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Sample records for effective magnetic fields

  1. Magnetic field effect on charged Brownian swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, M.; Velasco, R. M.; Jiménez-Aquino, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the effective diffusion of a spherical self-propelled charged particle swimming at low Reynolds number, and subject to a time-dependent magnetic field and thermal agitation. We find that the presence of an external magnetic field may reduce or enhance (depending on the type of swimming and magnetic field applied) the swimmer's effective diffusion, hence we get another possible strategy to control its displacement. For swimmers performing reciprocal motion, and under an oscillating time-dependent magnetic field, mechanical resonance appears when the swimmer and magnetic frequencies coincide, thus enhancing the particle's effective diffusion. Our analytical results are compared with Brownian Dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement.

  2. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  3. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  4. Effect of a magnetic field on sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Yasui, K

    1999-08-01

    The effect of a magnetic field on single-bubble sonoluminescence in water reported experimentally by Young, Schmiedel, and Kang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4816 (1996)] is studied theoretically. It is suggested that bubble dynamics is affected by the magnetic field because moving water molecules of the liquid suffer torque due to the Lorentz force acting on their electrical dipole moment, which results in the transformation of some of the kinetic energy into heat. It is shown that the magnetic field acts as if the ambient pressure of the liquid were increased. It is suggested that the effect increases as the amount of the liquid water increases. It is predicted that nonpolar liquid such as dodecane exhibits no effect of the magnetic field. PMID:11969959

  5. Effects of static magnetic fields on plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, O.

    In our recent experiment on STS-107 (MFA-Biotube) we took advantage of the magnetic heterogeneity of the gravity receptor cells of flax roots, namely stronger diamagnetism of starch-filled amyloplasts compared to cytoplasm (Δ ≊ < 0). High gradient magnetic fields (HGMF, grad(H2/2) up to 109-1010 Oe2/cm) of the experimental chambers (MFCs) repelled amyloplasts from the zones of stronger field thus providing a directional stimulus for plant gravisensing system in microgravity, and causing the roots to react. Such reaction was observed in the video downlink pictures. Unfortunately, the ``Columbia'' tragedy caused loss of the plant material and most of the images, thus preventing us from detailed studies of the results. Currently we are looking for a possibility to repeat this experiment. Therefore, it is very important to understand, what other effects (besides displacing amyloplasts) static magnetic fields with intensities 0 to 2.5104 Oe, and with the size of the area of non-uniformity 10-3 to 1 cm. These effects were estimated theoretically and tested experimentally. No statistically significant differences in growth rates or rates of gravicurvature were observed in experiments with Linum, Arabidopsis, Hordeum, Avena, Ceratodon and Chara between the plants grown in uniform magnetic fields of various intensities (102 to 2.5104 Oe) and those grown in the Earth's magnetic field. Microscopic studies also did not detect any structural differences between test and control plants. The magnitudes of possible effects of static magnetic fields on plant cells and organs (including effects on ion currents, magneto-hydrodynamic effects in moving cytoplasm, ponderomotive forces on other cellular structures, effects on some biochemical reactions and biomolecules) were estimated theoretically. The estimations have shown, that these effects are small compared to the thermodynamic noise and thus are insignificant. Both theoretical estimations and control experiments confirm, that

  6. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  7. Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L.; Orlov, Alexei P.; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A.; Breslavskaya, Natalia N.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the rate of DNA synthesis catalysed by polymerases β with isotopic ions 24Mg2+, 25Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ in the catalytic sites were detected. No difference in enzymatic activity was found between polymerases β carrying 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions with spinless, non-magnetic nuclei 24Mg and 26Mg. However, 25Mg2+ ions with magnetic nucleus 25Mg were shown to suppress enzymatic activity by two to three times with respect to the enzymatic activity of polymerases β with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions. Such an isotopic dependence directly indicates that in the DNA synthesis magnetic mass-independent isotope effect functions. Similar effect is exhibited by polymerases β with Zn2+ ions carrying magnetic 67Zn and non-magnetic 64Zn nuclei, respectively. A new, ion–radical mechanism of the DNA synthesis is suggested to explain these effects. Magnetic field dependence of the magnesium-catalysed DNA synthesis is in a perfect agreement with the proposed ion–radical mechanism. It is pointed out that the magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects may be used for medicinal purposes (trans-cranial magnetic treatment of cognitive deceases, cell proliferation, control of the cancer cells, etc). PMID:23851636

  8. Magnetic Field Effects on Plasma Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebersohn, F.; Shebalin, J.; Girimaji, S.; Staack, D.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we will discuss our numerical studies of plasma jets and loops, of basic interest for plasma propulsion and plasma astrophysics. Space plasma propulsion systems require strong guiding magnetic fields known as magnetic nozzles to control plasma flow and produce thrust. Propulsion methods currently being developed that require magnetic nozzles include the VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) [1] and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. Magnetic nozzles are functionally similar to de Laval nozzles, but are inherently more complex due to electromagnetic field interactions. The two crucial physical phenomenon are thrust production and plasma detachment. Thrust production encompasses the energy conversion within the nozzle and momentum transfer to a spacecraft. Plasma detachment through magnetic reconnection addresses the problem of the fluid separating efficiently from the magnetic field lines to produce maximum thrust. Plasma jets similar to those of VASIMR will be studied with particular interest in dual jet configurations, which begin as a plasma loops between two nozzles. This research strives to fulfill a need for computational study of these systems and should culminate with a greater understanding of the crucial physics of magnetic nozzles with dual jet plasma thrusters, as well as astrophysics problems such as magnetic reconnection and dynamics of coronal loops.[2] To study this problem a novel, hybrid kinetic theory and single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solver known as the Magneto-Gas Kinetic Method is used.[3] The solver is comprised of a "hydrodynamic" portion based on the Gas Kinetic Method and a "magnetic" portion that accounts for the electromagnetic behaviour of the fluid through source terms based on the resistive MHD equations. This method is being further developed to include additional physics such as the Hall effect. Here, we will discuss the current level of code development, as well as numerical simulation results

  9. Effect of magnetic field in malaria diagnosis using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan; Yuen, Clement

    2011-07-01

    The current gold standard method of Malaria diagnosis relies on the blood smears examination. The method is laborintensive, time consuming and requires the expertise for data interpretation. In contrast, Raman scattering from a metabolic byproduct of the malaria parasite (Hemozoin) shows the possibility of rapid and objective diagnosis of malaria. However, hemozoin concentration is usually extremely low especially at the early stage of malaria infection, rendering weak Raman signal. In this work, we propose the sensitive detection of enriched β-hematin, whose spectroscopic properties are equivalent to hemozoin, based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) by using magnetic nanoparticles. A few orders of magnitude enhancement in the Raman signal of β-hematin can be achieved using magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the effect of magnetic field on SERS enhancement is investigated. Our result demonstrates the potential of SERS using magnetic nanoparticles in the effective detection of hemozoin for malaria diagnosis.

  10. Hanle Effect Diagnostics of the Coronal Magnetic Field: A Test Using Realistic Magnetic Field Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouafi, N.-E.; Solanki, S. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2009-06-01

    Our understanding of coronal phenomena, such as coronal plasma thermodynamics, faces a major handicap caused by missing coronal magnetic field measurements. Several lines in the UV wavelength range present suitable sensitivity to determine the coronal magnetic field via the Hanle effect. The latter is a largely unexplored diagnostic of coronal magnetic fields with a very high potential. Here we study the magnitude of the Hanle-effect signal to be expected outside the solar limb due to the Hanle effect in polarized radiation from the H I Lyα and β lines, which are among the brightest lines in the off-limb coronal FUV spectrum. For this purpose we use a magnetic field structure obtained by extrapolating the magnetic field starting from photospheric magnetograms. The diagnostic potential of these lines for determining the coronal magnetic field, as well as their limitations are studied. We show that these lines, in particular H I Lyβ, are useful for such measurements.

  11. Anomaly induced effects in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2008-04-01

    We consider a modification of electrodynamics by an additional light massive vector field, interacting with the photon via Chern-Simons-like coupling. This theory predicts observable effects for the experiments studying the propagation of light in an external magnetic field, very similar to those, predicted by theories of axion and axion-like particles. We discuss a possible microscopic origin of this theory from a theory with non-trivial gauge anomaly cancellation between massive and light particles (including, for example, millicharged fermions). Due to the conservation of the gauge current, the production of the new vector field is suppressed at high energies. As a result, this theory can avoid both stellar bounds (which exist for axions) and the bounds from CMB considered recently, allowing for positive results in experiments like ALPS, LIPPS, OSQAR, PVLAS-2, BMV, Q&A, etc.

  12. Effect of zero magnetic field on cardiovascular system and microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfinkel, Yu. I.; At'kov, O. Yu.; Vasin, A. L.; Breus, T. K.; Sasonko, M. L.; Pishchalnikov, R. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of zero magnetic field conditions on cardiovascular system of healthy adults have been studied. In order to generate zero magnetic field, the facility for magnetic fields modeling "ARFA" has been used. Parameters of the capillary blood flow, blood pressure, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring were measured during the study. All subjects were tested twice: in zero magnetic field and, for comparison, in sham condition. The obtained results during 60 minutes of zero magnetic field exposure demonstrate a clear effect on cardiovascular system and microcirculation. The results of our experiments can be used in studies of long-term stay in hypo-magnetic conditions during interplanetary missions.

  13. Effect of zero magnetic field on cardiovascular system and microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Gurfinkel, Yu I; At'kov, O Yu; Vasin, A L; Breus, T K; Sasonko, M L; Pishchalnikov, R Yu

    2016-02-01

    The effects of zero magnetic field conditions on cardiovascular system of healthy adults have been studied. In order to generate zero magnetic field, the facility for magnetic fields modeling "ARFA" has been used. Parameters of the capillary blood flow, blood pressure, and the electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring were measured during the study. All subjects were tested twice: in zero magnetic field and, for comparison, in sham condition. The obtained results during 60 minutes of zero magnetic field exposure demonstrate a clear effect on cardiovascular system and microcirculation. The results of our experiments can be used in studies of long-term stay in hypo-magnetic conditions during interplanetary missions. PMID:26948007

  14. Effect of magnetic field on Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredin, Jerome; Grondein, Pascaline; Chabert, Pascal; Godyak, Valery; Aanesland, Ane

    2013-09-01

    In the context of PEGASES thruster where an ion-ion plasma is formed across a localized magnetic field, a study to understand how magnetic field affects the Langmuir probe measurements has been made. Several theoretical works have predict that the plasma anisotropy created by a magnetic field will influence Langmuir probe measurement as a function of the orientation of the probe tip. The study has been made in an electropositive plasma of argon for a uniform magnetic field to avoid effects of magnetic field gradient. The electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) measured with various magnetic field show that the measurements with the probe tip along the magnetic field are depleted in the low energy range compared to the one perpendicular to the magnetic field. Comparison of the results obtained with different magnetic field and different probe orientations allows for evaluation the effect of magnetic field on accuracy of EEDF measurement in plasma with magnetic field. These results confirm the theory on Langmuir probes in magnetized plasma that predict a depletion of low electron energy for measurements along the magnetic field lines.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging: effects of magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, L.E.; Arakawa, M.; Hoenninger, J.; McCarten, B.; Watts, J.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-04-01

    Magnetic resonance images of the head, abdomen, and pelvis of normal adult men were obtained using varying magnetic field strength, and measurements of T1 and T2 relaxations and of signal-to-noise (SN) ratios were determined. For any one spin echo sequence, gray/white matter contrast decreases and muscle/fat contrast increases with field. SN levels rise rapidly up to 3.0 kgauss and then change more slowly, actually dropping for muscle. The optimum field for magnetic resonance imaging depends on tissue type, body part, and imaging sequence, so that it does not have a unique value. Magnetic resonance systems that operate in the 3.0-5.0 kgauss range achieve most or all of the gains that can be achieved by higher magnetic fields.

  16. Effect of magnetic yoke on magnetic field distribution and intercepting effect of multi-channel cascading magnet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. P.; Wu, P.; Wang, L.; Li, F. C.; Chen, S.; Sun, S. F.

    2010-03-01

    `Magnetic-Sieve' possesses a potential use in oxygen separation. The effect of a magnetic yoke on magnetic field distribution and intercepting effect of multi-channel cascading magnet arrays in a `Magnetic-Sieve' configuration is studied by ANSYS finite element software. The multi-channel cascading magnet arrays consist of cuboid neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets. The size of the magnets is W×H = 38 mm×5 mm, and the clearance between two adjacent magnets is 1 mm. The results show that the intercepting effect tends to decrease from the central channel to the most lateral channels in multi-channel cascading magnet arrays. Compared with the simulation result of two magnets, the central magnetic inductions of the center channel and the most lateral channels in the multi-channel cascading magnet array including 14 magnets decrease respectively 10% and 31%, and the intercepting effects of the center channel and the most lateral channels decrease 19% and 60%, respectively. When the magnetic yoke is added on the multi-channel cascading magnet array, the above-mentioned four values are increased by 28%, 29%, 63% and 65%, respectively. The simulation study shows that the introducing of magnetic yokes can enhance the central magnetic induction and the intercepting effect of the gradient magnetic field, and moreover, reduce the disparities of intercepting effect among the channels.

  17. Magnetoplastic effect in metals in strong pulsed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soika, A. K.; Sologub, I. O.; Shepelevich, V. G.; Sivtsova, P. A.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of strong pulsed magnetic fields with a magnetic induction amplitude from 5 to 40 T on the mechanical properties of Al, Zn, Sn, and Al-Zn foils has been studied. It has been found that the magnetoplastic effect exhibits a new feature, namely, a significant and, probably, irreversible increase in the microhardness of Al and Al-Zn foils after their single exposure to a unipolar pulsed magnetic field.

  18. Effect of power frequency harmonics on magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Isokorpi, J; Rautee, J; Keikko, T; Korpinen, L

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of harmonic frequencies on magnetic field measurements. We introduced magnetic field meters in a known magnetic field of different frequencies: power frequency (50 Hz) as well as 3rd (150 Hz) and 5th (250 Hz) harmonic frequencies. Two magnetic field levels (0.25 A and 2.5 A) were used. A Helmholtz coil was applied to generate an exact magnetic field. The difference between the measurement results at harmonic frequencies and at power frequency was analyzed using the t-test for matched pairs. The test results show significant differences (P< or =0.01) for 13 out of 28 tests carried out, which is probably due to a curved frequency response near the power frequency. It is, therefore, essential to consider harmonic frequencies in magnetic field measurements in practice.

  19. Evidence for direct effect of magnetic fields on neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, C.F. ); Benane, S.G.; House, D.E. )

    1993-06-01

    Electric fields can cause changes in cell responses both in vitro and in vivo. Alternating magnetic fields have been proposed to act through the electric fields induced in the conducting medium surrounding the cells. We have used a simple exposure system to test the relative contribution of magnetic fields compared to induced electric fields in a standard PC-12 cell culture assay, in which cells respond to nerve growth factor by producing neurites. This response to stimulation by nerve growth factor is inhibited by sinusoidal, 50-Hz magnetic fields at field strengths below 10 [mu]T (100 mG). A standard procedure to distinguish magnetic- vs. electric-field effects demonstrates that the induced electric field is not involved. Additional work is necessary to identify the critical reaction site (or sites), and to establish the molecular mechanisms responsible for these result, 27 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Magnetic field control of the spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzmann, Ulrike; Hinzke, Denise; Kehlberger, Andreas; Guo, Er-Jia; Kläui, Mathias; Nowak, Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    The origin of the suppression of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect by applied magnetic fields is studied. We perform numerical simulations of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of motion for an atomistic spin model and calculate the magnon accumulation in linear temperature gradients for different strengths of applied magnetic fields and different length scales of the temperature gradient. We observe a decrease of the magnon accumulation with increasing magnetic field and we reveal that the origin of this effect is a field dependent change of the frequency distribution of the propagating magnons. With increasing field the magnonic spin currents are reduced due to a suppression of parts of the frequency spectrum. By comparison with measurements of the magnetic field dependent longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in YIG thin films with various thicknesses, we find qualitative agreement between our model and the experimental data, demonstrating the importance of this effect for experimental systems.

  1. Magnetic field modulation of chirooptical effects in magnetoplasmonic structures.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Prieto, Patricia; García, Fernando; Cebollada, Alfonso; González, Maria Ujué; García-Martin, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    In this work we analyse the magnetic field effects on the chirooptical properties of magnetoplasmonic chiral structures. The structures consist of two-dimensional arrays of Au gammadions in which thin layers of Co have been inserted. Due to the magnetic properties of the Au/Co interface the structures have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy which favours magnetic saturation along the surface normal, allowing magnetic field modulation of the chirooptical response with moderate magnetic fields. These structures have two main resonances. The resonance at 850 nm has a larger chirooptical response than the resonance at 650 nm, which, on the other hand, exhibits a larger magnetic field modulation of its chirooptical response. This dissimilar behaviour is due to the different physical origin of the chirooptical and magneto-optical responses. Whereas the chirooptical effects are due to the geometry of the structures, the magneto-optical response is related to the intensity of the electromagnetic field in the magnetic (Co) layers. We also show that the optical chirality can be modulated by the applied magnetic field, which suggests that magnetoplasmonic chiral structures could be used to develop new strategies for chirooptical sensing. PMID:24569696

  2. Magnetic field modulation of chirooptical effects in magnetoplasmonic structures.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Prieto, Patricia; García, Fernando; Cebollada, Alfonso; González, Maria Ujué; García-Martin, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    In this work we analyse the magnetic field effects on the chirooptical properties of magnetoplasmonic chiral structures. The structures consist of two-dimensional arrays of Au gammadions in which thin layers of Co have been inserted. Due to the magnetic properties of the Au/Co interface the structures have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy which favours magnetic saturation along the surface normal, allowing magnetic field modulation of the chirooptical response with moderate magnetic fields. These structures have two main resonances. The resonance at 850 nm has a larger chirooptical response than the resonance at 650 nm, which, on the other hand, exhibits a larger magnetic field modulation of its chirooptical response. This dissimilar behaviour is due to the different physical origin of the chirooptical and magneto-optical responses. Whereas the chirooptical effects are due to the geometry of the structures, the magneto-optical response is related to the intensity of the electromagnetic field in the magnetic (Co) layers. We also show that the optical chirality can be modulated by the applied magnetic field, which suggests that magnetoplasmonic chiral structures could be used to develop new strategies for chirooptical sensing.

  3. Thermoelectric effects and magnetic field amplification in magnetogasdynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1991-06-01

    It will be shown that thermoelectric effects amplify magnetic fields in compressible magnetogasdynamic turbulence (though not nearly as much as occurs across a curved reently bowshock). The importance of this result lies in the recognition that thermoelectric effects (in addition to kinetic effects) provide a real mechanism for the amplification of magnetic field strength (and total energy dissipation through ohmic losses) in a compressible, turbulent plasma.

  4. Quantum hall effect at low magnetic fields

    PubMed

    Huckestein

    2000-04-01

    The temperature and scale dependence of resistivities in the standard scaling theory of the integer quantum Hall effect is discussed. It is shown that recent experiments, claiming to observe a discrepancy with the global phase diagram of the quantum Hall effect, are in fact in agreement with the standard theory. The apparent low-field transition observed in the experiments is identified as a crossover due to weak localization and a strong reduction of the conductivity when Landau quantization becomes dominant.

  5. Diffraction patterns in ferrofluids: Effect of magnetic field and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, S.; Mohan, Shalini; Pai, Chintamani

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report the experimental observation of diffraction patterns in a ferrofluid comprising of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in hexane by a 10 mW He-Ne laser beam. An external dc magnetic field (0-2 kG) was applied perpendicular to the beam. The diffraction pattern showed a variation at different depths of the sample in both zero and applied magnetic field. The patterns also exhibit a change in shape and size as the external field is varied. This effect arises due to thermally induced self-diffraction under the influence of gravity and external magnetic field.

  6. Effects of solar magnetic field on cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goncher, G. A.; Kolomeets, E. V.; Lyakhova, A. K.; Slyunyaeva, N. V.; Stekolnikov, N. V.

    1985-01-01

    Aspects of the problem of galactic cosmic ray propagation, including inversion of the solar total magnetic field and an analysis of data related to the heliomagnetic cycle are discussed. It is noted that the global structure of the solar magnetic field results in an additional flux of galactic cosmic rays generated by curvature and gradient drifts. An analysis of heliomagnetic cycle data shows that the latitudinal gradient results in a N-S asymmetry, with the amplitude of the effect growing with depth in the atmosphere. The inversion of the solar total magnetic field, drift effects, and other space distributions are found to contribute to a 22-year cycle of solar activity.

  7. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  8. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE PROPAGATION OF NUCLEAR FLAMES IN MAGNETIC WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsuna, Masamichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2012-04-10

    We investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the propagation of laminar flames of nuclear reactions taking place in white dwarfs with masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We calculate the velocities of laminar flames parallel and perpendicular to uniform magnetic fields as eigenvalues of steady solutions for magnetic hydrodynamical equations. As a result, we find that even when the magnetic pressure does not dominate the entire pressure it is possible for the magnetic field to suppress the flame propagation through the thermal conduction. Above the critical magnetic field, the flame velocity decreases with increasing magnetic field strength as v {approx} B{sup -1}. In media with densities of 10{sup 7}, 10{sup 8}, and 10{sup 9} g cm{sup -3}, the critical magnetic fields are orders of {approx}10{sup 10}, 10{sup 11}, and 10{sup 12} G, respectively.

  9. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Daniel R.; Evans, Emrys W.; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A.; Wallace, Mark I.; MacKenzie, Stuart R.; Timmel, Christiane R.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor.

  10. Effects of magnetic fields on dissolution of arthritis causing crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Y.; Iwasaka, M.

    2015-05-01

    The number of gout patients has rapidly increased because of excess alcohol and salt intake. The agent responsible for gout is the monosodium urate (MSU) crystal. MSU crystals are found in blood and consist of uric acid and sodium. As a substitute for drug dosing or excessive water intake, physical stimulation by magnetic fields represents a new medical treatment for gout. In this study, we investigated the effects of a magnetic field on the dissolution of a MSU crystal suspension. The white MSU crystal suspension was dissolved in an alkaline solution. We measured the light transmission of the MSU crystal suspension by a transmitted light measuring system. The magnetic field was generated by a horizontal electromagnet (maximum field strength was 500 mT). The MSU crystal suspension that dissolved during the application of a magnetic field of 500 mT clearly had a higher dissolution rate when compared with the control sample. We postulate that the alkali solution promoted penetration upon diamagnetic rotation and this magnetic field orienting is because of the pronounced diamagnetic susceptibility anisotropy of the MSU crystal. The results indicate that magnetic fields represent an effective gout treatment approach.

  11. Collisional effects on Rayleigh-Taylor-induced magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Flaig, M.; Plewa, T.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hu, S. X.; Betti, R.; Hager, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V.

    2015-05-15

    Magnetic-field generation from the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability was predicted more than 30 years ago, though experimental measurements of this phenomenon have only occurred in the past few years. These pioneering observations demonstrated that collisional effects are important to B-field evolution. To produce fields of a measurable strength, high-intensity lasers irradiate solid targets to generate the nonaligned temperature and density gradients required for B-field generation. The ablation process naturally generates an unstable system where RT-induced magnetic fields form. Field strengths inferred from monoenergetic-proton radiographs indicate that in the ablation region diffusive effects caused by finite plasma resistivity are not negligible. Results from the first proof-of-existence experiments are reviewed and the role of collisional effects on B-field evolution is discussed in detail.

  12. Biological effects due to weak magnetic field on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    2004-01-01

    magnetic field may cause different biological effects at the cellular, tissue and organ levels. They may be functionally related to systems that regulate plant metabolism including the intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis. However, our understanding of very complex fundamental mechanisms and sites of interactions between weak magnetic fields and biological systems is still incomplete and still deserve strong research efforts.

  13. Lattice Study of Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterowd, Christopher; Detar, Carleton; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of graphene ranks as one of the most important developments in condensed matter physics in recent years. As a strongly interacting system whose low-energy excitations are described by the Dirac equation, graphene has many similarities with other strongly interacting field theories, particularly quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Graphene, along with other relativistic field theories, have been predicted to exhibit spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) when an external magnetic field is present. Using nonperturbative methods developed to study QCD, we study the low-energy effective field theory (EFT) of graphene subject to an external magnetic field. We find strong evidence supporting the existence of SSB at zero-temperature and characterize the dependence of the chiral condensate on the external magnetic field. We also present results for the mass of the Nambu-Goldstone boson and the dynamically generated quasiparticle mass that result from the SSB.

  14. Effect of a Magnetic Field on Drosophila under Supercooled Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Makoto; Terayama, Hayato; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hayashi, Shogo; Matsushita, Masayuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Under subzero degree conditions, free water contained in biological cells tends to freeze and then most living things die due to low temperatures. We examined the effect of a variable magnetic field on Drosophila under supercooled conditions (a state in which freezing is not caused even below the freezing point). Under such supercooled conditions with the magnetic field at 0°C for 72 hours, −4°C for 24 hours and −8°C for 1 hour, the Drosophila all survived, while all conversely died under the supercooled conditions without the magnetic field. This result indicates a possibility that the magnetic field can reduce cell damage caused due to low temperatures in living things. PMID:23284809

  15. Steady magnetic fields effect on lipid peroxidation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lalo, U V; Pankratov, Y V; Mikhailik, O M

    1994-10-01

    The effect of steady magnetic fields (ranging from 0 to 280 mT) has been investigated on the kinetics of non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation occurring in a model system consisting of liposomes obtained from 1, 2-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine by oxygen consumption. The process was found to be accelerated by weak steady magnetic fields. A computer simulation method was employed to detect the reactions that govern the process kinetics, to elucidate magneto-sensitive stages (initiation and reduction of iron(III), as well as lipid peroxide radical recombination) and to determine their rate constants at various external magnetic fields. The kinetics of peroxidation of lipid cell membranes have been modeled mathematically at oxygen and 'free' iron concentrations close to those in the cells and also at increased free iron concentrations at different external magnetic field values.

  16. Influence of oblique magnetic field on electron cross-field transport in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Miedzik, Jan; Daniłko, Dariusz; Barral, Serge

    2015-04-15

    The effects of the inclination of the magnetic field with respect to the channel walls in a Hall effect thruster are numerically studied with the use of a one-dimensional quasi-neutral Particle-In-Cell model with guiding center approximation of electron motion along magnetic lines. Parametric studies suggest that the incidence angle strongly influences electron transport across the magnetic field. In ion-focusing magnetic topologies, electrons collide predominantly on the side of the magnetic flux tube closer to the anode, thus increasing the electron cross-field drift. The opposite effect is observed in ion-defocussing topology.

  17. Effects of an oscillating magnetic field on homogeneous ferrofluid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Kristopher R.; Riley, James J.; Finlayson, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results from direct numerical simulations of homogeneous ferrofluid turbulence with a spatially uniform, applied oscillating magnetic field. Due to the strong coupling that exists between the magnetic field and the ferrofluid, we find that the oscillating field can affect the characteristics of the turbulent flow. The magnetic field does work on the turbulent flow and typically leads to an increased rate of energy loss via two dissipation modes specific to ferrofluids. However, under certain conditions this magnetic work results in injection, or a forcing, of turbulent kinetic energy into the flow. For the cases considered here, there is no mean shear and the mean components of velocity, vorticity, and particle spin rate are all zero. Thus, the effects shown are entirely due to the interactions between the turbulent fluctuations of the ferrofluid and the magnetic field. In addition to the effects of the oscillation frequency, we also investigate the effects of the choice of magnetization equation. The calculations focus on the approximate centerline conditions of the relatively low Reynolds number turbulent ferrofluid pipe flow experiments described previously [K. R. Schumacher , Phys. Rev. E 67, 026308 (2003)].

  18. Effects of Magnetic Field on Biological Cells and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Jen

    2001-03-01

    While there has been extensive research performed in the physics of magnetic fields and the physics and chemistry in life sciences, independent of each other, there has been a paucity of scientific research and development investigating the possible applications of magnetic fields in life sciences. The focus of this presentation is to present the stimulation mechanism by which magnetic fields affect (a) yeast cells (b) plant cells and (c) mammalian normal and cancer cells. Recently we have found that the Saccharomyces Cerevsa yeast growth increases by about 30to a 1 tesla field and the production of CO2 increases by about 30of yeast metabolism may be due to an increase in intercellular interaction and protein channel alignment, the introduction of an alteration in the DNA from the magnetic field exposure or a combination of these mechanisms. We also have found that the application of high magnetic fields (1 tesla and above) can have marked effects on the germination and growth of plants, especially corn, beans and peas. This finding has opened up the possibility of technology developments in botanical growth systems to accelerate seed germination and crop harvesting. Most recently we have investigated the application of high magnetic fields on leukemia, CaCoII and HEP G2 cancer cell lines. We found that when leukemia are exposed to a 12 tesla field for 2 hours has an increase in cell death by about 30that were not exposed to the magnetic field. Viability of CaCoII cells sandwiched between permanent magnets of maximum strength of 1.2 tesla was measured. A decrease in viable cells by 33unexposed cells. HSP 70 was measured for HEPG2 cells that were exposed to permanent magnetic field of 1.2 tesla for 40 minutes and for unexposed cells. It was found that the exposed cells produce 19 times more HSP70 compared to unexposed cells. Our results together with other investigators report suggest a strong evidence of a reduction in the cell growth rate for cancer cells when

  19. In Situ Magnetic Field Measurement using the Hanle Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a simple method of in situ magnetic field mapping near zero points in magnetic fields. It is ideal for measuring trapping parameters such the field gradient and curvature, and should be applicable in most experiments with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or similar setup. This method works by probing atomic transitions in a vacuum, and is based on the Hanle effect, which alters the polarization of spontaneous emission in the presence of a magnetic field. Unlike most techniques based on the Hanle effect, however, we look only at intensity. Instead of measuring polarization we use the change in directional radiation patterns caused by a magnetic field. Using one of the cooling beams for our MOT, along with a linear polarizer, a narrow slit, and an inexpensive webcam, we measure the three dimensional position of a magnetic field zero point within our vacuum to within +/-1 mm and the gradient through the zero point to an accuracy of 4%. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  20. Full particle orbit effects in regular and stochastic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shun; Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Vittot, Michel; del Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We present a numerical study of charged particle motion in a time-independent magnetic field in cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field model consists of an unperturbed reversed-shear (non-monotonic q-profile) helical part and a perturbation consisting of a superposition of modes. Contrary to most of the previous studies, the particle trajectories are computed by directly solving the full Lorentz force equations of motion in a six-dimensional phase space using a sixth-order, implicit, symplectic Gauss-Legendre method. The level of stochasticity in the particle orbits is diagnosed using averaged, effective Poincare sections. It is shown that when only one mode is present, the particle orbits can be stochastic even though the magnetic field line orbits are not stochastic (i.e., fully integrable). The lack of integrability of the particle orbits in this case is related to separatrix crossing and the breakdown of the global conservation of the magnetic moment. Some perturbation consisting of two modes creates resonance overlapping, leading to Hamiltonian chaos in magnetic field lines. Then, the particle orbits exhibit a nontrivial dynamics depending on their energy and pitch angle. It is shown that the regions where the particle motion is stochastic decrease as the energy increases. The non-monotonicity of the q-profile implies the existence of magnetic ITBs (internal transport barriers) which correspond to shearless flux surfaces located in the vicinity of the q-profile minimum. It is shown that depending on the energy, these magnetic ITBs might or might not confine particles. That is, magnetic ITBs act as an energy-dependent particle confinement filter. Magnetic field lines in reversed-shear configurations exhibit topological bifurcations (from homoclinic to heteroclinic) due to separatrix reconnection. We show that a similar but more complex scenario appears in the case of particle orbits that depend in a non-trivial way on the energy and pitch angle of the

  1. Planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, A. D.; Dalslet, B. T.; Skieller, D. H.; Lee, K. H.; Okkels, F.; Hansen, M. F.

    2010-07-05

    Until now, the planar Hall effect has been studied in samples with cross-shaped Hall geometry. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the planar Hall effect can be observed for an exchange-biased ferromagnetic material in a Wheatstone bridge topology and that the sensor signal can be significantly enhanced by a geometric factor. For the samples in the present study, we demonstrate an enhancement of the sensor output by a factor of about 100 compared to cross-shaped sensors. The presented construction opens a new design and application area of the planar Hall effect, which we term planar Hall effect bridge sensors.

  2. Planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, A. D.; Dalslet, B. T.; Skieller, D. H.; Lee, K. H.; Okkels, F.; Hansen, M. F.

    2010-07-01

    Until now, the planar Hall effect has been studied in samples with cross-shaped Hall geometry. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the planar Hall effect can be observed for an exchange-biased ferromagnetic material in a Wheatstone bridge topology and that the sensor signal can be significantly enhanced by a geometric factor. For the samples in the present study, we demonstrate an enhancement of the sensor output by a factor of about 100 compared to cross-shaped sensors. The presented construction opens a new design and application area of the planar Hall effect, which we term planar Hall effect bridge sensors.

  3. Orbital effect of magnetic field on the Majorana phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijholt, Bas; Akhmerov, Anton R.

    2016-06-01

    Studies of Majorana bound states in semiconducting nanowires frequently neglect the orbital effect of a magnetic field. Systematically studying its role leads us to several conclusions for designing Majoranas in this system. Specifically, we show that for experimentally relevant parameter values the orbital effect of a magnetic field has a stronger impact on the dispersion relation than the Zeeman effect. While Majoranas do not require the presence of only one dispersion subband, we observe that the size of the Majoranas becomes unpractically large, and the band gap unpractically small, when more than one subband is filled. Since the orbital effect of a magnetic field breaks several symmetries of the Hamiltonian, it leads to the appearance of large regions in parameter space with no band gap whenever the magnetic field is not aligned with the wire axis. The reflection symmetry of the Hamiltonian with respect to the plane perpendicular to the wire axis guarantees that the wire stays gapped in the topologically nontrivial region as long as the field is aligned with the wire.

  4. Current-Produced Magnetic Field Effects on Current Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Stone, N. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Current collection by an infinitely long, conducting cylinder in a magnetized plasma, taking into account the magnetic field of the collected current, is discussed. A region of closed magnetic surfaces disconnects the cylinder from infinity. Due to this, the collected current depends on the ratio between this region and the plasma sheath region and, under some conditions, current reduction arises. The current collection along a realistic "bare wire" space tether is considered. A number of factors are taken into account, including the resistance of the wire and shielding resulting from the current-induced magnetic field produced by current flow in the tether. The plasma density, tether length and radius, the geomagnetic field strength and angle to the orbital velocity vector were all used as parameters in the study. It is shown that magnetic shielding for certain tether system configurations, when combined with particular values of the governing parameters, significantly reduces the collected current. Specifically, it is shown that an electrodynamic tether in the "thruster" mode suffers greater reduction from magnetic shielding than a tether with the same characteristics deployed in the "generator" mode. We find that, for both modes, current-induced magnetic shielding becomes more significant as plasma density and wire radius increase. The same is true for the dependence on the angle of the geomagnetic field to the orbital velocity vector and the motion-induced electric field for the generator mode For the thruster mode, the effect is larger for smaller angles. In both operating modes, the shielding is more important for smaller angles between the tether and magnetic field. In addition to the above dependencies, the effect for the thruster mode essentially depends on the tether length. In general, any parametric change that increases tether current, relative to the strength of the electric field between the tether and the ambient plasma, will increase the shielding

  5. Wiggle Instability of Galactic Spiral Shocks: Effects of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Woong-Tae; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that the wiggle instability (WI) of spiral shocks in a galactic disk is responsible for the formation of gaseous feathers observed in grand-design spiral galaxies. We perform both a linear stability analysis and numerical simulations to investigate the effect of magnetic fields on the WI. The disk is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, and non-self-gravitating. We control the strengths of magnetic fields and spiral-arm forcing using the dimensionless parameters β and {F}, respectively. By solving the perturbation equations as a boundary-eigenvalue problem, we obtain dispersion relations of the WI for various values of β =1-∞ and {F}=5% and 10%. We find that the WI arising from the accumulation of potential vorticity at disturbed shocks is suppressed, albeit not completely, by magnetic fields. The stabilizing effect of magnetic fields is not from the perturbed fields but from the unperturbed fields that reduce the density compression factor in the background shocks. When {F}=5% and β ≲ 10 or {F}=10% and β ˜ 5-10, the most unstable mode has a wavelength of ˜0.1-0.2 times the arm-to-arm separation, which appears consistent with a mean spacing of observed feathers.

  6. Wiggle Instability of Galactic Spiral Shocks: Effects of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Woong-Tae; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that the wiggle instability (WI) of spiral shocks in a galactic disk is responsible for the formation of gaseous feathers observed in grand-design spiral galaxies. We perform both a linear stability analysis and numerical simulations to investigate the effect of magnetic fields on the WI. The disk is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, and non-self-gravitating. We control the strengths of magnetic fields and spiral-arm forcing using the dimensionless parameters β and {F}, respectively. By solving the perturbation equations as a boundary-eigenvalue problem, we obtain dispersion relations of the WI for various values of β =1-∞ and {F}=5% and 10%. We find that the WI arising from the accumulation of potential vorticity at disturbed shocks is suppressed, albeit not completely, by magnetic fields. The stabilizing effect of magnetic fields is not from the perturbed fields but from the unperturbed fields that reduce the density compression factor in the background shocks. When {F}=5% and β ≲ 10 or {F}=10% and β ∼ 5–10, the most unstable mode has a wavelength of ∼0.1–0.2 times the arm-to-arm separation, which appears consistent with a mean spacing of observed feathers.

  7. Magnetic field effects in flavoproteins and related systems.

    PubMed

    Evans, Emrys W; Dodson, Charlotte A; Maeda, Kiminori; Biskup, Till; Wedge, C J; Timmel, Christiane R

    2013-10-01

    Within the framework of the radical pair mechanism, magnetic fields may alter the rate and yields of chemical reactions involving spin-correlated radical pairs as intermediates. Such effects have been studied in detail in a variety of chemical systems both experimentally and theoretically. In recent years, there has been growing interest in whether such magnetic field effects (MFEs) also occur in biological systems, a question driven most notably by the increasing body of evidence for the involvement of such effects in the magnetic compass sense of animals. The blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome is placed at the centre of this debate and photoexcitation of its bound flavin cofactor has indeed been shown to result in the formation of radical pairs. Here, we review studies of MFEs on free flavins in model systems as well as in blue-light photoreceptor proteins and discuss the properties that are crucial in determining the magnetosensitivity of these systems. PMID:24511388

  8. Magnetic field effects in flavoproteins and related systems

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Emrys W.; Dodson, Charlotte A.; Maeda, Kiminori; Biskup, Till; Wedge, C. J.; Timmel, Christiane R.

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the radical pair mechanism, magnetic fields may alter the rate and yields of chemical reactions involving spin-correlated radical pairs as intermediates. Such effects have been studied in detail in a variety of chemical systems both experimentally and theoretically. In recent years, there has been growing interest in whether such magnetic field effects (MFEs) also occur in biological systems, a question driven most notably by the increasing body of evidence for the involvement of such effects in the magnetic compass sense of animals. The blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome is placed at the centre of this debate and photoexcitation of its bound flavin cofactor has indeed been shown to result in the formation of radical pairs. Here, we review studies of MFEs on free flavins in model systems as well as in blue-light photoreceptor proteins and discuss the properties that are crucial in determining the magnetosensitivity of these systems. PMID:24511388

  9. Effects of Horizontal Magnetic Fields on Acoustic Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rekha

    2007-02-01

    Local helioseismology techniques seek to probe the subsurface magnetic fields and flows by observing waves that emerge at the solar surface after passing through these inhomogeneities. Active regions on the surface of the Sun are distinguished by their strong magnetic fields, and techniques such as time-distance helioseismology can provide a useful diagnostic for probing these structures. Above the active regions, the fields fan out to create a horizontal magnetic canopy. We investigate the effect of a uniform horizontal magnetic field on the travel time of acoustic waves by considering vertical velocity in a simple plane-parallel adiabatically stratified polytrope. It is shown that such fields can lower the upper turning point of p-modes and hence influence their travel time. It is found that acoustic waves reflected from magnetically active regions have travel times up to a minute less than for waves similarly reflected in quiet regions. It is also found that sound speeds are increased below the active regions. These findings are consistent with time-distance measurements.

  10. Effects of simulated cosmological magnetic fields on the galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the effects of varying the intensity of the primordial magnetic seed field on the global properties of the galaxy population in ideal magnetohydrodynamic cosmological simulations performed with the moving-mesh code AREPO. We vary the seed field in our calculations in a range of values still compatible with the current cosmological upper limits. We show that above a critical intensity of ≃10-9 G, the additional pressure arising from the field strongly affects the evolution of gaseous structures, leading to a suppression of the cosmic star formation history, which is stronger for larger seed fields. This directly reflects into a lower total galaxy count above a fixed stellar mass threshold at all redshifts, and a lower galaxy number density at fixed stellar mass and a less massive stellar component at fixed virial mass at all mass scales. These signatures may be used, in addition to the existing methods, to derive tighter constraints on primordial magnetic seed field intensities.

  11. Removal of earth's magnetic field effect on magnetoelastic resonance sensors by an antisymmetric bias field

    PubMed Central

    Bergmair, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Suess, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoelastic sensors are used in a wide field of wireless sensing applications. The sensing element is a low-cost magnetostrictive ribbon whose resonant frequency depends on the measured quantity. The accuracy of magnetoelastic sensors is limited by the fact that the resonant frequency is also affected by the earth's magnetic field. In this paper we present a technique to minimize this effect by applying an antisymmetric magnetic bias field to the ribbon. The ribbon's response to external perturbation fields was measured and compared to a conventional sensor design. Our results show that the influence of the earth's magnetic field could be reduced by 77%. PMID:23565035

  12. Effects of 3D Toroidally Asymmetric Magnetic Field on Tokamak Magnetic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.

    2005-10-01

    The effects of 3D error magnetic field on magnetic surfaces are investigated using the DIII-D internal coils (I-Coils). Slowly rotating n=1 traveling waves at 5 Hz and various amplitudes were applied to systematically perturb the edge surfaces by programming the I-Coil currents. The vertical separatrix location difference between EFIT magnetic reconstructions that assumes toroidal symmetry and Thomson scattering Te measurements responds in phase to the applied perturbed field. The oscillation amplitudes increase with the strength of the applied field but are much smaller than those expected from the applied field alone. The results indicate that plasma response is important. Various plasma response models based on results from the MHD codes MARS and GATO are being developed and compared to the experimental observations. To more accurately evaluate the effects of magnetic measurement errors, a new form of the magnetic uncertainty matrix is also being implemented into EFIT. Details will be presented.

  13. Effect of elongational flow on ferrofuids under a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, S; Do, Younghae; Lopez, J M

    2013-07-01

    To set up a mathematical model for the flow of complex magnetic fluids, noninteracting magnetic particles with a small volume or an even point size are typically assumed. Real ferrofluids, however, consist of a suspension of particles with a finite size in an almost ellipsoid shape as well as with particle-particle interactions that tend to form chains of various lengths. To come close to the realistic situation for ferrofluids, we investigate the effect of elongational flow incorporated by the symmetric part of the velocity gradient field tensor, which could be scaled by a so-called transport coefficient λ(2). Based on the hybrid finite-difference and Galerkin scheme, we study the flow of a ferrofluid in the gap between two concentric rotating cylinders subjected to either a transverse or an axial magnetic field with the transport coefficient. Under the influence of a transverse magnetic field with λ(2)=0, we show that basic state and centrifugal unstable flows are modified and are inherently three-dimensional helical flows that are either left-winding or right-winding in the sense of the azimuthal mode-2, which is in contrast to the generic cases. That is, classical modulated rotating waves rotate, but these flows do not. We find that under elongational flow (λ(2)≠0), the flow structure from basic state and centrifugal instability flows is modified and their azimuthal vorticity is linearly changed. In addition, we also show that the bifurcation threshold of the supercritical centrifugal unstable flows under a magnetic field depends linearly on the transport coefficient, but it does not affect the general stabilization effect of any magnetic field. PMID:23944545

  14. DC magnetic field sensing based on the nonlinear magnetoelectric effect in magnetic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, Dmitrii; Chashin, Dmitrii; Ekonomov, Nikolai; Fetisov, Leonid; Fetisov, Yuri; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-09-01

    Recently, highly sensitive magnetic field sensors using the magnetoelectric effect in composite ferromagnetic-piezoelectric layered structures have been demonstrated. However, most of the proposed concepts are not useful for measuring dc magnetic fields, because the conductivity of piezoelectric layers results in a strong decline of the sensor’s sensitivity at low frequencies. In this paper, a novel functional principle of magnetoelectric sensors for dc magnetic field measurements is described. The sensor employs the nonlinear effect of voltage harmonic generation in a composite magnetoelectric structure under the simultaneous influence of a strong imposed ac magnetic field and a weak dc magnetic field to be measured. This physical effect arises due to the nonlinear dependence of the magnetostriction in the ferromagnetic layer on the magnetic field. A sensor prototype comprising of a piezoelectric fibre transducer sandwiched between two layers of the amorphous ferromagnetic Metglas® alloy was fabricated. The specifications regarding the magnetic field range, frequency characteristics, and noise level were studied experimentally. The prototype showed the responsivity of 2.5 V mT-1 and permitted the measurement of dc magnetic fields in the range of ~10 nT to about 0.4 mT. Although sensor operation is based on the nonlinear effect, the sensor response can be made linear with respect to the measured magnetic field in a broad dynamic range extending over 5 orders of magnitude. The underlying physics is explained through a simplified theory for the proposed sensor. The functionality, differences and advantages of the magnetoelectric sensor compare well with fluxgate magnetometers. The ways to enhance the sensor performance are considered.

  15. DC magnetic field sensing based on the nonlinear magnetoelectric effect in magnetic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, Dmitrii; Chashin, Dmitrii; Ekonomov, Nikolai; Fetisov, Leonid; Fetisov, Yuri; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-09-01

    Recently, highly sensitive magnetic field sensors using the magnetoelectric effect in composite ferromagnetic-piezoelectric layered structures have been demonstrated. However, most of the proposed concepts are not useful for measuring dc magnetic fields, because the conductivity of piezoelectric layers results in a strong decline of the sensor’s sensitivity at low frequencies. In this paper, a novel functional principle of magnetoelectric sensors for dc magnetic field measurements is described. The sensor employs the nonlinear effect of voltage harmonic generation in a composite magnetoelectric structure under the simultaneous influence of a strong imposed ac magnetic field and a weak dc magnetic field to be measured. This physical effect arises due to the nonlinear dependence of the magnetostriction in the ferromagnetic layer on the magnetic field. A sensor prototype comprising of a piezoelectric fibre transducer sandwiched between two layers of the amorphous ferromagnetic Metglas® alloy was fabricated. The specifications regarding the magnetic field range, frequency characteristics, and noise level were studied experimentally. The prototype showed the responsivity of 2.5 V mT‑1 and permitted the measurement of dc magnetic fields in the range of ~10 nT to about 0.4 mT. Although sensor operation is based on the nonlinear effect, the sensor response can be made linear with respect to the measured magnetic field in a broad dynamic range extending over 5 orders of magnitude. The underlying physics is explained through a simplified theory for the proposed sensor. The functionality, differences and advantages of the magnetoelectric sensor compare well with fluxgate magnetometers. The ways to enhance the sensor performance are considered.

  16. Biological effects of magnetic fields from superconducting magnetic energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1989-12-01

    Physical interaction mechanisms and potential biological effects of static and slowly time-varying magnetic fields are summarized. The results of laboratory and human health studies on this topic are related to the fringe magnetic field levels anticipated to occur in the proximity of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems. The observed biological effects of magnetic fields include: (1) magnetic induction of electrical potentials in the circulatory system and other tissues, (2) magneto-orientation of macromolecules and membranes in strong magnetic fields, and (3) Zeeman interactions with electronic spin states in certain classes of charge transfer reactions. In general, only the first of these interactions is relevant to the establishment of occupational exposure guidelines. Physical hazards posed by the interactions of magnetic fields with cardiac pacemakers and other implanted medical devices, e.g., aneurysm clips and prostheses, are important factors that must also be considered in establishing exposure guidelines. Proposed guidelines for limiting magnetic field exposure are discussed. 50 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Chemical amplification of magnetic field effects relevant to avian magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Kattnig, Daniel R; Evans, Emrys W; Déjean, Victoire; Dodson, Charlotte A; Wallace, Mark I; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R; Hore, P J

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's can change the yields of radical pair reactions even though the energies involved are orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy, kBT, at room temperature. Proposed as the source of the light-dependent magnetic compass in migratory birds, the radical pair mechanism is thought to operate in cryptochrome flavoproteins in the retina. Here we demonstrate that the primary magnetic field effect on flavin photoreactions can be amplified chemically by slow radical termination reactions under conditions of continuous photoexcitation. The nature and origin of the amplification are revealed by studies of the intermolecular flavin-tryptophan and flavin-ascorbic acid photocycles and the closely related intramolecular flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome. Amplification factors of up to 5.6 were observed for magnetic fields weaker than 1 mT. Substantial chemical amplification could have a significant impact on the viability of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor. PMID:27001735

  18. Fractional quantum Hall effect in a tilted magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papić, Z.

    2013-06-01

    We discuss the orbital effect of a tilted magnetic field on the quantum Hall effect in parabolic quantum wells. Many-body states realized at the fractional (1)/(3) and (1)/(2) filling of the second electronic subband are studied using finite-size exact diagonalization. In both cases, we obtain the phase diagram consisting of a fractional quantum Hall fluid phase that persists for moderate tilts, and eventually undergoes a direct transition to the stripe phase. It is shown that tilting of the field probes the geometrical degree of freedom of fractional quantum Hall fluids, and can be partly related to the effect of band-mass anisotropy.

  19. Recent Advance in Organic Spintronics and Magnetic Field Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valy Vardeny, Z.

    2013-03-01

    In this talk several important advances in the field of Organic Spintronics and magnetic field effect (MFE) of organic films and optoelectronic devices that have occurred during the past two years from the Utah group will be surveyed and discussed. (i) Organic Spintronics: We demonstrated spin organic light emitting diode (spin-OLED) using two FM injecting electrodes, where the electroluminescence depends on the mutual orientation of the electrode magnetization directions. This development has opened up research studies into organic spin-valves (OSV) in the space-charge limited current regime. (ii) Magnetic field effect: We demonstrated that the photoinduced absorption spectrum in organic films (where current is not involved) show pronounced MFE. This unravels the underlying mechanism of the MFE in organic devices, to be more in agreement with the field of MFE in Biochemistry. (iii) Spin effects in organic optoelectronic devices: We demonstrated that certain spin 1/2 radical additives to donor-acceptor blends substantially enhance the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells. This effect shows that studies of spin response and MFE in OPV devices are promising. In collaboration with T. Nguyen, E. Ehrenfreund, B. Gautam, Y. Zhang and T. Basel. Supported by the DOE grant 04ER46109 ; NSF Grant # DMR-1104495 and MSF-MRSEC program DMR-1121252 [2,3].

