Filters in Preventing Infections in Hematology Patients during Construction

    PubMed Central

    Özen, Mehmet; Yılmaz, Gülden; Coşkun, Belgin; Topçuoğlu, Pervin; Öztürk, Bengi; Gündüz, Mehmet; Atilla, Erden; Arslan, Önder; Özcan, Muhit; Demirer, Taner; İlhan, Osman; Konuk, Nahide; Balık, İsmail; Gürman, Günhan; Akan, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The increased risk of infection for patients caused by construction and renovation near hematology inpatient clinics is a major concern. The use of high-efficiency particulate absorption (HEPA) filters can reduce the risk of infection. However, there is no standard protocol indicating the use of HEPA filters for patients with hematological malignancies, except for those who have undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This quasi-experimental study was designed to measure the efficacy of HEPA filters in preventing infections during construction. Materials and Methods: Portable HEPA filters were placed in the rooms of patients undergoing treatment for hematological malignancies because of large-scale construction taking place near the hematology clinic. The rates of infection during the 6 months before and after the installation of the portable HEPA filters were compared. A total of 413 patients were treated during this 1-year period. Results: There were no significant differences in the antifungal prophylaxis and treatment regimens between the groups. The rates of infections, clinically documented infections, and invasive fungal infections decreased in all of the patients following the installation of the HEPA filters. When analyzed separately, the rates of invasive fungal infections were similar before and after the installation of HEPA filters in patients who had no neutropenia or long neutropenia duration. HEPA filters were significantly protective against infection when installed in the rooms of patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, patients who were undergoing consolidation treatment, and patients who were neutropenic for 1-14 days. Conclusion: Despite the advent of construction and the summer season, during which environmental Aspergillus contamination is more prevalent, no patient or patient subgroup experienced an increase in fungal infections following the installation of HEPA filters. The protective effect of HEPA

  8. Structural performance of HEPA filters under simulated tornado conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, H.L.; Gregory, W.S.; Ricketts, C.I.; Smith, P.R.

    1982-02-01

    This report contains the results of structural tests to determine the response of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters to simulated tornado conditions. The data include the structural limits of the filters, their resistance at high flow rates, and the effects of filter design features and tornado parameters. Considering all the filters tested, the mean break pressure or structural limit was found to be 2.35 pse (16.2 kPa). The maximum value was 2.87 psi (19.8 kPa), and the low value found was 1.31 psi (9.0 kPa). The type of failure was usually a medium break of the downstream filter fold. The type of filters that were evaluated were nuclear grade with design flow rates of 1000 cfm (0.472 m/sup 3//s), standard separators, and folded medium design. The parameters evaluated that are characteristic of the filter included manufacturer, separator type, faceguards, pack tightness, and aerosol loading. Manufacturer and medium properties were found to have a large effect on the structural limits.

  9. Structural performance of HEPA filters under simulated tornado conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, H. L.; Gregory, W. S.; Ricketts, C. I.; Smith, P. R.

    1982-02-01

    The response of high efficiency particulate air filters to simulated tornado conditions was determined. The data include the structural limits of the filters, their resistance at high flow rates, and the effects of filter design features and tornado parameters. Considering all the filters tested, the mean break pressure or structural limit was found to be 2.35 pse (16.2 kPa). The maximum value was 2.87 psi (19.8 kPa), and the low value found was 1.31 psi (9.0 kPa). The type of failure was usually a medium break of the downstream filter fold. The types of filters that were evaluated were nuclear grade with design flow rates of 1000 cfm (0.472 cu m/s), standard separators, and folded medium design. The parameters evaluated that are characteristic of the filter included manufacturer, separator type, face-guards, pack tightness, and aerosol loading. Manufacturer and medium properties were found to have a large effect on the structural limits.

  10. Exposure assessment of four pharmaceutical powders based on dustiness and evaluation of damaged HEPA filters.

    PubMed

    Levin, Marcus; Koponen, Ismo K; Jensen, Keld A

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we show the different dustiness characteristics of four molecular pharmaceutical powder candidates and evaluate the performance of HEPA filters damaged with three different pinhole sizes and exposed to dust using real industrial powders in a miniaturized EN15051 rotating drum dustiness tester. We then demonstrate the potential use of such data using first-order exposure modeling to assess the potential worker exposure and transmission of active powder ingredients into ventilation systems. The four powders had highly variable inhalable dustiness indices (1,036 - 14,501 mg/kg). Dust particle size-distributions were characterized by three peaks; the first occurred around 60-80 nm, the second around 250 nm, and the third at 2-3 μm. The second and third peaks are often observed in dustiness test studies, but peaks in the 60-80 nm range have not been previously reported. Exposure modeling in a 5 times 20 kg powder pouring scenario, suggests that excessive dust concentrations may be reached during use of powders with the highest dustiness levels. By number, filter-damage by three pinhole sizes resulted in damage-dependent penetration of 70-80 nm-size particles, but by volume and mass the penetration is still dominated by particles larger than 100 nm. Whereas the exposure potential was evident, the potential dust concentrations in air ducts following the pouring scenario above were at pg/m(3) levels. Hence, filter penetration at these damage levels was assumed to be only critical, if the active ingredients were associated with high hazard or unique product purity is required. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resource: An example of a typical particle number time-series of a complete dustiness test. It provides information on the HEPA-filter used including a scanning electron microscopy image of it. It also

  11. VecLoader HEPA Vacuum Insulation Removal System

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective remediation technologies for use in the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. To this end, the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE’s Office of Science and Technology sponsors Large-Scale Demonstration Projects (LSDPs) at which developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to DOE’s projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, decreased costs and shortened schedules. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project’s (FEMP’s) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Plan requires that interior and exterior walls of buildings that are being demolished be disassembled and all insulating materials removed prior to demolition. This report provides a comparative analysis of the baseline manual insulation removal technique currently employed at the FEMP, with an innovative vacuum insulation removal system.

  12. Isolation and characterization of revertants from four different classes of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase-deficient hepa-1 mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Van Gurp, J R; Hankinson, O

    1984-01-01

    Revertants were selected from aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH)-deficient recessive mutants belonging to three complementation groups and from a dominant mutant of the Hepa-1 cell line. The recessive mutants had low spontaneous reversion frequencies (less than 4 X 10(-7] that were increased by mutagenesis. The majority of these revertants also had reacquired only partial AHH activity. Revertants of group A mutants were identical to the wild type with respect to both in vivo and in vitro enzyme stability and the Km for the substrate, benzo [alpha]pyrene, and therefore failed to provide evidence that gene A is the AHH structural gene. Group B and group C mutants are defective in the functioning of the Ah receptor required for AHH induction. Revertants of these groups were normal with respect to in vivo temperature sensitivity for AHH induction and for the 50% effective dose for the inducer, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, and thus provided no evidence that the B and C genes code for components of the receptor. Two rare group C revertants possessed AHH activity in the absence of induction. The phenotype of one of these was shown to be recessive to the wild type. Spontaneous revertants of the dominant mutant occurred at a frequency 300-fold greater than those of the recessive mutants, and this frequency was not increased by mutagenesis. These revertants all displayed complete restoration of AHH activity to wild type levels. These observations and the results from cell hybridization studies suggest that the dominant revertants arose by a high frequency event leading to functional elimination of the dominant mutation. PMID:6493230

  13. Reduced cardiolipin content decreases respiratory chain capacities and increases ATP synthesis yield in the human HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Peyta, Laure; Jarnouen, Kathleen; Pinault, Michelle; Guimaraes, Cyrille; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Chevalier, Stephan; Dumas, Jean-François; Maillot, François; Hatch, Grant M; Loyer, Pascal; Servais, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a unique mitochondrial phospholipid potentially affecting many aspects of mitochondrial function/processes, i.e. energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. Most data focusing on implication of CL content and mitochondrial bioenergetics were performed in yeast or in cellular models of Barth syndrome. Previous work reported that increase in CL content leads to decrease in liver mitochondrial ATP synthesis yield. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the effects of moderate decrease in CL content on mitochondrial bioenergetics in human hepatocytes. For this purpose, we generated a cardiolipin synthase knockdown (shCLS) in HepaRG hepatoma cells showing bioenergetics features similar to primary human hepatocytes. shCLS cells exhibited a 55% reduction in CLS gene and a 40% decrease in protein expression resulting in a 45% lower content in CL compared to control (shCTL) cells. Oxygen consumption was significantly reduced in shCLS cells compared to shCTL regardless of substrate used and energy state analyzed. Mitochondrial low molecular weight supercomplex content was higher in shCLS cells (+60%) compared to shCTL. Significant fragmentation of the mitochondrial network was observed in shCLS cells compared to shCTL cells. Surprisingly, mitochondrial ATP synthesis was unchanged in shCLS compared to shCTL cells but exhibited a higher ATP:O ratio (+46%) in shCLS cells. Our results suggest that lowered respiratory chain activity induced by moderate reduction in CL content may be due to both destabilization of supercomplexes and mitochondrial network fragmentation. In addition, CL content may regulate mitochondrial ATP synthesis yield. PMID:26768115

  14. U-235 Holdup Measurements in the 321-M Lathe HEPA Banks

    SciTech Connect

    Salaymeh, S.R.

    2002-07-08

    The Analytical Development Section of Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was requested by the Facilities Decommissioning Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control and Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report covers holdup measurements of uranium residue in six high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter banks of the A-lathe and B-lathe exhaust systems of the 321-M facility. This report discusses the non-destructive assay measurements, assumptions, calculations, and results of the uranium holdup in these six items.

  15. Performance testing of HEPA filters: Progress towards a European standard procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Dyment, J.

    1997-08-01

    Proposals for a future European testing procedure for {open_quotes}High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters (HEPA and ULPA){close_quotes} are being developed by CEN (Comite Europeen de Normalisation). The new standard will be given the status of national standard in participating countries, conflicting national standards being withdrawn. The standard will comprise 5 parts covering the grouping and classification of HEPA and ULPA filters according to their efficiency, fundamental principles of testing, marking etc (in part 1). Part 2 will cover aerosol production, measurement principles, counting equipment and statistics. Parts 3-5 will cover testing flat sheet media, leak testing of filter elements and the efficiency testing of filter elements respectively. The efficiency test methods allow the use of either homogeneous monodisperse or polydisperse aerosols for the determination of particulate filtration efficiencies as a function of particle size. The particle size at which maximum penetration occurs is first determined in flat sheet media tests; tests on filter elements (constructed using the same filter medium) may be carried out using either a homogeneous monodisperse aerosol of the size at which maximum penetration occurs (MPPS) or a polydisperse aerosol whose median size is close to the MPPS. Tests with monodisperse aerosols may be conducted using condensation nucleus counting equipment; tests using polydisperse test aerosols require the use of optical sizing particle counters. When determining the efficiency of filter elements the downstream aerosol concentrations may be determined from air samples obtained using either an overall method (single point sampling after mixing) or a scan method. The scan method also allows {open_quotes}local{close_quotes} efficiency values to be determined. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Prenylated chalcones and flavanones as inducers of quinone reductase in mouse Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, C L; Aponso, G L; Stevens, J F; Deinzer, M L; Buhler, D R

    2000-02-28

    The objective of this study was to determine if prenylchalcones (open C-ring flavonoids) and prenylflavanones from hops and beer are inducers of quinone reductase (QR) in the mouse hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cell line. All the prenylchalcones and prenylflavanones tested were found to induce QR but not CYP1A1 in this cell line. In contrast, the synthetic chalcone, chalconaringenin, and the flavanone, naringenin, with no prenyl or geranyl groups, were ineffective in inducing QR. The hop chalcones, xanthohumol and dehydrocycloxanthohumol hydrate, also induced QR in the Ah-receptor-defective mutant cell line, Hepa 1c1c7 bp(r)c1. Thus, the prenylflavonoids represent a new class of monofunctional inducers of QR. PMID:10737704

  17. Comparative Localization and Functional Activity of the Main Hepatobiliary Transporters in HepaRG Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bachour-El Azzi, Pamela; Sharanek, Ahmad; Burban, Audrey; Li, Ruoya; Guével, Rémy Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Stieger, Bruno; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2015-05-01

    The role of hepatobiliary transporters in drug-induced liver injury remains poorly understood. Various in vivo and in vitro biological approaches are currently used for studying hepatic transporters; however, appropriate localization and functional activity of these transporters are essential for normal biliary flow and drug transport. Human hepatocytes (HHs) are considered as the most suitable in vitro cell model but erratic availability and inter-donor functional variations limit their use. In this work, we aimed to compare localization of influx and efflux transporters and their functional activity in differentiated human HepaRG hepatocytes with fresh HHs in conventional (CCHH) and sandwich (SCHH) cultures. All tested influx and efflux transporters were correctly localized to canalicular [bile salt export pump (BSEP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), and MDR3] or basolateral [Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) and MRP3] membrane domains and were functional in all models. Contrary to other transporters, NTCP and BSEP were less abundant and active in HepaRG cells, cellular uptake of taurocholate was 2.2- and 1.4-fold and bile excretion index 2.8- and 2.6-fold lower, than in SCHHs and CCHHs, respectively. However, when taurocholate canalicular efflux was evaluated in standard and divalent cation-free conditions in buffers or cell lysates, the difference between the three models did not exceed 9.3%. Interestingly, cell imaging showed higher bile canaliculi contraction/relaxation activity in HepaRG hepatocytes and larger bile canaliculi networks in SCHHs. Altogether, our results bring new insights in mechanisms involved in bile acids accumulation and excretion in HHs and suggest that HepaRG cells represent a suitable model for studying hepatobiliary transporters and drug-induced cholestasis. PMID:25690737

  18. Extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters by supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, J.B.

    1997-09-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) using unmodified carbon dioxide has been explored as an alternative method for the extraction of semivolatile organic compounds from high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. HEPA filters provide the final stage of containment on many exhaust systems in US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities by preventing the escape of chemical and radioactive materials entrained in the exhausted air. The efficiency of the filters is tested by the manufacturer and DOE using dioctylphthalate (DOP), a substance regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Therefore, the filters must be analyzed for semivolatile organics before disposal. Ninety-eight acid, base, and neutral semivolatile organics were spiked onto blank HEPA material and extracted using SFE, Soxhlet, automated Soxhlet, and sonication techniques. The SFE conditions were optimized using a Dionex SFE-703 instrument. Average recoveries for the 98 semivolatile compounds are 82.7% for Soxhlet, 74.0% for sonication, 70.2% for SFE, and 62.9% for Soxtec. Supercritical fluid extraction reduces the extraction solvent volume to 10--15 mL, a factor of 20--30 less than Soxhlet and more than 5 times less than Soxtec and sonication. Extraction times of 30--45 min are used compared to 16--18 h for Soxhlet extraction.

  19. Comparative proteomics reveals novel components at the plasma membrane of differentiated HepaRG cells and different distribution in hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells.

    PubMed

    Petrareanu, Catalina; Macovei, Alina; Sokolowska, Izabela; Woods, Alisa G; Lazar, Catalin; Radu, Gabriel L; Darie, Costel C; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a human pathogen causing severe liver disease and eventually death. Despite important progress in deciphering HBV internalization, the early virus-cell interactions leading to infection are not known. HepaRG is a human bipotent liver cell line bearing the unique ability to differentiate towards a mixture of hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells. In addition to expressing metabolic functions normally found in liver, differentiated HepaRG cells support HBV infection in vitro, thus resembling cultured primary hepatocytes more than other hepatoma cells. Therefore, extensive characterization of the plasma membrane proteome from HepaRG cells would allow the identification of new cellular factors potentially involved in infection. Here we analyzed the plasma membranes of non-differentiated and differentiated HepaRG cells using nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differences between the proteomes and the changes that lead to differentiation of these cells. We followed up on differentially-regulated proteins in hepatocytes- and biliary-like cells, focusing on Cathepsins D and K, Cyclophilin A, Annexin 1/A1, PDI and PDI A4/ERp72. Major differences between the two proteomes were found, including differentially regulated proteins, protein-protein interactions and intracellular localizations following differentiation. The results advance our current understanding of HepaRG differentiation and the unique properties of these cells. PMID:23977166

  20. High Content Imaging and Analysis Enable Quantitative In Situ Assessment of CYP3A4 Using Cryopreserved Differentiated HepaRG Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Aarati R.; Wilson, Melinda S.; McClanahan, Amy M.; Ball, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput imaging-based hepatotoxicity studies capable of analyzing individual cells in situ hold enormous promise for drug safety testing but are frequently limited by a lack of sufficient metabolically competent human cells. This study examined cryopreserved HepaRG cells, a human liver cell line which differentiates into both hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells, to determine if these cells may represent a suitable metabolically competent cellular model for novel High Content Analysis (HCA) applications. Characterization studies showed that these cells retain many features characteristic of primary human hepatocytes and display significant CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 induction, unlike the HepG2 cell line commonly utilized for HCA studies. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that CYP3A4 induction can be quantified via a simple image analysis-based method, using HepaRG cells as a model system. Additionally, data demonstrate that the hepatocyte and biliary epithelial subpopulations characteristic of HepaRG cultures can be separated during analysis simply on the basis of nuclear size measurements. Proof of concept studies with fluorescent cell function reagents indicated that further multiparametric image-based assessment is achievable with HepaRG. In summary, image-based screening of metabolically competent human hepatocyte models cells such as HepaRG offers novel approaches for hepatotoxicity assessment and improved drug screening tools. PMID:25276124

  1. The development of a HEPA filter with improved dust holding characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Dyment, J.; Hamblin, C.

    1995-02-01

    A limitation of the HEPA filters used in the extract of nuclear facilities is their relatively low capacity for captured dust. The costs associated with the disposal of a typical filter means that there are clear incentives to extend filter life. The work described in this report are the initial stages in the development of a filter which incorporates a medium which enhances its dust holding capacity. Experimental equipment was installed to enable the dust loading characteristics of candidate media to be compared with those of the glass fibre based papers currently used in filter construction. These tests involved challenging representative samples of the media with an air stream containing a controlled concentration of thermally generated sodium chloride particles. The dust loading characteristics of the media were then compared in terms of the rate of increasing in pressure differential. A number of {open_quotes}graded density{close_quotes} papers were subsequently identified which appeared to offer significant improvements in dust holding. In the second phase of the programme deep-pleat filters (1,700 M{sup 3}h{sup {minus}1}) incorporating graded density papers were manufactured and tested. Improvements of up to 50% were observed in their capacity for the sub-micron sodium chloride test dust. Smaller differences (15%) were measured when a coarser, carbon black, challenge was used. This is attributed to the differences in the particles sizes of the two dusts.

  2. Development of the sampling and nuclide analysis methods for spent HEPA filter wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Young-Yong Ji; Dae Seok Hong; Il-Sik Kang; Bum-Kyoung Seo; Jong-Sik Shon

    2007-07-01

    Spent filter wastes of about 2,160 units have been stored in the waste storage facility of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute since its operation. These spent filters have generally consisted of a HEPA filter after its filtering of all the contaminants in the gas stream generated during the operation of the HANARO research reactor and the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. At the moment, to secure enough storage space, it is necessary to make a volume reduction of the stored radioactive wastes through a compression treatment or a regulatory clearance. There have been many studies on a treatment and a clearance of the low level radioactive wastes generated from nuclear facilities. These methods are used in view of a reduction of a management cost and disposal cost and the security of free space for a waste storage facility approaching saturation. In order to dispose of the spent filters, it is first necessary to conduct a radionuclide assessment of them. To do that, a sampling procedure should be prepared to obtain a representative sample from a spent filter. As for conducting a nuclide analysis for this representative sample, a corresponding spent filter can be determined as either a regulatory clearance waste or a radioactive waste. (authors)

  3. Survey of HEPA filter applications and experience at Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.

    1981-11-01

    Results indicated that approximately 58% of the filters surveyed were changed out in the 1977 to 1979 study period and some 18% of all filters were changed out more than once. Most changeouts (60%) were due to the existence of a high pressure drop across the filter, indicative of filter plugging. The next most recurrent reasons for changeout and their percentage changeouts were leak test failure (15%) and preventive maintenance service life limit (12%). An average filter service life was calculated to be 3.0 years with a 2.0-year standard deviation. The labor required for filter changeout was calculated as 1.5 manhours per filter changed. Filter failures occurred with approximately 12% of all installed filters. Most failures (60%) occurred for unknown reasons and handling or installation damage accounted for an additional 20% of all failures. Media ruptures, filter frame failures and seal failures occurred with approximately equal frequency at 5 to 6% each. Subjective responses to the questionnaire indicate problems are: need for improved acid and moisture resistant filters; filters more readily disposable as radioactive waste; improved personnel training in filter handling and installation; and need for pretreatment of air prior to HEPA filtration.

  4. Generation of functional cholangiocyte-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells and HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Noushin; Dubois-Pot-Schneider, Hélène; Steichen, Clara; Desterke, Christophe; Leclerc, Philippe; Raveux, Aurélien; Combettes, Laurent; Weber, Anne; Corlu, Anne; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocytes are biliary epithelial cells, which, like hepatocytes, originate from hepatoblasts during embryonic development. In this study we investigated the potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to differentiate into cholangiocytes and we report a new approach, which drives differentiation of hESCs toward the cholangiocytic lineage using feeder-free and defined culture conditions. After differentiation into hepatic progenitors, hESCs were differentiated further into cholangiocytes using growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, interleukin-6, and then sodium taurocholate. These conditions also allowed us to generate cholangiocytes from HepaRG-derived hepatoblasts. hESC- and HepaRG-derived cholangiocyte-like cells expressed markers of cholangiocytes including cytokeratin 7 and osteopontin, and the transcription factors SOX9 and hepatocyte nuclear factor 6. The cells also displayed specific proteins important for cholangiocyte functions including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, secretin receptor, and nuclear receptors. They formed primary cilia and also responded to hormonal stimulation by increase of intracellular Ca2+. We demonstrated by integrative genomics that the expression of genes, which signed hESC- or HepaRG-cholangiocytes, separates hepatocytic lineage from cholangiocyte lineage. When grown in a 3D matrix, cholangiocytes developed epithelial/apicobasal polarity and formed functional cysts and biliary ducts. In addition, we showed that cholangiocyte-like cells could also be generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells, demonstrating the efficacy of our approach with stem/progenitor cells of diverse origins. Conclusion: We have developed a robust and efficient method for differentiating pluripotent stem cells into cholangiocyte-like cells, which display structural and functional similarities to bile duct cells in normal liver. These cells will be useful for the in vitro study of the molecular mechanisms of bile duct

  5. ANALYSIS OF VAPORS FROM METHYLENE CHLORIDE EXTRACTS OF NUCLEAR GRADE HEPA FILTER FIBERGLASS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    FRYE JM; ANASTOS HL; GUTIERREZ FC

    2012-06-07

    While several organic compounds were detected in the vapor samples used in the reenactment of the preparation of mounts from the extracts of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filter fiberglass samples, the most significant species present in the samples were methylene chloride, phenol, phenol-d6, and 2-fluorophenol. These species were all known to be present in the extracts, but were expected to have evaporated during the preparation of the mounts, as the mounts appeared to be dry before any vapor was collected. These species were present at the following percentages of their respective occupational exposure limits: methylene chloride, 2%; phenol, 0.4%; and phenol-d6, 0.6%. However, there is no established limit for 2-fluorophenol. Several other compounds were detected at low levels for which, as in the case of 2-fluorophenol, there are no established permissible exposure limits. These compounds include 2-chlorophenol; N-nitroso-1-propanamine; 2-fluoro-1,1{prime}-biphenyl; 1,2-dihydroacenaphthylene; 2,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-dione,2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl); trimethyl oxirane; n-propylpropanamine; 2-(Propylamino)ethanol; 4-methoxy-1-butene; 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one; and 3,4-dimethylpyridine. Some of these were among those added as surrogates or spike standards as part ofthe Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. preparation ofthe extract of the HEPA filter media and are indicated as such in the data tables in Section 2, Results; other compounds found were not previously known to be present. The main inorganic species detected (sulfate, sodium, and sulfur) are also consistent with species added in the preparation of the methylene chloride extract of the high-efficiency particulate air sample.

  6. Interactions of endosulfan and methoxychlor involving CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 in human HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Savary, Camille C; Jossé, Rozenn; Bruyère, Arnaud; Guillet, Fabrice; Robin, Marie-Anne; Guillouzo, André

    2014-08-01

    Humans are usually exposed to several pesticides simultaneously; consequently, combined actions between pesticides themselves or between pesticides and other chemicals need to be addressed in the risk assessment. Many pesticides are efficient activators of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), two major nuclear receptors that are also activated by other substrates. In the present work, we searched for interactions between endosulfan and methoxychlor, two organochlorine pesticides whose major routes of metabolism involve CAR- and PXR-regulated CYP3A4 and CYP2B6, and whose mechanisms of action in humans remain poorly understood. For this purpose, HepaRG cells were treated with both pesticides separately or in mixture for 24 hours or 2 weeks at concentrations relevant to human exposure levels. In combination they exerted synergistic cytotoxic effects. Whatever the duration of treatment, both compounds increased CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 mRNA levels while differently affecting their corresponding activities. Endosulfan exerted a direct reversible inhibition of CYP3A4 activity that was confirmed in human liver microsomes. By contrast, methoxychlor induced this activity. The effects of the mixture on CYP3A4 activity were equal to the sum of those of each individual compound, suggesting an additive effect of each pesticide. Despite CYP2B6 activity being unchanged and increased with endosulfan and methoxychlor, respectively, no change was observed with their mixture, supporting an antagonistic effect. Altogether, our data suggest that CAR and PXR activators endosulfan and methoxychlor can interact together and with other exogenous substrates in human hepatocytes. Their effects on CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 activities could have important consequences if extrapolated to the in vivo situation. PMID:24832206

  7. Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT performed in non-HEPA filter rooms: initial experience from a single center in India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Naithani, R; Mishra, P; Mahapatra, M; Seth, T; Dolai, T K; Bhargava, R; Saxena, R

    2009-01-01

    In developing countries, it is important to ascertain the safety of performing allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) in single rooms without high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. We present our experience of performing 40 such transplants from July 2004 to November 2007. Source of stem cells was peripheral blood in 33, bone marrow in six and combined in one. G-CSF started from day +1. The indications were SAA-18, CML-7, AML-7, ALL-2, myelodysplastic syndrome-2 and thalassemia major-4. The median age was 19 years (range 2.2-46) with 29 male and 11 female participants. Antibacterial and antifungal prophylaxis was administered along with conditioning, and at the onset of fever, systemic antibiotics were started. Antifungal agents were added if fever persisted for 3 days. Median time for neutrophil engraftment was 10 days (range 8-17). Fever occurred in 38 (95%) for a median of 5 days (range 1-38), and blood cultures were positive in seven (17.5%). Systemic antibiotics were used in 95% and antifungals in 57.5% cases. The 30-day mortality was nil, and 100-day mortality was 1 (2.5%). After day 100, there were eight fatalities (20%) due to chronic GVHD-3, relapse-2, graft rejection-2, disseminated tuberculosis and aspergillosis-1. Our experience suggests that allogeneic HSCT can be safely performed in non-HEPA filter rooms in India. PMID:18794872

  8. Walking in the high-rise city: a Health Enhancement and Pedometer-determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Leung, Angela Y M; Cheung, Mike K T; Tse, Michael A; Shum, Wai Chuen; Lancaster, B J; Lam, Cindy L K

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of good infrastructure in the public estates, many older adults in urban areas are sedentary. The Health Enhancement and Pedometer-Determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program was developed to assist older adults with diabetes and/or hypertension to acquire walking exercise habits and to build social support, while engaged in regular physical activity. This study aimed to describe the HEPA program and to report changes in participants' walking capacity and body strength after 10-week walking sessions. A pre- and postintervention design was used. Pedometers were used to measure the number of steps taken per day before and after the 10-week intervention. Upper and lower body strength, lower body flexibility, and quality of life were assessed. A total of 205 older adults completed the program and all health assessments. After the 10-week intervention, the average number of steps per day increased by 36%, from 6,591 to 8,934. Lower body strength, upper body strength, and aerobic fitness increased significantly after 10 weeks, along with improvement in the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF™-12) physical and mental health component summary scores. A social support network was built in the neighborhood, and the local environment was utilized to make walking possible and enjoyable. PMID:25170259

  9. Correlation of dysfunction of nonmuscle myosin IIA with increased induction of Cyp1a1 in Hepa-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Ebina, Masayuki; Shibazaki, Masahiko; Kudo, Kyoko; Kasai, Shuya; Kikuchi, Hideaki

    2011-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is one of the best known ligand-activated transcription factors and it induces Cyp1a1 transcription by binding with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Recent focus has been on the relationship of AhR with signaling pathways that modulate cell shape and migration. In nonmuscle cells, nonmuscle myosin II is one of the key determinants of cell morphology, but it has not been investigated whether its function is related to Cyp1a1 induction. In this study, we observed that (-)-blebbistatin, which is a specific inhibitor of nonmuscle myosin II, increased the level of CYP1A1-mRNA in Hepa-1 cells. Comparison of (-)-blebbistatin with (+)-blebbistatin, which is an inactive enantiomer, indicated that the increase of CYP1A1-mRNA was due to nonmuscle myosin II inhibition. Subsequent knockdown experiments observed that reduction of nonmuscle myosin IIA, which is only an isoform of nonmuscle myosin II expressed in Hepa-1 cells, was related to the enhancement of TCDD-dependent Cyp1a1 induction. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the increase of Cyp1a1 induction was the result of transcriptional activation due to increased binding of AhR and RNA polymerase II to the enhancer and proximal promoter regions of Cyp1a1, respectively. These findings provide a new insight into the correlation between the function of nonmuscle myosin II and gene induction. PMID:21216307

  10. Walking in the high-rise city: a Health Enhancement and Pedometer-determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela YM; Cheung, Mike KT; Tse, Michael A; Shum, Wai Chuen; Lancaster, BJ; Lam, Cindy LK

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of good infrastructure in the public estates, many older adults in urban areas are sedentary. The Health Enhancement and Pedometer-Determined Ambulatory (HEPA) program was developed to assist older adults with diabetes and/or hypertension to acquire walking exercise habits and to build social support, while engaged in regular physical activity. This study aimed to describe the HEPA program and to report changes in participants’ walking capacity and body strength after 10-week walking sessions. A pre- and postintervention design was used. Pedometers were used to measure the number of steps taken per day before and after the 10-week intervention. Upper and lower body strength, lower body flexibility, and quality of life were assessed. A total of 205 older adults completed the program and all health assessments. After the 10-week intervention, the average number of steps per day increased by 36%, from 6,591 to 8,934. Lower body strength, upper body strength, and aerobic fitness increased significantly after 10 weeks, along with improvement in the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF™-12) physical and mental health component summary scores. A social support network was built in the neighborhood, and the local environment was utilized to make walking possible and enjoyable. PMID:25170259

  11. Solutions for Dioctyl Phthalate (DOP) tested high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters destined for disposal at Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Gablin, K.A.

    1992-11-01

    In January 1992, Argonne National Laboratory East, Environmental and Waste Management Program, learned that a chemical material used for testing of all HEPA filters at the primary source, Flanders Filter, Inc. in Washington, NC, was considered a hazardous chemical by Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations. These regulations are under the jurisdiction of the Washington Administration Code, Chapter 173-303, and therefore directly under impact the Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria. Dioctyl Phthalate, ``DOP`` as it is referred to in chemical abbreviation form, is added in small test quantities at the factory, at three Department of Energy (DOE) operated HEPA filter test facilities, and in the installed duct work at various operating laboratories or production facilities. When small amounts of radioactivity are added to the filter media in operation, the result is a mixed waste. This definition would normally only develop in the state of Washington since their acceptance criteria is ten times more stringent then the US Environmental Protection Agencys` (US EPA). Methods of Processing will be discussed, which will include detoxification, physical separation, heat and vacuum separation, and compaction. The economic impact of a mixed waste definition in the State of Washington, and an Low Level Waste (LLW) definition in other locations, may lend this product to be a prime candidate for commercial disposal in the future, or a possible de-listing by the State of Washington.

  12. Solutions for Dioctyl Phthalate (DOP) tested high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters destined for disposal at Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Gablin, K.A.

    1992-11-01

    In January 1992, Argonne National Laboratory East, Environmental and Waste Management Program, learned that a chemical material used for testing of all HEPA filters at the primary source, Flanders Filter, Inc. in Washington, NC, was considered a hazardous chemical by Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations. These regulations are under the jurisdiction of the Washington Administration Code, Chapter 173-303, and therefore directly under impact the Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria. Dioctyl Phthalate, DOP'' as it is referred to in chemical abbreviation form, is added in small test quantities at the factory, at three Department of Energy (DOE) operated HEPA filter test facilities, and in the installed duct work at various operating laboratories or production facilities. When small amounts of radioactivity are added to the filter media in operation, the result is a mixed waste. This definition would normally only develop in the state of Washington since their acceptance criteria is ten times more stringent then the US Environmental Protection Agencys' (US EPA). Methods of Processing will be discussed, which will include detoxification, physical separation, heat and vacuum separation, and compaction. The economic impact of a mixed waste definition in the State of Washington, and an Low Level Waste (LLW) definition in other locations, may lend this product to be a prime candidate for commercial disposal in the future, or a possible de-listing by the State of Washington.

  13. Reliability and Validity of the SE-HEPA: Examining Physical Activity- and Healthy Eating-Specific Self-Efficacy among a Sample of Preadolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Michael M.; Burns, Leonard G.; Whitaker, Brandi N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the self-efficacy for healthy eating and physical activity measure (SE-HEPA) for preadolescents. Method. The reliability of the measure was examined to determine if the internal consistency of the measure was adequate (i.e., [alpha]s greater than 0.70). Next, in an…

  14. Expression System for High Levels of GAG Lyase Gene Expression and Study of the hepA Upstream Region in Flavobacterium heparinum

    PubMed Central

    Blain, Françoise; Tkalec, A. Lydia; Shao, Zhongqi; Poulin, Catherine; Pedneault, Marc; Gu, Kangfu; Eggimann, Bernhard; Zimmermann, Joe; Su, Hongsheng

    2002-01-01

    A system for high-level expression of heparinase I, heparinase II, heparinase III, chondroitinase AC, and chondroitinase B in Flavobacterium heparinum is described. hepA, along with its regulatory region, as well as hepB, hepC, cslA, and cslB, cloned downstream of the hepA regulatory region, was integrated in the chromosome to yield stable transconjugant strains. The level of heparinase I and II expression from the transconjugant strains was approximately fivefold higher, while heparinase III expression was 10-fold higher than in wild-type F. heparinum grown in heparin-only medium. The chondroitinase AC and B transconjugant strains, grown in heparin-only medium, yielded 20- and 13-fold increases, respectively, in chondroitinase AC and B expression, compared to wild-type F. heparinum grown in chondroitin sulfate A-only medium. The hepA upstream region was also studied using cslA as a reporter gene, and the transcriptional start site was determined to be 26 bp upstream of the start codon in the chondroitinase AC transconjugant strain. The transcriptional start sites were determined for hepA in both the wild-type F. heparinum and heparinase I transconjugant strains and were shown to be the same as in the chondroitinase AC transconjugant strain. The five GAG lyases were purified from these transconjugant strains and shown to be identical to their wild-type counterparts. PMID:12029040

  15. Expression system for high levels of GAG lyase gene expression and study of the hepA upstream region in Flavobacterium heparinum.

    PubMed

    Blain, Françoise; Tkalec, A Lydia; Shao, Zhongqi; Poulin, Catherine; Pedneault, Marc; Gu, Kangfu; Eggimann, Bernhard; Zimmermann, Joe; Su, Hongsheng

    2002-06-01

    A system for high-level expression of heparinase I, heparinase II, heparinase III, chondroitinase AC, and chondroitinase B in Flavobacterium heparinum is described. hepA, along with its regulatory region, as well as hepB, hepC, cslA, and cslB, cloned downstream of the hepA regulatory region, was integrated in the chromosome to yield stable transconjugant strains. The level of heparinase I and II expression from the transconjugant strains was approximately fivefold higher, while heparinase III expression was 10-fold higher than in wild-type F. heparinum grown in heparin-only medium. The chondroitinase AC and B transconjugant strains, grown in heparin-only medium, yielded 20- and 13-fold increases, respectively, in chondroitinase AC and B expression, compared to wild-type F. heparinum grown in chondroitin sulfate A-only medium. The hepA upstream region was also studied using cslA as a reporter gene, and the transcriptional start site was determined to be 26 bp upstream of the start codon in the chondroitinase AC transconjugant strain. The transcriptional start sites were determined for hepA in both the wild-type F. heparinum and heparinase I transconjugant strains and were shown to be the same as in the chondroitinase AC transconjugant strain. The five GAG lyases were purified from these transconjugant strains and shown to be identical to their wild-type counterparts. PMID:12029040

  16. Studies on the Role of Metabolic Activation in Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor–Dependent Hepatotoxicity: Induction of CYP3A4 Enhances the Cytotoxicity of Lapatinib in HepaRG Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Klarissa D.; Wahlin, Michelle D.; Papageorgiou, Ioannis; Unadkat, Jashvant D.; Nelson, Sidney D.