  20. Magnetic field effects on the motion of circumplanetary dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel Simon

    Hypervelocity impacts on satellites or ring particles replenish circumplanetary dusty rings with grains of all sizes. Due to interactions with the plasma environment and sunlight, these grains become electrically charged. We study the motion of charged dust grains launched at the Kepler orbital speed, under the combined effects of gravity and the electromagnetic force. We conduct numerical simulations of dust grain trajectories, covering a broad range of launch distances from the planetary surface to beyond synchronous orbit, and the full range of charge-to-mass ratios from ions to rocks, with both positive and negative electric potentials. Initially, we assume that dust grains have a constant electric potential, and, treating the spinning planetary magnetic field as an aligned and centered dipole, we map regions of radial instability (positive grains only), where dust grains are driven to escape or collide with the planet at high speed, and vertical instability (both positive and negative charges) whereby grains launched near the equatorial plane and are forced up magnetic field lines to high latitudes, where they may collide with the planet. We derive analytical criteria for local stability in the equatorial plane, and solve for the boundaries between all unstable and stable outcomes. Comparing our analytical solutions to our numerical simulations, we develop an extensive model for the radial, vertical and azimuthal motions of dust grains of arbitrary size and launch location. We test these solutions at Jupiter and Saturn, both of whose magnetic fields are reasonably well represented by aligned dipoles, as well as at the Earth, whose magnetic field is close to an anti-aligned dipole. We then evaluate the robustness of our stability boundaries to more general conditions. Firstly, we examine the effects of non-zero launch speeds, of up to 0.5 km s-1, in the frame of the parent body. Although these only weakly affect stability boundaries, we find that the influence

  1. Magnetic field effects on plant growth, development, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Maffei, Massimo E.

    2014-01-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) is a natural component of our environment. Plants, which are known to sense different wavelengths of light, respond to gravity, react to touch and electrical signaling, cannot escape the effect of GMF. While phototropism, gravitropism, and tigmotropism have been thoroughly studied, the impact of GMF on plant growth and development is not well-understood. This review describes the effects of altering magnetic field (MF) conditions on plants by considering plant responses to MF values either lower or higher than those of the GMF. The possible role of GMF on plant evolution and the nature of the magnetoreceptor is also discussed. PMID:25237317

  2. Reaction kinetics and mechanism of magnetic field effects in cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Solov'yov, Ilia A; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-26

    Creatures as varied as mammals, fish, insects, reptiles, and birds have an intriguing sixth sense that allows them to orient themselves in the Earth's magnetic field. Despite decades of study, the physical basis of this magnetic sense remains elusive. A likely mechanism is furnished by magnetically sensitive radical pair reactions occurring in the retina, the light-sensitive part of animal eyes. A photoreceptor, cryptochrome, has been suggested to endow birds with magnetoreceptive abilities as the protein has been shown to exhibit the biophysical properties required for an animal magnetoreceptor to operate properly. Here, we propose a theoretical analysis method for identifying cryptochrome's signaling reactions involving comparison of measured and calculated reaction kinetics in cryptochrome. Application of the method yields an exemplary light-driven reaction cycle, supported through transient absorption and electron-spin-resonance observations together with known facts on avian magnetoreception. The reaction cycle permits one to predict magnetic field effects on cryptochrome activation and deactivation. The suggested analysis method gives insight into structural and dynamic design features required for optimal detection of the geomagnetic field by cryptochrome and suggests further experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:22171949

  3. Medium effects of magnetic moments of baryons on neutron stars under strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, C. Y.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kim, K. S.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate medium effects caused by density-dependent magnetic moments of baryons on neutron stars under strong magnetic fields. If we allow the variation of anomalous magnetic moments (AMMs) of baryons in dense matter under strong magnetic fields, AMMs of nucleons are enhanced to be larger than those of hyperons. The enhancement naturally causes the chemical potentials of the baryons to be large and leads to the increase of the proton fraction. Consequently, it causes the suppression of hyperons, resulting in stiffness of the equation of state. Under the presumed strong magnetic fields, we evaluate the relevant particle populations, the equation of state, and the maximum masses of neutron stars by including density-dependent AMMs and compare them with those obtained from AMMs in free space.

  4. The Effect of Varying Magnetic Field Gradient on Combustion Dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzdalenko, Vera; Zake, Maija; Barmina, Inesa; Gedrovics, Martins

    2011-01-01

    The focus of the recent experimental research is to provide control of the combustion dynamics and complex measurements (flame temperature, heat production rate, and composition of polluting emissions) for pelletized wood biomass using a non-uniform magnetic field that produces magnetic force interacting with magnetic moment of paramagnetic oxygen. The experimental results have shown that a gradient magnetic field provides enhanced mixing of the flame compounds by increasing combustion efficiency and enhancing the burnout of volatiles.

  5. Effective field model of roughness in magnetic nano-structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lepadatu, Serban

    2015-12-28

    An effective field model is introduced here within the micromagnetics formulation, to study roughness in magnetic structures, by considering sub-exchange length roughness levels as a perturbation on a smooth structure. This allows the roughness contribution to be separated, which is found to give rise to an effective configurational anisotropy for both edge and surface roughness, and accurately model its effects with fine control over the roughness depth without the explicit need to refine the computational cell size to accommodate the roughness profile. The model is validated by comparisons with directly roughened structures for a series of magnetization switching and domain wall velocity simulations and found to be in excellent agreement for roughness levels up to the exchange length. The model is further applied to vortex domain wall velocity simulations with surface roughness, which is shown to significantly modify domain wall movement and result in dynamic pinning and stochastic creep effects.

  6. Magnetic field fiber sensor based on the magneto-birefringence effect of magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xueqin; Chen, Jiajia; Shi, Fuquan; Chen, Daru; Ren, Zhijun; Peng, Baojin

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the magneto-birefringence effect of magnetic fluid (MF) is adopted to form an innovative fiber optic magnetic field sensor. The sensitive section is fabricated via a D-shaped microstructure inscribed in a high-birefringence fiber Sagnac loop with a femtosecond laser. The D-shaped microstructure facilitates good combination of the optical-fiber Sagnac interferometer with the magneto-birefringence effect of MF without suffering from absorption loss and manual alignment. Experimental results show the good performance of the magnetic field fiver sensor, particularly its high stable extinction ratio. Preliminary results are provided, and the magnetic field sensitivity of 0.0823 nm/mT can be further improved by increasing the depth and length of the D-shaped microstructure.

  7. Magnetic field evolution in white dwarfs: The hall effect and complexity of the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muslimov, A. G.; Van Horn, H. M.; Wood, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of the magnetic fields in white dwarfs, taking into account the Hall effect. Because this effect depends nonlinearly upon the magnetic field strength B, the time dependences of the various multipole field components are coupled. The evolution of the field is thus significantly more complicated than has been indicated by previous investigations. Our calculations employ recent white dwarf evolutionary sequences computed for stars with masses 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 solar mass. We show that in the presence of a strong (up to approximately 10(exp 9) G) internal toroidal magnetic field; the evolution of even the lowest order poloidal modes can be substantially changed by the Hall effect. As an example, we compute the evolution of an initially weak quadrupole component, which we take arbitrarily to be approximately 0.1%-1% of the strength of a dominant dipole field. We find that coupling provided by the Hall effect can produce growth of the ratio of the quadrupole to the dipole component of the surface value of the magnetic field strength by more than a factor of 10 over the 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 10) year cooling lifetime of the white dwarf. Some consequences of these results for the process of magnetic-field evolution in white dwarfs are briefly discussed.

  8. Electric fields and chiral magnetic effect in Cu + Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2015-03-01

    The non-central Cu + Au collisions can create strong out-of-plane magnetic fields and in-plane electric fields. By using the HIJING model, we study the general properties of the electromagnetic fields in Cu + Au collisions at 200 GeV and their impacts on the charge-dependent two-particle correlator γq1q2 = < cos ⁡ (ϕ1 +ϕ2 - 2ψRP) > (see main text for definition) which was used for the detection of the chiral magnetic effect (CME). Compared with Au + Au collisions, we find that the in-plane electric fields in Cu + Au collisions can strongly suppress the two-particle correlator or even reverse its sign if the lifetime of the electric fields is long. Combining with the expectation that if γq1q2 is induced by elliptic-flow driven effects we would not see such strong suppression or reversion, our results suggest to use Cu + Au collisions to test CME and understand the mechanisms that underlie γq1q2.

  9. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2008-02-21

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems.

  10. Effect of static magnetic field on experimental dermal wound strength

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Yahya; Aydogan, Cem; Balcik, Cenk; Haberal, Nihan; Kirnap, Mahir; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Context: An animal model. Aim: We sought to evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields on cutaneous wound healing. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were used. Wounds were created on the backs of all rats. Forty of these animals (M group) had NeFeB magnets placed in contact with the incisions, either parallel (Pa) and perpendicular (Pr) to the incision. The other 40 animals (sham [S] group) had nonmagnetized NeFeB bars placed in the same directions as the implanted animals. Half of the animals in each group were killed and assessed for healing on postoperative day 7 and the other half on postoperative day 14. The following assessments were done: gross healing, mechanical strength, and histopathology. Statistical Analysis Used: Intergroup differences were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U or t test. Values for P less than 0.05 were accepted as significant. Results and Conclusions: There were no differences between the magnetic and sham animals with respect to gross healing parameters. The mechanical strength was different between groups. On postoperative day 14, the MPr14 had significantly higher scores than the other groups. When static, high-power, magnetic fields are placed perpendicular to the wound, increased wound healing occurs in the skin of the experimental model. PMID:23162219

  11. Effect of readout magnetic-field direction on trilayer magnetically induced super resolution media (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanoi, K.; Tanaka, T.; Sugimoto, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Shono, K.

    1997-04-01

    Among the proposed magnetically induced super resolution media, double-mask rear aperture detection (RAD) has the greatest potential for use in high-density land/groove recording.1 We proposed a trilayer double-mask RAD media that does not require a large initializing magnetic field.2 In this paper, we report the land/groove recording on the trilayer media for a 0.4 μm mark length and 0.7 μm track pitch. We found that crosstalk drastically changed depending on the direction of the readout magnetic field, and that the crosswrite is related to crosstalk. When applying the readout magnetic field in the erasing direction, the value of crosstalk was about -25 dB and a large crosswrite effect was observed. Conversely, the crosstalk was below -45 dB and no crosswrite effect was observed when applying the magnetic field in the writing direction. CNRs had almost the same value of 48 dB for both the above cases. To investigate the mask formation while applying the readout field in the writing direction, we precisely observed the wave form of the isolated marks. The carrier level rose twice with increasing readout field. However, the position of the leading edge mainly changed when increasing the field. We think that the low crosstalk is attributable to the enhancement of the front mask area. The trilayer media enables an areal density of 3 Gbit/in.2

  12. Effect of primordial magnetic fields on the ionization history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, Jens; Paoletti, D.; Finelli, F.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    Primordial magnetic fields (PMF) damp at scales smaller than the photon diffusion and free-streaming scale. This leads to heating of ordinary matter (electrons and baryons), which affects both the thermal and ionization history of our Universe. Here, we study the effect of heating due to ambipolar diffusion and decaying magnetic turbulence. We find that changes to the ionization history computed with recfast are significantly overestimated when compared with CosmoRec. The main physical reason for the difference is that the photoionization coefficient has to be evaluated using the radiation temperature rather than the matter temperature. A good agreement with CosmoRec is found after changing this aspect. Using Planck 2013 data and considering only the effect of PMF-induced heating, we find an upper limit on the rms magnetic field amplitude of B0 ≲ 1.1 nG (95 per cent c.l.) for a stochastic background of PMF with a nearly scale-invariant power spectrum. We also discuss uncertainties related to the approximations for the heating rates and differences with respect to previous studies. Our results are important for the derivation of constraints on the PMF power spectrum obtained from measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies with full-mission Planck data. They may also change some of the calculations of PMF-induced effects on the primordial chemistry and 21cm signals.

  13. Magnetic-field-modulated Kondo effect in a single-magnetic-ion molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Javier I.; Vernek, E.; Martins, G. B.; Mucciolo, E. R.

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically the low-temperature electronic transport properties of a single-ion magnet with uniaxial and transverse spin anisotropies. We find clear signatures of a Kondo effect caused by the presence of a transverse (zero-field) anisotropy in the molecule. This Kondo effect has an SU(2) pseudospin character, associated with a doublet ground state of the isolated molecule, which results from the transverse anisotropy. Upon applying a transverse magnetic field to the single-ion magnet, we observe oscillations of the Kondo effect due to the presence of diabolical points (degeneracies) of the energy spectrum of the molecule caused by geometrical phase interference effects, similar to those observed in the quantum tunneling of multi-ion molecular nanomagnets. The field-induced lifting of the ground-state degeneracy competes with the interference modulation, resulting in some cases in a suppression of the Kondo peak.

  14. Effects of Astrophysical Magnetic Fields in Partially Ionized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arge, Charles Nickolos

    1997-11-01

    Magnetic field studies in astrophysics are usually carried out with the assumptions that (i) the plasma is fully ionized, and (ii) ideal MHD applies. These assumptions are justified in many astrophysical contexts. However, here, we focus on two environments composed of partially ionized gas, and where dissipation processes due to departures from complete ionization have significant effects. Using detailed numerical computations, we quantify these non-ideal MHD effects and compare them with astrophysical data. First we consider the structure of an MHD shock as it relates to the interaction between the heliosphere and the local interstellar medium (LISM). We ask: does the heliosphere generate a bow shock as it moves through the LISM? Since the LISM is only partially ionized, ion-atom interactions provide a dissipation mechanism which may smooth out an otherwise abrupt transition between the LISM and the heliospheric material. To investigate this possibility, we develop a two-fluid code that computes the structure of one-dimensional transverse MHD shock fronts. We find existence of extensive areas of permissible parameter space where ion-atom mediation is strong enough to smear out the bow shock over hundreds of AU. This is relevant to a recent interpretation of Hubble Space Telescope spectra suggesting that the heliospheric bow shock does not exist. Next, we study the two-dimensional behavior of partially ionized gas in magnetized regions of the solar atmosphere. The highly time-dependent nature of solar magnetic fields frequently produces interacting oppositely directed magnetic fields. Since in partially ionized gases the ions 'feel' the field more than the atoms, the gas which emerges from such interacting fields may have a different ion/atom ratio than the ambient medium. By extending the ZEUS-3D code to apply to a partially ionized gas, we have quantified this effect. Our simulations show that enhancements in ion/atom ratios may be as large as a factor of almost

  15. Effects of non-linearities on magnetic field generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nalson, Ellie; Malik, Karim A.; Christopherson, Adam J. E-mail: achristopherson@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic fields are present on all scales in the Universe. While we understand the processes which amplify the fields fairly well, we do not have a ''natural'' mechanism to generate the small initial seed fields. By using fully relativistic cosmological perturbation theory and going beyond the usual confines of linear theory we show analytically how magnetic fields are generated. This is the first analytical calculation of the magnetic field at second order, using gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory, and including all the source terms. To this end, we have rederived the full set of governing equations independently. Our results suggest that magnetic fields of the order of 10{sup -30}- 10{sup -27} G can be generated (although this depends on the small scale cut-off of the integral), which is largely in agreement with previous results that relied upon numerical calculations. These fields are likely too small to act as the primordial seed fields for dynamo mechanisms.

  16. Effects of M dwarf magnetic fields on potentially habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, A. A.; Jardine, M.; Morin, J.; Donati, J.-F.; Lang, P.; Russell, A. J. B.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the effect of the magnetic fields of M dwarf (dM) stars on potentially habitable Earth-like planets. These fields can reduce the size of planetary magnetospheres to such an extent that a significant fraction of the planet's atmosphere may be exposed to erosion by the stellar wind. We used a sample of 15 active dM stars, for which surface magnetic-field maps were reconstructed, to determine the magnetic pressure at the planet orbit and hence the largest size of its magnetosphere, which would only be decreased by considering the stellar wind. Our method provides a fast means to assess which planets are most affected by the stellar magnetic field, which can be used as a first study to be followed by more sophisticated models. We show that hypothetical Earth-like planets with similar terrestrial magnetisation (~1 G) orbiting at the inner (outer) edge of the habitable zone of these stars would present magnetospheres that extend at most up to 6 (11.7) planetary radii. To be able to sustain an Earth-sized magnetosphere, with the exception of only a few cases, the terrestrial planet would either (1) need to orbit significantly farther out than the traditional limits of the habitable zone; or else, (2) if it were orbiting within the habitable zone, it would require at least a magnetic field ranging from a few G to up to a few thousand G. By assuming a magnetospheric size that is more appropriate for the young-Earth (3.4 Gyr ago), the required planetary magnetic fields are one order of magnitude weaker. However, in this case, the polar-cap area of the planet, which is unprotected from transport of particles to/from interplanetary space, is twice as large. At present, we do not know how small the smallest area of the planetary surface is that could be exposed and would still not affect the potential for formation and development of life in a planet. As the star becomes older and, therefore, its rotation rate and magnetic field reduce, the interplanetary

  17. Effect of the plasma-induced magnetic field on a magnetic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    A two-fluid, two-dimensional model of the plasma expansion in a divergent magnetic nozzle is used to investigate the effect of the plasma-induced magnetic field on the acceleration and divergence of the plasma jet self-consistently. The induced field is diamagnetic and opposes the applied one, increasing the divergence of the magnetic nozzle and weakening its strength. This has a direct impact on the propulsive performance of the device, the demagnetization and detachment of the plasma, and can lead to the appearance of zero-field points and separatrix surfaces downstream. In contrast, the azimuthal induced field, albeit non-zero, is small in all cases of practical interest.

  18. Magnetorheological effect in the magnetic field oriented along the vorticity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzhir, P. Magnet, C.; Fezai, H.; Meunier, A.; Bossis, G.; Rodríguez-Arco, L.; López-López, M. T.; Zubarev, A.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we have studied the magnetorheological (MR) fluid rheology in the magnetic field parallel to the fluid vorticity. Experimentally, the MR fluid flow was realized in the Couette coaxial cylinder geometry with the magnetic field parallel to the symmetry axis. The rheological measurements were compared to those obtained in the cone-plate geometry with the magnetic field perpendicular to the lower rheometer plate. Experiments revealed a quasi-Bingham behavior in both geometries with the stress level being just a few dozens of percent smaller in the Couette cylindrical geometry at the same internal magnetic field. The unexpectedly high MR response in the magnetic field parallel to the fluid vorticity is explained by stochastic fluctuations of positions and orientations of the particle aggregates. These fluctuations are induced by magnetic interactions between them. Once misaligned from the vorticity direction, the aggregates generate a high stress independent of the shear rate, and thus assimilated to the suspension apparent (dynamic) yield stress. Quantitatively, the fluctuations of the aggregate orientation are modeled as a rotary diffusion process with a diffusion constant proportional to the mean square interaction torque. The model gives a satisfactory agreement with the experimental field dependency of the apparent yield stress and confirms the nearly quadratic concentration dependency σ{sub Y}∝Φ{sup 2.2}, revealed in experiments. The practical interest of this study lies in the development of MR smart devices with the magnetic field nonperpendicular to the channel walls.

  19. The effect of Birkeland currents on magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peroomian, Vahe; Lyons, Larry R.; Schulz, Michael

    1996-01-01

    A technique was developed for the inclusion of large scale magnetospheric current systems in magnetic field models. The region 1 and 2 Birkeland current systems are included in the source surface model of the terrestrial magnetosphere. The region 1 and 2 Birkeland currents are placed in the model using a series of field aligned, infinitely thin wire segments. The normal component of the magnetic field from these currents is calculated on the surface of the magnetopause and shielded using image current carrying wires placed outside of the magnetosphere. It is found that the inclusion of the Birkeland currents in the model results in a northward magnetic field in the near-midnight tail, leading to the closure of previously open flux in the tail, and a southward magnetic field in the flanks. A sunward shift in the separatrix is observed.

  20. Interplanetary magnetic field effects on high latitude ionospheric convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Relations between the electric field and the electric current in the ionosphere can be established on the basis of a system of mathematical and physical equations provided by the equations of current continuity and Ohm's law. For this reason, much of the synthesis of electric field and plasma velocity data in the F-region is made with the aid of similar data sets derived from field-aligned current and horizontal current measurements. During the past decade, the development of a self-consistent picture of the distribution and behavior of these measurements has proceeded almost in parallel. The present paper is concerned with the picture as it applies to the electric field and plasma drift velocity and its dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field. Attention is given to the southward interplanetary magnetic field and the northward interplanetary magnetic field.

  1. Magnetic field and shock effects and remanent magnetization in a hypervelocity impact experiment. [lunar surface magnetization simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srnka, L. J.; Martelli, G.; Newton, G.; Cisowski, S. M.; Fuller, M. D.; Schaal, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    The impact of aluminum projectiles onto high-alumina terrestrial basalt blocks at 13-15 km/s in the presence of a variable magnetic field is studied. Plasma production but not field production was detected, and characteristics of the remanence and the shocked basalt are reported. Mineralogical data suggest that the magnetization acquired in the material near the craters is shock remanence. The experimental results might indicate that shock effects or possibly thermoremanence in ejecta fragments, may be responsible for part of the magnetization of the lunar surface.

  2. Magnetic field effect in organic films and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Bhoj Raj

    In this work, we focused on the magnetic field effect in organic films and devices, including organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. We measured magnetic field effect (MFE) such as magnetoconductance (MC) and magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) in OLEDs based on several pi- conjugated polymers and small molecules for fields |B|<100 mT. We found that both MC(B) and MEL(B) responses in bipolar devices and MC(B) response in unipolar devices are composed of two B-regions: (i) an 'ultra-small' region at |B| < 1-2 mT, and (ii) a monotonic response region at |B| >˜2mT. Magnetic field effect (MFE) measured on three isotopes of Poly (dioctyloxy) phenylenevinylene (DOO-PPV) showed that both regular and ultra-small effects are isotope dependent. This indicates that MFE response in OLED is mainly due to the hyperfine interaction (HFI). We also performed spectroscopy of the MFE including magneto-photoinduced absorption (MPA) and magneto-photoluminescence (MPL) at steady state conditions in several systems. This includes pristine Poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyl-oxy)-1,4-phenylene-vinylene] (MEH-PPV) films, MEH-PPV films subjected to prolonged illumination, and MEH-PPV/[6,6]-Phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend, as well as annealed and pristine C60 thin films. For comparison, we also measured MC and MEL in organic diodes based on the same materials. By directly comparing the MPA and MPL responses in films to MC and MEL in organic diodes based on the same active layers, we are able to relate the MFE in organic diodes to the spin densities of the excitations formed in the device, regardless of whether they are formed by photon absorption or carrier injection from the electrodes. We also studied magneto-photocurrent (MPC) and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of a 'standard' Poly (3-hexylthiophene)/PCBM device at various Galvinoxyl radical wt%. We found that the MPC reduction with Galvinoxyl wt% follows the same trend as that of the

  3. Magnetic Nanoparticle Quantitation with Low Frequency Magnetic Fields: Compensating for Relaxation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, John B.; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Kuehlert, Esra; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Reeves, Daniel B.; Perreard, Irina M.; Fiering, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the number of nanoparticles present in tissue is central to many in vivo and in vitro applications. Magnetic nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity both in vivo and in vitro using the harmonics of their magnetization produced in a sinusoidal magnetic field. However, relaxation effects damp the magnetic harmonics rendering them of limited use in quantitation. We show that an accurate measure of the number of nanoparticles can be made by correcting for relaxation effects. Correction for relaxation reduced errors of 50% for larger nanoparticles in high relaxation environments to 2%. The result is a method of nanoparticle quantitation capable of in vivo and in vitro applications including histopathology assays, quantitative imaging, drug delivery and thermal therapy preparation. PMID:23867287

  4. Performance of a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster with Magnetic Field Generated by Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2008-01-01

    While Hall thrusters can operate at high efficiency at kW power levels, it is difficult to construct one that operates over a broad envelope down to 100W while maintaining an efficiency of 45- 55%. Scaling to low power while holding the main dimensionless parameters constant requires a decrease in the thruster channel size and an increase in the magnetic field strength. Increasing the magnetic field becomes technically challenging since the field can saturate the miniaturized inner components of the magnetic circuit and scaling down the magnetic circuit leaves very little room for magnetic pole pieces and heat shields. An alternative approach is to employ a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) geometry. Laboratory model CHTs have operated at power levels ranging from the order of 50 Watts up to 1 kW. These thrusters exhibit performance characteristics which are comparable to conventional, annular Hall thrusters of similar size. Compared to the annular Hall thruster, the CHT has a lower insulator surface area to discharge chamber volume ratio. Consequently, there is the potential for reduced wall losses in the channel of a CHT, and any reduction in wall losses should translate into lower channel heating rates and reduced erosion. This makes the CHT geometry promising for low-power applications. Recently, a CHT that uses permanent magnets to produce the magnetic field topology was tested. This thruster has the promise of reduced power consumption over previous CHT iterations that employed electromagnets. Data are presented for two purposes: to expose the effect different controllable parameters have on the discharge and to summarize performance measurements (thrust, Isp, efficiency) obtained using a thrust stand. These data are used to gain insight into the thruster's operation and to allow for quantitative comparisons between the permanent magnet CHT and the electromagnet CHT.

  5. Electric current and magnetic field effects on bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvik, Elizabeth Louise

    The ability of bacteria to form and grow as biofilm presents a major challenge in clinical medicine. Through this work, two alternative electromagnetic treatment strategies were investigated to combat bacterial biofilms like those that cause chronic infections on indwelling medical devices. Direct electric current (DC) was applied at current densities of 0.7 to 1.8 mA/cm2 alone and in conjunction with antibiotic. Unlike most previous studies, chloride ions were included in the treatment solution at a physiologically-relevant concentration. Using this approach, low levels of DC alone were demonstrated to have a dose-responsive, biocidal effect against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms with no synergistic enhancement of antibiotic activity. Through a series of experiments using chemical measures, cell viability, and global gene expression, electrolytic generation of chlorine, a potent disinfectant, was identified as the predominant mechanism by which DC kills bacteria in biofilm. The second treatment strategy investigated weak, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) as a noninvasive approach, involving an extension of concepts from well-studied ELF-MF effects observed in eukaryotic systems to bacterial biofilm. S. epidermidis biofilms grown in weak, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) at Ca2+ and K+ ion resonance frequencies were assessed using global gene expression to determine if S. epidermidis in biofilm detect and respond to ELF-MFs. Frequency-dependent changes in gene expression were observed with upregulation of genes involved in transposase activity, signal transduction systems, and membrane transport processes indicating possible effects consistent with theories of ELF-MF induced changes in ion transport reported in eukaryotic cells. This is the first transcriptome study to indentify ELF-MF effects in bacteria. While no direct biocidal effect was observed with ELF-MF treatment, alteration of membrane

  6. Effect of magnetic field on reduction of nickel oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, M. W.; Fanick, R.; Jewett, J.; Rowe, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Results of observations recorded during constant temperature reduction of NiO, a paramagnetic substance, to Ni, a ferromagnetic element, are presented. The application of a large magnetic field (4,200 oersted) does not result in an acceleration of the reduction rate. To explain earlier observations that 500- and 1,400-oersted magnetic fields increase the reduction rate of iron ore which contains hematite (Fe2O3), Peters (1973) had suggested that thermodynamics theory could predict the acceleration in reaction rate when product and reactant species differ widely in their magnetic properties.

  7. Effects of the 9-T magnetic field on MRS photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-10-01

    The experimental results on the performance of the MRS (Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor) photodiode in the strong magnetic field of 9T, and the possible impact of the quench of the magnet at 9.5T on sensor's operation are reported. The measurement method used is being described. The results of the work agree with the expectations that the MRS photodiode is not exhibiting sensitivity to the magnetic field presence. This result is essential for the design of the future electron-positron linear collider detector.

  8. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  9. Effect of steady magnetic field on human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mileva, M.; Ivanov, B.; Bulanova, M.; Pantev, T.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure to steady magnetic field (SMF) for different periods of time did not elicit statistically reliable increase in chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Metaphase analysis of Crepis capilaris cells revealed that SMF (9 k0e, 200 0e/cm) for 2 days did not induce chromosome aberrations. Nor were any changes demonstrated in roots of beans, onions and L-fibroblasts of subcutaneous tissue of mice and Chinese hamsters. The obtained data are indicative of absence of cytogenetic effect of SMF. The level and spectrum of chromosome aberrations did not exceed the values for spontaneous chromatic fragments in cultures. Cytogenetic analysis of DEDE cells of the Chinese hamster revealed a mild mutagenic effect of SMF. Chromosomal aberrations were also demonstrated after exposure (5 min) of garlic roots.

  10. Experimental Study of Magnetic Field Effect on dc Corona Discharge in Low Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabbas, K.

    2014-09-01

    In the present paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effect of applying a transverse magnetic field on the dc corona discharge behavior in low vacuum. In general, two experiments were carried out in this work: the first is the ionization-region magnetic field experiment, and the second was the drift region magnetic field experiment. In these experiments, permanent magnets were used to produce magnetic field. The degree of vacuum used in this test was 0.4×105 Pa. It is found that the effect of the magnetic field increases as the degree of vacuum increases. It is also seen from this study that the corona current values are higher with magnetic fields than without magnetic fields. The experimental results indicate that the enhancement of the magnetic field near the wire discharge electrode has a significant influence on the increment of the discharge current. The effect of the magnetic field on the discharge current is the most significant with the negative corona discharges rather than with positive corona discharge. In contrast to, the curves were demonstrated that the application of magnetic fields in drift region magnetic field does not significantly change the corona discharge current. Discharge characteristics of magnetically enhanced corona discharges, extracted from this study, can be applied to various industrial applications, such as, in an electrostatic enhancement filter for the purpose of capturing fine particles, and as effective method for production of high ozone concentrations in a generator as compared to the ultraviolet (UV) radiation method.

  11. Hanle effect as a magnetic diagnostic for field-reversed configuration plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Deepak K.

    2016-11-01

    Hanle effect is presented as a low magnetic-field diagnostic for field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The non-perturbative technique is capable of measuring not only magnetic-field profile and direction but also field-null position and its shape. Conditions and configurations for the measurement are discussed. The technique is applicable to other low magnetic-field laboratory plasmas, e.g., magnetic-cusps, where measurements of low field are desirable, and it may also be extended to measure the two-dimensional vector magnetic-field.

  12. Magnetic field effects on superconductivity in alkali metal intercalates of MoS2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Flood, D. J.; Wagoner, D. E.; Somoano, R. B.; Rembaum, A.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of a magnetic field on the superconducting transition in MoS2 intercalated with potassium and sodium were studied. It was found that the potassium intercalated MoS2 has better properties in a magnetic field. In zero magnetic field the transition to superconductivity begins near 6.4 K. Diagrams of the basic circuitry for superconducting transition studies, and charts showing critical magnetic field versus critical temperature for the intercalated MoS2 are included.

  13. Geomagnetic field modulates artificial static magnetic field effect on arterial baroreflex and on microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-03-01

    Spreading evidence suggests that geomagnetic field (GMF) modulates artificial magnetic fields biological effect and associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. To explore the underlying physiological mechanism we studied 350 mT static magnetic field (SMF) effect on arterial baroreflex-mediated skin microcirculatory response in conjunction with actual geomagnetic activity, reflected by K and K p indices. Fourteen experiments were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h). Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and the ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after 40 min of NdFeB magnets local exposure to sinocarotid baroreceptors. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. We found a significant positive correlation between SMF-induced increase in BRS and increment in microvascular blood flow (ΔBRS with ΔMPPG, r=0.7, p<0.009) indicated the participation of the arterial baroreflex in the regulation of the microcirculation and its enhancement after SMF exposure. Geomagnetic disturbance, as opposed to SMF, decreased both microcirculation and BRS, and counteracted SMF-induced increment in microcirculatory blood flow ( K-index with ΔMPPG; r s=-0.55, p<0.041). GMF probably affected central baroreflex pathways, diminishing SMF direct stimulatory effect on sinocarotid baroreceptors and on baroreflex-mediated vasodilatatory response. The results herein may thus point to arterial baroreflex as a possible physiological mechanism for magnetic-field cardiovascular effect. It seems that geomagnetic disturbance modifies artificial magnetic fields biological effect and should be taken into consideration in the assessment of the final effect.

  14. Geomagnetic field modulates artificial static magnetic field effect on arterial baroreflex and on microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-03-01

    Spreading evidence suggests that geomagnetic field (GMF) modulates artificial magnetic fields biological effect and associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. To explore the underlying physiological mechanism we studied 350 mT static magnetic field (SMF) effect on arterial baroreflex-mediated skin microcirculatory response in conjunction with actual geomagnetic activity, reflected by K and K ( p ) indices. Fourteen experiments were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h). Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and the ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after 40 min of NdFeB magnets local exposure to sinocarotid baroreceptors. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. We found a significant positive correlation between SMF-induced increase in BRS and increment in microvascular blood flow (DeltaBRS with DeltaMPPG, r=0.7, p<0.009) indicated the participation of the arterial baroreflex in the regulation of the microcirculation and its enhancement after SMF exposure. Geomagnetic disturbance, as opposed to SMF, decreased both microcirculation and BRS, and counteracted SMF-induced increment in microcirculatory blood flow (K-index with DeltaMPPG; r (s)=-0.55, p<0.041). GMF probably affected central baroreflex pathways, diminishing SMF direct stimulatory effect on sinocarotid baroreceptors and on baroreflex-mediated vasodilatatory response. The results herein may thus point to arterial baroreflex as a possible physiological mechanism for magnetic-field cardiovascular effect. It seems that geomagnetic disturbance modifies artificial magnetic fields biological effect and should be taken into consideration in the assessment of the final effect. PMID:16983578

  15. Biological effects due to weak magnetic fields on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    In the evolution process, living organisms have experienced the action of the Earth's magnetic field (MF) that is a natural component of our environment. It is known that a galactic MF induction does not exceed 0.1 nT, since investigations of weak magnetic field (WMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planning long-term space flights to other planets where the magnetizing force is near 10-5 Oe. However, the role of WMF and its influence on organisms' functioning are still insufficiently investigated. A large number of experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in WMF has found that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during the early terms of germination in comparison with control. The proliferation activity and cell reproduction are reduced in meristem of plant roots under WMF application. The prolongation of total cell reproductive cycle is registered due to the expansion of G phase in1 different plant species as well as of G phase in flax and lentil roots along with2 relative stability of time parameters of other phases of cell cycle. In plant cells exposed to WMF, the decrease in functional activity of genome at early prereplicate period is shown. WMF causes the intensification in the processes of proteins' synthesis and break-up in plant roots. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein spectrum in growing and differentiated cells of plant roots exposed to WMF are revealed. At ultrastructural level, there are observed such ultrastructural peculiarities as changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to WMF. Mitochondria are the most sensitive organelle to WMF application: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix is electron

  16. The effects of weak magnetic fields on radical pairs.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Frank S; Greenebaum, Ben

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that radical concentrations can be modified by combinations of weak, steady and alternating magnetic fields that modify the population distribution of the nuclear and electronic spin state, the energy levels and the alignment of the magnetic moments of the components of the radical pairs. In low external magnetic fields, the electronic and nuclear angular momentum vectors are coupled by internal forces that outweigh the external fields' interactions and are characterized in the Hamiltonian by the total quantum number F. Radical pairs form with their unpaired electrons in singlet (S) or triplet (T) states with respect to each other. At frequencies corresponding to the energy separation between the various states in the external magnetic fields, transitions can occur that change the populations of both electron and nuclear states. In addition, the coupling between the nuclei, nuclei and electrons, and Zeeman shifts in the electron and nuclear energy levels can lead to transitions with resonances spanning frequencies from a few Hertz into the megahertz region. For nuclear energy levels with narrow absorption line widths, this can lead to amplitude and frequency windows. Changes in the pair recombination rates can change radical concentrations and modify biological processes. The overall conclusion is that the application of magnetic fields at frequencies ranging from a few Hertz to microwaves at the absorption frequencies observed in electron and nuclear resonance spectroscopy for radicals can lead to changes in free radical concentrations and have the potential to lead to biologically significant changes. PMID:25399679

  17. Effects of Traveling Magnetic Field on Dynamics of Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard; Motakef, Shariar

    2001-01-01

    TMF is based on imposing a controlled phase-shift in a train of electromagnets, forming a stack. Thus, the induced magnetic field can be considered to be travelling along the axis of the stack. The coupling of this traveling wave with an electrically conducting fluid results in a basic flow in a form of a single axisymmetric roll. The magnitude and direction of this flow can be remotely controlled. Furthermore, it is possible to localize the effect of this force field though activating only a number of the magnets. This force field generated in the fluid can, in principle, be used to control and modify convection in the molten material. For example, it can be used to enhance convective mixing in the melt, and thereby modify the interface shape, and macrosegregation. Alternatively, it can be used to counteract thermal and/or solutal buoyancy forces. High frequency TMF can be used in containerless processing techniques, such as float zoning, to affect the very edge of the fluid so that Marangoni flow can be counter balanced. The proposed program consists of basic fundamentals and applications. Our goal in conducting the following experiments and analyses is to establish the validity of TMF as a new tool for solidification processes. Due to its low power consumption and simplicity of design, this tool may find wide spread use in a variety of space experiments. The proposed ground based experiments are intended to establish the advantages and limitations of employing this technique. In the fundamentals component of the proposed program, we will use theoretical tools and experiments with mercury to establish the fundamental aspects of TMF-induced convection through a detailed comparison of theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of flow field. In this work, we will conduct a detailed parametric study involving the effects of magnetic field strength, frequency, wave vector, and the fluid geometry. The applications component of this work will be focused on

  18. Zero-magnetic field effect in pathogen bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creanga, D. E.; Poiata, A.; Morariu, V. V.; Tupu, P.

    2004-05-01

    Two lots of Gram-negative bacterial strains were tested for antibiotic drug resistance after exposure to zero-magnetic field. We found that the magneto-sensitive strains represent half of the analyzed samples (three Pseudomonas and five Enterobacter strains), some of them presenting two-three times modified resistance to antibiotic, while others revealed eight or 16 times changed resistance. Pseudomonas strain magnetic sensitivity is revealed better by ampicillin and tetracycline, while Enterobacter strain magnetic sensitivity is revealed better by ampicillin, kanamycin and ofloxacin.

  19. Reexaminations of the effects of magnetic field on the nucleation of undercooled Cu melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; He, Yixuan; Li, Jinshan; Kou, Hongchao; Beaugnon, Eric

    2016-10-01

    The effect of a high static magnetic field on the nucleation of an undercooled Cu melt has been investigated using a glass slag fluxing technique in a 12 T superconductor magnet. Controlled heating cycles with and without a magnetic field are performed and the results indicate that the magnetic field has no single effect on the mean undercooling of undercooled Cu liquid, which is different from previous reports. The high static magnetic field can enhance the undercooling of Cu at first, and the effect is weakened with increasing number of heating cycles. The undercooling of undercooled Cu is saturated at around 250 K regardless of the magnetic field after a certain number of heating cycles. The effects are interpreted on the basis of the thermodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic effects of the magnetic field on the undercooled melt and the heterogeneous nucleation theory.

  20. The effect of magnetic field on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Renema, J. J.; Rengelink, R. J.; Komen, I.; Wang, Q.; Kes, P.; Aarts, J.; Exter, M. P. van; Dood, M. J. A. de; Gaudio, R.; Hoog, K. P. M. op 't; Zhou, Z.; Fiore, A.; Sahin, D.; Driessen, E. F. C.

    2015-03-02

    We experimentally investigate the effect of a magnetic field on photon detection in superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs). At low fields, the effect of a magnetic field is through the direct modification of the quasiparticle density of states of the superconductor, and magnetic field and bias current are interchangeable, as is expected for homogeneous dirty-limit superconductors. At the field where a first vortex enters the detector, the effect of the magnetic field is reduced, up until the point where the critical current of the detector starts to be determined by flux flow. From this field on, increasing the magnetic field does not alter the detection of photons anymore, whereas it does still change the rate of dark counts. This result points at an intrinsic difference in dark and photon counts, and also shows that no enhancement of the intrinsic detection efficiency of a straight SSPD wire is achievable in a magnetic field.

  1. Transient effects in rotating magnetic field current drive*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren

    2000-10-01

    The time-dependent behavior of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive is investigated using a two-fluid model. The time and radius dependence separates so that the time-dependent behavior can be found by quadrature. This leads to the prediction of transient behavior leading rapidly to a quasi-steady state that evolves on a diffusion timescale. During the transient phase the ions and electrons spin up together. The timescale of the transient phase is set by the ion inertia in balance with ion-electron friction. Unless there is an additional ion momentum source to balance the resistive friction with the electrons, the quasi-steady state has no current drive effect. Collisions with neutrals is a momentum source in some experiments, notably rotamaks and the STX experiment at the University of Washington. Other sources of ion momentum will be needed for effective RMF current drive in hotter, fusion-relevant plasmas. The properties of the quasi-steady state are found, including the self-consistent ion rotation rate and radial electric field, and RMF corrections on the pressure balance. *This research is supported by USDOE grant DE-FG0398ER54480.

  2. Effects of Traveling Magnetic Field on Dynamics of Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz body force induced in electrically conducting fluids can be utilized for a number of materials processing technologies. An application of strong static magnetic fields can be beneficial for damping convection present during solidification. On the other hand, alternating magnetic fields can be used to reduce as well as to enhance convection. However, only special types of time dependent magnetic fields can induce a non-zero time averaged Lorentz force needed for convection control. One example is the rotating magnetic field. This field configuration induces a swirling flow in circular containers. Another example of a magnetic field configuration is the traveling magnetic field (TMF). It utilizes axisymmetric magnetostatic waves. This type of field induces an axial recirculating flow that can be advantageous for controlling axial mass transport, such as during solidification in long cylindrical tubes. Incidentally, this is the common geometry for crystal growth research. The Lorentz force induced by TMF can potentially counter-balance the buoyancy force, diminishing natural convection, or even setting up the flow in reverse direction. Crystal growth process in presence of TMF can be then significantly modified. Such properties as the growth rate, interface shape and macro segregation can be affected and optimized. Melt homogenization is the other potential application of TMF. It is a necessary step prior to solidification. TMF can be attractive for this purpose, as it induces a basic flow along the axis of the ampoule. TMF can be a practical alloy mixing method especially suited for solidification research in space. In the theoretical part of this work, calculations of the induced Lorentz force in the whole frequency range have been completed. The basic flow characteristics for the finite cylinder geometry are completed and first results on stability analysis for higher Reynolds numbers are obtained. A theoretical model for TMF mixing is also developed

  3. Physiological effects of fast oscillating magnetic field gradients.

    PubMed

    Budinger, T F; Fischer, H; Hentschel, D; Reinfelder, H E; Schmitt, F

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the physiological thresholds of neuromuscular stimulation relevant to very fast NMR imaging studies that use gradient switching at frequencies of 1-2 kHz and a maximum magnetic field of up to 10 mT, a series of studies were done with human volunteers using an experimental echo planar gradient coil set. The threshold for induction of localized and momentary sensations in the human back and abdomen for 10 subjects is 60 T/s for sinusoidally oscillating magnetic fields at 1.27 kHz. The threshold relates to an E field of 6 V/m and is shown to vary with number of oscillations and frequency in accord with theory. Using a simple model of E field induction, the threshold for stimulation of cardiac electrical events should be greater than 4 times this value.

  4. Oblique magnetic field effects over stability in superposed viscous ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jothimani, S.; Anjali Devi, S. P.

    2000-12-01

    The interface of two superposed viscous ferrofluids of infinite depth in the presence of an uniform magnetic field oblique to the interface is considered. The fluids are assumed to be incompressible and a surface tension T acts on the interface. Solutions of the linear problem and the linear dispersion relation are found. Exchange of stabilities are discussed for various cases.

  5. Effect of axial magnetic field on a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet ECR ion source.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Wada, H; Asaji, T; Furuse, M

    2016-02-01

    Herein, we conduct a fundamental study to improve the generation efficiency of a multi-charged ion source using argon. A magnetic field of our electron cyclotron resonance ion source is composed of a permanent magnet and a solenoid coil. Thereby, the axial magnetic field in the chamber can be tuned. Using the solenoid coil, we varied the magnetic field strength in the plasma chamber and measured the ion beam current extracted at the electrode. We observed an approximately three times increase in the Ar(4+) ion beam current when the magnetic field on the extractor-electrode side of the chamber was weakened. From our results, we can confirm that the multi-charged ion beam current changes depending on magnetic field intensity in the plasma chamber. PMID:26931955

  6. Predicting observational consequences of magnetic field effects in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov1, D. D.; Kane1, J. O.; Mizuta2, A.; Pound3, M. W.; Remington1, B. A.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetic fields are thought to play a substantial role in photoevaporated molecular clouds, an example of which is the famous Eagle Nebula. On the other hand, any direct measurements of the magnetic fields in the Eagle Nebula are still absent. To help in developing the observational strategies, we consider two models of the magnetic field and discuss their general compatibility with the observed structures. We also consider other factors that can be used to derive the structure and the strength of the magnetic field. The two models are those of an initially quasi-homogeneous magnetic field permeating the cloud prior to the onset of hydrodynamic motion, and of a pre-existing "magnetostatic turbulence" [1]. We evaluate possible magnetic field strength in the ablated flow, magnetic field effects on the velocity distribution inside the cloud, and on the star formation. [1] D.D. Ryutov, B.A. Remington. PPCF, 44, B407, 2002.

  7. EFFECTS OF THE NON-RADIAL MAGNETIC FIELD ON MEASURING MAGNETIC HELICITY TRANSPORT ACROSS THE SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y. L.; Zhang, M.

    2015-05-10

    It is generally believed that the evolution of magnetic helicity has a close relationship with solar activity. Before the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), earlier studies had mostly used Michelson Doppler Imager/SOHO line of sight (LOS) magnetograms and assumed that magnetic fields are radial when calculating the magnetic helicity injection rate from photospheric magnetograms. However, this assumption is not necessarily true. Here we use the vector magnetograms and LOS magnetograms, both taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on SDO, to estimate the effects of the non-radial magnetic field on measuring the magnetic helicity injection rate. We find that: (1) the effect of the non-radial magnetic field on estimating tangential velocity is relatively small; (2) when estimating the magnetic helicity injection rate, the effect of the non-radial magnetic field is strong when active regions are observed near the limb and is relatively weak when active regions are close to disk center; and (3) the effect of the non-radial magnetic field becomes minor if the amount of accumulated magnetic helicity is the only concern.

  8. Effect of the magnetic material on AC losses in HTS conductors in AC magnetic field carrying AC transport current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xing-Xing; Huang, Chen-Guang; Yong, Hua-Dong; Zhou, You-He

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the AC losses in several typical superconducting composite conductors using the H-formulation model. A single superconducting strip with ferromagnetic substrate or cores and a stack of coated conductors with ferromagnetic substrates are studied. We consider all the coated conductors carrying AC transport currents and simultaneously exposed to perpendicular AC magnetic fields. The influences of the amplitude, frequency, phase difference and ferromagnetic materials on the AC losses are investigated. The results show that the magnetization losses of single strip and stacked strips have similar characteristics. The ferromagnetic substrate can increase the magnetization loss at low magnetic field, and decrease the loss at high magnetic field. The ferromagnetic substrate can obviously increase the transport loss in stacked strips. The trends of total AC losses of single strip and stacked strips are similar when they are carrying current or exposed to a perpendicular magnetic field. The effect of the frequency on the total AC losses of single strip is related to the amplitude of magnetic field. The AC losses decrease with increasing frequency in low magnetic field region while increase in high magnetic field region. As the phase difference changes, there is a periodic variation for the AC losses. Moreover, when the strip is under only the transport current and magnetic field, the ferromagnetic cores will increase the AC losses for large transport current or field.

  9. Magnetodeformation effects and the swelling of ferrogels in a uniform magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Filipcsei, Genoveva; Zrínyi, Miklos

    2010-07-14

    Magnetic field sensitive gels (ferrogels or magnetoelastic gels) are three-dimensional cross-linked networks of flexible polymers swollen by ferrofluids or magnetic fluids. We have studied the response of magnetic field sensitive polymer gels to an external magnetic field. Two phenomena were investigated in detail: deformation and swelling under a uniform magnetic field. Gel spheres containing magnetic particles distributed randomly in the gel matrix as well as pearl chain aggregates chemically fixed in the network were exposed to a static homogeneous magnetic field. It was found that the spatial distribution of the magnetic particles plays an essential role in the magnetodeformation effect. A weak effect was observed for gels containing randomly distributed magnetic particles. In response to the magnetic field induction, these gel spheres elongated along the field lines and were compressed in the perpendicular direction. No magnetodeformation was observed for gels containing aligned particles in the polymer matrix. The influence of an external magnetic field on the equilibrium swelling degree was also the subject of this study. Using thermodynamic arguments it was shown that a uniform external field may result in deswelling of the ferrogels at high field intensities.

  10. Axial Magnetic Field Effects on Xenon Short-Arc Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Chen, Tang; Li, Wanwan; Zha, Jun; Xia, Weidong

    2014-12-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field (AMF) on an old xenon short-arc lamp is experimentally investigated in this work. As the AMF increases up to 18 mT, the visible radiation power and electric power ascend more than 80% and 70% respectively, and the radiation efficiency is improved by 23% for the best increment at 12 mT AMF. The measurement of radiation intensity shows that the increment of radiation intensity comes mostly from the plasma area close to the cathode tip, and partially from the other area of the arc column. Successive images of the arc indicate that the arc column not only rotates about its axis, but revolves around the axis of electrodes with the AMF. The arc column structure is constricted, distorted and elongated as the AMF increases. It is suggested that the improvements of the radiation intensity and radiation efficiency are attributed to the constriction of the arc column, which is mainly induced by the enhanced cathode jet.

  11. In-plane magnetic field effect on switching voltage and thermal stability in electric-field-controlled perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grezes, C.; Rojas Rozas, A.; Ebrahimi, F.; Alzate, J. G.; Cai, X.; Katine, J. A.; Langer, J.; Ocker, B.; Khalili Amiri, P.; Wang, K. L.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of in-plane magnetic field on switching voltage (Vsw) and thermal stability factor (Δ) are investigated in electric-field-controlled perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs). Dwell time measurements are used to determine the voltage dependence of the energy barrier height for various in-plane magnetic fields (Hin), and gain insight into the Hin dependent energy landscape. We find that both Vsw and Δ decrease with increasing Hin, with a dominant linear dependence. The results are reproduced by calculations based on a macrospin model while accounting for the modified magnetization configuration in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  12. Tuning of random lasers by means of external magnetic fields based on the Voigt effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasempour Ardakani, Abbas; Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bahrampour, Ali Reza

    2013-04-01

    It has been proposed that emission spectrum of random lasers with magnetically active semiconductor constituents can be made tunable by external magnetic fields. By employing the FDTD method, the spectral intensity and spatial distribution of electric field are calculated in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is numerically shown that due to the magneto-optical Voigt effect, the emission spectrum of a semiconductor-based random laser can be made tunable by adjusting the external magnetic field. The effect of magnetic field on the localization length of the laser modes is investigated. It is also shown that the spatial distribution of electric field exhibited remarkable modification with variation of magnetic field.

  13. Influence of nuclear spin on chemical reactions: Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    1983-01-01

    The course of chemical reactions involving radical pairs may depend on occurrence and orientation of nuclear spins in the pairs. The influence of nuclear spins is maximized when the radical pairs are confined to a space that serves as a cage that allows a certain degree of independent diffusional and rotational motion of the partners of the pair but that also encourages reencounters of the partners within a period which allows the nuclear spins to operate on the odd electron spins of the pair. Under the proper conditions, the nuclear spins can induce intersystem crossing between triplet and singlet states of radical pairs. It is shown that this dependence of intersystem crossing on nuclear spin leads to a magnetic isotope effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of separating isotopes on the basis of nuclear spins rather than nuclear masses and also leads to a magnetic field effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of influencing the course of polymerization by the application of weak magnetic fields. PMID:16593273

  14. Effect of pulse magnetic field stimulation on calcium channel current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Lee, Z. H.; Ng, W. C.; Khoa, W. L.; Teoh, S. H.; Soong, T. H.; Qin, Y. R.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Li, X. P.

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of low frequency and high amplitude pulse magnetic field (PMF) on Calcium ion channel current of cells. Measurements were done on the Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK 293), which have only Calcium ion channels functioning. The whole cell current was measured by patch clamp method, with the clamped voltage ramping from -90 mV to +50 mV across the cell membrane. A PMF was generated by a 400-turn coil connected to a pulse current generator. The frequency of the pulse was 7 Hz, the width of the pulse was 3 ms, and the amplitude of the pulse, or the flux density, was ranging from 6 to 25 mT. The results showed that the profile of the whole cell Calcium channel current could be modified by the PMF. With the PMF applied, the phase shifting occurred: the onset of the channel opening took place several mili-seconds earlier than that without the PWF and correspondingly, the whole cell current reached its maximum earlier, and the current returned back to zero earlier as well. When the PWF was stopped, these effects persisted for a period of time, and then the current profile "recovered" to its original appearance. The decrease of the onset time and peak current time could be due to the local electric potential induced by the PWF and the direct interaction between PMF and ion channels/ions. The exact mechanisms of the observed effects of PMF on the cell are still unknown and need to be further studied.

  15. Electric field effect on the magnetization process for a very thin Co60Fe40 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K. Z.; Ranjbar, R.; Sugihara, A.; Kondo, Y.; Mizukami, S.

    2016-08-01

    The electric field effect on the magnetization process for a very thin Co60Fe40 film was studied. The magnetization process under the electric field was characterized using tunnel magnetoresistance curves measured in a fully-epitaxial (001)-oriented CoFe(1)/MgO/CoFe(3) (thickness in nanometers) magnetic tunnel junction, where both the CoFe electrodes are magnetized in- plane. The out-of-plane saturation field of the thinner CoFe electrode changed linearly by varying the applied voltage, and the field-induced change of saturation field was estimated to be -0.10 TV-1. This change in the saturation field is interpreted as the electric field induced change in a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy originating from the CoFe/MgO interface. The electric field effect efficiency was estimated to be about 200 fJV-1 m-1.

  16. [Effect of the low-frequency impulse magnetic field on the autonomic nervous system in animals].

    PubMed

    Kraiukhina, K Iu; Lobkaeva, E P; Deviatkova, N S

    2010-01-01

    The effect of weak (up to 3.5 mT) low-frequency (up to 100 Hz) impulse magnetic field on the state of the vegetative nervous system of animals has been studied by analyzing the variability of the heart rate. The effect of the magnetic field was estimated by a specially designed complex for recording cardiac signals of animals. Several specially selected regimes of impulse magnetic fields were studied. It was shown that the impulse magnetic field possesses a high biological activity at all regimes used, and the indices of the vegetative nervous system after the exposure to the impulse magnetic field approach the values typical for normotonic animals. This makes it possible to use magnetic fields at these regimes in magnetotherapy. PMID:20968088

  17. Safety Problems of Electric and Magnetic Fields and Experimental Magnetic Fusion Facilities 3.Biological Effects of Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakoshi, Junji

    The possible health hazard of exposure to low-frequency magnetic fields has become an issue of considerable public concern. Although many epidemiological studies have done, the results are inconsistent to explain an association between exposure to the magnetic fields in the environment and apparent cancer. In in vitro studies, the existence of the effects of the magnetic fields at low flux density has also been contradictory in various reports. This paper reviews studies on cellular and molecular effects of low-frequency magnetic fields.

  18. Effect of Magnetic Field on Thermal Instability of Oldroydian Viscoelastic Rotating Fluid in Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, R. C.; Rana, G. C.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of a vertical magnetic field on thermal instability of an Oldroydian visco-elastic rotating fluid in a porous medium. By applying the normal mode analysis method, the dispersion relation governing the effects of rotation, magnetic field and medium permeability is derived and solved analytically and numerically. For the case of stationary convection, the Oldroydian viscoelastic fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid and it is observed that rotation has a stabilizing effect while the magnetic field and medium permeability have a stabilizing/destabilizing effect under certain conditions on thermal instability of the Oldroydian viscoelastic fluid in a porous medium. The oscillatory modes are introduced due to the presence of rotation, the magnetic field and gravity field. It is also observed that the `principle of exchange of stability' is invalid in the presence of rotation and the magnetic field.

  19. Rapid rise time pulsed magnetic field circuit for pump-probe field effect studies.

    PubMed

    Salaoru, T A; Woodward, Jonathan R

    2007-03-01

    Here we describe an electronic circuit capable of producing rapidly switched dc magnetic fields of up to 20 mT with a rise time of 10 ns and a pulse length variable from 50 ns to more than 10 micros, suitable for use in the study of magnetic field effects on radical pair (RP) reactions. This corresponds to switching the field on a time scale short relative to the lifetime of typical RPs and maintaining it well beyond their lifetimes. Previous experiments have involved discharging a capacitor through a low inductance coil for a limited time using a switching circuit. These suffer from decaying field strength over the duration of the pulse given primarily by the ratio of the pulse width to the RC constant of the circuit. We describe here a simple yet elegant solution that completely eliminates this difficulty by employing a feedback loop. This allows a constant field to be maintained over the entire length of the pulse. PMID:17411229

  20. Dynamic of the Dust Structures under Magnetic Field Effect in DC Glow Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, M. M.; D'yachkov, L. G.; Antipov, S. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work, we investigate dust structures in the striation of DC glow discharges under magnetic field actions. The dependence of rotation frequency of dusty plasma structures as a function of the magnetic field was investigated. For various magnetic fields kinetic temperatures of the dust particles, diffusion coefficients, and effective coupling coefficient {gamma}* have been determined. Obtained results are analyzed and compared with theoretical predictions.

  1. Preparation of iron oxide nanoparticles by laser ablation in DMF under effect of external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Raid A.; Sulaiman, Ghassan M.; Abdulrahman, Safa A.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the effect of applying an external magnetic field on the characteristics of iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in dimethylformamide (DMF). The NPs synthesized with and without applying of magnetic field were characterized by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Vis absorption, scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM results confirmed that the particle size was decreased after applying magnetic field.

  2. Solar Surface Anisotropy effect on the Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, Véronique

    2015-10-01

    Within the literature there are at least 15 references indicating that the horizontal magnetic flux does not exactly balance vertical flux in sunspots, leading to the surprising result that div B would depart from zero. Intuitively, this has to be related to the stratification at the surface of the star, due to which horizontal and vertical typical lengths are different. This surface anisotropy results from gravity, but how does gravity influence the magnetic field? To answer this question, a scenario has been proposed in two recent publications, based on anisotropic Debye shielding. The presentation reported in this paper was devoted to investigate the possibility and causes of a non-zero div B. A scaling law associated with the anisotropy is able to reestablish the nullity of div B, which would lead to a renewed MHD in the solar photosphere layer. An eventual observation in the laboratory is also reported.

  3. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  4. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  5. Effects of sweep rates of external magnetic fields on the labyrinthine instabilities of miscible magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, C.-Y.; Lin, J.-Z.; Chen, M.-Y.; Chen, L.-Q.; Liang, T.-K.

    2011-05-01

    The interfacial instability of miscible magnetic fluids in a Hele-Shaw Cell is studied experimentally, with different magnitudes and sweep rates of the external magnetic field. The initial circular oil-based magnetic fluid drop is surrounded by the miscible fluid, diesel. The external uniform magnetic fields induce small fingerings around the initial circular interface, so call labyrinthine fingering instability, and secondary waves. When the magnetic field is applied at a given sweep rate, the interfacial length grows significantly at the early stage. It then decreases when the magnetic field reaches the preset values, and finally approaches a certain asymptotic value. In addition, a dimensionless parameter, Pe, which includes the factors of diffusion and sweep rate of the external magnetic field, is found to correlate the experimental data. It is shown that the initial growth rate of the interfacial length is linearly proportional to Pe for the current experimental parameter range and is proportional to the square root of the sweep rate at the onset of labyrinthine instability.

  6. Effects of Magnetic Field on Fracture Toughness of Manganese-Zinc Ferrite Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y. P.; Fang, D. N.; Soh, A. K.

    Effects of magnetic field on the fracture toughness of magnetic ceramics were experimentally investigated by the use of the single-edge-notch-beam (SENB) specimens of three kinds of manganese-zinc ferrite ceramics with different permeability. Results indicate that there is no significant change in the measured fracture toughness of the Manganese-Zinc Ferrite ceramics in the presence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the crack lengths caused by the Vickers' indentation on the manganese-zinc ferrite ceramics show that the fracture toughness in the magnetic field direction is almost identical to that in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. This reveals that the polycrystalline ceramic still exhibits isotropic fracture behavior after magnetization. Finally, a qualitative explanation is given in terms of a small-scale magnetic saturation model.

  7. [The effect of static magnetic fields on osteoblast activity: an in-vitro study].

    PubMed

    Papadopulos, M A; Hörler, I; Gerber, H; Rahn, B A; Rakosi, T

    1992-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the influence of static magnetic fields can be demonstrated in an osteoblast cell culture. For this in-vitro study we used osteoblasts originating from the embryonal calvariae of rats. The total material (n = 41) was divided in four groups: a) cell cultures submitted to the fields of attracting magnets (n = 11), b) cell cultures in the fields of repelling magnets (n = 10), c) cell cultures under the influence of demagnetized magnets (sham group, n = 11), d) control cultures (n = 9). The cell cultures were subjected for 21 days to magnetic fields (intensity 178 ml) using Neodynium magnets. Osteoblast activity was histo-chemically determined by staining the alkaline phosphatase produced. The quantitative evaluation was performed by measuring the optical density of the cell cultures and the results were statistically analysed. The results of these in-vitro study are: 1. The optical density of the cell cultures was nearly the same in samples with or without the influence of magnetic fields. 2. No divergent reaction could be found between the application of homogeneous and heterogeneous magnetic fields. 3. The different orientation of homogeneous magnetic fields in vertical or horizontal direction did not effect the osteoblast cell culture. 4. The cellular distribution in the osteoblast cultures does not follow the orientation of the magnetic field lines. 5. The form of the osteoblasts was nearly the same among all four groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1526613

  8. Spin-lattice dynamics simulation of external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, C. P.; Zhou, Yan

    2014-03-15

    Modeling of field-induced magnetization in ferromagnetic materials has been an active topic in the last dozen years, yet a dynamic treatment of distance-dependent exchange integral has been lacking. In view of that, we employ spin-lattice dynamics (SLD) simulations to study the external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron. Our results show that an external field can increase the inflection point of the temperature. Also the model provides a better description of the effect of spin correlation in response to an external field than the mean-field theory. An external field has a more prominent effect on the long range magnetic order than on the short range counterpart. Furthermore, an external field allows the magnon dispersion curves and the uniform precession modes to exhibit magnetic order variation from their temperature dependence.

  9. Hall-effect thruster--Cathode coupling: The effect of cathode position and magnetic field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerville, Jason D.

    2009-12-01

    Hall-effect thruster (HET) cathodes are responsible for the generation of the free electrons necessary to initiate and sustain the main plasma discharge and to neutralize the ion beam. The position of the cathode relative to the thruster strongly affects the efficiency of thrust generation. However, the mechanisms by which the position affects the efficiency are not well understood. This dissertation explores the effect of cathode position on HET efficiency. Magnetic field topology is shown to play an important role in the coupling between the cathode plasma and the main discharge plasma. The position of the cathode within the magnetic field affects the ion beam and the plasma properties of the near-field plume, which explains the changes in efficiency of the thruster. Several experiments were conducted which explored the changes of efficiency arising from changes in cathode coupling. In each experiment, the thrust, discharge current, and cathode coupling voltage were monitored while changes in the independent variables of cathode position, cathode mass flow and magnetic field topology were made. From the telemetry data, the efficiency of the HET thrust generation was calculated. Furthermore, several ion beam and plasma properties were measured including ion energy distribution, beam current density profile, near-field plasma potential, electron temperature, and electron density. The ion beam data show how the independent variables affected the quality of ion beam and therefore the efficiency of thrust generation. The measurements of near-field plasma properties partially explain how the changes in ion beam quality arise. The results of the experiments show that cathode position, mass flow, and field topology affect several aspects of the HET operation, especially beam divergence and voltage utilization efficiencies. Furthermore, the experiments show that magnetic field topology is important in the cathode coupling process. In particular, the magnetic field

  10. Theory of light-induced effective magnetic field in Rashba ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaiumzadeh, Alireza; Titov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on all-optical magnetization reversal in conductive ferromagnetic thin films we use nonequilibrium formalism to calculate the effective magnetic field induced in a Rashba ferromagnet by a short laser pulse. The main contribution to the effect originates in the direct optical transitions between spin-split subbands. The resulting effective magnetic field is inversely proportional to the impurity scattering rate and can reach the amplitude of a few Tesla in the systems like Co/Pt bilayers. We show that the total light-induced effective magnetic field in ferromagnetic systems is the sum of two contributions: a helicity dependent term, which is an even function of magnetization, and a helicity independent term, which is an odd function of magnetization. The primary role of the spin-orbit interaction is to widen the frequency range for direct optical transitions.

  11. Magnetic field effects on viscous fingering of a ferrofluid in an anisotropic Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballou, R.; Molho, P.

    2005-12-01

    When a viscous fluid is pushed into a more viscous one in a Hele-Shaw cell, the interface between the two fluids may become unstable, leading to fingering and ramified patterns. Anisotropy can be introduced by engraving a grid in one plate of the cell, allowing one to obtain dendritic patterns. The use of a ferrofluid as one of the viscous fluid is a way to introduce magnetism in the problem, especially the magnetic field as a control parameter. Magnetic field effects on viscous fingering of ferrofluids have already been studied: in a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell, a magnetic field applied in the cell plane is stabilizing when parallel to the interface between the two fluids and destabilizing when normal to the interface. A magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of a radial Hele-Shaw cell has the same destabilizing effect as the pressure. We have studied the effect of a magnetic field, normal to and in the plane of anisotropic radial Hele-Shaw cells te{5}, to characterize the competing effects of hydrodynamics, magnetic field and dipolar energy, and anisotropy. Here we study more precisely the effect of a magnetic field normal to a radial anisotropic Hele-Shaw cell. Figs 8, Refs 9.

  12. Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Tomishige, Masahiko; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masao; Shibata, Naho; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum was studied by using a superconducting magnet. Around a centre of a round vessel, random swimming at 0 T and aligned swimming parallel to the magnetic field (MF) of 8 T were observed. Near a wall of the vessel, however, swimming round and round along the wall at 0 T and aligned swimming of turning at right angles upon collision with the wall, which was remarkable around 1-4 T, were detected. It was experimentally revealed that the former MF-induced parallel swimming at the vessel centre was caused physicochemically by the parallel magnetic orientation of the cell itself. From magnetic field dependence of the extent of the orientation, the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (χ ∥-χ ⊥) was first obtained to be 3.4× 10-23 emu cell-1 at 298 K for Paramecium caudatum. The orientation of the cell was considered to result from the magnetic orientation of the cell membrane. On the other hand, although mechanisms of the latter swimming near the vessel wall regardless of the absence and presence of the magnetic field are unclear at present, these experimental results indicate that whether the cell exists near the wall alters the magnetic field effect on the swimming in the horizontal magnetic field.

  13. Effect of UV irradiation and magnetic field on immunometabolic effects of antibiotics immobilized in cell carriers.

    PubMed

    Lazarev, A I; Siplivyi, G V; Kukureka, A V; Siplivaya, L E

    2008-06-01

    The effects of UV and magnetic radiation on the immunometabolic activity of ampicillin and cephazolin immobilized in erythrocytic and leukocytic carriers were studied in intact Wistar rats and animals infected with staphylococci. Erythrocytic and leukocytic carriers with antibiotics were obtained. Injection of free antibiotics stimulated the immunosuppressive, pro-oxidant, and hepatotoxic effects, associated with staphylococcal infection. Treatment with antibiotics in erythrocytic and leukocytic carriers stimulated (to different degrees) the activity of the immune system and stabilized the parameters of LPO, antioxidant defense, cytolysis, and cholestasis. Ultraviolet irradiation and magnetic field modified (to different measures) the immunometabolic effects of ampicillin and cephazolin, immobilized in erythrocytic and leukocytic carriers, in animals with staphylococcal infection.

  14. Effects of interstellar particles upon the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Winter, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    The flow of interstellar neutral particles into the interplanetary medium and their subsequent ionization in the presence of the electromagnetic field of the solar wind can cause a loss of field angular momentum by the solar wind. One effect of this loss of field angular momentum is a significant unwinding of the spiral field. This effect is evaluated using simple models for neutral density and ion production. For a free-stream interstellar medium with a neutral hydrogen density of 1 per cubic centimeter and a velocity relative to the sun of 10 to 20 km per second, the spiral angle at the orbit of Jupiter will be less than its nominal value of 45 deg at the orbit of the earth.

  15. Vacuum effects in magnetic field with with account for fermion anomalous magnetic moment and axial-vector interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubnov, Andrey; Gubina, Nadezda; Zhukovsky, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We study vacuum polarization effects in the model of Dirac fermions with additional interaction of an anomalous magnetic moment with an external magnetic field and fermion interaction with an axial-vector condensate. The proper time method is used to calculate the one-loop vacuum corrections with consideration for different configurations of the characteristic parameters of these interactions.

  16. Radial current density effects on rotating magnetic field current drive in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, R. A.; Gilli, M.; Farengo, R.

    2008-10-15

    Steady state solutions, suitable for field-reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) are obtained by properly including three-dimensional effects, in the limit of large FRC elongation, and the radial component of Ohm's law. The steady electrostatic potential, necessary to satisfy Ohm's law, is considered to be a surface function. The problem is analyzed at the midplane of the configuration and it is reduced to the solution of two coupled nonlinear differential equations for the real and imaginary parts of the phasor associated to the longitudinal component of the vector potential. Additional constraints are obtained by requesting that the steady radial current density and poloidal magnetic flux vanish at the plasma boundary which is set at the time-averaged separatrix. The results are presented in terms of the degree of synchronism of the electrons with the RMF and compared with those obtained when radial current effects are neglected. Three important differences are observed when compared with the case without radial current density. First, at low penetration of the RMF into the plasma there is a significant increase in the driven azimuthal current. Second, the RMF amplitude necessary to access the high synchronism regime, starting from low synchronism, is larger and the difference appears to increase as the separatrix to classical skin depth ratio increases. Third, the minimum RMF amplitude necessary to sustain almost full synchronism is reduced.

  17. SU-E-T-368: Effect of a Strong Magnetic Field On Select Radiation Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, M; Wen, Z; Tailor, R; Sawakuchi, G; Flint, D; Beddar, S; Ibbott, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of a strong magnetic field on TLD-100, OSLD (Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}:C), and PRESAGE dosimetry devices. This study will help to determine which types of dosimeters can be used for quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry measurements in a magnetic resonance imaginglinear accelerator (MRI-linac) system. Methods: The dosimeters were separated into two categories which were either exposed or not exposed to a strong magnetic field. In each category a set of dosimeters was irradiated with 0, 2, or 6 Gy. To expose the dosimeters to a magnetic field the samples in that category were place in a Bruker small animal magnetic resonance scanner at a field strength slightly greater than 2.5 T for at least 1 hour preirradiation and at least 1 hour post-irradiation. Irradiations were performed with a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian TrueBeam linac with 10×10 cm{sup 2} field at a 600 MU/min dose rate. The samples that received no radiation dose were used as control detectors. Results: The readouts of the dosimeters which were not exposed to a strong magnetic field were compared with the measurements of the dosimetry devices which were exposed to a magnetic field. No significant differences (less than 2% difference) in the performance of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE dosimeters due to exposure to a strong magnetic field were observed. Conclusion: Exposure to a strong magnetic field before and after irradiation does not appear to change the dosimetric properties of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE which indicates that these dosimeters have potential for use in quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry in a MRI-linac. We plan to further test the effect of magnetic fields on these devices by irradiating them in the presence of a magnetic fields similar to those produced by a MRI-linac system. Elekta-MD Anderson Cancer Center Research Agreement.

  18. Effect of trapping in a degenerate plasma in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, H. A.; Iqbal, M. J.; Tsintsadze, N.; Masood, W.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2012-09-01

    Effect of trapping as a microscopic phenomenon in a degenerate plasma is investigated in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field. The plasma comprises degenerate electrons and non-degenerate ions. The presence of the quantizing magnetic field is discussed briefly and the effect of trapping is investigated by using the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. The linear dispersion relation for ion acoustic wave is derived in the presence of the quantizing magnetic field and its influence on the propagation characteristics of the linear ion acoustic wave is discussed. Subsequently, fully nonlinear equations for ion acoustic waves are used to obtain the Sagdeev potential and the investigation of solitary structures. The formation of solitary structures is studied both for fully and partially degenerate plasmas in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field. Both compressive and rarefactive solitons are obtained for different conditions of temperature and magnetic field.

  19. Effects of magnetic field gradients on the aggregation dynamics of colloidal magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, D; Goñi, A R; Osán, T M; Cerioni, L M C; Smessaert, A; Klapp, S H L; Faraudo, J; Pusiol, D J; Thomsen, C

    2015-10-14

    We have used low-field (1)H nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) to investigate the aggregation dynamics of magnetic particles in ionic ferrofluids (IFFs) in the presence of magnetic field gradients. At the beginning of the experiments, the measured NMR spectra were broad and asymmetric, exhibiting two features attributed to different dynamical environments of water protons, depending on the local strength of the field gradients. Hence, the spatial redistribution of the magnetic particles in the ferrofluid caused by the presence of an external magnetic field in a time scale of minutes can be monitored in real time, following the changes in the features of the NMR spectra during a period of about an hour. As previously reported [Heinrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2011, 106, 208301], in the homogeneous magnetic field of a NMR spectrometer, the aggregation of the particles of the IFF proceeds in two stages. The first stage corresponds to the gradual aggregation of monomers prior to and during the formation of chain-like structures. The second stage proceeds after the chains have reached a critical average length, favoring lateral association of the strings into hexagonal zipped-chain superstructures or bundles. In this work, we focus on the influence of a strongly inhomogeneous magnetic field on the aforementioned aggregation dynamics. The main observation is that, as the sample is immersed in a certain magnetic field gradient and kept there for a time τinh, magnetophoresis rapidly converts the ferrofluid into an aggregation state which finds its correspondence to a state on the evolution curve of the pristine sample in a homogeneous field. From the degree of aggregation reached at the time τinh, the IFF sample just evolves thereafter in the homogeneous field of the NMR spectrometer in exactly the same way as the pristine sample. The final equilibrium state always consists of a colloidal suspension of zipped-chain bundles with

  20. Effect of electron reflection on magnetized plasma sheath in an oblique magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Ma, J. X. Wei, Zi-An

    2015-09-15

    Magnetized plasma sheaths in an oblique magnetic field were extensively investigated by conventionally assuming Boltzmann relation for electron density. This article presents the study of the magnetized sheath without using the Boltzmann relation but by considering the electron reflection along the magnetic field lines caused by the negative sheath potential. A generalized Bohm criterion is analytically derived, and sheath profiles are numerically obtained, which are compared with the results of the conventional model. The results show that the ion Mach number at the sheath edge normal to the wall has a strong dependence on the wall potential, which differs significantly from the conventional model in which the Mach number is independent of the wall potential. The floating wall potential is lower in the present model than that in the conventional model. Furthermore, the sheath profiles are appreciably narrower in the present model when the wall bias is low, but approach the result of the conventional model when the wall bias is high. The sheath thickness decreases with the increase of ion-to-electron temperature ratio and magnetic field strength but has a complex relationship with the angle of the magnetic field.

  1. Effect of Magnetic Fields on the Boiling Heat Transfer Characteristics of Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naphon, Paisarn

    2015-11-01

    The main focus of the present study is to investigate the effect of magnetic fields on the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics on the cylindrical surface of nanofluids. The nanofluids with suspended TiO2 nanoparticles in the base fluid refrigerant R141b are used as the working fluid. Effects of magnetic field strength, nanoparticle concentration, and boiling pressure on the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient and the boiling bubble characteristics are considered. In this study, magnetic fields with strengths of 5.0× 10^{-4} T, 7.5× 10^{-4} T, and 10.0× 10^{-4} T are applied to exert a force on the boiling surface with permanent magnets. According to the experimental results, it is found that the magnetic fields have a significant effect on the pool boiling heat transfer enhancement with a maximum enhancement of 27.91 %.

  2. Magnetic-field effect on the photoactivation reaction of Escherichia coli DNA photolyase

    PubMed Central

    Henbest, Kevin B.; Maeda, Kiminori; Hore, P. J.; Joshi, Monika; Bacher, Adelbert; Bittl, Robert; Weber, Stefan; Timmel, Christiane R.; Schleicher, Erik

    2008-01-01

    One of the two principal hypotheses put forward to explain the primary magnetoreception event underlying the magnetic compass sense of migratory birds is based on a magnetically sensitive chemical reaction. It has been proposed that a spin-correlated radical pair is produced photochemically in a cryptochrome and that the rates and yields of the subsequent chemical reactions depend on the orientation of the protein in the Earth's magnetic field. The suitability of cryptochrome for this purpose has been argued, in part, by analogy with DNA photolyase, although no effects of applied magnetic fields have yet been reported for any member of the cryptochrome/photolyase family. Here, we demonstrate a magnetic-field effect on the photochemical yield of a flavin–tryptophan radical pair in Escherichia coli photolyase. This result provides a proof of principle that photolyases, and most likely by extension also cryptochromes, have the fundamental properties needed to form the basis of a magnetic compass. PMID:18799743

  3. Magnetic-field effect on the photoactivation reaction of Escherichia coli DNA photolyase.

    PubMed

    Henbest, Kevin B; Maeda, Kiminori; Hore, P J; Joshi, Monika; Bacher, Adelbert; Bittl, Robert; Weber, Stefan; Timmel, Christiane R; Schleicher, Erik

    2008-09-23

    One of the two principal hypotheses put forward to explain the primary magnetoreception event underlying the magnetic compass sense of migratory birds is based on a magnetically sensitive chemical reaction. It has been proposed that a spin-correlated radical pair is produced photochemically in a cryptochrome and that the rates and yields of the subsequent chemical reactions depend on the orientation of the protein in the Earth's magnetic field. The suitability of cryptochrome for this purpose has been argued, in part, by analogy with DNA photolyase, although no effects of applied magnetic fields have yet been reported for any member of the cryptochrome/photolyase family. Here, we demonstrate a magnetic-field effect on the photochemical yield of a flavin-tryptophan radical pair in Escherichia coli photolyase. This result provides a proof of principle that photolyases, and most likely by extension also cryptochromes, have the fundamental properties needed to form the basis of a magnetic compass.

  4. Effects of static magnetic fields on cognition, vital signs, and sensory perception: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Angela; Szostek, Anne; Nees, Frauke; Meyer, Patric; Semmler, Wolfhard; Flor, Herta

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate whether cognitive processes, sensory perception, and vital signs might be influenced by static magnetic fields in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which could pose a risk for health personnel and patients, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies that examined effects of static magnetic fields. Studies covering the time from 1992 to 2007 were selected. Cohen's d effects sizes were used and combined in different categories of neuropsychology (reaction time, visual processing, eye-hand coordination, and working memory). Additionally, effects of static magnetic fields on sensory perception and vital signs were analyzed. In the category "neuropsychology," only effects on the visual system were homogeneous, showing a statistically significant impairment as a result of exposure to static magnetic fields (d = -0.415). Vital signs were not affected and effects on sensory perceptions included an increase of dizziness and vertigo, primarily caused by movement during static magnetic field gradient exposures. The number of studies dealing with this topic is very small and the experimental set-up of some of the analyzed studies makes it difficult to accurately determine the effects of static magnetic fields by themselves, excluding nonspecific factors. The implications of these results for MRI lead to suggestions for improvement in research designs.

  5. Magnetic field and remanent magnetization effects of basin-forming impacts on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.

    1987-01-01

    Maps of the distribution of lunar surface magnetic fields produced by the electron reflection method have shown that the largest observed concentrations of lunar crustal magnetization occur antipodal (diametrically opposite) to four relatively young large impact basins: Imbrium, Orientale, Serenitatis, and Crisium. A model is proposed here for the formation of these magnetization concentrations (or 'magcons') in which the partially ionized vapor cloud produced in a hypervelocity (greater than 10 km/s) basin-forming impact expands around the moon forcing a preexisting ambient magnetic field to be concentrated for a brief (less than 1 day) time period in the antipodal zone. Acquisition of magnetic remanence during the period of compressed field amplification may occur by one of several mechanisms, such as shock remanence by impact of solid secondaries ejected from the basin-forming event. The model implies that basin-forming impacts have played a major role in determining the large-scale distribution of crustal magnetization detectable from lunar orbit.

  6. Effect of a magnetic field on the adsorptive removal of methylene blue onto wheat straw biochar.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoting; Zhu, Weiyong; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Lili; Zhu, Lingfeng; Zhao, Weigao

    2016-04-01

    Biochar pyrolyzed from wheat straw was innovatively used for the adsorptive removal of cationic dye methylene blue through exposure to a magnetic field. The adsorption capability of the biochar pyrolyzed at 200 °C exceeded that of samples pyrolyzed at higher temperatures. The surface acidic functional groups of wheat straw biochar were deduced to be more sensitive to the effects of the external magnetic field. The enhancement of the magnetic field achieved by increases in the initial dye concentration, and a decrease in the biochar dosage and solution pH, were more significant compared with those caused by other conditions. Kinetic experiments indicated that chemisorption occurred during adsorption. The qmax values for dye adsorption without, and with, an external magnetic field were found to be 46.6 and 62.5mg/g, respectively. These demonstrated that wheat straw biochar could be used for the efficient adsorption of pollutants when assisted by an external magnetic field.

  7. Exciton effective mass enhancement in coupled quantum wells in electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, J.; Muljarov, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a calculation of exciton states in semiconductor coupled quantum wells in the presence of electric and magnetic fields applied perpendicular to the QW plane. The exciton Schrödinger equation is solved in real space in three-dimensions to obtain the Landau levels of both direct and indirect excitons. Calculation of the exciton energy levels and oscillator strengths enables mapping of the electric and magnetic field dependence of the exciton absorption spectrum. For the ground state of the system, we evaluate the Bohr radius, optical lifetime, binding energy and dipole moment. The exciton mass renormalization due to the magnetic field is calculated using a perturbative approach. We predict a non-monotonous dependence of the exciton ground state effective mass on magnetic field. Such a trend is explained in a classical picture, in terms of the ground state tending from an indirect to a direct exciton with increasing magnetic field.

  8. The Effect of a Rotating Magnetic Field on Flow Stability During Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Martin P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of a rotating magnetic field on the stability of flow in crystal growth configurations has been experimentally modeled using liquid gallium contained in a finite cylinder and heated from below. Several distinct flow regions were determined as a function of the Rayleigh and Hartmann numbers. At low values of the Rayleigh and Hartmann numbers, a region of stationary flow exists. As the rotating magnetic field is increased, the critical Rayleigh number bounding the stationary flow region can increase by a factor of 10. However, the rotating magnetic field itself induces an instability at a critical value of the Hartmann number independent of the Rayleigh number. In the stationary flow region, the rotating magnetic field can induce fluid motion with velocities several orders of magnitude larger than typical semiconductor crystal growth velocities. Thus, a rotating magnetic field can be used to achieve the benefits of forced convection without triggering deleterious instabilities.

  9. Effect of the magnetic field direction on forced convection heat transfer enhancements in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherief, Wahid; Avenas, Yvan; Ferrouillat, Sébastien; Kedous-Lebouc, Afef; Jossic, Laurent; Berard, Jean; Petit, Mickael

    2015-07-01

    Applying a magnetic field on a ferrofluid flow induces a large increase of the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper, the thermal-hydraulic behaviors of two commercial ferrofluids are compared. The variations of both the pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficient due to the magnetic field are measured in the following conditions: square duct, laminar flow and uniform wall heat flux. The square section with two insulated walls allows for the characterization of the effect of the magnetic field direction. The experimental results show that the heat transfer is better enhanced when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. In the best case, the local heat transfer coefficient increase is about 75%. On the contrary, another experimental setup shows no enhancement of thermal conductivity when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2014) - Elected submissions", edited by Adel Razek

  10. MO-G-BRF-09: Investigating Magnetic Field Dose Effects in Mice: A Monte Carlo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Melancon, A; Hazle, J; Court, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-linac treatments, radiation dose distributions are affected by magnetic fields, especially at high-density/low-density interfaces. Radiobiological consequences of magnetic field dose effects are presently unknown; therefore, preclinical studies are needed to ensure the safe clinical use of MRI-linacs. This study investigates the optimal combination of beam energy and magnetic field strength needed for preclinical murine studies. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 was used to simulate the effects of a magnetic field when irradiating a mouse-sized lung phantom with a 1.0cmx1.0cm photon beam. Magnetic field effects were examined using various beam energies (225kVp, 662keV[Cs-137], and 1.25MeV[Co-60]) and magnetic field strengths (0.75T, 1.5T, and 3T). The resulting dose distributions were compared to Monte Carlo results for humans with various field sizes and patient geometries using a 6MV/1.5T MRI-linac. Results: In human simulations, the addition of a 1.5T magnetic field caused an average dose increase of 49% (range:36%–60%) to lung at the soft tissue-to-lung interface and an average dose decrease of 30% (range:25%–36%) at the lung-to-soft tissue interface. In mouse simulations, the magnetic fields had no effect on the 225kVp dose distribution. The dose increases for the Cs-137 beam were 12%, 33%, and 49% for 0.75T, 1.5T, and 3.0T magnetic fields, respectively while the dose decreases were 7%, 23%, and 33%. For the Co-60 beam, the dose increases were 14%, 45%, and 41%, and the dose decreases were 18%, 35%, and 35%. Conclusion: The magnetic field dose effects observed in mouse phantoms using a Co-60 beam with 1.5T or 3T fields and a Cs-137 beam with a 3T field compare well with those seen in simulated human treatments with an MRI-linac. These irradiator/magnet combinations are suitable for preclinical studies investigating potential biological effects of delivering radiation therapy in the presence of a magnetic field. Partially funded by Elekta.

  11. The effect of magnetic field intensity and treatment time on graphene / epoxy composites’ fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z. Q.; Zhang, L.; Fu, S.; Yuan, R. H.; Dong, Z. W.; Ren, X. M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the intensity of the magnetic field and the treatment time on the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composites is researched. Also, the mechanism of the effect of the magnetic field on the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composites and a method to improve the impact resistance is explored. Then, three-point bending tests are employed to characterize the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composite. The results show that the intervention of magnetic field could induce GNS to generated orientation arrangement, improving the fracture toughness of the graphene/epoxy composite. When the intensity of the magnetic field was increased, the growth rate of the fracture toughness slowed. However, when 2T magnetic was used to synthetically process the material, and when the processing time was less than 50 min, the fracture toughness of the composite material increased significantly.

  12. Hydraulic concentration of magnetic fields in the solar photosphere. II - Bernoulli effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic filaments in the solar photosphere are subject to vigorous kneading and massaging by the convective turbulence at, and beneath, the visible surface. It is shown that the Bernoulli effect of the consequent surging of fluid up and down along the filaments is a major factor in concentrating the magnetic pressure of the filament (the mean square field). The mean field is also increased if the phase velocity of the external massaging exceeds the Alfven speed within the filament. The net observational magnetic result of the surging, then, depends upon the response of the observing instrument, and whether it essentially observes the mean field, the rms field, or whether there are saturation effects. It is suggested that the chromospheric mottles (spicules) seen in H alpha are in fact the intense magnetic filaments that carry most of the magnetic flux across the photospheric boundary of the sun.

  13. Effect of different magnetic field distributions on laminar ferroconvection heat transfer in horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhnejad, Yahya; Hosseini, Reza; Saffar-avval, Majid

    2015-09-01

    The forced convection heat transfer of ferrofluid steady state laminar flow through a circular axisymmetric horizontal pipe under different magnetic field is the focus of this study. The pipe is under constant heat flux while different linear axial magnetic fields were applied on the ferrofluid with equal magnetic energy. In this scenario, viscosity of ferrofluid is temperature dependent, to capture ferrofluid real behavior a nonlinear Langevin equation was considered for equilibrium magnetization. For this purpose, the set of nonlinear governing PDEs was solved using proper CFD techniques: the finite volume method and SIMPLE algorithm were used to discretize and numerically solve the governing equation in order to obtain thermohydrodynamic flow characteristics. The numerical results show a promising enhancement of up to 135.7% in heat transfer as a consequence of the application of magnetic field. The magnetic field also increases pressure loss of up to 77% along the pipe; but effectiveness (favorable to unfavorable effect ratio) of the magnetic field as a performance index economically justifies its application such that higher magnetic field intensity causes higher effectiveness of up to 1.364.

  14. Direct observation of f-pair magnetic field effects and time-dependence of radical pair composition using rapidly switched magnetic fields and time-resolved infrared methods.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Jonathan R; Foster, Timothy J; Salaoru, Adrian T; Vink, Claire B

    2008-07-21

    A rapidly switched (<10 ns) magnetic field was employed to directly observe magnetic fields from f-pair reactions of radical pairs in homogeneous solution. Geminate radical pairs from the photoabstraction reaction of benzophenone from cyclohexanol were observed directly using a pump-probe pulsed magnetic field method to determine their existence time. No magnetic field effects from geminate pairs were observed at times greater than 100 ns after initial photoexcitation. By measuring magnetic field effects for fields applied continuously only after this initial geminate period, f-pair effects could be directly observed. Measurement of the time-dependence of the field effect for the photolysis of 2-hydroxy-4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-2-methylpropiophenone in cyclohexanol using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy revealed not only the presence of f-pair magnetic field effects but also the ability of the time dependence of the MARY spectra to observe the changing composition of the randomly encountering pairs throughout the second order reaction period.

  15. Cosmic ray pressure driven magnetic field amplification: dimensional, radiative and field orientation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, T. P.; Drury, L. O'C.

    2014-10-01

    Observations of non-thermal emission from several supernova remnants suggest that magnetic fields close to the blastwave are much stronger than would be naively expected from simple shock compression of the field permeating the interstellar medium (ISM). We investigate in some detail a simple model based on turbulence generation by cosmic ray pressure gradients. Previously, this model was investigated using 2D magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Motivated by the well-known qualitative differences between 2D and 3D turbulence, we further our investigations of this model using both 2D and 3D simulations to study the influence of the dimensionality of the simulations on the field amplification achieved. Further, since the model implies the formation of shocks which can, in principle, be efficiently cooled by collisional cooling, we include such cooling in our simulations to ascertain whether it could increase the field amplification achieved. Finally, we examine the influence of different orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the normal of the blastwave. We find that dimensionality has a slight influence on the overall amplification achieved, but a significant impact on the morphology of the amplified field. Collisional cooling has surprisingly little impact, primarily due to the short time which any element of the ISM resides in the precursor region for supernova blastwaves. Even allowing for a wide range of orientations of the magnetic field, we find that the magnetic field can be expected to be amplified by, on average, at least an order of magnitude in the precursors of supernova blastwaves.

  16. Facility Measures Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honess, Shawn B.; Narvaez, Pablo; Mcauley, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Partly automated facility measures and computes steady near magnetic field produced by object. Designed to determine magnetic fields of equipment to be installed on spacecraft including sensitive magnetometers, with view toward application of compensating fields to reduce interfernece with spacecraft-magnetometer readings. Because of its convenient operating features and sensitivity of its measurements, facility serves as prototype for similar facilities devoted to magnetic characterization of medical equipment, magnets for high-energy particle accelerators, and magnetic materials.

  17. Behavioral effects on rats of motion within a high static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Thomas A; Carella, Lee; Gonzalez, Dani; Janowitz, Ilana; Mueller, Anthony; Mueller, Kathleen; Neth, Bryan; Smith, James C

    2011-03-01

    Some human subjects report vestibular disturbances such as vertigo, apparent motion, and nausea around or within high strength MRI systems operating at 4 T to 9.4 T. These vestibular effects have been ascribed to the consequences of movement through the high magnetic field. We have previously found that exposure to magnetic fields above 7 T suppresses rearing, causes locomotor circling, and induces conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in rodents. The present experiments were designed to test the effects on rats of motion through the magnetic field of the 14.1 T superconducting magnet. In Experiment 1, we compared the effects of multiple rapid insertions and removals from the center of the magnet to the effects of continuous exposure. Repeated traversal of the magnetic field gradient with only momentary exposure to 14.1 T was sufficient to suppress rearing and induce a significant CTA. Repeated insertion and removal from the magnet, however, did not have a greater effect than a single 30-min exposure on either acute locomotor behavior or CTA acquisition. Prolonged exposure was required to induce locomotor circling. In the second series of experiments, we controlled the rate of insertion and removal by means of an electric motor. Locomotor circling appeared to be dependent on the speed of insertion and removal, but the suppression of rearing and the acquisition of CTA were independent of speed of insertion and removal. In Experiment 3, we inserted rats into the center of the magnet and then rotated them about their rostral-caudal axis during a 30-min 14.1 T exposure. Rotation within the magnet did not modulate the behavioral effects of exposure. We conclude that, in rats, movement through the steep gradient of a high magnetic field has some behavioral effects, but sustained exposure to the homogenous center of the field is required for the full behavioral consequences. PMID:21118699

  18. Numerical simulation of dielectric bubbles coalescence under the effects of uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadidi, Amin; Jalali-Vahid, Davood

    2016-06-01

    In this research, the co-axial coalescence of a pair of gas bubbles rising in a viscous liquid column under the effects of an external uniform magnetic field is simulated numerically. Considered fluids are dielectric, and applied magnetic field is uniform. Effects of different strengths of magnetic field on the interaction of in-line rising bubbles and coalescence between them were investigated. For numerical modeling of the problem, a computer code was developed to solve the governing equations which are continuity, Navier-Stokes equation, magnetic field equation and level set and reinitialization of level set equations. The finite volume method is used for the discretization of the continuity and momentum equations using SIMPLE scheme where the finite difference method is used to discretization of the magnetic field equations. Also a level set method is used to capture the interface of two phases. The results are compared with available numerical and experimental results in the case of no-magnetic field effect which show a good agreement. It is found that uniform magnetic field accelerates the coalescence of the bubbles in dielectric fluids and enhances the rise velocity of the coalesced bubble.

  19. Training effects induced by cycling of magnetic field in ferromagnetic rich phase-separated nanocomposite manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kalipada; Das, I.

    2015-12-01

    We have carried out an experimental investigation of magneto-transport and magnetic properties of charge-ordered Pr0.67Ca0.33MnO3 (PCMO) and ferromagnetic La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) nanoparticles along with a nanocomposite consisting of those two types of nanoparticles. From the magneto-transport measurements, clear irreversibility is observed in the field dependence of resistance due to magnetic field cycling in the case of PCMO nanoparticles. The value of resistance increases during such a field cycling. However such an irreversibility is absent in the case of LSMO nanoparticles as well as nanocomposites. On the other hand, the magnetic measurements indicate the gradual growth of antiferromagnetic phases in all samples leading to a decrease in magnetization. These inconsistencies between magneto-transport and magnetic behaviors are attributed to the magnetic training effects.

  20. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1995-12-31

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with an electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater than the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. Magnetic switches and particularly fast kicker magnets are used in the accelerator industry to quickly deflect particle beams into and out of various transport lines, storage rings, dumps, and specifically to differentially route individual bunches of particles from a train of bunches which are injected or ejected from a given ring.

  1. Magnetic field mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, R. M.; Stenger, F. J.

    1969-01-01

    Magnetic field mapper locates imperfections in cadmium sulphide solar cells by detecting and displaying the variations of the normal component of the magnetic field resulting from current density variations. It can also inspect for nonuniformities in other electrically conductive materials.

  2. Structure-specific magnetic field inhomogeneities and its effect on the correlation time.

    PubMed

    Ziener, Christian H; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Melkus, Gerd; Weber, Thomas; Herold, Volker; Jakob, Peter M

    2006-12-01

    We describe the relationship between the correlation time and microscopic spatial inhomogeneities in the static magnetic field. The theory takes into account diffusion of nuclear spins in the inhomogeneous field created by magnetized objects. A simple general expression for the correlation time is obtained. It is shown that the correlation time is dependent on a characteristic length, the diffusion coefficient of surrounding medium, the permeability of the surface and the volume fraction of the magnetized objects. For specific geometries (spheres and cylinders), exact analytical expressions for the correlation time are given. The theory can be applied to contrast agents (magnetically labeled cells), capillary network, BOLD effect and so forth.

  3. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  4. Magnetic field effects on dental amalgam in divers welding and cutting electrically underwater

    SciTech Connect

    Ortendahl, T.W.; Hoegstedt, P.

    1988-11-01

    Divers have for some years been complaining about a metallic taste in the mouth while electrically welding and cutting underwater. This paper reports on results from an assessment of this problem. It was hypothesized that the magnetic fields arising from the welding or cutting current could correlate with the reported symptoms. The intraoral magnetic flux density was calculated to 1.15 mT, at 650 ADC, in a normal cutting situation. This was verified in vivo. This magnetic field was shown to contain an AC component that is a candidate for inducing secondary currents in the oral tissues and restorative materials. Five submerged divers exposed to a magnetic field of 0.35 mT did not report any metallic taste. Magnetophosphenes were reported by 1 diver. (Magnetophosphenes are luminous impressions due to excitement of the retina by a magnetic field in addition to or in place of impingement of light rays.) Only a slight shielding effect to magnetic fields was observed due to a copper-brass helmet. An in vitro model for exposure of dental amalgams to magnetic fields was designed. Recommendations for decreasing the magnetic field surrounding the diver in practical work is given.

  5. Magnetic field effects on THz radiation from rectangular shape Bi2212 IJJ’s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaki, Kazuhiro; Tsujimoto, Manabu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Minami, Hidetoshi; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2010-12-01

    The effects of magnetic field on terahertz radiation emitted from the rectangular mesa of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ’s) made of Bi2212 single crystals were studied up to 150 Oe. Strong suppression of the radiation power was observed when magnetic field was applied to the c-axis of the sample, while in the case of H//ab-plane, the radiation power showed a weak and broad peak in the weak field region (˜50 Oe), then it decreased and diminished around 150 Oe. These magnetic field effects are interpreted by the strong influence of magnetic field on the I-V curve, which set up the condition for the THz radiation.

  6. Effect of interplanetary magnetic field on ionosphere over the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Patel, V. L.

    1975-01-01

    Large and quick changes of the latitude of the interplanetary magnetic field from its southward to northward direction are shown to be associated with the disappearance of the Es-q layer (Knecht, 1959) at the equatorial ionosphere during the daytime or with the reversal of E region horizontal and F region vertical electron drifts during both night and day. This phenomenon is suggested as the imposition of an electric field in the ionosphere in a direction opposite to that of the Sq electric field. The resultant electrostatic field on the equatorial ionosphere would be decreased or even reversed from its normal direction, resulting in the reduction of electron drift velocity. When the normal Sq field is over-compensated by the magnetospheric electric field, the electron drifts are reversed and the irregularities in the E region due to the cross-field instabilities are inhibited, resulting in the sudden disappearance of the Es-q layers.

  7. Effect of a Transverse Magnetic Field on Stray Grain Formation of Ni-Based Single Crystal Superalloy During Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weidong; Liu, Huan; Lan, Jian; Li, Chuanjun; Zhong, Yunbo; Li, Xi; Cao, Guanghui; Ren, Zhongming

    2016-08-01

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on stray grain formation during directional solidification of superalloy was investigated. Experimental results indicated that the transverse magnetic field effectively suppressed the stray grain formation on the side the primary dendrite diverges from the mold wall. Moreover, the quenched experimental results indicated that the solid/liquid interface shape was obviously changed in a transverse magnetic field. The effect of a transverse magnetic field on stray grain formation was discussed.

  8. Vector Tomography for the Coronal Magnetic Field. II. Hanle Effect Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, M.; Inhester, B.; Lin, H.; Davila, J.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of saturated coronal Hanle effect vector tomography or the application of vector tomographic inversion techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional magnetic field configuration of the solar corona using linear polarization measurements of coronal emission lines. We applied Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion to artificial data produced from analytical coronal magnetic field models with equatorial and meridional currents and global coronal magnetic field models constructed by extrapolation of real photospheric magnetic field measurements. We tested tomographic inversion with only Stokes Q, U, electron density, and temperature inputs to simulate observations over large limb distances where the Stokes I parameters are difficult to obtain with ground-based coronagraphs. We synthesized the coronal linear polarization maps by inputting realistic noise appropriate for ground-based observations over a period of two weeks into the inversion algorithm. We found that our Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion can partially recover the coronal field with a poloidal field configuration, but that it is insensitive to a corona with a toroidal field. This result demonstrates that Hanle effect vector tomography is an effective tool for studying the solar corona and that it is complementary to Zeeman effect vector tomography for the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field.

  9. VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY FOR THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD. II. HANLE EFFECT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kramar, M.; Inhester, B.; Lin, H.; Davila, J. E-mail: Joseph.M.Davila@nasa.gov E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-09-20

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of saturated coronal Hanle effect vector tomography or the application of vector tomographic inversion techniques to reconstruct the three-dimensional magnetic field configuration of the solar corona using linear polarization measurements of coronal emission lines. We applied Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion to artificial data produced from analytical coronal magnetic field models with equatorial and meridional currents and global coronal magnetic field models constructed by extrapolation of real photospheric magnetic field measurements. We tested tomographic inversion with only Stokes Q, U, electron density, and temperature inputs to simulate observations over large limb distances where the Stokes I parameters are difficult to obtain with ground-based coronagraphs. We synthesized the coronal linear polarization maps by inputting realistic noise appropriate for ground-based observations over a period of two weeks into the inversion algorithm. We found that our Hanle effect vector tomographic inversion can partially recover the coronal field with a poloidal field configuration, but that it is insensitive to a corona with a toroidal field. This result demonstrates that Hanle effect vector tomography is an effective tool for studying the solar corona and that it is complementary to Zeeman effect vector tomography for the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field.