    2014-01-01

    Idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity has been associated with the oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib, which is used in metastatic breast cancer therapy. Lapatinib is extensively metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4/5 to yield an O-debenzylated metabolite, which can undergo further oxidation to a reactive quinone imine. A recent clinical study reported that concomitant use of lapatinib with dexamethasone increased the incidence of hepatotoxicity in metastatic breast cancer patients treated with lapatinib, and so we hypothesized that induction of CYP3A enhances the bioactivation of lapatinib to reactive intermediates that contribute to hepatotoxicity. Therefore, we examined the effect of CYP3A4 induction on the cytotoxicity and metabolism of lapatinib in the HepaRG human hepatic cell line. Differentiated HepaRG cells were pretreated with dexamethasone (100 μM) or the prototypical CYP3A4 inducer rifampicin (4 μM) for 72 hours, followed by incubation with lapatinib (0–100 μM) for 24 hours. Cell viability was monitored using WST-1 assays, and metabolites were quantified by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Induction of CYP3A4 by dexamethasone or rifampicin enhanced lapatinib-induced cytotoxicity, compared with treatment with lapatinib alone. A direct comparison of the cytotoxicity of lapatinib versus O-debenzylated lapatinib demonstrated that the O-debenzylated metabolite was significantly more cytotoxic than lapatinib itself. Furthermore, pretreatment with 25 μM l-buthionine sulfoximine to deplete intracellular glutathione markedly enhanced lapatinib cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity was correlated with increased formation of O-debenzylated lapatinib and cysteine adducts of the putative quinone imine intermediate. Collectively, these data suggest that CYP3A4 induction potentiates lapatinib-induced hepatotoxicity via increased reactive metabolite formation. PMID:24191259

  17. Automated detection of hepatotoxic compounds in human hepatocytes using HepaRG cells and image-based analysis of mitochondrial dysfunction with JC-1 dye

    SciTech Connect

    Pernelle, K.; Le Guevel, R.; Glaise, D.; Stasio, C. Gaucher-Di; Le Charpentier, T.; Bouaita, B.; Corlu, A.; Guguen-Guillouzo, C.

    2011-08-01

    In this study, our goal was to develop an efficient in situ test adapted to screen hepatotoxicity of various chemicals, a process which remains challenging during the early phase of drug development. The test was based on functional human hepatocytes using the HepaRG cell line, and automation of quantitative fluorescence microscopy coupled with automated imaging analysis. Differentiated HepaRG cells express most of the specific liver functions at levels close to those found in primary human hepatocytes, including detoxifying enzymes and drug transporters. A triparametric analysis was first used to evaluate hepatocyte purity and differentiation status, mainly detoxication capacity of cells before toxicity testing. We demonstrated that culturing HepaRG cells at high density maintained high hepatocyte purity and differentiation level. Moreover, evidence was found that isolating hepatocytes from 2-week-old confluent cultures limited variations associated with an ageing process occurring over time in confluent cells. Then, we designed a toxicity test based on detection of early mitochondrial depolarisation associated with permeability transition (MPT) pore opening, using JC-1 as a metachromatic fluorescent dye. Maximal dye dimerization that would have been strongly hampered by efficient efflux due to the active, multidrug-resistant (MDR) pump was overcome by coupling JC-1 with the MDR inhibitor verapamil. Specificity of this test was demonstrated and its usefulness appeared directly dependent on conditions supporting hepatic cell competence. This new hepatotoxicity test adapted to automated, image-based detection should be useful to evaluate the early MPT event common to cell apoptosis and necrosis and simultaneously to detect involvement of the multidrug resistant pump with target drugs in a human hepatocyte environment. - Highlights: > We define conditions to preserve differentiation of selective pure HepaRG hepatocyte cultures. > In these conditions, CYPs

  18. 1-Nitropyrene (1-NP) induces apoptosis and apparently a non-apoptotic programmed cell death (paraptosis) in Hepa1c1c7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Asare, Nana Landvik, Nina E.; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Rissel, Mary; Tekpli, Xavier; Ask, Kjetil; Lag, Marit; Holme, Jorn A.

    2008-07-15

    Mechanistic studies of nitro-PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) of interest might help elucidate which chemical characteristics are most important in eliciting toxic effects. 1-Nitropyrene (1-NP) is the predominant nitrated PAH emitted in diesel exhaust. 1-NP-exposed Hepa1c1c7 cells exhibited marked changes in cellular morphology, decreased proliferation and different forms of cell death. A dramatic increase in cytoplasmic vacuolization was observed already after 6 h of exposure and the cells started to round up at 12 h. The rate of cell proliferation was markedly reduced at 24 h and apoptotic as well as propidium iodide (PI)-positive cells appeared. Electron microscopic examination revealed that the vacuolization was partly due to mitochondria swelling. The caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK inhibited only the apoptotic cell death and Nec-1 (an inhibitor of necroptosis) exhibited no inhibitory effects on either cell death or vacuolization. In contrast, cycloheximide markedly reduced both the number of apoptotic and PI-positive cells as well as the cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting that 1-NP induced paraptotic cell death. All the MAPKs; ERK1/2, p38 and JNK, appear to be involved in the death process since marked activation was observed upon 1-NP exposure, and their inhibitors partly reduced the induced cell death. The ERK1/2 inhibitor PD 98057 completely blocked the induced vacuolization, whereas the other MAPKs inhibitors only had minor effects on this process. These findings suggest that 1-NP may cause apoptosis and paraptosis. In contrast, the corresponding amine (1-aminopyrene) elicited only minor apoptotic and necrotic cell death, and cells with characteristics typical of paraptosis were absent.

  19. 1-Nitropyrene (1-NP) induces apoptosis and apparently a non-apoptotic programmed cell death (paraptosis) in Hepa1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Asare, Nana; Landvik, Nina E; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Rissel, Mary; Tekpli, Xavier; Ask, Kjetil; Låg, Marit; Holme, Jørn A

    2008-07-15

    Mechanistic studies of nitro-PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) of interest might help elucidate which chemical characteristics are most important in eliciting toxic effects. 1-Nitropyrene (1-NP) is the predominant nitrated PAH emitted in diesel exhaust. 1-NP-exposed Hepa1c1c7 cells exhibited marked changes in cellular morphology, decreased proliferation and different forms of cell death. A dramatic increase in cytoplasmic vacuolization was observed already after 6 h of exposure and the cells started to round up at 12 h. The rate of cell proliferation was markedly reduced at 24 h and apoptotic as well as propidium iodide (PI)-positive cells appeared. Electron microscopic examination revealed that the vacuolization was partly due to mitochondria swelling. The caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK inhibited only the apoptotic cell death and Nec-1 (an inhibitor of necroptosis) exhibited no inhibitory effects on either cell death or vacuolization. In contrast, cycloheximide markedly reduced both the number of apoptotic and PI-positive cells as well as the cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting that 1-NP induced paraptotic cell death. All the MAPKs; ERK1/2, p38 and JNK, appear to be involved in the death process since marked activation was observed upon 1-NP exposure, and their inhibitors partly reduced the induced cell death. The ERK1/2 inhibitor PD 98057 completely blocked the induced vacuolization, whereas the other MAPKs inhibitors only had minor effects on this process. These findings suggest that 1-NP may cause apoptosis and paraptosis. In contrast, the corresponding amine (1-aminopyrene) elicited only minor apoptotic and necrotic cell death, and cells with characteristics typical of paraptosis were absent. PMID:18417179

  20. Down-regulation of the detoxifying enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 by vanadium in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2009-05-01

    Recent data suggest that vanadium (V5+) compounds exert protective effects against chemical-induced carcinogenesis, mainly through modifying various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. In fact, we have shown that V5+ down-regulates the expression of Cyp1a1 at the transcriptional level through an ATP-dependent mechanism. However, incongruously, there is increasing evidence that V5+ is found in higher amounts in cancer cells and tissues than in normal cells or tissues. Therefore, the current study aims to address the possible effect of this metal on the regulation of expression of an enzyme that helps maintain endogenous antioxidants used to protect tissues/cells from mutagens, carcinogens, and oxidative stress damage, NAD(P) H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1). In an attempt to examine these effects, Hepa 1c1c7 cells and its AhRdeficient version, c12, were treated with increasing concentrations of V5+ in the presence of two distinct Nqo1 inducers, the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SUL). Our results showed that V5+ inhibits the TCDD- and SUL-mediated induction of Nqo1 at mRNA, protein, and catalytic activity levels. At transcriptional level, V5+ was able to decrease the TCDD- and SUL-induced nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the subsequent binding to antioxidant responsive element (ARE) without affecting Nrf2 protein levels. Looking at post-transcriptional level; we found that V5+ did not affect Nqo1 mRNA transcripts turn-over rates. However, at the post-translational level V5+ increased Nqo1 protein half-life. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that V5+ down-regulates Nqo1 at the transcriptional level, possibly through inhibiting the ATP-dependent activation of Nrf2. PMID:19367690

  1. Down-regulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-regulated genes by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and lipopolysaccharide in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Gharavi, Negar; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2005-03-01

    Although much is known concerning the effects of inflammation and oxidative stress on the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), little is known about the modulation of other aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-regulated genes such as glutathione-S-transferase Ya (GST Ya) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QOR) by inflammation. In the present study, the effect of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the constitutive and inducible expression of the AHR-regulated genes cyp1a1, GST Ya, and QOR was determined in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 (WT), AHR-deficient (C12), and AHR nuclear translocator protein (ARNT)-deficient (C4) cells. We found that both TNF-alpha and LPS strongly repressed the constitutive expression and the beta-naphthoflavone-mediated induction of cyp1a1, GST Ya, and QOR in WT but not in C12 and C4 cells. The induction of GST Ya and QOR activities and mRNA levels by phenolic antioxidant, tert-butylhydroquinone, through the antioxidant response element was not significantly affected by TNF-alpha or LPS. In addition, a significant increase in reactive oxygen species was observed in WT, C12, and C4 cells treated with TNF-alpha or LPS which was completely prevented by tert-butylhydroquinone. These results show that the down-regulation of AHR-regulated genes by TNF-alpha and LPS is dependent on the presence of both heterodimeric transcription factors, AHR and ARNT. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species may be involved in the down-regulation of AHR-regulated genes. PMID:15627257

  2. 40 CFR 141.717 - Pre-filtration treatment toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... conditions. (ii) The study must include sampling both from the production well(s) and from monitoring wells... production well(s). ..., pebbles or larger particles, and minor cement. A system must characterize the aquifer at the well site...

  3. 40 CFR 141.717 - Pre-filtration treatment toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conditions. (ii) The study must include sampling both from the production well(s) and from monitoring wells... production well(s). ..., pebbles or larger particles, and minor cement. A system must characterize the aquifer at the well site...

  4. 40 CFR 141.717 - Pre-filtration treatment toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... conditions. (ii) The study must include sampling both from the production well(s) and from monitoring wells... production well(s). ..., pebbles or larger particles, and minor cement. A system must characterize the aquifer at the well site...

  5. 40 CFR 141.717 - Pre-filtration treatment toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conditions. (ii) The study must include sampling both from the production well(s) and from monitoring wells... production well(s). ..., pebbles or larger particles, and minor cement. A system must characterize the aquifer at the well site...

  6. 40 CFR 141.717 - Pre-filtration treatment toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conditions. (ii) The study must include sampling both from the production well(s) and from monitoring wells... production well(s). ..., pebbles or larger particles, and minor cement. A system must characterize the aquifer at the well site...

  7. Analysis of two benzo[a]pyrene-resistant mutants of the mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 P(1)450 gene via cDNA expression in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, S; Smith, H H; Hankinson, O; Nebert, D W

    1987-01-01

    Two benzo[a]pyrene-resistant mutant clones (c1 and c37) of the mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 wild-type (wt) cell line were examined for their lack of P(1)450 [aryl hydrocarbon (benzo[a]pyrene) hydroxylase (AHH)] activity. From lambda gt11 cDNA libraries, the nearly full-length P(1)450 cDNAs of wt, c1 and c37 were isolated and sequenced. The c1 cDNA was found to have a single mutation leading to premature termination of the protein after Asn-414; a rapidly migrating band corresponding to this truncated protein was found on Western immunoblots. The c37 cDNA was found to have two point mutations, leading to Leu-118----Arg-118 and Arg-245----Pro-245, but otherwise to encode the normal (524-residue) protein; the mature protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. P(1)450 cDNA from wt, c1 and c37 and chimeric cDNAs between wt and c37 were inserted into the expression vector pAAH5 and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 50.L4. The Leu-118----Arg-118 mutation alone was found to have negligible effect on AHH activity, while the Arg-245----Pro-245 mutation alone leads to a 2- to 3-fold decrease in enzyme activity. The two mutations together totally abrogate AHH activity. The biologic mutant c37 provides the first evidence for the importance of Arg-245, and the complementary function of Leu-118, in normal P(1)450 enzymic function. This alteration in a single amino acid from arginine to proline might block electron flow directly, or change secondary structure of the protein, such that normal monooxygenation of benzo[a]pyrene cannot occur. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 5. PMID:3308449

  8. Benzo[a]pyrene, 3-methylcholanthrene and beta-naphthoflavone induce oxidative stress in hepatoma hepa 1c1c7 Cells by an AHR-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Elbekai, Reem H; Korashy, Hesham M; Wills, Kelly; Gharavi, Negar; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2004-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have been shown to cause oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo in various animal models but the mechanisms by which these compounds produce oxidative stress are unknown. In the current study we have investigated the role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by its cognate ligands and the consequent effect on cyp1a1 activity, mRNA and protein expressions. For this purpose, Hepa 1c1c7 cells wild-type (WT) and C12 mutant cells, which are AHR-deficient, were incubated with increasing concentrations of the AHR-ligands, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P, 0.25-25 microM), 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC, 0.1-10 microM) and beta-naphthoflavone (betaNF, 1-50 microM). The studied AHR-ligands dose-dependently increased lipid peroxidation in WT but not in C12 cells. However, only B[a]P and betaNF, at the highest concentrations tested, significantly increased H2O2 production in WT but not C12 cells. The increase in lipid peroxidation and H2O2 production by AHR-ligands were accompanied by a decrease in the cyp1a1 catalytic activity but not mRNA or protein expressions, which were significantly induced in a dose-dependent manner by all AHR-ligands, suggesting a post-translational mechanism is involved in the decrease of cyp1a1 activity. The AHR-ligand-mediated decrease in cyp1a1 activity was reversed by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that the AHR-ligands induce oxidative stress by an AHR-dependent pathway. PMID:15621696

  9. Differential regulation of polysome mRNA levels in mouse Hepa-1C1C7 cells exposed to dioxin.

    PubMed

    Thornley, Jessica A; Trask, Heidi W; Ridley, Christian J A; Korc, Murray; Gui, Jiang; Ringelberg, Carol S; Wang, Sinny; Tomlinson, Craig R

    2011-10-01

    The environmental agent 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or dioxin) causes a multitude of human illnesses. In order to more fully understand the underlying biology of TCDD toxicity, we tested the hypothesis that new candidate genes could be identified using polysome RNA from TCDD-treated mouse Hepa-1c1c7 cells. We found that (i) differentially expressed whole cell and cytoplasm RNA levels are both poor predictors of polysome RNA levels; (ii) for a majority of RNAs, differential RNA levels are regulated independently in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and polysomes; (iii) for the remaining polysome RNAs, levels are regulated via several different mechanisms, including a "tagging" of mRNAs in the nucleus for immediate polysome entry; and (iv) most importantly, a gene list derived from differentially expressed polysome RNA generated new genes and cell pathways potentially related to TCDD biology. PMID:21570461

  10. Induction of quinone reductase activity by stilbene analogs in mouse Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Y H; Kim, S; Park, J E; Jeong, L S; Lee, S K

    2001-12-01

    Based on the potential cancer chemopreventive activity of resveratrol, a trihydroxystilbene with the induction of quinone reductase activity, this study was designed to determine if stilbene-related compounds were inducers of phase II detoxifying metabolic enzyme quinone reductase (QR) in the mouse hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Among the thirteen compounds tested, several compounds including 3,4,5,3',5'-pentamethoxy-trans-stilbene were found to potentially induce QR activity in this cell line. In addition, substitution with 3-thiofurane ring instead of phenyl ring in the stilbene skeleton also exhibited potential induction of QR activity. This result will give primary information to design the potential inducers of QR activity in the stilbene analogs. PMID:11794542

  11. DIFFERENTIAL REGULATION OF POLYSOME mRNA LEVELS IN MOUSE HEPA-1C1C7 CELLS EXPOSED TO DIOXIN

    PubMed Central

    Thornley, Jessica A.; Trask, Heidi W.; Ridley, Christian J. A.; Korc, Murray; Gui, Jiang; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Wang, Sinny; Tomlinson, Craig R.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental agent 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or dioxin) causes a multitude of human illnesses. In order to more fully understand the underlying biology of TCDD toxicity, we tested the hypothesis that new candidate genes could be identified using polysome RNA from TCDD-treated mouse Hepa-1c1c7 cells. We found that (i) differentially expressed whole cell and cytoplasm RNA levels are both poor predictors of polysome RNA levels; (ii) for a majority of RNAs, differential RNA levels are regulated independently in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and polysomes; (iii) for the remaining polysome RNAs, levels are regulated via several different mechanisms, including a “tagging” of mRNAs in the nucleus for immediate polysome entry; and (iv) most importantly, a gene list derived from differentially expressed polysome RNA generated new genes and cell pathways potentially related to TCDD biology. PMID:21570461

  12. Translational control plays a prominent role in the hepatocytic differentiation of HepaRG liver progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Romain; Beretta, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Background We investigated the molecular events associated with the differentiation of liver progenitor cells into functional and polarized hepatocytes, using human HepaRG cells that display potent hepatocytic differentiation-inducible properties and share some features with liver progenitor cells. Results Profiling of total and of polysome-bound transcripts isolated from HepaRG cells undergoing hepatocytic differentiation was performed. A group of 3,071 probe sets was reproducibly regulated by at least 2-fold in total or in polysome-bound RNA populations, upon differentiation. The fold changes in the total and the polysome-bound RNA populations for these 3,071 probe sets were poorly correlated (R = 0.38). Moreover, while the majority of the regulated polysome-bound RNA probe sets were up-regulated upon differentiation, the majority of the regulated probe sets selected from the total RNA population was down-regulated. Genes translationally up-regulated were associated with cell cycle inhibition, increased susceptibility to apoptosis and innate immunity. In contrast, genes transcriptionally up-regulated during differentiation corresponded in the majority to liver-enriched transcripts involved in lipid homeostasis and drug metabolism. Finally, several epithelial and hepato-specific transcripts were strongly induced in the total RNA population but were translationally repressed. Conclusion Translational regulation is the main genomic event associated with hepatocytic differentiation of liver progenitor cells in vitro and targets genes critical for moderating hepatocellular growth, cell death and susceptibility to pathogens. Transcriptional regulation targets specifically liver-enriched transcripts vital for establishing normal hepatic energy homeostasis, cell morphology and polarization. The hepatocytic differentiation is also accompanied by a reduction of the transcript content complexity. PMID:18221535

  13. HepaRG microencapsulated spheroids in DMSO-free culture: novel culturing approaches for enhanced xenobiotic and biosynthetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Sofia P; Costa, Rita; Estrada, Marta; Shevchenko, Valery; Brito, Catarina; Alves, Paula M

    2015-08-01

    The need for models that recapitulate liver physiology is perceived for drug development, study of liver disease and bioartificial liver support. The bipotent cell line HepaRG constitutes an efficient surrogate of liver function, yet its differentiated status relies on high concentrations of DMSO, which may compromise the study of drug metabolism and limit the applicability of this hepatic model. Herein, we present a three-dimensional (3D) strategy for the differentiation of HepaRG based on alginate microencapsulation of cell spheroids and culture in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-free conditions. A ratio of 2.9:1 hepatocyte-like to biliary-like cells was obtained in the 3D culture, with an improvement of 35.9 % in the hepatocyte differentiation when compared with two-dimensional (2D) cultures. The expression of the hepatic identity genes HNF4α and PXR in 3D cultures was comparable to 2D differentiated cultures, while the expression of homeostatic-associated genes albumin and carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 was higher in 3D. Moreover, the spheroids presented a polarized organization, exhibiting an interconnected bile canalicular network and excretory functionality, assessed by specific activity of MRP2. Importantly, despite variability in basal gene expression levels, the activity of the phase I enzymes cytochrome P450 family 3, subfamily A, polypeptide 4 and cytochrome P450 family 1, subfamily A, polypeptide 2 upon induction was comparable to differentiated 2D cultures and albumin production and ammonia detoxification were enhanced in 3D. The presented model is suitable for toxicological applications, as it allows high throughput analysis of multiple compounds in a DMSO-free setting. Due to the high xenobiotic metabolism and maintenance of biosynthetic functions, the applicability of this model might be broadened to understand liver physiology and for bioartificial liver applications. PMID:25107451

  14. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in neutropenic patients during hospital construction: before and after chemoprophylaxis and institution of HEPA filters.

    PubMed

    Oren, I; Haddad, N; Finkelstein, R; Rowe, J M

    2001-04-01

    Between September 1993 and December 1993, during extensive hospital construction and indoor renovation, a nosocomial outbreak of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis occurred in acute leukemia patients treated in a regular ward that has only natural ventilation. The observed infection rate was 50%. Chemoprophylaxis with intravenous continuous low-dose amphotericin B was then instituted as a preventive measure. During the next 18 months invasive pulmonary aspergillosis developed in 43% of acute leukemia patients. After that period a new hematology ward was opened with an air filtration system through high-efficiency particulate air filtration (HEPA) filters, and a bone marrow transplantation program was started on the hematology service. During the following three years, none of the acute leukemia or bone marrow transplantation patients who were hospitalized exclusively in the hematology ward developed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, although 29% of acute leukemia patients who were housed in a regular ward, because of shortage of space in the new facility, still contracted invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Overall, 31 patients were diagnosed with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis during almost five years: 74% of patients recovered from invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, and 42% are long-term survivors; 26% of patients died of resistant leukemia with aspergillosis, but no one died of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis alone. In conclusion, during an on-going construction period, an extremely high incidence rate of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in acute leukemia patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy was observed. Institution of low-dose intravenous amphotericin B prophylaxis marginally reduced the incidence rate of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Keeping patients in a special ward with air filtration through a HEPA system eliminated invasive pulmonary aspergillosis completely. Among patients who developed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, early diagnosis and

  15. Trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor stimulate CYP3A4 proximal promoter activity in Hepa-I cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Mee Ryung; Kim, Dae-Kee; Sheen, Yhun Yhong

    2004-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the most abundant CYPs in human liver, comprising approximately 30% of the total liver CYPs contents and is involved in the metabolism of more than 60% of currently used therapeutic drugs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of CYP3A4 gene expression have not been understood. Thus, this study has been carried out to gain the insight of the molecular mechanism of CYP3A4 gene expression, investigating if the histone deacetylation is involved in the regulation of CYP3A4 gene expression by proximal promoter. Also SXR was investigated to see if they were involved in the regulation of CYP3A4 proximal promoter activity. Hepa-I cells were transfected with a plasmid containing approximately 1 kb of the human CYP3A4 proximal promoter region (863 to +64 bp) cloned in front of a reporter gene, luciferase, in the presence or absence of SXR. Transfected cells were treated with CYP3A4 inducers such as rifampicin, PCN and RU 486, in order to examine the regulation of CYP3A4 gene expression in the presence or absence of trichostatin A (TSA). In Hepa-I cells, CYP3A4 inducers increased modestly the luciferase activity when TSA was co-treated, but this increment was not enhanced by SXR cotransfection. Taken together, these results indicated that the inhibition of histone deacetylation was required to SXR-mediated increase in CYP3A4 proximal promoter region when rifampicin, or PCN was treated. Further a trans-activation by SXR may demand other species-specific transcription factors. PMID:15180307

  16. Recovery of plutonium from HEPA filters by Ce(IV): promoted dissolution of PuO/sub 2/ and recycle of the cerium promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Scheitlin, F.M.; Bond, W.D.

    1980-05-01

    Studies carried out in this investigation included (1) electrolytic production of Ce(IV) from Ce(III), (2) leaching of refractory PuO/sub 2/ from HEPA filters with maintenance of Ce(IV) by anodic oxidation during leaching, and (3) evaluation of methods for contacting the HEPA solids with the leaching solution and for separating the solid residue from the leaching liquor. Anodic oxidation of Ce(III) was accomplished with an electric current efficiency of about 85% at current densities of 0.04 to 0.4 A/dm/sup 2/ at Pt anode. Refractory PuO/sub 2/ was dissolved by a 4.0 M HNO/sub 3/ - 0.1 M Ce(IV) solution in 1.5 h at 100/sup 0/C using stirred-contact leaching of the solids or by recirculating the leachant through a packed column of the solids. Cerium(IV) concentrations were maintained continuously by anodic oxidation throughout leaching. Dissolution times up to 10 h were required unless the HEPA media were oxidized initially in air at 300/sup 0/C to destroy carbonaceous species which consumed Ce(IV) more rapidly than it could be regenerated be anodic oxidation. Leaching solids in packed columns avoided the relatively difficult liquid-solids separation by centrifugation which was required after stirred-contact leaching; however, the solids handling difficulties remain. A flowsheet is proposed for the recovery of actinides from HEPA filters. A 4 M HNO/sub 3/ - 0.1 M Ce(IV) nitrate solution is used as the leachant and the Ce(III) is recycled to the leaching operation using bidentate solvent extraction.

  17. The synthetic retinoid AGN 193109 but not retinoic acid elevates CYP1A1 levels in mouse embryos and Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Soprano, D R; Gambone, C J; Sheikh, S N; Gabriel, J L; Chandraratna, R A; Soprano, K J; Kochhar, D M

    2001-07-15

    The synthetic retinoid AGN 193109 is a potent pan retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonist. Treatment of pregnant mice with a single oral 1 mg/kg dose of this antagonist on day 8 postcoitum results in severe craniofacial (median cleft face or frontonasal deficiency) and eye malformations in virtually all exposed fetuses. Using differential display analysis, we have determined that CYP1A1 mRNA levels are elevated in mouse embryos 6 h following treatment with AGN 193109. Similarly, an elevation in CYP1A1 mRNA levels, protein levels, and aryl hydrocarbon hydoxylase activity occurs in Hepa-1c1c7 cells, with the maximal elevation observed when the cells were treated with 10(-5) M AGN 193109 for 4 to 8 h. Elevation in CYP1A1 mRNA levels in mouse embryos and Hepa-1c1c7 cells does not occur upon treatment with the natural retinoid, all-trans-retinoic acid. Finally, elevation in CYP1A1 mRNA levels was not observed when mutant Hepa-1c1c7 cells, which are defective in either the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), were treated with AGN 193109. This suggests that the AhR/ARNT pathway and not the RAR/RXR pathway is mediating the elevation of CYP1A1 mRNA levels by AGN 193109, at least in the Hepa-1c1c7 cells. This is the first example of a retinoid that displays the abililty to regulate both the RAR/RXR and AhR/ARNT transcriptional regulatory pathways. PMID:11446831

  18. Comparative microarray analysis of basal gene expression in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 wild-type and mutant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fong, C J; Burgoon, L D; Zacharewski, T R

    2005-08-01

    Hepa-1c1c7 wild-type and benzo[a]pyrene-resistant derived mutant cell lines have been used to elucidate pathways and mechanisms involving the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). However, there has been little focus on other biological processes which may differ between the isolated lines. In this study, mouse cDNA microarrays representing 4858 genes were used to examine differences in basal gene expression between mouse Hepa-1c1c7 wild-type and c1 (truncated Cyp1a1 protein), c4 (AhR nuclear translocator, ARNT, deficient), and c12 (low AhR levels) mutant cell lines. Surprisingly, c1 mutants exhibited the greatest number of gene expression changes compared to wild-type cells, followed by c4 and c12 lines, respectively. Differences in basal gene expression were consistent with cell line specific variations in morphology, mitochondrial activity, and proliferation rate. MTT and direct cell count assays indicate both c4 and c12 mutants exhibit increased proliferative activity when compared to wild-type cells, while the c1 mutants exhibited decreased activity. This study further characterizes Hepa-1c1c7 wild-type and mutant cells and identifies significant differences in biological processes that should be considered when conducting comparative mechanistic studies with these lines. PMID:15888666

  19. Mold colonization during use of preservative-treated and untreated air filters, including HEPA filters from hospitals and commercial locations over an 8-year period (1996-2003).

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel L; Simmons, Robert B; Crow, Sidney A; Ahearn, Donald G

    2005-07-01

    High efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA; 99.97% efficient at 0.3 microm) filters, filters with ASHRAE particulate arrestance rating of 90-95% at 1 mum (90-95% filters), and lower efficiency cellulosic-polyester filters from air conditioning systems in hospitals and commercial buildings were removed from the systems and examined microscopically for mold colonization. Cellulosic-type filters from systems with water entrainment problems typically were colonized, or became colonized upon incubation in moisture chambers. Species of Acremonium, Aspergillus, and Cladosporium were most common. With air filters of all types, treatment of filter media with an antimicrobial preservative tended to reduce or delay colonization. Mold colonization of HEPA and 90-95% filters was observed most often on the load surfaces, but two untreated HEPA filters were permeated with fungi, one with Aspergillus flavus, the other with Cladosporium sp. Air filters in heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, particularly those with chronic or periodic exposure to moisture, may serve as point sources for indoor molds. PMID:15856351

  20. Detection of main metabolites of XLR-11 and its thermal degradation product in human hepatoma HepaRG cells and human urine.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Kanda, Koji; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Kuwayama, Kenji; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Iwata, Yuko Togawa; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    The metabolism of (1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (XLR-11), a novel synthetic cannabinoid, was studied using a HepaRG cell culture. The HepaRG cells were incubated with the drug for 48 hours and the metabolites were extracted from the culture medium by liquid-liquid extraction. The extract was analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to detect the metabolites. N-(5-Hydroxypentyl) metabolite and N-pentanoic acid metabolite were identified in the culture medium of XLR-11, and several other metabolites, presumably formed by oxidation of the first two metabolites and XLR-11, were detected. The extract of an XLR-11 user's urine was also analyzed; however, the metabolites detected in the urine were different from XLR-11 metabolites in the medium. A metabolic experiment with the thermal degradation product of XLR-11, XLR-11 degradant, using HepaRG cells revealed that the urinary metabolites were almost identical to the XLR-11 degradant metabolites. These findings suggest that most of the XLR-11 was degraded by heating when the user smoked the herbal product containing XLR-11. PMID:25600155

  1. Formation of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites in human liver microsomes, S9 fraction, HepaRG-cells, and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Toni; Rousu, Timo; Mattila, Sampo; Chesné, Christophe; Pelkonen, Olavi; Turpeinen, Miia; Tolonen, Ari

    2015-11-10

    The objective was to compare several in vitro human liver-derived subcellular and cellular incubation systems for the formation of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites. Incubations of pooled human liver microsomes, human liver S9 fractions, HepaRG-cells, and human hepatocytes were performed with glutathione as a trapping agent. Experiments with liver S9 were performed under two conditions, using only NADPH and using a full set of cofactors enabling also conjugative metabolism. Ten structurally different compounds were used as a test set, chosen as either "positive" (ciprofloxacin, clozapine, diclofenac, ethinyl estradiol, pulegone, and ticlopidine) or "negative" (caffeine, citalopram, losartan, montelukast) compounds, based on their known adverse reactions on liver or bone marrow. GSH conjugates were observed for seven of the ten compounds; while no conjugates were observed for caffeine, citalopram, or ciprofloxacin. Hepatocyte and HepaRG assays produced a clearly lower number and lower relative abundance of GSH conjugates compared to assays with microsomes and S9 fractions. The major GSH conjugates were different for many compounds in cellular subfractions and cell-based systems. Hepatocytes generally produced a higher number of GSH conjugates than HepaRG cells, although the differences were minor. The results show that the hepatic enzyme system used for screening of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites do have a high impact on the results, and results between different systems are comparable only qualitatively. PMID:26263063

  2. Zinc ionophore activity of quercetin and epigallocatechin-gallate: from Hepa 1-6 cells to a liposome model.

    PubMed

    Dabbagh-Bazarbachi, Husam; Clergeaud, Gael; Quesada, Isabel M; Ortiz, Mayreli; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Fernández-Larrea, Juan B

    2014-08-13

    Labile zinc, a tiny fraction of total intracellular zinc that is loosely bound to proteins and easily interchangeable, modulates the activity of numerous signaling and metabolic pathways. Dietary plant polyphenols such as the flavonoids quercetin (QCT) and epigallocatechin-gallate act as antioxidants and as signaling molecules. Remarkably, the activities of numerous enzymes that are targeted by polyphenols are dependent on zinc. We have previously shown that these polyphenols chelate zinc cations and hypothesized that these flavonoids might be also acting as zinc ionophores, transporting zinc cations through the plasma membrane. To prove this hypothesis, herein, we have demonstrated the capacity of QCT and epigallocatechin-gallate to rapidly increase labile zinc in mouse hepatocarcinoma Hepa 1-6 cells as well as, for the first time, in liposomes. In order to confirm that the polyphenols transport zinc cations across the plasma membrane independently of plasma membrane zinc transporters, QCT, epigallocatechin-gallate, or clioquinol (CQ), alone and combined with zinc, were added to unilamellar dipalmitoylphosphocholine/cholesterol liposomes loaded with membrane-impermeant FluoZin-3. Only the combinations of the chelators with zinc triggered a rapid increase of FluoZin-3 fluorescence within the liposomes, thus demonstrating the ionophore action of QCT, epigallocatechin-gallate, and CQ on lipid membrane systems. The ionophore activity of dietary polyphenols may underlay the raising of labile zinc levels triggered in cells by polyphenols and thus many of their biological actions. PMID:25050823

  3. Transcriptional induction of the mouse metallothionein-I gene in hydrogen peroxide-treated Hepa cells involves a composite major late transcription factor/antioxidant response element and metal response promoter elements.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, T; Palmiter, R D; Andrews, G K

    1994-01-01

    Synthesis of metallothionein-I (MT-I) and heme oxygenase mRNAs is rapidly and transiently induced by H2O2 in mouse hepatoma cells (Hepa) and this effect is blocked by catalase. Menadione, which generates free radicals, also induces these mRNAs. Deletion mutagenesis revealed that a region between -42 and -153 in the mouse MT-I promoter was essential for induction of a CAT reporter gene. A multimer of a 16 bp sequence (-101 to -86) that includes an antioxidant response element and overlapping adenovirus major late transcription factor binding site elevated basal expression and allowed induction by H2O2 when inserted upstream of a minimal promoter. However, deletion of this region (-100 to -89) from the intact MT-I promoter (-153) did not completely eliminate response. Multiple copies of a metal response element also permitted response to H2O2. These results suggest that induction of MT-I gene transcription by H2O2 is mediated by at least two different elements within the proximal MT-I gene promoter and suggest a previously undescribed function of the MRE. Induction of MT gene transcription by ROS and the subsequent scavenging of ROS by the MT peptide is reminiscent of the metal regulatory loop and is consistent with the hypothesized protective functions of MT. Images PMID:7800494

  4. Preferential induction of the AhR gene battery in HepaRG cells after a single or repeated exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, Julie Josse, Rozenn Lambert, Carine Antherieu, Sebastien Laurent, Veronique Loyer, Pascal Robin, Marie-Anne Guillouzo, Andre

    2010-11-15

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) are two of the most common heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) produced during cooking of meat, fish and poultry. Both HAA produce different tumor profiles in rodents and are suspected to be carcinogenic in humans. In order to better understand the molecular basis of HAA toxicity, we have analyzed gene expression profiles in the metabolically competent human HepaRG cells using pangenomic oligonucleotide microarrays, after either a single (24-h) or a repeated (28-day) exposure to 10 {mu}M PhIP or MeIQx. The most responsive genes to both HAA were downstream targets of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR): CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 after both time points and CYP1B1 and ALDH3A1 after 28 days. Accordingly, CYP1A1/1A2 induction in HAA-treated HepaRG cells was prevented by chemical inhibition or small interference RNA-mediated down-regulation of the AhR. Consistently, HAA induced activity of the CYP1A1 promoter, which contains a consensus AhR-related xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). In addition, several other genes exhibited both time-dependent and compound-specific expression changes with, however, a smaller magnitude than previously reported for the prototypical AhR target genes. These changes concerned genes mainly related to cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, and cancer. In conclusion, these results identify the AhR gene battery as the preferential target of PhIP and MeIQx in HepaRG cells and further support the hypothesis that intake of HAA in diet might increase human cancer risk.