  10. Preliminary Results of Performance Measurements on a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster with Magnetic Field Generated by Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Raitses, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster, which more readily lends itself to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, was measured using a planar plasma probe and a thrust stand. The field in the cylindrical thruster was produced using permanent magnets, promising a power reduction over previous cylindrical thruster iterations that employed electromagnets to generate the required magnetic field topology. Two sets of ring-shaped permanent magnets are used, and two different field configurations can be produced by reorienting the poles of one magnet relative to the other. A plasma probe measuring ion flux in the plume is used to estimate the current utilization for the two magnetic configurations. The measurements indicate that electron transport is impeded much more effectively in one configuration, implying a higher thrust efficiency. Preliminary thruster performance measurements on this configuration were obtained over a power range of 100-250 W. The thrust levels over this power range were 3.5-6.5 mN, with anode efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 14-19% and 875- 1425 s, respectively. The magnetic field in the thruster was lower for the thrust measurements than the plasma probe measurements due to heating and weakening of the permanent magnets, reducing the maximum field strength from 2 kG to roughly 750-800 G. The discharge current levels observed during thrust stand testing were anomalously high compared to those levels measured in previous experiments with this thruster.

  11. Magnetic fields as triggers of microalga growth: evaluation of its effect on Spirulina sp.

    PubMed

    Deamici, Kricelle Mosquera; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; Santos, Lucielen Oliveira

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the influence of magnetic field on the growth and biomass composition of Spirulina sp., cultivated in vertical tubular photobioreactors. Magnetic fields of 5, 30 and 60mT generated by electric current and ferrite magnets were applied at different lengths of time. The magnetic field of 30 and 60mT for 1hd(-1) stimulated the growth, thus leading to higher biomass concentration by comparison with the control culture. Increase in productivity, protein and carbohydrate contents were 105.1% (60mT for 1hd(-1)), 16.6% (60mT for 24hd(-1)) and 133.2% (30mT for 24hd(-1)), respectively. These values were higher than the ones of the control. Results showed that magnetic field may influence the growth of Spirulina sp., since it triggers a stimulating effect and can leads to twofold biomass concentration in equal cultivation time periods. PMID:27566513

  12. Experimental Investigation of Effectiveness of Magnetic Field on Food Freezing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toru; Takeuchi, Yuri; Masuda, Kazunori; Watanabe, Manabu; Shirakashi, Ryo; Fukuda, Yutaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Koga, Nobumitsu; Hiruma, Naoya; Ichioka, Jun; Takai, Kiyoshi

    Recently, several food refrigeration equipments that utilize magnetic field have attracted much attention from food production companies, consumers and mass media. However, the effectiveness of the freezers is not scientifically examined. Therefore, the effectiveness should be clarified by experiments or theoretical considerations. In this study, the effect of weak magnetic field (about 0.0005 T) on freezing process of several kinds of foods was investigated by using a specially designed freezer facilitated with magnetic field generator. The investigation included the comparison of freezing curves, drip amount, physicochemical evaluations on color and texture, observation of microstructure, and sensory evaluation. From the results of the control experiments, it can be concluded that weak magnetic field around 0.0005 T provided no significant difference on temperature history during freezing and on the qualities of frozen foods, within our experimental conditions.

  13. Effect of magnetic field fluctuation on ultra-low field MRI measurements in the unshielded laboratory environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Chang, Baolin; Qiu, Longqing; Dong, Hui; Qiu, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations in our unshielded urban laboratory can reach hundreds of nT in the noisy daytime and is only a few nT in the quiet midnight. The field fluctuation causes the Larmor frequency fL to drift randomly for several Hz during the unshielded ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements, thus seriously spoiling the averaging effect and causing imaging artifacts. By using an active compensation (AC) technique based on the spatial correlation of the low-frequency magnetic field fluctuation, the field fluctuation can be suppressed to tens of nT, which is a moderate situation between the noisy daytime and the quiet midnight. In this paper, the effect of the field fluctuation on ULF MRI measurements was investigated. The 1D and 2D MRI signals of a water phantom were measured using a second-order low-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in three fluctuation cases: severe fluctuation (noisy daytime), moderate fluctuation (daytime with AC) and minute fluctuation (quiet midnight) when different gradient fields were applied. When the active compensation is applied or when the frequency encoding gradient field Gx reaches a sufficiently strong value in our measurements, the image artifacts become invisible in all three fluctuation cases. Therefore it is feasible to perform ULF-MRI measurements in unshielded urban environment without imaging artifacts originating from magnetic fluctuations by using the active compensation technique and/or strong gradient fields.

  14. Effect of magnetic field fluctuation on ultra-low field MRI measurements in the unshielded laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Chang, Baolin; Qiu, Longqing; Dong, Hui; Qiu, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations in our unshielded urban laboratory can reach hundreds of nT in the noisy daytime and is only a few nT in the quiet midnight. The field fluctuation causes the Larmor frequency fL to drift randomly for several Hz during the unshielded ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements, thus seriously spoiling the averaging effect and causing imaging artifacts. By using an active compensation (AC) technique based on the spatial correlation of the low-frequency magnetic field fluctuation, the field fluctuation can be suppressed to tens of nT, which is a moderate situation between the noisy daytime and the quiet midnight. In this paper, the effect of the field fluctuation on ULF MRI measurements was investigated. The 1D and 2D MRI signals of a water phantom were measured using a second-order low-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in three fluctuation cases: severe fluctuation (noisy daytime), moderate fluctuation (daytime with AC) and minute fluctuation (quiet midnight) when different gradient fields were applied. When the active compensation is applied or when the frequency encoding gradient field Gx reaches a sufficiently strong value in our measurements, the image artifacts become invisible in all three fluctuation cases. Therefore it is feasible to perform ULF-MRI measurements in unshielded urban environment without imaging artifacts originating from magnetic fluctuations by using the active compensation technique and/or strong gradient fields. PMID:26037135

  15. Magnetoelectric effect in antiferromagnetic LiCoPO4 in pulsed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrustalyov, V. M.; Savytsky, V. M.; Kharchenko, M. F.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetoelectric effect in single-crystal LiCoPO4 (TN = 21.8 K) is studied in strong pulsed magnetic fields which destroy the antiferromagnetic structure of the crystal spin ordering. The electric polarization along the crystallographic a axis induced by a magnetic field H||b is measured. New features of the electric polarization in a magnetic field are found, including a spike in the polarization near the field for the first magnetic transition at H1 = 123 kOe, a recovery of the electric polarization at the second magnetic transition H2 = 210 kOe, and a gradual reduction to zero on approaching the third transition at H3 = 263 kOe. Various possible magnetic structures in the high field phases are examined which are consistent with their magnetization and electric polarization. The observed linear dependence of the polarization on field strength in the initial antiferromagnetic phase and the vanishing of the polarization in the first high-field phase are in good agreement with previous studies of the magnetoelectric effect in LiCoPO4 [Wiegelmann et al., Ferroelectrics 161, 147 (1994); H. Wiegelman, Ph.D. thesis (University of Konstanz, Konstanz, 1995)].

  16. Non-Temperature Induced Effects of Magnetized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Alternating Magnetic Field in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hapuarachchige, Sudath; Kato, Yoshinori; Ngen, Ethel J.; Smith, Barbara; Delannoy, Michael; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the damaging effects of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (MNP) on magnetically labeled cancer cells when subjected to oscillating gradients in a strong external magnetic field. Human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were labeled with MNP, placed in the high magnetic field, and subjected to oscillating gradients generated by an imaging gradient system of a 9.4T preclinical MRI system. Changes in cell morphology and a decrease in cell viability were detected in cells treated with oscillating gradients. The cytotoxicity was determined qualitatively and quantitatively by microscopic imaging and cell viability assays. An approximately 26.6% reduction in cell viability was detected in magnetically labeled cells subjected to the combined effect of a static magnetic field and oscillating gradients. No reduction in cell viability was observed in unlabeled cells subjected to gradients, or in MNP-labeled cells in the static magnetic field. As no increase in local temperature was observed, the cell damage was not a result of hyperthermia. Currently, we consider the coherent motion of internalized and aggregated nanoparticles that produce mechanical moments as a potential mechanism of cell destruction. The formation and dynamics of the intracellular aggregates of nanoparticles were visualized by optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The images revealed a rapid formation of elongated MNP aggregates in the cells, which were aligned with the external magnetic field. This strategy provides a new way to eradicate a specific population of MNP-labeled cells, potentially with magnetic resonance imaging guidance using standard MRI equipment, with minimal side effects for the host. PMID:27244470

  17. Critical component of the interplanetary magnetic field responsible for large geomagnetic effects in the polar cap.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilhjelm, J.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    An observed influence of the interplanetary magnetic-sector structure on the geomagnetic variations in the polar cap appears to be due to the component of the interplanetary magnetic field near the ecliptic perpendicular to the earth-sun direction. This suggests that the observed effect on the ground originates in the front of the magnetosphere.

  18. Critical component of the interplanetary magnetic field responsible for large geomagnetic effects in the polar cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Lassen, K.; Wilhjelm, J.; Wilcox, J. M.; Gonzalez, W.; Colburn, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    An observed influence is studied of the interplanetary magnetic sector structure on the geomagnetic variations in the polar cap which appears to be due to the component of the interplanetary magnetic field near the ecliptic perpendicular to the earth-sun direction. It is suggested that the observed effect on the ground originates in the front of the magnetosphere.

  19. On the cyclotron resonance mechanism for magnetic field effects on transmembrane ion conductivity.

    PubMed

    Halle, B

    1988-01-01

    The cyclotron resonance model, recently proposed to account for physiological response to weak environmental magnetic fields, is shown to violate the laws of classical mechanics. Further, it is argued that the ubiquitous presence of dynamic friction in fluid media precludes significant magnetic effects on membrane ion transport. PMID:2461205

  20. The magnetic shear-current effect: generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-04-01

    > A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. The effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo - in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is non-helical, with the mean field coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack of turbulent resistivity quenching by magnetic fluctuations. As well as being interesting for its applications to general high Reynolds number astrophysical turbulence, where strong small-scale magnetic fluctuations are expected to be prevalent, the magnetic shear-current effect is a likely candidate for large-scale dynamo in the unstratified regions of ionized accretion disks. Evidence for this is discussed, as well as future research directions and the challenges involved with understanding details of the effect in astrophysically relevant regimes.

  1. Magnetic field effect on the liquidus boundary of Bi-Mn binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Koyama, Keiichi; Oikawa, Katsunari; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    The magnetic field effect (MFE) on liquidus boundary of Bi-Mn binary system was investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and the computer coupling of phase diagram method (CALPHAD). The liquidus boundary for Bi-18at.%Mn and Bi-24at.%Mn rose clearly by the application of the magnetic fields. The MFE for liquidus boundary temperature Tliq changed from ΔTliq∝B2 to ΔTliq∝B because of the large increase of the peritectic temperature from BiMn and BiMn1.08 by the application of magnetic field.

  2. Electromagnetic field and the chiral magnetic effect in the quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Kirill

    2015-06-01

    Time evolution of an electromagnetic field created in heavy-ion collisions strongly depends on the electromagnetic response of the quark-gluon plasma, which can be described by the Ohmic and chiral conductivities. The latter is intimately related to the chiral magnetic effect. I argue that a solution to the classical Maxwell equations at finite chiral conductivity is unstable due to the soft modes k <σχ that grow exponentially with time. In the kinematical region relevant for the relativistic heavy-ion collisions, I derive analytical expressions for the magnetic field of a point charge. I show that finite chiral conductivity causes oscillations of magnetic field at early times.

  3. Properties of the resonant tunneling diode in external magnetic field with inclusion of the Rashba effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niketić, Nemanja; Milanović, Vitomir; Radovanović, Jelena

    2014-07-01

    Influence of the Rashba effect on electronic properties of resonant tunneling diode in an external magnetic field is analyzed in this paper. Wave functions and energies, as well as expressions for currents densities, are determined for electrons of both spins. Appearances of many modes due to the external magnetic field induce irregularities in the current-voltage characteristics, which are observable in case when the thermal energy is lower than, or comparable to, the energy difference of two consecutive Landau levels. Current density through the heterostructure is investigated with emphasis on the degree of spin polarization; further, spin transfer is shown to depend on the direction of external magnetic field.

  4. The induced magnetic and electric fields' paradox leading to multicaloric effects in multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vopson, Melvin M.

    2016-04-01

    Magneto-electric effect in multiferroics implies that an applied magnetic field induces an electric polarization change in a multiferroic solid and vice versa, an applied electric field modifies its magnetization. The magneto-electric effect is a powerful feature of multiferroics and has attracted huge interest due to potential technological applications. One such possible application is the multicaloric effect in multiferroics. However, a closer examination of this effect and its derivation leads to a paradox, in which the predicted changes in one of the order phase at a constant applied field are due to the excitation by the same field. Here this apparent paradox is first explained in detail and then solved. Understanding how electric and magnetic fields can be induced in multiferroic materials is an essential tool enabling their theoretical modeling as well as facilitating the introduction of future applications.

  5. Effects of open field line plasma on rotating magnetic field current drive in a field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milroy, Richard D.

    2001-06-01

    A numerical model has been used to study the effects that open field line plasma may have on the rotating magnetic field (RMF), when it is applied to a field-reversed configuration (FRC) for current drive. The model is a two-dimensional (r-θ) magnetohydrodynamic computer simulation. The RMF is found to be an extremely good particle pump, continuously sweeping plasma into the FRC from the outer region, and thus evacuating the space near the containment vessel wall. This effect can lead to a very low density near the wall, providing good thermal insulation. However, if there is a plasma source in the open field line region (such as outgassing from the containment vessel wall) capable of maintaining relatively low-density plasma, the RMF may be amplified in this region. While this effect may speed the rate of penetration, it also has a deleterious effect where excessive penetration leads to predictions of an internal structure that rotates slower than the RMF, and chaotic equilibrium.

  6. The effect of stabilizer on the trapped field of stacks of superconducting tape magnetized by a pulsed field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, A. G.; Patel, A.; Baskys, A.; Hopkins, S. C.; Kalitka, V.; Molodyk, A.; Glowacki, B. A.

    2015-08-01

    Stacks of high temperature superconducting tape, magnetized using pulsed fields, provide a new type of permanent magnet using superconductors. To optimize the trapped field in such stacks, the role of stabilization layers was investigated by pulse magnetizing a 12 mm square stack of 15 tape layers over a temperature range of 15-77 K. The stacks consisted of commercial tape with a silver stabilizer of 1-3 μm or tape with an additional 20 μm layer of copper on top of 1 μm of silver. It was found that the trapped field and flux are relatively insensitive to the stabilizer thickness, and 1 μm of silver only, led to the highest trapped field. An FEM model was also developed for a stack that considered for the first time both the actual thickness of metallic and superconducting layers, to investigate the effect of heating and heat transfer when a stack of tapes is magnetized.

  7. Chip-Based Measurements of Brownian Relaxation of Magnetic Beads Using a Planar Hall Effect Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerberg, Frederik W.; Dalslet, Bjarke T.; Snakenborg, Detlef; Johansson, Christer; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2010-12-01

    We present a simple `click-on' fluidic system with integrated electrical contacts, which is suited for electrical measurements on chips in microfluidic systems. We show that microscopic magnetic field sensors based on the planar Hall effect can be used for detecting the complex magnetic response using only the self-field arising from the bias current applied to the sensors as excitation field. We present measurements on a suspension of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 250 nm vs. temperature and find that the observations are consistent with the Cole-Cole model for Brownian relaxation with a constant hydrodynamic bead diameter when the temperature dependence of the viscosity of water is taken into account. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of performing measurements of the Brownian relaxation response in a lab-on-a-chip system and constitute the first step towards an integrated biosensor based on the detection of the dynamic response of magnetic beads.

  8. The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2013-05-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2-10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 6-1000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.06-10 T) could result in a factor of 2-500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix.

  9. The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2013-05-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2−10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 6–1000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.06–10 T) could result in a factor of 2–500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix.

  10. Effect of temperature and magnetic field on two-flavor superconducting quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Tanumoy; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of turning on temperature for the charge neutral phase of two-flavor color superconducting (2SC) dense quark matter in the presence of constant external magnetic field. Within the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, by tuning the diquark coupling strength, we study the interdependent evolution of the quark Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer gap and dynamical mass as functions of temperature and magnetic field. We find that magnetic field B ≳0.02 GeV2 (1 018 G ) leads to anomalous temperature behavior of the gap in the gapless 2SC phase (moderately strong coupling), reminiscent of previous results in the literature found in the limit of weak coupling without magnetic field. The 2SC gap in the strong coupling regime is abruptly quenched at ultrahigh magnetic field due to the mismatched Fermi surfaces of up and down quarks imposed by charge neutrality and oscillation of the gap due to Landau level quantization. The dynamical quark mass also displays strong oscillation and magnetic catalysis at high magnetic field, although the latter effect is tempered by nonzero temperature. We discuss the implications for newly born compact stars with superconducting quark cores.

  11. The Effect of Magnetic Fields on the Quorum Sensing-Regulated Luminescence of Vibrio fischeri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Addie; Hagen, Steve; Son, Minjun

    2015-03-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism by which bacteria communicate through the secretion and detection of extracellular signaling molecules known as autoinducers. This research focuses on the quorum sensing regulated bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri, a marine bacterium that lives in symbiosis with certain fish and squid species. Previous studies of V. harveyi, a close relative of V. fisheri, indicate that a strong magnetic field has a positive effect on V.harveyi bioluminescence. However the effect of magnetic fields on quorum sensing-regulated luminescence is in general poorly understood. We grew V. fischeri in solid and liquid growth media, subject to strong static magnetic fields, and imaged the bioluminescence over a period of forty-eight hours. Luminescence patterns were analyzed in both the spatial and time dimensions. We find no indication that a magnetic field influences Vibrio fischeri luminescence either positively or negatively. This research was funded by the Grant Number NSF DMR-1156737.

  12. Effects of a 60 Hz magnetic field on central cholinergic systems of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1993-03-15

    The authors studied the effects of an acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field on sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline uptake in the brain of the rat. Decreases in uptake were observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after the animals were exposed to a magnetic field at flux densities [>=] 0.75 mT. These effects of the magnetic field were blocked by pretreating the animals with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone, but not by the peripheral opioid antagonist, naloxone methiodide. These data indicate that the magnetic-field-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain were mediated by endogenous opioids in the central nervous systems.

  13. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q. Y.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×109 A/m2 under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only. PMID:26732287

  14. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q. Y.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×109 A/m2 under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only.

  15. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  16. Effects of magnetic fields on improving mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Keting; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of magnetic fields on improving the mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed are investigated in the paper. In this research, the magnetically fluidized bed (MFB) is used as the reactor in which ferromagnetic particles are fluidized with simulated flue gas under the influence of an external magnetic field. Lime slurry is continuously sprayed into the reactor. As a consequence, the desulfurization reaction and the slurry drying process take place simultaneously in the MFB. In this paper, the effects of ferromagnetic particles and external magnetic fields on the desulphurization efficiency are studied and compared with that of quartz particles as the fluidized particles. Experimental results show that the ferromagnetic particles not only act as a platform for lime slurry to precipitate on like quartz particles, but also take part in the desulfurization reaction. The results also show that the specific surface area of ferromagnetic particles after reaction is enlarged as the magnetic intensity increases, and the external magnetic field promotes the oxidation of S(IV), improving the mass transfer between sulphur and its sorbent. Hence, the efficiency of desulphurization under the effects of external magnetic fields is higher than that in general fluidized beds.

  17. Effect of a High Magnetic Field on Microstructures of Ni-Based Single Crystal Superalloy During Seed Melt-Back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weidong; Liu, Huan; Li, Chuanjun; Ren, Zhongming; Zhong, Yunbo; Li, Xi; Cao, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    The effects of a high magnetic field on microstructures during seed melt-back of superalloy were investigated. Experimental results indicated that the high magnetic field significantly modified the melt-back interface shape and the melt-back zone length. In addition, stray grain on the edge of sample was effectively suppressed in the high magnetic field. Based on experimental results and quantitative analysis, the above results should be attributed to the increasing temperature gradient in a high magnetic field.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion in the presence of internal gradients: the effect of magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F; Fordham, E J

    2010-02-01

    It is known that internal magnetic field gradients in porous materials, caused by susceptibility differences at the solid-fluid interfaces, alter the observed effective Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation times T2,eff. The internal gradients scale with the strength of the static background magnetic field B0. Here, we acquire data at various magnitudes of B0 to observe the influence of internal gradients on T2-T2 exchange measurements; the theory discussed and observations made are applicable to any T2-T2 analysis of heterogeneous materials. At high magnetic field strengths, it is possible to observe diffusive exchange between regions of local internal gradient extrema within individual pores. Therefore, the observed exchange pathways are not associated with pore-to-pore exchange. Understanding the significance of internal gradients in transverse relaxation measurements is critical to interpreting these results. We present the example of water in porous sandstone rock and offer a guideline to determine whether an observed T2,eff relaxation time distribution reflects the pore size distribution for a given susceptibility contrast (magnetic field strength) and spin echo separation. More generally, we confirm that for porous materials T1 provides a better indication of the pore size distribution than T2,eff at high magnetic field strengths (B0>1 T), and demonstrate the data analysis necessary to validate pore size interpretations of T2,eff measurements.

  19. Quantifying the motion of magnetic particles in excised tissue: Effect of particle properties and applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Sandip; Ramaswamy, Bharath; Horton, Emily; Gangapuram, Sruthi; Nacev, Alek; Depireux, Didier; Shimoji, Mika; Shapiro, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a method to investigate how magnetic particle characteristics affect their motion inside tissues under the influence of an applied magnetic field. Particles are placed on top of freshly excised tissue samples, a calibrated magnetic field is applied by a magnet underneath each tissue sample, and we image and quantify particle penetration depth by quantitative metrics to assess how particle sizes, their surface coatings, and tissue resistance affect particle motion. Using this method, we tested available fluorescent particles from Chemicell of four sizes (100 nm, 300 nm, 500 nm, and 1 μm diameter) with four different coatings (starch, chitosan, lipid, and PEG/P) and quantified their motion through freshly excised rat liver, kidney, and brain tissues. In broad terms, we found that the applied magnetic field moved chitosan particles most effectively through all three tissue types (as compared to starch, lipid, and PEG/P coated particles). However, the relationship between particle properties and their resulting motion was found to be complex. Hence, it will likely require substantial further study to elucidate the nuances of transport mechanisms and to select and engineer optimal particle properties to enable the most effective transport through various tissue types under applied magnetic fields.

  20. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  1. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  2. Effects of slot closure by soft magnetic powder wedge material in axial-field permanent magnet brushless machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, S.; Eastham, J. F.; Canova, A.

    1996-04-01

    The article reports on a study of the effects of slot closure in axial-field permanent magnet brushless machines by a two-dimensional finite element method (2D FEM) of analysis. The closure of the slots is made by using soft magnetic powder wedge material. Parameter values and machine performance for the open and closed slot configuration are computed. In order to test the 2D FEM model, calculated results are compared with measurements and favorable agreement is shown.

  3. North-South Asymmetries in Earth's Magnetic Field - Effects on High-Latitude Geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, K. M.; Cnossen, I.; Milan, S. E.; Haaland, S. E.; Coxon, J.; Pedatella, N. M.; Förster, M.; Reistad, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The solar-wind magnetosphere interaction primarily occurs at altitudes where the dipole component of Earth's magnetic field is dominating. The disturbances that are created in this interaction propagate along magnetic field lines and interact with the ionosphere-thermosphere system. At ionospheric altitudes, the Earth's field deviates significantly from a dipole. North-South asymmetries in the magnetic field imply that the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (M-I-T) coupling is different in the two hemispheres. In this paper we review the primary differences in the magnetic field at polar latitudes, and the consequences that these have for the M-I-T coupling. We focus on two interhemispheric differences which are thought to have the strongest effects: 1) A difference in the offset between magnetic and geographic poles in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and 2) differences in the magnetic field strength at magnetically conjugate regions. These asymmetries lead to differences in plasma convection, neutral winds, total electron content, ion outflow, ionospheric currents and auroral precipitation.

  4. Estimation of the effects of strong static magnetic fields on plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, O.

    In our recent studies we extensively used ponderomotive magnetic forces in high gradient magnetic fields (HGMF) for displacing organelles inside plant gravity receptor cells. Such displacement is a convenient tool both for investigating plant gravity perception mechanism and for physical characterization of the cell interior, and can have future practical applications in providing a directional stimulus for plants in microgravity. This method takes advantage of the magnetic heterogeneity of the receptor cells, namely stronger diamagnetism of starch-filled amyloplasts compared to cytoplasm (? æ < 0). Such particles are repelled from the zones of stronger field in a non-uniform field. To exert a force on amyloplasts, which is comparable to the gravity force, the dynamic factor of the field grad(H2 /2) needs to be 109 - 1 01 0 Oe 2 /cm, and the field intensity in the experimental magnetic systems typically varies from 0 to 2.5-104 Oe, while the size of the area of non-uniformity is 10-2 to 1 cm. Possible effects of such static magnetic fields on plants other than magnetophoresis of amyloplasts were estimated theoretically and tested experimentally. No statistically significant differences in growth rates or rates of gravicurvature were observed in experiments with Linum, Arabidopsis, Hordeum, Avena, Ceratodon and Chara between the plants grown in uniform magnetic fields of various intensities (102 to 2.5-104 Oe) and those grown in the Earth's magnetic field. Microscopic studies also did not detect any structural differences between test and control plants. The magnitudes of possible effects of static magnetic fields on plant cells and organs (including effects on ion currents, magneto-hydrodynamic effects in moving cytoplasm, ponderomotive forces on other cellular structures, effects on some biochemical reactions and biomolecules) were estimated theoretically. The estimations have shown, that these effects are small compared to the thermodynamic noise and thus are

  5. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  6. Effect of normal and parallel magnetic fields on the stability of interfacial flows of magnetic fluids in channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yecko, Philip

    2010-02-01

    The effect of an imposed magnetic field on the linear stability of immiscible two-fluid Poiseuille flow in a channel is examined for low Reynolds numbers. Surface tension acts on the interface, the fluids have different densities and viscosities, and one fluid is magnetic (ferrofluid). A Langevin function is used to model the fluid magnetization, resulting in a nonlinear permeability; the stability properties depend on this permeability relation both directly and indirectly, through the base state solution. Uniform magnetic fields applied normal or parallel to the interface both lead to an interfacial instability. Normal fields excite longer wavelength modes, generally having higher growth rates, but parallel fields can excite faster growing modes in high permeability fluids at large applied field strength. Whether or not the field stabilizes or destabilizes the flow depends on the viscosity and layer thickness ratios in a simple way, while the placement of the magnetic fluid layer does not play a major role. Growth rates predicted for realistic microchannel conditions are shown to be large enough to make ferrofluid manipulation a practical method of control.

  7. Generation of a Seed Magnetic Field around First Stars: The Biermann Battery Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Kentaro; Susa, Hajime

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the generation processes of magnetic fields around first stars. Since first stars are expected to form anisotropic ionization fronts in the surrounding clumpy media, magnetic fields are generated by the effects of radiation force, as well as the Biermann battery effect. We calculated the amplitude of the magnetic field generated by the effects of radiation force around the first stars in a preceding paper but the Biermann battery effects were not taken into account. In this paper, we calculate the generation of magnetic fields by the Biermann battery effect as well as the effects of radiation force, utilizing radiation hydrodynamics simulations. As a result, we find that the generated magnetic field strengths are ~10-19 G - 10-17 G at ~100 pc-1 kpc scale, an order of magnitude larger than the results of our previous study mainly as a result of the Biermann battery effect. We also find that this result is insensitive to various physical parameters including the mass of the source star and the distance between the source and the dense clump, unless we take unlikely values of these parameters.

  8. GENERATION OF A SEED MAGNETIC FIELD AROUND FIRST STARS: THE BIERMANN BATTERY EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Kentaro; Susa, Hajime E-mail: susa@konan-u.ac.jp

    2011-11-10

    We investigate the generation processes of magnetic fields around first stars. Since first stars are expected to form anisotropic ionization fronts in the surrounding clumpy media, magnetic fields are generated by the effects of radiation force, as well as the Biermann battery effect. We calculated the amplitude of the magnetic field generated by the effects of radiation force around the first stars in a preceding paper but the Biermann battery effects were not taken into account. In this paper, we calculate the generation of magnetic fields by the Biermann battery effect as well as the effects of radiation force, utilizing radiation hydrodynamics simulations. As a result, we find that the generated magnetic field strengths are {approx}10{sup -19} G - 10{sup -17} G at {approx}100 pc-1 kpc scale, an order of magnitude larger than the results of our previous study mainly as a result of the Biermann battery effect. We also find that this result is insensitive to various physical parameters including the mass of the source star and the distance between the source and the dense clump, unless we take unlikely values of these parameters.

  9. Effects of magnetic fields during high voltage live-line maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göcsei, Gábor; Kiss, István, Dr; Németh, Bálint

    2015-10-01

    In case of transmission and distribution networks, extra low frequency (typically 50 or 60 Hz) electric and magnetic fields have to be taken into consideration separately from each other. Health effects have been documented from exposures to both types of fields. Magnetic fields are qualified as possibly carcinogenic to humans (category “2B”) by WHO's cancer research institute, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), so it is essential to protect the workers against their harmful effects. During live-line maintenance (LLM) electric fields can be shielded effectively by different kinds of conductive clothing, which are enclosed metal surfaces acting as a Faraday-cage. In practice laboratory measurements also prove their efficiency, the required shielding ratio is above 99% by the related standard.. A set of measurements have proved that regular conductive clothing used against the electric fields cannot shield the magnetic fields effectively at all. This paper introduces the possible risks of LLM from the aspect of the health effects of magnetic fields. Although in this case the principle of shielding the electric fields cannot be applied, new considerations in equipment design and technology can be used as a possible solution. Calculations and simulations based on the data of the Hungarian transmission network - which represents the European grid as a part of ENTSO-E - and high-current laboratory measurement results also prove the importance of the topic.

  10. Magnetic field effects on copper metal deposition from copper sulfate aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Chikako; Maeda, Aya; Katsuki, Akio; Maki, Syou; Morimoto, Shotaro; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2014-05-01

    Effects of a magnetic field (≤0.5 T) on electroless copper metal deposition from the reaction of a copper sulfate aqueous solution and a zinc thin plate were examined in this study. In a zero field, a smooth copper thin film grew steadily on the plate. In a 0.38 T field, a smooth copper thin film deposited on a zinc plate within about 1 min. Then, it peeled off repeatedly from the plate. The yield of consumed copper ions increased about 2.1 times compared with that in a zero field. Mechanism of this magnetic field effect was discussed in terms of Lorentz force- and magnetic force-induced convection and local volta cell formation.

  11. Investigation of the effects of magnetic field exposure on human melatonin. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cook, M.R.; Cohen, H.D.

    1994-08-01

    Several rodent studies have suggested that magnetic field exposure may alter the daily pattern of melatonin secretion. This study investigated melatonin levels in mean exposed overnight to magnetic fields of 10 mG and 200 mG. The study also assessed the potential effects of exposure on a number of performance and self-reported endpoints in the subjects. Investigation of this area is important, as altered diurnal melatonin cycles have been linked to a variety of endpoints, including reproductive outcome, neurobehavioral function, and carcinogenesis. The results of this investigation did not support the a priori hypothesis that exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields of 10 mG and 200 mG alters nighttime melatonin levels in a population of adult males. However, the data suggested the possibility of differential sensitivity to magnetic fields based on an individual`s baseline melatonin level.

  12. Experimental Realization of Strong Effective Magnetic Fields in an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Aidelsburger, M.; Atala, M.; Trotzky, S.; Chen, Y.-A.; Bloch, I.; Nascimbene, S.

    2011-12-16

    We use Raman-assisted tunneling in an optical superlattice to generate large tunable effective magnetic fields for ultracold atoms. When hopping in the lattice, the accumulated phase shift by an atom is equivalent to the Aharonov-Bohm phase of a charged particle exposed to a staggered magnetic field of large magnitude, on the order of 1 flux quantum per plaquette. We study the ground state of this system and observe that the frustration induced by the magnetic field can lead to a degenerate ground state for noninteracting particles. We provide a measurement of the local phase acquired from Raman-induced tunneling, demonstrating time-reversal symmetry breaking of the underlying Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the quantum cyclotron orbit of single atoms in the lattice exposed to the magnetic field is directly revealed.

  13. Chain-induced effects in the Faraday instability on ferrofluids in a horizontal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhonoshin, V. V.; Lange, Adrian

    2004-04-01

    The linear stability analysis of the Faraday instability on a viscous ferrofluid in a horizontal magnetic field is performed. Strong dipole-dipole interactions lead to the formation of chains elongated in the field direction. The formation of chains results in a qualitative new behavior of the ferrofluid. This new behavior is characterized by a neutral stability curve similar to that observed earlier for Maxwell viscoelastic liquids and causes a significant weakening of the energy dissipation at high frequencies. In the case of a ferrofluid with chains in a horizontal magnetic field, the effective viscosity is anisotropic and depends on the field strength as well as on the wave frequency.

  14. Effects of Magnetic Field Topology on Secondary Neutron Spectra in MagLIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    Ignition in Magneto-Inertial Fusion schemes requires both inertial and magnetic confinement of the fuel and charged fusion products. Recent theoretical and experimental work has demonstrated the confinement of charged fusion products by magnetic fields in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments. This confinement can be inferred from the ratio of secondary to primary neutron yields and the shape of secondary neutron spectra. In this work we investigate the effects of magnetic field topology on the shape of secondary neutron spectra. The MagLIF design has a cylindrical geometry and includes both axial and azimuthal magnetic fields. The azimuthal field is initially in the liner surrounding the fuel but instability growth may cause it to penetrate into the fuel. Charged fusion products (such as tritons or alpha particles) that are isotropically emitted and then confined by an axial field will flow parallel and anti-parallel to the field with equal intensities. In the case of tritons, this motion results in a secondary neutron spectrum emitted in the axial direction that is symmetric. However, in an azimuthal field such particles exhibit singular orbits and there is a net ion drift along the axis. This ion drift can cause the secondary neutron spectrum to be asymmetric. We examine the effects on the spectrum shape of confinement by a combination of axial and azimuthal fields.

  15. The effect of magnetic field on copper in various corrosive medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, L. Y.; Othman, N. K.; Jalar, A.; Ismail, I.

    2014-09-03

    The effect of applied magnetic field on the corrosion behaviour of copper within various corrosive medium is investigated. The copper coupon is immersed in 0.5 M HCl, 0.5 M NaCl and 0.5 M NaOH with or without applying up to 40 mT magnetic fields for 24 hours. The weight loss of copper coupon in HCl increased up to 96.56% with applied magnetic fields. However, in NaOH medium, only 33.33% more weight loss was observed and no difference were observed for coupons in NaCl when magnetic field is applied. This observation indicates that corrosion behaviour in HCl and NaOH is controlled by mass transport that can be influenced by the induced magneto hydrodynamics effect when magnetic field is applied. There was no change in weight loss of copper in NaCl when magnetic field is applied because the corrosion mechanism of copper in NaCl is governed by electron charge transfer.

  16. An investigation of magnetic field effects on plume density and temperature profiles of an applied-field MPD thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, S. Ray; Myers, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    Applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance is below levels required for primary propulsion missions. While MPD thruster performance has been found to increase with the magnitude of the applied-field strength, there is currently little understanding of the impact of applied-field shape on thruster performance. The results of a study in which a single applied-field thruster was operated using three solenoidal magnets with diameters of 12.7, 15.2, and 30.4-cm are presented. Thruster voltage and anode power deposition were measured for each applied field shape over a range of field strengths. Plume electron number density and temperature distributions were measured using a Langmuir probe in an effort to determine the effect of field shape on plume confinement by the diverging magnetic-field for each of the three magnetic field shapes. Results show that the dependence of the measured thruster characteristics on field shape were non-monotonic and that the field shape had a significant effect on the plume density and temperature profiles.

  17. Exploiting time-resolved magnetic field effects for determining radical ion reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessmertnykh, A. O.; Borovkov, V. I.; Bagryansky, V. A.; Molin, Yu N.

    2016-07-01

    The capabilities of the method of time-resolved magnetic field effect in determining the rates of charge transfer reactions between radical ions and molecules on a nanosecond time scale have been investigated. The approach relies on the electron spin coherence in radical pair's partners generated by ionizing radiation. The spin evolution of the pair is sensitive to the reaction since the latter results in changing magnetic interactions of the unpaired electron. This process can be monitored by magnetic-field-sensitive fluorescence from an irradiated sample that is illustrated using reactions involving alkane radical cations. The accuracy and limitations of the approach are discussed.

  18. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Iziumov, Iu G; Izvekov, E I; Nepomniashchikh, V A

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior.

  19. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Iziumov, Iu G; Izvekov, E I; Nepomniashchikh, V A

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25438567

  20. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25508098

  1. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND ORIENTATION ON MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Hartmann, Lee W.; Stone, James M.

    2009-04-10

    We present a set of numerical simulations addressing the effects of magnetic field strength and orientation on the flow-driven formation of molecular clouds. Fields perpendicular to the flows sweeping up the cloud can efficiently prevent the formation of massive clouds but permit the buildup of cold, diffuse filaments. Fields aligned with the flows lead to substantial clouds, whose degree of fragmentation and turbulence strongly depends on the background field strength. Adding a random field component leads to a 'selection effect' for molecular cloud formation: high column densities are only reached at locations where the field component perpendicular to the flows is vanishing. Searching for signatures of colliding flows should focus on the diffuse, warm gas, since the cold gas phase making up the cloud will have lost the information about the original flow direction because the magnetic fields redistribute the kinetic energy of the inflows.

  2. The Effects of Ion heating in Martian Magnetic Crustal Fields: Particle Tracing and Ion Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C. M.; Andersson, L.

    2014-12-01

    Ion heating is a process that may allow low energy ions within the Martian ionosphere to be accelerated and escape. Ion heating can be especially efficient if the ions stay in the heating region for long time durations. With this in mind, the magnetic crustal field regions on Mars are particularly interesting. We focus on ions present within these regions, where changes in magnetic field strength and direction can heat these ions. Since crustal magnetic fields can maintain a trapped particle population it is unclear how efficiently plasma can be built up that can later escape to space. We investigate here two drivers: rotation of the planet and the solar wind pressure. As crustal fields rotate from the wake of the planet to the sub solar point and back, they experience compression and expansion over time scales of ~24 hours. The solar wind pressure on the other hand can cause variations over much shorter time scales (minutes). The effect of these two drivers using a particle tracing simulation that solves the Lorentz force is presented. O+ ions are seeded within the simulation box. The magnetic environment is a linear sum of a dipole field and a solar wind magnetic field. The dipole field represents the magnetic crustal field and the dipole strength is chosen to be consistent with MGS magnetometer observations of Martian crustal field regions. By increasing the solar wind strength the magnetic dipole is compressed. Decreasing solar wind strength allows the dipole to expand. Small magnitude, short time scale variations can be imposed over the top of this larger variation to represent short time scale solar wind variations. Since the purpose of this analysis is to understand the changes of the ion distribution inside the crustal field, simplistic assumptions of the field outside the crustal field can be made. Initial results are presented, with the focus on two main questions: (a) can low energy ions be heated and escape the closed dipole field lines as a result of

  3. Photopyroelectric Calorimetry of Magnetic Nanofluids: Effect of Type of Surfactant and Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadarlat, D.; Longuemart, S.; Turcu, R.; Streza, M.; Vekas, L.; Hadj Sahraoui, A.

    2014-11-01

    Five types of magnetic nanofluids, based on nanoparticles with water as the carrier liquid, were investigated by using the two photopyroelectric (PPE) detection configurations (back (BPPE) and front (FPPE)), together with the thermal-wave resonator cavity (TWRC) technique as the scanning procedure. The difference between the nanofluids was the type of surfactant: double layers of lauric (LA-LA), oleic (OA-OA), and miristic (MA-MA) acids and also double layers of lauric-miristic (LA-MA) and palmitic-oleic (PA-OA) fatty acids were used. In both detection configurations, the information was contained in the phase of the PPE signal. The thermal diffusivity of nanofluids was obtained in the BPPE configuration, from the scan of the phase of the signal as a function of the liquid's thickness. Using the same scanning procedure in the FPPE configuration, the thermal effusivity was directly measured. The influence of a 0.12 kG magnetic field on the thermal effusivity and thermal diffusivity was also investigated. Because of different surfactants, the thermal effusivity of the investigated nanofluids ranges from to , and the thermal diffusivity, from to . The magnetic field has practically no influence on the thermal effusivity, and produces a maximum increase of the thermal diffusivity (LA-LA surfactant) of about 4 %.

  4. Sub-millitesla magnetic field effects on the recombination reaction of flavin and ascorbic acid radicals.

    PubMed

    Evans, Emrys W; Kattnig, Daniel R; Henbest, Kevin B; Hore, P J; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R

    2016-08-28

    Even though the interaction of a <1 mT magnetic field with an electron spin is less than a millionth of the thermal energy at room temperature (kBT), it still can have a profound effect on the quantum yields of radical pair reactions. We present a study of the effects of sub-millitesla magnetic fields on the photoreaction of flavin mononucleotide with ascorbic acid. Direct control of the reaction pathway is achieved by varying the rate of electron transfer from ascorbic acid to the photo-excited flavin. At pH 7.0, we verify the theoretical prediction that, apart from a sign change, the form of the magnetic field effect is independent of the initial spin configuration of the radical pair. The data agree well with model calculations based on a Green's function approach that allows multinuclear spin systems to be treated including the diffusive motion of the radicals, their spin-selective recombination reactions, and the effects of the inter-radical exchange interaction. The protonation states of the radicals are uniquely determined from the form of the magnetic field-dependence. At pH 3.0, the effects of two chemically distinct radical pair complexes combine to produce a pronounced response to ∼500 μT magnetic fields. These findings are relevant to the magnetic responses of cryptochromes (flavin-containing proteins proposed as magnetoreceptors in birds) and may aid the evaluation of effects of weak magnetic fields on other biologically relevant electron transfer processes. PMID:27586950

  5. Sub-millitesla magnetic field effects on the recombination reaction of flavin and ascorbic acid radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Emrys W.; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Henbest, Kevin B.; Hore, P. J.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.; Timmel, Christiane R.

    2016-08-01

    Even though the interaction of a <1 mT magnetic field with an electron spin is less than a millionth of the thermal energy at room temperature (kBT), it still can have a profound effect on the quantum yields of radical pair reactions. We present a study of the effects of sub-millitesla magnetic fields on the photoreaction of flavin mononucleotide with ascorbic acid. Direct control of the reaction pathway is achieved by varying the rate of electron transfer from ascorbic acid to the photo-excited flavin. At pH 7.0, we verify the theoretical prediction that, apart from a sign change, the form of the magnetic field effect is independent of the initial spin configuration of the radical pair. The data agree well with model calculations based on a Green's function approach that allows multinuclear spin systems to be treated including the diffusive motion of the radicals, their spin-selective recombination reactions, and the effects of the inter-radical exchange interaction. The protonation states of the radicals are uniquely determined from the form of the magnetic field-dependence. At pH 3.0, the effects of two chemically distinct radical pair complexes combine to produce a pronounced response to ˜500 μT magnetic fields. These findings are relevant to the magnetic responses of cryptochromes (flavin-containing proteins proposed as magnetoreceptors in birds) and may aid the evaluation of effects of weak magnetic fields on other biologically relevant electron transfer processes.

  6. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  7. A study of full particle orbit effects in stochastic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shun; Cambon, Benjamin; Leoncini, Xavier; Del-Castillo Negrete, Diego; Vittot, Michel; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Garbet, Xavier

    2015-11-01

    Full orbit effects of charged particle motion in a stochastic magnetic field are investigated. Particles move following the Lorentz force in a prescribed static magnetic field with no electric field in a cylinder with periodic boundary condition. The magnetic field model consists of the perturbation of equilibrium fields with monotonic and reversed shear q-profiles. Unlike the gyrokinetic theory, the adiabatic invariance of the magnetic momentum is not assumed, and the full Hamiltonian equations of motion are numerically integrated by using a symplectic method. Contrary to the simpler case of magnetic field line tracing, the dynamical properties of full orbit is not easily straightforward. To address this issue, we propose a method to construct reduced Poincaré plots from the full particle trajectory in three-dimensional space. This diagnostic is used to clarify the nontrivial relationship between the integrability and stochasticity of field lines and particle orbits. A problem of particular interest is the study of finite Larmor radius effects on the stochasticity and the topology of orbits.

  8. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils; Le, Guan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near-Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field. Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling its effect still produce the largest residuals between observations and present-day geomagnetic field models. A lot of progress has been achieved so far, but there are still open issues like the characteristics of the partial ring current. Other currents discussed are those flowing in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterising the tail current intensity. Here we propose an approach that may help to properly quantify the magnetic contribution from the tail current for geomagnetic field modelling. Some open questions that require further investigation are mentioned at the end.

  9. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils; Le, Guan

    2016-01-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near- Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field. Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling its effect still produce the largest residuals between observations and present-day geomagnetic field models. A lot of progress has been achieved so far, but there are still open issues like the characteristics of the partial ring current. Other currents discussed are those flowing in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterizing the tail current intensity. Here we propose an approach that may help to properly quantify the magnetic contribution from the tail current for geomagnetic field modelling. Some open questions that require further investigation are mentioned at the end.

  10. Anisotropies of the Taylor Scale, Correlation Scale, and Effective Magnetic Reynolds Number Determination from Solar Wind Magnetic Field Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weygand, J. M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Matthaeus, M. H.; Dasso, S.; Kistler, L. M.

    2009-04-01

    ACE, Cluster, Geotail, IMP-8, Interball, THEMIS, and Wind data from many different intervals in the solar wind are employed to determine the magnetic correlation scale and the Taylor microscale from simultaneous multiple point measurements. For this study we define the correlation scale as the exponential decay constant of the correlation coefficient as a function of spacecraft separation and the Taylor scale as the radius of curvature of the correlation coefficient values at zero separation. The present determination of the Taylor scale makes use of a novel extrapolation technique to derive a statistically stable estimate from a range of measurements at small spatial separations [Weygand et al., 2007]. Using all the slow solar wind data (600 km/s), the correlation scale length is found to be smallest (about 1.3x106 km) in the direction parallel to the magnetic field and largest (about 2.2x106 km) in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. The anisotropies in the turbulent magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind are consistent with slow solar containing mainly two-dimensional turbulence and the fast solar wind having mostly slab type turbulence. The effective magnetic Reynolds number can be expressed in terms of the correlation scale and the Taylor scale. The difference in the Taylor and correlation scale in the parallel and perpendicular direction indicates that the effective magnetic Reynolds number varies with the direction of the magnetic field and has values between 1x106 and 8x106 . Knowledge of the effective magnetic Reynolds number may be useful in magnetohydrodynamic modeling of the solar wind and galactic cosmic ray diffusion in the heliosphere.

  11. Spinodal instabilities and the distillation effect in nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, A.; Providencia, C.; Providencia, J. Da

    2009-01-15

    We study the effect of strong magnetic fields, of the order of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} G, on the instability region of nuclear matter at subsaturation densities. Relativistic nuclear models both with constant couplings and with density-dependent parameters are considered. It is shown that a strong magnetic field can have large effects on the instability regions giving rise to bands of instability and wider unstable regions. As a consequence, we predict larger transition densities at the inner edge of the crust of compact stars with strong magnetic fields. The direction of instability gives rise to a very strong distillation effect if the last Landau level is only partially filled. However, for almost completed Landau levels, an antidistillation effect may occur.

  12. Effect of an alternating nonuniform magnetic field on ferrofluid flow and heat transfer in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goharkhah, Mohammad; Ashjaee, Mehdi

    2014-08-01

    Forced convective heat transfer of water based Fe3O4 nanofluid (ferrofluid) in the presence of an alternating non-uniform magnetic field is investigated numerically. The geometry is a two-dimensional channel which is subjected to a uniform heat flux at the top and bottom surfaces. Nonuniform magnetic field produced by eight line source dipoles is imposed on several parts of the channel. Also, a rectangular wave function is applied to the dipoles in order to turn them on and off alternatingly. The effects of the alternating magnetic field strength and frequency on the convective heat transfer are investigated for four different Reynolds numbers (Re=100, 600, 1200 and 2000) in the laminar flow regime. Comparing the results with zero magnetic field case, show that the heat transfer enhancement increases with the Reynolds number and reaches a maximum of 13.9% at Re=2000 and f=20 Hz. Moreover, at a constant Reynolds number, it increases with the magnetic field intensity while an optimum value exists for the frequency. Also, the optimum frequency increases with the Reynolds number. On the other hand, the heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is always accompanied by a pressure drop penalty. A maximum pressure drop increase of 6% is observed at Re=2000 and f=5 Hz which shows that the pressure drop increase is not as significant as the heat transfer enhancement.

  13. Magnetic field effects in a polymer/fullerene blend photovoltaic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyuk-Jae; Basham, James I.; Gundlach, David J.; Richter, Curt A.

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) systems based on blends of conjugated polymers and fullerene derivatives have shown great promise for low-cost and efficient photovoltaic applications. Recent findings suggest that a weak external magnetic field can disturb the spin configuration of excited states and subsequently change properties of OPV cells such as photocurrent. These changes are referred to as magnetic field effects (MFEs). In order to have a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the MFEs in polymer/fullerene blend photovoltaic systems, we fabricated poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) cells and carried out photovoltaic device performance and impedance spectroscopy measurements with and without an externally applied magnetic field. A significant reduction in short circuit current (JSC) as well as open circuit voltage (VOC) was observed with an applied magnetic field of a 0.1 tesla compared to those measured without a magnetic field under the same intensity of illumination. Impedance spectroscopy data gives insights into the influence of an external magnetic field on charge generation and recombination near normal photovoltaic operating conditions.

  14. Magnetic fields in the cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1983-08-01

    Descriptive models for the dynamo processes that generate magnetic fields around celestial objects are reviewed. Magnetic fields are produced, along with an electric current, when a conductor is moved perpendicularly through a magnetic field, so long as the resulting current is fed back into the conductor to amplify the current and field. In MHD theory, the lines of force of the magnetic field travel with the conducting fluid. A weak current or field must be present initially to generate the field. Planets have molten cores and stars have ionized gases to act as the conductors, and all space has sufficient gas with free electrons. The rotations of the planets, stars, and galaxy enhance the magnetic fields. Convective patterns have been characterized in the earth's molten core because of anomalies observed in the magnetic field at the surface. It has been shown that the faster a planet rotates, the more powerful its magnetic field is. However, fluid motions will produce fields only if the fluid motion is helical. The exact mechanism in stars could be primordial magnetism trapped during formation. However, in galaxies, the Biermann battery effect, wherein free electrons move along the surfaces of stars, could create enough of a field for the amplification process to proceed.