  5. Evaluation of cytochrome P450 inductions by anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine, and carbamazepine using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Ikuo; Murayama, Norie; Kuroki, Ayaka; Kota, Jagannath; Iwano, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Hirota, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine is structurally related to carbamazepine, but has reportedly different metabolic pathway. Auto-induction potentials of oxcarbazepine, its pharmacologically active metabolite 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine were evaluated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 mRNA levels and primary metabolic rates using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. For the CYP1A2 the induction potential determined as the fold change in mRNA levels was 7.2 (range: 2.3-11.5) and 10.0 (6.2-13.7) for oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively, while 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine did not induce. The fold change in mRNA levels for CYP2B6 was 11.5 (3.2-19.3), 7.0 (2.5-10.8) and 14.8 (3.1-29.1) for oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively. The fold change for CYP3A4 induction level by oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine was 3.5 (1.2-7.4), 2.7 (0.8-5.7) and 8.3 (3.5-14.5), respectively. The data suggest lower induction potential of oxcarbazepine and 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine relative to carbamazepine. The results in HepaRG cells showed similar trend as the human hepatocytes. After incubation for 72 h in hepatocytes and HepaRG cells, auto-induction was evident for only carbamazepine metabolism. The 10-keto group instead of double bond at C10 position is evidently a determinant factor for limited auto-induction of P450 enzymes by oxcarbazepine. PMID:26711482

  6. Stability of the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor and its Regulated Genes in the Low activity Variant of Hepa-1 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey-Johnson, Andria; Abukalam, Rawia; Eltom, Sakina E.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the expression kinetics of some of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-regulated genes in LA1 variant cells compared to wild type (WT) Hepa-1 mouse hepatoma cell lines, and we investigated the stability of AhR protein as a key step in the function of this receptor. Treatment of both cell types with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) resulted in increased CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA with a subsequent down regulation of AhR. We show here that co-treatment with transcription inhibitor actinomycin D (ActD) has reversed the TCDD-induced depletion of AhR protein in WT. However, the proteolytic degradation of AhR in absence of TCDD was significantly higher in LA1 cells than in WT, and ActD treatment reduced this loss. Induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA by TCDD in WT cells each exhibited bursts of activity in the initial hour which were about 3-fold greater than in LAI cells. The induced mRNA levels in LA1 exhibited a slow and sustained increase approximating the WT levels by 20 h. The induction of two other AhR-regulated genes also showed comparable turnover differences between the two cell types. Thus, altered regulation of the AhR responsive genes in LA1 may result from a difference in AhR stability. PMID:25637755

  7. Stability of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and its regulated genes in the low activity variant of Hepa-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Humphrey-Johnson, Andria; Abukalam, Rawia; Eltom, Sakina E

    2015-03-01

    We examined the expression kinetics of some of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-regulated genes in LA1 variant cells compared to wild type (WT) Hepa-1 mouse hepatoma cell lines, and we investigated the stability of AhR protein as a key step in the function of this receptor. Treatment of both cell types with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) resulted in increased CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA with a subsequent down regulation of AhR. We show here that co-treatment with transcription inhibitor actinomycin D (ActD) has reversed the TCDD-induced depletion of AhR protein in WT. However, the proteolytic degradation of AhR in absence of TCDD was significantly higher in LA1 cells than in WT, and ActD treatment reduced this loss. Induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA by TCDD in WT cells each exhibited bursts of activity in the initial hour which were about 3-fold greater than in LAI cells. The induced mRNA levels in LA1 exhibited a slow and sustained increase approximating the WT levels by 20h. The induction of two other AhR-regulated genes also showed comparable turnover differences between the two types of cell. Thus, altered regulation of the AhR responsive genes in LA1 may result from a difference in AhR stability. PMID:25637755

  8. Activation of the black seabream (Acanthopagrus schlegeli) somatolactin-alpha gene promoter by Pit-1c in the Hepa-T1 cell-line.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Chan, King Ming

    2010-03-01

    Somatolactin (SL) is a pituitary hormone of the growth hormone (GH) gene family found only in fish. To understand the regulation of this hormone at the level of gene transcription, we obtained a SLalpha gene from black seabream (bsb), with its 5' flanking promoter region carrying several putative transcription factors including seven binding sites for pituitary-specific transcription factor 1 (Pit-1). To study the actions of Pit-1 on this gene promoter, we cloned three variants of bsbPit-1 (Pit-1a, Pit-1b and Pit-1c) derived from alternative splicing of mRNA or differential transcription start sites from black seabream pituitary. The deduced amino acid sequences of these Pit-1s contained 371 amino acids (aa), 333 and 311aa for the three Pit-1 variants, Pit-1a, Pit-1b and Pit-1c, respectively, with diverse regions of Pit-1 located at the transactivation domain. The actions of bsbPit-1 variants on the bsbSL gene promoter were investigated using a co-transfection assay, with a reporter gene using a transient expression assay in Hepa-T1 cells. The N-terminus truncated isoform bsbPit-1c showed the highest level of activity on SLalpha gene promoter activation in Hepa-T1 cells; however, neither Pit-1a nor Pit-1b activated the bsbSL gene promoter in the same study. PMID:19766121

  9. The utility of intensified environmental surveillance for pathogenic moulds in a stem cell transplantation ward during construction work to monitor the efficacy of HEPA filtration.

    PubMed

    Nihtinen, A; Anttila, V-J; Richardson, M; Meri, T; Volin, L; Ruutu, T

    2007-09-01

    A 12-week environmental study was performed to ensure that the patient rooms of an SCT ward with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration remained uncontaminated by moulds during close-by construction work. The sampling included measuring the ventilation channel pressure, particle count measurements, air sampling, settled dust analysis and fungal cultures from the oral and nasal cavities of the patients. No changes in the air pressure occurred. Median particle counts in patient rooms were 63-420 particles/l. The mean particle count of the outside air was 173,659 particles/l. Patient room air samples were negative for aspergilli in 32 of 33 cases. All samples of the outside air were positive for moulds. Aspergillus fumigatus was isolated at the beginning of excavation works at the construction area and in two of 33 dust samples from patient rooms. All 70 nasal samples were negative. Of 35 mouth samples, one sample was positive for A. niger in a patient with a previously diagnosed aspergillus infection. During a median follow-up of 214 days, no invasive aspergillus infections were diagnosed in the 55 patients treated during the construction period. In conclusion, the HEPA filters seemed to have performed well in preventing an aspergillosis outbreak. PMID:17589532

  10. Sulforaphane induces CYP1A1 mRNA, protein, and catalytic activity levels via an AhR-dependent pathway in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 and human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2009-03-01

    Recent reports have proposed that some naturally occurring phytochemicals can function as anticancer agents mainly through inducing phase II drug detoxification enzymes. Of these phytochemicals, isothiocyanates sulforaphane (SUL), present in broccoli, is by far the most extensively studied. In spite of its positive effect on phase II drug metabolizing enzymes, its effect on the phase I bioactivating enzyme cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1) is still a matter of debate. As a first step to investigate this effect, Hepa 1c1c7 and HepG2 cells were treated with various concentration of SUL. Our results showed that SUL-induced CYP1A1 mRNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, this induction was further reflected on the protein and catalytic activity levels. Investigating the effect of SUL at the transcriptional level revealed that SUL increases the Cyp1a1 mRNA as early as 1h. The RNA polymerase inhibitor actinomycin D (Act-D) completely abolished the SUL-induced Cyp1a1 mRNA. Furthermore, SUL successfully activated AhR transformation and its subsequent binding to the XRE. At the post-transcriptional level, SUL did not affect the levels of existing Cyp1a1 mRNA transcripts. This is the first demonstration that the broccoli-derived SUL can directly induce Cyp1a1 gene expression in an AhR-dependent manner and represents a novel mechanism by which SUL induces this enzyme. PMID:19013013

  11. Selecting Cells for Bioartificial Liver Devices and the Importance of a 3D Culture Environment: A Functional Comparison between the HepaRG and C3A Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    van Wenum, Martien; Adam, Aziza A A; Hakvoort, Theodorus B M; Hendriks, Erik J; Shevchenko, Valery; van Gulik, Thomas M; Chamuleau, Robert A F M; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the first clinical trials on Bioartificial Livers (BALs) loaded with a proliferative human hepatocyte cell source have started. There are two cell lines that are currently in an advanced state of BAL development; HepaRG and HepG2/C3A. In this study we aimed to compare both cell lines on applicability in BALs and to identify possible strategies for further improvement. We tested both cell lines in monolayer- and BAL cultures on growth characteristics, hepatic differentiation, nitrogen-, carbohydrate-, amino acid- and xenobiotic metabolism. Interestingly, both cell lines adapted the hepatocyte phenotype more closely when cultured in BALs; e.g. monolayer cultures produced lactate, while BAL cultures showed diminished lactate production (C3A) or conversion to elimination (HepaRG), and urea cycle activity increased upon BAL culturing in both cell lines. HepaRG-BALs outperformed C3A-BALs on xenobiotic metabolism, ammonia elimination and lactate elimination, while protein synthesis was comparable. In BAL cultures of both cell lines ammonia elimination correlated positively with glutamine production and glutamate consumption, suggesting ammonia elimination was mainly driven by the balance between glutaminase and glutamine synthetase activity. Both cell lines lacked significant urea cycle activity and both required multiple culture weeks before reaching optimal differentiation in BALs. In conclusion, culturing in BALs enhanced hepatic functionality of both cell lines and from these, the HepaRG cells are the most promising proliferative cell source for BAL application. PMID:27489500

  12. Selecting Cells for Bioartificial Liver Devices and the Importance of a 3D Culture Environment: A Functional Comparison between the HepaRG and C3A Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    van Wenum, Martien; Adam, Aziza A.A.; Hakvoort, Theodorus B.M.; Hendriks, Erik J.; Shevchenko, Valery; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Chamuleau, Robert A.F.M.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the first clinical trials on Bioartificial Livers (BALs) loaded with a proliferative human hepatocyte cell source have started. There are two cell lines that are currently in an advanced state of BAL development; HepaRG and HepG2/C3A. In this study we aimed to compare both cell lines on applicability in BALs and to identify possible strategies for further improvement. We tested both cell lines in monolayer- and BAL cultures on growth characteristics, hepatic differentiation, nitrogen-, carbohydrate-, amino acid- and xenobiotic metabolism. Interestingly, both cell lines adapted the hepatocyte phenotype more closely when cultured in BALs; e.g. monolayer cultures produced lactate, while BAL cultures showed diminished lactate production (C3A) or conversion to elimination (HepaRG), and urea cycle activity increased upon BAL culturing in both cell lines. HepaRG-BALs outperformed C3A-BALs on xenobiotic metabolism, ammonia elimination and lactate elimination, while protein synthesis was comparable. In BAL cultures of both cell lines ammonia elimination correlated positively with glutamine production and glutamate consumption, suggesting ammonia elimination was mainly driven by the balance between glutaminase and glutamine synthetase activity. Both cell lines lacked significant urea cycle activity and both required multiple culture weeks before reaching optimal differentiation in BALs. In conclusion, culturing in BALs enhanced hepatic functionality of both cell lines and from these, the HepaRG cells are the most promising proliferative cell source for BAL application. PMID:27489500

  13. Comparisons of differential gene expression elicited by TCDD, PCB126, βNF, or ICZ in mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Nault, Rance; Forgacs, Agnes L; Dere, Edward; Zacharewski, Timothy R

    2013-10-23

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a promiscuous receptor activated by structurally diverse synthetic and natural compounds. AhR activation may lead to ligand-specific changes in gene expression despite similarities in mode of action. Therefore, differential gene expression elicited by four structurally diverse, high affinity AhR ligands (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; 10nM, 30 μg/kg), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126; 100nM, 300μg/kg), β-naphthoflavone (βNF; 10 μM, 90 mg/kg), and indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ; 1μM)) in mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver samples were compared. A total of 288, 183, 119, and 131 Hepa1c1c7 genes were differentially expressed (|fold-change|≥ 1.5, P1(t)≥ 0.9999) by TCDD, βNF, PCB126, and ICZ, respectively. Only ∼35% were differentially expressed by all 4 ligands in Hepa1c1c7 cells. In vivo, 661, 479, and 265 hepatic genes were differentially expressed following treatment with TCDD, βNF, and PCB126, respectively. Similar to Hepa1c1c7 cells, ≤ 34% of gene expression changes were common across all ligands. Principal components analysis identified time-dependent gene expression divergence. Comparisons of ligand-elicited expression between Hepa1c1c7 cells and mouse liver identified only 11 common gene expression changes across all ligands. Although metabolism may explain some ligand-specific gene expression changes, PCB126, βNF, and ICZ also elicited divergent expression compared to TCDD, suggestive of selective AhR modulation. PMID:23994337

  14. Comparisons of differential gene expression elicited by TCDD, PCB126, βNF, or ICZ in mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Nault, Rance; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Dere, Edward; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a promiscuous receptor activated by structurally diverse synthetic and natural compounds. AhR activation may lead to ligand-specific changes in gene expression despite similarities in mode of action. Therefore, differential gene expression elicited by four structurally diverse, high affinity AhR ligands (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; 10 nM, 30 µg/kg), 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126; 100 nM, 300 µg/kg), β-naphthoflavone (βNF; 10 µM, 90 mg/kg), and indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ; 1 µM)) in mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver samples were compared. A total of 288, 183, 119, and 131 Hepa1c1c7 genes were differentially expressed (|fold-change| ≥ 1.5, P1(t) ≥ 0.9999) by TCDD, βNF, PCB126, and ICZ, respectively. Only ~35% were differentially expressed by all 4 ligands in Hepa1c1c7 cells. In vivo, 661, 479, and 265 hepatic genes were differentially expressed following treatment with TCDD, βNF, and PCB126, respectively. Similar to Hepa1c1c7 cells, ≤34% of gene expression changes were common across all ligands. Principal components analysis identified time-dependent gene expression divergence. Comparisons of ligand-elicited expression between Hepa1c1c7 cells and mouse liver identified only 11 common gene expression changes across all ligands. Although metabolism may explain some ligand-specific gene expression changes, PCB126, βNF, and ICZ also elicited divergent expression compared to TCDD, suggestive of selective AhR modulation. PMID:23994337

  15. MG-132 inhibits the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 at the catalytic activity but not the mRNA or protein levels in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Elbekai, Reem H; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2008-11-10

    Previous studies have shown that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced degradation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is inhibited by MG-132, a potent inhibitor of the 26S proteasome. Therefore, the current study aims to address the effect of MG-132 on the AhR-regulated gene, cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), using murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Our results showed that MG-132 at the highest concentration tested, 10 microM significantly increased the Cyp1a1 at mRNA, protein and catalytic activity levels through a transcriptional mechanism. On the other hand, MG-132 further potentiated the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 at mRNA but not at protein level. In contrast, MG-132 significantly inhibited the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 catalytic activity. In addition, we showed that the decrease in Cyp1a1 catalytic activity is not Cyp specific, as MG-132 significantly inhibited Cyp2b1 and total cytochrome P450 catalytic activities. These results prompted us to examine the effect of MG-132 on total cellular heme content and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA, a rate limiting enzyme of heme degradation. Our results showed that MG-132 significantly induced HO-1 mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, MG-132 potentiated the induction of HO-1 mRNA by TCDD in a concentration-dependent manner. The induction of HO-1 mRNA level coincided with a decrease in total cellular heme content. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates for the first time that MG-132, despite of increasing Cyp1a1 mRNA expression, it decreases its activity probably through decreasing its heme content. PMID:18835339

  16. Process Evaluation of Making HEPA Policy Practice: A Group Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Robert G; Moore, Justin B; Huberty, Jennifer; Freedman, Darcy; Turner-McGrievy, Brie; Beighle, Aaron; Ward, Diane; Pate, Russell; Saunders, Ruth; Brazendale, Keith; Chandler, Jessica; Ajja, Rahma; Kyryliuk, Becky; Beets, Michael W

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the link between implementation of Strategies to Enhance Practice (STEPs) and outcomes. Twenty after-school programs (ASPs) participated in an intervention to increase children's accumulation of 30 minutes/day of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and quality of snacks served during program time. Outcomes were measured via accelerometer (MVPA) and direct observation (snacks). STEPs implementation data were collected via document review and direct observation. Based on implementation data, ASPs were divided into high/low implementers. Differences between high/low implementers' change in percentage of boys accumulating 30 minutes/day of MVPA were observed. There was no difference between high/low implementers for girls. Days fruits and/or vegetables and water were served increased in the high/low implementation groups, while desserts and sugar-sweetened beverages decreased. Effect sizes (ES) for the difference in changes between the high and low group ranged from low (ES = 0.16) to high (ES = 0.97). Higher levels of implementation led to increased MVPA for boys, whereas girls MVPA benefited from the intervention regardless of high/low implementation. ESs of the difference between high/low implementers indicate that increased implementation of STEPs increases days healthier snacks are served. Programs in the high-implementation group implemented a variety of STEPs strategies, suggesting local adoption/adaptation is key to implementation. PMID:27216875

  17. Camel milk modulates the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-regulated genes, Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1, in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Korashy, Hesham M; El Gendy, Mohamed A M; Alhaider, Abdulqader A; El-Kadi, Ayman O

    2012-01-01

    There is a traditional belief in the Middle East that camel milk may aid in prevention and treatment of numerous cases of cancer yet, the exact mechanism was not investigated. Therefore, we examined the ability of camel milk to modulate the expression of a well-known cancer-activating gene, Cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), and cancer-protective genes, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1), in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cell line. Our results showed that camel milk significantly inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 gene expression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most potent Cyp1a1 inducer and known carcinogenic chemical, at mRNA, protein, and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, camel milk significantly decreased the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE)-dependent luciferase activity, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism is involved. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of camel milk was associated with a proportional increase in heme oxygenase 1. On the other hand, camel milk significantly induced Nqo1 and Gsta1 mRNA expression level in a concentration-dependent fashion. The RNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely blocked the induction of Nqo1 mRNA by camel milk suggesting the requirement of de novo RNA synthesis through a transcriptional mechanism. In conclusion, camel milk modulates the expression of Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1 at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. PMID:22570534

  18. Camel Milk Modulates the Expression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Regulated Genes, Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1, in Murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korashy, Hesham M.; El Gendy, Mohamed A. M.; Alhaider, Abdulqader A.; El-Kadi, Ayman O.

    2012-01-01

    There is a traditional belief in the Middle East that camel milk may aid in prevention and treatment of numerous cases of cancer yet, the exact mechanism was not investigated. Therefore, we examined the ability of camel milk to modulate the expression of a well-known cancer-activating gene, Cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), and cancer-protective genes, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1), in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cell line. Our results showed that camel milk significantly inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 gene expression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most potent Cyp1a1 inducer and known carcinogenic chemical, at mRNA, protein, and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, camel milk significantly decreased the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE)-dependent luciferase activity, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism is involved. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of camel milk was associated with a proportional increase in heme oxygenase 1. On the other hand, camel milk significantly induced Nqo1 and Gsta1 mRNA expression level in a concentration-dependent fashion. The RNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely blocked the induction of Nqo1 mRNA by camel milk suggesting the requirement of de novo RNA synthesis through a transcriptional mechanism. In conclusion, camel milk modulates the expression of Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1 at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. PMID:22570534

  19. A Rapid and Sensitive HPLC-DAD Assay to Quantify Lamotrigine, Phenytoin and Its Main Metabolite in Samples of Cultured HepaRG Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana; Rodrigues, Márcio; Falcão, Amílcar; Alves, Gilberto

    2016-09-01

    A sensitive and fast high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection assay was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin (HPPH), phenytoin (PHT) and lamotrigine (LTG) in samples of cultured HepaRG cells. Chromatographic separation of analytes and internal standard (IS) was achieved in ∼15 min on a C18-column, at 35°C, using acetonitrile (6%), methanol (25%) and a mixture (69%) of water-triethylamine (99.7:0.3, v/v; pH 6.0), pumped at 1 mL/min. The analytes and IS were detected at 215 or 235 nm. Calibration curves were linear with regression coefficients >0.994 over the concentration ranges of 0.1-15 µg/mL for HPPH; 0.15-30 µg/mL for PHT and 0.2-20 µg/mL for LTG. The method showed to be accurate (bias value of ±10.5 or ±17.6% in the lower limit of quantification, LLOQ) and precise (coefficient variation ≤8.1 or ≤15.4% in the LLOQ), and the absolute recovery of the analytes ranged from 62.5 to 96.9%. HepaRG cells have emerged as a very promising in vitro model to evaluate metabolic, drug interaction and/or pharmacokinetic studies, and this methodology will be suitable to support subsequent studies involving the antiepileptic drugs PHT and LTG. PMID:27199444

  20. Baicalin induces NAD(P)H:quinone reductase through the transactivation of AP-1 and NF-kappaB in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, H J; Lee, Y W; Lee, S K

    2004-12-01

    Baicalin (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone-7-O-D-glucuronic acid, BA) is a flavone isolated from Scutellariae radix. In our previous report BA was a major active principle of NAD(P)H:quinone reductase (QR) induction mediated by Scutellariae radix extract and the induction was related to the transcriptional activation of the QR gene in Hepa 1c1c7 cells. The primary aim of the present study was to determine the molecular mechanism of QR gene expression by baicalin. The antioxidant or electrophile response element (ARE/EpRE) found at the 5'-flanking region of phase II genes may play an important role in mediating their induction by xenobiotics, including chemopreventive agents. In accordance, to study the molecular mechanisms of QR gene expression by BA, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), using nuclear extracts of treated and untreated cells against ARE, activator protein-1 (AP-1) or nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) binding sites, showed that BA increased the binding levels of the parameters in a dose-dependent manner. Further, Hepa 1c1c7 cells were transiently transfected with a plasmid containing three copies of the AP-1- or NF-kappaB-binding site linked to a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene. Using the CAT reporter gene assay, a dose-dependent transactivation of AP-1- or NF-kappaB-mediated CAT expression was observed with the treatment of BA. These results clearly indicate that BA induces the QR gene expression and activity by transactivation of AP-1 and NF-kappaB, and thus BA may be considered as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent with the induction of phase II detoxification enzyme. PMID:15548947

  1. Activation of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway occurs in the CD133 positive cells of mouse liver cancer Hepa 1–6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Kuo-Shyang; Sheen, I-Shyan; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Yu, Ming-Che; Hsiau, Hsin-I; Chang, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Hsin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Background The important role of cancer stem cells in carcinogenesis has been emphasized in research. CD133+ cells have been mentioned as liver cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Some researchers have proposed that the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway contributes to hepatocarcinogenesis and that the pathway activation occurs mainly in cancer stem cells. We investigated whether the activation of the Shh pathway occurs in CD133+ cells from liver cancer. Materials and methods We used magnetic sorting to isolate CD133+ cells from mouse cancer Hepa 1–6 cells. To examine the clonogenicity, cell culture and soft agar colony formation assay were performed between CD133+ and CD133− cells. To study the activation of the Shh pathway, we examined the mRNA expressions of Shh, patched homolog 1 (Ptch-1), glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (Gli-1), and smoothened homolog (Smoh) by real-time polymerase chain reaction of both CD133+ and CD133− cells. Results The number (mean ± standard deviation) of colonies of CD133+ cells and CD133− cells was 1,031.0 ± 104.7 and 119.7 ± 17.6 respectively. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Their clonogenicity was 13.7% ± 1.4% and 1.6% ± 0.2% respectively with a statistically significant difference found (P < 0.001). CD133+ cells and CD133− cells were found to have statistically significant differences in Shh mRNA and Smoh mRNA (P = 0.005 and P = 0.043 respectively). Conclusion CD133+ Hepa 1–6 cells have a significantly higher colony proliferation and clonogenicity. The Shh pathway is activated in these cells that harbor stem cell features, with an underexpression of Shh mRNA and an overexpression of Smoh mRNA. Blockade of the Shh signaling pathway may be a potential therapeutic strategy for hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:23950652

  2. Hepa room air purifier

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.B.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a portable air purification apparatus comprising a housing including a base portion and cover means, the base portion including an air deflection means and a plate means mounted in spaced relationship to the air deflection means so as to create a substantially continuous air exhaust opening therebetween. A centrifugal fan means is disposed between the plate means and the air deflection means and is mounted so as to direct air radially outwardly therefrom through the air exhaust opening, at least one opening through the plate means to permit air flow therethrough to the centrifugal fan means. The motor means carried by the base portion and extends upwardly with respect to the opening in the plate means, the motor means having drive shaft means for driving the centrifugal fan means. An air filter means is mounted between the base portion and the cover means so that air is drawn therethrough toward the centrifugal fan means, and a means for secures the cover means relative to the base means to thereby retain the air filter means therebetween.

  3. Early steps in bilirubin-mediated apoptosis in murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells are characterized by aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent oxidative stress and activation of the mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Garth H; Bend, John R

    2005-01-01

    Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), the end product of heme catabolism, causes apoptosis in cells of the central nervous system, endothelial cells, and hepatotoma cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to UCB cytotoxicity remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to characterize the sequence of early events leading to UCB-mediated cytotoxicity in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells. In the present study, UCB (5-50 microM) was found to markedly increase the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a concentration-dependent manner, which is significantly elevated by 30 min post-treatment. This generation of ROS by UCB is not dependent on aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) signaling, as cells deficient in the Ahr (C12 cells) or the Ahr nuclear translocator protein (Arnt; C4 cells) were as efficient at generating ROS as wild type (WT) Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization, evaluated with the lipophilic cationic dye, JC-1, occurred at least by 2 h after treatment with 50 muM UCB. Analysis of the caspase cascade demonstrated that activation of caspase-9 preceded activation of caspase-3. No conversion of procaspase-2 to active caspase-2 was detected in this study. These results demonstrate that UCB-mediated apoptosis in Hepa 1c1c7 cells is associated with increased oxidative stress and that caspase-9, and definitely not caspase-2, is the initiator caspase for apoptosis in UCB-treated Hepa 1c1c7 cells. PMID:16173058

  4. Cloning and characterization of a tilapia (Oreochromis aureus) metallothionein gene promoter in Hepa-T1 cells following the administration of various heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Chan, William Wai Lun; Chan, King Ming

    2008-01-20

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are highly conserved intracellular metal-binding proteins that contribute to the homeostasis of essential metals and the detoxification of non-essential heavy metals. MT gene expression is induced by various heavy metal ions, and Zn(2+) is able to bind and activate a transcription factor associated with the MT gene that is known as the metal responsive element (MRE) binding transcription factor-1 (MTF-1). Heavy metals other than Zn(2+), such as Cd(2+) and Cu(2+), fail to activate the binding of MTF-1 to MREs despite their ability to induce the transcription of the MT gene. To study how different metal ions regulate MT gene expression, a tilapia (ti)-MT gene promoter was cloned and its responses to activation by various metal ions measured using a Hepa T1 cell culture model. The tiMT gene promoter contains six functional MREs within 2118bp 5' of the translational start site. A transient gene expression study showed the tiMT gene promoter fragment to be responsive to Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), and Zn(2+). Deletions from the 5' end and the site-directed mutagenesis of individual MREs in the tiMT gene promoter confirmed that both proximal and distal clusters of MREs were required for the maximal metal induction of the tiMT gene. The distal cluster of MREs greatly enhanced the induction of tiMT gene expression by several of the heavy metal ions, and especially the non-Zn(2+) ions. Individual MREs showed a different responsiveness to metal ions, with MREe being the most potent, MREb being responsive to Zn(2+) but not to other metal ions, and MREa being mainly for the basal expression of the tiMT gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) identified a transcription factor that was able to bind most of the MREs, with the exception of MREd, but the binding was only activated by the in vivo administration of Zn(2+), not the administration of Cd(2+) or Cu(2+). In conclusion, the results of this study on a Hepa T1 cell model suggest that the

  5. Aqueous extracts of selenium-fertilized broccoli increase selenoprotein activity and inhibit DNA single-strand breaks, but decrease the activity of quinone reductase in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Keck, Anna-Sigrid; Finley, John W

    2006-05-01

    Depending on growth conditions, broccoli may be enriched in the isothiocyanate sulforaphane and/or the mineral selenium (Se); both compounds may play an important role in the reduction of intracellular oxidative stress and chronic disease prevention. Sulforaphane up-regulates transcription of Phase II detoxification proteins (e.g. quinone reductase [QR]), whereas Se is needed for the production of thioredoxin reductase (TR) and glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1), both of which exhibit antioxidant activity. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the fertilization of broccoli with Se increases the antioxidant ability of broccoli. Hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA single-strand breaks (measured by single cell electrophoresis, Comet assay) and activity of antioxidant enzymes (GPx, TR and QR) were measured in mouse hepatoma cells (Hepa 1c1c7 cells) treated with purified sulforaphane, sodium selenite or extracts of selenized broccoli. When supplied separately as chemically pure substances, sodium selenite was more effective than sulforaphane for reduction of single-strand breaks. Se-fertilized broccoli extracts were the most effective for reduction of DNA single-strand breaks, and extracts that contained 0.71 microM Se and 0.08 microM sulforaphane inhibited 94% of DNA single-strand breaks. A significant positive association (r = 0.81, p = 0.009) between GPx1 activity and inhibition of DNA single-strand breaks as well as a 24h lag time between addition of Se, sulforaphane or broccoli extract and inhibition of single-strand breaks suggests that some of the antioxidant protection is mediated through selenoproteins. Conversely, fertilization of broccoli with Se decreased the ability of broccoli extract to induce QR activity. These results demonstrate that Se and sulforaphane, alone or as a component of broccoli, may help decrease oxidative stress. They further suggest that Se is the most important for decreasing oxidative stress, but maximizing the Se content

  6. Anti-tumor effects of paeonol in a HepA-hepatoma bearing mouse model via induction of tumor cell apoptosis and stimulation of IL-2 and TNF-alpha production.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guo-Ping; Wang, Hua; Xu, Shu-Ping; Shen, Yu-Xian; Wu, Qiang; Chen, Zhen-Dong; Wei, Wei

    2008-04-28

    Paeonol, a phenolic component from the root bark of Paeonia moutan, is traditionally used as a Chinese herbal medicine to activate the blood flow and remove blood stasis. Evidence shows that paeonol have anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which paeonol exerts the anti-tumor effects by using a murine model of hepatoma established by in vivo injection of mouse HepA-hepatoma cells. Treatment of mice with 100, 200, or 400 mg/kg/day of paeonol significantly inhibited the growth of the HepA tumor in mice, induced HepA cell apoptosis as demonstrated by light microscopy and electron microscopy analyses, decreased the expression of Bcl-2 and increased the expression of Bax in HepA tumor tissues in a dose-related manner. Administration of paeonol in vivo also elevated serum levels of IL-2 and TNF-alpha in tumor-bearing mice. Moreover, splenocytes and macrophages isolated from paeonol-treated HepA tumor-bearing mice produced higher levels of IL-2 and TNF-alpha in response to concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide stimulation, respectively, compared to these isolated from non-treated HepA tumor-bearing mice. In vitro treatment with paeonol was able to directly stimulate IL-2 and TNF-alpha production in splenocytes and macrophages from tumor-bearing mice, respectively. In conclusion, paeonol has the anti-tumor effect against hepatoma cells, which are likely mediated via induction of tumor cell apoptosis and stimulation of IL-2 and TNF-alpha production. Paeonol could be a promising drug to treat hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:18329639

  7. Suppression of cytochrome P450 1A1 expression induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in mouse hepatoma hepa-1c1c7 cells treated with serum of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate- and green tea extract-administered rats.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Itsuko; Tsutsui, Miki; Sakane, Iwao; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2009-05-01

    The suppression of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression was examined in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells treated with serum prepared from (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate- and green tea extract-administered rats. Catechins were found in the rat plasma after the administration. In Hepa-1c1c7 cells, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced CYP1A1 expression was suppressed by treatment with the rat serum. It is concluded that catechins can possibly modulate CYP1A1 expression. PMID:19420696

  8. Induction of cytochrome P450 1A1 gene expression by a vitamin K3 analog in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Chun, Y J; Lee, B Y; Yang, S A; Ryu, C K; Kim, M Y

    2001-10-31

    Nine vitamin K3 analogs were compared with respect to the induction of the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells. 6-(4-Diethylamino)phenyl-7-chloro-5,8-quinolinedione (EA4) caused a significant induction of the CYP1A1-mediated ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The induction was accompanied by an increase of the Cyp1a1 mRNA transcription. The transient expression of the mouse Cyp1a1-CAT gene into cells showed that EA4 induced CAT activity. However, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and its nuclear partner, aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator mRNA transcription, were unaffected by the EA4 treatment. When the cells were incubated with EA4 in the presence of 1 nM TCDD, the ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity that was induced by TCDD was significantly suppressed by EA4. Inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide strongly enhanced the EA4-dependent Cyp1a1 mRNA expression. Up-regulation of protein kinase C by a 2 h preincubation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased the EA4-dependent expression of the Cyp1a1 gene. In human cells, such as HepG2 (human hepatocarcinoma), MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma cell line), and HL-60 (human promyelocytic cell line), the expression of CYP1A1 mRNA was also induced by EA4 treatment. Moreover, CYP1B1 mRNA was increased by EA4 in MCF-7 cells. These results indicate that EA4 modulates CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expressions by transcriptional activation. Also, protein kinase C may be involved in the induction mechanism of CYP1A1 by EA4. PMID:11710520

  9. Signalling pathways involved in 1-nitropyrene (1-NP)-induced and 3-nitrofluoranthene (3-NF)-induced cell death in Hepa1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Asare, Nana; Tekpli, Xavier; Rissel, Mary; Solhaug, Anita; Landvik, Nina; Lecureur, Valerie; Podechard, Normand; Brunborg, Gunnar; Låg, Marit; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Holme, Jørn A

    2009-11-01

    We previously reported that 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) and 3-nitrofluoranthene (3-NF) elicited apoptotic cell death as well as non-apoptotic programmed cell deaths (PCDs) with paraptotic and necroptotic characteristics, respectively. In the present study, we have further confirmed and extended these findings. Flow cytometric analyses of 1-NP-exposed/3NF-exposed Hepa1c1c7 cells revealed that caspase-3 was only activated in the subpopulation of cells corresponding to that with classic apoptotic morphology. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that leucocyte elastase inhibitor-derived DNaseII (LEI/L-DNaseII), apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and endonuclease G (EndoG) were more clearly translocated to the nucleus following 3-NF exposure than after 1-NP. These 3-NF-induced changes in AIF and EndoG translocation were reduced by necrostatin-1, an inhibitor of necroptotic cell death. Both compounds lead to accumulation of lipid droplets and induced DNA damage. Activation of checkpoint kinase (CHK) 1 and H2AX, but not ataxia telangiectasia mutated and CHK2, were observed. Furthermore, inhibition of p53 using pifithrin-alpha reduced the cell death induced by both compounds, suggesting a role of DNA damage/CHK1/p53 pathway in the death process. 1-NP-induced cell death was in addition characterized by increased oxidative damage and intracellular accumulation of Ca(2+). These findings further support the notion that 1-NP elicited apoptotic cell death and PCD with paraptotic characteristics, while 3-NF induced apoptosis and a PCD with necroptotic features. PMID:19703935

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated induction of the cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha gene by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kinehara, Masaki; Fukuda, Itsuko; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2009-10-01

    Upon binding to ligands such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is activated to form a heterodimer with an aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (Arnt). This complex binds to DNA. It has been shown that the AhR bonds to a DNA sequence called the dioxin response element (DRE), which controls the expression of battery genes. It is reported that TCDD releases arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids via activation of phospholipase A(2)s (PLA(2)s) in various cell types. Recently, we demonstrated that the TCDD-activated AhR binds to the second intron of the Pla2g4a gene, which encodes cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha (cPLA(2)alpha), in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells. This result suggests that Pla2g4a appears to be a target gene of the AhR. In the present study, we investigated whether the transcriptional regulation of Pla2g4a is dependent on the AhR in Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Treatment of the cells with TCDD increased mRNA expression of Pla2g4a and enzymatic activity of PLA(2,) while this increased expression was not observed in AhR-defective c12 cells. After transient transfection of an Ahr gene-expressing plasmid into the c12 cells, expression of Pla2g4a was increased by TCDD. These results indicate that Pla2g4a may be a novel target gene of the AhR, and its transcriptional induction is mediated through binding of the AhR to the second intron of Pla2g4a, although this target site does not have a typical DRE sequence. PMID:19716514

  11. Effects of culture conditions on estrogen-mediated hepatic in vitro gene expression and correlation to in vivo responses

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, C.J.; Burgoon, L.D.; Zacharewski, T.R. . E-mail: tzachare@msu.edu

    2006-08-15

    Refinement of in vitro systems for predictive toxicology is important in order to develop high-throughput early toxicity screening assays and to minimize animal testing studies. This study assesses the ability of mouse Hepa-1c1c7 hepatoma cell model under differing culture conditions to predict in vivo estrogen-induced hepatic gene expression changes. Custom mouse cDNA microarrays were used to compare Hepa-1c1c7 temporal gene expression profiles treated with 10 nM 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) in serum-free and charcoal-stripped serum supplemented media at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. Stripped serum supplemented media increased the number gene expression changes and overall responsiveness likely due to the presence of serum factors supporting proliferation and mitochondrial activity. Data from both experiments were compared to a gene expression time course study examining the hepatic effects of 100 {mu}g/kg 17{alpha}-ethynyl estradiol (EE) in C57BL/6 mice at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h. Only 18 genes overlapped between the serum-free and in vivo studies, whereas 238 genes were in common between Hepa-1c1c7 cells in stripped serum data and C57BL/6 liver samples. Stripped serum cultured cells exhibited E2-elicited gene expression changes associated with proliferation, cytoskeletal re-organization, cholesterol uptake and synthesis, increased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation, and oxidative stress, which correlated with in vivo hepatic responses. These results demonstrate that E2 treatment of Hepa-1c1c7 cells in serum supplemented media modulate responses in selected pathways which appropriately model estrogen-elicited in vivo hepatic responses.