  15. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  16. Effect of applied magnetic fields during directional solidification of eutectic Bi-Mn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decarlo, J. L.; Pirich, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of rod eutectics Bi/MnBi were directionally solidified in a growth-up Bridgman-Stockbarger configuration in the presence of a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kg to determine whether gravity-driven convective effects could be reduced or eliminated. The experiments were carried out over a range of furnace velocities, V, of 0.2 to 50 cm per hour with a thermal gradient at the liquid-solid interface of 100 C/cm and 150 C/cm. Morphological, thermal and magnetic analyses were carried out on samples grown with and without an applied magnetic field. For samples grown at V greater than 3 cm per hour in a transverse magnetic field, reduced mean rod diameter and interrod spacing occurred as well as undercooling and increased coercive strength. The data agreed with that obtained for low-g growth at 50 cm per hour and 30 cm per hour.

  17. Biologic effects of prolonged exposure to ELF electromagnetic fields in rats. 2: 50 Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Margonato, V.; Cerretelli, P.; Nicolini, P.; Conti, R.; Zecca, L.; Veicsteinas, Z.

    1995-12-31

    To provide possible laboratory support to health risk evaluation associated with long-term, low-intensity magnetic field exposure, 256 male albino rats and an equal number of control animals (initial age 12 weeks) were exposed 22 h/day to a 50 Hz magnetic flux density of 5 {micro}T for 32 weeks (a total of about 5,000 h). Hematology was studied from blood samples before exposure to the field and at 12 week intervals. Morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, and testes as well as brain neurotransmitters were assessed at the end of the exposure period. In two identical sets of experiments, no significant differences in the investigated variables were found between exposed and sham-exposed animals. It is concluded that continuous exposure to a 50 Hz magnetic field of 5 {micro}T from week 12 to week 44, which makes up {approximately}70% of the life span of the rat before sacrifice, does not cause changes in growth rate, in the morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, testes, and bone marrow, in hematology and hematochemistry, or in the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin.

  18. [Effect of weak and superweak magnetic fields on intensity and asexual reproduction of the planarian Dugesia tigrina].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V V; Sheĭman, I M; Fesenko, E E

    2002-01-01

    It was shown that the exposure to combined weak and extraweak magnetic fields (permanent component 42 microT; variable component of an amplitude of 100 nT, frequency 1-60 Hz) increases the intensity of asexual propagation of planarians Dugesia tigrina. The effect of combined magnetic fields is most pronounced at frequencies of 1, 3.7, and 32 Hz. The presence of concomitant technogeneous fields (50 Hz, 30 nT) does not markedly influence the effects of weak magnetic fields with a small variable component. Upon realization of effects of weak magnetic fields, their both components are of great importance; the absence of one (permanent) component changes the sing of the effect to the opposite. The transfer of the effect to planarians through water pretreated with magnetic fields probably indicates that aqueous medium is involved in the realization of biological effects of weak magnetic fields.

  19. The effect of the magnetic field stretching on the development of the ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, R.; Toth, G.; Liemohn, M. W.; Skoug, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    While the dipolar solution for the geomagnetic field during quiet times represents a reasonable assumption, during storm activity this assumption becomes invalid. Theoretical and numerical modifications to an inner magnetosphere - Hot Electron Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI)- model are implemented, in order to accommodate for a non-dipolar arbitrary magnetic field. HEIDI solves the time dependent, gyration and bounced averaged kinetic equation for the phase space density of one or more ring current species. In this study the effect of the magnetic field stretching on the build-up of the ring current is examined for both real and idealized input conditions.

  20. Effect of magnetic field on thermo emf of Pd + Cr + Os/Cu + Fe thermocouple

    SciTech Connect

    Gololobov, E.M.; Petrashko, V.V.; Semenenko, Yu.A.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of a magnetic field with a strength of up to 46.5 kOe on the thermoemf of a thermocouple of Pd + 0.5 at.% Cr + 0.5 at.% Os/Cu + 0.15 at.% Fe in the temperature range of 4.2-85/sup 0/K is studied. The maximum error of the thermocouple due to the magnetic field for a cold-junction (in same field) temperature of 4.2/sup 0/K is less than or equal to 0.38/sup 0/K over the entire temperature range.

  1. No effect of exposure to static and sinusoidal magnetic fields on nitric oxide production by macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mnaimneh, S. |; Bizri, M. |; Veyret, B.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of exposure to static (1--100 mT) or sinusoidal (1 Hz, 1.6 mT) magnetic fields on the production of nitric oxide (NO) by murine BCG-activated macrophages were investigated. In these cells, the inducible isoform of NO synthase is present. No significant differences were observed in nitrite levels among exposed, sham-exposed, or control macrophages after exposure for 14 h to static fields of 1, 10, 50, and 100 mT and to sinusoidal 1.6 mT, 1 Hz magnetic fields.

  2. Magnetic field effects on yields and decays of fluorescence of pyrimidine vapor: Excited rovibronic level dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Nobuhiro; Takemura, Takeshi; Fujita, Masahisa; Baba, Hiroaki

    1988-04-01

    External magnetic field effects on yields and decays of fluorescence of pyrimidine vapor on excitation into various rotational levels belonging to the vibrationless level or the 6a1 level of S1 have been studied in a supersonic jet or in a bulk gas at room temperature with a field strength of 0-150 G. The fast component of fluorescence is not affected by an external magnetic field, whereas the slow fluorescence is quenched by a field except for excitation at the R(0) line belonging to the 0-0 transition. The fluorescence quenching is more effective at the 6a1 level than that at 00, indicating that the level density of the triplet state coupled to the singlet state plays an important role in the magnetic mixing of the triplet spin sublevels, in terms of which the fluorescence quenching by a magnetic field is interpreted. The excited rotational level dependence of the fluorescence quenching by a magnetic field is attributed to K scrambling in the triplet manifold following intersystem crossing.

  3. [Modulating effect of weak combined magnetic fields on duration of mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor metamorphosis stage].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V V; Sheĭman, I M; Iablokova, E V; Fesenko, E E

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that an exposure of pupae of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor to the combined static (42 μT) and very weak alternating (250 nT) magnetic fields exerts different influence, depending on the frequency of the alternating magnetic field, on duration of metamorphosis processes in these insects. For instance, an exposure of pupae to weak combined magnetic fields, adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for glutaminic acid (4,4 Hz), stimulates metamorphosis process--a transitional stage from pupae to imago lasts shorter. An inhibiting effect was observed when adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for Ca2 (32,2 Hz). At some frequencies this effect is not seen. For instance, an exposure at a frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for K+ (16,5 Hz) exerts no noticeable effect on the duration of the pupal metamorphosis stage.

  4. [Modulating effect of weak combined magnetic fields on duration of mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor metamorphosis stage].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V V; Sheĭman, I M; Iablokova, E V; Fesenko, E E

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that an exposure of pupae of the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor to the combined static (42 μT) and very weak alternating (250 nT) magnetic fields exerts different influence, depending on the frequency of the alternating magnetic field, on duration of metamorphosis processes in these insects. For instance, an exposure of pupae to weak combined magnetic fields, adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for glutaminic acid (4,4 Hz), stimulates metamorphosis process--a transitional stage from pupae to imago lasts shorter. An inhibiting effect was observed when adjusted to the frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for Ca2 (32,2 Hz). At some frequencies this effect is not seen. For instance, an exposure at a frequency of ion cyclotron resonance for K+ (16,5 Hz) exerts no noticeable effect on the duration of the pupal metamorphosis stage. PMID:25715625

  5. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  6. Effect of steady and time-harmonic magnetic fields on macrosegragation in alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Incropera, F.P.; Prescott, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    Buoyancy-induced convection during the solidification of alloys can contribute significantly to the redistribution of alloy constituents, thereby creating large composition gradients in the final ingot. Termed macrosegregation, the condition diminishes the quality of the casting and, in the extreme, may require that the casting be remelted. The deleterious effects of buoyancy-driven flows may be suppressed through application of an external magnetic field, and in this study the effects of both steady and time-harmonic fields have been considered. For a steady magnetic field, extremely large field strengths would be required to effectively dampen convection patterns that contribute to macrosegregation. However, by reducing spatial variations in temperature and composition, turbulent mixing induced by a time-harmonic field reduces the number and severity of segregates in the final casting.

  7. The effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James W; Haines, Jackie; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Dubrova, Yuri E

    2015-03-01

    The growing human exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has raised a considerable concern regarding their genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of ELF magnetic fields irradiation on mutation induction in the germline and somatic tissues of male mice. Seven week old BALB/c×CBA/Ca F1 hybrid males were exposed to 10, 100 or 300μT of 50Hz magnetic fields for 2 or 15h. Using single-molecule PCR, the frequency of mutation at the mouse Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) locus Ms6-hm was established in sperm and blood samples of exposed and matched sham-treated males. ESTR mutation frequency was also established in sperm and blood samples taken from male mice exposed to 1Gy of acute X-rays. The frequency of ESTR mutation in DNA samples extracted from blood of mice exposed to magnetic fields did not significantly differ from that in sham-treated controls. However, there was a marginally significant increase in mutation frequency in sperm but this was not dose-dependent. In contrast, acute exposure X-rays led to significant increases in mutation frequency in sperm and blood of exposed males. The results of our study suggest that, within the range of doses analyzed here, the in vivo mutagenic effects of ELF magnetic fields are likely to be minor if not negligible.

  8. Biological effects of strong static magnetic fields on insulin-secreting cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, T.; Miyakoshi, J.

    2009-03-01

    The magnetic flux density of MRI for clinical diagnosis has been increasing. However, there remains very little biological data regarding the effect of strong static magnetic fields (SMFs) on human health. To evaluate the biological effects of strong SMFs, we cultured INS-1 cells under exposure to sham and SMF conditions for 1 or 2 h, and analyzed insulin secretion, mRNA expression, cell proliferation and cell number. Exposure to SMF with a high magnetic field gradient for 1 h significantly increased insulin secretion and insulin 1 mRNA expression. Exposure to SMF did not affect cell proliferation and cell number. Our results suggested that MRI systems with a higher magnetic flux density might not cause cell proliferative or functional damages on insulin-secreting cells.

  9. Experimental concept for examination of biological effects of magnetic field concealed by gravity.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Tomita-Yokotani, K; Hashimoto, H; Takai, M; Tsushima, M; Nakamura, T

    2004-01-01

    Space is not only a place to study biological effects of gravity, but also provides unique opportunities to examine other environmental factors, where the biological actions are masked by gravity on the ground. Even the earth's magnetic field is steadily acting on living systems, and is known to influence many biological processes. A systematic survey and assessment of its action are difficult to conduct in the presence of dominant factors, such as gravity. Investigation of responses of biological systems against the combined environment of zero-gravity and zero-magnetic field might establish the baseline for the analysis of biological effects of magnetic factors. We propose, in this paper, an experimental concept in this context, together with a practical approach of the experiments, both in orbit and on the ground, with a thin magnetic shielding film. Plant epicotyl growth was taken as an exemplar index to evaluate technical and scientific feasibility of the proposed system concept.

  10. Direct numerical simulations of magnetic field effects on turbulent flow in a square duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, R.; Vanka, S. P.; Thomas, B. G.

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic fields are crucial in controlling flows in various physical processes of industrial significance. One such process is the continuous casting of steel, where different magnetic field configurations are used to control the turbulent flow of steel in the mold in order to minimize defects in the cast steel. The present study has been undertaken to understand the effects of a magnetic field on mean velocities and turbulence parameters in turbulent molten metal flow through a square duct. The coupled Navier-Stokes magnetohydrodynamic equations have been solved using a three-dimensional fractional-step numerical procedure. The Reynolds number was kept low in order to resolve all the scales in the flow without using a subgrid scale turbulence model. Computations were performed with three different grid resolutions, the finest grid having 8.4×106 cells. Because liquid metals have low magnetic Reynolds number, the induced magnetic field has been considered negligible and the electric potential method for magnetic field-flow coupling has been implemented. After validation of the computer code, computations of turbulent flow in a square duct with different Hartmann numbers were performed until complete laminarization of the flow. The time-dependent and time-averaged nature of the flow has been examined through distribution of mean velocities, turbulent fluctuations, vorticity, and turbulent kinetic energy budgets.

  11. The Effect of Extremely Low Frequency Alternating Magnetic Field on the Behavior of Animals in the Presence of the Geomagnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Belova, Natalia A.; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the geomagnetic field can influence animal migration and homing. The magnetic field detection by animals is known as magnetoreception and it is possible due to two different transduction mechanisms: the first one through magnetic nanoparticles able to respond to the geomagnetic field and the second one through chemical reactions influenced by magnetic fields. Another behavior is the magnetic alignment where animals align their bodies to the geomagnetic field. It has been observed that magnetic alignment of cattle can be disrupted near electric power lines around the world. Experimentally, it is known that alternating magnetic fields can influence living beings, but the exact mechanism is unknown. The parametric resonance model proposes a mechanism to explain that effect on living beings and establishes that, in the presence of a constant magnetic field, molecules associated with biochemical reactions inside cells can absorb resonantly alternating magnetic fields with specific frequencies. In the present paper, a review is made about animal magnetoreception and the effects of alternating magnetic fields in living beings. It is suggested how alternating magnetic fields can interfere in the magnetic alignment of animals and a general conclusion is obtained: alternating magnetic field pollution can affect the magnetic sensibility of animals. PMID:26823664

  12. Radiation and Magnetic Field Effects on New Semiconductor Power Devices for Hl-Lhc Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, S.; Abbate, C.; Baccaro, S.; Busatto, G.; Citterio, M.; Iannuzzo, F.; Lanza, A.; Latorre, S.; Lazzaroni, M.; Sanseverino, A.; Velardi, F.

    2014-06-01

    The radiation hardness of commercial Silicon Carbide and Gallium Nitride power MOSFETs is presented in this paper, for Total Ionizing Dose effects and Single Event Effects, under γ, neutrons, protons and heavy ions. Similar tests are discussed for commercial DC-DC converters, also tested in operation under magnetic field.

  13. The heating effect of iron-cobalt magnetic nanofluids in an alternating magnetic field: application in magnetic hyperthermia treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this research, FeCo alloy magnetic nanofluids were prepared by reducing iron(III) chloride hexahydrate and cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate with sodium borohydride in a water/CTAB/hexanol reverse micelle system for application in magnetic hyperthermia treatment. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and energy-dispersive analysis indicate the formation of bcc-structured iron-cobalt alloy. Magnetic property assessment of nanoparticles reveals that some samples are single-domain superparamagnetic, while others are single- or multi-domain ferromagnetic. The stability of the magnetic fluids was achieved by using a CTAB/1-butanol surfactant bilayer. Results of Gouy magnetic susceptibility balance experiments indicate good stability of FeCo nanoparticles even after dilution. The inductive properties of corresponding magnetic fluids including temperature rise and specific absorption rate were determined. Results show that with increasing of the nanoparticle size in the single-domain size regime, the generated heat increases, indicating the significant effect of the hysteresis loss. Finally, the central parameter controlling the specific absorption rate of nanoparticles was introduced, the experimental results were compared with those of the Stoner-Wohlfarth model and linear response theory, and the best sample for magnetic hyperthermia treatment was specified. PMID:24359163

  14. Effects of a conducting sphere moving through a gradient magnetic field.

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Richard B.; Kalra, Chiranjeev S.; Shneider, Mikhail; Giffin, Adom; Ames, Thomas L.

    2010-04-01

    We examine several conducting spheres moving through a magnetic field gradient. An analytical approximation is derived and an experiment is conducted to verify the analytical solution. The experiment is simulated as well to produce a numerical result. Both the low and high magnetic Reynolds number regimes are studied. Deformation of the sphere is noted in the high Reynolds number case. It is suggested that this deformation effect could be useful for designing or enhancing present protection systems against space debris.

  15. Competition between Abelian and Zeeman magnetic field effects in a two dimensional ultracold gas of fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Cichy, Agnieszka; Polak, Tomasz P.

    2015-03-15

    The ground state of ultracold fermions in the presence of effects of orbital and Zeeman magnetic fields is analyzed. Five different states are found: unpolarized superconducting state, partially and fully polarized normal states and phase separated regions, partially or fully polarized. The system, in the presence of orbital synthetic magnetic field effects, shows non-monotonous changes of the phase boundaries when electron concentration is varied. We observe not only reentrant phenomena, but also density dependent oscillations of different areas of the phase diagram. Moreover the chemical potential shows oscillatory behavior and discontinuities with respect to changes in the number of fermions.

  16. Interacting electrons in a two-dimensional disordered environment: effect of a zeeman magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Denteneer, P J H; Scalettar, R T

    2003-06-20

    The effect of a Zeeman magnetic field coupled to the spin of the electrons on the conducting properties of the disordered Hubbard model is studied. Using the determinant quantum Monte Carlo method, the temperature- and magnetic-field-dependent conductivity is calculated, as well as the degree of spin polarization. We find that the Zeeman magnetic field suppresses the metallic behavior present for certain values of interaction and disorder strength and is able to induce a metal-insulator transition at a critical field strength. It is argued that the qualitative features of magnetoconductance in this microscopic model containing both repulsive interactions and disorder are in agreement with experimental findings in two-dimensional electron and hole gases in semiconductor structures.

  17. Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields of transformers and possible biological and health effects.

    PubMed

    Sirav, Bahriye; Sezgin, Gaye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2014-12-01

    Physiological processes in organisms can be influenced by extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic energy. Biological effect studies have great importance; as well as measurement studies since they provide information on the real exposure situations. In this study, the leakage magnetic fields around a transformer were measured in an apartment building in Küçükçekmece, Istanbul, and the measurement results were evaluated with respect to the international exposure standards. The transformer station was on the bottom floor of a three-floor building. It was found that people living and working in the building were exposed to ELF magnetic fields higher than the threshold magnetic field value of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Many people living in this building reported health complaints such as immunological problems of their children. There were child-workers working in the textile factories located in the building. Safe distances or areas for these people should be recommended. Protective measures could be implemented to minimize these exposures. Further residential exposure studies are needed to demonstrate the exposure levels of ELF magnetic fields. Precautions should, therefore, be taken either to reduce leakage or minimize the exposed fields. Shielding techniques should be used to minimize the leakage magnetic fields in such cases.

  18. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, J; Steciw, S; Fallone, B G

    2010-08-21

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 +/- 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically. PMID:20679699

  19. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Aubin, J.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-08-01

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 ± 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically.

  20. Findings point to complexity of health effects of electric, magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1994-07-18

    Significant findings on the physiological consequences of exposure to electric and magnetic fields (EMF) have been coming from current research in various areas: cell function, epidemiology, bone healing, health effects of video display terminals, and whole-animal studies. But as results presented to more than 500 attendees at the 16th annual meeting of the Bioelectromagnetics Society in Copenhagen in mid-June clearly showed, research on EMF is complicated. The most comprehensive results presented at the meeting were in the area of breast cancer. Taken together, data from epidemiological, cellular, hormonal, and animal studies give a multifaceted picture of how EMF might promote the disease. One theory linking EMF and breast cancer is that magnetic fields lower the amount of the hormone melatonin produced in humans. As a consequence, the natural suppressive effect of melatonin on breast cancer cell growth is reduced. Another theory is that magnetic fields may directly interfere with melatonin's suppressive action on breast cancer cell proliferation.

  1. The effect of magnetic field on the susceptibility maximum in the spatially anisotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ying; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Qi-Zhou; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Yi-Kun

    2008-12-01

    The effect of magnetic field h on the longitudinal susceptibility in a spin S=1/2 exchange anisotropic three-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnet, is studied by the double-time Green's function method within Tyablikov approximation. The calculation results indicated that the height χ(Tm) and position Tm of the maximum of the longitudinal susceptibility display different behaviors related to the magnetic fields and exchange anisotropic parameters. These behaviors are very different from that in the exchange anisotropic Heisenberg ferromagnet in the magnetic field. The results are: (1) When the field h is weak, in a antiferromagnet, the height χ(Tm) is a constant χ0 which is independent of field and exchange anisotropy, but the position Tm is only a function of the exchange anisotropy. While in a ferromagnet, both χ(Tm) and Tm are a function of field and the exchange anisotropy. (2) When the field h is strong, in a antiferromagnet, χ(Tm) becomes dependent of field and the exchange anisotropy, and χ(Tm) and Tm are fitted satisfactory to power laws: χ(Tm)-χ0∝hd and TN-Tm∝hc, respectively. Here TN is the Neel temperature. On the contrary, in a ferromagnet, χ(Tm) and Tm are fitted to power laws: χ(Tm)∝h and Tm-Tc∝h, where Tc is the Curie temperature. The above results are very useful in studying the magnetic property of coordination polymers.

  2. Effects of the fractional order and magnetic field on the blood flow in cylindrical domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Shah, Nehad; Vieru, Dumitru; Fetecau, Constantin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, based on the magnetohydrodynamics approach, the blood flow along with magnetic particles through a circular cylinder is studied. The fluid is acted by an oscillating pressure gradient and an external magnetic field. The study is based on a mathematical model with Caputo fractional derivatives. The model of ordinary fluid, corresponding to time-derivatives of integer order, is obtained as a particular case. Closed forms of the fluid velocity and magnetic particles velocity are obtained by means of the Laplace and finite Hankel transforms. Effects of the order of Caputo's time-fractional derivatives and of the external magnetic field on flow parameters of both blood and magnetic particles are studied. Numerical simulations and graphical illustrations are used in order to study the influence of the fractional parameter α, Reynolds number and Hartmann number on the fluid and particles velocity. The results highlights that, models with fractional derivatives bring significant differences compared to the ordinary model. This fact can be an important advantage for some practical problems. It also results that the blood velocity, as well as that of magnetic particles, is reduced under influence of the exterior magnetic field.

  3. Protective Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Molecular Behavior Changes of Hemoglobin Induced by Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Nahed S.; Abou Aiad, T. H. M.

    With the use of electricity and industrialization of societies, humans are commonly exposed to static magnetic field induced by electric currents. The putative mechanisms by which Static Magnetic Field (SMF) may affect biological systems is that of increasing free radical life span in organisms. To test this hypothesis, we investigate the effect of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) treatment on the changes in the molecular behavior of hemoglobin as a result of exposure of the animals to magnetic field in the occupation levels. By measuring the relative permittivity, dielectric loss, relaxation time, conductivity, radius and diffusion coefficient of aqueous solutions of hemoglobin. These measurements were calculated in the frequency range of (100 Hz-100 kHz) to give more information about molecular behavior. Twenty four male albino rats were equally divided into four groups 1, 2, 3 and 4. Animals of group 1, were used as control, animals of group 2, were exposed to (0.2T) magnetic field and that of group 3, 4, were treated with Ascorbic Acid by two doses group 3 (20 mg kg-1 body weight), group 4 (50 mg kg-1 body weight) orally half hour before exposure to magnetic field. The sub chronic exposure expanded (1 h day-1) for 30 consecutive days. The results indicated that exposure of animals to magnetic field resulted in changes in the molecular behavior of hemoglobin molecule while treatment with ascorbic acid afforded comparatively more significant amelioration in these molecular changes, via decreasing the radical pair interaction of magnetic field with biological molecules.

  4. The effects of magnetic field in plume region on the performance of multi-cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Peng Liu, Hui Yu, Daren; Gao, Yuanyuan; Mao, Wei

    2015-10-15

    The performance characteristics of a Multi-cusped Field Thruster depending on the magnetic field in the plume region were investigated. Five magnetic field shielding rings were separately mounted near the exit of discharge channel to decrease the strength of magnetic field in the plume region in different levels, while the magnetic field in the upstream was well maintained. The test results show that the electron current increases with the decrease of magnetic field strength in the plume region, which gives rise to higher propellant utilization and lower current utilization. On the other hand, the stronger magnetic field in the plume region improves the performance at low voltages (high current mode) while lower magnetic field improves the performance at high voltages (low current mode). This work can provide some optimal design ideas of the magnetic strength in the plume region to improve the performance of thruster.

  5. Effect of metal impregnation in the field cool magnetization of bulk superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, M.; Nariki, S.; Sakai, N.; Hirabayashi, I.

    2006-10-01

    Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductors have significant potential for various applications due to the high critical current density and the highly trapped magnetic fields. Recently we have developed a large sized bulk superconductor using Gd210, which is discovered in the microgravity experiment. We investigated the mechanical properties and the cryostability of the Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductor to determine how to improve toughness and heat conduction of the large sized bulk superconductor. We introduced a stainless ring around the circumference of the bulk to increase the fracture strength of the bulk. Also, we introduced Al wires inserted in the hole along the c-axis of the bulk, and then the sample was subjected to the impregnation by using Bi-Sn-Cd alloy. We measured the trapped magnetic fields and the repulsive forces of the samples. The trapped magnetic field distributions were 1.13-1.36 T. The repulsive forces at 1 mm gap between the sample bulk and the permanent magnet with the surface magnetic induction of 0.37 T were about 70 N at 77 K. We have also measured the temperature dependence of the trapped magnetic field, and confirmed the effect of metal impregnation.

  6. [Effects and molecular mechanisms of the biological action of weak and extremely weak magnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V V; Ponomarev, V O; Novikov, G V; Kuvichkin, V V; Iablokova, E V; Fesenko, E E

    2010-01-01

    A number of effects of weak combined (static and alternating) magnetic fields with an alternating component of tens and hundreds nT at a collinear static field of 42 microT, which is equivalent to the geomagnetic field, have been found: the activation of fission and regeneration of planarians Dugesia tigrina, the inhibition of the growth of the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in mice, the stimulation of the production of the tumor necrosis factor by macrophages, a decrease in the protection of chromatin against the action of DNase 1, and the enhancement of protein hydrolysis in systems in vivo and in vitro. The frequency and amplitude ranges for the alternating component of weak combined magnetic fields have been determined at which it affects various biological systems. Thus, the optimal amplitude at a frequency of 4.4 Hz is 100 nT (effective value); at a frequency of 16.5 Hz, the range of effective amplitudes is broader, 150-300 nT; and at a frequency of 1 (0.5) Hz, it is 300 nT. The sum of close frequencies (e.g., 16 and 17 Hz) produces a similar biological effect as the product of the modulating (0.5 Hz) and carrying frequencies (16.5 Hz), which is explained by the ratio A = A0sin omega1t + A0sin omega2t = A0sin(omega1 + omega2)t/2cos(omega1 - omega2)t/2. The efficiency of magnetic signals with pulsations (the sum of close frequencies) is more pronounced than that of sinusoidal frequencies. These data may indicate the presence of several receptors of weak magnetic fields in biological systems and, as a consequence, a higher efficiency of the effect at the simultaneous adjustment to these frequencies by the field. Even with consideration of these facts, the mechanism of the biological action of weak combined magnetic fields remains still poorly understood. PMID:20968074

  7. Cosmic Magnetic Fields - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard; Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields have been known in antiquity. Aristotle attributes the first of what could be called a scientific discussion on magnetism to Thales, who lived from about 625 BC. In China “magnetic carts” were in use to help the Emperor in his journeys of inspection. Plinius comments that in the Asia Minor province of Magnesia shepherds' staffs get at times “glued” to a stone, a alodestone. In Europe the magnetic compass came through the Arab sailors who met the Portuguese explorers. The first scientific treatise on magnetism, “De Magnete”, was published by William Gilbert who in 1600 described his experiments and suggested that the Earth was a huge magnet. Johannes Kepler was a correspondent of Gilbert and at times suggested that planetary motion was due to magnetic forces. Alas, this concept was demolished by Isaac Newton,who seeing the falling apple decided that gravity was enough. This concept of dealing with gravitational forces only remains en vogue even today. The explanations why magnetic effects must be neglected go from “magnetic energy is only 1% of gravitation” to “magnetic fields only complicate the beautiful computer solutions”. What is disregarded is the fact that magnetic effects are very directional(not omni-directional as gravity) and also the fact that magnetic fields are seen every where in our cosmic universe.

  8. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Brink, A.; Vermijs, G.; Solignac, A.; Koo, J.; Kohlhepp, J. T.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2016-03-01

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface.

  9. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, A; Vermijs, G; Solignac, A; Koo, J; Kohlhepp, J T; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2016-01-01

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface. PMID:26940861

  10. Effects of magnetic field strength in the discharge channel on the performance of a multi-cusped field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Hui; Gao, Yuanyuan; Yu, Daren

    2016-09-01

    The performance characteristics of a Multi-cusped Field Thruster depending on the magnetic field strength in the discharge channel were investigated. Four thrusters with different outer diameters of the magnet rings were designed to change the magnetic field strength in the discharge channel. It is found that increasing the magnetic field strength could restrain the radial cross-field electron current and decrease the radial width of main ionization region, which gives rise to the reduction of propellant utilization and thruster performance. The test results in different anode voltage conditions indicate that both the thrust and anode efficiency are higher for the weaker magnetic field in the discharge channel.

  11. THE EFFECT OF LOWER MANTLE METALLIZATION ON MAGNETIC FIELD GENERATION IN ROCKY EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R.; Stanley, S.; Elkins-Tanton, L.

    2013-05-10

    Recent theoretical and experimental evidence indicates that many of the materials that are thought to exist in the mantles of terrestrial exoplanets will metallize and become good conductors of electricity at mantle pressures. This allows for strong electromagnetic coupling of the core and the mantle in these planets. We use a numerical dynamo model to study the effect of a metallized lower mantle on the dynamos of terrestrial exoplanets using several inner core sizes and mantle conductivities. We find that the addition of an electrically conducting mantle results in stronger core-mantle boundary fields because of the increase in magnetic field stretching. We also find that a metallized mantle destabilizes the dynamo resulting in less dipolar, less axisymmetric poloidal magnetic fields at the core-mantle boundary. The conducting mantle efficiently screens these fields to produce weaker surface fields. We conclude that a conducting mantle will make the detection of extrasolar terrestrial magnetic fields more difficult while making the magnetic fields in the dynamo region stronger.

  12. Geomagnetic and strong static magnetic field effects on growth and chlorophyll a fluorescence in Lemna minor.

    PubMed

    Jan, Luka; Fefer, Dušan; Košmelj, Katarina; Gaberščik, Alenka; Jerman, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) varies over Earth's surface and changes over time, but it is generally not considered as a factor that could influence plant growth. The effects of reduced and enhanced GMFs and a strong static magnetic field on growth and chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence of Lemna minor plants were investigated under controlled conditions. A standard 7 day test was conducted in extreme geomagnetic environments of 4 µT and 100 µT as well as in a strong static magnetic field environment of 150 mT. Specific growth rates as well as slow and fast Chl a fluorescence kinetics were measured after 7 days incubation. The results, compared to those of controls, showed that the reduced GMF significantly stimulated growth rate of the total frond area in the magnetically treated plants. However, the enhanced GMF pointed towards inhibition of growth rate in exposed plants in comparison to control, but the difference was not statistically significant. This trend was not observed in the case of treatments with strong static magnetic fields. Our measurements suggest that the efficiency of photosystem II is not affected by variations in GMF. In contrast, the strong static magnetic field seems to have the potential to increase initial Chl a fluorescence and energy dissipation in Lemna minor plants.

  13. Geomagnetic and strong static magnetic field effects on growth and chlorophyll a fluorescence in Lemna minor.

    PubMed

    Jan, Luka; Fefer, Dušan; Košmelj, Katarina; Gaberščik, Alenka; Jerman, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) varies over Earth's surface and changes over time, but it is generally not considered as a factor that could influence plant growth. The effects of reduced and enhanced GMFs and a strong static magnetic field on growth and chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence of Lemna minor plants were investigated under controlled conditions. A standard 7 day test was conducted in extreme geomagnetic environments of 4 µT and 100 µT as well as in a strong static magnetic field environment of 150 mT. Specific growth rates as well as slow and fast Chl a fluorescence kinetics were measured after 7 days incubation. The results, compared to those of controls, showed that the reduced GMF significantly stimulated growth rate of the total frond area in the magnetically treated plants. However, the enhanced GMF pointed towards inhibition of growth rate in exposed plants in comparison to control, but the difference was not statistically significant. This trend was not observed in the case of treatments with strong static magnetic fields. Our measurements suggest that the efficiency of photosystem II is not affected by variations in GMF. In contrast, the strong static magnetic field seems to have the potential to increase initial Chl a fluorescence and energy dissipation in Lemna minor plants. PMID:25708622

  14. Electron impact ionization in the Martian atmosphere: Interplay between scattering and crustal magnetic field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillis, Robert J.; Fang, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Precipitating electrons are typically the dominant source of energy input into Mars' nighttime upper atmosphere, with consequences for atmospheric and ionospheric structure, composition, chemistry, and electrodynamics. Mars' spatially heterogeneous crustal magnetic fields affect the fluxes of precipitating electrons, via both the magnetic mirror force and Gauss' law of conservation of magnetic flux. We use a kinetic electron transport model to examine ionization rate profiles that result from the combination of these magnetic effects and elastic and inelastic scattering by atmospheric neutrals. Specifically, we calculate ionization rates as a function of altitude, crustal magnetic field strength, and the initial energy and pitch angle of the precipitating electrons, covering the relevant ranges of these parameters. Several complex behaviors are exhibited, including bifurcating ionization peaks with distinct characteristics and energy-dependent and crustal field strength-dependent increases in ionization with decreasing pitch angle. Elucidating such behavior is important for understanding the effect of Mars' unique crustal fields on the Mars upper atmosphere and ionosphere, both to predict the consequences of measured electron precipitation and to enable, for the first time, downward coupling of global plasma models with thermosphere-ionosphere models.

  15. Frequency shifts and modulation effects due to solenoidal magnetic field inhomogeneities in ion cyclotron mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Dale W.; Rockwood, Alan L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1995-02-01

    Solenoidal (i.e. axially symmetric) magnetic field inhomogeneities, which in addition have symmetry under the operation z --> -z are the most important to Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry since they introduce frequency shifts at first-order in perturbation theory. Frequency shifts for all three fundamental modes are derived for the leading second-order and fourth-order solenoidal inhomogeneities without any restrictions on the initial conditions. The analytical frequency shifts agree very well with frequency shifts obtained from numerical trajectory calculations using the exact classical equations of motion. The effect of the inhomogeneity on the ion trajectory is solved analytically. For a strong magnetic bottle field, the cyclotron motion is frequency modulated at twice the z-oscillation frequency resulting in sidebands. However, the amplitude of these sidebands is negligibly small for typical inhomogeneity strengths. The effect of a magnetized ICR trap on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is studied by analytical methods. We find that the leading magnetic bottle field decreases as d-3, where d is the cylindrical ion trap diameter.

  16. The unique effect of in-plane anisotropic strain in the magnetization control by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Wang, J.; Hu, F. X.; Liu, Y.; Kuang, H.; Wu, R. R.; Sun, J. R.; Shen, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    The electric field control of magnetization in both (100)- and (011)-Pr0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3(PSMO/PMN-PT) heterostructures were investigated. It was found that the in-plane isotropic strain induced by electric field only slightly reduces the magnetization at low temperature in (100)-PSMO/PMN-PT film. On the other hand, for (011)-PSMO/PMN-PT film, the in-plane anisotropic strain results in in-plane anisotropic, nonvolatile change of magnetization at low-temperature. The magnetization, remanence and coercivity along in-plane [100] direction are suppressed by the electric field while the ones along [01-1] direction are enhanced, which is ascribed to the extra effective magnetic anisotropy induced by the electric field via anisotropic piezostrains. More interestingly, such anisotropic modulation behaviors are nonvolatile, demonstrating a memory effect.

  17. The Effect of Rotating a Faraday Disc Perpendicular to an Applied Magnetic Field Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.

    2003-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic model that examines the effect of rotating an electrically conducting cylinder with a uniform external magnetic field applied orthogonal to its axis is presented. Noting a simple geometry, it can be classified as a fundamental dynamo problem. For the case of an infinitely long cylinder, an analytical solution is obtained and analyzed in detail. A semi-analytical model was developed that considers a finite cylinder. Experimental data from a spinning brass wheel in the presence of Earth's magnetic field were compared to the proposed theory and found to fit well.

  18. Combined effect of magnetic field and thermal dispersion on a non-darcy mixed convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Amin, M. F.; Sun, Shuyu

    2011-09-01

    This paper is devoted to investigate the influences of thermal dispersion and magnetic field on a hot semi-infinite vertical porous plate embedded in a saturated Darcy-Forchheimer-Brinkman porous medium. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. The effects of transverse magnetic field parameter (Hartmann number Ha), Reynolds number Re (different velocities), Prandtl number Pr (different types of fluids) and dispersion parameter on the wall shear stress and the heat transfer rate are discussed.

  19. The effect of a magnetic field on heat transfer in a slotted channel

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, I.A.; Kirillov, I.R.; Sidorenkov, S.S.; Hua, T.Q.; Reed, C.B.

    1994-07-01

    The results of numerical and experimental studies of liquid metal heat transfer in slotted channels in a transverse magnetic field are presented. Test results showed an improvement in heat transfer in a straight channel at low and moderate interaction parameter, N. The Nusselt number at small N (around 120) was up to 2 times higher than in turbulent flow without a magnetic field, Peclet number being equal. This effect of heat transfer enhancement is caused by the generation and development of large scale velocity fluctuations in the near heated wall area. Qualitative and quantitative correlations between heat transfer and velocity fluctuation characteristics are presented.

  20. Magnetic field effect on the Coulomb interaction of acceptors in semimagnetic quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kalpana, P.; Merwyn, A.; Nithiananthi, P.; Jayakumar, K.; Reuben, Jasper D.

    2015-06-24

    The Coulomb interaction of holes in a Semimagnetic Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te / CdTe Spherical and Cubical Quantum Dot (SMQD) in a magnetic field is studied using variational approach in the effective mass approximation. Since these holes in QD show a pronounced collective behavior, while distinct single particle phenomena is suppressed, their interaction in confined potential becomes very significant. It has been observed that acceptor-acceptor interaction is more in cubical QD than in spherical QD which can be controlled by the magnetic field. The results are presented and discussed.

  1. Rectifying properties of magnetite-based Schottky diode and the effects of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Z.; Sun, J. R.; Xie, Y. W.; Wang, D. J.; Lu, W. M.; Liang, S.; Shen, B. G.

    2007-04-01

    Rectifying properties, with and without magnetic field, of a high quality Fe3O4/SrTiO3:Nb Schottky diode have been experimentally studied. The junction exhibits an excellent rectifying behavior both below and above the Verwey temperature (TV) of Fe3O4. Magnetic field has a weak but visible effect on the transport process of the junction, producing a negative magnetoresistance for T TV. Based on an analysis of the current-voltage characteristics, the spin polarization of Fe3O4 has been deduced. It is a strong function of temperature, varying between -78% and 18%.

  2. Effect of temperature and magnetic field on the photocurrent response of biomolecular bulk-hetero junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Hiroyuki; Sekiguchi, Yusuke; Matsuda, Masaki

    2012-02-01

    The photocurrent responses were investigated for the biomolecular bulk-hetero junction of chlorophyll α (Chl-α) and 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)-propyl-1-phenyl-1-phenyl-(6,6)C61 (PCBM) in the temperature range between 300 K and 1.5 K under the magnetic field up to 8 T. The chopped-light photocurrent decreases on lowering the temperature. Below 10 K, photocurrent decrease was observed under the applied magnetic field. Decay of the photocurrent observed at 10 K was ascribed to the formation of the charged trap under light irradiation. The magnetic field effect (MFE) observed in this device was found to be very similar to that observed in P3HT:PCBM bulk-hetero junction at low temperatures.

  3. Effect of temperature and magnetic field on the photocurrent response of biomolecular bulk-hetero junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Hiroyuki; Sekiguchi, Yusuke; Matsuda, Masaki

    2011-11-01

    The photocurrent responses were investigated for the biomolecular bulk-hetero junction of chlorophyll α (Chl-α) and 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)-propyl-1-phenyl-1-phenyl-(6,6)C61 (PCBM) in the temperature range between 300 K and 1.5 K under the magnetic field up to 8 T. The chopped-light photocurrent decreases on lowering the temperature. Below 10 K, photocurrent decrease was observed under the applied magnetic field. Decay of the photocurrent observed at 10 K was ascribed to the formation of the charged trap under light irradiation. The magnetic field effect (MFE) observed in this device was found to be very similar to that observed in P3HT:PCBM bulk-hetero junction at low temperatures.

  4. Effect of wake potential on Coulomb crystallization in the presence of magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Saurav; Das, Nilakshi

    2012-10-15

    The formation of dust crystal in plasma under the influence of repulsive Yukawa (Debye-Hueckel) potential is a well known phenomenon. The regular structure of dust particles is affected by anisotropic ion flow near the sheath region. The bombardment of the ions over dust grains distorts their Debye sphere by overshielding the dust cloud and gives rise to an attractive oscillatory wake potential. In this paper, we have obtained an expression for wake potential along with the Yukawa type of potential in a complex plasma in the presence of magnetic field, for subsonic ion flow towards the plasma sheath. In the presence of magnetic field, interaction potential gets modified and becomes anisotropic. We have studied the combined effect of the attractive wake potential as well as repulsive Yukawa potential on a 2D dust crystal, both in the presence and absence of magnetic field, using molecular dynamic simulation.

  5. The Effect of Electric and Magnetic Fields on Protein Self-Organization and Osteoblast Biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Xiaolan; Fourman, Lara; Singal, Sanchita; Meng, Yizhi; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2009-03-01

    The induction of bone formation to an intentional orientation is a potentially viable clinical treatment for bone regeneration. Among the many chemical and physical factors, electric and magnetic fields are an essential way to regulate the behavior of cells and matrix fibers. The aims of this study are to investigate the effects of electric and magnetic fields on protein self-organization and osteoblast biomineralization on polymer surfaces in vitro. To this end, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize the morphology of protein fiber and ECM by cells. The mechanical property of protein fibers was investigated by shear modulation force microscopy (SMFM). The late-stage of mineralization was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and grazing incident x-ray diffraction (GIXD). The primary data indicated that the magnetic field could enhance the biomineralization of osteoblast.

  6. The Nernst effect in layered superconductors under a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinh, Bui Duc; Thu, Le Minh; Hoc, Nguyen Quang

    2016-08-01

    We calculated the Nernst signal eN, describing the Nernst effect in type-II superconductor in the vortex-liquid regime, by using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equation with thermal noise. The nonlinear interaction term in the TDGL equation is treated within self-consistent Gaussian approximation. The expression of the Nernst signal eN including all the Landau levels is presented in explicit form which is applicable essentially to the whole phase. Our results are compared with the recent experimental data on high-Tc superconductor.

  7. EFFECTS OF FOSSIL MAGNETIC FIELDS ON CONVECTIVE CORE DYNAMOS IN A-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Toomre, Juri; Browning, Matthew K.; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2009-11-01

    The vigorous magnetic dynamo action achieved within the convective cores of A-type stars may be influenced by fossil magnetic fields within their radiative envelopes. We study such effects through three-dimensional simulations that model the inner 30% by radius of a 2 M {sub sun} A-type star, capturing the convective core and a portion of the overlying radiative envelope within our computational domain. We employ the three-dimensional anelastic spherical harmonic code to model turbulent dynamics within a deep rotating spherical shell. The interaction between a fossil field and the core dynamo is examined by introducing a large-scale magnetic field into the radiative envelope of a mature A star dynamo simulation. We find that the inclusion of a twisted toroidal fossil field can lead to a remarkable transition in the core dynamo behavior. Namely, a super-equipartition state can be realized in which the magnetic energy built by dynamo action is 10-fold greater than the kinetic energy of the convection itself. Such strong-field states may suggest that the resulting Lorentz forces should seek to quench the flows, yet we have achieved super-equipartition dynamo action that persists for multiple diffusion times. This is achieved by the relative co-alignment of the flows and magnetic fields in much of the domain, along with some lateral displacements of the fastest flows from the strongest fields. Convection in the presence of such strong magnetic fields typically manifests as 4-6 cylindrical rolls aligned with the rotation axis, each possessing central axial flows that imbue the rolls with a helical nature. The roll system also possesses core-crossing flows that couple distant regions of the core. We find that the magnetic fields exhibit a comparable global topology with broad, continuous swathes of magnetic field linking opposite sides of the convective core. We have explored several poloidal and toroidal fossil field geometries, finding that a poloidal component is

  8. Magnetoelectric effect and phase transitions in CuO in external magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaosheng; Qureshi, Navid; Yasin, Shadi; Mukhin, Alexander; Ressouche, Eric; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Skourski, Yurii; Geshev, Julian; Ivanov, Vsevolod; Gospodinov, Marin; Skumryev, Vassil

    2016-01-01

    Apart from being so far the only known binary multiferroic compound, CuO has a much higher transition temperature into the multiferroic state, 230 K, than any other known material in which the electric polarization is induced by spontaneous magnetic order, typically lower than 100 K. Although the magnetically induced ferroelectricity of CuO is firmly established, no magnetoelectric effect has been observed so far as direct crosstalk between bulk magnetization and electric polarization counterparts. Here we demonstrate that high magnetic fields of ≈50 T are able to suppress the helical modulation of the spins in the multiferroic phase and dramatically affect the electric polarization. Furthermore, just below the spontaneous transition from commensurate (paraelectric) to incommensurate (ferroelectric) structures at 213 K, even modest magnetic fields induce a transition into the incommensurate structure and then suppress it at higher field. Thus, remarkable hidden magnetoelectric features are uncovered, establishing CuO as prototype multiferroic with abundance of competitive magnetic interactions. PMID:26776921

  9. Magnetoelectric effect and phase transitions in CuO in external magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaosheng; Qureshi, Navid; Yasin, Shadi; Mukhin, Alexander; Ressouche, Eric; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Skourski, Yurii; Geshev, Julian; Ivanov, Vsevolod; Gospodinov, Marin; Skumryev, Vassil

    2016-01-01

    Apart from being so far the only known binary multiferroic compound, CuO has a much higher transition temperature into the multiferroic state, 230 K, than any other known material in which the electric polarization is induced by spontaneous magnetic order, typically lower than 100 K. Although the magnetically induced ferroelectricity of CuO is firmly established, no magnetoelectric effect has been observed so far as direct crosstalk between bulk magnetization and electric polarization counterparts. Here we demonstrate that high magnetic fields of ≈ 50 T are able to suppress the helical modulation of the spins in the multiferroic phase and dramatically affect the electric polarization. Furthermore, just below the spontaneous transition from commensurate (paraelectric) to incommensurate (ferroelectric) structures at 213 K, even modest magnetic fields induce a transition into the incommensurate structure and then suppress it at higher field. Thus, remarkable hidden magnetoelectric features are uncovered, establishing CuO as prototype multiferroic with abundance of competitive magnetic interactions. PMID:26776921

  10. Effects of anisotropies in turbulent magnetic diffusion in mean-field solar dynamo models

    SciTech Connect

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-04-10

    We study how anisotropies of turbulent diffusion affect the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields and the dynamo process on the Sun. The effect of anisotropy is calculated in a mean-field magnetohydrodynamics framework assuming that triple correlations provide relaxation to the turbulent electromotive force (so-called the 'minimal τ-approximation'). We examine two types of mean-field dynamo models: the well-known benchmark flux-transport model and a distributed-dynamo model with a subsurface rotational shear layer. For both models, we investigate effects of the double- and triple-cell meridional circulation, recently suggested by helioseismology and numerical simulations. To characterize the anisotropy effects, we introduce a parameter of anisotropy as a ratio of the radial and horizontal intensities of turbulent mixing. It is found that the anisotropy affects the distribution of magnetic fields inside the convection zone. The concentration of the magnetic flux near the bottom and top boundaries of the convection zone is greater when the anisotropy is stronger. It is shown that the critical dynamo number and the dynamo period approach to constant values for large values of the anisotropy parameter. The anisotropy reduces the overlap of toroidal magnetic fields generated in subsequent dynamo cycles, in the time-latitude 'butterfly' diagram. If we assume that sunspots are formed in the vicinity of the subsurface shear layer, then the distributed dynamo model with the anisotropic diffusivity satisfies the observational constraints from helioseismology and is consistent with the value of effective turbulent diffusion estimated from the dynamics of surface magnetic fields.

  11. Experimental comparison of ring and diamond shaped planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-09-01

    Planar Hall effect magnetic field sensors with ring and diamond shaped geometries are experimentally compared with respect to their magnetic field sensitivity and total signal variation. Theoretically, diamond shaped sensors are predicted to be 41% more sensitive than corresponding ring shaped sensors for negligible shape anisotropy. To experimentally validate this, we have fabricated both sensor geometries in the exchange-biased stack Ni80Fe20(tFM)/Cu(tCu)/Mn80Ir20(10 nm) with tFM=10 , 20, and 30 nm and tCu=0 , 0.3, and 0.6 nm. Sensors from each stack were characterized by external magnetic field sweeps, which were analyzed in terms of a single domain model. The total signal variation of the diamond sensors was generally found to be about 40% higher than that for the ring sensors in agreement with theoretical predictions. However, for the low-field sensitivity, the corresponding improvement varied from 0% to 35% where the largest improvement was observed for sensor stacks with comparatively strong exchange bias. This is explained by the ring sensors being less affected by shape anisotropy than the diamond sensors. To study the effect of shape anisotropy, we also characterized sensors that were surrounded by the magnetic stack with a small gap of 3 μm. These sensors were found to be less affected by shape anisotropy and thus showed higher low-field sensitivities.

  12. Magnetic field effects on recombination fluorescence in liquid iso-octane

    SciTech Connect

    Saik, V.O.; Ostafin, A.E.; Lipsky, S.

    1995-11-01

    The 123.6 nm photoionization of deuterated isooctane at {minus}10 {degree}C in the presence of hexafluorobenzene has been studied by examining the effect of a magnetic field to alter the quantum yield of recombination fluorescence. This fluorescence results from geminate recombination of hexafluorobenzene anions with isooctane positive ions. The use of a deuterated as contrasted to a protonated alkane makes the intensity of the recombination fluorescence much more sensitive to the magnetic field and permits observation of two maxima in the fluorescence yield at field strengths of 0 and 411 G and a possible third maximum at 822 G. The theory of the hyperfine induced spin evolution predicts these resonances at selected multiples of the C{sub 6}F{sup {minus}}{sub 6} hyperfine constant of 137 G. Utilizing the diffusion theory of geminate recombination in a Coulomb field, the experimental magnetic field spectrum is found to be well predicted over most of the range of magnetic field strengths studied (up to 2.5 kG) by a simple, one parameter, exponential radial probability density of initial scavenged geminate pair separation distances. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  13. Immunological and biochemical effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cohen, H.D.

    1990-01-30

    Public concern is growing about the possible health risks of exposure to the electric and magnetic fields generated by power distribution systems. This research program is evaluating whether field exposure results in specific and replicable effects on measures of human performance, physiology, biochemistry, and subjective state. The studies reported here were performed under controlled laboratory conditions in the Human Exposure Test Facility at Midwest Research Institute (MRI). 80 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Measurements of magnetic fields using the Zeeman effect in laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Briand, J.; Kieffer, J.C.; Gomes, A.; Arnas, C.; Dinguirard, J.P.; Quemener, Y.; Berge, L.; El Tamer, M.; Armengaud, M.

    1987-09-01

    In this article, experimental results on magnetic fields obtained from measurements of the Zeeman effect in laser-produced plasmas are presented. Observations of the coronal plasma produced by interaction between a carbon plane target and a 0.25 m laser beam, show for the first time at such short wavelengths the existence of toroidal and axial fields with amplitudes reaching, respectively, 0.35 and 0.5 MG.

  15. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Mance, Deni; Baldus, Marc; Gast, Peter; Huber, Martina; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2015-06-21

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between “bulk” and “core” nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei.

  16. Switchable voltage control of the magnetic coercive field via magnetoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Ma, Jing; Li, Zheng; Shen, Yang; Lin, Yuanhua; Nan, C. W.

    2011-08-01

    Switchable voltage modulation of the magnetic properties is reported in different multiferroic bilayers with magnetic films grown on pre-poled ferroelectric substrates, based on the magneto-optical Kerr effect observations. The dynamic voltage control of the magnetic coercive field (Hc) is dependent not only on the materials properties of each ferroic layer, but also on the bias voltage history. The Hc versus electric field behaviors essentially track the dependence of the piezostrains of the substrates on the bias voltage. The observations demonstrate that Hc in such multiferroic bilayers can be controlled by voltage via strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling and that the Hc change is not an artifact due to a heating effect.

  17. Superposition of DC magnetic fields by cascading multiple magnets in magnetic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2015-09-01

    A novel method that can effectively collect the DC magnetic field produced by multiple separated magnets is proposed. With the proposed idea of a magnetic loop, the DC magnetic field produced by these separated magnets can be effectively superimposed together. The separated magnets can be cascaded in series or in parallel. A novel nested magnetic loop is also proposed to achieve a higher DC magnetic field in the common air region without increasing the DC magnetic field in each magnetic loop. The magnetic loop can be made by a magnetic hose, which is designed by transformation optics and can be realized by the combination of super-conductors and ferromagnetic materials.

  18. Magnetization switching in a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction by combining spin-transfer torque and electric field-effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, S.; Nakatani, Y.; Yamanouchi, M.; Ikeda, S.; Sato, H.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-26

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme for magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junctions, in which two successive voltage pulses are applied to utilize both spin-transfer torque and electric field effect. Under this switching scheme, a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction with perpendicular magnetic easy axis is shown to switch faster than by spin-transfer torque alone and more reliably than that by electric fields alone.

  19. Note: Spectral motional Stark effect diagnostic for measurement of magnetic fields below 0.3 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Donin, A.; Savkin, V.

    2013-08-01

    The paper reports on development of the spectral motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic in the midplane of the gas dynamic trap (GDT) linear system for magnetic confinement of anisotropic hot-ion plasma. The axially symmetric GDT vacuum magnetic field has a minimum value in the midplane, which varies from 0.2 to 0.35 T in different regimes of operation. Buildup of 15 keV ion population generates a diamagnetic reduction of magnetic field in the plasma core of up to 30% in the maximum density region, as measured by the existing eight-line MSE diagnostic. Commissioning of the midplane MSE provided first direct measurements of diamagnetic modifications in the minimum magnetic field GDT section, a necessary complement to the understanding of equilibrium and self-organization of high-β plasmas in GDT. Making use of the stable short-pulse diagnostic beam and calibration of the apparent spectral width of beam emission lines allow for the measurement of the plasma magnetic field of 0.29 ± 0.007 T with the integration time of 200 μs.

  20. Direct MRI detection of the neuronal magnetic field: the effect of the dendrite branch.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ling; Xiong, Hong-Chuan; Yao, De-Zhong

    2010-09-21

    In recent years, neuronal current MRI (nc-MRI) was proposed as a new imaging method to directly map the magnetic field change caused by neuronal activity. Nc-MRI could offer improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to blood hemodynamics-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this paper, with a finite current dipole as the model of dendrite or dendrite branch, we investigated the spatial distribution of the magnetic field generated by synchronously activated neurons to evaluate the possibility of nc-MRI. Our simulations imply that the existence of a dendrite branch may not only increase the strength of the neuronal magnetic field (NMF), but also raise the non-uniform and unsymmetry of the NMF; therefore, it can enhance the detectability of the neuronal current magnetic field by MRI directly. The results show that the signal phase shift is enlarged, but it is unstable and is still very small, <1 radian, while the magnitude signal may be strong enough for a typical MRI voxel to be detected. We suggest making further efforts to measure the magnitude signal which may induce a large effect in an nc-MRI experiment.

  1. Effective tight-binding model for MX2 under electric and magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shanavas, Kavungal Veedu; Satpathy, S.

    2015-06-15

    We present a systematic method for developing a five band Hamiltonian for the metal d orbitals that can be used to study the effect of electric and magnetic fields on multilayer MX2 (M=Mo,W and X=S,Se) systems. On a hexagonal lattice of d orbitals, the broken inversion symmetry of the monolayers is incorporated via fictitious s orbitals at the chalcogenide sites. A tight-binding Hamiltonian is constructed and then downfolded to get effective d orbital overlap parameters using quasidegenerate perturbation theory. The steps to incorporate the effects of multiple layers, external electric and magnetic fields are also detailed. We find that anmore » electric field produces a linear-k Rashba splitting around the Γ point, while a magnetic field removes the valley pseudospin degeneracy at the ±K points. Lastly, our model provides a simple tool to understand the recent experiments on electric and magnetic control of valley pseudospin in monolayer dichalcogendies.« less

  2. Effects of External Magnetic Fields on the Excited States of (ND)8 Metal Complexes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helms, Charles Alan

    Large changes in the steady state emissions and lifetimes as a function of external magnetic field strength have been observed for (nd)^8 mononuclear and binuclear complexes. These unusually pronounced effects are attributed to a field-induced symmetry reduction leading to a relaxation of transition dipole selection rules. Both spin-orbit coupling and magnetic field strength appear to play a role in determining the magnitude of the observed effect. A theoretical model has been developed to rationalize the results obtained for the Pt_2(H _2P_2O _5)_sp{4}{4-} ion. An analogous model should pertain to the mononuclear systems. Closed-shell (La(III), Lu(III)) rare earth salts of the Pt_2(H_2P _2O_5)_sp{4 }{4-} ion show the same dependence on an externally applied magnetic field as the previously examined K and Ba analogs, in all respects. However, the luminescence properties of the openshell salts are markedly different, even in the absence of a magnetic field. The zero-field phosphorescence lifetime of GdKPt_2 (H_2P_2O _5)_4 is one-tenth that of the closed-shell lifetime, but the position of the phosphorescence is unchanged from the closed-shell case. The application of an external magnetic field produces no further changes in the electronic properties of the open-shell salts. Salts containing rare earth ions with low-lying atomic states (Eu(III)) exhibit complete quenching of the Pt _2(H_2P_2 O_5)_sp{4}{4 -} phosphorescence, indicating efficient energy transfer. Results from complexes containing rare earth ions are analyzed in terms of an angular momentum coupling scheme. A recently published derivation of basis functions for the Pt_2(H_2 P_2O_5)_sp {4}{4-} ion including spin-orbit interactions was repeated and confirmed.

  3. Effects of variation in solar conditions and crustal sources' orientation on the Martian magnetic field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulusen, D.; Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.; Brain, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Strong crustal magnetic sources on the surface of Mars directly interact with the solar magnetic field and plasma, resulting a very dynamic environment near the planet. Effects of the orientation of these remnant magnetic sources with respect to the sun and variation of the solar conditions on the Martian plasma interaction have been investigated in a previous paper. In this previous study, magnetic topology maps obtained from ~7 years of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) directional electron observations (obtained by Dave Brain) were compared with the topology maps obtained from a set of BATS-R-US MHD simulations for Mars. One conclusion from this study was that although the MHD model is consistent with the data and provides insight about the global magnetic field topology variation with changing crustal field orientation and solar parameters, detailed investigation of local effects is difficult due to MGS orbital bias. Moreover, proper comparison of the observations with the model requires more careful data selection rather than using 7 years time averages. In this paper, we readdress the study to tackle the problems of our previous work by performing more detailed data analysis and present the results of the updated model-data comparison.

  4. Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution in magnetic shape memory alloys: Phase field simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yongmei M.

    2009-02-09

    Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution during magnetic field-induced deformation in magnetic shape memory alloys are studied by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The simulations show that different twin boundary mobilities lead to drastically different domain microstructures and evolution pathways, yielding very different magnetization and strain responses, even with opposite signs. The study also reveals complex domain phenomena in magnetic shape memory alloys.

  5. Behavioral effects of long-term exposure to magnetic fields in rats.

    PubMed

    Trzeciak, H I; Grzesik, J; Bortel, M; Kuśka, R; Duda, D; Michnik, J; Małecki, A

    1993-01-01

    Male rats and pregnant and nonpregnant female rats of the Wistar strain were sham-exposed or exposed to static (0.49 T) or to extremely low frequency (50 Hz) magnetic fields (0.018 T) 2 h per day for 20 consecutive days. Measures of irritability, exploratory activity, and locomotion were made in that order before and after the 4th, 10th, and 17th 2-h exposures. A reliable decrease in the irritability of rats after repeated exposure to a static or undulating field was found. No significant effects of treatment conditions on open-field behavior and locomotor activity were observed. Pregnancy had no influence on the behavioral end points. These results indicate that irritability of rats may be used as a simple behavioral indicant of mammalian sensitivity to magnetic fields. PMID:8216385

  6. Effect of pressure and magnetic field on the phase transitions in lanthanum-deficient manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakonov, V. P.; Fita, I.; Zubov, E.; Pashchenko, V.; Mikhaylov, V.; Bukhantsev, Yu.; Szymczak, Henryk

    2001-08-01

    We report on the pressure, field and temperature dependencies of magnetization and resistance in manganites of (La1-xCax)1-yMn1+y O3 type. The M(T) dependencies is established to exhibit the following peculiarities: the first is connected with the paramagnet (PM)-ferromagnet (FM) transition at 267 K; the peak of M(T) dependence eat 263K is presumable due to an existence of AFM clusters; an anomaly in magnetization is connected with the FM-canted phase transition at 42K and the large irreversibility in the field-cooled and zero field- cooled magnetization. As field is increased above 200 Oe, the sign of the M(T) anomaly changes, namely, the M(T) magnetization increases with increasing field at 42K. The character of M(T) dependencies does not change under pressure. However, both the Curie temperature, Tc, and the resistance peak corresponding to metal-insulator transition shift in the direction of high temperatures with increasing pressure. A pressure stabilizes the ferromagnetic metallic phase. The temperature of the FM-canting phase transition does not change under pressure. The magneto resistance effect increase by 15 percent under pressure of 12.6 kbar.

  7. Passive shielding effect on space profile of magnetic field emissions for wireless power transfer to vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Batra, T. Schaltz, E.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetic fields emitted by wireless power transfer systems are of high importance with respect to human safety and health. Aluminum and ferrite are used in the system to reduce the fields and are termed as passive shielding. In this paper, the influence of these materials on the space profile has been investigated with the help of simulations on Comsol for the four possible geometries—no shielding, ferrite, aluminum, and full shielding. As the reflected impedance varies for the four geometries, the primary current is varied accordingly to maintain constant power transfer to the secondary side. Surrounding magnetic field plots in the vertical direction show that maxima's of the two coils for the no shielding geometry are centered at the respective coils and for the remaining three are displaced closer to each other. This closeness would lead to more effective addition of the two coil fields and an increase in the resultant field from space point of view. This closeness varies with distance in the horizontal direction and vertical gap between the coils and is explained in the paper. This paper provides a better understanding of effect of the passive shielding materials on the space nature of magnetic fields for wireless power transfer for vehicle applications.

  8. [Effect of weak combined magnetic fields on the metamorphosis of the meal-worm beetle Tenebrio molitor].

    PubMed

    Ermakov, A M; Lednev, V V

    2010-01-01

    The effects of weak combined magnetic fields adjusted to the parametric resonance for Ca2+ and K+ and extremely weak alternating magnetic field on the metamorphosis of the meal-worm beetle Tenebrio molitor have been studied. It was shown that the exposure of pupas of insects to all above-indicated types of fields stimulates the metamorphosis. However, after the exposure to weak combined magnetic fields adjusted to the parametric resonance for Ca2+ and K+, the number of insects with anomalies increases, which is not observed by the action of the weak alternating magnetic field.

  9. Faraday-Effect Polarimeter Diagnostic for Internal Magnetic Field Fluctuation Measurements in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    A high-resolution Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer diagnostic currently under construction at the DIII-D tokamak has three overall measurement goals: (1) determine the current density dynamics at the magnetic axis, J(0,t), for torque-free plasmas (no NBI) and bootstrap current in the pedestal region; (2) resolve both coherent and broadband magnetic fluctuations [at the level δb <= 1 Gauss with up to 2 MHz bandwidth] associated with MHD perturbations, energetic particle driven modes and broadband turbulence (e.g. microtearing modes), and (3) identify non-axisymmetric structures and plasma response to externally applied RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) fields being developed for ELM control as well as MHD events. These goals will be achieved using a 650-700 GHz source and heterodyne receiver system to measure the line-integrated Faraday-effect and density along three horizontal chords positioned at the magnetic axis and +/-15 cm off-axis. The system will be double-pass and cornercube retroreflectors have already been installed. Simultaneous measurement of density and Faraday effect allows isolation of the fluctuating magnetic field component in the radial direction. Supported by US DOE under DE-FG03-01ER54615 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  10. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  11. Planarian activity differences when maintained in water pre-treated with magnetic fields: a nonlinear effect.

    PubMed

    Gang, Noa; Persinger, Michael A

    2011-12-01

    There have been multiple claims that exposing water to a static magnetic field affects its properties which influence living systems. To test this hypothesis, planarian subsequent to dissection were maintained in spring water that had been previously exposed for only one day to one of three (16, 160, or 1,600 G) intensity static magnetic fields or to a reference condition. Although there was no significant difference in regeneration rates over the subsequent seven-day period, there was a statistically significant nonlinear effect for planarian mobility and diffusion rates. Both mobility rates and diffusion velocity of a liquid within the water that had been exposed to the 16 G field was about twice that for water exposed to the other intensities. These results imply that nonlinear biophysical effects may emerge under specific conditions of intensity ranges for particular volumes of water.

  12. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  13. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Cryptochrome-dependent magnetic field effect on seizure response in Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    Marley, Richard; Giachello, Carlo N G; Scrutton, Nigel S; Baines, Richard A; Jones, Alex R

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that facilitate animal magnetoreception have both fascinated and confounded scientists for decades, and its precise biophysical origin remains unclear. Among the proposed primary magnetic sensors is the flavoprotein, cryptochrome, which is thought to provide geomagnetic information via a quantum effect in a light-initiated radical pair reaction. Despite recent advances in the radical pair model of magnetoreception from theoretical, molecular and animal behaviour studies, very little is known of a possible signal transduction mechanism. We report a substantial effect of magnetic field exposure on seizure response in Drosophila larvae. The effect is dependent on cryptochrome, the presence and wavelength of light and is blocked by prior ingestion of typical antiepileptic drugs. These data are consistent with a magnetically-sensitive, photochemical radical pair reaction in cryptochrome that alters levels of neuronal excitation, and represent a vital step forward in our understanding of the signal transduction mechanism involved in animal magnetoreception. PMID:25052424

  15. Indirect measurement of the magnetocaloric effect using a novel differential scanning calorimeter with magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, S; Linderoth, S; Pryds, N; Kuhn, L Theil; Jensen, J Buch

    2008-08-01

    A simple and high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) unit operating under magnetic field has been built for indirect determination of the magnetocaloric effect. The principle of the measuring unit in the calorimeter is based on Peltier elements as heat flow sensors. The high sensitivity of the apparatus combined with a suitable calibration procedure allows very fast and accurate heat capacity measurements under magnetic field to be made. The device was validated from heat capacity measurements for the typical DSC reference material gallium (Ga) and a La(0.67)Ca(0.33)MnO(3) manganite system and the results were highly consistent with previous reported data for these materials. The DSC has a working range from 200 to 340 K and has been tested in magnetic fields reaching 1.8 T. The signal-to-noise ratio is in the range of 10(2)-10(3) for the described experiments. Finally the results have been compared to results from a Quantum Design(R) physical properties measuring system. The configuration of the system also has the advantage of being able to operate with other types of magnets, e.g., permanent magnets or superconducting coils, as well as the ability to be expanded to a wider temperature range.

  16. Self-consistent, three-dimensional equilibrium effects on tokamak magnetic field ripple

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.L.; Reiman, A.H.

    1987-10-01

    Self-consistent equilibrium effects on tokamak magnetic field ripple have been calculated using a three-dimensional equilibrium code. The effects are found to be large enough that they should be included in tokamak ignition experiment designs. Even the modification of the well depth associated with the flow of force-free plasma current along rippled field lines is substantial. An analysis of the results separates the contribution of the Shafranov shift to the ripple modification from the contributions of other finite-pressure effects. 5 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Evaluation of potential health effects of 10 kHz magnetic fields: a rodent reproductive study.

    PubMed

    Dawson, B V; Robertson, I G; Wilson, W R; Zwi, L J; Boys, J T; Green, A W

    1998-01-01

    New technology involving the use of high-frequency inductive power distribution (HID) has recently been developed for use in materials handling and personnel transfer. Sinusoidal magnetic fields at a frequency of 10 kHz with field intensities of approximately 0.2 mT are generated directly between the current-carrying coils of this equipment. Effects of 10 kHz magnetic fields on cell division, migration, and differentiation have never been previously investigated. To evaluate potential effects on these parameters, a rodent reproductive study was undertaken using Wistar rats. Exposures were at 0.095, 0.24, and 0.95 mT with a background exposure of 5-10 microT. Three sets of parental rats were exposed continuously for 20-23.5 h/day to the fields: maternal rats during gestation, paternal rats for at least 45 days prior to mating and maternal rats 1 month prior to mating. Exposure phases thus covered spermatogenesis, maturation of the ovum and ovulation, fertilization, implantation, embryogenesis, organogenesis, and maturation of the fetus immediately prior to parturition. In all experiments pregnancy outcome was assessed. These studies failed to demonstrate any reproductive toxicity resulting from maternal or fetal exposure during gestation or following paternal or maternal exposure for several weeks prior to mating. No quantitative or qualitative effects on spermatogenesis occurred after exposure, and no effects on the estrous cycle or ovulation could be demonstrably linked to the 10 kHz magnetic field exposure at 0.095, 0.25, or 0.95 mT. Where possible, parental clinical chemistry and hematology were also examined. As in mouse toxicology studies previously reported, minor differences were observed between control and treated groups. These were regarded as statistically, but not biologically, significant and could not categorically be attributed to magnetic field exposure.

  18. The suppression effect of external magnetic field on the high-power microwave window multipactor phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xue Wang, Yong; Fan, Junjie

    2015-02-15

    To suppress the surface multipactor phenomenon and improve the transmitting power of the high-power microwave window, the application of external magnetic fields is theoretically analyzed and simulated. A Monte Carlo algorithm is used to track the secondary electron trajectories and study the multipactor scenario on the surface of a cylinder window. It is confirmed that over-resonant magnetic fields (an external magnetic field whose magnitude is slightly greater than that of a resonant magnetic field) will generate a compensating trajectory and collision, which can suppress the secondary electron avalanche. The optimal value of this external magnetic field that will avoid the multipactor phenomenon on cylinder windows is discussed.

  19. Magnetic fields during galaxy mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenbeck, Kai; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.

    2016-09-01

    Galaxy mergers are expected to play a central role for the evolution of galaxies and may have a strong effect on their magnetic fields. We present the first grid-based 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulations investigating the evolution of magnetic fields during merger events. For this purpose, we employed a simplified model considering the merger event of magnetized gaseous disks in the absence of stellar feedback and without a stellar or dark matter component. We show that our model naturally leads to the production of two peaks in the evolution of the average magnetic field strength within 5 kpc, within 25 kpc, and on scales in between 5 and 25 kpc. The latter is consistent with the peak in the magnetic field strength previously reported in a merger sequence of observed galaxies. We show that the peak on the galactic scale and in the outer regions is most likely due to geometrical effects, as the core of one galaxy enters the outskirts of the other one. In addition, the magnetic field within the central ~5 kpc is physically enhanced, which reflects the enhancement in density that is due to efficient angular momentum transport. We conclude that high-resolution observations of the central regions will be particularly relevant for probing the evolution of magnetic field structures during merger events.

  20. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  1. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  2. Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields on the Performance of a Superconducting Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Jacek Sekutowicz; Waldemar Singer

    2005-05-01

    A special two-cell cavity was designed to obtain surface field distributions suitable for investigation of electric and magnetic field effects on cavity performance. The cavity design and preliminary results were presented in a previous contribution. The bulk niobium cavity was heat-treated in a vacuum furnace at 1250 C to improve thermal conductivity. Three seamless hydroformed Nb/Cu cavities of the same design were fabricated to investigate the role of the electron beam welds located in high field areas. This paper will present RF test results at 2 K for the bulk niobium and one of the seamless cavities.

  3. Investigating the Effect of Line Dipole Magnetic Field on Hydrothermal Characteristics of a Temperature-Sensitive Magnetic Nanofluid Using Two-Phase Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahiraei, Mehdi; Hangi, Morteza

    2016-10-01

    Hydrothermal characteristics of a temperature-sensitive magnetic nanofluid between two parallel plates are investigated in the presence of magnetic field produced by one or multiple line dipole(s) using the two-phase mixture model. As the nanofluid reaches the region where the magnetic field is applied, a rotation is developed due to the dependency of magnetization on temperature. This can lead to mixing in the flow and more uniform distribution of temperature due to the disturbance caused in the boundary layer, and consequently, enhancement in convective heat transfer. The results indicate that the disturbance in boundary layer adjacent to the lower wall is more significant than the upper wall. By application of the magnetic field, the convective heat transfer increases locally for both walls. Due to the intensified mixing, a sudden pressure drop occurs when the fluid reaches the region where the magnetic field is applied. For greater magnetic field strengths and lower Reynolds numbers, the improvement in convective heat transfer is more significant. For small magnetic field strengths, the effect of applying magnetic field on the upper wall is much smaller than that on the lower wall; however, this effect becomes almost the same for both walls at great magnetic field strengths.

  4. Magnetic field can alleviate toxicological effect induced by cadmium in mungbean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-ping; Li, Ran; He, Jun-Min

    2011-06-01

    To alleviate toxicological effect induced by cadmium in mungbean seedlings, seeds were divided into four groups: The controls groups (CK, without treatment), magnetic field treated groups (MF), cadmium treated groups (CS), and magnetic field treated followed by cadmium treated groups (MF + CS).The results showed: (i) Compared with the controls, cadmium stress resulted in enhancing in the concentration of malondialdehyde, H(2)O(2) and O(2-), and the conductivity of electrolyte leakage while decreasing in the nitrice oxide synthase (NOS) activity, the concentration of nitrice oxide (NO), chlorophyll and total carbon and nitrogen, the net photosynthetic rate, the stomatal conductance, the transpiration rate, the water use efficiency, the lateral number and seedlings growth except for intercellular CO(2) concentration increase. However, the seedlings treated with 600 mT magnetic field followed by cadmium stress the concentration of malondialdehyde, H(2)O(2) and O(2-), and the conductivity of electrolyte leakage decreased, while the above mentioned NO concentration, NOS activity, photosynthesis and growth parameters increased compared to cadmium stress alone. (ii) Compared with the cadmium stress (CS), the seedling growth were inhibited when the seeds were treated with NO scavenger (hemoglobin, HB) and inhibition of NO generating enzyme (sodium tungstate, ST), conversely, the seedling growth were improved by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and CaCl(2). In the case of the HB and ST treatment followed by magnetic field and then the seedling subjected to CS, the seedlings growth was better than that of hemoglobin (HB) followed by CS and ST followed by CS. The seeds were treated with SNP and CaCl(2) followed by MF, and then subjected to CS, the seedlings growth were better than that of SNP followed by CS, and CaCl(2) followed by CS. These results suggested that magnetic field compensates for the toxicological effects of cadmium exposure are related to NO signal.

  5. Effect of weak static magnetic fields on the development of cultured skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Surma, Sergei V; Belostotskaya, Galina B; Shchegolev, Boris F; Stefanov, Vasily E

    2014-12-01

    We studied the effect produced on the development and functional activity of skeletal muscle cells from newborn Wistar rats in primary culture by weak static magnetic fields (WSMF; 60-400 µT) with a high capacity of penetrating the biological media. To reduce the impact of external magnetic fields, cells were cultured at 37 °C in a multilayered shielding chamber with the attenuation coefficient equal to 160. WSMF inside the chamber was created by a circular permanent magnet. We found that the application of WSMF with the magnetic field strength only a few times that of the geomagnetic field can accelerate the development of skeletal muscle cells, resulting in the formation of multinuclear hypertrophied myotubes. WSMF was shown to induce 1.5- to 3.5-fold rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i due to the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) through ryanodine receptors (RyR), which increases in the maturation of myotubes. We also found that fully differentiated myotubes at late stages of development were less sensitive to WSMF, manifesting a gradual decrease in the frequency of contractions. However, myotubes at the stage when electromechanical coupling was forming dramatically reduced the frequency of contractions during the first minutes of their exposure to WSMF.

  6. Electronic transport of Lorentz plasma with collision and magnetic field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Chong; Wan, Feng; Jia, Mo-Ran; Li, Zi-Liang; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song

    2016-10-01

    The electronic transverse transport of Lorentz plasma with collision and magnetic field effects is studied by solving the Boltzmann equation for different electron density distributions. For the Maxwellian distribution, it is shown that transport coefficients decrease as Ω increases, Ω is the ratio of an electron’s magneto-cyclotron frequency to plasma collision frequency. It means that the electrons are possible to be highly collimated by a strong magnetic field. For the quasi-monoenergetic distribution with different widths, it is found that the transport coefficients decrease greatly as ɛ¯ decreases. In particular when the width approaches to zero the transverse transport coefficients are hardly affected by the magnetic field and the minimal one is obtained. Results imply that the strong magnetic field and quasi-monoenergetic distribution are both beneficial to reduce the electronic transverse transport. This study is also helpful to understand the relevant problems of plasma transport in the background of the inertial confinement fusion. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475026 and 11305010) and the NSAF of China (Grant No. U1530153).

  7. Water Complexes Take Part in Biological Effect Created by Weak Combined Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykina, Nadiia

    2016-07-01

    It was revealed experimentally that at small level of magnetic field's noise (less than 4µT/Hz0.5) the dependence of gravitropc reaction of cress roots on frequency had a fine structure/ The peak that corresponded to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ ions for the static component of combined magnetic field that was equal to 40µT became split up into three peaks ( f1 = 31/3Hz, f2 = 32.5Hz i f3 = 34 Hz./ . The frequency f1 corresponded to the Ca2+ ion (theoretical value 31.6 Hz), the frequency f2 corresponded to the hydronium ion H3O+ (theoretical value 32.9 Hz), the frequency f3 corresponded to OH- ion (theoretical value 35 Hz). Taking into account the influence of combined magnetic field on hydronium ions and Del Giudice' hypothesis one may throw away doubts about the possibility of ion cyclotron resonance. The hydronium ions are unusual because they have a long free path length. It was revealed that pH of the distillated water changed under the treatment in combined magnetic field tuned to cyclotron frequency of hydronium ion. Such changes in pH had to lead to the biological effects on the molecular ,cell and organism levels.

  8. Effects of extremely low frequency magnetic field on oxidative balance in brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Ciejka, Elzbieta; Kleniewska, P; Skibska, B; Goraca, A

    2011-12-01

    Extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) may result in oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation with an ultimate effect on a number of systemic disturbances and cell death. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of ELF-MF parameters most frequently used in magnetotherapy on reactive oxygen species generation (ROS) in brain tissue of experimental animals depending on the time of exposure to this field. The research material included adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 3-4 months. The animals were divided into 3 groups: I - control (shame) group; II - exposed to the following parameters of the magnetic field: 7 mT, 40 Hz, 30 min/day, 10 days; III - exposed to the ELF-MF parameters of 7 mT, 40 Hz, 60 min/day, 10 days. The selected parameters of oxidative stress: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), total free sulphydryl groups (-SH groups) and protein in brain homogenates were measured after the exposure of rats to the magnetic field. ELF-MF parameters of 7 mT, 40 Hz, 30 min/day for 10 days caused a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and insignificant increase in H(2)O(2) and free -SH groups. The same ELF-MF parameters but applied for 60 min/day caused a significant increase in free -SH groups and protein concentration in the brain homogenates indicating the adaptive mechanism. The study has shown that ELF-MF applied for 30 min/day for 10 days can affect free radical generation in the brain. Prolongation of the exposure to ELF-MF (60/min/day) caused adaptation to this field. The effect of ELF-MF irradiation on oxidative stress parameters depends on the time of animal exposure to magnetic field. PMID:22314568

  9. An Experimental Study of the Effects of A Rotating Magnetic Field on Electrically Conducting Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1998-01-01

    The use of a rotating magnetic field for stirring metallic melts has been a commonly adopted practice for a fairly long period. The elegance of the technique stems from its non-intrusive nature and the intense stirring it can produce in an electrically conducting medium. A further application of the method in recent times has been in the area of crystal growth from melts (e.g. germanium). The latter experiments have been mainly research oriented in order to understand the basic physics of the process and to establish norms for optimizing such a technique for the commercial production of crystals. When adapted for crystal growth applications, the rotating magnetic field is used to induce a slow flow or rotation in the melt which in effect significantly curtails temperature field oscillations in the melt. These oscillations are known to cause dopant striations and thereby inhomogeneities in the grown crystal that essentially degrades the crystal quality. The applied field strength is typically of the order of milli-Teslas with a frequency range between 50-400 Hz. In this investigation, we report findings from experiments that explore the feasibility of applying a rotating magnetic field to aqueous salt solutions, that are characterized by conductivities that are several orders of magnitude smaller than semi-conductor melts. The aim is to study the induced magnetic field and consequently the induced flow in such in application. Detailed flow field description obtained through non-intrusive particle displacement tracking will be reported along with an analytical assessment of the results. It is anticipated that the obtained results will facilitate in establishing a parameter range over which the technique can be applied to obtain a desired flow field distribution. This method can find applicability in the growth of crystals from aqueous solutions and give an experimenter another controllable parameter towards improving the quality of the grown crystal.

  10. Bioluminescence under static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Ueno, S.

    1998-06-01

    In the present study, the effect of magnetic fields on the emission of light by a living system was studied. The fireflies Hotaria parvula and Luciola cruciata were used as the bioluminescence systems. The firefly light organ was fixed at the edge of an optical fiber. The emitted light was introduced into a single-channel photon-counting system using an optical fiber. We measured both the spectrum of a constant light emission and, the time course of bioluminescence pulses. Two horizontal-type superconducting magnets, which produced 8 and 14 T magnetic fields at their center, were used as the magnetic-field generators. We also carried out an in vitro study of bioluminescence. The enzymatic activity of luciferase was measured under a 14 T magnetic field. We measured emission spectra of bioluminescence over the interval 500-600 nm at 25 °C in a stable emission state. It was observed that the peak wavelength around 550 nm shifted to 560 nm under a 14 T magnetic field. However, the effects of magnetic fields were not significant. Also, we measured the time course of emissions at 550 nm in a transient emission state. The rate in the light intensity under a 14 T magnetic field increased compared to the control. There is a possibility that the change in the emission intensities under a magnetic field is related to a change in the biochemical systems of the firefly, such as the enzymatic process of luciferase and the excited singlet state with subsequent light emission.

  11. CMOS Compatible 3-Axis Magnetic Field Sensor using Hall Effect Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Joshua R.

    The purpose of this study is to design, fabricate and test a CMOS compatible 3-axis Hall effect sensor capable of detecting the earth's magnetic field, with strength's of ˜50 muT. Preliminary testing of N-well Van Der Pauw structures using strong neodymium magnets showed proof of concept for hall voltage sensing, however, poor geometry of the structures led to a high offset voltage. A 1-axis Hall effect sensor was designed, fabricated and tested with a sensitivity of 1.12x10-3 mV/Gauss using the RIT metal gate PMOS process. Poor geometry and insufficient design produced an offset voltage of 0.1238 volts in the 1-axis design; prevented sensing of the earth's magnetic field. The new design features improved geometry for sensing application, improved sensitivity and use the RIT sub-CMOS process. The completed 2-axis device showed an average sensitivity to large magnetic fields of 0.0258 muV/Gauss at 10 mA supply current.

  12. Experimental study of the magnetic field enhanced Payne effect in magnetorheological elastomers.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Vladislav V; Ecker, Eva; Stepanov, Gennady V; Shamonin, Mikhail; Monkman, Gareth J; Kramarenko, Elena Yu; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2014-11-21

    The dynamic modulus and the loss factor of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) of various compositions and anisotropies are studied by dynamic torsion oscillations performed in the absence and in the presence of an external magnetic field. The emphasis is on the Payne effect, i.e. the dependence of the elastomer magnetorheological characteristics on the strain amplitude and their evolution with cyclically increasing and decreasing strain amplitudes. MREs are based on two silicone matrices differing in storage modulus (soft, G' ∼ 10(3) Pa, and hard, G' ∼ 10(4) Pa, matrices). For each matrix, the concentration of carbonyl iron particles with diameters of 3-5 μm was equal to 70 and 82 mass% (22 and 35 vol%, respectively) in the composite material. Samples for each filler content, isotropic and aligned-particles, are investigated. It is found that the Payne effect significantly increases in the presence of an external magnetic field and varies with the cyclical loading which reaches saturation after several cycles. The results are interpreted as the processes of formation-destruction-reformation of the internal filler structure under the simultaneously applied mechanical force and magnetic field. Impacts of matrix elasticity and magnetic interactions on the filler alignment are elucidated. PMID:25278263

  13. Experimental study of the magnetic field enhanced Payne effect in magnetorheological elastomers.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Vladislav V; Ecker, Eva; Stepanov, Gennady V; Shamonin, Mikhail; Monkman, Gareth J; Kramarenko, Elena Yu; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2014-11-21

    The dynamic modulus and the loss factor of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) of various compositions and anisotropies are studied by dynamic torsion oscillations performed in the absence and in the presence of an external magnetic field. The emphasis is on the Payne effect, i.e. the dependence of the elastomer magnetorheological characteristics on the strain amplitude and their evolution with cyclically increasing and decreasing strain amplitudes. MREs are based on two silicone matrices differing in storage modulus (soft, G' ∼ 10(3) Pa, and hard, G' ∼ 10(4) Pa, matrices). For each matrix, the concentration of carbonyl iron particles with diameters of 3-5 μm was equal to 70 and 82 mass% (22 and 35 vol%, respectively) in the composite material. Samples for each filler content, isotropic and aligned-particles, are investigated. It is found that the Payne effect significantly increases in the presence of an external magnetic field and varies with the cyclical loading which reaches saturation after several cycles. The results are interpreted as the processes of formation-destruction-reformation of the internal filler structure under the simultaneously applied mechanical force and magnetic field. Impacts of matrix elasticity and magnetic interactions on the filler alignment are elucidated.

  14. Exploring the extent of magnetic field effect on intermolecular photoinduced electron transfer in different organized assemblies.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Basu, Samita

    2005-09-15

    Magnetic field effect (MFE) on the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between phenazine (PZ) and the amines, N,N-dimethylaniline , N,N-diethylaniline, 4,4'-bis(dimethylamino)diphenylmethane (DMDPM), and triethylamine, has been studied in micelles, reverse micelles, and small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) with a view to understand the effect of spatial location of the donor and acceptor moieties on the magnetic field behavior. The structure of the assembly is found to influence greatly the PET dynamics and hence the MFE of all the systems studied. The magnetic field behavior in micelles is consistent with the hyperfine mechanism, but high B(1/2) values have been obtained which have been ascribed to hopping and lifetime broadening. The variation of MFE with W(0), in reverse micelles, proves yet again that the MFE maximizes at an optimum separation distance between the acceptor and donor. This is the first example of such behavior for intermolecular PET in heterogeneous medium. We have also reported for the first time MFE on intermolecular PET in SUVs. In this case, the PZ-DMDPM system responds most appreciably to an external field compared to the other acceptor-donor systems because it is appropriately positioned in the bilayer. The differential behavior of the amines has been discussed in terms of their confinement in different zones of the organized assemblies depending on their bulk, hydrophobic, and electrostatic effects.

  15. Some effects of high- gradient magnetic field on tropism of roots of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrachuk, A.; Belyavskaya, N.

    The perception of gravity in living organisms is mostly based on the response of the gravisensing system to displacement of some specific mass caused by gravitational force. According to the starch-statolith hypothesis the amyloplasts play the role of specific mass in gravisensing cells of higher plants. Kuznetsov & Hasenstein (1996) have demonstrated that the high-gradient magnetic field (HGMF) exerts a directional ponderomotive force on diamagnetic substances, in particular, statoliths. This effect of the HGMF causes root response similar to that produced by the change in gravity vector. Their studies supported the starch-statolith hypothesis and showed that ponderomotive force can be used to modify force acting on statoliths by manipulating statolith locations within gravisensing cells. We have designed the HGMF facility that allows for generating the HGMF and analyzing its effects on higher plants' roots. It records by videosystem and measures with the help of image analysis software the parameters of kinetics of root bending under both the HGMF action and gravistimulation. Two species of plants (pea and cress) have been examined. The main results of the work are the following: 1) The magnetotropic effect of HGMF on root growth was found for both species. 2) The critical value of ponderomotive force that caused the magnetotropic effect was estimated by modeling the magnetic field spatial distribution in the region of root apex. 3) The electron-microscopic analysis of statocytes after the HGMF treatment was carried out. The displacement of amyloplasts in root statocytes of two species of plants in HGMF was firstly demonstrated at the ultrastructural level. 4) Spatial distribution of exogenous proton fluxes (pH) along the roots was studied. The changes in pH distribution along curvature zone and apices of roots were revealed in the HGMF. It is known that application of HGMFs or strong uniform magnetic fields may influence ion transport due to Ampere force. It

  16. Effect of magnetic field on quasiparticle branches of intrinsic Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Ozyuzer, L.; Ozdemir, M.; Kurter, C.; Hinks, D. G.; Gray, K. E.

    2007-01-01

    The interlayer tunneling spectroscopy has been performed on micron-sized mesa arrays of HgBr{sub 2} intercalated superconducting Bi2212 single crystals. A ferromagnetic multilayer (Au/Co/Au) is deposited on top of the mesas. The spin-polarized current is driven along the c-axis of the mesas through a ferromagnetic Co layer and the hysteretic quasiparticle branches are observed at 4.2 K. Magnetic field evolution of hysteretic quasiparticle branches is obtained to examine the effect of injected spin-polarized current on intrinsic Josephson junction characteristics. It is observed that there is a gradual distribution in quasiparticle branches with the application of magnetic field and increasing field reduces the switching current progressively.

  17. The effect of external magnetic field on plasma acceleration in electromagnetic railgun channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobashev, S. V.; Zhukov, B. G.; Kurakin, R. O.; Ponyaev, S. A.; Reznikov, B. I.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the effect of an external magnetic field on the dynamics of a free plasma piston (PP) accelerated without solid striker armature in an electromagnetic railgun channel filled with various gases (argon or helium). It is established that, as the applied magnetic field grows, the velocity of a shock wave generated by PP in the channel increases. The experimental results are compared to a theoretical model that takes into account the gas pressure force behind the shock wave and the drag force that arises when erosion mass entering the channel is partly entrained by the accelerated plasma. The results of model calculations are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The discrepancy somewhat increases with the applied field, but the maximum deviation still does not exceed 20%.

  18. Formation of photoluminescent n-type macroporous silicon: Effect of magnetic field and lateral electric potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunez, E. E.; Estevez, J. O.; Campos, J.; Basurto-Pensado, M. A.; Agarwal, V.

    2014-11-01

    Metal electrode-free electrochemical etching of low doped n-type silicon substrates, under the combined effect of magnetic and lateral electric field, is used to fabricate photoluminescent n-type porous silicon structures in dark conditions. A lateral gradient in terms of structural characteristics (i.e. thickness and pore dimensions) along the electric field direction is formed. Enhancement of electric and magnetic field resulted in the increase of pore density and a change in the shape of the macropore structure, from circular to square morphology. Broad photoluminescence (PL) emission from 500 to 800 nm, with a PL peak wavelength ranging from 571 to 642 nm, is attributed to the wide range of microporous features present on the porous silicon layer.

  19. Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haosheng

    2007-05-01

    Centuries after the birth of modern solar astronomy, the Sun's corona still keeps many of its secrets: How is it heated to a million-degree temperature? How does it harbor the cool and dense prominence gas amid the tenuous and hot atmosphere? How does it drive the energetic events that eject particles into interplanetary space with speed exceeding 1% of the speed of light? We have greatly improved our knowledge of the solar corona with decades of space X-ray and EUV coronal observations, and many theories and models were put forward to address these problems. In our current understanding, magnetic fields are undoubtedly the most important fields in the corona, shaping its structure and driving its dynamics. It is clear that the resolution of these important questions all hinge on a better understanding of the organization, evolution, and interaction of the coronal magnetic field. However, as the direct measurement of coronal magnetic field is a very challenging observational problem, most of our theories and models were not experimentally verified. Nevertheless, we have finally overcome the experimental difficulties and can now directly measure the coronal magnetic field with great accuracy. This new capability can now be used to study the static magnetic structure of the corona, and offers hope that we will, in the near future, be able to directly observe the evolution of the coronal magnetic field of energetic solar events. More importantly, it finally allows us to conduct vigorous observational tests of our theories and models. In this lecture, I will review current research activities related to the observation, interpretation, and modeling of the coronal magnetic field, and discuss how they can help us resolve some of the long standing mysteries of the solar corona.

  20. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  1. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  2. Visual observation of the effect of magnetic field on moving air and vapor bubbles in a magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, K.; Jeyadevan, B.; Akagami, Y.; Torigoe, T.; Asari, S.

    1999-07-01

    Theoretical prediction suggests that magnetic fluid (MF) as working liquid in heat pipe could enhance and control the heat transfer under the application of magnetic field. However, heat pipe experiments using ionic MF showed only marginal gain and demands investigation. As an initial step, visualization of air and vapor bubbles behavior under zero and applied magnetic field has been carried out using X-ray. The observations can be summarized as follows; applied magnetic field (a) reduces the size and deforms the shape of the bubble that secede from the heating surface or air supply tube, and (b) accelerates the movement of the bubble in the liquid.

  3. The effect of magnetic field and disorders on the electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Bala; Jalil, M B A; Tan, S G; Liang, Gengchiau

    2010-09-22

    We developed a unified mesoscopic transport model for graphene nanoribbons, which combines the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism with the real-space π-orbital model. Based on this model, we probe the spatial distribution of electrons under a magnetic field, in order to obtain insights into the various signature Hall effects in disordered armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNR). In the presence of a uniform perpendicular magnetic field (B[Symbol: see text]-field), a perfect AGNR shows three distinct spatial current profiles at equilibrium, depending on its width. Under nonequilibrium conditions (i.e. in the presence of an applied bias), the net electron flow is restricted to the edges and occurs in opposite directions depending on whether the Fermi level lies within the valence or conduction band. For electrons at an energy level below the conduction window, the B[Symbol: see text]-field gives rise to local electron flux circulation, although the global flux is zero. Our study also reveals the suppression of electron backscattering as a result of the edge transport which is induced by the B[Symbol: see text]-field. This phenomenon can potentially mitigate the undesired effects of disorder, such as bulk and edge vacancies, on the transport properties of AGNR. Lastly, we show that the effect of [Formula: see text]-field on electronic transport is less significant in the multimode compared to the single-mode electron transport.

  4. Effect of magnetic field on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of graphite plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Atiqa; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Akram, Mahreen; Khalid, Ayesha; Yaseen, Nazish; Ahmad, Qazi Salman

    2016-03-01

    The effect of transverse magnetic field on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of graphite plasma as a function of fluence has been investigated. Graphite targets were exposed to Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 10 ns) laser pulses at various laser fluences ranging from 0.4 to 2.9 J cm-2 under two different environment of air and Ar at a pressure of 150 and 760 torr. A transverse magnetic field of strength 0.5 tesla was employed by using permanent magnets. It is revealed that due to the presence of the magnetic field the emission intensity, electron temperature and number density of graphite plasma have been increased at all fluences and for all environmental conditions. The enhancement in plasma parameters is attributed to magnetic confinement effect and Joule heating effect. Initially by increasing the fluence from 0.4 to 1.5 J cm-2 (in air) and 0.4 to 1.8 J cm-2 (in Ar), the emission intensity, electron temperature and number density have been increased and have attained their maximum values. Further increase in fluence was responsible for the decreasing trend in all plasma parameters. More increase in fluence (beyond 1.8 J cm-2 in case of air and 2.2 J cm-2 in case of Ar) up to a maximum value of 2.9 J cm-2, the saturation or self-sustained regime was achieved, which is responsible for insignificant changes in plasma parameters. The value of plasma parameter " β" was also evaluated analytically, and it was less than one for all conditions (fluences as well as environments), which confirmed the existence of confinement effect.

  5. The magnetic flux excess effect as a consequence of non-Parker radial evolution of interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    The “magnetic flux excess” effect is exceeding of magnetic flux Fs=4π|Br|r2 measured by distant spacecraft over the values obtained through measurements at the Earth’s orbit (Owens et al., JGR, 2008). Theoretically, its conservation should take place at any heliocentric distance r further than 10 solar radii, which means that the difference between the flux measured at 1 AU and Fs observed in another point in the heliosphere should be zero. However, the difference is negative closer to the Sun and increasingly positive at larger heliocentric distances. Possible explanations of this effect are continuously discussed, but the consensus is yet not reached.It is shown that a possible source of this effect is the solar wind expansion not accordingly with the Parker solution at least at low heliolatitudes. The difference between the experimentally found (r-5/3) and commonly used (r-2) radial dependence of the radial component of the IMF Br may lead to mistakes in the IMF point-to-point recalculations (Khabarova & Obridko, ApJ, 2012; Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013). Using the observed Br (r) dependence, it is easy to find the variation of difference between the magnetic flux Fs(r) at certain heliocentric distance r and Fs_1AU at 1 AU, which can be calculated as Fs(r)-Fs_1AU =4π·(B1AU /[1AU]-5/3) (r2-5/3 -[1AU]2-5/3) (Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013).The possible influence of presence of the heliospheric current sheet near the ecliptic plane on the picture of magnetic field lines and consequent deviation from the Parker's model is discussed.- Khabarova Olga, and Obridko Vladimir, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82, http://arxiv.org/pdf/1204.6672v2.pdf- Olga V. Khabarova, The interplanetary magnetic field: radial and latitudinal dependences. Astronomy Reports, 2013, Vol. 57, No. 11, pp. 844-859, http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1305/1305.1204.pdf

  6. Large magnetic field effects in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Reenen, S.; Kersten, S. P.; Wouters, S. H. W.; Cox, M.; Janssen, P.; Koopmans, B.; Bobbert, P. A.; Kemerink, M.

    2013-09-01

    Large negative magnetoconductance (MC) of ˜12% is observed in electrochemically doped polymer light-emitting diodes at sub-band-gap bias voltages (Vbias). Simultaneously, a positive magnetoefficiency (Mη) of 9% is observed at Vbias = 2 V. At higher bias voltages, both the MC and Mη diminish while a negative magnetoelectroluminescence (MEL) appears. The negative MEL effect is rationalized by triplet-triplet annihilation that leads to delayed fluorescence, whereas the positive Mη effect is related to competition between spin mixing and exciton formation leading to an enhanced singlet:triplet ratio at nonzero magnetic field. The resultant reduction in triplet exciton density is argued to reduce detrapping of polarons in the recombination zone at low-bias voltages, explaining the observed negative MC. Regarding organic magnetoresistance, this study provides experimental data to verify existing models describing magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors, which contribute to better understanding hereof. Furthermore, we present indications of strong magnetic field effects related to interactions between trapped carriers and excitons, which specifically can be studied in electrochemically doped organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Regarding light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs), this work shows that delayed fluorescence from triplet-triplet annihilation substantially contributes to the electroluminescence and the device efficiency.

  7. Magnetic field driving gradient effects on the microstructure in amorphous-nanocrystalline cobalt alloy ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhaowei; Song, Yujun; Sun, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Yanwei

    2012-01-01

    Field effects on the early crystallization of Co-rich amorphous ribbons (Co68.15Fe4.35Si12.5B15, atomic%) performed at 450 °C for 30 minutes in an applied 10 Oe longitudinal or transverse external magnetic field are investigated by comparing with the as-spun and annealed samples in zero applied magnetic field. Results indicate that the crystallization on the surface skin of the ribbon differs from that of the middle section due to the combined effects from the field direction and the defects or stress characteristics across the ribbons. In particular, the ribbons annealed under a transverse field exhibit an extremely distinct graded microstructure across the ribbon, which features amorphous-phased skin layers (top and bottom) of about 4-5 μm thickness and a middle amorphous-nanocrystalline composite layer about 10-12 μm thick, with the nanograins of 434 +/- 99 nm dispersing in the amorphous matrix.Field effects on the early crystallization of Co-rich amorphous ribbons (Co68.15Fe4.35Si12.5B15, atomic%) performed at 450 °C for 30 minutes in an applied 10 Oe longitudinal or transverse external magnetic field are investigated by comparing with the as-spun and annealed samples in zero applied magnetic field. Results indicate that the crystallization on the surface skin of the ribbon differs from that of the middle section due to the combined effects from the field direction and the defects or stress characteristics across the ribbons. In particular, the ribbons annealed under a transverse field exhibit an extremely distinct graded microstructure across the ribbon, which features amorphous-phased skin layers (top and bottom) of about 4-5 μm thickness and a middle amorphous-nanocrystalline composite layer about 10-12 μm thick, with the nanograins of 434 +/- 99 nm dispersing in the amorphous matrix. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10968e

  8. The effect of external magnetic field on the Raman peaks in manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, A. K.; Rout, G. C.

    2014-04-24

    We report here a microscopic theoretical model study exhibiting the effect of external magnetic field on the Raman excitation peaks in the CMR manganite system. The Hamiltonian consists of Jahn-Teller (J-T) distortion in e{sub g} band, the double exchange interaction and the Heisenberg spin-spin interaction. Further the phonons are coupled to e{sub g} band electrons, J-T distorted e{sub g} band and the double exchange interaction. The Raman spectral intensity is calculated from the imaginary part of the phonon Green function. The spectra exhibits three peaks besides a very weak high energy peak. The magnetic field effect on these peaks are reported.

  9. Effects of magnetic field and Hall current to the blood velocity and LDL transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, I.; Naser, N.; Talib, A. H.; Mahali, S.

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic field and Hall current effects have been considered on blood velocity and concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). It is important to observe those effects to the flowing blood in a stenosed artery. The analysis from the obtained results may be useful to some clinical procedures, such as MRI, where the radiologists may have more information in the investigations before cardiac operations could be done. In this study, the uniform magnetic field and Hall current are applied to the Newtonian blood flow through an artery having a cosine-shaped stenosis. The governing equations are coupled with mass transfer and solved employing a finite difference Marker and Cell (MAC) method with an appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The graphical results of velocity profiles and LDL concentration are presented in this paper and the results show that the velocity increases and concentration decreases as Hall parameter increased.