  12. Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and horse antithymocyte globulin conditioning regimen for allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation performed in non-HEPA filter rooms for multiply transfused patients with severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Prem, S; Mahapatra, M; Seth, T; Chowdhary, D R; Mishra, P; Pillai, L; Narendra, A M V R; Mehra, N K; Saxena, R; Choudhry, V P

    2006-04-01

    Multiply transfused patients of severe aplastic anemia are at increased risk of graft rejection. Five such patients underwent peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from HLA-identical siblings with a fludarabine-based protocol. The conditioning consisted of fludarabine 30 mg/m(2)/day x 6 days, cyclophosphamide 60 mg/kg/day x 2 days and horse antithymocyte globulin (ATG) x 4 days. Two different ATG preparations were used: ATGAM (dose 30 mg/kg/day x 4 days) or Thymogam (dose 40 mg/kg/day x 4 days). Engraftment: median time to absolute neutrophil count (ANC) >0.5 x 10(9)/l was 11 days (range: 8-17) and median time to platelet count >20 x 10(9)/l was 11 days (range: 9-17). At a median follow-up of 171 days (range: 47-389), there has been no graft rejection and all patients are in complete remission. Acute GVHD (grade 1) occurred in one patient only. Chronic GVHD developed in two patients (extensive in one and limited in another). The transplants were performed in non-HEPA filter rooms. In only one patient, systemic antifungal therapy (voriconazole) was used. The use of Thymogam brand of ATG for conditioning is being reported for the first time. Our experience suggests that this fludarabine-based protocol allows rapid sustained engraftment in high-risk patients without significant immediate toxicity. PMID:16518427

  13. Soy isoflavones increase quinone reductase in hepa-1c1c7 cells via estrogen receptor beta and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 binding to the antioxidant response element.

    PubMed

    Froyen, Erik B; Steinberg, Francene M

    2011-09-01

    Soy protein and isoflavones (genistein and daidzein) have been demonstrated to increase quinone reductase (QR) activity, protein, and mRNA in animal and cell culture models. However, their mechanism of action has not been completely characterized. Additionally, it has not been determined if equol, a daidzein metabolite, can modulate QR activity and expression. Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is thought to be involved in stimulating QR gene transcription by anti-estrogens and phytoestrogens, along with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). This study tested the hypothesis that genistein, daidzein and equol increase quinone reductase activity, protein and mRNA via ERβ and Nrf2 binding to the QR antioxidant response element (ARE). QR expression and activity were determined using TaqMan polymerase chain reaction, protein immunoblots and activity assays. Molecular events were investigated using luciferase reporter gene assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Hepa-1c1c7 cells were treated with control [0.1% (v:v) dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)]; 1 μmol/L β-naphthoflavone (positive control); 5 μmol/L resveratrol (ChIP positive control for ERβ binding) and 1, 5 and 25 μmol/L genistein, daidzein or equol. Treatment durations were 1 h (ChIP), 24 h (mRNA and luciferase assays) and 24 and 48 h (protein and activity). Genistein, daidzein and equol increased QR activity, protein and mRNA, with daidzein and equol having more of an impact at physiologic concentrations (1 and 5 μmol/L) compared to genistein. Furthermore, the study results demonstrate that genistein, daidzein and equol interact with the QR ARE and that daidzein and equol act via both ERβ and Nrf2 binding strongly to the QR ARE. PMID:21167702

  14. High-throughput evaluation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-binding sites selected via chromatin immunoprecipitation-based screening in Hepa-1c1c7 cells stimulated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    PubMed

    Kinehara, Masaki; Fukuda, Itsuko; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2008-12-01

    Upon binding to ligands such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is activated to form a heterodimer with an aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (Arnt) and binds to DNA. It has been shown that the binding of AhR to DNA depends on the dioxin response element (DRE) and controls xenobiotic-response genes. AhR-binding DNA fragments from mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells stimulated with TCDD were once enriched in a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) DNA library and screened through a high-throughput southwestern chemistry-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (SW-ELISA). After screening 1700 fragments, the ChIP-SW-ELISA screening strategy allowed us to isolate 77 fragments tightly interacting with AhR in the presence of TCDD. Only 39 of the 77 fragments appeared to contain a typical DRE, indicating that in some cases the DRE was dispensable for AhR-binding, while 75 fragments were located within promoter-distal regions. Genomic mapping of the 77 fragments enabled us to estimate 121 potential AhR targets including known targets such as Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1, but only a limited number exhibited an altered expression dependent on TCDD. This study revealed the fact that TCDD-activated AhR frequently binds to promoter-distal regions even without a DRE and is not always involved in transcriptional regulation, suggesting that within the genome DNA-binding of AhR could take place often in many regions without cis-regulatory elements and might not be a key determinant to establish its regulatory function. PMID:19282623

  15. Pathway and time-resolved benzo[a]pyrene toxicity on Hepa1c1c7 cells at toxic and subtoxic exposure.

    PubMed

    Kalkhof, Stefan; Dautel, Franziska; Loguercio, Salvatore; Baumann, Sven; Trump, Saskia; Jungnickel, Harald; Otto, Wolfgang; Rudzok, Susanne; Potratz, Sarah; Luch, Andreas; Lehmann, Irina; Beyer, Andreas; von Bergen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is an environmental contaminant mainly studied for its toxic/carcinogenic effects. For a comprehensive and pathway orientated mechanistic understanding of the effects directly triggered by a toxic (5 μM) or a subtoxic (50 nM) concentration of B[a]P or indirectly by its metabolites, we conducted time series experiments for up to 24 h to study the effects in murine hepatocytes. These cells rapidly take up and actively metabolize B[a]P, which was followed by quantitative analysis of the concentration of intracellular B[a]P and seven representative degradation products. Exposure with 5 μM B[a]P led to a maximal intracellular concentration of 1604 pmol/5 × 10(4) cells, leveling at 55 pmol/5 × 10(4) cells by the end of the time course. Changes in the global proteome (>1000 protein profiles) and metabolome (163 metabolites) were assessed in combination with B[a]P degradation. Abundance profiles of 236 (both concentrations), 190 (only 5 μM), and 150 (only 50 nM) proteins were found to be regulated in response to B[a]P in a time-dependent manner. At the endogenous metabolite level amino acids, acylcarnitines and glycerophospholipids were particularly affected by B[a]P. The comprehensive chemical, proteome and metabolomic data enabled the identification of effects on the pathway level in a time-resolved manner. So in addition to known alterations, also protein synthesis, lipid metabolism, and membrane dysfunction were identified as B[a]P specific effects. PMID:25362887

  16. Metabolic changes detected by in vivo magnetic resonance studies of HEPA-1 wild-type tumors and tumors deficient in hypoxia-inducible factor-1beta (HIF-1beta): evidence of an anabolic role for the HIF-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, John R; McSheehy, Paul M J; Robinson, Simon P; Troy, Helen; Chung, Yuen-Li; Leek, Russell D; Williams, Kaye J; Stratford, Ian J; Harris, Adrian L; Stubbs, Marion

    2002-02-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) regulates many pathways potentially important for tumor growth, including angiogenesis and glycolysis. Most attention has focused on its role in the response to hypoxia, but HIF-1 is also constitutively expressed in many tumors. To analyze the role of this pathway in vivo, we used magnetic resonance (MR) methods and complementary techniques to monitor metabolic changes in tumors derived from HEPA-1 mouse hepatoma lines that were either wild type (WT) or deficient in hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF-1beta (c4). The c4 tumors grew significantly more slowly than the WT tumors (P < 0.05), but were examined at a similar size (0.4-0.6 g). At the tumor size used in these studies, no differences in vascularity were observed, and MR parameters measured that related to tumor blood flow, vascularity, and oxygenation demonstrated no significant differences between the two tumor types. Unexpectedly, the ATP content of the c4 tumor was approximately 5 times less than in the WT tumor [measured in tumor extracts (P < 0.001) and by metabolic imaging (P < 0.05)]. Noninvasive (31)P MR spectroscopy showed that the nucleoside triphosphate/P(i) ratio of the two tumor types was similar, so the low ATP content of the c4 tumors was not caused by (or a cause of) impaired cellular bioenergetics. Rather, glycine, an essential precursor for de novo purine formation, was significantly lower in the c4 tumors (P < 0.05), suggesting that ATP synthesis was impaired in the mutant tumor cells. Supporting evidence for this hypothesis came from the significantly lower concentrations of betaine, phosphocholine, and choline in the c4 tumors (P < 0.05); these are intermediates in an alternative pathway for glycine synthesis. No significant differences were seen in lactate or glucose content. MR resonances from phosphodiesters, which relate to the metabolic turnover of phospholipid membranes, were significantly lower in the WT tumors than in the c4 tumors, both

  17. A Comprehensive Professional Development Training's Effect on Afterschool Program Staff Behaviors to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Beighle, Aaron; Webster, Collin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evaluate a comprehensive intervention designed to support staff and program leaders in the implementation of the YMCA of USA Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Standards for their afterschool programs (3-6pm). Design Pre (Fall 2011) and post (Spring 2012) assessment no control-group. Setting/Participants Four large-scale YMCA afterschool programs serving approximately 500 children. Intervention Professional development training founded in the 5Ms (i.e. Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, Maximize) and LET US Play principles (i.e. lines, elimination, team size, uninvolved staff/kids, and space, equipment and rules), on-site booster training sessions, workshops, and ongoing technical support for staff and program leaders from January to May 2012. Main outcome measures System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition (SOSPAN). Analysis Multilevel mixed effects linear (i.e., staff behaviors expressed as a percentage of the number of scans observed) and logistic regression. Results A total of 5328 SOSPAN scans were completed over the two measurement periods. Of the 20 staff behaviors identified in HEPA Standards and measured in this study, 17 increased or decreased in the appropriate direction. For example, staff engaged in physical activity with children increased from 26.6% to 37% and staff eating unhealthy foods decreased from 42.1% to 4.5%. Conclusions Comprehensive professional development training, founded in the 5Ms and LET US Play principles, and ongoing technical assistance can have a sizable impact on key staff behaviors identified by HEPA Standards for afterschool programs. PMID:24858323

  18. Disruption of period gene expression alters the inductive effects of dioxin on the AhR signaling pathway in the mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Qu Xiaoyu; Metz, Richard P.; Porter, Weston W.; Cassone, Vincent M.; Earnest, David J.

    2009-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) are transcription factors that express Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) DNA-binding motifs and mediate the metabolism of drugs and environmental toxins in the liver. Because these transcription factors interact with other PAS genes in molecular feedback loops forming the mammalian circadian clockworks, we determined whether targeted disruption or siRNA inhibition of Per1 and Per2 expression alters toxin-mediated regulation of the AhR signaling pathway in the mouse liver and Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells in vitro. Treatment with the prototypical Ahr ligand, 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), had inductive effects on the primary targets of AhR signaling, Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1, in the liver of all animals, but genotype-based differences were evident such that the toxin-mediated induction of Cyp1A1 expression was significantly greater (2-fold) in mice with targeted disruption of Per1 (Per1{sup ldc} and Per1{sup ldc}/Per2{sup ldc}). In vitro experiments yielded similar results demonstrating that siRNA inhibition of Per1 significantly increases the TCDD-induced expression of Cyp1A1 and Cyp1B1 in Hepa1c1c7 cells. Per2 inhibition in siRNA-infected Hepa1c1c7 cells had the opposite effect and significantly decreased both the induction of these p450 genes as well as AhR and Arnt expression in response to TCDD treatment. These findings suggest that Per1 may play a distinctive role in modulating AhR-regulated responses to TCDD in the liver.

  19. Effectiveness of dust control methods for crystalline silica and respirable suspended particulate matter exposure during manual concrete surface grinding.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Milz, Sheryl A; Wagner, Cynthia D; Bisesi, Michael S; Ames, April L; Khuder, Sadik; Susi, Pam; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2010-12-01

    Concrete grinding exposes workers to unacceptable levels of crystalline silica dust, known to cause diseases such as silicosis and possibly lung cancer. This study examined the influence of major factors of exposure and effectiveness of existing dust control methods by simulating field concrete grinding in an enclosed workplace laboratory. Air was monitored during 201 concrete grinding sessions while using a variety of grinders, accessories, and existing dust control methods, including general ventilation (GV), local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and wet grinding. Task-specific geometric mean (GM) of respirable crystalline silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled-grinding, while GV was off/on, were 0.17/0.09, 0.57/0.13, 1.11/0.44, and 23.1/6.80, respectively. Silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ using 100-125 mm (4-5 inch) and 180 mm (7 inch) grinding cups were 0.53/0.22 and 2.43/0.56, respectively. GM concentrations of silica dust were significantly lower for (1) GV on (66.0%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (99.0%), LEV:Shop-vac- (98.1%) or wet- (94.4%) vs. uncontrolled-grinding. Task-specific GM of respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP) concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled grinding, while GV was off/on, were 1.58/0.63, 7.20/1.15, 9.52/4.13, and 152/47.8, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP using 100-125 mm and 180 mm grinding cups were 4.78/1.62 and 22.2/5.06, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP were significantly lower for (1) GV on (70.2%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (98.9%), LEV:Shop-vac- (96.9%) or wet- (92.6%) vs. uncontrolled grinding. Silica dust and RSP were not significantly affected by (1) orientation of grinding surfaces (vertical vs. inclined); (2) water flow rates for wet grinding; (3) length of task-specific sampling time; or, (4) among cup sizes of 100, 115 or 125 mm. No combination of factors or control methods reduced an 8-hr exposure level to below the

  20. Effectiveness of smokeless ashtrays.

    PubMed

    Wampler, D A; Miller-Leiden, S; Nazaroff, W W; Gadgil, A J; Litvak, A; Mahanama, K R; Nematollahi, M

    1995-06-01

    Most environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) issues from the tips of smoldering cigarettes between puffs. Smokeless ashtrays are designed to reduce ETS exposure by removing particulate and/or gas-phase contaminants from this plume. This paper describes an experimental investigation of the effectiveness of four smokeless ashtrays: two commercial devices and two prototypes constructed by the authors. In the basic experimental protocol, one or more cigarettes was permitted to smolder in a room. Particulate or gas-phase pollutant concentrations were measured in the room air over time. Device effectiveness was determined by comparing pollutant concentrations with the device in use to those obtained with no control device. A lung deposition model was applied to further interpret device effectiveness for particle removal. The commercial ashtrays were found to be substantially ineffective in removing ETS particles because of the use of low-quality filter media and/or the failure to draw the smoke through the filter. A prototype ashtray using HEPA filter material achieved better than 90% particle removal efficiency. Gas-phase pollutant removal was tested for only one prototype smokeless ashtray, which employed filters containing activated carbon and activated alumina. Removal efficiencies for the 18 gas-phase compounds measured (above the detection limit) were in the range of 70 to 95%. PMID:7788509

  1. The effect of bicarbonate on menadione-induced redox cycling and cytotoxicity: potential involvement of the carbonate radical.

    PubMed

    Aljuhani, Naif; Michail, Karim; Karapetyan, Zubeida; Siraki, Arno G

    2013-10-01

    We have investigated the effect of NaHCO3 on menadione redox cycling and cytotoxicity. A cell-free system utilized menadione and ascorbic acid to catalyze a redox cycle, and we utilized murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells for in vitro experiments. Experiments were performed using low (2 mmol/L) and physiological (25 mmol/L) levels of NaHCO3 in buffer equilibrated to physiological pH. Using oximetry, ascorbic acid oxidation, and ascorbyl radical detection, we found that menadione redox cycling was enhanced by NaHCO3. Furthermore, Hepa 1c1c7 cells treated with menadione demonstrated cytotoxicity that was significantly increased with physiological concentrations of NaHCO3 in the media, compared with low levels of NaHCO3. Interestingly, the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) with 2 different metal chelators was associated with a protective effect against menadione cytotoxicity. Using isolated protein, we found a significant increase in protein carbonyls with menadione-ascorbate-SOD with physiological NaHCO3 levels; low NaHCO3 or SOD-free reactions produced lower levels of protein carbonyls. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the hydrogen peroxide generated by menadione redox cycling together with NaHCO3-CO2 are potential substrates for SOD peroxidase activity that can lead to carbonate-radical-enhanced cytotoxicity. These findings demonstrate the importance of NaHCO3 in menadione redox cycling and cytotoxicity. PMID:24144048

  2. Evaluation of the effect of media velocity on filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filters.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Steven L; Parsons, Michael S; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Waggoner, Charles A

    2008-11-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are widely used to control particulate matter emissions from processes that involve management or treatment of radioactive materials. Section FC of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers AG-1 Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment currently restricts media velocity to a maximum of 2.5 cm/sec in any application where this standard is invoked. There is some desire to eliminate or increase this media velocity limit. A concern is that increasing media velocity will result in higher emissions of ultrafine particles; thus, it is unlikely that higher media velocities will be allowed without data to demonstrate the effect of media velocity on removal of ultrafine particles. In this study, the performance of nuclear grade HEPA filters, with respect to filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size, was evaluated as a function of media velocity. Deep-pleat nuclear grade HEPA filters (31 cm x 31 cm x 29 cm) were evaluated at media velocities ranging from 2.0 to 4.5 cm/sec using a potassium chloride aerosol challenge having a particle size distribution centered near the HEPA filter most penetrating particle size. Filters were challenged under two distinct mass loading rate regimes through the use of or exclusion of a 3 microm aerodynamic diameter cut point cyclone. Filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size measurements were made throughout the duration of filter testing. Filter efficiency measured at the onset of aerosol challenge was noted to decrease with increasing media velocity, with values ranging from 99.999 to 99.977%. The filter most penetrating particle size recorded at the onset of testing was noted to decrease slightly as media velocity was increased and was typically in the range of 110-130 nm. Although additional testing is needed, these findings indicate that filters operating at media velocities up to 4.5 cm/sec will meet or exceed current filter efficiency requirements. Additionally

  3. Effects of MERV 16 filters and routine work practices on enclosed cabs for reducing respirable dust and DPM exposures in an underground limestone mine

    PubMed Central

    Noll, J.D.; Cecala, A.B.; J.A.Organiscak; Rider, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    An effective technique to minimize miners’ respirable dust and diesel exposure on mobile mining equipment is to place mine operators in enclosed cabs with designed filtration and pressurization systems. Many factors affect the performance of these enclosed cab systems, and one of the most significant factors is the effectiveness of the filtration system. High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-type filters are typically used because they are highly efficient at capturing all types and sizes of particles, including those in the submicron range such as diesel particulate matter (DPM). However, in laboratory tests, minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) 16 filters have proven to be highly efficient for capturing DPM and respirable dust. Also, MERV 16 filters can be less restrictive to cab airflow and less expensive than HEPA filters. To verify their effectiveness in the field, MERV 16 filters were used in the enclosed cab filtration system on a face drill and roof bolting mining machine and tested at an underground limestone mine. Test results showed that DPM and respirable dust concentrations were reduced by more than 90% when the cabs were properly sealed. However, when the cab door was opened periodically throughout the shift, the reduction efficiency of the MERV 16 filters was reduced to 80% on average. PMID:26236044

  4. Surface sampling methods for Bacillus anthracis spore contamination.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Wayne T; Hein, Misty J; Taylor, Lauralynn; Curwin, Brian D; Kinnes, Gregory M; Seitz, Teresa A; Popovic, Tanja; Holmes, Harvey T; Kellum, Molly E; McAllister, Sigrid K; Whaley, David N; Tupin, Edward A; Walker, Timothy; Freed, Jennifer A; Small, Dorothy S; Klusaritz, Brian; Bridges, John H

    2002-10-01

    During an investigation conducted December 17-20, 2001, we collected environmental samples from a U.S. postal facility in Washington, D.C., known to be extensively contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores. Because methods for collecting and analyzing B. anthracis spores have not yet been validated, our objective was to compare the relative effectiveness of sampling methods used for collecting spores from contaminated surfaces. Comparison of wipe, wet and dry swab, and HEPA vacuum sock samples on nonporous surfaces indicated good agreement between results with HEPA vacuum and wipe samples. However, results from HEPA vacuum sock and wipe samples agreed poorly with the swab samples. Dry swabs failed to detect spores >75% of the time when they were detected by wipe and HEPA vacuum samples. Wipe samples collected after HEPA vacuum samples and HEPA vacuum samples collected after wipe samples indicated that neither method completely removed spores from the sampled surfaces. PMID:12396930

  5. 340 vault K1 exhaust system HEPA filter evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, T.E., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-01

    A previous evaluation documented in report WHC-SD-GN-RPT-30005, Rev. 0, titled ``Evaluation on Self-Contained High Efficiency Particulate Filters,`` revealed that the SCHEPA filters do not have required documentation to be in compliance with the design, testing, and fabrication standards required in ASME N-509, ASME N-510, and MIL-F-51068. These standards are required by DOE Order 6430.IA. Without this documentation, filter adequacy cannot be verified. The existing SCHEPA filters can be removed and replaced with new filters and filter housing which meet current codes and standards.

  6. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1996-12-31

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (BEME`s) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (BEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these radioactively contaminated filters will be dissolved using caustic solutions. As a result of these tests, a simple dissolution process was developed. In this process, the contaminated filter is first immersed in boiling 5% caustic solution for 24 hours and then water is sprayed on the filter. These steps break down the filter first chemically and then mechanically. The metal cage is rinsed and considered low level waste. The dissolved filter is pumpable and mixed with high level waste. Compared to earlier dissolution studies using caustic-acid-caustic solutions, the proposed method represents a 66% savings in cycle time and amount of liquid waste generated. This paper provides the details of filter mockups and results of the dissolution tests.

  7. Performance measurements on HEP-A pipelined MIMD computer

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, H.F.

    1983-01-01

    A pipelined implementation of MIMD operation is embodied in the HEP computer. This architectural concept should be carefully evaluated now that such a computer is available commercially. This paper studies the degree of utilization of pipelines in the MIMD environment. A detailed analysis of two extreme cases indicates that pipelined utilization is quite high. Although no direct comparisons are made with other computers, the low pipeline idle time in this machine indicates that this architectural technique may be more beneficial in an MIMD machine than in either SISD or SIMD machines. 10 references.

  8. 42 CFR 84.1100 - Scope and effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... with particulate filters approved under the provisions of this subpart after July 10, 1995 will have a... under the provisions of this subpart shall be only high-efficiency (HEPA) as described in § 84.1130(a)(4... air-purifying respirators approved under the provisions of this subpart KK......

  9. A Coordinated Comprehensive Professional Development Training’s Effect on Summer Day Camp Staff Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Promoting Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. Glenn; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Beighle, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Background The YMCA of USA recently adopted Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Standards for their summer-day-camps (SDCs). Standards call for staff to exhibit HEPA promoting behaviors while eliminating HEPA discouraging behaviors. No studies have evaluated training programs to influence policy specified staff behaviors and related changes in child activity in SDCs. Method Four YMCA summer-day-camps serving approximately 800 children per week participated in this no control group pre/post pilot study. Professional development training founded in the 5Ms (Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, Maximize) and LET US Play principles (lines, elimination, team size, uninvolved staff/kids, and space, equipment and rules) was delivered to staff. Outcomes were staff promotion behaviors and child activity assessed via systematic observation instruments. Results Twelve of 17 HEPA staff behaviors changed in the appropriate direction from baseline to post-assessment with five behaviors reaching statistically significant changes. The percentage of girls and boys observed in moderate-to-vigorous-physical-activity increased from 15.3% to 18.3% (p > .05) and 17.9% to 21.2% whereas sedentary behavior decreased from 66.8% to 59.8% and 62.3% to 53.6%, respectively. Conclusion Evidence suggests that the professional development training designed to assist SDCs to meet the HEPA Standards can lead to important changes in staff behaviors and children’s physical activity. PMID:25368946

  10. Effects on the efficiency of activated carbon on exposure to welding fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, D.

    1995-02-01

    It is the intention of this paper to document that certain types of welding fumes have little or no effect on the effectiveness of the carbon filter air filtration efficiency when directly exposed to a controlled amount of welding fumes for a short-term period. The welding processes studied were restricted to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Contrary to the SMAW and FCAW processes, the GTAW (or TIG) and the GMAW (or MIG) welding processes do not require the use of flux as part of the overall process. Credit was taken for these processes occurring in inert gas environments and producing minimal amount of smoke. It was concluded that a study involving the SMAW process would also envelop the effects of the TIG and MIG welding processes. The quantity of welding fumes generated during the arc welding process is a function of the particular process, the size and type of electrode, welding machine amperage, and operator proficiency. For this study, the amount of welding for specific testing was equated to the amount of welding normally conducted during plant unit outages. Different welding electrodes were also evaluated, and the subsequent testing was limited to an E7018 electrode which was judged to be representative of all carbon and stainless steel electrodes commonly used at the site. The effect of welding fumes on activated charcoal was tested using a filtration unit complete with prefilters, upstream and downstream high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and a carbon adsorber section. The complete system was field tested in accordance with ANSI N510 standards prior to exposing the filters and the adsorber bed to welding fumes. The carbon samples were tested at an established laboratory using ASTM D3803-1989 standards.

  11. From cell lines to tissues: extrapolation of transcriptional effects to human tissues (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new suite of assays in the metabolically-competent, human hepatocyte-derived HepaRG cell line has been added to the ToxCast screening suite. For 1066 chemicals we have evaluated the chemical treatment-induced changes in expression for a diverse set of 93 genes representative of...

  12. Irradiation-induced localization of IL-12-expressing mesenchymal stem cells to enhance the curative effect in murine metastatic hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Su Jin; Yang, Seung-Hyun; Sung, Young Chul; Seong, Jinsil

    2015-08-01

    Irradiation in conjunction with gene therapy is considered for efficient cancer treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), due to their irradiation-promotable tumor tropism, are ideal delivery vehicles for gene therapy. In this study, we investigated whether treatment with radiation and interleukin (IL)-12-expressing MSCs (MSCs/IL-12) exerts improved antitumor effects on murine metastatic hepatoma. HCa-I and Hepa 1-6 cells were utilized to generate heterotopic murine hepatoma models. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with irradiation or MSCs/IL-12 alone, or a combination. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) expression was assessed in irradiated hepatoma tissues to confirm a chemotactic effect. Combination treatment strategies were established and their therapeutic efficacies were evaluated by monitoring tumor growth, metastasis and survival rate. IL-12 expression was assessed and the apoptotic activity and immunological alterations in the tumor microenvironment were examined. MCP-1/CCL2 expression and localization of MSCs/IL-12 increased in the irradiated murine hepatoma cells. The antitumor effects, including suppression of pulmonary metastasis and survival rate improvements, were increased by the combination treatment with irradiation and MSCs/IL-12. IL-12 expression was increased in tumor cells, causing proliferation of cluster of differentiation 8(+) T-lymphocytes and natural killer cells. The apoptotic activity increased, indicating that the cytotoxicity of immune cells was involved in the antitumor effect of the combined treatment. Treatment with irradiation and MSCs/IL-12 showed effectiveness in treating murine metastatic hepatoma. IL-12-induced proliferation of immune cells played an important role in apoptosis of tumor cells. Our results suggest that treatment with irradiation and MSCs/IL-12 may be a useful strategy for enhancing antitumor activity in metastatic hepatoma. PMID:25639194

  13. Engineering Task Plan for Hepa Filter Differential Pressure (DP) Fan Interlock Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    SIMONS, S.R.

    2000-05-19

    This document provides a plan for installation of Differential Pressure (DP) fan interlocks on the primary ventilation systems in selected Tank Farm facilities. This plan contains the engineering tasks required for installation and is summarized by the Acceptance for Beneficial Use list. Individuals responsible for each task are identified and scheduled accordingly.

  14. Radiological and toxicological calculations for AY-102 and C-106HEPA filters and pre-filters

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, T.R.; Van Vleet, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    The high heat content solids in Tank 241-C-106 are to be removed and transferred to Tank 241-AY-102 by sluicing operations, to be authorized under project W-320. Once sluicing operations are underway, the state of these tanks will be transformed from `unagitated` to `agitated`. This means that the partition fraction which described the aerosol content of the head space will increase from 1 X 10{sup - 20} to 1 X 10{sup -1}. This head space will become much more loaded with suspended material. The nature of this suspended material may change significantly, sluicing may inadvertently bring up radioactive solids which normally would lay under many meters of liquid supernate. It is an enabling assumption that the headspace and filter aerosols in Tank 241-AY-102 are a 90/10 liquid/solid split; there is an unmitigated and mitigated composition. It is an enabling assumption that the sluicing line; the headspace in Tank 241-C-106, and the filters in Tank 241-C-106 contain aerosols which are a 67/33 liquid/solid split; there is an unmitigated and mitigated composition.

  15. Are Effective Properties Effective?

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ru; Ingber, Marc S.; Hsiao, S.-C.

    2008-02-15

    The effective moduli (effective Young's modulus, effective Poisson's ratio, effective shear modulus, and effective bulk modulus) of dispersed-phase-reinforced composite materials are determined at the mesoscopic level using three-dimensional parallel boundary element simulations. By comparing the mesoscopic BEM results and the macroscopic results based on effective properties, limitations in the effective property approach have been examined.

  16. The impact of onsite workplace health-enhancing physical activity interventions on worker productivity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Michelle Jessica; Coombes, Brooke Kaye; Comans, Tracy Anne; Johnston, Venerina

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of onsite workplace health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) programmes on worker productivity. The PROSPERO registration number is CRD42014008750. A search for controlled trials or randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effects of onsite workplace HEPA programmes on productivity levels of working adults was performed. Risk of bias of included studies was assessed, and the inter-rater reliability of the quality assessment was analysed. Qualitative synthesis of available evidence is presented. Eight studies were included in the review. There is consistent evidence that onsite workplace HEPA programmes do not reduce levels of sick leave. There appears to be inconsistent evidence of the impact of onsite workplace HEPA programmes on worker productivity. A high-quality study of an onsite combination (aerobic, strengthening and flexibility) HEPA regime and a moderate-quality study of a Tai Chi programme improved worker productivity measured with questionnaires in female laundry workers and older female nurses, respectively. Two high-quality studies and four moderate-quality studies did not show benefit. Studies that showed benefit were mainly those designed with productivity measures as primary outcomes, delivered to occupations involved with higher physical loads, and had higher compliance and programme intensity. The small number of studies and the lack of consistency among studies limited further analyses. There is inconsistent evidence that onsite workplace HEPA programmes improve self-reported worker productivity. Future high-quality RCTs of onsite workplace HEPA programmes should be designed around productivity outcomes, target at-risk groups and investigate interventions of sufficient intensity. High attendance with improved recording is needed to achieve significant results in augmenting worker productivity. PMID:25780031

  17. Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Bergman, W.; Ford, H.W.; Lipska, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect HEPA filters in exit ventilation ducts from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Several methods for partially mitigating the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified through testing and analysis. These independently involve controlling the fuel, controlling the fire, and intercepting the smoke aerosol prior to its sorption on the HEPA filter. Exit duct treatment of aerosols is not unusual in industrial applications and involves the use of scrubbers, prefilters, and inertial impaction, depending on the size, distribution, and concentration of the subject aerosol. However, when these unmodified techniques were applied to smoke aerosols from fires on materials, common to experimental laboratories of LLNL, it was found they offered minimal protection to the HEPA filters. Ultimately, a continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. This technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modificaton of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has a particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, we laminated rolling filter media with the desired properties. It is not true that the use of rolling prefilters solely to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols is cost effective in every type of containment system, especially if standard fire-protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

  18. Virucidal effects of rodent cage-cleaning practices on the viability of adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Porter, Jacqueline D; Lyons, Russette M

    2002-09-01

    Human adenoviruses and adenoviral vectors are classified as Risk Group 2 agents and require BSL2 containment and practices. An additional consideration in using adenoviruses and viral vectors in laboratory animal studies is the possible transmission of these agents to other animals and/or personnel as a result of viral shedding in animal urine and feces. When handling BSL2 agents, cage-wash staff are required to wear appropriate personnel protective equipment, including scrubs, Tyvek suit, hair covering, dust mask, shoes covers, and gloves. Current decontamination procedures are to bag and autoclave soiled rodent cages containing bedding prior to washing in the cage washer to prevent possible adenoviral transmission. However, the practice of autoclaving softens the polycarbonate-based rodent cages, allowing damaging agents or conditions to affect the integrity of the plastic and degrade the cages. The objective of this study was to determine whether current rodent cage-cleaning practices produced virucidal effects for use in lieu of or prior to autoclaving the cages. We found that heating an Av3GFP vector in a test tube to a temperature of 74 degrees C (165 degrees F) for 6 min conditions equivalent to those of the cage washer resulted in greater than an 11-log reduction in infectivity of the vector as evaluated by its cytopathic effect on cells. The combination of heating and a liquid, phosphate-free alkaline detergent produced the same reduction in vector infectivity. However, common cage-cleaning solutions alone possessed no virucidal activity. The high temperatures used in cage-washing procedures alone or in combination with a cleaning solution reduced or eliminated the risk of transmission from viral shedding through urine and feces even at vector concentrations far greater than would ever be expected to be present. Autoclaving cages diminishes the stability and integrity of the polycarbonate cages without providing a further reduction in the risk of virus or

  19. Chlorine dioxide as a treatment for ballast water to control invasive species: shipboard testing.

    PubMed

    Maranda, Lucie; Cox, Annie M; Campbell, Robert G; Smith, David C

    2013-10-15

    The efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in eliminating organisms present in estuarine ballast water of a containership was determined under actual operating conditions by comparing the survival of planktonic communities present in waters of treated and control ballast tanks. Sampling was via ballast-tank hatches. The treatment (5 mg L(-1)ClO2 without pre-filtration) delivered by a prototype ClO2-generating system was generally effective against planktonic assemblages, although bacterial communities rebounded after a few days. Regardless of temperature, ClO2 was very effective against phytoplankton; the effect was immediate, without resurgence. Some zooplankters in the ≥ 50-μm fraction may survive the biocide, especially those able to find refuge within a protective coating (e.g., cysts, resting eggs, and shells) or in sediment. In order to boost efficacy, a pre-filtration step is recommended (now installed as standard equipment) to lower the intake of the ≥ 50-μm fraction and lessen the challenge posed by this size class. PMID:23987094

  20. Human antioxidant-response-element-mediated regulation of type 1 NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase gene expression. Effect of sulfhydryl modifying agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Jaiswal, A K

    1994-11-15

    Human antioxidant-response element (hARE) containing two copies of the AP1/AP1-like elements arranged as inverse repeat is known to mediate basal and beta-naphthoflavone-induced transcription of the type 1 NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) gene. Band-shift assays revealed that beta-naphthoflavone increased binding of nuclear proteins at the hARE. Super shift assays identified Jun-D and c-Fos proteins in the band-shift complexes observed with control and beta-naphthoflavone-treated Hepa-1 nuclear extracts. Hepa-1 cells stably transformed with hARE-tk-chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) recombinant plasmid were used to demonstrate that, in addition to beta-naphthoflavone, a variety of antioxidants, tumor promoters and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) also increased expression of hARE-mediated CAT gene. beta-naphthoflavone induction of the CAT gene expression in Hepa-1 cells was found insensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases. However, binding of regulatory proteins at the hARE and the CAT gene expression in Hepa-1 cells were increased by dithiothreitol, 2-mercaptoethanol and diamide. Treatment of the Hepa-1 cells with N-ethylmaleimide reduced binding of proteins at the hARE and interfered with expression and beta-naphthoflavone induction of the CAT gene. These results suggested a role of sulfhydryl modification of hARE binding (Jun and Fos) proteins which mediate basal and induced expression of the NQO1 gene. We also report that in-vitro-translated products of the proto-oncogenes, Jun and Fos, bind to the hARE in band-shift assays. The incubation of Jun and Fos proteins with small amounts of nuclear extract from dimethylsulfoxide-treated (control) or beta-naphthoflavone treated Hepa-1 cells prior to band-shift assays increased the binding of Jun and Fos proteins to the hARE. Interestingly, the increase in binding of Jun and Fos proteins to the hARE was more prominent with beta-naphthoflavone-treated nuclear extract as compared to the control

  1. Evaluation of the Antitumor Efficacy of RNAi-Mediated Inhibition of CDC20 and Heparanase in an Orthotopic Liver Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meizhou; Zhang, Yangde; Liao, Yunjun; Chen, Yixing; Pan, Yifeng; Tian, Hu; Zhan, Yongqiang; Liu, Dongjing

    2015-08-01

    Over 90% of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are diagnosed at an advanced stage. This study investigated the antitumor efficacy of the inhibition of cell division cycle protein 20 (CDC20) and heparanase (HPSE) expression in Hepa1-6 mouse hepatoma cells. Cell viability was measured by the MTT assay. Cell cycle was analyzed by cytometry. The invasion assay was performed using the Transwell chamber. The orthotopic liver tumor model was established by inoculating the livers of immunocompetent Kunming mice with Hepa1-6 cells. The MTT assay showed that 50 and 100 nM CDC20 siRNA-1 and HPSE siRNA-2 significantly reduced Hepa1-6 cell viability with the combination of CDC20 and HPSE siRNA being the most effective. Silencing of CDC20 or both CDC20 and HPSE expression significantly induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in Hepa1-6 HCC cells. Silencing HPSE expression significantly inhibited the invasion ability of Hepa1-6 cells with the combination of CDC20 and HPSE silencing being more effective than HPSE alone. Silencing CDC20 and HPSE expression significantly inhibited HCC tumor growth in the orthotopic liver tumor model, but the combination was most effective. Silencing CDC20 and HPSE expression activated cell apoptosis and autophagy. In conclusion, targeting inhibition of both CDC20 and HPSE expression is an ideal strategy for HCC therapy. PMID:26132704

  2. Home interventions are effective at decreasing indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, L. M.; Diette, G. B.; Scott, M.; McCormack, M. C.; Matsui, E. C.; Curtin-Brosnan, J.; Williams, D. L.; Kidd-Taylor, A.; Shea, M.; Breysse, P. N.; Hansel, N. N.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a by-product of combustion produced by indoor gas appliances such as cooking stoves, is associated with respiratory symptoms in those with obstructive airways disease. We conducted a three-armed randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of interventions aimed at reducing indoor NO2 concentrations in homes with unvented gas stoves: (i) replacement of existing gas stove with electric stove; (ii) installation of ventilation hood over existing gas stove; and (iii) placement of air purifiers with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and carbon filters. Home inspection and NO2 monitoring were conducted at 1 week pre-intervention and at 1 week and 3 months post-intervention. Stove replacement resulted in a 51% and 42% decrease in median NO2 concentration at 3 months of follow-up in the kitchen and bedroom, respectively (P = 0.01, P = 0.01); air purifier placement resulted in an immediate decrease in median NO2 concentration in the kitchen (27%, P < 0.01) and bedroom (22%, P = 0.02), but at 3 months, a significant reduction was seen only in the kitchen (20%, P = 0.05). NO2 concentrations in the kitchen and bedroom did not significantly change following ventilation hood installation. Replacing unvented gas stoves with electric stoves or placement of air purifiers with HEPA and carbon filters can decrease indoor NO2 concentrations in urban homes. PMID:24329966

  3. Effects of Particles on Trace-Gas Measurement Using Open-Path Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchale, L.; Shadman, S.; Yalin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Open-path Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy offers many potential advantages over traditional closed-path configurations for the measurement of atmospheric trace gasses. Removal of the vacuum pump and flow system may enable more compact instruments suitable for remote and mobile deployments as well as real time measurement of 'sticky' gases. However, open path operation introduces new challenges including exposure of high reflectivity mirrors to ambient air and aerosols, the need to measure wider (pressure broadened) spectral peaks and possible signal interferences due to optical extinction by aerosol particles in the cavity laser beam. The present submission focuses on the effects of aerosol particles on open-path CRDS using a near-infrared (1742 nm) methane gas measurement system as a test bed. A simple purge enclosure system was developed to prevent aerosol deposition on the cavity high-reflectors. The purge uses ambient air pulled in with a micro-pump through a hepa filter and maintained mirror reflectivity R>0.99996 over 100 hours of use in the presence of high aerosol loading. Optical extinction due to ambient aerosols can change the cavity loss and influence the recorded ring-down times. We observed relatively large fluctuations due to supermicron particles and a near-constant baseline shift due to smaller submicron particles. The fluctuations correspond to absorption on the order of 10-8-10-7 cm-1, comparable to the amplitude of the targeted methane absorption features, causing significant interference. Simple software filter approaches were developed to counter these fluctuations without a priori knowledge of the ambient aerosols. The filters exploit the statistical distribution of signals as well as the expected absorption lineshape. Using these filters, noise-equivalent sensitivities within a factor of ~3 of closed-path systems were obtained (4x10-10cm-1Hz-1/2). Outdoor open-path measurements were validated with side-by-side measurements with a commercial

  4. Characterization of the airborne activity confinement system prefilter material

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.A.; Monson, P.R.

    1992-05-01

    A general concern with assessing the effects of postulated severe accidents is predicting and preventing the release of radioactive isotopes to the environment at the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor. Unless the confinement systems are breached in an accident the Airborne Activity Confinement System forces all of the internal air through the filter compartments. Proper modeling of the radioactivity released to the environment requires knowledge of the filtering characteristics of the demisters, the HEPA`s, and the charcoal beds. An investigation of the mass loading characteristics for a range of particle sizes was performed under the direction of Vince Novick of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in connection with the restart of the K reactor. Both solid and liquid aerosols were used to challenge sample prefilter and HEPA filters. The results of the ANL investigation are reported in this document.

  5. Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvares, N.; Beason, D.; Bergman, V.; Creighton, J.; Ford, H.; Lipska, A.

    1980-08-25

    The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, in exit ventilation ducts, from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Initially, methods were developed to cool fire-heated air by fine water spray upstream of the filters. It was recognized that smoke aerosol exposure to HEPA filters could also cause disruption of the containment system. Through testing and analysis, several methods to partially mitigate the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified. A continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. The technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total time duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modification of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, rolling filter media were laminated with the desired properties. The approach was Edisonian, but truncation in short order to a combination of prefilters was effective. The application of this technique was qualified, since it is of use only to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols. It is not believed that this technique is cost effective in the total spectrum of containment systems, especially if standard fire protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high-fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

  6. Chemoprotective activity of boldine: modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kubínová, R; Machala, M; Minksová, K; Neca, J; Suchý, V

    2001-03-01

    Possible chemoprotective effects of the naturally occurring alkaloid boldine, a major alkaloid of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.) leaves and bark, including in vitro modulations of drug-metabolizing enzymes in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1 cell line and mouse hepatic microsomes, were investigated. Boldine manifested inhibition activity on hepatic microsomal CYP1A-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylase activities and stimulated glutathione S-transferase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In addition to the known antioxidant activity, boldine could decrease the metabolic activation of other xenobiotics including chemical mutagens. PMID:11265593

  7. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Waste Composition and High Efficiency Particulate Air Filter Loading

    SciTech Connect

    ZIMMERMAN, B.D.

    2000-12-11

    This analysis evaluates the effect of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) waste isotopic composition on Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) accidents involving high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter failure in Double-Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRTs). The HEPA Filter Failure--Exposure to High Temperature or Pressure, and Steam Intrusion From Interfacing Systems accidents are considered. The analysis concludes that dose consequences based on the PFP waste isotopic composition are bounded by previous FSAR analyses. This supports USQD TF-00-0768.

  8. Evaluation of prototype electrofibrous filters for nuclear-ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Kuhl, W.D.; Biermann, A.H.; Johnson, J.S.; Lum, B.Y.

    1982-12-02

    Two prototypes electrofibrous filters were designed, built and evaluated in laboratory tests and in field installations. These prototypes were designed for use in nuclear ventilation ducts as prefilters to HEPA filters. One prototype is designed to be a permanent component of the ventilation system while the other is a disposable unit. The disposable electrofibrous prefilter was installed in the exhaust stream of a glove box in which barrels of uranium turnings are burned. Preliminary tests show the disposable prefilter is effectively prolonging the HEPA filter life.

  9. The chemopreventive effects of Saussurea salicifolia through induction of apoptosis and phase II detoxification enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Chul Young; Lee, Saet Byoul; Tunsag, Jigjidsuren; Batsuren, Dulamjav; Nho, Chu Won

    2007-12-01

    The ethanol extract of the aerial part of the Mongolian medicinal plant Saussurea salicifolia induced a dose-dependent cell growth inhibition in both human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells and mouse hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells (IC(50)=30.22 and 116.96 mug/ml), respectively. The extract induced an apoptosis in AGS cells inference from the externalization of the phosphatidylserine, the increase of the sub G0/G1 content (%) and the apoptotic morphological changes including membrane blebbing, the formation of apoptotic bodies and chromatin condensation. In order to identify active substances causing the apoptosis, we further isolated major compounds present in Saussurea salicifolia and 7 compounds were isolated including a sesquiterpene lactone, cynaropicrin, 3 lignans (trachelogenin, matairesinol and arctigenin) and 3 lignan glycosides (tracheloside, matairesinoside and arctiin). In general the lignan aglycones were more cytotoxic than their lignan glycosides in both AGS cells and Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Cynaropicrin not only showed the most potent cytotoxicity among the 7 major compounds but also it induced an apoptosis and a weak G2/M arrest in AGS cells. Arctigenin had the second-best cytotoxicity among 7 major compounds, and induced an apoptosis. In order to evaluate the induction of the phase II detoxification enzyme, we measured the induction of quinone reductase activity of the extract, fractions and compounds in Hepa 1c1c7 cells. The ethyl acetate fraction and arctigenin showed the strongest cancer chemopreventive activity (chemoprevention index=9.88 and 7.57, respectively). These data suggest that the extract as well as the lignan compounds (especially arctigenin) originated from Saussurea salicifolia may be served as potential cancer chemopreventive agents for prevention or treatment of human cancers. PMID:18057725

  10. Comparison of techniques to reduce residential lead dust on carpet and upholstery: the new jersey assessment of cleaning techniques trial.

    PubMed

    Yiin, Lih-Ming; Rhoads, George G; Rich, David Q; Zhang, Junfeng; Bai, Zhipeng; Adgate, John L; Ashley, Peter J; Lioy, Paul J

    2002-12-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum cleaners are recommended by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for cleaning lead-contaminated house dust. We performed a randomized field study to determine whether a conventional (non-HEPA) vacuum cleaner could achieve cleaning results comparable with those of a HEPA vacuum cleaner. We compared the lead loading reductions of these two vacuum cleaners in a total of 127 New Jersey homes of lead-exposed children. We used wet towelettes and a vacuum sampler to collect lead dust from carpets and upholstery before and after vacuum cleaning. The vacuum sampling data showed that the HEPA and non-HEPA vacuum cleaners resulted in 54.7% (p = 0.006) and 36.4% (p = 0.020) reductions in lead loading, respectively, when used on soiled carpets, although the overall difference in lead loading reduction between the two vacuum cleaners was not statistically significant (p = 0.293). The wipe sampling data did not show any significant lead loading reduction for either of the vacuum cleaners, suggesting that both vacuum cleaners fail to clean the surfaces of carpet effectively, considering that wipe sampling media simulate surface contact. On upholstery, the wipe sampling data showed a significant reduction in lead loading for the non-HEPA vacuum cleaner (22.2%, p = 0.047). Even with the significant reduction, the postcleaning lead loadings on upholstery were similar to those on carpets. The similar lead loading results for carpets and upholstery indicate that soiled upholstery may be as important a source of childhood lead exposure as carpets. PMID:12460803

  11. Comparison of techniques to reduce residential lead dust on carpet and upholstery: the new jersey assessment of cleaning techniques trial.

    PubMed Central

    Yiin, Lih-Ming; Rhoads, George G; Rich, David Q; Zhang, Junfeng; Bai, Zhipeng; Adgate, John L; Ashley, Peter J; Lioy, Paul J

    2002-01-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum cleaners are recommended by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for cleaning lead-contaminated house dust. We performed a randomized field study to determine whether a conventional (non-HEPA) vacuum cleaner could achieve cleaning results comparable with those of a HEPA vacuum cleaner. We compared the lead loading reductions of these two vacuum cleaners in a total of 127 New Jersey homes of lead-exposed children. We used wet towelettes and a vacuum sampler to collect lead dust from carpets and upholstery before and after vacuum cleaning. The vacuum sampling data showed that the HEPA and non-HEPA vacuum cleaners resulted in 54.7% (p = 0.006) and 36.4% (p = 0.020) reductions in lead loading, respectively, when used on soiled carpets, although the overall difference in lead loading reduction between the two vacuum cleaners was not statistically significant (p = 0.293). The wipe sampling data did not show any significant lead loading reduction for either of the vacuum cleaners, suggesting that both vacuum cleaners fail to clean the surfaces of carpet effectively, considering that wipe sampling media simulate surface contact. On upholstery, the wipe sampling data showed a significant reduction in lead loading for the non-HEPA vacuum cleaner (22.2%, p = 0.047). Even with the significant reduction, the postcleaning lead loadings on upholstery were similar to those on carpets. The similar lead loading results for carpets and upholstery indicate that soiled upholstery may be as important a source of childhood lead exposure as carpets. PMID:12460803

  12. Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 550 Side Effects WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS? WHO GETS SIDE EFFECTS? ... t assume that you will get every side effect that’s listed! Most people have few or only ...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10002 - 2-Thiazolidinone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... HEPA filters; and supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or continuous flow mode and... NCELs as an alternative to the § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30... substance may cause internal organ effects (blood, liver, and kidney). The substance may cause...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10002 - 2-Thiazolidinone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HEPA filters; and supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or continuous flow mode and... NCELs as an alternative to the § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30... substance may cause internal organ effects (blood, liver, and kidney). The substance may cause...

  15. QTL mapping for quinone reductase activity in broccoli with Hepa1c1c7 cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Floret tissue from 125 F2:3 broccoli families derived from the cross 'VI-158 x Brocolette Neri E. Cespuglio (BNC)' was harvested in 2009. Tissue was freeze-dried and stored in the dark at -80 until use. Distilled water was added to floret tissue (50 mg/mL) and auto-hydrolyzed for 24 hours in room te...

  16. Acceptable knowledge summary report for combustible/noncombustible, metallic, and HEPA filter waste resulting from {sup 238}Pu fabrication activities

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.S.Z.; Foxx, C.L.

    1998-02-19

    All transuranic (TRU) waste must be sufficiently characterized and certified before it is shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) allows use of acceptable knowledge (AK) for waste characterization. EPA uses the term AK in its guidance document and defines AK and provides guidelines on how acceptable knowledge should be obtained and documented. This AK package has been prepared in accordance with Acceptable Knowledge Documentation (TWCP-QP-1.1-021,R.2). This report covers acceptable knowledge information for five waste streams generated at TA-55 during operations to fabricate various heat sources using feedstock {sup 238}Pu supplied by the Savannah River Site (SRS). The {sup 238}Pu feedstock itself does not contain quantities of RCRA-regulated constituents above regulatory threshold limits, as known from process knowledge at SRS and as confirmed by chemical analysis. No RCRA-regulated chemicals were used during {sup 238}Pu fabrication activities at TA-55, and all {sup 238}Pu activities were physically separated from other plutonium processing activities. Most of the waste generated from the {sup 238}Pu fabrication activities is thus nonmixed waste, including waste streams TA-55-43, 45, and 47. The exceptions are waste streams TA-55-44, which contains discarded lead-lined rubber gloves used in the gloveboxes that contained the {sup 238}Pu material, and TA-55-46, which may contain pieces of discarded lead. These waste streams have been denoted as mixed because of the presence of the lead-containing material.

  17. Nosocomial invasive aspergillosis in a heart transplant patient acquired during a break in the HEPA air filtration system.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, P; Guinea, J; Peláez, T; Durán, C; Blanco, J L; Bouza, E

    2004-03-01

    We report a case of nosocomially acquired invasive aspergillosis (IA) in a low-risk heart transplant recipient due to a break in the air conditioning system. A high overload of Aspergillus spores in the intensive care unit room led this patient to acquire IA. Identical environmental and patient isolates allowed our hypothesis to be confirmed and a very precise incubation time to be estimated. PMID:15225229

  18. High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Generation, Characterization, and Disposal Experiences at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, D. E.

    2002-02-28

    High Efficiency Particulate Air filtration is an essential component of the containment and ventilation systems supporting the research and development activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. High Efficiency Particulate Air filters range in size from 7.6cm (3 inch) by 10.2 cm (4 inch) cylindrical shape filters to filter array assemblies up to 2.1 m (7 feet) high by 1.5 m (5 feet) wide. Spent filters are grouped by contaminates trapped in the filter media and become one of the components in the respective waste stream. Waste minimization and pollution prevention efforts are applied for both radiological and non-radiological applications. Radiological applications include laboratory hoods, glove boxes, and hot cells. High Efficiency Particulate Air filters also are generated from intake or pre-filtering applications, decontamination activities, and asbestos abatement applications. The disposal avenues include sanitary/industrial waste, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and Toxic Substance Control Act, regulated waste, solid low-level waste, contact handled transuranic, and remote handled transuranic waste. This paper discusses characterization and operational experiences associated with the disposal of the spent filters across multiple applications.

  19. In vitro kinetics of amiodarone and its major metabolite in two human liver cell models after acute and repeated treatments.

    PubMed

    Pomponio, Giuliana; Savary, Camille C; Parmentier, Céline; Bois, Frederic; Guillouzo, André; Romanelli, Luca; Richert, Lysiane; Di Consiglio, Emma; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-12-25

    The limited value of in vitro toxicity data for the in vivo extrapolation has been often attributed to the lack of kinetic data. Here the in vitro kinetics of amiodarone (AMI) and its mono-N-desethyl (MDEA) metabolite was determined and modelled in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and HepaRG cells, after single and repeated administration of clinically relevant concentrations. AMI bioavailability was influenced by adsorption to the plastic and the presence of protein in the medium (e.g. 10% serum protein reduced the uptake by half in HepaRG cells). The cell uptake was quick (within 3h), AMI metabolism was efficient and a dynamic equilibrium was reached in about a week after multiple dosing. In HepaRG cells the metabolic clearance was higher than in PHH and increased over time, as well as CYP3A4. The interindividual variability in MDEA production in PHHs was not proportional to the differences in CYP3A4 activities, suggesting the involvement of other CYPs and/or AMI-related CYP inhibition. After repeated treatment AMI showed a slight potential for bioaccumulation, whereas much higher intracellular MDEA levels accumulated over time, especially in the HepaRG cells, associated with occurrence of phospholipidosis. The knowledge of in vitro biokinetics is important to transform an actual in vitro concentration-effect into an in vivo dose-effect relationship by using appropriate modelling, thus improving the in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation. PMID:25546373

  20. Summary of efficiency testing of standard and high-capacity high-efficiency particulate air filters subjected to simulated tornado depressurization and explosive shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.; Gregory, W.S.

    1985-04-01

    Pressure transients in nuclear facility air cleaning systems can originate from natural phenomena such as tornadoes or from accident-induced explosive blast waves. This study was concerned with the effective efficiency of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters during pressure surges resulting from simulated tornado and explosion transients. The primary objective of the study was to examine filter efficiencies at pressure levels below the point of structural failure. Both standard and high-capacity 0.61-m by 0.61-m HEPA filters were evaluated, as were several 0.2-m by 0.2-m HEPA filters. For a particular manufacturer, the material release when subjected to tornado transients is the same (per unit area) for both the 0.2-m by 0.2-m and the 0.61-m by 0.61-m filters. For tornado transients, the material release was on the order of micrograms per square meter. When subjecting clean HEPA filters to simulated tornado transients with aerosol entrained in the pressure pulse, all filters tested showed a degradation of filter efficiency. For explosive transients, the material release from preloaded high-capacity filters was as much as 340 g. When preloaded high-capacity filters were subjected to shock waves approximately 50% of the structural limit level, 1 to 2 mg of particulate was released.

  1. Recycling of cleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.; Energy Systems; Inst. of Paper Science and Tech.

    2000-11-01

    inorganic NPEs can enable the mills to recycle bleach effluents to reduce water consumption. The electrodialysis process also effectively retained up to 98% of the organics and can reduce the organic discharge in the mill wastewater. By using suitable commercially available electrodialysis membranes, there were no indications of rapid or irreversible membrane fouling or scale formation, even in extended laboratory scale operations up to 100 hours. Results of laboratory experiments also showed that commercially available membranes properly selected for this process would have good stability to withstand the potentially oxidative conditions of the filtrate. A pilot-scale field demonstration was also conducted at a southern mill, using the D0 filtrate from the bleach plant. During the field demonstration we found serious membrane 2 stack clogging problems, which apparently were caused by fine fibers that escaped through the 5-micron pre-filters, although such a pre-filtration method had been satisfactory in the laboratory tests. Additional R&D is recommended to address this pre-filtration or clogging issue with systems approaches integrating pre-filtration, other separation methods, and stack design. After the pre-filtration/clogging issue is overcome, laboratory development and pilot demonstration are recommended to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the long-term process parameters. The key technical issues here include membrane lives, control and mitigation of fouling and scaling, and cleaning-in-place protocols. From the data collected in this work, a preliminary process design and economic evaluations were performed for a model mill with 1,000-ton/day pulp production that uses a bleaching sequence based on chlorine dioxide. Assuming 3 m{sup 3} acidic effluents to be treated per ton of pulp produced, the electrodialysis process would require a membrane area of about 361 m{sup 2} for this model mill. The energy consumption of the electrodialytic stack for

  2. Recycling of bleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.

    2002-03-04

    inorganic NPEs can enable the mills to recycle bleach effluents to reduce water consumption. The electrodialysis process also effectively retained up to 98% of the organics and can reduce the organic discharge in the mill wastewater. By using suitable commercially available electrodialysis membranes, there were no indications of rapid or irreversible membrane fouling or scale formation, even in extended laboratory scale operations up to 100 hours. Results of laboratory experiments also showed that commercially available membranes properly selected for this process would have good stability to withstand the potentially oxidative conditions of the filtrate. A pilot-scale field demonstration was also conducted at a southern mill, using the D0 filtrate from the bleach plant. During the field demonstration we found serious membrane stack clogging problems, which apparently were caused by fine fibers that escaped through the 5-micron pre-filters, although such a pre-filtration method had been satisfactory in the laboratory tests. Additional R&D is recommended to address this pre-filtration or clogging issue with systems approaches integrating pre-filtration, other separation methods, and stack design. After the pre-filtration/clogging issue is overcome, laboratory development and pilot demonstration are recommended to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the long-term process parameters. The key technical issues here include membrane lives, control and mitigation of fouling and scaling, and cleaning-in-place protocols.

  3. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 1: Dose assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    On February 3, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires RL to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission monitoring requirements in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, and to continuously monitor radionuclide emissions in accordance with requirements in 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. A Compliance Plan was submitted to EPA, Region 10, on April 30, 1993. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health on the Hanford Site. Stacks that have the potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent to a maximum exposed individual greater than 0.1 mrem/y must be monitored continuously for radionuclide emissions. Five methods were approved by EPA, Region 10 for performing the assessments: Release Fractions from Appendix D of 40 CFR 61, Back Calculations Using A HEPA Filtration Factor, Nondestructive Assay of HEPA Filters, A Spill Release Fraction, and Upstream of HEPA Filter Air Concentrations. The first two methods were extremely conservative for estimating releases. The third method, which used a state-of-the-art portable gamma spectrometer, yielded surprising results from the distribution of radionuclides on the HEPA filters. All five methods are described. Assessments using a HEPA Filtration Factor for back calculations identified 32 stacks that would have emissions that would cause an EDE to the MEI greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}. The number was reduced to 15 stacks when the other methods were applied. The paper discusses reasons for the overestimates.

  4. Hepatocyte-specific Keap1 deletion reduces liver steatosis but not inflammation during non-alcoholic steatohepatitis development.

    PubMed

    Ramadori, Pierluigi; Drescher, Hannah; Erschfeld, Stephanie; Schumacher, Fabienne; Berger, Cordula; Fragoulis, Athanassios; Schenkel, Julia; Kensler, Thomas W; Wruck, Christoph J; Trautwein, Christian; Kroy, Daniela C; Streetz, Konrad L

    2016-02-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to fatty acids accumulation has been classically proposed as a possible "second hit" triggering progression from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In this study we challenged hepatocyte-specific Keap1 knockout mice (Keap1(Δhepa)) and littermate Cre- controls (Keap1(fx/fx)) with two different diet models of NASH in order to evaluate the effects of the anti-oxidant transcription factor Nrf2 over-activation on hepatic metabolism and disease progression. After 4 weeks of MCD diet the liver/body weight ratio of Keap1(Δhepa) mice was significantly higher compared to littermate controls with no differences in total body weight. Strikingly, liver histology revealed a dramatic reduction of lipid droplets confirmed by a decreased content of intra-hepatic triglycerides in Keap1(Δhepa) compared to controls. In parallel to reduced expression of genes involved in lipid droplet formation, protein expression of Liver X Receptor (LXRα/β) and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) was significantly decreased. In contrast, genes involved in mitochondrial lipid catabolism were markedly up-regulated in Keap1(Δhepa) livers. A similar phenotype characterized by inhibition of lipogenesis in favor of increased mitochondrial catabolic activity was also observed after 13 weeks of western diet administration. MCD-induced apoptosis was significantly dampened in Keap1(Δhepa) compared to Keap1(fx/fx) as detected by TUNEL, cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2 protein expression analyses. However, no differences in inflammatory F4/80- and CD11b-positive cells and pro-fibrogenic genes were detected between the two groups. Although hepatic lack of Keap1 did not ameliorate inflammation, the resulting constitutive Nrf2 over-activation in hepatocytes strongly reduced hepatic steatosis via enhanced lipid catabolism and repressed de novo lipogenesis during murine NASH development. PMID:26698665

  5. Thermal Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmage, Sylvia S.; Coutant, Charles C.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the effect of temperature on the biosphere water, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes the effects of temperature on growth, production, and embryonic and larval development. A list of 401 references is also presented. (HM)

  6. "Further Effects"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinigstein, Steven Michael

    In writing Further Effects, I intended to illustrate the benefits that are to be had from the use of effects - processing, when applied at the compositional level, rather than as a post-compositional afterthought. When effects are used creatively in the compositional stage, they will influence the very nature of a piece. They are capable of expressing rhythmic and metric ideas. They can alter the natural timbre of an instrument. This can be done on levels of abstraction ranging from discreet subtlety to disguise beyond recognition. There is one effect (known as "pitch shift.") that allows an instrument to play pitches that are well outside of its range. In Further Effects, I direct the performers to use a volume pedal (which I view as a tool, rather than an effect) for the broadened creative use of dynamics that it so efficiently grants. The use of an effects processor and volume pedal creates a need for ancillary equipment. An amplifier, cables, and an electric hook-up (a microphone or a pickup) will be required for each instrument. While an amplifier serves to project the processed sound, there must also be a device or method to suppress unprocessed sound. A great deal of thought and work goes into the use of effects; yet I feel it is wasteful to use this musical resource merely as post-compositional decoration.

  7. Thermal effects

    SciTech Connect

    Harrelson, M.E.; Talmadge, S.S.; Cravens, J.B.

    1984-06-01

    A literature review is presented of recent studies on the role of temperature effects and change in temperature caused by thermal power plants on aquatic life. Several of these studies involve the use of models that allow testing of hypotheses concerning the effects of temperature on fish and insects. 91 references.

  8. Gauging Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foord, Kathleen A.; Haar, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    Books by education experts and speakers at national professional conferences have inspired many school leaders to initiate professional learning communities (PLCs). Sustaining them effectively to raise student achievement is another matter. How can one know whether a PLC is moving toward a desired outcome? Measuring effectiveness requires an…

  9. Effective Schools Require Effective Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPointe, Michelle; Davis, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    At long last, scholars and policy makers have come to realize what most school administrators have known for years--that effective schools require both outstanding teachers and strong leaders. Although there is considerable research about the characteristics of effective school leaders and the strategies principals can use to help manage…

  10. Health Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapter . Additional information regarding the health effects of climate change and references to supporting literature can be found ... globalchange.gov/engage/activities-products/NCA3/technical-inputs . Climate change, together with other natural and human-made health ...

  11. System and Apparatus for Filtering Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H. (Inventor); Vijayakumar, Rajagopal (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A modular pre-filtration apparatus may be beneficial to extend the life of a filter. The apparatus may include an impactor that can collect a first set of particles in the air, and a scroll filter that can collect a second set of particles in the air. A filter may follow the pre-filtration apparatus, thus causing the life of the filter to be increased.

  12. Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin, but Not Sorafenib or Paclitaxel, Have a Synergistic Effect with Yttrium-90 in Reducing Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Line Viability.

    PubMed

    Edeline, Julien; Coulouarn, Cédric; Crouzet, Laurence; Pracht, Marc; Lepareur, Nicolas; Clément, Bruno; Garin, Etienne

    2015-12-01

    Synergy between yttrium-90 (90Y) and antineoplastic drugs was investigated. Viability of HepaRG (hepatocellular carcinoma) and HuCCT1 (cholangiocarcinoma) cells was studied through a tetrazolium dye reduction assay. A combination index (CI) was calculated, with CI < 1 denoting synergy and CI > 1 denoting antagonism. In HepaRG cells, gemcitabine showed synergy with 90Y (CI = 0.70 [95% confidence interval = 0.65-0.75]), whereas oxaliplatin (CI = 1.15 [1.08-1.21]), paclitaxel (CI = 1.26 [1.15-1.37]), and sorafenib (CI = 1.77 [1.65-1.89]) showed antagonism. In HuCCT1 cells, gemcitabine (CI = 0.54 [0.50-0.58]) and oxaliplatin (CI = 0.86 [0.82-0.90]) showed synergy with 90Y, whereas paclitaxel (CI = 1.18 [1.09-1.27]) and sorafenib (CI = 1.21 [1.12-1.30]) showed antagonism. These results suggest that gemcitabine and oxaliplatin should be tested in combination with 90Y radioembolization for treatment of liver cancer. PMID:26596183

  13. Plasma Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Radio communication with space probes requires sending signals through the Earth's ionosphere and usually the solar wind. During planetary flybys, the signal may also pass through the ionosphere of another planet. These ionized media can perturb the radio signal in a variety of ways. Examples of these perturbations are variations in the electrical length between the spacecraft and the ground station, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized signals, amplitude and phase scintillations, and spectral and angular broadening. These plasma effects can have undesirable influences on telemetry performance and thus need to be understood from a communications engineering viewpoint. The plasma effects are, however, useful from a scientific viewpoint, since the effects on the communications link can often be inverted to estimate the physical conditions in the plasma.

  14. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Panyue; Ye, Jie; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2014 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: anaerobic wastewater and sludge treatment, biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, membrane biological treatment, sewage sludge pyrolysis, natural treatment, resource recovery, electrolysis, oxidation and adsorption treatment. PMID:26420108

  15. Communicating Effectively

    Cancer.gov

    The seventh module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores communication issues pertinent to African Americans with cancer and their health care providers, discusses strategies for culturally sensitive communication, and presents the SPIKES protocol, a practical framework for effective communication.

  16. Sleeper Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Daphne; Mondloch, Catherine J.; Lewis, Terri L.

    2007-01-01

    Early experience preserves and refines many capabilities that emerge prenatally. Here we describe another role that it plays--establishing the neural substrate for capabilities that emerge at a much later point in development. The evidence comes from sleeper effects: permanent deficits when early experience was absent in capabilities that normally…

  17. System Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk

  18. Blazhko Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teays, Terry

    1996-01-01

    The cause of the Blazhko effect, the long-term modulation of the light and radial velocity curves of some RR Lyr stars, is still not understood. The observational characteristics of the Blazhko effect are discussed. Some preliminary results are presented from two recent campaigns to observe RR Lyr, using the International Ultraviolet Explorer along with ground-based spectroscopy and photometry, throughout a pulsation cycle, at a variety of Blazhko phases. A set of ultraviolet light curves have been generated from low dispersion IUE spectra. In addition, the (visual) light curves from IUE's Fine Error Sensor are analyzed using the Fourier decomposition technique. The values of the parameters Psi(sub 21) and R(sub 21) at different Blazhko phases of RR Lyr span the range of values found for non-Blazhko variables of similar period.

  19. Zeeman Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The splitting of a spectral line into two, three or more components, that occurs when the source of that line lies within a magnetic field. This phenomenon is named after the Dutch physicist, Pieter Zeeman (1865-1943), who discovered the effect in the laboratory, in 1896. The separation of the components of a line is proportional to the strength of the magnetic field and the number of components,...

  20. Thermal Effects.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming; Zhang, Panyue; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2015 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, wastewater treatment for organic conversion, industrial wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and solid waste, sludge biochar preparation and application, pyrolysis of sewage sludge, reduction heavy metal in sewage sludge and soil, and other issues of wastewater and sludge treatment. PMID:27620109

  1. Ambient air and its potential effects on conception in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J; Gilligan, A; Esposito, W; Schimmel, T; Dale, B

    1997-08-01

    Incidences of chemical air contamination (CAC) are common in assisted reproductive technology, but not reported in peer review format. Justified fear of car and industrial emissions clearly exists among reproductive specialists, but standards for air contents and gaseous emission limits have not been reported. Here, we describe air sampling methods and assay systems which can be applied to any laboratory or laboratory item. It was found that unfiltered outside air may be cleaner than high efficiency particulate air filtration (HEPA) filtered laboratory air or air obtained from incubators, due to accumulation of volatile organic compounds derived from adjacent spaces or specific laboratory products such as compressed CO2, sterile Petri dishes and other materials or devices known to release gaseous emissions. Specific groups of products such as anaesthetic gases, refrigerants, cleaning agents, hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds such as benzene and toluene are described. The latter were shown to accumulate specifically in incubators. Isopropyl alcohol was the most dominant product found, though it was not used by the laboratory staff. Concentrations of this agent were low in incubator air, indicating that it was probably absorbed by the water in the pan or by culture medium. Measures to counter CAC are proposed, including the use of activated carbon filters and oxidizing material placed in the central air handling systems, in separate free-standing units or even inside the incubators. PMID:9308805

  2. Erosion Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The impact crater in this THEMIS image is a model illustration to the effects of erosion on Mars. The degraded crater rim and several landslides observed in crater walls is evidence to the mass wasting of materials. Layering in crater walls also suggests the presence of materials that erode at varying rates.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 31.6, Longitude 44.3 East (315.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  3. Effective committees.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jannette

    2012-03-01

    A committee is a group of people officially delegated to perform a function, such as investigating, considering, reporting, or acting on a matter. Some committees function like task forces and work on specific, time-limited projects. When the work is finished, the committees are no longer needed. These committees are called ad hoc committees. Other committees are standing committees. They are created by the standing orders, rules, by-laws, or regulations of an organization and exist and function indefinitely (eg, finance, membership, education, nomination). Both types of committees can form subcommittees if the workloads are heavy or complex in nature. Committees can be among the most important working forces of an organization. They serve as work units of the organization, taking work and breaking it into meaningful and manageable chunks. They efficiently carry out the work of the organization. Committee work should be a rewarding experience for both the members and the organization. Committees represent, involve, and serve members, as well as provide an important training ground for future leaders of an organization. New or inexperienced members can gain valuable insight into an organization and develop confidence by serving on committees. There are several key elements of effective committees, including (1) a clear, written purpose; (2) an effective committee chair; (3) thoughtfully appointed members; and (4) well-run meetings. PMID:22386164

  4. Treatment with Parkinsonia aculeata combats insulin resistance-induced oxidative stress through the increase in PPARγ/CuZn-SOD axis expression in diet-induced obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Tiago Gomes; Oliveira, Alexandre Gabarra; Vecina, Juliana Falcato; Marin, Rodrigo Miguel; Franco, Eryvelton Souza; Abdalla Saad, Mario J; de Sousa Maia, Maria Bernadete

    2016-08-01

    Parkinsonia aculeata L. (Caesalpiniaceae) is a traditional ethnomedicine and has been used for the empiric treatment of hyperglycemia, without scientific background. Mechanistic analyses at molecular level from the antioxidant mechanism observed by P. aculeata are required. Herein the effects of the treatment by hydroethanolic extract partitioned with ethyl acetate of P. aculeata aerial parts (HEPa/EtOAc) in mice fed a high-fat diet that share many obesity phenotypes with humans were evaluated. The animals were treated orally with HEPa/EtOAc (125 and 250 mg/kg/day) and pioglitazone (5 mg/kg/day), for 16 days. After the treatment, HEPa/EtOAc reduced fasting serum glucose and insulin levels, as well as homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance. In addition, an improvement in glucose intolerance was also observed. Indeed, a reduction in the circulating levels of TNF-α and IL-6 was also observed. Furthermore, at molecular level, it was demonstrated that the HEPa/EtOAc treatment was able to improve these physiological parameters, through the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) per si, as well as the enhancement of antioxidant mechanism by an increase in PPARγ/Cu(2+), Zn(2+)-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) axis expression in liver and adipose tissue. In sum, P. aculeata is effective to improve insulin resistance in a mouse model of obesity and this effect seems to involve the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms through the increase in PPARγ/CuZn-SOD axis expression. PMID:27372351

  5. Characterization of the airborne activity confinement system prefilter material

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.A.; Monson, P.R.