  10. Effects of magnetic fields produced by simulated and real geomagnetic storms on rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Bretón, J. L.; Mendoza, B.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report experiments of arterial pressure (AP) measurements of ten Wistar rats subjected to geomagnetic field changes and to artificially stimulated magnetic field variations. Environmental electromagnetic effects were screened using a semianechoic chamber, which allowed us to discern the effects associated with geomagnetic storms. We stimulated the subjects with a linear magnetic profile constructed from the average changes of sudden storm commencement (SSC) and principal phases of geomagnetic storms measured between 1996 and 2008 with Dst ⩽ -100 nT. Although we found no statistically significant AP variations, statistically significant AP changes were found when a geomagnetic storm occurred during the experimental period. Using the observed geomagnetic storm variations to construct a geomagnetic profile to stimulate the rats, we found that the geomagnetic field variations associated to the SSC day were capable of increasing the subjects AP between 7% and 9% from the reference value. Under this magnetic variation, the subjects presented a notably restless behavior not seen under other conditions. We conclude that even very small changes in the geomagnetic field associated with a geomagnetic storm can produce a measurable and reproducible physiological response.

  11. Effect of a magnetic field on intersubband polaritons in a quantum well: strong to weak coupling conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervishko, A. A.; Kibis, O. V.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate theoretically the effect of a magnetic field on intersubband polaritons in an asymmetric quantum well placed inside an optical resonator. It is demonstrated that the field-induced diamagnetic shift of electron subbands in the well increases the broadening of optical lines corresponding to intersubband electron transitions. As a consequence, the magnetic field can switch the polariton system from the regime of strong light-matter coupling to the regime of weak one. This effect paves a way to the effective control of polaritonic devices with a magnetic field.

  12. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-03-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects,1,2 researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields,3-5 which was given the name "The Moses Effect."5 Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary were produced by superconducting magnets.

  13. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at

  14. Phase modulated magnetoelectric delta-E effect sensor for sub-nano tesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabel, S.; Kirchhof, C.; Yarar, E.; Meyners, D.; Quandt, E.; Faupel, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a resonant micromechanical magnetic field sensor, which utilizes the magnetically induced change in elastic modulus, i.e., the delta-E effect. The sensor is based on magnetoelectric thin film composites, resulting in high sensitivity at room temperature and at low frequencies. The cantilever is electrically excited and read out by a 2 μm AlN piezoelectric layer. Depending on its magnetization, the 2 μm thin film of amorphous (Fe90Co10)78Si12B10 changes its elasticity, which results in a shift of the cantilever's resonance frequency. The sensor is operated in the first or second transversal bending mode at 7.6 kHz or 47.4 kHz. With a limit of detection of 140 pTHz-0.5 at 20 Hz under a magnetic bias field and 1 nTHz-0.5 without external bias field, this sensor exceeds all comparable designs by one order of magnitude.

  15. Nuclear-spin-induced cotton-mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li-Juan; Vaara, Juha

    2014-08-01

    Novel, high-sensitivity and high-resolution spectroscopic methods can provide site-specific nuclear information by exploiting nuclear magneto-optic properties. We present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of the recently proposed nuclear-spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field (NSCM-B). In NSCM-B, ellipticity is induced in a linearly polarized light beam, which can be attributed to both the dependence of the symmetric dynamic polarizability on the external magnetic field and the nuclear magnetic moment, as well as the temperature-dependent partial alignment of the molecules due to the magnetic fields. Quantum-chemical calculations of NSCM-B were conducted for a series of molecular liquids. The overall order of magnitude of the induced ellipticities is predicted to be 10(-11) -10(-6) rad T(-1)  M(-1)  cm(-1) for fully spin-polarized nuclei. In particular, liquid-state heavy-atom systems should be promising for experiments in the Voigt setup.

  16. The effects of direct-current magnetic fields on turtle retinas vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Raybourn, M.S.

    1983-05-13

    Direct-current magnetic fields of 10 to 100 gauss cause a significant short-term reduction of the in vitro electroretinographic b-wave response in turtle retina. This response compression is not accompanied by the usual reduction in retinal sensitivity that occurs with background illumination. Furthermore, this effect is obtained only briefly after the offset of ambient lighting in the diurnal light-dark cycle of nonhibernating animals.

  17. Magnetic field and particle concentration competitive effects on ferrofluid based silicone elastomer microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Balasoiu, M.; Lebedev, V. T.; Orlova, D. N.; Bica, I.

    2011-12-15

    Structural peculiarities of ferroelastomers composed of polydimetylsiloxane with embedded magnetite particles during polymerization have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The effects of ferroparticles' concentration in the range of C = 0-6 wt %, and external magnetic fields of induction B = 0-1 kG applied during the polymerization on the structure of polymeric matrix and particles distribution in polymer were analyzed.

  18. Magnetic Field Effects on Convection and Solidification in Normal and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ben Q.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    It has been well understood that convective flows induced by g-jitter forces associated with spacecraft are responsible for defects formation and irregularity in product quality during melt growth of single crystals in microgravity. This research is concerned about numerical simulations and experimental measurements for the purpose of developing a fundamental understanding of the g-jitter induced fluid flows and their effects on solidification in microgravity with and without the presence of additional damping forces that are derived from the applied DC magnetic fields. The numerical models include both 2-D and 3-D transient fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer and solidification under the combined action of g-jitter and magnetic fields. Numerical simulations using both the 2-D and 3-D models are conducted for both idealized, synthesized and real g-jitter forces, and 2-D simulations are tested against the experimental measurements taken on the thermal oscillator. 2-D solidification models have also been developed and simulations are conducted. Results show that the numerical model predictions compare well with the measurements. Analysis of these results illustrates that an applied magnetic field can have a drastic influence on the convective flows induced by g-jitter and can be particularly useful to suppress the effects resulting from the spiking of g-jitter signatures, which are considered the most detrimental effects on quality of crystals grown in space. Work in progress includes developing 3-D numerical models for solidification phenomena with the presence of both g-jitter and magnetic fields and measurements of flow fluid and its effect on solidification in both transparent fluid and low melting point melts to verify numerical predictions.

  19. Large-scale magnetic field in the accretion discs of young stars: the influence of magnetic diffusion, buoyancy and Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaibrakhmanov, S. A.; Dudorov, A. E.; Parfenov, S. Yu.; Sobolev, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the fossil magnetic field in the accretion and protoplanetary discs using the Shakura and Sunyaev approach. The distinguishing feature of this study is the accurate solution of the ionization balance equations and the induction equation with Ohmic diffusion, magnetic ambipolar diffusion, buoyancy and the Hall effect. We consider the ionization by cosmic rays, X-rays and radionuclides, radiative recombinations, recombinations onto dust grains, and also thermal ionization. The buoyancy appears as the additional mechanism of magnetic flux escape in the steady-state solution of the induction equation. Calculations show that Ohmic diffusion and magnetic ambipolar diffusion constraint the generation of the magnetic field inside the `dead' zones. The magnetic field in these regions is quasi-vertical. The buoyancy constraints the toroidal magnetic field strength close to the disc inner edge. As a result, the toroidal and vertical magnetic fields become comparable. The Hall effect is important in the regions close to the borders of the `dead' zones because electrons are magnetized there. The magnetic field in these regions is quasi-radial. We calculate the magnetic field strength and geometry for the discs with accretion rates (10^{-8}-10^{-6}) {M}_{⊙} {yr}^{-1}. The fossil magnetic field geometry does not change significantly during the disc evolution while the accretion rate decreases. We construct the synthetic maps of dust emission polarized due to the dust grain alignment by the magnetic field. In the polarization maps, the `dead' zones appear as the regions with the reduced values of polarization degree in comparison to those in the adjacent regions.

  20. Modeling of integrated sunlight velocity measurements: The effect of surface darkening by magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Henney, C. J.; Schimpf, S.; Fossat, E.; Gelly, B.; Grec, G.; Loudagh, S.; Schmider, F.-X; Palle, P.; Regulo, C.

    1993-01-01

    It has been known since the work by Claverie et al. (1982) that integrated-sunlight velocities measured with the resonance scattering technique show variations with time scales of weeks to months. The cause can be understood in terms of the effects of solar activity as was pointed out by Edmunds & Gough (1983) and Andersen & Maltby (1983). The latter authors included a model calculation based on sunspot areas which showed good promise of being able to quantitatively reproduce the observed velocity shifts. We discuss in this paper a new modeling effort based on daily magnetograms obtained at the 150-ft tower on Mt. Wilson. This type of database is more quantitative than sunspot area. Similar maps of magnetically sensitive quantities will be measured on a continuous time base as part of several planned helioseismology experiments (from space with the Solar Oscillations Imagery/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOI/MDI) experiment on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), see Scherrer et al. (1991) or with ground-based networks, see Hill & Leibacher (1991)). We discuss the correlations between various magnetically sensitive quantities and develop a new model for the effects of magnetic field on line profiles and surface brightness. From these correlations we integrate the line profile changes over the solar surface using observed magnetic field strengths measured at lambda 5250.2. The final output is a new model for the effects of magnetic fields on integrated sunlight velocities which we compare with daily offset velocities derived from the International Research on the Interior of the Sun (IRIS)-T instrument at the Observatorio del Teide.

  1. Experimental study on the effect of applying a crossed magnetic field on the insulator flashover behavior in high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Elabass, K.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a possible method of reducing the flashover stress is achieved by the effect of an additional magnetic field in the transverse direction on the main applied electric field. The degree of vacuum used in this study was 5×10-5 Pa. The magnetic flux density B employed in this study extends from 4×10-3 to 24×10-3 T. From the results obtained throughout this work, the transverse magnetic field increases the flashover voltage and decreases the leakage current. The effect of the transverse magnetic field on the surface flashover of the dielectric solid in vacuum shows a marked dependence on the material and the thickness of the test specimen, the vacuum degree, the type of electric field (AC or DC) as well as the type of magnetic field (AC or DC).

  2. Electronic structure of a spherical quantum dot: Effects of the Kratzer potential, hydrogenic impurity, external electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehyar, A.; Rezaei, G.; Zamani, A.

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, we have investigated the simultaneous effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the energy spectrum of an electron bound to an impurity confined in a spherical quantum dot with Kratzer potential. To this end, energy eigenvalues are obtained using the asymptotic iteration method. The energy dependencies upon the confinement potential and external fields are reported. Our results indicate that the confinement potential, external electric and magnetic fields have a great influence on the energy eigenvalues of the system. We found that, an increase in the magnetic field increases the energy eigenvalues of the states with positive magnetic quantum number, m ≽ 0 . While, the states with negative m decrease, reaching to their minimum values and increase again, with increasing the magnetic field. Moreover, an increase in electric field strength leads to decrease the confinement effects and energy eigenvalues of the system.

  3. Solar wind interaction effects on the magnetic fields around Mars: Consequences for interplanetary and crustal field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.-J.; Brain, D. A.; Ulusen, D.; Lillis, R. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Espley, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The first unambiguous detections of the crustal remanent magnetic fields of Mars were obtained by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) during its initial orbits around Mars, which probed altitudes to within ∼110 km of the surface. However, the majority of its measurements were carried out around 400 km altitude, fixed 2 a.m. to 2 p.m. local time, mapping orbit. While the general character and planetary origins of the localized crustal fields were clearly revealed by the mapping survey data, their effects on the solar wind interaction could not be investigated in much detail because of the limited mapping orbit sampling. Previous analyses (Brain et al., 2006) of the field measurements on the dayside nevertheless provided an idea of the extent to which the interaction of the solar wind and planetary fields leads to non-ideal field draping at the mapping altitude. In this study we use numerical simulations of the global solar wind interaction with Mars as an aid to interpreting that observed non-ideal behavior. In addition, motivated by models for different interplanetary field orientations, we investigate the effects of induced and reconnected (planetary and external) fields on the Martian field's properties derived at the MGS mapping orbit altitude. The results suggest that inference of the planetary low order moments is compromised by their influence. In particular, the intrinsic dipole contribution may differ from that in the current models because the induced component is so dominant.

  4. Magnetic fields at uranus.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuña, M H; Behannon, K W; Burlaga, L F; Connerney, J E; Lepping, R P; Neubauer, F M

    1986-07-01

    The magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft revealed a strong planetary magnetic field of Uranus and an associated magnetosphere and fully developed bipolar masnetic tail. The detached bow shock wave in the solar wind supersonic flow was observed upstream at 23.7 Uranus radii (1 R(U) = 25,600 km) and the magnetopause boundary at 18.0 R(U), near the planet-sun line. A miaximum magnetic field of 413 nanotesla was observed at 4.19 R(U ), just before closest approach. Initial analyses reveal that the planetary magnetic field is well represented by that of a dipole offset from the center of the planet by 0.3 R(U). The angle between Uranus' angular momentum vector and the dipole moment vector has the surprisingly large value of 60 degrees. Thus, in an astrophysical context, the field of Uranus may be described as that of an oblique rotator. The dipole moment of 0.23 gauss R(3)(U), combined with the large spatial offset, leads to minimum and maximum magnetic fields on the surface of the planet of approximately 0.1 and 1.1 gauss, respectively. The rotation period of the magnetic field and hence that of the interior of the planet is estimated to be 17.29+/- 0.10 hours; the magnetotail rotates about the planet-sun line with the same period. Thelarge offset and tilt lead to auroral zones far from the planetary rotation axis poles. The rings and the moons are embedded deep within the magnetosphere, and, because of the large dipole tilt, they will have a profound and diurnally varying influence as absorbers of the trapped radiation belt particles.

  5. Magnetic Field Effects and Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Highly Collisional Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozeman, Steven Paul

    The homogeneity and size of radio frequency (RF) and microwave driven plasmas are often limited by insufficient penetration of the electromagnetic radiation. To investigate increasing the skin depth of the radiation, we consider the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a weakly ionized plasma immersed in a steady magnetic field where the dominant collision processes are electron-neutral and ion-neutral collisions. Retaining both the electron and ion dynamics, we have adapted the theory for cold collisionless plasmas to include the effects of these collisions and obtained the dispersion relation at arbitrary frequency omega for plane waves propagating at arbitrary angles with respect to the magnetic field. We discuss in particular the cases of magnetic field enhanced wave penetration for parallel and perpendicular propagation, examining the experimental parameters which lead to electromagnetic wave propagation beyond the collisional skin depth. Our theory predicts that the most favorable scaling of skin depth with magnetic field occurs for waves propagating nearly parallel to B and for omega << Omega_{rm e} where Omega_{rm e} is the electron cyclotron frequency. The scaling is less favorable for propagation perpendicular to B, but the skin depth does increase for this case as well. Still, to achieve optimal wave penetration, we find that one must design the plasma configuration and antenna geometry so that one generates primarily the appropriate angles of propagation. We have measured plasma wave amplitudes and phases using an RF magnetic probe and densities using Stark line broadening. These measurements were performed in inductively coupled plasmas (ICP's) driven with a standard helical coil, a reverse turn (Stix) coil, and a flat spiral coil. Density measurements were also made in a microwave generated plasma. The RF magnetic probe measurements of wave propagation in a conventional ICP with wave propagation approximately perpendicular to B show an increase in

  6. The mitigating effect of self-generated magnetic field on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2012-10-01

    It has long been expected that Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in ICF can generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface during the deceleration phase of target implosion. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. Nonlinear evolution of RTI leads to undesirable mixing of hot and cold plasmas and enhances target energy loss. RTI is also expected to generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. The generated magnetic field can then be further amplified via the MHD dynamo effect. While the planar 2-D simulations only generate out-of-plane magnetic fields, 3-D simulations will result in further amplification of the complex magnetic field structures via the MHD dynamo. This is studied by including a seed in-plane magnetic field in 2-D and examining the resulting magnetic field structure and magnitude. The self-generated out-of-plane magnetic fields depend on ICF parameters via the scaling law, mi√A g/λ where mi is the ion mass, A is the Atwood number, g is the acceleration, and λ is the wavelength. These magnetic fields grow to magnitudes of 10^2-10^3 T for ICF relevant parameter regimes. While this is dynamically insignificant due to the plasma pressure far exceeding the magnetic pressure, it can significantly reduce perpendicular electron thermal conductivity by a factor of 2-10. Such a reduction in thermal conductivity perpendicular to the magnetic field contributes to lowering of radial energy transport in the implosion target.

  7. Effect of collisions on dc magnetic-field generation in a plasma by resonance absorption of light

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.C.; Gourdin-Serveniere, A.; Mora, P.; Pellat, R.

    1982-05-01

    The importance of collisional ponderomotive effects on dc magnetic field generation is stressed. Computer simulations show that a weak rate of collision is sufficient to completely modify dc magnetic field generation in the resonant absorption of light, as compared with previous collisionless simulations. The agreement with theoretical predictions is shown.

  8. Magnetic field effects in the charge transfer photochemistry of Co(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraudi, G.

    1993-03-01

    The effect of the magnetic induction on the quantum yield of X -2 (X = Cl, Br) radicals photogenerated in 249 nm flash irradiations of Co(NH 3) 5X 2+ was investigated at field intensities between 0 and 9 T. The quantum yield decreases with field intensity towards a minimum, ø( B) / ø (0) ≈ 0.90 at 0.25 T. The quantum yield tends to recover its zero-field value as the field increases from 0.25 to 7 T. These experimental observations have been compared with magnetokinetic effects on the respective reactions of X -2 radicals with Co(OH 2) 2+6 and Co (Me 6-[14]dieneN 4) 2+.

  9. Electrically silent magnetic fields.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, B J; Wikswo, J P

    1986-01-01

    There has been a significant controversy over the past decade regarding the relative information content of bioelectric and biomagnetic signals. In this paper we present a new, theoretical example of an electrically-silent magnetic field, based on a bidomain model of a cylindrical strand of tissue generalized to include off-diagonal components in the conductivity tensors. The physical interpretation of the off-diagonal components is explained, and analytic expressions for the electrical potential and the magnetic field are found. These expressions show that information not obtainable from electrical potential measurements can be obtained from measurements of the magnetic field in systems with conductivity tensors more complicated than those previously examined. PMID:3779008

  10. Generalized magnetotail equilibria: Effects of the dipole field, thin current sheets, and magnetic flux accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Merkin, V. G.

    2016-08-01

    Generalizations of the class of quasi-1-D solutions of the 2-D Grad-Shafranov equation, first considered by Schindler in 1972, are investigated. It is shown that the effect of the dipole field, treated as a perturbation, can be included into the original 1972 class solution by modification of the boundary conditions. Some of the solutions imply the formation of singularly thin current sheets. Equilibrium solutions for such sheets resolving their singular current structure on the scales comparable to the thermal ion gyroradius can be obtained assuming anisotropic and nongyrotropic plasma distributions. It is shown that one class of such equilibria with the dipole-like boundary perturbation describes bifurcation of the near-Earth current sheet. Another class of weakly anisotropic equilibria with thin current sheets embedded into a thicker plasma sheet helps explain the formation of thin current sheets in a relatively distant tail, where such sheets can provide ion Landau dissipation for spontaneous magnetic reconnection. The free energy for spontaneous reconnection can be provided due to accumulation of the magnetic flux at the tailward end of the closed field line region. The corresponding hump in the normal magnetic field profile Bz(x,z = 0) creates a nonzero gradient along the tail. The resulting gradient of the equatorial magnetic field pressure is shown to be balanced by the pressure gradient and the magnetic tension force due to the higher-order correction of the latter in the asymptotic expansion of the tail equilibrium in the ratio of the characteristic tail current sheet variations across and along the tail.

  11. Frame-dragging effects on magnetic fields near a rotating black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas, V.; Kopáček, O.; Kunneriath, D.

    2012-07-01

    We discuss the role of general relativity frame dragging acting on magnetic field lines near a rotating (Kerr) black hole. Near ergosphere the magnetic structure becomes strongly influenced and magnetic null points can develop. We consider aligned magnetic fields as well as fields inclined with respect to the rotation axis, and the two cases are shown to behave in profoundly different ways. Further, we construct surfaces of equal values of local electric and magnetic intensities, which have not yet been discussed in the full generality of a boosted rotating black hole.

  12. Effect of a magnetic field on massive-star winds - I. Mass-loss and velocity for a dipole field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Christopher; Townsend, Richard H. D.

    2016-11-01

    We generalize the Rigid-Field Hydrodynamic equations to accommodate arbitrary magnetic field topologies, resulting in a new Arbitrary Rigid-Field Hydrodynamic (ARFHD) formalism. We undertake a critical point calculation of the steady-state ARFHD equations with a CAK-type radiative acceleration and determine the effects of a dipole magnetic field on the usual CAK mass-loss rate and velocity structure. Enforcing the proper optically thin limit for the radiative line-acceleration is found to decrease both the mass-loss and wind acceleration, while rotation boosts both properties. We define optically thin correction and rotation parameters to quantify these effects on the global mass-loss rate and develop scaling laws for the surface mass-flux as a function of surface colatitude. These scaling laws are found to agree with previous laws derived from magnetohydrodynamic simulations of magnetospheres. The dipole magnetosphere velocity structure is found to differ from a global beta-velocity law, which contradicts a central assumption of the previously developed XADM model of X-ray emission from magnetospheres.

  13. Measurement of the stray field emanating from magnetic force microscope tips by Hall effect microsensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiaville, A.; Belliard, L.; Majer, D.; Zeldov, E.; Miltat, J.

    1997-10-01

    We describe the use of micronic Hall sensors as magnetic-field profilometers with submicron resolution. The procedure involves the deconvolution of Hall voltage maps produced by scanning the field source over the sensor, with a scanning probe microscope. The response function of an infinite Hall cross is calculated analytically in the two-dimensional case, using conformal mapping techniques. Various methods of deconvolution of the Hall voltage maps are presented and compared. The calculated response function is used for the deconvolutions, and different effective sensor sizes are tried. It is shown that the remaining main uncertainties come from the ignorance of the true response function of the sensor, ascribed to the charge depletion phenomenon that is known to occur at the sensor edges. The method is applied to thin-film magnetic force microscope tips for which a precise knowledge of the tips field at sample location proves crucial to image interpretation. Maximum fields in the range 10-100 Oe are found at a distance known to be about 100 nm from the tip contact surface, depending on the tip coating thickness and magnetization direction.

  14. Transient particle acceleration in strongly magnetized neutron stars. II - Effects due to a dipole field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1991-01-01

    Sheared Alfven waves generated by nonradial crustal disturbances above the polar cap of a strongly magnetized neutron star induce an electric field component parallel to B. An attempt is made to determine the manner in which the strong radial dependence of B affects the propagation of these sheared Alfven waves, and whether this MHD process is still an effective particle accelerator. It is found that although the general field equation is quite complicated, a simple wavelike solution can still be obtained under the conditions of interest for which the Alfven phase velocity decouples from the wave equation. The results may be applicable to gamma-ray burst sources.

  15. Effects of power fluctuation on fast magnetic field detection using a spin-torque oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanao, Taro; Nagasawa, Tazumi; Kudo, Kiwamu; Suto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Michinaga; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2016-11-01

    We study the effects of power fluctuation on a high-data-transfer-rate read head with a spin-torque oscillator using a nonlinear oscillator model. By numerically solving the model under random sequences of applied pulsed magnetic fields (corresponding to stray fields from data bits), the bit-error rate is estimated. For a large damping rate of power, the bit errors are caused primarily by phase fluctuation that is enhanced by amplitude-phase coupling. In contrast, for a small damping rate of power, the bit errors are caused primarily by power fluctuation and are independent of amplitude-phase coupling.

  16. Electric-field control of magnetism in graphene quantum dots: A route to spin field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapito, Luis; Kioussis, Nicholas; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2011-03-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate for all-carbon electronics because of its outstanding electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Also, the relentless drive for miniaturization leads to the use of ever smaller graphene fragments; at nanoscopic dimensions (< 10nm), edge states become more relevant. Edge states are important because they lie in the vicinity of the Fermi level and hence are relevant to transport properties. Furthermore, edge states exhibit magnetism. We have employed ab-initio electronic structure and Landauerüttiker transport calculations to study the magnetoelectro effects of graphene patches. We will present results of (1) how specific geometries (such as ``diamond'' shape) favor specific magnetic states, (2) how those magnetic states can be controlled by an external electric field, and (3) we will demonstrate how a graphene fragment containing different edge geometries can be employed as a spin-polarized field effect transistor. Supported by Grants NSF-PREM DMR-00116566 and DMR-0958596 and by NIH 3SC3GM084838-02S1 and 1SC3GM084838-02.

  17. Low-field magnetic sensors based on the planar Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhl, A.; Van Dau, F. Nguyen; Childress, J. R.

    1995-05-01

    Sensitive magnetic field detection devices have been fabricated based on the planar Hall effect. The active material consists of permalloy ultrathin films (6 nm thick) epitaxially grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy is induced in the film through ferromagnetic coupling with a Fe/Pd bilayer epitaxially grown on MgO(001). The active layer shows a magnetoresistive ratio ΔR/R=2%. The device gives a sensitivity of 100 V/TA and a minimum detectable field below 10 nT. The detector response is linear over at least four decades. The transverse resistivity is sensitive only to the anisotropic resistivity, and not to the isotropic resistivity term which is highly temperature sensitive. Consequently, the thermal noise at 1 Hz is reduced by four orders of magnitude compared to a similar longitudinal magnetoresistive detector.

  18. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture.

    PubMed

    Klein, M; Pankiewicz, R; Zalas, M; Stampor, W

    2016-01-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism. PMID:27440452

  19. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture.

    PubMed

    Klein, M; Pankiewicz, R; Zalas, M; Stampor, W

    2016-07-21

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism.

  20. Evidence for a dose-dependent effect of pulsed magnetic fields on pain processing.

    PubMed

    Robertson, John A; Juen, Nicole; Théberge, Jean; Weller, Julie; Drost, Dick J; Prato, Frank S; Thomas, Alex W

    2010-09-27

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the dose-response relationship (sham, 100, 200, 1000 microT) between a pulsed extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELFMF) and acute thermal pain on the dominant right hand. Forty-seven participants were recruited, and pulsed ELFMF was applied through the MRI gradient system using a novel technique. Regions of interest (ROIs) matching those of previous studies were examined for a potential dose response. Significant correlations between applied field strength and change in BOLD activity were found in the anterior cingulate and the ipsilateral insula, indicating that there might be either a dose response or a threshold effect of the ELFMF. PMID:20643187

  1. Effect of the tilted magnetic field on the magnetosubbands and conductance in the bilayer quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwiej, T.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically study the single electron magnetotransport in GaAs and InGaAs vertically stacked bilayer nanowires. In considered geometry, the tilted magnetic field is always perpendicular to the main (transport) axis of the quantum wire and, therefore its transverse and vertical components allow separately for changing the magnitude of intralayer and interlayer subbands mixing. We study the changes introduced to energy dispersion relation E(k) by tilted magnetic field of strength up to several tesla and analyze their origins for symmetric as well as asymmetric confining potentials in the growth direction. Calculated energy dispersion relations are thereafter used to show that the value of a conductance of the bilayer nanowire may abruptly rise as well as fall by few conductance quanta when the Fermi energy in nanosystem is changed. It is also shown that such conductance oscillations, in conjunction with spin Zeeman effect, may give a moderately spin polarized current in the bilayer nanowire.

  2. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M.; Pankiewicz, R.; Zalas, M.; Stampor, W.

    2016-07-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism.

  3. Effect of toroidal magnetic field on n = 1 mode stability in rotamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Goss, J.; Kalaria, D.; Huang, T. S.

    2011-08-15

    To study the effect of toroidal magnetic field on n = 1 mode stability, a series of experiments with linearly ramping the axial current I{sub z}, which makes field-reversed configuration (FRC) to spherical tokamak (ST) transition, have been conducted in rotamak. Results clearly demonstrate that the tilt mode can be completely suppressed by small I{sub z} around 0.4 kA (in comparison with 2.0 kA plasma current). An unknown new mode with larger magnetic perturbations is triggered when I{sub z} reaches 0.5 kA. This instability mode keeps saturation while plasma current is boosted when I{sub z} is in the range of 0.6-1.4 kA. When I{sub z} exceeds 1.6 kA, the new mode suddenly disappears and discharge is free from instability modes.

  4. Magnetic field effects in dye-sensitized solar cells controlled by different cell architecture

    PubMed Central

    Klein, M.; Pankiewicz, R.; Zalas, M.; Stampor, W.

    2016-01-01

    The charge recombination and exciton dissociation are generally recognized as the basic electronic processes limiting the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. In this work, we propose a detailed mechanism of photocurrent generation in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) examined by magnetic field effect (MFE) technique. Here we demonstrate that the magnitude of the MFE on photocurrent in DSSCs can be controlled by the radius and spin coherence time of electron-hole (e-h) pairs which are experimentally modified by the photoanode morphology (TiO2 nanoparticles or nanotubes) and the electronic orbital structure of various dye molecules (ruthenium N719, dinuclear ruthenium B1 and fully organic squaraine SQ2 dyes). The observed MFE is attributed to magnetic-field-induced spin-mixing of (e-h) pairs according to the Δg mechanism. PMID:27440452

  5. Inverse parabolic quantum dot: The transition energy under magnetic field effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safwan, S. A.; El Meshed, Nagwa

    2016-08-01

    We present here, the evolution of the transition energy with a static magnetic field, when the electron and the hole are confined in inverse parabolic quantum dot (IPQD). The unexpected behavior is found, at the weak confinement regime the conduction band minimum and the top of valance band change from s-state to p-state or d-state for confined electron and hole inside IPQD, respectively. The strength of the inverse parabolic potential (potential hump) inside a quantum dot has the upper hand in tuning the ground state momentum for both electron and hole, and consequently their interband transition energy is changed. Knowing that this is not the case for the other types of potentials. The quantum size, the magnetic field and inverse potential hump effects on electron and hole ground and excited states are discussed.

  6. [Biological and health effects on electric and magnetic fields at extremely low frequencies].

    PubMed

    Torregrossa, M V

    2005-01-01

    While the enormous benefits of using electricity in everyday life and health care are unquestioned, during the past 20 years the general public has become increasingly concerned about potential adverse health effects of exposure to electric and magnetic fields at extremely low frequencies (ELF). Such exposures arise mainly from the transmission and use of electrical energy at the power frequencies of 50/60 Hz. The international scientific community is addressing the associated health issues through in vitro, in vivo and epidemiological studies, although present research results are often contradictory. The purpose of this paper is to provide information about the possible impacts of exposure to electric and magnetic field at ELF frequencies on health within the community and the workplace. Information comes from recent research studies on this subject and from epidemiological pooled studies recently reviewed by eminent authorities.

  7. Hyperfine interaction mechanism of magnetic field effects in sequential fluorophore and exciplex fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodin, Dmitry V.; Ivanov, Anatoly I.; Burshtein, Anatoly I.

    2013-03-01

    The magnetic field effect on the fluorescence of the photoexcited electron acceptor, 1A*, and the exciplex, 1[D+δA-δ] formed at contact of 1A* with an electron donor 1D, is theoretically explored in the framework of Integral Encounter Theory. It is assumed that the excited fluorophore is equilibrated with the exciplex that reversibly dissociates into the radical-ion pair. The magnetic field sensitive stage is the spin conversion in the resulting geminate radical-ion pair, 1, 3[D+…A-] that proceeds due to hyperfine interaction. We confirm our earlier conclusion (obtained with a rate description of spin conversion) that in the model with a single nucleus spin 1/2 the magnitude of the Magnetic Field Effect (MFE) also vanishes in the opposite limits of low and high dielectric permittivity of the solvent. Moreover, it is shown that MFE being positive at small hyperfine interaction A, first increases with A but approaching the maximum starts to decrease and even changes the sign.

  8. EFFECT OF BACKGROUND MAGNETIC FIELD ON TURBULENCE DRIVEN BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Sai, Kazuhito; Katoh, Yuto; Terada, Naoki; Ono, Takayuki E-mail: yuto@stpp.gp.tohoku.ac.jp E-mail: ono@stpp.gp.tohoku.ac.jp

    2013-04-20

    We investigate the background magnetic field dependence of the saturated state of a magnetorotational instability (MRI) in an accretion disk by performing three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We assume an unstratified disk by employing the local shearing box approximation. Three different uniform background magnetic field configurations are treated for a wide range of field intensities. These simulations indicate that the time variations of the turbulent stress and the magnetic energy are altered by the presence of a poloidal component of the background field. We find that the saturation amplitude of the turbulent stress and the magnetic energy are determined by both the poloidal and azimuthal components of the field. In particular, when the poloidal component has the same intensity, the obtained turbulent stress for {beta}{sub y0} Almost-Equal-To 200 becomes smaller than those for a purely poloidal field case. Despite the fact that the background field affects the MRI turbulence, the correlation between the obtained turbulent stress and the magnetic energy in the nonlinear stage is independent of the field topology. Our results indicate that the saturated turbulent stress has a stronger correlation with the power of the perturbed component of the magnetic field than with the power of the total magnetic field. These results suggest that both the intensity and the direction of the background magnetic field significantly affect the turbulent motion of the MRI in accretion disks.

  9. Effect of Background Magnetic Field on Turbulence Driven by Magnetorotational Instability in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Kazuhito; Katoh, Yuto; Terada, Naoki; Ono, Takayuki

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the background magnetic field dependence of the saturated state of a magnetorotational instability (MRI) in an accretion disk by performing three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We assume an unstratified disk by employing the local shearing box approximation. Three different uniform background magnetic field configurations are treated for a wide range of field intensities. These simulations indicate that the time variations of the turbulent stress and the magnetic energy are altered by the presence of a poloidal component of the background field. We find that the saturation amplitude of the turbulent stress and the magnetic energy are determined by both the poloidal and azimuthal components of the field. In particular, when the poloidal component has the same intensity, the obtained turbulent stress for β y0 ≈ 200 becomes smaller than those for a purely poloidal field case. Despite the fact that the background field affects the MRI turbulence, the correlation between the obtained turbulent stress and the magnetic energy in the nonlinear stage is independent of the field topology. Our results indicate that the saturated turbulent stress has a stronger correlation with the power of the perturbed component of the magnetic field than with the power of the total magnetic field. These results suggest that both the intensity and the direction of the background magnetic field significantly affect the turbulent motion of the MRI in accretion disks.

  10. The protective effect of a constant magnetic field. [reduction of molecular cell pathology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosunov, A. V.; Tripuzov, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    The protective effect of a constant magnetic field sharply reduced spontaneous lysis of E. coli cells when subjected to ultraviolet radiation. A protective effect of a CMF was found in a study of tissue cultures of normally growing cells (kidney epithelium) and cancer cells (cells from a cancer of the larynx). The protective effect of a CMF is also seen in a combined exposure of tissue cultures to X-rays and CMF energy (strength of the CMF was 2000 oersteds with a gradient of 500 oersteds/cm). The data obtained are of interest to experimental oncology (development of new methods of treating malignant tumors).

  11. Influence of magnetic field on 1/f noise in GaAs resistors without surface effects

    SciTech Connect

    Song, M.H.; Birbas, A.N.; van der Ziel, A.; van Rheenen, A.D.

    1988-07-15

    The influence on magnetic field on 1/f noise in a planar GaAs resistor grown by molecular-beam epitaxy and without surface effects was investigated experimentally. The experimental results can be explained by the number fluctuation model but not by the mobility fluctuation model. Previously, experimental results indicating number fluctuation type of 1/f noise were mostly attributed to the surface effects associated with the particular structures used for the experiments. In our device the surface effects were diminished so that the fluctuations of the bulk current could be considered to produce the 1/f noise.

  12. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields, their strength and structure in intergalactic space, their first occurrence in young galaxies, and their dynamical importance for galaxy evolution remain widely unknown. Radio synchrotron emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized radio synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30 μG) and in central starburst regions (50-100 μG). Such fields are dynamically important; they can affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized radio emission traces ordered fields which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, generated from isotropic turbulent fields by compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields of 10-15 μG strength are generally found in interarm regions and follow the orientation of adjacent gas spiral arms. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered (anisotropic turbulent) fields are also observed at the inner edges of the spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies, and in central regions of starburst galaxies. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are an excellent tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium. Irregular galaxies host isotropic turbulent fields often of similar strength as in spiral galaxies, but only weak ordered fields. Faraday rotation measures (RM) of the diffuse polarized radio emission from the disks of several galaxies reveal large-scale spiral patterns that can be described by the superposition of azimuthal modes; these are signatures of regular fields generated by a mean-field α -Ω dynamo. So far no indications were found in external galaxies of large-scale field reversals, like the one in the Milky Way. Ordered magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos

  13. Stability of rotating self-gravitating filaments: effects of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Shubhadeep; Mondal, Surajit; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2016-07-01

    We have performed systematic local linear stability analysis on a radially stratified infinite self-gravitating cylinder of rotating plasma under the influence of magnetic field. In order to render the system analytically tractable, we have focused solely on the axisymmetric modes of perturbations. Using cylindrical coordinate system, we have derived the critical linear mass density of a non-rotating filament required for gravitational collapse to ensue in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field. Moreover, for such filaments threaded by axial magnetic field, we show that the growth rates of the modes having non-zero radial wavenumber are reduced more strongly by the magnetic field than that of the modes having zero radial wavenumber. More importantly, our study contributes to the understanding of the stability property of rotating astrophysical filaments that are more often than not influenced by magnetic fields. In addition to complementing many relevant numerical studies reported the literature, our results on filaments under the influence of magnetic field generalize some of the very recent analytical works. For example, here we prove that even a weak magnetic field can play a dominant role in determining stability of the filament when the rotation time-scale is larger than the free-fall time-scale. A filamentary structure with faster rotation is, however, comparatively more stable for the same magnetic field. The results reported herein, due to strong locality assumption, are strictly valid for the modes for which one can ignore the radial variations in the density and the magnetic field profiles.

  14. A magnetic field-dependent modulation effect tends to stabilize light transmission through binary ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Lin, Yueqiang; Liu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Qingmei; Miao, Hua; Fu, Jun; Lin, Lihua

    2012-06-01

    In binary ferrofluids composed of ferromagnetic γ-Fe2O3/Ni2O3 composite nanoparticles (A particles) and noncrystalline Fe2O3 nanoparticles (B particles), the A particles alone will form chain-like aggregates upon application of a magnetic field. Due to both the long-range 'magnetic convergent force' (FC) and the short-range 'magnetic divergent force' (FD), the A-particle chains immersed in the B-particle 'sea' will move in a manner similar to the process of vibrational damping. The apparent damping of the ferrofluids will vary from weak to overdamping according to the motion of the chains, so that the intensity of light transmitted through a ferrofluid film along the direction of the field would tend to stabilize after a period of rapid decrements and increments. In binary ferrofluids, the B-particle system can produce a modulation effect on both the damping and the driving force, further stabilizing the behavior of the transmitted light. At low fields (e.g., 500 Gs, 900 Gs) only the modulation of the viscosity drag force (Fv) is considerable, so that overdamping increases linearly with B-particle volume fraction (ФB), and the variation in the transmitted light is much slower during the process tending towards stability as ФB increases. However, at high fields (e.g., 1300 Gs) the polarization of the B-particle 'sea' is enhanced, so that FD is modulated as well as Fv (i.e., both the practical damping and driving forces are modulated simultaneously). Thus, the apparent overdamping of the binary ferrofluids system will vary non-linearly as ФB increases, and the transmitted light will tend to stabilize faster for ferrofluids with high ΦB than for those with low ФB at an applied magnetic field of 1300 Gs.

  15. The effects of weak extremely low frequency magnetic fields on calcium/calmodulin interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Hendee, S P; Faour, F A; Christensen, D A; Patrick, B; Durney, C H; Blumenthal, D K

    1996-01-01

    Mechanisms by which weak electromagnetic fields may affect biological systems are of current interest because of their potential health effects. Lednev has proposed an ion parametric resonance hypothesis (Lednev, 1991, Bioelectromagnetics, 12:71-75), which predicts that when the ac, frequency of a combined dc-ac magnetic field equals the cyclotron frequency of calcium, the affinity of calcium for calcium-binding proteins such as calmodulin will be markedly affected. The present study evaluated Lednev's theory using two independent systems, each sensitive to changes in the affinity of calcium for calmodulin. One of the systems used was the calcium/calmodulin-dependent activation of myosin light chain kinase, a system similar to that previously used by Lednev. The other system monitored optical changes in the binding of a fluorescent peptide to the calcium/calmodulin complex. Each system was exposed to a 20.9 microT static field superimposed on a 20.9 microT sinusoidal field over a narrow frequency range centered at 16 Hz, the cyclotron frequency of the unhydrated calcium ion. In contrast to Lednev's predictions, no significant effect of combined dc-ac magnetic fields on calcium/calmodulin interactions was indicated in either experimental system. PMID:8744329

  16. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  17. Effects of an applied magnetic field on directional solidification of off-eutectic Bi-Mn alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decarlo, J. L.; Pirich, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    Off-eutectic compositions of Bi-Mn were directionally solidified in applied transverse magnetic fields up to 3 kG to determine the effects on thermal and solutal convection. For Bi-rich compositions, the magnetic field appeared to increase mixing as determined from thermal, morphological, chemical and magnetic analyses. For Mn-rich compositions morphological and chemical analyses suggest some reduction in mixing due to application of the magnetic field. Conductivity gradients in the melt are suggested as a possible mechanism for the observed results.

  18. Approaching magnetic field effects in biology using the radical pair mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Jeffrey Michael

    1997-11-01

    The overall goal of this thesis has been to explain any of the reported magnetic field effects in biology (magnetic orientation of many species and/or health effects, such as cancer, due to man-made electromagnetic fields) using the radical pair mechanism, a quantum mechanical mechanism known for over 20 years that lets singlet-to-triplet yields (which can be related to reaction rates) of radical pair reactions depend on applied magnetic fields. This goal seems reasonable considering the known roles of many biological free radicals in cancer, disease, aging, development, and cellular signaling, the constant reminders in the media to take anti-oxidant vitamins to protect against certain deleterious free radicals, and the success of the radical pair mechanism in explaining magnetic field effects in photosynthetic reaction centers. To approach the above goal, this thesis develops several methods (using perturbation theory and other techniques in the Schrodinger and Liouville formalisms) for calculating singlet-to-triplet yields in combinations of steady and oscillating fields (some of these algorithms are more versatile or efficient while others give more insight, and all serve as cross-checks on each other) and uses these tools to explore and explain a number of interesting phenomena such as yields sensitive to the magnitude and orientation of earth-strength (0.5 G) steady fields as well as the magnitude, orientation, and frequency of very weak (7 mG or less) oscillating fields. In particular, this thesis examines such effects in several coenzyme B12 systems, systems long studied by EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, the chief method for determining the spin Hamiltonians, spin relaxation rates, and other parameters needed for calculations) in which organometallic cobalt-carbon bonds are often cleaved homolytically to form radical pairs. Among the B12-dependent enzymes are ribonucleotide reductase (which converts RNA to DNA nucleotides), methyl malonyl CoA mutase

  19. Immunological and biochemical effects of 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Fotopoulos, S.S.; Graham, C.

    1985-02-05

    Demand for electric power increased at an annual average rate of 7.5% between 1912 and 1971. In order to meet this demand, utility companies have had to increase both the number and the operating voltages employed in their overhead transmission lines. Public concern has been expressed about possible risks to human health and function arising from exposure to the electric and magnetic fields generated by these lines. The New York State Department of Health (NYSDH) is currently administering a wide-ranging research program to address the above issues. As part of this effort, MRI was funded to perform the first double-blind human study of the effects of exposure to combined 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. The study focused on measure of human performance physiology and subjective state. The present project into the planned double-blind study. The purpose of Phase 1 was to conduct a comprehensive, screening evaluation of the effects of field exposure on human immunologic hematologic and biochemical parameters. Phase 1 of the current program has now also been completed, and the purpose of this report is to summarize our findings in regard to the effects of field exposure on measures of human immunologic, hematologic and biochemical function. The following sections of this document present the specific aims of the research conducted, the experimental methods and procedures followed, and the statistical analysis performed. The document concludes with a discussion of the findings obtained.

  20. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  1. Biological effects of ELF (extremely-low-frequency) electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1989-10-01

    Studies have been conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Two areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function, and (2) experiments on cancer development in animals. In behavioral experiments, preliminary data suggest that short term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies were conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Finally, using a chemically-induced mammary tumor model, experiments were conducted in which rats, chronically exposed to 60-Hz electric fields, showed an enhancement in the number of tumors per tumor bearing animal.

  2. Magnetic fields and childhood cancer: an epidemiological investigation of the effects of high-voltage underground cables.

    PubMed

    Bunch, K J; Swanson, J; Vincent, T J; Murphy, M F G

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence of increased risks for childhood leukaemia from magnetic fields has implicated, as one source of such fields, high-voltage overhead lines. Magnetic fields are not the only factor that varies in their vicinity, complicating interpretation of any associations. Underground cables (UGCs), however, produce magnetic fields but have no other discernible effects in their vicinity. We report here the largest ever epidemiological study of high voltage UGCs, based on 52,525 cases occurring from 1962-2008, with matched birth controls. We calculated the distance of the mother's address at child's birth to the closest 275 or 400 kV ac or high-voltage dc UGC in England and Wales and the resulting magnetic fields. Few people are exposed to magnetic fields from UGCs limiting the statistical power. We found no indications of an association of risk with distance or of trend in risk with increasing magnetic field for leukaemia, and no convincing pattern of risks for any other cancer. Trend estimates for leukaemia as shown by the odds ratio (and 95% confidence interval) per unit increase in exposure were: reciprocal of distance 0.99 (0.95-1.03), magnetic field 1.01 (0.76-1.33). The absence of risk detected in relation to UGCs tends to add to the argument that any risks from overhead lines may not be caused by magnetic fields.

  3. The transverse magnetic field effect on steady-state solutions of the Bursian diode

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanik, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-04-15

    A study of steady-states of a planar vacuum diode driven by a cold electron beam (the Bursian diode) under an external transverse magnetic field is presented. The regime of no electrons turned around by a magnetic field only is under the consideration. The emitter electric field is evaluated as a characteristic function for the existence of solutions depending on the diode length, the applied voltage, and the magnetic field strength. At certain conditions, it is shown that a region of non-unique solutions exists in the Bursian diode when the magnetic field is absent. An expression for the maximum current transmitted through the diode is derived. The external magnetic field is put forth to control fast electronic switches based on the Bursian diode.

  4. The transverse magnetic field effect on steady-state solutions of the Bursian diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Sourav; Ender, A. Ya.; Kuznetsov, V. I.; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-04-01

    A study of steady-states of a planar vacuum diode driven by a cold electron beam (the Bursian diode) under an external transverse magnetic field is presented. The regime of no electrons turned around by a magnetic field only is under the consideration. The emitter electric field is evaluated as a characteristic function for the existence of solutions depending on the diode length, the applied voltage, and the magnetic field strength. At certain conditions, it is shown that a region of non-unique solutions exists in the Bursian diode when the magnetic field is absent. An expression for the maximum current transmitted through the diode is derived. The external magnetic field is put forth to control fast electronic switches based on the Bursian diode.

  5. Effect of Transverse Magnetic Fields on Cold-Atom Nonlinear Magneto-Optical Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, David; Kunz, Paul; Fatemi, Fredrik; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-05-01

    We investigate nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) in cold atoms in the presence of a transverse magnetic field where alignment-to-orientation conversion (AOC) dominates. The AOC mechanism, which relies on AC-Stark shifts generated by a strong, off-resonant probe beam, significantly alters the NMOR resonance. When an additional magnetic field is present, parallel to the electric field of the light, a nested feature within this NMOR resonance manifests. Unlike similar features observed with lower optical power in warm vapors, attributed to optical pumping through nearby hyperfine levels, this feature is due solely to the AOC mechanism. Using numerical simulations, a perturbative solution, and experimental observations we characterize the feature with respect to optical power, optical polarization, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction. These results shed further light on the AOC mechanism common to NMOR-based experiments and we demonstrate a potential application to measure transverse DC magnetic fields and spatial gradients.

  6. The Movement of a Nerve in a Magnetic Field: Application to MRI Lorentz Effect Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Bradley J.; Luterek, Adam; Puwal, Steffan

    2014-01-01

    Direct detection of neural activity with MRI would be a breakthrough innovation in brain imaging. A Lorentz force method has been proposed to image nerve activity using MRI; a force between the action currents and the static MRI magnetic field causes the nerve to move. In the presence of a magnetic field gradient, this will cause the spins to precess at a different frequency, affecting the MRI signal. Previous mathematical modeling suggests that this effect is too small to explain the experimental data, but that model was limited because the action currents were assumed to be independent of position along the nerve, and because the magnetic field was assumed to be perpendicular to the nerve. In this paper, we calculate the nerve displacement analytically without these two assumptions. Using realistic parameter values, the nerve motion is less than 5 nm, which induced a phase shift in the MRI signal of less than 0.02°. Therefore, our results suggest that Lorentz force imaging is beyond the capabilities of current technology. PMID:24728667

  7. Effect of myocardial anisotropy on the torso current flow patterns, potentials and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ramon, C; Wang, Y; Haueisen, J; Schimpf, P; Jaruvatanadilok, S; Ishimaru, A

    2000-05-01

    The effects of myocardial anisotropy on the torso current flow patterns, voltage and the magnetic field were examined using an anatomically realistic torso model of an adult male subject. A finite element model of the torso was built with 19 major tissue types identified. The myocardial fibre orientation in the heart wall was included with a voxel resolution of 0.078 x 0.078 x 0.3 cm. The fibre orientations from the canine heart which are available in the literature were mapped to our adult male subject's human heart using deformable mapping techniques. The current and potential distribution in the whole torso were computed using an idealized dipolar source of +/-1.0 V in the middle of the septum of the heart wall as a boundary condition. An adaptive finite element solver was used. Two cases were studied. In one case the myocardium was isotropic and in the other it was anisotropic. It was found that the current density distribution shows a very noticeable difference between the isotropic and anisotropic myocardium. The resultant magnetic field in front of the torso was computed using the Biot-Savart law. It was found that the magnetic field profile was slightly affected by the myocardial anisotropy. The potential on the torso surface also shows noticeable changes due to the myocardial anisotropy. PMID:10843096

  8. Effects of magnetic fields on lithium evolution in F and G stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. D.; Bi, S. L.; Yang, W. M.; Liu, K.; Tian, Z. J.; Ge, Z. S. E-mail: bisl@bnu.edu.cn

    2014-02-01

    To study the effects of magnetic fields on lithium depletion and to explain the characteristics of lithium evolution in F- and G-type stars in open clusters, we construct a stellar model that includes a Tayler-Spruit dynamo-type field. Through examining the features of extra-mixing caused by magnetic fields in stellar interiors and the relationship between lithium depletion and the input parameters (i.e., mass, metallicity, and the initial rotational condition), we find that the magnetic model produces extra-mixing processes different from other models. During pre-main sequence, the model exhibits very efficient extra-mixing, resulting in strong lithium depletion. As a star evolves, the efficiency of extra-mixing rapidly decreases and lithium depletion slows down at old ages. By setting up different initial rotating conditions, the model predicts dispersions of lithium abundance in both main sequence and pre-main sequence stages. The dispersion begins when a radiative core forms in the interior. The number sees a rapid growth afterward, reaching 0.1-0.5 dex at zero age main sequence in G and late-F stars. The increase of dispersion continues in the main sequence, which is slight in G and late-F stars while significant in mid-F stars. Finally, a comparison is carried out between the theoretical results and the observed data in four open clusters. Good agreements are obtained.