    1992-05-01

    A general concern with assessing the effects of postulated severe accidents is predicting and preventing the release of radioactive isotopes to the environment at the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor. Unless the confinement systems are breached in an accident the Airborne Activity Confinement System forces all of the internal air through the filter compartments. Proper modeling of the radioactivity released to the environment requires knowledge of the filtering characteristics of the demisters, the HEPA's, and the charcoal beds. An investigation of the mass loading characteristics for a range of particle sizes was performed under the direction of Vince Novick of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in connection with the restart of the K reactor. Both solid and liquid aerosols were used to challenge sample prefilter and HEPA filters. The results of the ANL investigation are reported in this document.

  6. Analysis and consequences of fire inside the ventilation ducts of a nuclear facility

    SciTech Connect

    Briand, A.R.; Laborde, J.C. ); Savornin, J.H.; Tessier, J.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Accident events involving fire are rather frequent and could have a severe effect on the safety of nuclear facilities. Among the fires that have broken out in nuclear plants, several have resulted from ignition of dust deposited inside the ventilation ducts and on the high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The BEATRICE test facility has been designed and built at a French nuclear studies center to enable the analysis and consequences of these types of fires to be evaluated. The associated experimental program is aimed at characterizing the fire (fire spread, aerosols formed), determining and simulating the temperature profiles along the duct (thermal losses evaluation by the pipette code), and evaluating the challenge and behavior of the associated HEPA filters (efficiency, contamination release, etc.). The tests performed in this study contributed to improvements in the basic knowledge about fires inside ventilation ducts and define the associated strategies (ventilation control, filters protection, etc.).

  7. Microbial effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lamborg, M.R.; Hardy, R.W.F.; Paul, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    The postulated doubling of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ is not likely to have direct effect on soil microbial activity because during the growing season, the concentration of CO/sub 2/ in the soil atmosphere is already ten to fifty times higher than existing atmospheric CO/sub 2/. Based on all available experimental information, it is estimated that a doubling of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ will cause an increase in primary productivity of 10 to 40% depending on locale. The increase in biomass will, in turn, produce a limitation of available soil nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus. Increased organic carbon together with nitrogen and/or phosphorus limitation will result in a preferential increase in nitrogen fixation and mycorrhizal activities as the expedient means for supplying required nutrients to sustain the predicted increase in primary productivity. Therefore, increased emphasis should be placed on fundamental research related to soil microbiology with special reference to nitrogen-fixing, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria, and to the mycorrhizal fungi. 111 references, 2 figures.

  8. Shredder and incinerator technology for treatment of commercial transuranic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Oma, K.H.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Ross, W.A.

    1985-10-01

    This report describes the selection and evaluation of process equipment to accomplish the shredding and incineration of commercial TRU wastes. The primary conclusions derived from this study are: Shredding and incineration technology appears effective for converting simulated commercial TRU wastes to a noncombustible form. The gas-heated controlled-air incinerator received the highest technical ranking. On a scale of 1 to 10, the incinerator had a Figure-of-Merit (FOM) number of 7.0. This compares to an FOM of 6.1 for the electrically heated controlled-air incinerator and an FOM of 5.8 for the rotary kiln incienrator. The present worth costs of the incineration processes for a postulated commercial reprocessing plant were lowest for the electrically heated and gas-heated controlled-air incinerators with costs of $16.3 M and $16.9 M, respectively (1985 dollars). Due to higher capital and operating costs, the rotary kiln process had a present worth cost of $20.8 M. The recommended process from the three evaluated for the commercial TRU waste application is the gas-heated controlled-air incinerator with a single stage of shredding for feed pretreatment. This process had the best cost-effectiveness ratio of 1.0 (normalized). The electrically heated controller-air incinerator had a rating of 1.2 and the rotary kiln rated a 1.5. Most of the simulated wastes were easily processed by the low-speed shredders evaluated. The HEPA filters proved difficult to process, however. Wood-framed HEPA filters tended to ride on the cutter wheels and spacers without being gripped and shredded. The metal-framed HEPA filters and other difficult to shred items caused the shredders to periodically reach the torque limit and go into an automatic reversal cycle; however, the filters were eventually processed by the units. All three incinerators were ineffective for oxidizing the aluminum metal used as spacers in HEPA filters.

  9. Electrofibrous prefilters for use in nuclear ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Kuhl, W.D.; Russell, W.L.; Taylor, R.D.; Hebard, H.D.; Biermann, A.H.; Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Lum, B.Y.

    1981-02-19

    We have established a comprehensive program for the US Department of Energy to develop electrofibrous prefilters to extend the life of High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters that are used in the nuclear industry. We have selected the electrofibrous filter because, compared to the mechanical fibrous filter, it has a higher efficiency and longer lifetime. Two different electrofibrous filters have been developed for use in nuclear ventilation systems. One prototype is a stationary prefilter while the other is a rolling prefilter. Both prefilters use the same basic filtering technique in which a fibrous filter medium is sandwiched between a high voltage electrode and a ground electrode, both electrodes having a sufficient open area to offer minimum air resistance. The applied voltage on the electrodes generates an electric field that polarizes the filter fibers, which then attract suspended particles via electrostatic forces. The filter media and electrodes have been pleated to provide a sufficiently long particle residence time. The special requirement of protecting the HEPA filter from a high concentration of smoke aerosols during fire conditions led to the development of the rolling, electrofibrous prefilter. We established the feasibility of this concept in a series of tests using commercially available rolling prefilters that were modified for removing smoke aerosols. Although the rolling prefilter concept is not a cost effective measure for the sole purpose of protecting HEPA filters from smoke aerosols, it became cost effective when used primarily for protecting the HEPA filters from normal production aerosols. The same piece of equipment is then used for both normal operating conditions as well as emergency fire conditions. Several prototype electrofibrous rolling prefilters were designed, built and evaluated. The filter evaluations were conducted using NaCl and DOP aerosols as well as smoke aerosols.

  10. Induction of NAD(P)H:quinone reductase in murine hepatoma cells by phenolic antioxidants, azo dyes, and other chemoprotectors: a model system for the study of anticarcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    De Long, M.J.; Prochaska, H.J.; Talalay, P.

    1986-02-01

    Exposure of murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells to a variety of chemical agents known to protect animals against the neoplastic, mutagenic, and other toxic effects of chemical carcinogens results in dose- and time-dependent inductions of NAD(P)H:quinone reductase (EC 1.6.99.2). This enzyme protects against quinone toxicity by promoting obligatory two-electron reductions that divert quinones from oxidative cycling or direct interactions with critical nucleophiles. Quinone reductase levels are stable in culture, are easily measured, and are useful markers for the inductive effects of chemoprotective agents. The Hepa 1c1c7 system responds to chemoprotective compounds such as phenolic antioxidants /e.g., BHA (3(2)-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole), BHT (3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxytoluene), and tert-butylhydroquinone/, lipophilic azo dyes belonging to the 1,1'-azonaphthalene, Sudan I (1-phenylazo-2-naphthol), and Sudan III (1-(4-phenylazophenylazo)-2-naphthol) families, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, coumarin and various other lactones, flavonoids, and certain sulfur compounds (e.g., benzylisothiocyanate, dithiolthiones, and dithiocarbamates), all of which are recognized enzyme inducers and chemoprotectors in vivo. Quinone reductase induction in Hepa 1c1c7 cells therefore provides a simple, versatile, and reliable system for the evaluation of the potency, kinetics, and mechanism of action of anticarcinogens.

  11. Hepatic protection and anticancer activity of curcuma: A potential chemopreventive strategy against hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, YAN; SHI, XUE; ZHANG, JINGWEN; ZHANG, XIANG; MARTIN, ROBERT C.G.

    2014-01-01

    Malignant transformation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) occurs through repetitive liver injury in a context of inflammation and oxidative DNA damage. A spectrum of natural sesquiterpenoids from curcuma oil has displayed anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic properties. The aim of the study was to investigate the hepatoprotective and anti-HCC effects of curcuma oil in vivo and in vitro. Mice were pretreated with curcuma oil (100 mg/kg) for 3 days, then treated with Concanavalin A (30 mg/kg). The hepatic tissue was evaluated for histology, CD4+ cell, interferon-γ, apoptosis, lipid peroxidation, 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine and MnSOD. C57L/J mice were treated with curcuma oil and 107 Hepa1-6 cells directly inoculated into liver lobes. The effects of curcuma oil on cell growth and cell death were evaluated. In addition, MnSOD, HSP60, catalase, NF-κB and caspase-3 were also investigated in the Hepa1-6 cells treated with curcuma oil. Pretreatment with curcuma oil significantly attenuates inflammation and oxidative damage by Concanavalin A. Treatment with curcuma oil can decrease the incidence of HCC. Curcuma oil inhibits cell growth and induces cell death in Hepa1-6 cells. Curcuma protected mice with hepatic injury from inflammatory and oxidative stress. Curcuma oil can inhibit hepatoma cell growth in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24270742

  12. Field evaluation of prototype electrofibrous filters

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, W.D.; Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.H.; Lum, B.Y.

    1982-09-30

    New prototype electrofibrous filters were designed, built and evaluated in laboratory tests and in field installations. Two prototypes were designed for use in nuclear ventilation ducts as prefilters to HEPA filters. One prototype is designed to be a permanent component of the ventilation system while the other is a disposable unit. The disposable electrofibrous prefilter was installed in the exhaust stream of a glove box in which barrels of uranium turnings are burned. Preliminary tests show the disposal prefilter is effectively prolonging the HEPA filter life. An earlier prototype of the rolling prefilter was upgraded to meet the increased requirements for installation in a nuclear facility. This upgraded prototype was evaluated in the fire test facility at LLNL and shown to be effective in protecting HEPA filters from plugging under the most severe smoke conditions. The last prototype described in this report is a recirculating air filter. After demonstrating a high performance in laboratory tests the unit was shipped to Savannah River where it is awaiting installation in a Pu fuel fabrication facility. An analysis of the particulate problem in Savannah River indicates that four recirculating air filter will save $172,000 per year in maintenance costs.

  13. Evaluation of In Vitro Biotransformation Using HepaRG Cells to Improve High-Throughput Chemical Hazard Prediction: A Toxicogenomics Analysis (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA’s ToxCast program has generated a wealth of data in >600 in vitro assayson a library of 1060 environmentally relevant chemicals and failed pharmaceuticals to facilitate hazard identification. An inherent criticism of many in vitro-based strategies is the inability of a...

  14. Identification of proteins containing redox-sensitive thiols after PRDX1, PRDX3 and GCLC silencing and/or glucose oxidase treatment in Hepa 1-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Almagro, Carlos A; Prieto-Álamo, María-José; Pueyo, Carmen; Jurado, Juan

    2012-12-21

    The oxidation and reduction of cysteine thiols are thought to be a major mechanism for redox regulation. The aim of this study was to identify proteins with reactive thiols and determine their oxidation profiles under oxidative stress induced by simultaneous silencing of antioxidant defences (peroxiredoxin-1, peroxiredoxin-3, and the catalytic subunit of the glutamate-cysteine ligase), and/or treatment with glucose oxidase (GO). Using an approach that combined the labelling of reversibly oxidised cysteines, 2-DE protein separation and MS analysis, we identified 26 proteins with cysteines prone to reversible oxidation belonging to different functional classes. Among these proteins are those that have not been previously recognised as reversible oxidation targets, including cytoplasmic aspartate aminotransferase, proteasome subunit alpha type-6, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins isoA2/B1 and A/B, and histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1. We provide the first evidence of reversible oxidation for specific cysteines, including Cys112 and Cys146 in glutamate dehydrogenase 1, Cys17 in actins, Cys5 in protein disulfide-isomerase A3, and Cys267 in the heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein. Silencing induced lower oxidative stress than GO treatment. Nevertheless, we detected some proteins particularly sensitive to oxidation by silencing. We hypothesised that these proteins may play a role in regulatory mechanisms by redox stress. PMID:22975676

  15. Effective Teaching/Effective Urban Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Dyan; Charner-Laird, Megin; Kirkpatrick, Cheryl L.; Szczesiul, Stacy Agee; Gordon, Pamela J.

    2006-01-01

    This article considers the ways in which 17 novice teachers define and describe effective urban teaching and the stark contrasts that these teachers draw between effective urban teaching and effective teaching. The authors find that descriptions of students played a considerable role when participants made distinctions between effective teaching…

  16. Transcriptional regulation of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene by cooperation between hepatic nuclear factors.

    PubMed Central

    Yanuka-Kashles, O; Cohen, H; Trus, M; Aran, A; Benvenisty, N; Reshef, L

    1994-01-01

    To study the transcriptional regulation of the liver gluconeogenic phenotype, the underdifferentiated mouse Hepa-1c1c7 (Hepa) hepatoma cell line was used. These cells mimicked the fetal liver by appreciably expressing the alpha-fetoprotein and albumin genes but not the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene. Unlike the fetal liver, however, Hepa cells failed to express the early-expressed factors hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF-1 alpha) and HNF-4 and the late-expressed factor C/EBP alpha, thereby providing a suitable system for examining possible cooperation between these factors in the transcriptional regulation of the PEPCK gene. Transient transfection assays of a chimeric PEPCK-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase construct showed a residual PEPCK promoter activity in the Hepa cell line, which was slightly stimulated by cotransfection with a single transcription factor from either the C/EBP family or HNF-1 alpha but not at all affected by cotransfection of HNF-4. In contrast, cotransfection of the PEPCK construct with members from the C/EBP family plus HNF-1 alpha resulted in a synergistic stimulation of the PEPCK promoter activity. This synergistic effect depended on the presence in the PEPCK promoter region of the HNF-1 recognition sequence and on the presence of two C/EBP recognition sequences. The results demonstrate a requirement for coexistence and cooperation between early and late liver-enriched transcription factors in the transcriptional regulation of the PEPCK gene. In addition, the results suggest redundancy between members of the C/EBP family of transcription factors in the regulation of PEPCK gene expression. Images PMID:7935427

  17. Characterizing the mechanism of thiazolidinedione-induced hepatotoxicity: An in vitro model in mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dan; Wu, Chun-qi; Li, Ze-jun; Liu, Yue; Fan, Xing; Wang, Quan-jun; Ding, Ri-gao

    2015-04-15

    Objective: To characterize the mechanism of action of thiazolidinedione (TZD)-induced liver mitochondrial toxicity caused by troglitazone, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone in HepaRG cells. Methods: Human hepatoma cells (HepaRG) were treated with troglitazone, rosiglitazone, or pioglitazone (12.5, 25, and 50 μM) for 48 h. The Seahorse Biosciences XF24 Flux Analyzer was used to measure mitochondrial oxygen consumption. The effect of TZDs on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were detected by flow cytometry. The mitochondrial ultrastructure of HepaRG cells was observed under a transmission electrical microscope (TEM). mtDNA content was evaluated by real-time PCR, and ATP content and mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complex I, II, III, IV activity were measured via chemiluminescence. Results were considered statistically significant at p < 0.05. Results: Among the three drugs, troglitazone exhibited the highest potency, followed by rosiglitazone, and then pioglitazone. The TZDs caused varying degrees of mitochondrial respiratory function disorders including decreases in oxygen consumption, MRC activity, and ATP level, and an elevation in ROS level. TZD treatment resulted in mtDNA content decline, reduction in MMP, and alterations of mitochondrial structure. Conclusion: All investigated TZDs show a certain degree of mitochondrial toxicity, with troglitazone exhibiting the highest potency. The underlying mechanism of TZD-induced hepatotoxicity may be associated with alterations in mitochondrial respiratory function disorders, oxidative stress, and changes in membrane permeability. These parameters may be used early in drug development to further optimize risk:benefit profiles. - Highlights: • We compared three TZD mitochondrial toxicity characteristics in HepaRG cells. • TZD induced respiratory disorders and mitochondrial structural damage. • Mitochondrial toxicity evaluation presents guidance value for hepatotoxicity.

  18. Fire protection considerations in the design of plutonium handling and storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-08-01

    Unwanted fire in a facility that handles plutonium must be addressed early in the facility design. Such fires have the potential for transporting radioactive contamination throughout the building and widespread downwind dispersal. Features that mitigate such events can be severely challenged during the fire. High temperatures can cause storage containers to burst; a very efficient dispersal mechanism for radioactive contamination. The fire will also establish ventilation patterns that cause the migration of smoke and radioactive contamination throughout the facility. The smoke and soot generated by the fire will enter the exhaust system and travel to the filtration system where it will deposit on the filters. The quantity of smoke generated during a typical multi-room fire is expected to blind most High Efficiency Particulate Airfilter (HEPA) media. The blinding can have two possible outcomes. (1) The air movement though the facility is reduced, compromising the negative pressure containment and allowing contamination to leave the building though doors and other openings; or (2) the filters collapse allowing the contamination to bypass the filtration media and exit the building through the filter plenum. HEPA filter blinding during severe fires can be prevented or mitigated. Increasing the face surface area of HEPA filters will increase the smoke filtration capacity of the system, thus preventing blinding. As an alternative sandfilters can be provided to mitigate the effects of the HEPA filter bypass. Both concepts have distinct advantages. This paper will explore these two design concepts and two others; it will describe the design requirements necessary for each concept to prevent unacceptable contamination spread. The intent is to allow the filter media selection to be based on a comprehensive understanding of the four different design concepts.

  19. Making healthy eating and physical activity policy practice: process evaluation of a group randomized controlled intervention in afterschool programs.

    PubMed

    Weaver, R Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Hutto, Brent; Saunders, Ruth P; Moore, Justin B; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer L; Ward, Dianne S; Pate, Russell R; Beighle, Aaron; Freedman, Darcy

    2015-12-01

    This study describes the link between level of implementation and outcomes from an intervention to increase afterschool programs' (ASPs) achievement of healthy eating and physical activity (HE-PA) Standards. Ten intervention ASPs implemented the Strategies-To-Enhance-Practice (STEPs), a multi-component, adaptive intervention framework identifying factors essential to meeting HE-PA Standards, while 10 control ASPs continued routine practice. All programs, intervention and control, were assigned a STEPs for HE-PA index score based on implementation. Mixed-effects linear regressions showed high implementation ASPs had the greatest percentage of boys and girls achieving 30 min of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (47.3 and 29.3%), followed by low implementation ASPs (41.3 and 25.0%), and control ASPs (34.8 and 18.5%). For healthy eating, high/low implementation programs served fruits and vegetables an equivalent number of days, but more days than control programs (74.0 and 79.1% of days versus 14.2%). A similar pattern emerged for the percent of days sugar-sweetened foods and beverages were served, with high and low implementation programs serving sugar-sweetened foods (8.0 and 8.4% of days versus 52.2%), and beverages (8.7 and 2.9% of days versus 34.7%) equivalently, but less often than control programs. Differences in characteristics and implementation of STEPs for HE-PA between high/low implementers were also identified. PMID:26590240

  20. Cadmium induces retinoic acid signaling by regulating retinoic acid metabolic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H

    2009-09-11

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1-6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1-6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 microm cadmium in Hepa 1-6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  1. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  2. Social Context Effects on School Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinger, Philip; Murphy, Joseph

    In this two-part paper, an attempt is made to examine the relationship between social contexts and effective schools and specifically to contribute to the development of a conceptual model for understanding how social contexts influence the operation of effective schools and student learning. In the first part, school effects research is drawn…

  3. p65 down-regulates DEPTOR expression in response to LPS stimulation in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoling; Jin, Dan; Yu, An; Sun, Jun; Chen, Xiaodong; Yang, Zaiqing

    2016-09-01

    DEPTOR, a novel endogenous inhibitor of mTOR, plays an important role in regulating the inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and in mouse skeletal muscle. However, the regulatory mechanism of DEPTOR transcription and its effects on liver inflammation are unknown presently. Here we reported the role of DEPTOR in regulating inflammatory response in mouse liver-derived Hepa1-6 cells and in a mouse model with LPS-induced hepatic inflammation. The results revealed that DEPTOR over-expression in Hepa1-6 liver cells increased the mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Contrasting results were observed in Hepa1-6 cells with DEPTOR interference. Treatment Hepa1-6 cells with rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTORC1, increased MCP-1 mRNA, but have no significant effect on IL-6 mRNA. DEPTOR expression was down-regulated in Hepa1-6 cells with the treatment of inflammatory stimuli LPS or the over-expression of p65/NF-κB, a key inflammatory transcription factor. NF-κB antagonist (PDTC) and inhibitor (IκBα) blocked the effect of LPS on DEPTOR expression. The study in vivo showed that DEPTOR mRNA and protein were significantly reduced in a mouse model with LPS-induced hepatic inflammation, which was accompanied by a concurrent activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. Further, the transcriptional regulation of DEPTOR was explored, which revealed that DEPTOR promoter activity was significantly down-regulated by NF-κB. The progressive deletions and mutations demonstrated that the NF-κB binding motif situated at -145/-127 region is an essential component required for the DEPTOR promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays determined that p65 can directly interact with the DEPTOR promoter DNA. Those results indicate DEPTOR regulates liver inflammation at least partially via mTORC1 pathway, and is down-regulated by LPS through p65. PMID:27179948

  4. If My Child Has Asthma, Can We Keep Our Pet?

    MedlinePlus

    ... people say that certain breeds of dogs or cats, particularly those that don't shed, won't ... HEPA air cleaners can really help, especially for cat allergies. Vacuums are available with HEPA filters as ...

  5. Women's health-enhancing physical activity and eudaimonic well being.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Leah J; Kowalski, Kent C; Mack, Diane E; Wilson, Philip M; Crocker, Peter R E

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we explored the role of health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA; Miilunpalo, 2001) in women's eudaimonic well being (i.e., psychological flourishing at one's maximal potential; Ryff 1989). We used a quantitative approach (N= 349) to explore the relationship between HEPA and eudaimonic well being. While HEPA was not related to eudaimonic well being, experiencing eudaimonia through HEPA contributed unique variance in eudaimonic well being beyond HEPA and experiencing hedonia through HEPA. As quality of activity was more important than quantity, a qualitative component (N = 10) provided further insight on if and how HEPA contributes to women's eudaimonic well being. Participants supported HEPA in fulfilling their potential through goal setting/striving providing bonding experiences, allowing for self-reflection, and developing a physical/able body. PMID:22978195

  6. Evaluation of cleaning methods applied in home environments after renovation and remodeling activities.

    PubMed

    Yiin, Lih-Ming; Lu, Shou-En; Sannoh, Sulaiman; Lim, Benjamin S; Rhoads, George G

    2004-10-01

    We conducted a cleaning trial in 40 northern New Jersey homes where home renovation and remodeling (R&R) activities were undertaken. Two cleaning protocols were used in the study: a specific method recommended by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), in the 1995 "Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing," using a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtered vacuum cleaner and a tri-sodium phosphate solution (TSP); and an alternative method using a household vacuum cleaner and a household detergent. Eligible homes were built before the 1970s with potential lead-based paint and had recent R&R activities without thorough cleaning. The two cleaning protocols were randomly assigned to the participants' homes and followed the HUD-recommended three-step procedure: vacuuming, wet washing, and repeat vacuuming. Wipe sampling was conducted on floor surfaces or windowsills before and after cleaning to evaluate the efficacy. All floor and windowsill data indicated that both methods (TSP/HEPA and non-TSP/non-HEPA) were effective in reducing lead loading on the surfaces (P < 0.001). When cleaning was applied to surfaces with initial lead loading above the clearance standards, the reductions were even greater, above 95% for either cleaning method. The mixed-effect model analysis showed no significant difference between the two methods. Baseline lead loading was found to be associated with lead loading reduction significantly on floors (P < 0.001) and marginally on windowsills (P = 0.077). Such relations were different between the two cleaning methods significantly on floors (P < 0.001) and marginally on windowsills (P = 0.066), with the TSP/HEPA method being favored for higher baseline levels and the non-TSP/non-HEPA method for lower baseline levels. For the 10 homes with lead abatement, almost all post-cleaning lead loadings were below the standards using either cleaning method. Based on our results, we recommend

  7. Evaluation of surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) as a filter for removal of E. coli and fecal coliforms from drinking water wells in Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, S. P.; Mtethiwa, A.; Ghambi, C.; Lusangasi, B.

    2012-12-01

    Unsafe drinking water is a problem faced by millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa and in developing nations around the world. While effective water treatments exist, their generally high costs preclude their use by the low-income populations that need them most. Surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) is a low-cost filter medium that has previously been demonstrated to efficiently remove bacteria and viruses in laboratory settings. The first known field test of SMZ as a drinking water filter was conducted in rural villages near Lilongwe, Malawi. Water was drawn from hand-dug wells and filtered through SMZ packs constructed from local materials. This filtration step was repeated over a period of several weeks to determine the effective lifetime of the filters. Pre-filtration and post-filtration samples were analyzed for E. coli and fecal coliforms by culturing and colorimetric presence/absence tests. All unfiltered water samples were contaminated with E. coli and fecal coliforms. The aforementioned pathogens were not detected in any of the initial filtered samples. After filtering an average of approximately 40 liters, E. coli and fecal coliforms were found to be present in the filtered water, presumably indicating that the filters had become saturated with the pathogens. The results demonstrate that SMZ could serve as an effective, affordable filter medium for treatment of drinking water in rural settings and developing countries. It is anticipated that the design of the filters could be further enhanced, leading to an increase in their effective lifespan.

  8. Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Hepasphere 30–60 μm. Safety and Efficacy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Malagari, Katerina; Pomoni, Maria; Moschouris, Hippokratis; Kelekis, Alexios; Charokopakis, Angelos Bouma, Evanthia Spyridopoulos, Themistoklis; Chatziioannou, Achilles; Sotirchos, Vlasios; Karampelas, Theodoros Tamvakopoulos, Constantin; Filippiadis, Dimitrios; Karagiannis, Enangelos; Marinis, Athanasios; Koskinas, John; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2013-11-22

    Background: This study examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using a newly developed size of a superabsorbent polymer drug-eluting embolic material.MethodsForty-five patients with documented HCC (Child–Pugh score A/B: 55.5 %/44.5 %) were embolized with HepaSphere microspheres 30–60 μm with escalation of lesion, dose, and frequency of re-embolization. Local response was evaluated with modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). Plasma levels of doxorubicin were measured in 24 patients at baseline and at 5, 20, 40, 60, and 120 min, at 6, 24, and 48 h, and at 7 days, respectively, to determine doxorubicin in plasma (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC). Measurements of three patients who underwent lipiodol-based conventional chemoembolization (c-TACE) were also performed.ResultsTACE with HepaSphere was well tolerated with an acceptable safety profile and no 30-day mortality. Response rates were calculated on intention-to-treat basis with complete response (CR) in 17.8 % reaching 22.2 % for the target lesion. Overall partial response (PR) was seen in 51.1 %, stable disease in 20 %, and progressive disease in 11.1 % of patients. Overall objective response (CR + PR), including patients treated at all dosages of doxorubicin, was seen in 68.9 % of cases. After a median follow-up of 15.6 months, 1-year survival is 100 %. Doxorubicin AUC was significantly lower in patients with HepaSphere 30–60 μm (35,195 ± 27,873 ng × min/ml) than in patients with conventional TACE (103,960 ± 16,652 ng × min/ml; p = 0.009). Cmax was also significantly lower with HepaSphere 30–60 μm (83.9 ± 32.1 ng/ml) compared with c-TACE (761.3 ± 58.8 ng/ml; p = 0.002).ConclusionHepaSphere 30–60 μm is an effective drug-eluting embolic material with a favourable pharmacokinetic profile.

  9. Evaluation of CYP3A4 inhibition and hepatotoxicity using DMSO-treated human hepatoma HuH-7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yitong; Flynn, Thomas J.; Xia, Menghang; Wiesenfeld, Paddy L.; Ferguson, Martine S.

    2016-01-01

    A human hepatoma cell line (HuH-7) was evaluated as a metabolically competent cell model to investigate cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inhibition, induction, and hepatotoxicity. First, CYP3A4 gene expression and activity were determined in HuH-7 cells under three culture conditions: 1-week culture, 3-week culture, or 1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) treatment. HuH-7 cells treated with DMSO for 2 weeks after confluence expressed the highest CYP3A4 gene expression and activity compared to the other two culture conditions. Furthermore, CYP3A4 activity in DMSO-treated HuH-7 cells was compared to that in a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2/C3A) and human bipotent progenitor cell line (HepaRG), which yielded the following ranking: HepaRG > DMSO-treated HuH-7 >> HepG2/C3A cells. The effects of three known CYP3A4 inhibitors were evaluated using DMSO-treated HuH-7 cells. CYP3A4 enzyme inhibition in HuH-7 cells was further compared to human recombinant CYP3A4, indicating similar potency for reversible inhibitors (IC50 within 2.5 fold), but different potency for the irreversible inhibitor. Next, induction of CYP3A4 activity was compared between DMSO-treated HuH-7 and HepaRG cells using two known inducers. DMSO-treated HuH-7 cells yielded minimal CYP3A4 induction compared to that in the HepaRG cells after 48-h treatments. Finally, the cytotoxicity of five known hepatotoxicants was evaluated in DMSO-treated HuH-7 cells, HepG2/C3A, and HepaRG cells, and significant differences in cytotoxic sensitivity were observed. Overall, DMSO-treated HuH-7 cells are a valuable model for medium- or high-throughput screening of chemicals for CYP3A4 inhibition and hepatotoxicity. PMID:26377104

  10. Women's Health-Enhancing Physical Activity and Eudaimonic Well Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Leah J.; Kowalski, Kent C.; Mack, Diane E.; Wilson, Philip M.; Crocker, Peter R. E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we explored the role of health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA; Miilunpalo, 2001) in women's eudaimonic well being (i.e., psychological flourishing at one's maximal potential; Ryff, 1989). We used a quantitative approach (N = 349) to explore the relationship between HEPA and eudaimonic well being. While HEPA was not related to…

  11. ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, D.A.

    1998-07-27

    Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

  12. On Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  13. Improving School Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBeath, John, Ed.; Mortimore, Peter, Ed.

    School effectiveness is an issue that has preoccupied researchers and policymakers for 3 decades. To study how ineffective schools become effective and what constitutes an effective school, the Improving School Effectiveness Project was carried out in Scotland from 1995 to 1997. This project forms the basis of discussion in this book, which has 11…

  14. On effect size.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J

    2012-06-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension, measure/index, and value), outline 10 corollaries that follow from our definition, and review ideal qualities of effect sizes. Our definition of effect size is general and subsumes many existing definitions of effect size. We define effect size as a quantitative reflection of the magnitude of some phenomenon that is used for the purpose of addressing a question of interest. Our definition of effect size is purposely more inclusive than the way many have defined and conceptualized effect size, and it is unique with regard to linking effect size to a question of interest. Additionally, we review some important developments in the effect size literature and discuss the importance of accompanying an effect size with an interval estimate that acknowledges the uncertainty with which the population value of the effect size has been estimated. We hope that this article will facilitate discussion and improve the practice of reporting and interpreting effect sizes. PMID:22545595

  15. Regulation with placebo effects.

    PubMed

    Malani, Anup

    2008-12-01

    A growing scientific literature supports the existence of placebo effects from a wide range of health interventions and for a range of medical conditions. This Article reviews this literature, examines the implications for law and policy, and suggests future areas for research on placebo effects. In particular, it makes the case for altering the drug approval process to account for, if not credit, placebo effects. It recommends that evidence of placebo effects be permitted as a defense in cases alleging violations of informed consent or false advertising. Finally, it finds that tort law already has doctrines such as joint and several liability to account for placebo effects. Future research on placebo effects should focus on whether awareness of placebo effects can disable these effects and whether subjects can control their own placebo effects. PMID:19353835

  16. [Placebo and placebo effect].

    PubMed

    Aulas, J-J

    2005-11-01

    The word placebo appeared for the first time in an English medical dictionary in 1785. In French, it appeared much latter in 1958. This word defines an experimental tool used for rigourous evaluation of a specific effect of pharmacological treatment and the non specific effect of any therapy. The placebo effect is the strictly psychological or psychophysiological effect of a placebo. The two principal components of placebo effect as a pain killer, which has been extensively studied in this field, are positive expectancies of both the patient and the physician. Although the mechanisms of action of placebo effect are not well understood, results of several recent works are particularly interesting. PMID:16292233

  17. Stormwater BMP Effectiveness Toolkit

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA has identified the effectiveness of Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) as a priority research need. Effective protection of biotic integrity requires that processes maintaining the diversity of physical habitats be protected. Methods are needed to evaluate the e...

  18. Memory effects in turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, J. O.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the wake flow of a hemisphere and cylinder show that such memory effects can be substantial and have a significant influence on momentum transport. Memory effects are described in terms of suitable memory functions.

  19. Side Effects (Management)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ...

  20. Effective College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraway, James E.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses other writings on effective college teaching and then presents his list of necessary characteristics for the effective teacher, stressing the interpersonal dimension of the teaching-learning situation. (MF)

  1. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  2. Emotional Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Emotional Side Effects In this section you can learn more about ... Finding and Paying for Treatment Treatments and Side Effects Survivorship: During and After Treatment Children and Cancer ...

  3. Hormonal effects in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb babies ...

  4. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  5. Andexanet: Effectively Reversing Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2016-06-01

    Despite direct oral anticoagulants becoming a mainstay of anticoagulant therapy, the effective, timely, and safe reversal of their anticoagulant effect remains challenging. Emerging evidence attests that andexanet, a recombinant and inactive variant of native factor X (FXa), competitively inhibits and counteracts the anticoagulant effect of many inhibitors of native activated FXa. PMID:27048885

  6. Effects of spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the effects of spatial resolution on extraction of geologic information are woefully lacking but spatial resolution effects can be examined as they influence two general categories: detection of spatial features per se; and the effects of IFOV on the definition of spectral signatures and on general mapping abilities.

  7. Effective Schools Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Daniel U.; Lezotte, Lawrence W.

    Research studies that have focused on identifying the characteristics or correlates of elementary and secondary schools that are unusually effective are reviewed, concentrating on the "effective schools" movement. Research on effective schools supports the conclusion that they rank high on certain characteristics frequently referred to as…

  8. Effective Teachers of Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medwell, Jane; Wray, David; Poulson, Louise; Fox, Richard

    A study was commissioned to help the Teacher Training Agency and teachers in England to understand more clearly how effective teachers help children to become literate. Research aims were to: identify the key factors of what effective teachers know, understand, and do that enables them to put effective literacy teaching into practice; identify the…

  9. Characteristics of Effective Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetten, David A.; Cameron, Kim S.

    THe confusing and often contradictory literature on organizational effectiveness is reviewed briefly, followed by a discussion of the leading models of effectiveness, their relative applicability to colleges and universities, questions for guiding the design of a specific study of organizational effectiveness, and guidelines for effective…

  10. Special Effects Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxer, Jennifer; Valenta, Carol

    This guide accompanies "Special Effects," a 40-minute IMAX film and "Special Effects II", a multimedia, interactive traveling exhibit designed by the California Museum of Science and Industry. The exhibit focuses on the underlying scientific and technical processes of special effects from the earliest motion picture to state-of-the-art digital…

  11. The butterfly effect of the "butterfly effect".

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kevin J

    2009-07-01

    The "Butterfly Effect" metaphor states with variance that the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil can cause a tornado in Texas. This metaphor has become part of the common vernacular of Western culture. In this paper I discuss the origins of the metaphor, examine its current usage within popular culture, and present an argument as to why it is popular. I propose that the metaphor is a type of semantic attractor, a narrative device with invariant meaning but audience-specific contextualization. Finally I address whether the Butterfly Effect metaphor is a good example of itself. PMID:19527619

  12. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction Loss of Fertility Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When ...

  13. Running effective meetings, running effective groups.

    PubMed

    Ogborn, S E

    1994-12-01

    Meetings are effective if they meet the objectives of each person involved in the least amount of time possible. Different strategies are needed for different types of meetings. Different leadership styles are necessary depending on the members' personality preferences and the stages of the group's development. Good leaders know how to adapt to these preferences and stages. PMID:10139146

  14. Effect identification in comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Oakes, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The widespread adoption of electronic medical records means there are now vast data resources available for comparative effectiveness research (CER). In concert with conventional randomized controlled trials, CER holds great promise for advancing our understanding of how different therapeutic treatments yield different health outcomes in different settings and with different populations. But in a research culture fixated on estimating correlations and p-values, the threat of misinterpretation of results and improper CER inferences is troubling. Accordingly, this paper aims to shore up the inferential foundations of CER by introducing the fundamentals of effect identification, which is the process of identifying or teasing out empirically defensible causal effects from competing explanations. Three primary requirements of effect identification-positivity, exchangeability, and consistency- are explained and simple exampled are given. The take home message is that so-called big data from medical records may not yield better or more useful results. Advances will come only when the right question is addressed with the appropriate data and methods. PMID:25848556

  15. 3M Empore(R)-Membrane Filter Technology: Cesium Removal from Fuel Storage Water Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.N.

    2003-07-15

    This paper describes results from a seven-day demonstration of the use of 3M Empore(R) membrane filter loaded with ion exchange material (potassium cobalt hexacynoferrate) for cesium uptake from the R-Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site. The goal of the demonstration was to evaluate the ability of the Process Absorber Development unit, a water pre-filtration /CoHex configuration on a skid, to remove cesium from R-Disassembly Basin at a linear processing flow rate of 22.9 liters per minute (1,204 liters/minute/m2). Over 210,000 liters of R-Disassembly Basin water was processed through the PADU without a cesium breakthrough, that is, the effluent after treatment with CoHex, contained less than detectable amounts of radioactive cesium. Some of the observed advantages of the Empore(R) membrane filter technology over conventional packed column ion exchange systems include rapid flow rates without channeling effects, low volume secondary waste and fast extraction or rapid kinetics per unit of flow.

  16. Improving material decomposition by spectral optimization of photon counting computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polster, C.; Hahn, K.; Gutjahr, R.; Schöck, F.; Kappler, S.; Dietrich, O.; Flohr, T. G.

    2016-03-01

    Photon counting detectors in computed tomography facilitate measurements of spectral distributions of detected X-ray quanta in discrete energy bins. Along with the dependency on wavelength and atomic number of the mass attenuation coefficient, this information allows for reconstruction of CT images of different material bases. Decomposition of two materials is considered standard in today's dual-energy techniques. With photon-counting detectors the decomposition of more than two materials becomes achievable. Efficient detection of CT-typical X-ray spectra is a hard requirement in a clinical environment. This is fulfilled by only a few sensor materials such as CdTe or CdZnTe. In contrast to energy integrating CT-detectors, the pixel dimensions must be reduced to avoid pulse pile-up problems at clinically relevant count rates. However, reducing pixel sizes leads to increased K-escape and charge sharing effects. As a consequence, the correlation between incident and detected X-ray energy is reduced. This degradation is quantified by the detector response function. The goal of this study is to improve the achievable material decomposition by adapting the incident X-ray spectrum with respect to the properties (i.e. the detector response function) of a photon counting detector. A significant improvement of a material decomposition equivalent metric is achievable when using specific materials as X-ray pre-filtration (K-edge filtering) while maintaining the applied patient dose and image quality.

  17. Techniques to improve detection and analysis of extracellular vesicles using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Heather C; Danesh, Ali; Shah, Avani; Lacroix, Jacques; Spinella, Philip C; Norris, Philip J

    2015-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) range in size from 50 nm to 1 µm. Flow cytometry (FCM) is the most commonly used method for analyzing EVs; however, accurate characterization of EVs remains challenging due to their small size and lack of discrete positive populations. Here we report the use of optimization techniques that are especially well-suited for analyzing EVs from a high volume of clinical samples. Utilizing a two pronged approach that included 1) pre-filtration of antibodies to remove aggregates, followed by 2) detergent lysis of a replicate sample to account for remaining false positive events, we were able to effectively limit false positive non-EV events. In addition, we show that lysed samples are a useful alternative to isotypes for setting gates to exclude background fluorescence. To reduce background, we developed an approach using filters to "wash" samples post-staining thus providing a faster alternative to ultracentrifugation and sucrose gradient fractionation. In conclusion, use of these optimized techniques enhances the accuracy and efficiency of EV detection using FCM. PMID:25847910

  18. DMS-prefiltered mass spectrometry for the detection of biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2008-04-01

    Technologies based on Differential Mobility Spectrometry (DMS) are ideally matched to rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of chemicals like biomarkers. Biomarkers linked to exposure to radiation, exposure to CWA's, exposure to toxic materials (TICs and TIMs) and to specific diseases are being examined in a number of laboratories. Screening for these types of exposure can be improved in accuracy and greatly speeded up by using DMS-MS instead of slower techniques like LC-MS and GC-MS. We have performed an extensive series of tests with nanospray-DMS-mass spectroscopy and standalone nanospray-DMS obtaining extensive information on chemistry and detectivity. DMS-MS systems implemented with low-resolution, low-cost, portable mass-spectrometry systems are very promising. Lowresolution mass spectrometry alone would be inadequate for the task, but with DMS pre-filtration to suppress interferences, can be quite effective, even for quantitative measurement. Bio-fluids and digests are well suited to ionization by electrospray and detection by mass-spectrometry, but signals from critical markers are overwhelmed by chemical noise from unrelated species, making essential quantitative analysis impossible. Sionex and collaborators have presented data using DMS to suppress chemical noise, allowing detection of cancer biomarkers in 10,000-fold excess of normal products 1,2. In addition, a linear dynamic range of approximately 2,000 has been demonstrated with accurate quantitation 3. We will review the range of possible applications and present new data on DMS-MS biomarker detection.

  19. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  20. Dynamic ground effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John W., Jr.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Gilbert, William P.

    1990-01-01

    A research program is underway at the NASA Langley Research Center to study the effect of rate of descent on ground effects. A series of powered models were tested in the Vortex Research Facility under conditions with rate of descent and in the 14 x 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel under identical conditions but without rate of descent. These results indicate that the rate of descent can have a significant impact on ground effects particularly if vectored or reversed thrust is used.

  1. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    PubMed

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency. PMID:25401364

  2. Atomic lighthouse effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máximo, C. E.; Kaiser, R.; Courteille, Ph. W.; Bachelard, R.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease of the magnetic field efficiency.

  3. Volcano-electromagnetic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Malcolm J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Volcano-electromagnetic effects—electromagnetic (EM) signals generated by volcanic activity—derive from a variety of physical processes. These include piezomagnetic effects, electrokinetic effects, fluid vaporization, thermal demagnetization/remagnetization, resistivity changes, thermochemical effects, magnetohydrodynamic effects, and blast-excited traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Identification of different physical processes and their interdependence is often possible with multiparameter monitoring, now common on volcanoes, since many of these processes occur with different timescales and some are simultaneously identified in other geophysical data (deformation, seismic, gas, ionospheric disturbances, etc.). EM monitoring plays an important part in understanding these processes.

  4. Cardiac effects of vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Dicken, Bryan; Bigam, David; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Vasopressin is an essential hormone involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. It has been in use therapeutically for many decades, with an emphasis on its vasoconstrictive and antidiuretic properties. However, this hormone has a ubiquitous influence and has specific effects on the heart. Although difficult to separate from its powerful vascular effects in the clinical setting, a better understanding of vasopressin's direct cardiac effects could lead to its more effective clinical use for a variety of shock states by maximizing its therapeutic benefit. The cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin are complex and require further elucidation. Complicating our understanding include the various receptors and secondary messengers involved in vasopressin's effects, which may lead to various results based on differing doses and varying environmental conditions. Thus, there have been contradictory reports on vasopressin's action on the coronary vasculature and on its effect on inotropy. However, beneficial results have been found and warrant further study to expand the potential therapeutic role of vasopressin. This review outlines the effect of vasopressin on the coronary vasculature, cardiac contractility, and on hypertrophy and cardioprotection. These cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin represent an interesting area for further study for potentially important therapeutic benefits. PMID:24621650

  5. Volcanic effects on climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions which inject large amounts of sulfur-rich gas into the stratosphere produce dust veils which last years and cool the earth's surface. At the same time, these dust veils absorb enough solar radiation to warm the stratosphere. Since these temperature changes at the earth's surface and in the stratosphere are both in the opposite direction of hypothesized effects from greenhouse gases, they act to delay and mask the detection of greenhouse effects on the climate system. Tantalizing recent research results have suggested regional effects of volcanic eruptions, including effects on El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In addition, a large portion of the global climate change of the past 100 years may be due to the effects of volcanoes, but a definite answer is not yet clear. While effects of several years were demonstrated with both data studies and numerical models, long-term effects, while found in climate model calculations, await confirmation with more realistic models. Extremely large explosive prehistoric eruptions may have produced severe weather and climate effects, sometimes called a 'volcanic winter'. Complete understanding of the above effects of volcanoes is hampered by inadequacies of data sets on volcanic dust veils and on climate change. Space observations can play an increasingly important role in an observing program in the future. The effects of volcanoes are not adequately separated from ENSO events, and climate modeling of the effects of volcanoes is in its infancy. Specific suggestions are made for future work to improve the knowledge of this important component of the climate system.

  6. Interdependence and Group Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wageman, Ruth

    1995-01-01

    Investigated the differential effects of task design and reward system design on group functioning in a large U.S. corporation; the effectiveness of "hybrid" groups (having tasks and rewards with both individual and group elements); and how individuals' autonomy preferences moderate their responses to interdependence. Groups performed best when…

  7. Effective rigidity of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peliti, L.

    1986-12-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations of shape (undulations) in reducing the effective rigidity of membranes is reviewed. The consequences of this effect on vesicle size distribution and on the structure of microemulsions, as well as on other physical phenomena, are sketched.

  8. Defining Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layne, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author looks at the meaning of specific terminology commonly used in student surveys: "effective teaching." The research seeks to determine if there is a difference in how "effective teaching" is defined by those taking student surveys and those interpreting the results. To investigate this difference, a sample group of professors and students…

  9. Dimensions of Teacher Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimberly, Ronald C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes a study of teacher effectiveness in college departments of sociology, anthropology, and social work. Five types of teacher effectiveness were found to be potentially useful for student, faculty, and administrative purposes. They include teacher task responsiveness, respect for students, teacher capability, student development, and…

  10. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-07-01

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  11. The polarized EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    W. Bentz; I. C. Cloet; A. W. Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We calculate both the spin independent and spin dependent nuclear structure functions in an effective quark theory. The nucleon is described as a composite quark-diquark state, and the nucleus is treated in the mean field approximation. We predict a sizable polarized EMC effect, which could be confirmed in future experiments.

  12. Organizational Effectiveness of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskel, Cecil

    1982-01-01

    Because organizational effectiveness of schools is difficult to define, a model is needed to explain the complexities of the concept. Two models offer some promise. One is the goal model, which defines effectiveness as the degree to which organizations meet or surpass their goals (either official or operational). The other is the system resource…

  13. Developing Effective Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, T.J.

    In this introductory work, the main principles on which British companies are basing management development programs are presented, and stages in assuring a supply of effective managerial talent are set forth: stages in assuring a supply of effective managerial t"lent are set forth: program planning based on clear objectives and communication;…

  14. Correlational effect size benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Frank A; Aguinis, Herman; Singh, Kulraj; Field, James G; Pierce, Charles A

    2015-03-01

    Effect size information is essential for the scientific enterprise and plays an increasingly central role in the scientific process. We extracted 147,328 correlations and developed a hierarchical taxonomy of variables reported in Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology from 1980 to 2010 to produce empirical effect size benchmarks at the omnibus level, for 20 common research domains, and for an even finer grained level of generality. Results indicate that the usual interpretation and classification of effect sizes as small, medium, and large bear almost no resemblance to findings in the field, because distributions of effect sizes exhibit tertile partitions at values approximately one-half to one-third those intuited by Cohen (1988). Our results offer information that can be used for research planning and design purposes, such as producing better informed non-nil hypotheses and estimating statistical power and planning sample size accordingly. We also offer information useful for understanding the relative importance of the effect sizes found in a particular study in relationship to others and which research domains have advanced more or less, given that larger effect sizes indicate a better understanding of a phenomenon. Also, our study offers information about research domains for which the investigation of moderating effects may be more fruitful and provide information that is likely to facilitate the implementation of Bayesian analysis. Finally, our study offers information that practitioners can use to evaluate the relative effectiveness of various types of interventions. PMID:25314367

  15. Overview of atmospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rote, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Effluents from the transportation system are the major cause of Satellite Power System related atmospheric effects. These effects are discussed and include inadvertent weather modification, air quality degradation, compositional changes in the stratosphere and mesosphere, formation of noctilucent clouds, plasma density changes, airglow enhancements, and changes in composition and dynamics of the plasmasphere and magnetosphere.

  16. School Effectiveness and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, I. I.; Oakley, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Fiedler's contingency theory relates school effectiveness to a combination of principals' leadership style and situational favorability for the principal. Data from teacher questionnaires on school climate and effectiveness and measures of principal's leadership in 176 Canadian elementary schools did not support Fiedler's model. Contains 54…

  17. Presenting Food Science Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    While the need to present food science information effectively is viewed as a critical competency for food scientists by the Institute of Food Technologists, most food scientists may not receive adequate training in this area. Effective presentations combine both scientific content and delivery mechanisms that demonstrate presenter enthusiasm for…

  18. Cardiovascular Effects Of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, Harold

    1992-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum presents study of effects of weightlessness and simulations upon cardiovascular systems of humans and animals. Reviews research up to year 1987 in United States and Soviet space programs on such topics as physiological changes induced by weightlessness in outer space and by subsequent return to Earth gravity and also reviews deconditioning effects of prolonged bed rest on ground.

  19. The Chelate Effect Redefined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Silva, J. J. R. Frausto

    1983-01-01

    Discusses ambiguities of the accepted definition of the chelate effect, suggesting that it be defined in terms of experimental observation rather than mathematical abstraction. Indicates that the effect depends on free energy change in reaction, ligand basicity, pH of medium, type of chelates formed, and concentration of ligands in solution. (JN)

  20. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  1. Effects on Insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of controlled and modified atmospheres on insects is reviewed and summarized in this chapter. Traditionally, controlled and modified atmospheres are used to store and preserve fresh fruits and vegetables. The effects on insects and the potential of these treatments are secondary to the...

  2. The Kaye Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, J. M.; Landig, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, "The Kaye effect", as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid…

  3. Music Teacher Effectiveness Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Manny

    Although relatively few studies exist, a review of the research reveals some common characteristics of an effective music teacher. Effective music teachers tend to be extroverted, enthusiastic, and care sincerely for their students. Such teachers are competent in musicianship (particularly in diagnosing and correcting musical errors and in using…

  4. PLEIOTROPIC EFFECTS OF STATINS

    PubMed Central

    Liao, James K.; Laufs, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. In clinical trials, statins are beneficial in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. However, the overall benefits observed with statins appear to be greater than what might be expected from changes in lipid levels alone, suggesting effects beyond cholesterol lowering. Indeed, recent studies indicate that some of the cholesterol-independent or “pleiotropic” effects of statins involve improving endothelial function, enhancing the stability of atherosclerotic plaques, decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation, and inhibiting the thrombogenic response. Furthermore, statins have beneficial extrahepatic effects on the immune system, CNS, and bone. Many of these pleiotropic effects are mediated by inhibition of isoprenoids, which serve as lipid attachments for intracellular signaling molecules. In particular, inhibition of small GTP-binding proteins, Rho, Ras, and Rac, whose proper membrane localization and function are dependent on isoprenylation, may play an important role in mediating the pleiotropic effects of statins. PMID:15822172

  5. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

    PubMed

    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  6. Making healthy eating and physical activity policy practice: the design and overview of a group randomized controlled trial in afterschool programs.

    PubMed

    Beets, Michael W; Glenn Weaver, R; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer; Ward, Dianne S; Freedman, Darcy A; Saunders, Ruth; Pate, Russell R; Beighle, Aaron; Hutto, Brent; Moore, Justin B

    2014-07-01

    National and state organizations have developed policies calling upon afterschool programs (ASPs, 3-6 pm) to serve a fruit or vegetable (FV) each day for snack, while eliminating foods and beverages high in added-sugars, and to ensure children accumulate a minimum of 30 min/d of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Few efficacious and cost-effective strategies exist to assist ASP providers in achieving these important public health goals. This paper reports on the design and conceptual framework of Making Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Policy Practice in ASPs, a 3-year group randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of strategies designed to improve snacks served and increase MVPA in children attending community-based ASPs. Twenty ASPs, serving over 1800 children (6-12 years) will be enrolled and match-paired based on enrollment size, average daily min/d MVPA, and days/week FV served, with ASPs randomized after baseline data collection to immediate intervention or a 1-year delayed group. The framework employed, STEPs (Strategies To Enhance Practice), focuses on intentional programming of HEPA in each ASPs' daily schedule, and includes a grocery store partnership to reduce price barriers to purchasing FV, professional development training to promote physical activity to develop core physical activity competencies, as well as ongoing technical support/assistance. Primary outcome measures include children's accelerometry-derived MVPA and time spend sedentary while attending an ASP, direct observation of staff HEPA promoting and inhibiting behaviors, types of snacks served, and child consumption of snacks, as well as, cost of snacks via receipts and detailed accounting of intervention delivery costs to estimate cost-effectiveness. PMID:24893225

  7. Making Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Policy Practice: The Design and Overview of a Group Randomized Controlled Trial in Afterschool Programs

    PubMed Central

    Beets, Michael W.; Weaver, R. Glenn; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer; Ward, Dianne S.; Freedman, Darcy A.; Saunders, Ruth; Pate, Russell R.; Beighle, Aaron; Moore, Justin B.

    2014-01-01

    National and state organizations have developed policies calling upon afterschool programs (ASPs, 3-6pm) to serve a fruit or vegetable (FV) each day for snack, while eliminating foods and beverages high in added-sugars, and to ensure children accumulate a minimum of 30 min/d of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Few efficacious and cost-effective strategies exist to assist ASP providers in achieving these important public health goals. This paper reports on the design and conceptual framework of Making Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (HEPA) Policy Practice in ASPs, a 3-year group randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of strategies designed to improve snacks served and increase MVPA in children attending community-based ASPs. Twenty ASPs, serving over 1,800 children (6-12yrs) will be enrolled and match-paired based on enrollment size, average daily min/d MVPA, and days/week FV served, with ASPs randomized after baseline data collection to immediate intervention or a 1-year delayed group. The framework employed, STEPs (Strategies To Enhance Practice), focuses on intentional programming of HEPA in each ASPs’ daily schedule, and includes a grocery store partnership to reduce price barriers to purchasing FV, professional development training to promote physical activity to develop core physical activity competencies, as well as ongoing technical support/assistance. Primary outcome measures include children’s accelerometry-derived MVPA and time spend sedentary while attending an ASP, direct observation of staff HEPA promoting and inhibiting behaviors, types of snacks served, and child consumption of snacks, as well as, cost of snacks via receipts and detailed accounting of intervention delivery costs to estimate cost-effectiveness. PMID:24893225

  8. Cardiovascular Effects of Felypressin

    PubMed Central

    Cecanho, Rodrigo; De Luca, Laurival Antonio; Ranali, José

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of felypressin (FEL) were studied in Wistar rats. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure measurements were taken in awake rats treated with vasopressin (AVP), FEL, or epinephrine (EPI). Each group received either an intravenous (IV) or an intracerebroventricular V1 receptor antagonist, saline, area postrema removal, or sham surgery. Analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls (P < .05) were applied. Felypressin and AVP induced a pressor effect, and bradycardia was inhibited by IV V1 antagonist. Intracerebroventricular V1 antagonist and area postrema removal enhanced their pressor effects. Epinephrine induced a higher pressor effect and a similar bradycardia that was not affected by the treatments. It was concluded that FEL depends on V1 receptors to induce pressor and bradycardic effects, and that it produces a high relationship between bradycardia and mean arterial pressure variation depending on area postrema and central V1 receptors. These effects are potentially less harmful to the cardiovascular system than the effects of EPI. PMID:17177590

  9. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  10. Use of effective dose.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D; Balonov, M; Martin, C J; Ortiz Lopez, P; Menzel, H-G; Simmonds, J R; Smith-Bindman, R; Wakeford, R

    2016-06-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 provided a detailed explanation of the purpose and use of effective dose and equivalent dose to individual organs and tissues. Effective dose has proven to be a valuable and robust quantity for use in the implementation of protection principles. However, questions have arisen regarding practical applications, and a Task Group has been set up to consider issues of concern. This paper focusses on two key proposals developed by the Task Group that are under consideration by ICRP: (1) confusion will be avoided if equivalent dose is no longer used as a protection quantity, but regarded as an intermediate step in the calculation of effective dose. It would be more appropriate for limits for the avoidance of deterministic effects to the hands and feet, lens of the eye, and skin, to be set in terms of the quantity, absorbed dose (Gy) rather than equivalent dose (Sv). (2) Effective dose is in widespread use in medical practice as a measure of risk, thereby going beyond its intended purpose. While doses incurred at low levels of exposure may be measured or assessed with reasonable reliability, health effects have not been demonstrated reliably at such levels but are inferred. However, bearing in mind the uncertainties associated with risk projection to low doses or low dose rates, it may be considered reasonable to use effective dose as a rough indicator of possible risk, with the additional consideration of variation in risk with age, sex and population group. PMID:26980800

  11. Potential antitumor activity of novel DODAC/PHO-S liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Arthur Cássio de Lima; Saraiva, Greice Kelle Viegas; Filho, Otaviano Mendonça Ribeiro; Chierice, Gilberto Orivaldo; Neto, Salvador Claro; Cuccovia, Iolanda Midea; Maria, Durvanei Augusto

    2016-01-01

    In recent studies, we showed that synthetic phosphoethanolamine (PHO-S) has a great potential for inducing cell death in several tumor cell lines without damage to normal cells. However, its cytotoxic effect and selectivity against tumor cells could increase with encapsulation in cationic liposomes, such as dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC), due to electrostatic interactions between these liposomes and tumor cell membranes. Our aim was to use cationic liposomes to deliver PHO-S and to furthermore maximize the therapeutic effect of this compound. DODAC liposomes containing PHO-S (DODAC/PHO-S), at concentrations of 0.3–2.0 mM, prepared by ultrasonication, were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic light scattering. The cytotoxic effect of DODAC/PHO-S on B16F10 cells, Hepa1c1c7 cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was assessed by MTT assay. Cell cycle phases of B16F10 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and the morphological changes by SEM, after treatment. The liposomes were spherical and polydisperse in solution. The liposomes were stable, presenting an average of ∼50% of PHO-S encapsulation, with a small reduction after 40 days. DODAC demonstrated efficient PHO-S delivery, with the lowest values of IC50% (concentration that inhibits 50% of the growth of cells) for tumor cells, compared with PHO-S alone, with an IC50% value of 0.8 mM for B16F10 cells and 0.2 mM for Hepa1c1c7 cells, and without significant effects on endothelial cells. The Hepa1c1c7 cells showed greater sensitivity to the DODAC/PHO-S formulation when compared to B16F10 cells and HUVECs. The use of DODAC/PHO-S on B16F10 cells induced G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest, with the proportion significantly greater than that treated with PHO-S alone. The morphological analysis of B16F10 cells by SEM showed changes such as “bleb” formation, cell detachment, cytoplasmic retraction, and apoptotic bodies after DODAC/PHO-S treatment. Cationic liposomal

  12. Chemopreventive effects of free and bound phenolics associated to steep waters (nejayote) obtained after nixtamalization of different maize types.

    PubMed

    Rojas-García, Carlos; García-Lara, Silverio; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A

    2012-03-01

    Free and bound phenolics extracts from nejayote solids were obtained after optimally lime-cooking blue, normal white, red, normal yellow, high-carotenoid and quality protein maize types. The extraction yield ranged from 4.47 to 10.05%. Bound phenolics extracts had higher content of total phenolics, antioxidant activity and ferulic acid compared to the free phenolics extracts. In general, free phenolics extracts were less cytotoxic than the bound phenolics counterparts. Bound phenolics extracts had higher induction of quinone reductase (QR) and particularly the normal yellow nejayote exerted the highest chemopreventive index tested in Hepa1c1c7 cells. When tested for monofunctional phase 2 induction capacity in BPrc1 cells, the bound phenolics extracts of blue, normal white and quality protein nejayotes were better inducers than the normal yellow counterpart. Particularly, the free phenolics extract of the white maize nejayote induced BPrc1 cells QR and exerted a higher chemopreventive index compared to the bound phenolics extract. Therefore, the nejayote of the normal white maize was the best source of monofunctional phase 2 enzyme inducers. PMID:22311197

  13. Bustling argon: biological effect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option. PMID:24088583

  14. Improving engineering effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiero, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Methodologies to improve engineering productivity were investigated. The rocky road to improving engineering effectiveness is reviewed utilizing a specific semiconductor engineering organization as a case study. The organization had a performance problem regarding new product introductions. With the help of this consultant as a change agent the engineering team used a systems approach to through variables that were effecting their output significantly. Critical factors for improving this engineering organization's effectiveness and the roles/responsibilities of management, the individual engineers and the internal consultant are discussed.

  15. Cardiovascular Effects of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, K.

    1985-01-01

    Physiological changes resulting from long term weightlessness are reviewed and activities conducted to study cardiovascular deconditioning at NASA Ames are discussed. Emphasis is on using monkeys in chair rest, water immersion, and tilt table studies to simulate space environment effects.

  16. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  17. Effects of New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Transnational implications of technological change and innovation in telecommunications are discussed, including impact on jobs and industrial relations, computer security, access to information, and effects of technological innovation on international economic systems. (SK)

  18. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  19. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins. PMID:21406855

  20. Cytogenetic effects of cyclamates

    SciTech Connect

    Jemison, E.W.; Brown, K.; Rivers, B.; Knight, R.

    1984-01-01

    PHA-stimulated human peripheral lymphocytes were used as a model system for assessing the in vitro effects of calcium cyclamate. Techniques of autoradiography, cytological staining, cell counting, liquid scintillation and karyotyping were used to study the cytogenetic damage and biochemical effects of calcium cyclamate when assayed in 24 hour intervals for 96 hours. The cells were exposed to 10(-2) and 10(-3) molar concentrations of calcium cyclamate in TC 199 medium with fetal calf serum and antibiotics. It was noted that the addition of cyclamate increased mitotic rate of lymphocyte cells in cultures. It was determined that calcium cyclamate impaired the synthesis of deoxribonunucleic acid (as depicted by decreased incorporation of tritiated thymidine), reduced grain counts in autoradiographs and increased chromosome aberrations in cyclamate treated PHA stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Morphological changes and growth rates showed significant effects. These studies indicate that calcium cyclamate has variable significant effects on leucocytes growth and chromosome morphology.

  1. Effects of Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... you or your family member has ever had heat stroke, or suffered from the condition in a previous surgery, be sure to tell the physician anesthesiologist. Regional Anesthesia The potential side effects of regional anesthesia (such as an epidural or ...

  2. Comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, J A; Schaefer, P W; Romero, J M; Rabinov, J D; Sanelli, P C; Manchikanti, L

    2014-09-01

    The goal of comparative effectiveness research is to improve health care while dealing with the seemingly ever-rising cost. An understanding of comparative effectiveness research as a core topic is important for neuroradiologists. It can be used in a variety of ways. Its goal is to look at alternative methods of interacting with a clinical condition, ideally, while improving delivery of care. While the Patient-Centered Outcome Research initiative is the most mature US-based foray into comparative effectiveness research, it has been used more robustly in decision-making in other countries for quite some time. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence of the United Kingdom is a noteworthy example of comparative effectiveness research in action. PMID:24874531

  3. Radiation effects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented. (ACR)

  4. Evaluating teaching effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kirschling, J M; Fields, J; Imle, M; Mowery, M; Tanner, C A; Perrin, N; Stewart, B J

    1995-12-01

    Major reform in nursing education is underway, with increased emphasis being placed on the importance of the teacher-student relationship. An instrument for evaluation of teaching effectiveness, developed at the Oregon Health Sciences University School of Nursing, attempts to capture the student's perception of the quality of the teacher-student relationship as well as other salient aspects of teaching practices. The evaluation tool contains 26 items evaluating teaching effectiveness and 14 items that evaluate the course. The teaching effectiveness items yield five scales including: knowledge and expertise, facilitative teaching methods, communication style, use of own experiences, and feedback. Psychometric testing has been completed and there is evidence of construct validity in relation to teaching effectiveness and internal consistency reliability for the five scales. PMID:8583255

  5. Side Effects of Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactions to the different drugs. The doctors, nurses, and pharmacists will describe what to look out for in ... will be monitored very closely by doctors, nurses, and pharmacists to make sure that all side effects are ...

  6. Systems effectiveness evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicely, H. P., Jr.; Givens, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    Eight integrated computer programs provide needed capability to reduce man-hours needed to perform routine monitoring and assessment of effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability of large electronic equipment systems.

  7. Health Effects of Tsunamis

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Specific Types of Emergencies Health Effects of Tsunamis Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... environmental hazards. The majority of deaths associated with tsunamis are related to drownings, but traumatic injuries are ...

  8. Pictorial Superiority Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Douglas L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Pictures generally show superior recognition relative to their verbal labels. This experiment was designed to link this pictorial superiority effect to sensory or meaning codes associated with the two types of symbols. (Editor)

  9. [Genetic effects of radiation].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nori

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a short review of genetic effect of radiation. This includes methods and results of a large-scale genetic study on specific loci in mice and of various studies in the offspring of atomic-bomb survivors. As for the latter, there is no results obtained which suggest the effect of parental exposure to radiation. Further, in recent years, studies are conducted to the offspring born to parents who were survivors of childhood cancers. In several reports, the mean gonad dose is quite large whereas in most instances, the results do not indicate genetic effect following parental exposure to radiation. Possible reasons for the difficulties in detecting genetic effect of radiation are discussed. PMID:22514926

  10. Modulational effects in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata, T.

    1997-12-01

    We discuss effects of field modulations in accelerators, specifically those that can be used for operational beam diagnostics and beam halo control. In transverse beam dynamics, combined effects of nonlinear resonances and tune modulations influence diffusion rates with applied tune modulation has been demonstrated. In the longitudinal domain, applied RF phase and voltage modulations provide mechanisms for parasitic halo transport, useful in slow crystal extraction. Experimental experiences with transverse tune and RF modulations are also discussed.

  11. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  12. "Side" effects: a misnomer.

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    The tragic results for the babies of patients prescribed thalidomide, although they can indeed be termed "side" effects, hardly warrant so slight an epithet, and Dr Joyce in his paper would like the term to be dropped in favour of "additional" effects of drugs. Despite extensive clinical trials before drugs are put before the prescribing doctor, side effects cannot be entirely anticipated or eliminated, and indeed many are not harmful. However, it is important, Dr Joyce argues, for information to the doctor from the patient and from the doctor to the manufacturer to be collected and evaluated. Only in this way can effects of drugs other than those intended be drawn to the notice of the manufacturer. The commentary by two practising physicians emphasizes the ambiguities in the descriptive literature accompanying a new drug. Dr Herxheimer and Dr Higgs would like to see some sort of panel to be established to reassess drugs in the light of observations on their effects and "side" effects on patients, a task which the existing Committee on Safety of Medicines could not at the moment undertake. A medical need for a new drug should be established before it is manufactured, let alone offered to the general practitioner. PMID:823336

  13. Anthocyan does not suppress transformation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor induced by dioxin.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Rie; Fukuda, Itsuko; Nishiumi, Shin; Hosokawa, Keizo; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2004-01-01

    Dioxins cause a variety of toxic effects through transformation of a cytosolic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We have previously demonstrated that certain natural flavones and flavonols at the dietary levels suppress AhR transformation. In this study, we investigated whether 5 anthocyanidins, 15 anthocyanins, and protocatechuic acid suppress AhR transformation in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells. All the compounds tested here at 5 microM unexpectedly failed to suppress the transformation induced by 0.1 nM TCDD, indicating that anthocyan does not have a potential to prevent dioxin toxicity. PMID:15630228

  14. Environmental Remediation in the Treatment of Allergy and Asthma: Latest Updates

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Lakiea S.; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    In the modern era, the prevalence of asthma and allergies are increasing. It has been speculated that environmental exposures are contributing to this rise. Several studies demonstrate that common indoor allergen exposures exacerbate asthma. Minimizing exposure to allergens and remediating the environment play a critical role in the treatment of asthma and allergies. The most effective environmental control measures are tailored multifaceted interventions which include education, thorough cleaning, using high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, integrated pest management, and maintenance of these practices. PMID:24488258

  15. 4-methylumbelliferone inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth by decreasing IL-6 production and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Piccioni, Flavia; Fiore, Esteban; Bayo, Juan; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Peixoto, Estanislao; Rizzo, Manglio; Malvicini, Mariana; Tirado-González, Irene; García, Mariana G; Alaniz, Laura; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    Cirrhosis is characterized by an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix components including hyaluronic acid (HA) and is widely considered a preneoplastic condition for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). 4-Methylumbelliferone (4MU) is an inhibitor of HA synthesis and has anticancer activity in an orthotopic HCC model with underlying fibrosis. Our aim was to explore the effects of HA inhibition by 4MU orally administered on tumor microenvironment. Hepa129 tumor cells were inoculated orthotopically in C3H/HeJ male mice with fibrosis induced by thioacetamide. Mice were orally treated with 4MU. The effects of 4MU on angiogenesis were evaluated by immunostaining of CD31 and quantification of proangiogenic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, interleukin-6, IL-6 and C-X-C motif chemokine 12, CXCL12). IL-6 was also quantified in Hepa129 cells in vitro after treatment with 4MU. Migration of endothelial cells and tube formation were also analyzed. As a result, 4MU treatment decreases tumor growth and increased animal survival. Systemic levels of VEGF were significantly inhibited in 4MU-treated mice. Expression of CD31 was reduced after 4MU therapy in liver parenchyma in comparison with control group. In addition, mRNA expression and protein levels of IL-6 and VEGF were inhibited both in tumor tissue and in nontumoral liver parenchyma. Interestingly, IL-6 production was dramatically reduced in Kupffer cells isolated from 4MU-treated mice, and in Hepa129 cells in vitro. Besides, 4MU was able to inhibit endothelial cell migration and tube formation. In conclusion, 4MU has antitumor activity in vivo and its mechanisms of action involve an inhibition of angiogenesis and IL-6 production. 4MU is an orally available molecule with potential for HCC treatment. PMID:25882295

  16. Effective Transport Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Roberto

    In this chapter we study a particular case of multiphase systems, namely two-phase materials in which one of the phases is randomly dispersed in the other, so that the composite can be viewed on a macroscale as an effective continuum, with well defined properties. In general, the theoretical determination of the parameter for an effective medium requires, as a rule, the solution of a corresponding transport problem at the microscale, which takes into account the morphology of the system and its evolution. As the mathematical problem is well-posed on a microscale, this can be accomplished using, for example, the multiple scale approach shown in Chap. 11 ; however, the task requires massive computations and is therefore difficult to implement from the practical standpoint. Here, instead, we focus on a deterministic approach to the problem, where the geometry and spatial configuration of the particles comprising the included phase are given and the solution to the microscale problem is therefore sought analytically. As examples, we study the effective thermal conductivity of solid reinforced materials (Sect. 10.1), the effective viscosity of non-colloidal suspensions (Sect. 10.2), the effective permeability of porous materials (10.3) and the effective self- and gradient diffusivities of colloidal suspensions (Sect. 10.4). Then, in Sect. 10.5, an alternative dynamic definition of the transport coefficients is considered, which can also serve as a basis to determine the effective properties of complex systems.

  17. Air Cleaning Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This health technology policy assessment will answer the following questions: When should in-room air cleaners be used? How effective are in-room air cleaners? Are in-room air cleaners that use combined HEPA and UVGI air cleaning technology more effective than those that use HEPA filtration alone? What is the Plasmacluster ion air purifier in the pandemic influenza preparation plan? The experience of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) locally, nationally, and internationally underscored the importance of administrative, environmental, and personal protective infection control measures in health care facilities. In the aftermath of the SARS crisis, there was a need for a clearer understanding of Ontario’s capacity to manage suspected or confirmed cases of airborne infectious diseases. In so doing, the Walker Commission thought that more attention should be paid to the potential use of new technologies such as in-room air cleaning units. It recommended that the Medical Advisory Secretariat of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care evaluate the appropriate use and effectiveness of such new technologies. Accordingly, the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee asked the Medical Advisory Secretariat to review the literature on the effectiveness and utility of in-room air cleaners that use high-efficiency particle air (HEPA) filters and ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) air cleaning technology. Additionally, the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee prioritized a request from the ministry’s Emergency Management Unit to investigate the possible role of the Plasmacluster ion air purifier manufactured by Sharp Electronics Corporation, in the pandemic influenza preparation plan. Clinical Need Airborne transmission of infectious diseases depends in part on the concentration of breathable infectious pathogens (germs) in room air. Infection control is achieved by a combination of administrative, engineering

  18. Spin Hall effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinova, Jairo; Valenzuela, Sergio O.; Wunderlich, J.; Back, C. H.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spin Hall effects are a collection of relativistic spin-orbit coupling phenomena in which electrical currents can generate transverse spin currents and vice versa. Despite being observed only a decade ago, these effects are already ubiquitous within spintronics, as standard spin-current generators and detectors. Here the theoretical and experimental results that have established this subfield of spintronics are reviewed. The focus is on the results that have converged to give us the current understanding of the phenomena, which has evolved from a qualitative to a more quantitative measurement of spin currents and their associated spin accumulation. Within the experimental framework, optical-, transport-, and magnetization-dynamics-based measurements are reviewed and linked to both phenomenological and microscopic theories of the effect. Within the theoretical framework, the basic mechanisms in both the extrinsic and intrinsic regimes are reviewed, which are linked to the mechanisms present in their closely related phenomenon in ferromagnets, the anomalous Hall effect. Also reviewed is the connection to the phenomenological treatment based on spin-diffusion equations applicable to certain regimes, as well as the spin-pumping theory of spin generation used in many measurements of the spin Hall angle. A further connection to the spin-current-generating spin Hall effect to the inverse spin galvanic effect is given, in which an electrical current induces a nonequilibrium spin polarization. This effect often accompanies the spin Hall effect since they share common microscopic origins. Both can exhibit the same symmetries when present in structures comprising ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers through their induced current-driven spin torques or induced voltages. Although a short chronological overview of the evolution of the spin Hall effect field and the resolution of some early controversies is given, the main body of this review is structured from a pedagogical

  19. The negative repetition effect.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Neil W; Peterson, Daniel J

    2013-09-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising negative repetition effect, in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and across pairs, the target words were drawn from a small set of categories. In the repetition condition, the pairs were initially presented in a random order and then presented a 2nd time blocked by the category of the target words. In the single presentation condition, the pairs were presented only in the blocked order. Participants in the former condition recalled fewer target words on a free recall test despite having seen the word pairs twice (the negative repetition effect). This phenomenon is explored in a series of 5 experiments assessing 3 theoretical accounts of the effect. The experiments demonstrate that the negative repetition effect generalizes over multiple encoding conditions (reading and generative encoding), over different memory tests (free and cued recall), and over delay (5 min and 2 days). The results argue against a retrieval account and a levels-of-processing account but are consistent with the item-specific-relational account, the account upon which the effect was initially predicated. PMID:23421508

  20. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  1. A "voice inversion effect?".

    PubMed

    Bédard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-07-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an "auditory face" rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a "voice inversion effect," by analogy to the classical "face inversion effect," which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted of a gender identification task on two syllables pronounced by 90 speakers (boys, girls, men, and women). Experiment 2 consisted of a speaker discrimination task on pairs of syllables (8 men and 8 women). Experiment 3 consisted of an instrument discrimination task on pairs of melodies (8 string and 8 wind instruments). In all three experiments, stimuli were presented in 4 conditions: (1) no inversion; (2) temporal inversion (e.g., backwards speech); (3) frequency inversion centered around 4000 Hz; and (4) around 2500 Hz. Results indicated a significant decrease in performance caused by sound inversion, with a much stronger effect for frequency than for temporal inversion. Interestingly, although frequency inversion markedly affected timbre for both voices and instruments, subjects' performance was still above chance. However, performance at instrument discrimination was much higher than for voices, preventing comparison of inversion effects for voices vs. non-vocal stimuli. Additional experiments will be necessary to conclude on the existence of a possible "voice inversion effect." PMID:15177788

  2. Pleiotropic effects of statins

    PubMed Central

    Kavalipati, Narasaraju; Shah, Jay; Ramakrishan, Ananthraman; Vasnawala, Hardik

    2015-01-01

    Statins or 3-hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors not only prevents the synthesis of cholesterol biosynthesis but also inhibits the synthesis of essential isoprenoid intermediates such as farnesyl pyrophosphate, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, isopentanyl adenosine, dolichols and polyisoprenoid side chains of ubiquinone, heme A, and nuclear lamins. These isoprenoid intermediates are required for activation of various intracellular/signaling proteins- small guanosine triphosphate bound protein Ras and Ras-like proteins like Rho, Rab, Rac, Ral, or Rap which plays an indispensible role in multiple cellular processes. Reduction of circulating isoprenoids intermediates as a result of HMG CoA reductase inhibition by statins prevents activation of these signalling proteins. Hence, the multiple effects of statins such as antiinflammatory effects, antioxidant effects, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects, plaque stability, normalization of sympathetic outflow, and prevention of platelet aggregation are due to reduction of circulating isoprenoids and hence inactivation of signalling proteins. These multiple lipid-independent effects of statins termed as statin pleiotropy would potentially open floodgates for research in multiple treatment domains catching attentions of researchers and clinician across the globe. PMID:26425463

  3. Effective Nutritional Supplement Combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Matt; Cribb, Paul J.

    Few supplement combinations that are marketed to athletes are supported by scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Quite often, under the rigor of scientific investigation, the patented combination fails to provide any greater benefit than a group given the active (generic) ingredient. The focus of this chapter is supplement combinations and dosing strategies that are effective at promoting an acute physiological response that may improve/enhance exercise performance or influence chronic adaptations desired from training. In recent years, there has been a particular focus on two nutritional ergogenic aids—creatine monohydrate and protein/amino acids—in combination with specific nutrients in an effort to augment or add to their already established independent ergogenic effects. These combinations and others are discussed in this chapter.

  4. Cyclone vibration effects

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.C.; Tillery, M.I.

    1981-09-01

    A Government Accounting Office review of coal mine dust sampling procedures recommended studies be performed to determine accuracy and precision of dust measurements taken with current equipment. The effects of vibration on the 10-mm Dorr-Oliver nylon cyclone run at a flow rate of 2 L/min were investigated. A total of 271 samples were taken during 95 tests. All tests lasted about 7 h each and were performed inside a 19 l capacity aerosol chamber. Coal dust concentrations of about 2 mg/m/SUP/3 in air and a respirable fraction of 25-30% were used. The effects of a variety of vibration frequencies and stroke lengths were tested in two modes (horizontal and vertical). At most frequencies and stroke lengths, vibration was found to have an insignificant effect on cyclone performance.

  5. Transgenerational genetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Vicki R; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2012-01-01

    Since Mendel, studies of phenotypic variation and disease risk have emphasized associations between genotype and phenotype among affected individuals in families and populations. Although this paradigm has led to important insights into the molecular basis for many traits and diseases, most of the genetic variants that control the inheritance of these conditions continue to elude detection. Recent studies suggest an alternative mode of inheritance where genetic variants that are present in one generation affect phenotypes in subsequent generations, thereby decoupling the conventional relations between genotype and phenotype, and perhaps, contributing to ‘missing heritability’. Under some conditions, these transgenerational genetic effects can be as frequent and strong as conventional inheritance, and can persist for multiple generations. Growing evidence suggests that RNA mediates these heritable epigenetic changes. The primary challenge now is to identify the molecular basis for these effects, characterize mechanisms and determine whether transgenerational genetic effects occur in humans. PMID:22122083

  6. Aviation noise effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

  7. Effective Documentation Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleboda, Claire

    1997-01-01

    Quality assurance programs provide a very effective means to monitor and evaluate medical care. Quality assurance involves: (1) Identify a problem; (2) Determine the source and nature of the problem; (3) Develop policies and methods to effect improvement; (4) Implement those polices; (5) Monitor the methods applied; and (6) Evaluate their effectiveness. Because this definition of quality assurance so closely resembles the Nursing Process, the health unit staff was able to use their knowledge of the nursing process to develop many forms which improve the quality of patient care. These forms include the NASA DFRC Service Report, the occupational injury form (Incident Report), the patient survey (Pre-hospital Evaluation/Care Report), the Laboratory Log Sheet, the 911 Run Sheet, and the Patient Assessment Stamp. Examples and steps which are followed to generate these reports are described.

  8. Cosmological memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolish, Alexander; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of (1 +z ).

  9. Relative age effect: implications for effective practice.

    PubMed

    Andronikos, Georgios; Elumaro, Adeboye Israel; Westbury, Tony; Martindale, Russell J J

    2016-06-01

    Physical and psychological differences related to birthdate amongst athletes of the same selection year have been characterised as the "relative age effects" (RAEs). RAEs have been identified in a variety of sports, both at youth and adult level, and are linked with dropout of athletes and a reduction of the talent pool. This study examined the existence, mechanisms and possible solutions to RAEs using qualitative methodology. Seven experts in the field of talent identification and development were interviewed. Inductive analysis of the data showed that, while there was mixed evidence for the existence of RAEs across sports, the eradication of RAEs was attributed to controllable features of the development environment. The factors reported included the structure of "categories" used to group athletes within the sport (e.g. age, weight, size, skills), recognition and prioritisation of long-term development over "short term win focus." Education of relevant parties (e.g. coaches, scouts, clubs) about RAEs and the nature of "talent" within a long-term context was suggested, along with careful consideration of the structure of the development environment (e.g. delayed selection, provision for late developers, focus on skills not results, use of challenge). Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:26417709

  10. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, David R; Medina, Douglas J; Hawk, Larry W; Fosco, Whitney D; Richards, Jerry B

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE) that links behavioral- and neural-based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009; Rankin etal., 2009). We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow) normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect "accelerated-HRE." Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement-based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior. PMID:24409128

  11. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  12. Modeling Hofmeister Effects.

    PubMed

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A

    2009-03-11

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed. PMID:20161468

  13. Modeling Hofmeister Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed. PMID:20161468

  14. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  15. Magnetic Nernst effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brechet, Sylvain D.; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2015-09-01

    The thermodynamics of irreversible processes in continuous media predicts the existence of a magnetic Nernst effect that results from a magnetic analog to the Seebeck effect in a ferromagnet and magnetophoresis occurring in a paramagnetic electrode in contact with the ferromagnet. Thus, a voltage that has DC and AC components is expected across a Pt electrode as a response to the inhomogeneous magnetic induction field generated by magnetostatic waves of an adjacent YIG slab subject to a temperature gradient. The voltage frequency and dependence on the orientation of the applied magnetic induction field are quite distinct from that of spin pumping.

  16. [Cytoprotective effects of bilirubin].

    PubMed

    Vítek, L

    2005-01-01

    Bilirubin, a major product of heme catabolism, belongs to compounds with pleiotropic biologic effects. For a long time bilirubin was considered as a metabolite dangerous for human health, neonatologists know well serious clinical complication of neonatal jaundice called bilirubin encephalopathy. Nevertheless, recent data has demonstrated that bilirubin exhibits potent antioxidant and even anti-inflammatory effects with substantial clinical impacts. The aim of the present study was to summarize present knowledge in this rapidly evolving field and suggest further possible clinical consequences. PMID:15981989

  17. Photostimulated even acoustoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmelev, G. M.; Shon, N. Kh.; Tsurkan, G. I.

    1985-02-01

    Photostimulated photogalvanic (PG) and acoustogalvanic (AG) currents in a semiconductor placed in the field of two linearly polarized electromagnetic waves with frequencies Omega sub 1 = 2Omega sub 2 are analyzed. These currents affect the probability of electron scattering and the HF acoustic flux field. Under specified double laser illumination the system comprising an electron gas and photons becomes noncentrosymmetric, which leads to the PG and AG effects. The AG effect represents a contribution to the acoustoelectric current that is linear according to intensity and even according to the acoustic wave vector.

  18. Enhancing board effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Curran, Connie R; Totten, Mary K

    2010-01-01

    Like any other job, board work is associated with specific competencies. Competencies are the combination of knowledge, skills, personal characteristics, and behaviors needed to perform a job or task effectively. Boards are only as strong as their weakest member. Board education should focus on improving the knowledge and skills of the board and individual members and on overall board performance. Assessment of individual board member performance is designed to evaluate the trustee's knowledge of board roles and responsibilities and the expectations of board members. Board effectiveness is built through competency-based board member recruitment and selection; board member education and development; and evaluation of board, board member, and meeting performance. PMID:21291066

  19. Nonequilibrium effects in Isoscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Dorso, C. O.; Lopez, J. A.

    2007-02-12

    In this work we study within a simple model different properties of the system that allow us to understand the properties of the isoscaling observable. We first show that isoscaling is a general property of fragmenting systems. We show this by using a simple generalized percolation model. We show that the usual isoscaling property can be obtained in the case of bond percolation in bichromatic lattices with any regular topology. In this case the probabilities of each color (isospin) are independent. We then explore the effect of introducing 'non-equilibrium' effects.

  20. Contamination effects study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The in-situ optical surface measurement system is a facility designed to study the deleterious effects of particulate materials on the surface reflectivities of optical materials in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). This arrangement is designed to simulate the on-orbit effects of contamination and degradation of optical surfaces. This simulation is accomplished through the use of non-coherent VUV sources illuminating optical surfaces located in a high vacuum chamber. Several sources of contamination are employed. The reflectivity is measured both at the specular reflection as well as at two scattered positions, forward and reverse. The system components are described and an operating procedure is given.

  1. Germ-line mutations, DNA damage, and global hypermethylation in mice exposed to particulate air pollution in an urban/industrial location

    PubMed Central

    Yauk, Carole; Polyzos, Aris; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; Somers, Christopher M.; Godschalk, Roger W.; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Berndt, M. Lynn; Pogribny, Igor P.; Koturbash, Igor; Williams, Andrew; Douglas, George R.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Particulate air pollution is widespread, yet we have little understanding of the long-term health implications associated with exposure. We investigated DNA damage, mutation, and methylation in gametes of male mice exposed to particulate air pollution in an industrial/urban environment. C57BL/CBA mice were exposed in situ to ambient air near two integrated steel mills and a major highway, alongside control mice breathing high-efficiency air particulate (HEPA) filtered ambient air. PCR analysis of an expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus revealed a 1.6-fold increase in sperm mutation frequency in mice exposed to ambient air for 10 wks, followed by a 6-wk break, compared with HEPA-filtered air, indicating that mutations were induced in spermatogonial stem cells. DNA collected after 3 or 10 wks of exposure did not exhibit increased mutation frequency. Bulky DNA adducts were below the detection threshold in testes samples, suggesting that DNA reactive chemicals do not reach the germ line and cause ESTR mutation. In contrast, DNA strand breaks were elevated at 3 and 10 wks, possibly resulting from oxidative stress arising from exposure to particles and associated airborne pollutants. Sperm DNA was hypermethylated in mice breathing ambient relative to HEPA-filtered air and this change persisted following removal from the environmental exposure. Increased germ-line DNA mutation frequencies may cause population-level changes in genetic composition and disease. Changes in methylation can have widespread repercussions for chromatin structure, gene expression and genome stability. Potential health effects warrant extensive further investigation. PMID:18195365

  2. A cellular model to study drug-induced liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Application to acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Michaut, Anaïs; Le Guillou, Dounia; Moreau, Caroline; Bucher, Simon; McGill, Mitchell R; Martinais, Sophie; Gicquel, Thomas; Morel, Isabelle; Robin, Marie-Anne; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can increase susceptibility to hepatotoxicity induced by some xenobiotics including drugs, but the involved mechanisms are poorly understood. For acetaminophen (APAP), a role of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is suspected since the activity of this enzyme is consistently enhanced during NAFLD. The first aim of our study was to set up a cellular model of NAFLD characterized not only by triglyceride accumulation but also by higher CYP2E1 activity. To this end, human HepaRG cells were incubated for one week with stearic acid or oleic acid, in the presence of different concentrations of insulin. Although cellular triglycerides and the expression of lipid-responsive genes were similar with both fatty acids, CYP2E1 activity was significantly increased only by stearic acid. CYP2E1 activity was reduced by insulin and this effect was reproduced in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Next, APAP cytotoxicity was assessed in HepaRG cells with or without lipid accretion and CYP2E1 induction. Experiments with a large range of APAP concentrations showed that the loss of ATP and glutathione was almost always greater in the presence of stearic acid. In cells pretreated with the CYP2E1 inhibitor chlormethiazole, recovery of ATP was significantly higher in the presence of stearate with low (2.5mM) or high (20mM) concentrations of APAP. Levels of APAP-glucuronide were significantly enhanced by insulin. Hence, HepaRG cells can be used as a valuable model of NAFLD to unveil important metabolic and hormonal factors which can increase susceptibility to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26739624

  3. 1,N(2)-propanodeoxyguanosine adduct formation in aortic DNA following inhalation of acrolein.

    PubMed Central

    Penn, A; Nath, R; Pan, J; Chen, L; Widmer, K; Henk, W; Chung, F L

    2001-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that many of the cytotoxic and health-threatening components of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) reside in the vapor phase of the smoke. We have reported previously that inhalation of 1,3-butadiene, a prominent vapor phase component of ETS, accelerates arteriosclerotic plaque development in cockerels. In this study we asked whether inhaled acrolein, a reactive aldehyde that is also a prominent vapor-phase component of ETS, damages artery-wall DNA and accelerates plaque development. Cockerels inhaled 0, 1, or 10 ppm acrolein mixed with HEPA-filtered air for 6 hr. Half were killed immediately (day 1 group) for detection of the stable, premutagenic 1,N(2)-propanodeoxyguanosine acrolein adduct (AdG3) in aortic DNA via a (32)P-postlabeling/HPLC method, and half were killed after 10 days (day 10 group) for indirect assessment of adduct repair. In the day 1 group, acrolein-DNA adducts were 5 times higher in the 1 and 10 ppm groups than in HEPA-filtered air controls. However, in the day 10 group, adduct levels in the 1 and 10 ppm acrolein groups were reduced to the control adduct level. For the plaque studies, cockerels inhaled 1 ppm acrolein (6 hr/day, 8 weeks), mixed with the same HEPA-filtered air inhaled by controls. Plaque development was measured blind by computerized morphometry. Unlike butadiene inhalation, acrolein inhalation did not accelerate plaque development. Thus, even though repeated exposure to acrolein alone has no effect on plaque size under the exposure conditions described here, a single, brief inhalation exposure to acrolein elicits repairable DNA damage to the artery wall. These results suggest that frequent exposure to ETS may lead to persistent artery-wall DNA damage and thus provide sites on which other ETS plaque accelerants can act. PMID:11333181

  4. Development of an air cleaning system for dissolving high explosives from nuclear warheads

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Staggs, K.; Wapman, D.

    1997-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has a major effort underway in dismantling nuclear weapons. In support of this effort we have been developing a workstation for removing the high explosive (HE) from nuclear warheads using hot sprays of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent to dissolve the HE. An important component of the workstation is the air cleaning system that is used to contain DMSO aerosols and vapor and radioactive aerosols. The air cleaning system consists of a condenser to liquefy the hot DMSO vapor, a demister pad to remove most of the DMSO aerosols, a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter to remove the remaining aerosols, an activated carbon filter to remove the DMSO vapor, and a final HEPA filter to meet the redundancy requirement for HEPA filters in radioactive applications. The demister pad is a 4{double_prime} thick mat of glass and steel fibers and was selected after conducting screening tests on promising candidates. We also conducted screening tests on various activated carbons and found that all had a similar performance. The carbon breakthrough curves were fitted to a modified Wheeler`s equation and gave excellent predictions for the effect of different flow rates. After all of the components were assembled, we ran a series of performance tests on the components and system to determine the particle capture efficiency as a function of size for dioctyl sebacate (DOS) and DMSO aerosols using laser particle counters and filter samples. The pad had an efficiency greater than 990% for 0.1 {mu}m DMSO particles. Test results on the prototype carbon filter showed only 70% efficiency, instead of the 99.9% in small scale laboratory tests. Thus further work will be required to develop the prototype carbon filter. 7 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Kinetics and dynamics of cyclosporine A in three hepatic cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Bellwon, P; Truisi, G L; Bois, F Y; Wilmes, A; Schmidt, T; Savary, C C; Parmentier, C; Hewitt, P G; Schmal, O; Josse, R; Richert, L; Guillouzo, A; Mueller, S O; Jennings, P; Testai, E; Dekant, W

    2015-12-25

    In vitro experiments have a high potential to improve current chemical safety assessment and reduce the number of animals used. However, most studies conduct hazard assessment alone, largely ignoring exposure and kinetic parameters. Therefore, in this study the kinetics of cyclosporine A (CsA) and the dynamics of CsA-induced cyclophilin B (Cyp-B) secretion were investigated in three widely used hepatic in vitro models: primary rat hepatocytes (PRH), primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and HepaRG cells. Cells were exposed daily to CsA for up to 14 days. CsA in cells and culture media was quantified by LC-MS/MS and used for pharmacokinetic modeling. Cyp-B was quantified by western blot analysis in cells and media. All cell systems took up CsA rapidly from the medium after initial exposure and all showed a time- and concentration-dependent Cyp-B cellular depletion and extracellular secretion. Only in PRH an accumulation of CsA over 14 days repeated exposure was observed. Donor-specific effects in CsA clearance were observed in the PHH model and both PHH and HepaRG cells significantly metabolized CsA, with no bioaccumulation being observed after repeated exposure. The developed kinetic models are described in detail and show that all models under-predict the in vivo hepatic clearance of CsA, but to different extents with 27-, 24- and 2-fold for PRH, PHH and HepaRG cells, respectively. This study highlights the need for more attention to kinetics in in vitro studies. PMID:26193170

  6. Space Environmental Effects Knowledgebase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, B. E.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the results of an NRA funded program entitled Space Environmental Effects Knowledgebase that received funding through a NASA NRA (NRA8-31) and was monitored by personnel in the NASA Space Environmental Effects (SEE) Program. The NASA Project number was 02029. The Satellite Contamination and Materials Outgassing Knowledgebase (SCMOK) was created as a part of the earlier NRA8-20. One of the previous tasks and part of the previously developed Knowledgebase was to accumulate data from facilities using QCMs to measure the outgassing data for satellite materials. The main object of this current program was to increase the number of material outgassing datasets from 250 up to approximately 500. As a part of this effort, a round-robin series of materials outgassing measurements program was also executed that allowed comparison of the results for the same materials tested in 10 different test facilities. Other programs tasks included obtaining datasets or information packages for 1) optical effects of contaminants on optical surfaces, thermal radiators, and sensor systems and 2) space environmental effects data and incorporating these data into the already existing NASA/SEE Knowledgebase.

  7. Using Your Library Effectively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennepin County Library, Minnetonka, MN.

    This collection of materials for a three-hour instructional program for young people and adults in the effective use of the public library includes an introduction to the program, a teaching guide for the librarian, a packet of materials for students, and a summary of 90 evaluations of the program as it was presented at two area libraries and…

  8. Teacher Effectiveness: A Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Myrtle

    1969-01-01

    This document summarizes the highlights of research on teacher effectiveness and concludes with recommendations based on a synthesis of this past work. The various methodologies that have been used are discussed, from rating scales to objective observation techniques, such as OScAR and the ecological studies. The major problems in teacher…

  9. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  10. DCPS Effective Schools Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, 2009

    2009-01-01

    DCPS is committed to providing "all" students with the caliber of education they deserve. The goal of the DCPS Effective Schools Framework is to ensure that every child, in every classroom, has access to a high-quality and engaging standards-based instructional program, and that all school supports are aligned to support teaching and learning. The…

  11. Globalisation, Effectiveness and Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimore, Peter

    This paper reports principally on two studies, prompted by research on school effectiveness in the United States and England, which indicate globalization is beginning to affect school improvement. The first study cites case studies of two schools--from working-class, multi-ethnic, poorly educated areas of Singapore and London--to determine if…

  12. Effects of New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A series of articles looks at computerization and unions in Australia, France, and India; bargaining agreements about technological innovation in India, the United Kingdom, and the United States; and the effects of technology on the labor force in the Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, and the United States. (SK)

  13. Marijuana: respiratory tract effects.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kelly P; Sutter, Mark E; Albertson, Timothy E

    2014-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used drug of abuse in the USA. It is commonly abused through inhalation and therefore has effects on the lung that are similar to tobacco smoke, including increased cough, sputum production, hyperinflation, and upper lobe emphysematous changes. However, at this time, it does not appear that marijuana smoke contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Marijuana can have multiple physiologic effects such as tachycardia, peripheral vasodilatation, behavioral and emotional changes, and possible prolonged cognitive impairment. The carcinogenic effects of marijuana are unclear at this time. Studies are mixed on the ability of marijuana smoke to increase the risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer. Some studies show that marijuana is protective for development of malignancy. Marijuana smoke has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the immune system. Components of cannabis are under investigation as treatment for autoimmune diseases and malignancy. As marijuana becomes legalized in many states for medical and recreational use, other forms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have been developed, such as food products and beverages. As most research on marijuana at this time has been on whole marijuana smoke, rather than THC, it is difficult to determine if the currently available data is applicable to these newer products. PMID:23715638

  14. Effective Thinking Outdoors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Rod

    1997-01-01

    Effective Thinking Outdoors (ETO) is an organization that teaches thinking skills and strategies via significant outdoor experiences. Identifies the three elements of thinking as creativity, play, and persistence; presents a graphic depiction of the problem-solving process and aims; and describes an ETO exercise, determining old routes of travel…

  15. Effective Intervention for Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Randie; Kellner, Millicent H.; Green, Stuart; Elias, Maurice J.

    2012-01-01

    Most professional educators are aware that every school should have an effective approach to harassment, intimidation, and bullying (HIB) prevention in which every member of the school community participates. Regardless of the approach a school takes, all students and all staff members should be knowledgeable participants who have been trained to…

  16. The Effective Clinical Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wink, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the common problems with clinical conferences and suggests approaches to maximize student learning. Suggests that an effective clinical conference has three characteristics: (1) it is a group event; (2) it contributes to the achievement of course and clinical objectives; and (3) it provides a setting for students to explore personal…

  17. Designing "Educationally Effective" Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, Joan

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses data from a curriculum intervention project designed to introduce new forms of discussion, seen as educationally effective, into the primary classroom. While the introduction of talk as an aid to learning is premised on a social approach to learning, such interventions are often evaluated in terms of cognitive benefits and…

  18. Effects of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    von Hippel, F.

    1983-01-01

    The author reviews the subject rising the following topics and subtopics: I. Nuclear explosions: heat, nuclear radiation, and radioactive fallout; II. Effects: radiation sickness, burns, blast injuries, and equivalent areas of death; III. Nuclear war: battlefield, regional, intercontinental - counterforce, and intercontinental - counter-city and industry. There are two appendices. 34 references, 32 figures.

  19. Qualities of Effective Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H.; Richard, Holly B.; Catano, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    You know how important principals are in advancing student achievement and school success, but it's not been exactly clear which components of the principal's job are the highest priority... until now. Following on the results-based approach from the ASCD best-seller "Qualities of Effective Teachers", James Stronge and his coauthors explain how…

  20. Effective Use of Usenet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Gord

    1992-01-01

    Continues a description of the Usenet computer network that began in the previous issue. The effective use of Usenet is discussed, including how to screen out unwanted information, the most helpful newsgroups to access, and setting up news reader software. Ideas for library outreach services via Usenet are also suggested. (LRW)

  1. Reporting Research Results Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessment research is at its best when it packages research results and data so that they can be digested by multiple audiences. Too many assessment researchers spend all their efforts planning and executing the research project with little attention to closing the loop at the end. If assessment findings are not communicated effectively, the…

  2. Contaminant effects on fisheries

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, V.W.; Hodson, P.V.; Nriagu, J.O.

    1984-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the effects of water pollution on fish and fisheries. Topics include: monitoring lead pollution in fish, metallothionein and acclimation to heavy metals in fish, modeling approaches, appraising the status of fisheries, and assessing the health of aquatic ecosystems.

  3. Effects on saltwater organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Reish, D.J.; Oshida, P.S.; Wilkes, F.G.; Mearns, A.J.; Ginn, T.C.; Carr, R.S.

    1984-06-01

    A review of the literature reveals numerous articles dealing with the uptake of metals by marine organisms. Cadmium, copper, zinc, and methyl mercury have been shown to have toxic effects on fish, oysters, clams, lobsters, and other marine animals. Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the accumulation of these metals. 237 references.

  4. Is Effective Teaching Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Helen; Mantzicopoulos, Panayota

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the ecological validity of using observation-based scores to evaluate individual teachers' effectiveness, mirroring their use by school administrators. Using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System, the authors asked (a) how similar are teachers' emotional support, classroom organization, and instructional support scores from…

  5. Microcircuit radiation effects databank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Radiation test data submitted by many testers is collated to serve as a reference for engineers who are concerned with and have some knowledge of the effects of the natural radiation environment on microcircuits. Total dose damage information and single event upset cross sections, i.e., the probability of a soft error (bit flip) or of a hard error (latchup) are presented.

  6. Teaching Effective Interviewing Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemons, Frankie

    Through careful preparation and followup, students can insure successful job interviews. If they evaluate their own skills and expectations and assess employer characteristics before interviews, they can increase their credibility with interviewers and make more effective job decisions. If they anticipate irrelevant or illegal questions on such…

  7. Heterologous vaccine effects.

    PubMed

    Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; Aaby, Peter; Shann, Frank; Netea, Mihai G; Levy, Ofer; Louis, Jacques; Picot, Valentina; Greenberg, Michael; Warren, William

    2016-07-25

    The heterologous or non-specific effects (NSEs) of vaccines, at times defined as "off-target effects" suggest that they can affect the immune response to organisms other than their pathogen-specific intended purpose. These NSEs have been the subject of clinical, immunological and epidemiological studies and are increasingly recognized as an important biological process by a growing group of immunologists and epidemiologists. Much remain to be learned about the extent and underlying mechanisms for these effects. The conference "Off-target effects of vaccination" held in Annecy-France (June 8-10 2015) intended to take a holistic approach drawing from the fields of immunology, systems biology, epidemiology, bioinformatics, public health and regulatory science to address fundamental questions of immunological mechanisms, as well as translational questions about vaccines NSEs. NSE observations were examined using case-studies on live attenuated vaccines and non-live vaccines followed by discussion of studies of possible biological mechanisms. Some possible pathways forward in the study of vaccines NSE were identified and discussed by the expert group. PMID:27312214

  8. Pleiotropic effects of incretins

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2012-01-01

    Drugs that augment the incretin system [glucagon like peptide (GLP) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors] represent a novel class of anti-hyperglycemic agents that have shown to improve the health and survival of beta-cells (improvement in postprandial hyperglycemia) and suppress glucagon (improvement in fasting hyperglycemia). The incretins represent a large family of molecules referred to as the “glucagon superfamily of peptide hormones” of which more than 90% of the physiological effects of incretins are accomplished by GLP-17-37 and GLP17-36 amide and gastric insulinotropic peptide (GIP). GLP-1 mediates its effects via the GLP-1 receptor, which has a wide tissue distribution [pancreas, lung, heart, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, macrophages and monocytes, kidney, gastrointestinal tract (stomach and intestine), central nervous system (neoortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius) and peripheral nervous system]. This would imply that the incretin system has effects outside the pancreas. Over time data has accumulated to suggest that therapies that augment the incretin system has beneficial pleiotrophic effects. The incretins have shown to possess a cardiac-friendly profile, preserve neuronal cells and safeguard from neuronal degeneration, improve hepatic inflammation and hepatosteatosis, improve insulin resistance, promote weight loss and induce satiety. There is growing evidence that they may also be renoprotective promoting wound healing and bone health. PMID:22701844

  9. Building Effective Afterschool Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fashola, Olatokunbo S.

    Through a comprehensive review of various afterschool programs across the United States, this resource provides a practical overview of the research and best practices that can be easily adapted and applied in the development of highly effective afterschool programs. chapters focus on: (1) "Why Afterschool Programs?" (benefits, challenges, and…

  10. The Negative Repetition Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  11. Effective Nonverbal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parratt, Smitty

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of understanding nonverbal communication in enhancing the personal and work relationships of interpreters and increasing their effectiveness in meeting the needs of customers. Discusses the mystique of body language, cultural variation in the use of gestures, the stages of an encounter, interpreting gesture clusters, and…

  12. Case 26: Somogyi effect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This individual has a classic manifestation of the Somogyi effect, which is fasting morning hyperglycemia in response to hypoglycemia in the early morning and late night hours. The danger is that if night-time blood glucose levels are not measured, the physician may interpret the patient as having h...

  13. Alexandrite effect spectropyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan

    2006-08-01

    Alexandrite crystal is commonly used for making alexandrite laser, and it also has a less-known phenomenon called the alexandrite effect that refers to the color change between different light sources. A novel spectropyrometer for temperature measurement of a radiating body utilizing the alexandrite effect is introduced. The alexandrite effect method for temperature measurement is based on the relationship between the temperature of blackbody and the hue-angle in the CIELAB color space. The alexandrite effect spectropyrometer consists of an optical probe, a spectrometer, a computer, and an alexandrite filter. It measures the spectral power distribution of a radiating body through the alexandrite filter, calculates the hue-angle, and determines the temperature. The spectropyrometer is suitable for temperature measurement of any radiating body with or without spectral lines in its spectral power distribution from 1000 K to 100000 K. The spectropyrometer is particularly useful for high to ultrahigh temperature measurement of any radiating bodies with spectral line emissions, such as electric arcs and discharges, plasmas, and high temperature flames.

  14. Tips for Effective Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supple, Kevin F.

    2009-01-01

    School business officials' days are filled with numbers and reports--audits, balance sheets, check registers, financial statements, journal entries, vouchers, and warrant reports, just to name a few. Those are all important tools that school business officers use to manage the financial resources of the district effectively. However, they are also…

  15. Cost Effective Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickman, Jerry L.; Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1996-01-01

    This laboratory exercise seeks to develop a cost effective prototype development. The exercise has the potential of linking part design, CAD, mold development, quality control, metrology, mold flow, materials testing, fixture design, automation, limited parts production and other issues as related to plastics manufacturing.

  16. Radiation: Doses, Effects, Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lean, Geoffrey, Ed.

    Few scientific issues arouse as much public controversy as the effects of radiation. This booklet is an attempt to summarize what is known about radiation and provide a basis for further discussion and debate. The first four chapters of the booklet are based on the most recent reports to the United Nations' General Assembly by the United Nations…

  17. Fast and effective?

    PubMed

    Trueland, Jennifer

    2013-12-18

    The 5.2 diet involves two days of fasting each week. It is being promoted as the key to sustained weight loss, as well as wider health benefits, despite the lack of evidence on the long-term effects. Nurses need to support patients who wish to try intermittent fasting. PMID:24345130

  18. The Effective, Efficient Professor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felder, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a succinct overview of the book "The Effective, Efficient Professor" (P. Wankat) that presents a wealth of strategies and techniques for successful faculty members. Sections of the book focus on time management, teaching, students, and scholarship and service. Includes some practical tips from the book ranging from instructional…

  19. Desert Storm environmental effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, E. W.

    It is noted that after more than six months of operation of the Patriot launch station in the Saudi Arabian desert no problems that were attributed to high temperature occurred. The environmental anomalies that did occur were cosmetic in nature and related to dust and salt fog. It was concluded that the Desert Storm environmental effects were typical of worldwide hot, dry climates.

  20. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…