  9. Magnetic field effects for copper suspended nanofluid venture through a composite stenosed arteries with permeable wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Butt, Adil Wahid

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper magnetic field effects for copper nanoparticles for blood flow through composite stenosis in arteries with permeable wall are discussed. The copper nanoparticles for the blood flow with water as base fluid is not explored yet. The equations for the Cu-water nanofluid are developed first time in the literature and simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions. Exact solutions have been evaluated for velocity, pressure gradient, the solid volume fraction of the nanoparticles and temperature profile. The effect of various flow parameters on the flow and heat transfer characteristics is utilized.

  10. Effect of Interface Shape and Magnetic Field on the Microstructure of Bulk Ge:Ga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal and compositional gradients induced during the growth process contribute significantly to the development of defects in the solidified boule. Thermal gradients and the solid-liquid interface shape can be greatly effected by ampoule material. Compositional gradients are strongly influenced by interface curvature and convective flow in the liquid. Results of this investigation illustrate the combined influences of interface shape and convective fluid flow. An applied magnetic field was used to reduce the effects of convective fluid flow in the electrically conductive melt during directional solidification. Several 8 mm diameter boules of Ga-doped Ge were grown at different field strengths, up to 5 Tesla, in four different ampoule materials. Compositional profiles indicate mass transfer conditions ranged from completely mixed to diffusion controlled. The influence of convection in the melt on the developing crystal microstructure and defect density was investigated as a function of field strength and ampoule material. Chemical etching and electron backscattered electron diffraction were used to map the crystal structure of each boule along the center plane. Dislocation etch pit densities were measured for each boule. Results show the influence of magnetic field strength and ampoule material on overall crystal quality.

  11. Structural and magnetic field effects on spin fluctuations in Sr3Ru2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Shantanu; Lee, Wei-Cheng

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of magnetic excitations in Sr3Ru2O7 in the paramagnetic metallic phase using a three-band tight-binding model. The effect of Mn or Ti dopant ions on the Sr3Ru2O7 band structure has been included by taking into account the dopant-induced suppression of the oxygen octahedral rotation in the tight-binding band structure. We find that the low-energy spin fluctuations are dominated by three wave vectors around q ⃗=( (0 ,0 ) ,(π /2 ,π /2 ) ) and (π ,0 ) , which compete with each other. As the octahedral rotation is suppressed with increasing doping, the three wave vectors evolve differently. In particular, the undoped compound has dominant wave vectors at q ⃗=( (0 ,0 ) ,(π /2 ,π /2 ) ) , but doping Sr3Ru2O7 leads to a significant enhancement in the spin susceptibility at the q ⃗=(π ,0 ) wave vector, bringing the system closer to a magnetic instability. All the features calculated from our model are in agreement with neutron scattering experiments. We have also studied the effect of a c -axis Zeeman field on the low-energy spin fluctuations. We find that an increasing magnetic field suppresses the antiferromagnetic (AFM) fluctuations and leads to stronger competition between the AFM and ferromagnetic spin fluctuations. The magnetic field dependence observed in our calculations therefore supports the scenario that the observed nematic phase in the metamagnetic region in Sr3Ru2O7 is intimately related to the presence of a competing ferromagnetic instability.

  12. Effects of Magnetic Field on the Turbulent Wake of a Cylinder in MHD Channel Flow

    SciTech Connect

    John Rhoads; Edlundd, Eric; Ji, Hantao

    2013-04-01

    Results from a free-surface MHD flow experiment are presented detailing the modi cation of vortices in the wake of a circular cylinder with its axis parallel to the applied magnetic fi eld. Experiments were performed with a Reynolds number near Re ~ 104 as the interaction parameter, N = |j x B| / |ρ (υ • ∇), was increased through unity. By concurrently sampling the downstream fluid velocity at sixteen cross-stream locations in the wake, it was possible to extract an ensemble of azimuthal velocity profi les as a function of radius for vortices shed by the cylinder at varying strengths of magnetic field. Results indicate a signi cant change in vortex radius and rotation as N is increased. The lack of deviations from the vortex velocity pro file at high magnetic fi elds suggests the absence of small-scale turbulent features. By sampling the wake at three locations downstream in subsequent experiments, the decay of the vortices was examined and the effective viscosity was found to decrease as N-049±0.4. This reduction in effective viscosity is due to the modi cation of the small-scale eddies by the magnetic fi eld. The slope of the energy spectrum was observed to change from a k-1.8 power-law at low N to a k-3.5 power-law for N > 1. Together, these results suggest the flow smoothly transitioned to a quasi-two-dimensional state in the range 0 < N < 1.

  13. Effect of magnetic field on seed germination and seedling growth of sunflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matwijczuk, A.; Kornarzyński, K.; Pietruszewski, S.

    2012-07-01

    The impact of a variable magnetic field, magnetically treated water and a combination of both these factors on the germination of seeds and the final mass at the initial stage of growth sunflower plants was presented. Investigations were carried out in pots filled with sand, tin an air-conditioned plant house with no access to daylight using fluorescent light as illumination. A statistical significance positive impact was achieved for the samples subjected to the interaction of both stimulating factors simultaneously, the magnetic field and the impact of treated water several times on the speed of seed germination and final plant mass. Negative impacts were obtained for the majority of the test cases, for the magnetically treated water, the short duration of activity of the magnetic field and for the connection of the magnetic field and low-flow times.

  14. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Silchenko, O.; Sokoloff, D.; Horellou, C.; Beck, R.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. The investigation of these magnetic fields can be helpful for understanding galactic evolution; however, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Aims: Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. Methods: We use tested methods for modelling α-Ω galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Results: Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513, where the ring counter-rotates with respect to the disc. Strong shear in the region between the disc and the ring is associated with unusually strong dynamo drivers in such counter-rotators. The effect of the strong drivers is found to be unexpectedly moderate. With counter-rotation in the disc, a generic model shows that a steady mixed parity magnetic configuration that is unknown for classical spiral galaxies, may be excited, although we do not specifically model NGC 4513. Conclusions: We deduce that ring galaxies constitute a morphological class of galaxies in which identification of large-scale magnetic fields from observations of polarized radio emission, as well as dynamo modelling, may be possible. Such studies have the potential to throw additional light on the physical nature of rings, their lifetimes, and evolution.

  15. The Effects of a Magnetic Field on the Crystallization of a Fluorozirconate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Lapointe, Michael R.; Jia, Zhiyong

    2006-01-01

    An axial magnetic field of 0.1T was applied to ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) fibers during heating to the glass crystallization temperature. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to identify crystal phases. It was shown that fibers exposed to the magnetic field did not crystallize while fibers not exposed to the field did crystallize. A hypothesis based on magnetic work was proposed to explain the results and tested by measuring the magnetic susceptibilities of the glass and crystal.

  16. Effect of static magnetic field on electricity production and wastewater treatment in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qinqin; Zhou, Shaoqi

    2014-12-01

    The effect of a magnetic field (MF) on electricity production and wastewater treatment in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been investigated. Electricity production capacity could be improved by the application of a low-intensity static MF. When a MF of 50 mT was applied to MFCs, the maximum voltage, total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency increased from 523 ± 2 to 553 ± 2 mV, ∼93 to ∼96 %, and ∼80 to >90 %, respectively, while the start-up time and coulombic efficiency decreased from 16 to 10 days and ∼50 to ∼43 %, respectively. The MF effects were immediate, reversible, and not long lasting, and negative effects on electricity generation and COD removal seemed to occur after the MF was removed. The start-up and voltage output were less affected by the MF direction. Nitrogen compounds in magnetic MFCs were nitrified more thoroughly; furthermore, a higher proportion of electrochemically inactive microorganisms were found in magnetic systems. TP was effectively removed by the co-effects of microbe absorption and chemical precipitation. Chemical precipitates were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope capable of energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) to be a mixture of phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl compounds.

  17. Effect of static magnetic field on electricity production and wastewater treatment in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qinqin; Zhou, Shaoqi

    2014-12-01

    The effect of a magnetic field (MF) on electricity production and wastewater treatment in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been investigated. Electricity production capacity could be improved by the application of a low-intensity static MF. When a MF of 50 mT was applied to MFCs, the maximum voltage, total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency increased from 523 ± 2 to 553 ± 2 mV, ∼93 to ∼96 %, and ∼80 to >90 %, respectively, while the start-up time and coulombic efficiency decreased from 16 to 10 days and ∼50 to ∼43 %, respectively. The MF effects were immediate, reversible, and not long lasting, and negative effects on electricity generation and COD removal seemed to occur after the MF was removed. The start-up and voltage output were less affected by the MF direction. Nitrogen compounds in magnetic MFCs were nitrified more thoroughly; furthermore, a higher proportion of electrochemically inactive microorganisms were found in magnetic systems. TP was effectively removed by the co-effects of microbe absorption and chemical precipitation. Chemical precipitates were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope capable of energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) to be a mixture of phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl compounds. PMID:25326779

  18. Magnetic effects on thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguš, Samo; Bojkovski, Jovan; Drnovšek, Janko; Geršak, Gregor

    2014-03-01

    Thermometers in laboratory environment and industrial applications are often subject to extraneous, usually unwanted and uncontrolled magnetic fields. Magnetic field influence can be minimized, but cannot be fully cancelled out. Even more, in most cases, there is no awareness of the existence of magnetic fields, let alone their effect on measurement instrumentation. In the past, sensitivity to high dc magnetic fields has been investigated in cryogenics and at high temperatures. More recently, the magnetic effect on weak dc magnetic fields was presented. The goal of this paper was to analyse and empirically and experimentally prove the magnetic sensitivity of thermocouples exposed to low magnetic fields: both dc and ac. Precision and uniform alternating and direct magnetic flux densities were generated by means of permanent magnets and power amplifiers with air-cored coils. The magnetic effect on ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic thermocouples at liquid-nitrogen-boiling point (-196 °C), ice point (0 °C), in water (17 °C) and at melting point of gallium fixed point cell (29.7646 °C) was investigated. Magnetic-field-dependent temperature errors of up to 700 mK (at 5.3 mT: dc) and up to 1 °C (at 10 mT: ac 50 Hz magnetic fields) were detected. From the results, it can be concluded that, ideally for temperature measurements of the highest accuracy in the above-cryogenic temperature range, magnetic sensitivity should be estimated and taken into account either as the correction of an error and/or as an additional source of measurement uncertainty. Special consideration should be given to thermocouple orientation relative to the magnetic field direction, influence of metal enclosures and magnetization effects on ferromagnetic components of thermocouples.

  19. Prediction of the shielding effectiveness at low frequency in near magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frikha, Amin; Bensetti, Mohamed; Duval, Fabrice; Lafon, Frédéric; Pichon, Lionel

    2014-04-01

    Equipment used in hybrid or electric vehicles (HEVs) must meet certain requirements. Beyond issues of electro-magnetic compatibility (EMC), it's necessary to assess the risks related to the exposure of the passengers to electromagnetic field inside an HEV. At low frequencies, using the electromagnetic shielding as protection is inefficient. The compliance can be achieved done by defining the harness's architecture or by the use of permeable materials. In this paper, we will focus on the prediction of the shielding effectiveness of materials subjected to a near magnetic field source at low frequency (9 kHz-10 MHz).We will focus our study on two cases. In the first case, we will work on the numerical modeling of an enclosure with and without opening. The result from the model is compared to the measurement's results obtained with a test bench developed in our laboratory. In the second case, the impact of the slot in the enclosure will be studied. An analytical method based on magnetic moments approximation is developed to predict the shielding effectiveness for infinite plane with slot. The results obtained with the latter are compared with the numerical results.

  20. Reexamination of magnetic isotope and field effects on adenosine triphosphate production by creatine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Darragh; Silkstone, Gary; Poddar, Soumya; Ranson, Richard; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Wilson, Michael T.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of isotopically enriched magnesium on the creatine kinase catalyzed phosphorylation of adenosine diphosphate is examined in two independent series of experiments where adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were determined by a luciferase-linked luminescence end-point assay or a real-time spectrophotometric assay. No increase was observed between the rates of ATP production with natural Mg, 24Mg, and 25Mg, nor was any significant magnetic field effect observed in magnetic fields from 3 to 1,000 mT. Our results are in conflict with those reported by Buchachenko et al. [J Am Chem Soc 130:12868–12869 (2008)], and they challenge these authors’ general claims that a large (two- to threefold) magnetic isotope effect is “universally observable” for ATP-producing enzymes [Her Russ Acad Sci 80:22–28 (2010)] and that “enzymatic phosphorylation is an ion-radical, electron-spin-selective process” [Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:10793–10796 (2005)]. PMID:22198842

  1. Effects of reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy boundary measurements on localization of active neural source.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui-min; Lee, Kok-Meng; Hu, Liang; Foong, Shaohui; Fu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Localization of active neural source (ANS) from measurements on head surface is vital in magnetoencephalography. As neuron-generated magnetic fields are extremely weak, significant uncertainties caused by stochastic measurement interference complicate its localization. This paper presents a novel computational method based on reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy measurements for enhanced ANS localization by suppressing effects of unrelated noise. In this approach, the magnetic flux density (MFD) in the nearby current-free space outside the head is reconstructed from measurements through formulating the infinite series solution of the Laplace's equation, where boundary condition (BC) integrals over the entire measurements provide "smooth" reconstructed MFD with the decrease in unrelated noise. Using a gradient-based method, reconstructed MFDs with good fidelity are selected for enhanced ANS localization. The reconstruction model, spatial interpolation of BC, parametric equivalent current dipole-based inverse estimation algorithm using reconstruction, and gradient-based selection are detailed and validated. The influences of various source depths and measurement signal-to-noise ratio levels on the estimated ANS location are analyzed numerically and compared with a traditional method (where measurements are directly used), and it was demonstrated that gradient-selected high-fidelity reconstructed data can effectively improve the accuracy of ANS localization. PMID:26358243

  2. Magnetic holes in the solar wind. [(interplanetary magnetic fields)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. M.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis is presented of high resolution interplanetary magnetic field measurements from the magnetometer on Explorer 43 which showed that low magnetic field intensities in the solar wind at 1 AU occur as distinct depressions or 'holes'. These magnetic holes are new kinetic-scale phenomena, having a characteristic dimension on the order of 20,000 km. They occurred at a rate of 1.5/day in the 18-day time span (March 18 to April 6, 1971) that was analyzed. Most of the magnetic holes are characterized by both a depression in the absolute value of the magnetic field, and a change in the magnetic field direction; some of these are possibly the result of magnetic merging. However, in other cases the magnetic field direction does not change; such holes are not due to magnetic merging, but might be a diamagnetic effect due to localized plasma inhomogeneities.

  3. Biological Effects of Static Magnetic Fields: Ideal Experiments for Introductory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendler, Barry S.; Grove, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    A serendipitous finding involving static magnetic fields can be used to design experiments suitable for both science and nonscience majors. It has been reported that organisms respond differently to high-gauss magnetic fields generated by north poles than they do to those generated by south poles. Experimental tests of this hypothesis are ideal…

  4. Pulsed high-magnetic-field experiments: New insights into the magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Mn-In Heusler alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar Mejía, C. Nayak, A. K.; Felser, C.; Nicklas, M.; Ghorbani Zavareh, M.; Wosnitza, J.; Skourski, Y.

    2015-05-07

    The present pulsed high-magnetic-field study on Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} gives an extra insight into the thermodynamics of the martensitic transformation in Heusler shape-memory alloys. The transformation-entropy change, ΔS, was estimated from field-dependent magnetization experiments in pulsed high magnetic fields and by heat-capacity measurements in static fields. We found a decrease of ΔS with decreasing temperature. This behavior can be understood by considering the different signs of the lattice and magnetic contributions to the total entropy. Our results further imply that the magnetocaloric effect will decrease with decreasing temperature and, furthermore, the martensitic transition is not induced anymore by changing the temperature in high magnetic fields.

  5. Pulsed high-magnetic-field experiments: New insights into the magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Mn-In Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Mejía, C.; Ghorbani Zavareh, M.; Nayak, A. K.; Skourski, Y.; Wosnitza, J.; Felser, C.; Nicklas, M.

    2015-05-01

    The present pulsed high-magnetic-field study on Ni50Mn35In15 gives an extra insight into the thermodynamics of the martensitic transformation in Heusler shape-memory alloys. The transformation-entropy change, ΔS, was estimated from field-dependent magnetization experiments in pulsed high magnetic fields and by heat-capacity measurements in static fields. We found a decrease of ΔS with decreasing temperature. This behavior can be understood by considering the different signs of the lattice and magnetic contributions to the total entropy. Our results further imply that the magnetocaloric effect will decrease with decreasing temperature and, furthermore, the martensitic transition is not induced anymore by changing the temperature in high magnetic fields.

  6. Effect of metal-to-metal interface states on the electric-field modified magnetic anisotropy in MgO/Fe/non-magnetic metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X. W.; Cheng, X. M.; Huang, T.; Wang, S.; Xue, K. H.; Miao, X. S.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of metal-to-metal interface on electric-field modified magnetic anisotropy in MgO/Fe/non-magnetic metal (Ta, Pt, Au) is revealed by density functional calculations. We demonstrate that the contribution from the metal-to-metal interface can be strong enough to dominate the electric field effect on magnetic anisotropy of Fe/MgO-based films, and the strain could also effectively tune the electric field effect. By analyzing the interface states by density of states and band structures, the dependence of the magnetoelectric effect on metal-to-metal interface is elucidated. These results are of considerable interest in the area of electric field controlled magnetic anisotropy and switching.

  7. Immunological and biochemical effects of 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Fotopoulos, S.S.; Graham, C.

    1990-01-01

    Demand for electric energy increased at an annual average rate of 7.5% between 1912 and 1971. In order to meet this demand, utility companies have increased the number and size of their generating units and the operating voltages employed in overhead transmission lines. Recently public concern has been expressed about possible risks to human health, function, and well-being arising from exposure to the electric and magnetic fields associated with overhead transmission line voltage. The Department of Energy funded the present project to investigate the effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on critically important immunological, biochemical, and hematological variables. Inclusion of such variables will be of great value in assessing the effects of 60-Hz fields on human health and welfare, and will provide results comparable to ongoing animal studies. The scope of this project includes six major goals: development of systems for incorporating biochemistry, hematology, and immunology data collection into the procedures already developed for the performance and physiology study funded by the New York State Overhead Power Lines Project; development of sample tracking and quality assurance procedures for project data; methods development and setting up of all procedures for performing assays; collecting data; carrying out assays according to the procedures defined; and statistically evaluating and interpreting the effects of 60-Hz exposure on hematological, biochemical, and immunological parameters. 3 tabs.

  8. Biological effects of electrical- or magnetic-field application. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the application of electrical or magnetic fields to organisms. Changes in cell structure, cell shape, metabolism, mitosis, cell orientation, neuron response, germination response, and growth rates are discussed. The citations also examine the effects of electrical or magnetic field exposure from transmission lines. Biological applications of electric field cited include genetic transfer, plant cell fusion, and seed disinfection. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Effect of magnetic field on the microstructure and macrosegregation in directionally solidified Pb-Sn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Shah, Rajesh; Song, Hui

    1994-07-01

    An investigation into the influence of a transverse magnetic field (0.45 T) on the mushy zone morphology and macrosegregation in directionally solidified hypoeutectic Pb-Sn alloy shows that the field has no influence on the morphology of dendritic arrays. The field does, however, cause severe distortion in the cellular array morphology. Cellular arrayed growth with the magnetic field results in an extensive channel formation in the mushy zone, as opposed to the wellaligned and uniformly distributed cells formed in the absence of the field. The channels are produced due to the anisotropy in the thermosolutal convection caused by the magnetic field. Macrosegregation, however, along the length of the directionally solidified samples is not influenced by this magnetic field for either the cellular or dendritic arrays.

  10. Transient magneto-optic effects in ferrofluid-filled microstructured fibers in pulsed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agruzov, Petr M.; Pleshakov, Ivan V.; Bibik, Efim E.; Stepanov, Serguei I.; Shamrai, Alexander V.

    2015-09-01

    Transient magneto-optic effects in ferrofluid-filled microstructured optical fibers are considered. Magneto-optic responses of two types, i.e., an even and an odd one, were observed in the longitudinal geometry of an applied pulsed magnetic field for the kerosene-based Fe3O4 ferrofluid with ∼8 \\text{nm} nanoparticles. For the first time a submicrosecond response time limited by the rise time of the applied field pulse (∼0.35 μ \\text{s}) was demonstrated for the odd magneto-optic effect in an all-fiber system, and responses of the even and odd magneto-optic effects were separated. A strong influence of the pulse width on the relaxation time of the even response is attributed to the formation of particle aggregates.

  11. Effect of an electric field on the magnetization of a SmFe3(BO3)4 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidman, A. L.; Balaev, A. D.; Dubrovskii, A. A.; Eremin, E. V.; Shaikhutdinov, K. A.; Temerov, V. L.; Gudim, I. A.

    2015-07-01

    A change in the magnetization of a SmFe3(BO3)4 single crystal in response to an applied alternating electric field has been experimentally observed for the first time. The measurements have demonstrated that the magnetization oscillates not only at a frequency of the applied electric field but also at twice the frequency. The dependences of the magnetoelectric effect on the magnetic and electric fields and temperature have been measured. It has been assumed that the existence of the second harmonic of the magnetoelectric effect is due to the electrostriction.

  12. Effects of static magnetic field on magnetosome formation and expression of mamA, mms13, mms6 and magA in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoke; Liang, Likun

    2009-05-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce nanometer-size intracellular magnetic crystals. The superior crystalline and magnetic properties of magnetosomes have been attracting much interest in medical applications. To investigate effects of intense static magnetic field on magnetosome formation in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, cultures inoculated with either magnetic or non-magnetic pre-cultures were incubated under 0.2 T static magnetic field or geomagnetic field. The results showed that static magnetic field could impair the cellular growth and raise C(mag) values of the cultures, which means that the percentage of magnetosome-containing bacteria was increased. Static magnetic field exposure also caused an increased number of magnetic particles per cell, which could contribute to the increased cellular magnetism. The iron depletion in medium was slightly increased after static magnetic field exposure. The linearity of magnetosome chain was also affected by static magnetic field. Moreover, the applied intense magnetic field up-regulated mamA, mms13, magA expression when cultures were inoculated with magnetic cells, and mms13 expression in cultures inoculated with non-magnetic cells. The results implied that the interaction of the magnetic field created by magnetosomes in AMB-1 was affected by the imposed magnetic field. The applied static magnetic field could affect the formation of magnetic crystals and the arrangement of the neighboring magnetosome.

  13. Experimental and theoretical study on effects of magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Daren; Li Hong; Ning Zhongxi; Yan Guojun; Wu Zhiwen

    2009-10-15

    An experiment has been made to investigate the effect of curved magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in the ion acceleration region of Hall thrusters. The experimental results show that the electron current due to near wall conductivity is of the minimum in the case of focused topology and increases in the cases of both less-focus and over-focus topologies. This finding cannot be explained properly by the magnetic mirror effect, which is the one and only reported effect related to the magnetic field curvature so far. Based on the analysis of interaction between the plasma and the wall, a new physical effect is proposed. The difference of magnetic field topology causes different electric potential distribution, leads to different ion flux to the wall, results in the change of sheath property and secondary electron emission, and finally affects the electron current due to near wall conductivity. This effect is further justified by the agreement between the experiment and simulation which is performed with a particle-in-cell model. Therefore, we conclude that the ion flow injection is a significant effect to near wall conductivity in the scope of curved magnetic field topology besides the magnetic mirror effect. Moreover, we find that the focus topology of magnetic field is favorable to obtain a high thruster performance from both the ion acceleration aspect and the electron conduction aspect and so is useful practically for thruster optimization.

  14. The effect of external magnetic fields on the pore structure of polyurethane foams loaded with magnetic microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schümann, M.; Seelig, N.; Odenbach, S.

    2015-10-01

    Elastic matrices loaded with magnetic microparticles are a new kind of magnetic hybrid material gaining a lot of scientific interest during the last few years. The central advantage of those materials is given by the possibility to control the mechanical properties by external stimuli, in this case external magnetic fields. Due to their extraordinary elastic properties, polyurethane foams are a promising matrix material for a new approach to synthesize such magnetic hybrid materials. A key to a deeper understanding of this new material is the investigation on how the inner structure of the hybrid material is controllable by the application of an external magnetic field during the polymerization. This paper presents a convenient method for analysis of structural changes of magnetically influenced particle loaded polyurethane foams. The geometry and size of up to 40 000 individual pores was evaluated by means of x-ray microtomography and digital image processing. A modest impact of the magnetic field on the pore structure was found with the utilized foam material, proving the convenient applicability of this method for future investigation with magnetic hybrid foams.

  15. The effect of electron inertia in Hall-driven magnetic field penetration in electron-magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Ottinger, P. F.; Schumer, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field penetration in electron-magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) can be driven by density gradients through the Hall term [Kingsep et al., Sov. J. Plasma Phys. 10, 495 (1984)]. Particle-in-cell simulations have shown that a magnetic front can go unstable and break into vortices in the Hall-driven EMHD regime. In order to understand these results, a new fluid model had been derived from the Ly/Ln≪1 limit of EMHD, where Ly is the length scale along the front and Ln is the density gradient length scale. This model is periodic in the direction along the magnetic front, which allows the dynamics of the front to be studied independently of electrode boundary effects that could otherwise dominate the dynamics. Numerical solutions of this fluid model are presented that show for the first time the relation between Hall-driven EMHD, electron inertia, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, and the formation of magnetic vortices. These solutions show that a propagating magnetic front is unstable to the same KH mode predicted for a uniform plasma. This instability causes the electron flow to break up into vortices that are then driven into the plasma with a speed that is proportional to the Hall speed. This demonstrates that, in two-dimensional geometry with sufficiently low collisionality [collision rate ν ≲ vHall/(4 δe) ], Hall-driven magnetic penetration occurs not as a uniform shock front but rather as vortex-dominated penetration. Once the vortices form, the penetration speed is found to be nearly a factor of two larger than the redicted speed ( vHall/2 ) obtained from Burgers' equation in the one-dimensional limit.

  16. Nonlinear Faraday effect in CdS semiconductor in an ultrahigh magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Druzhinin, V.V.; Tatsenko, O.M.; Bykov, A.I.

    1994-08-01

    A significant nonlinearity in the angle of rotation polarization plane was observed in CdS at wavelengths of 494 in the presence of high magnetic fields (0.5-5 MG). The onset significant nonlinearity also depended on sample temperature. An absorption study with probe wavelength of {approximately} 494 nm revealed an increase in optical transmission associated with a splitting of the conduction band. Dispersion, field and temperature curves indicate a low conduction electron mass m{sub e} = 0.3 m{sub o}. A numerical calculation and interpretation of the observed effects was carried out using band theory. The optical and magnetooptical properties of semiconducting crystals of CdS were studied, reviews of which are presented in [1,2]. This article describes joint American-Russian experiments to study the optical and magnetooptical properties of CdS in ultrahigh fields to {approximately} 7 MG.

  17. Gamma radiation and magnetic field mediated delay in effect of accelerated ageing of soybean.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mahesh; Singh, Bhupinder; Ahuja, Sumedha; Dahuja, Anil; Anand, Anjali

    2015-08-01

    Soybean seeds were exposed to gamma radiation (0.5, 1, 3 and 5 kGy), static magnetic field (50, 100 and 200 mT) and a combination of gamma radiation and magnetic energy (0.5 kGy + 200 mT and 5 kGy + 50 mT) and stored at room temperature for six months. These seeds were later subjected to accelerated ageing treatment at 42 °C temperature and 95-100 % relative humidity and were compared for various physical and biochemical characteristics between the untreated and the energized treatments. Energy treatment protected the quality of stored seeds in terms of its protein and oil content . Accelerated aging conditions, however, affected the oil and protein quantity and quality of seed negatively. Antioxidant enzymes exhibited a decline in their activity during aging while the LOX activity, which reflects the rate of lipid peroxidation, in general, increased during the aging. Gamma irradiated (3 and 5 kGy) and magnetic field treated seeds (100 and 200 mT) maintained a higher catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activity which may help in efficient scavenging of deleterious free radical produced during the aging. Aging caused peroxidative changes to lipids, which could be contributed to the loss of oil quality. Among the electromagnetic energy treatments, a dose of 1-5 kGy of gamma and 100 mT, 200 mT magnetic field effectively slowed the rate of biochemical degradation and loss of cellular integrity in seeds stored under conditions of accelerated aging and thus, protected the deterioration of seed quality. Energy combination treatments did not yield any additional protection advantage. PMID:26243899

  18. On the effects of magnetic field line topology on the energy propagation in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelaresi, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Using the MHD approximation, we study the propagation of energy from photospheric footpoint motions into the corona. Our model consists of a magnetic carpet with closed and open magnetic field lines. Magnetic null points are present close at the surface. The applied photospheric driver twists the field into a topologically non-trivial configuration which leads to reconnection and a change in field line topology. Prior to this event, the energy propagation into the corona is largely inhibited due to closed field lines. After such events the energy is free to propagate into the corona.

  19. Dynamic effects of restoring footpoint symmetry on closed magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, J. P.; Østgaard, N.; Tenfjord, P.; Laundal, K. M.; Snekvik, K.; Haaland, S.; Milan, S. E.; Oksavik, K.; Frey, H. U.; Grocott, A.

    2016-05-01

    Here we present an event where simultaneous global imaging of the aurora from both hemispheres reveals a large longitudinal shift of the nightside aurora of about 3 h, being the largest relative shift reported on from conjugate auroral imaging. This is interpreted as evidence of closed field lines having very asymmetric footpoints associated with the persistent positive y component of the interplanetary magnetic field before and during the event. At the same time, the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network observes the ionospheric nightside convection throat region in both hemispheres. The radar data indicate faster convection toward the dayside in the dusk cell in the Southern Hemisphere compared to its conjugate region. We interpret this as a signature of a process acting to restore symmetry of the displaced closed magnetic field lines resulting in flux tubes moving faster along the banana cell than the conjugate orange cell. The event is analyzed with emphasis on Birkeland currents (BC) associated with this restoring process, as recently described by Tenfjord et al. (2015). Using data from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) during the same conditions as the presented event, the large-scale BC pattern associated with the event is presented. It shows the expected influence of the process of restoring symmetry on BCs. We therefore suggest that these observations should be recognized as being a result of the dynamic effects of restoring footpoint symmetry on closed field lines in the nightside.

  20. Effects of intrinsic magnetostriction on tube-topology magnetoelectric sensors with high magnetic field sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, Scott M.; Fitchorov, Trifon; Obi, Ogheneyunume; Chen, Yajie Harris, Vincent G.; Jiang, Liping; Hao, Hongbo; Wu, Shuangxia

    2014-05-07

    Three quasi-one-dimensional magnetoelectric (ME) magnetic field sensors, each with a different magnetostrictive wire material, were investigated in terms of sensitivity and noise floor. Magnetostrictive Galfenol, iron-cobalt-vanadium, and iron-nickel wires were examined. Sensitivity profiles, hysteresis effects, and noise floor measurements for both optimally biased and zero-biased conditions are presented. The FeNi wire (FN) exhibits high sensitivity (5.36 mV/Oe) at bias fields below 22 Oe and an optimal bias of 10 Oe, whereas FeGa wire (FG) exhibits higher sensitivity (6.89 mW/Oe) at bias fields >22 Oe. The sensor of FeCoV wire (FC) presents relatively low sensitivity (2.12 mV/Oe), due to low magnetostrictive coefficient. Each ME tube-topology sensor demonstrates relatively high sensitivity at zero bias field, which results from a magnetic shape anisotropy and internal strain of the thin magnetostrictive wire.

  1. Magnetization dynamics using ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudosa, Ioan

    Very short and well shaped magnetic field pulses can be generated using ultra-relativistic electron bunches at Stanford Linear Accelerator. These fields of several Tesla with duration of several picoseconds are used to study the response of magnetic materials to a very short excitation. Precession of a magnetic moment by 90 degrees in a field of 1 Tesla takes about 10 picoseconds, so we explore the range of fast switching of the magnetization by precession. Our experiments are in a region of magnetic excitation that is not yet accessible by other methods. The current table top experiments can generate fields longer than 100 ps and with strength of 0.1 Tesla only. Two types of magnetic were used, magnetic recording media and model magnetic thin films. Information about the magnetization dynamics is extracted from the magnetic patterns generated by the magnetic field. The shape and size of these patterns are influenced by the dissipation of angular momentum involved in the switching process. The high-density recording media, both in-plane and perpendicular type, shows a pattern which indicates a high spin momentum dissipation. The perpendicular magnetic recording media was exposed to multiple magnetic field pulses. We observed an extended transition region between switched and non-switched areas indicating a stochastic switching behavior that cannot be explained by thermal fluctuations. The model films consist of very thin crystalline Fe films on GaAs. Even with these model films we see an enhanced dissipation compared to ferromagnetic resonance studies. The magnetic patterns show that damping increases with time and it is not a constant as usually assumed in the equation describing the magnetization dynamics. The simulation using the theory of spin-wave scattering explains only half of the observed damping. An important feature of this theory is that the spin dissipation is time dependent and depends on the large angle between the magnetization and the magnetic

  2. Ionization equilibrium of hydrogen in strong magnetic field with allowance for pressure effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bulik, P.; Pavlov, G. ); Potekhin, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ionization equilibrium in highly magnetized (B = 10[sup 10] to 10[sup 12]G) hydrogen is investigated at temperatures from 5 eV to 50 keV and densities in the range 10[sup [minus]3] to 10[sup 3] g/cm[sup 3]. We have used the occupation probability formalism in order to take into account the pressure and density effects. The occupation probabilities used are slightly modified as compared to those derived by Hummer and Mihalas. We find that pressure ionization degree varies with the form of microfield distribution function. The non-ionized fraction is increased by the magnetic field in most of the parameter space. It is large enough so that the bound-free absorption must be taken into account in realistic models of neutron star atmospheres.

  3. Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Ravat, D.; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Cosmos 49, Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO-2, 4 and 6)) and Magsat have been the only low-earth orbiting satellites to measure the crustal magnetic field on a global scale. These missions revealed the presence of long- wavelength (> 500 km) crustal anomalies predominantly located over continents. Ground based methods were, for the most part, unable to record these very large-scale features; no doubt due to the problems of assembling continental scale maps from numerous smaller surveys acquired over many years. Questions arose as to the source and nature of these long-wave length anomalies. As a result there was a great stimulant given to the study of the magnetic properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Some indication as to the nature of these deep sources has been provided by the recent results from the deep crustal drilling programs. In addition, the mechanism of magnetization, induced or remanent, was largely unknown. For computational ease these anomalies were considered to result solely from induced magnetization. However, recent results from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), a magnetometer-bearing mission to Mars, have revealed crustal anomalies with dimensions similar to the largest anomalies on Earth. These Martian features could only have been produced by remanent magnetization, since Mars lacks an inducing field. The origin of long-wavelength crustal anomalies, however, has not been completely determined. Several large crustal magnetic anomalies (e.g., Bangui, Kursk, Kiruna and Central Europe) will be discussed and the role of future satellite magnetometer missions (Orsted, SUNSAT and Champ) in their interpretation evaluated.

  4. Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2010-01-01

    Mmore » agnetic fields are everywhere in nature, and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high-temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cutoff scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude B λ and the power spectral index n B which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.« less

  5. Superconducting proximity effect in three-dimensional topological insulators in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burset, Pablo; Lu, Bo; Tkachov, Grigory; Tanaka, Yukio; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M.; Trauzettel, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The proximity-induced pair potential in a topological insulator-superconductor hybrid features an interesting superposition of a conventional spin-singlet component from the superconductor and a spin-triplet one induced by the surface state of the topological insulator. This singlet-triplet superposition can be altered by the presence of a magnetic field. We study the interplay between topological order and superconducting correlations performing a symmetry analysis of the induced pair potential, using Green functions techniques to theoretically describe ballistic junctions between superconductors and topological insulators under magnetic fields. We relate a change in the conductance from a gapped profile into one with a zero-energy peak with the transition into a topologically nontrivial regime where the odd-frequency triplet pairing becomes the dominant component in the pair potential. The nontrivial regime, which provides a signature of odd-frequency triplet superconductivity, is reached for an out-of-plane effective magnetization with strength comparable to the chemical potential of the superconductor or for an in-plane one, parallel to the normal-superconductor interface, with strength of the order of the superconducting gap. Strikingly, in the latter case, a misalignment with the interface yields an asymmetry with the energy in the conductance unless the total contribution of the topological surface state is considered.

  6. Effects of different slow wave structures and finite magnetic field on microwave emission in a BWO

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.; Ishihara, O.; Grabowski, C.; Gahl, J.; Schamiloglu, E.

    1996-12-31

    In a Backward Wave Oscillator (BWO) an electron beam, guided by a strong applied magnetic field, flows into a waveguide with periodic ripple imposed on its wall. The periodic ripple in the waveguide causes oscillations in the electron beam to grow and allows high power microwave radiation to be extracted. Although a variety of slow wave structures have been used to produce high power microwaves in BWOs, no systematic study has been done to determine the effects of the shape of slow wave structure. The authors have carried out computer simulations, using the PIC mode MAGIC, to study these effects by using sinusoidal, square well, and saw tooth ripple structures along the waveguide. Electrons are emitted as a beam at the entrance of the waveguide at a fraction of the space charge limiting current with energy on the order of 1 MeV. Ripple amplitudes are set less than 5 mm with a period of between 5 mm to 15 mm. The waveguide has typical radius between 10 mm to 25 mm. Preliminary results suggest that in smoothly varying ripples, such as sinusoidal ripples, less output microwave power is produced than in angular structures, such as square well ripples. Since the UNM long-pulse BWO experiment has produced higher output microwave power by using nonuniform slow wave structures, particle simulations have also been carried out to examine effects of shape of nonuniform structures as well. Simulations are also in progress to study the effects of applied magnetic field strength on microwave emission in BWOs.

  7. Electric-field-induced spin resonance in antiferromagnetic insulators: Inverse process of the dynamical chiral magnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Akihiko; Chiba, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    We propose a realization of the electric-field-induced antiferromagnetic resonance. We consider three-dimensional antiferromagnetic insulators with spin-orbit coupling characterized by the existence of a topological term called the θ term. By solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in the presence of the θ term, we show that, in contrast to conventional methods using ac magnetic fields, the antiferromagnetic resonance state is realized by ac electric fields along with static magnetic fields. This mechanism can be understood as the inverse process of the dynamical chiral magnetic effect, an alternating current generation by magnetic fields. In other words, we propose a way to electrically induce the dynamical axion field in condensed matter. We discuss a possible experiment to observe our proposal, which utilizes the spin pumping from the antiferromagnetic insulator into a heavy metal contact.

  8. Mathematical modeling of the nonlinear electrodynamics effect of signal delay in the magnetic field of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapochka, M. G.; Denisov, M. M.; Denisova, I. P.; Kalenova, N. V.; Korolev, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    The paper is devoted to mathematical modeling of the nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics effect: the action of the strong magnetic field of a pulsar on the propagation of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that, due to the birefringence of the vacuum, for one normal wave, it takes more time to travel from a pulsar to a detector installed on astrophysical satellites than for the other normal wave. The delay of the pulse carried by the second normal wave relative to pulse carried by the first normal wave from the common point of origin to the satellite is calculated.

  9. Effects of Strong Static Magnetic Fields on Amphibian Development and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Satomi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Furuno, Nobuaki; Yamashita, Masamichi; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-07-01

    This investigation attempts to clarify the effects of strong vertical and static magnetic fields (SMFs) of 11-15 T on Xenopus laevis development and on Xotx2 (an important regulator of fore- and midbrain morphogenesis) and Xag1 (essential for cement gland formation) gene expression. Results showed that (1) a strong SMF significantly retarded normal development and induced microcephaly, two heads, abnormal cement glands and multiple malformations, indicating that SMF inhibits normal embryonic development, (2) a strong SMF suppressed Xotx2 and Xag1 expression.

  10. Effect of magnetic field profile on the uniformity of a distributed electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C. C.; Chou, S. F.; Chang, T. H.; Chao, H. W.; Chen, C. C.

    2013-07-15

    This study extensively measured the uniformity of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma versus the magnetic field distribution. The influence of magnetic field distribution on the generation of uniform ECR plasma was examined. It is suggested that in addition to the uniformity of the magnetic field distribution at ECR zone and at the downstream zone near the substrate, the transition of the magnetic field between these two zones is also crucial. A uniform ECR plasma with the electron density uniformity of ±7.7% over 500 × 500 mm{sup 2} was measured at the downstream. The idea of generating uniform ECR plasma can be scaled up to a much larger area by using an n × n microwave input array and a well-designed magnetic system.

  11. The effect of magnetic field-free space on the acoustic behavior of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulafus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jin-Chang; Jin, Hai-Qiang; Lin, Yun-Fang; Chen, Hao; Yang, Xin-Yu; Zeng, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Xun

    1998-07-01

    The effect of magnetic field-free space (MFFS) on the acoustic behavior of budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulafus) is obvious. The daily frequency of their cries in uniform MFFS (UMFFS) and non-uniform MFFS (NMFFS) decreases by 44.7±10.0% as compared with that in the geomagnetic field (GMF) on the average. The occupation rate of protesting cries (R op) in NMFFS decreases by 8.5% 20.3% as compared with that in GMF on the average and shows an adaptability variation. In 75% of the observation days, the R op in UMFFS increases by 16.2% 23.3% as compared with that in GMF. As for the effect of MFFS on the rhythmic habits of budgerigars, only the ending time of crying is affected to certain extent, 67 minutes earlier than in GMF on the average.

  12. Magnetic fields end-face effect investigation of HTS bulk over PMG with 3D-modeling numerical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yujie; Lu, Yiyun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the magnetic fields end-face effect of high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk over a permanent magnetic guideway (PMG) is researched with 3D-modeling numerical method. The electromagnetic behavior of the bulk is simulated using finite element method (FEM). The framework is formulated by the magnetic field vector method (H-method). A superconducting levitation system composed of one rectangular HTS bulk and one infinite long PMG is successfully investigated using the proposed method. The simulation results show that for finite geometrical HTS bulk, even the applied magnetic field is only distributed in x-y plane, the magnetic field component Hz which is along the z-axis can be observed interior the HTS bulk.

  13. Magnetic ordering and crystal field effects in quasi-caged structure compound PrFe2Al8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Harikrishnan S.; Ghosh, Sarit K.; Ramesh Kumar, K.; Strydom, André M.

    2016-04-01

    The compound PrFe2Al8 possesses a three-dimensional network structure resulting from the packing of Al polyhedra centered at the transition metal element Fe and the rare earth Pr. Along the c-axis, Fe and Pr form chains which are separated from each other by the Al-network. In this paper, the magnetism and crystalline electric field effects in PrFe2Al8 are investigated through the analysis of magnetization and specific heat data. A magnetic phase transition in the Pr lattice is identified at TNPr ≈ 4 K in dc magnetization and ac susceptibility data. At 2 K, the magnetization isotherm presents a ferromagnetic saturation, however, failing to reach full spin-only ferromagnetic moment of Pr3+. Metamagnetic step-like low-field features are present in the magnetization curve at 2 K which is shown to shift upon field-cooling the material. Arrott plots centered around TPrN display "S"-like features suggestive of an inhomogeneous magnetic state. The magnetic entropy, Sm, estimated from specific heat outputs a value of R ln(2) at TN2 suggesting a doublet state for Pr3+. The magnetic specific heat is modeled by using a 9-level Schottky equation pertinent to the Pr3+ ion with J=4. Given the crystalline electric field situation of Pr3+, the inference of a doublet state from specific heat and consequent long-range magnetic order is an unexpected result.

  14. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  15. The effect of 2.1 T static magnetic field on astrocyte viability and morphology.

    PubMed

    Khodarahmi, Iman; Mobasheri, Hamid; Firouzi, Masoumeh

    2010-07-01

    The viability and a number of morphological properties of in situ astrocytes of rat spinal cord cultures including changes in surface area and migration of both cell body and nucleus were investigated at magnetic field intensities comparable to those currently used for magnetic resonance imaging. Viability of rat spinal astrocytes was studied after up to 72 hours of 2.1T static magnetic field exposure. Surface areas and two-dimensional centroids of both soma and nucleus after 2 hours of magnetic field exposure were determined and compared with those of the same cells before magnetic field exposure. Cell membrane ruffling was quantified using fractal analysis. Viability of astrocytes remained unchanged at 4, 16, 24, 48 and 72 hours. The mean soma area before and after 2 hours of field exposure was 6450 microm(2) and 6299 microm(2), respectively, whereas the values for nuclear area were 185.6 microm(2) and 185.7 microm(2). The mean displacement of the centroid of soma parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field direction was 1.07 microm and 0.78 microm, respectively. The corresponding quantities for nuclei were 0.29 microm and -2.00 microm. None of these changes were statistically significant. No membrane protrusion was observed by fractal analysis. In conclusion, strong static magnetic field at 2.1 T does not significantly affect the viability and morphological properties of rat astrocytes.

  16. Magnetic field effects on the energy deposition spectra of MV photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, C; Stanescu, T; Fallone, B G

    2009-01-21

    Several groups worldwide have proposed various concepts for improving megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy that involve irradiating patients in the presence of a magnetic field-either for image guidance in the case of hybrid radiotherapy-MRI machines or for purposes of introducing tighter control over dose distributions. The presence of a magnetic field alters the trajectory of charged particles between interactions with the medium and thus has the potential to alter energy deposition patterns within a sub-cellular target volume. In this work, we use the MC radiation transport code PENELOPE with appropriate algorithms invoked to incorporate magnetic field deflections to investigate electron energy fluence in the presence of a uniform magnetic field and the energy deposition spectra within a 10 microm water sphere as a function of magnetic field strength. The simulations suggest only very minor changes to the electron fluence even for extremely strong magnetic fields. Further, calculations of the dose-averaged lineal energy indicate that a magnetic field strength of at least 70 T is required before beam quality will change by more than 2%.

  17. The effect of giant impactors on the magnetic field energy of an early Martian dynamo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, McGregor; Thieulot, Cedric; Monteux, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Through the cratering record embedded on its surface, Mars is one of the key planets required for investigating the formation and impact frequency in the early history of our Solar System. This record also holds clues to the events that may have caused the observed hemispheric dichotomy and cessation of the magnetic field that was present within the first 500 Myr of the planets' formation. We investigate the influence of giant impacts on the early Martian dynamo using the numerical dynamo modelling code PARODY-JA [1]. We hypothesize that the input heat from a giant impact will decrease the total heat flux at the CMB through mantle heating which leads to a decrease in the Rayleigh number of the core. As boundary conditions for the heat flux anomaly size, we use numerical results of a 750 km diameter impactor from the Monteux and Arkani-Hamed, 2014 [2] study which investigated impact heating and core merging of giant impacts in early Mars. We also determine the decrease in Rayleigh number from the change in total heat flux at the CMB using these results, where the decrease after impact is due to shock heating at the CMB. We calculate the time-averaged total magnetic field energy for an initial homogeneous heat flux model using a range of Rayleigh numbers (5 x 103 - 1 x 10^5). The Rayleigh number is then decreased for three new models - homogeneous, north pole impact and equatorial impact - and the time-averaged energy again determined. We find that the energy decreases more in our impact models, compared with the homogeneous, along with a variation in energy between the north pole and equatorial impact models. We conclude that giant impacts in Mars' early history would have decreased the total magnetic energy of the field and the decrease in energy is also dependent on the location of the impact. The magnetic field could have been disrupted beyond recovery from a planetesimal-sized collision; such as the suggested Borealis basin forming impact, or through the

  18. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate. PMID:25940850

  19. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate.

  20. Probing the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot via full counting statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Nie, Yi-Hang; Chen, Jingzhe; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We study theoretically the full counting statistics of electron transport through a quantum dot weakly coupled to two ferromagnetic leads, in which an effective nuclear-spin magnetic field originating from the configuration of nuclear spins is considered. We demonstrate that the quantum coherence between the two singly-occupied eigenstates and the spin polarization of two ferromagnetic leads play an important role in the formation of super-Poissonian noise. In particular, the orientation and magnitude of the effective field have a significant influence on the variations of the values of high-order cumulants, and the variations of the skewness and kurtosis values are more sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective field than the shot noise. Thus, the high-order cumulants of transport current can be used to qualitatively extract information on the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot. - Highlights: • The effective nuclear-spin magnetic field gives rise to the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix of single QD. • The off-diagonal elements of reduced density matrix of the QD have a significant impact on the high-order current cumulants. • The high-order current cumulants are sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field. • The FCS can be used to detect the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single QD.

  1. Brain Tumor Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Potential Drug Delivery: Effect of Administration Route and Magnetic Field Topography

    PubMed Central

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated feasibility of magnetically-mediated retention of iron-oxide nanoparticles in brain tumors after intravascular administration. The purpose of this study was to elucidate strategies for further improvement of this promising approach. In particular, we explored administration of the nanoparticles via a non-occluded carotid artery as a way to increase the passive exposure of tumor vasculature to nanoparticles for subsequent magnetic entrapment. However, aggregation of nanoparticles in the afferent vasculature interfered with tumor targeting. The magnetic setup employed in our experiments was found to generate a relatively uniform magnetic flux density over a broad range, exposing the region of the afferent vasculature to high magnetic force. To overcome this problem, the magnetic setup was modified with a 9-mm diameter cylindrical NdFeB magnet to exhibit steeper magnetic field topography. Six-fold reduction of the magnetic force at the injection site, achieved with this modification, alleviated the aggregation problem under the conditions of intact carotid blood flow. Using this setup, carotid administration was found to present 1.8-fold increase in nanoparticle accumulation in glioma compared to the intravenous route at 350 mT. This increase was found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretically estimated 1.9-fold advantage of carotid administration, Rd. The developed approach is expected to present an even greater advantage when applied to drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibiting higher values of Rd. PMID:21763736

  2. Non-Fermi-liquid magic angle effects in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed, A. G.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a theoretical problem of electron-electron interactions in an inclined magnetic field in a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) conductor. We show that they result in strong non-Fermi-liquid corrections to a specific heat, provided that the direction of the magnetic field is far from the so-called Lebed's magic angles (LMAs). If magnetic field is directed close to one of the LMAs, the specific heat corrections become small and the Fermi-liquid picture restores. As a result, we predict Fermi-liquid-non-Fermi-liquid angular crossovers in the vicinities of the LMA directions of the field. We suggest to perform the corresponding experiment in the Q1D conductor (Per) 2Au (mnt) 2 under pressure in magnetic fields of the order of H ≃25 T .

  3. Effect of adiabatic trapping on vortices and solitons in degenerate plasma in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, S.; Shah, H. A.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of adiabatic trapping as a microscopic phenomenon in an inhomogeneous degenerate plasma is investigated in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field, and a modified Hasegawa Mima equation for the drift ion-acoustic wave is obtained. The linear dispersion relation in the presence of the quantizing magnetic field is investigated. The modified Hasegawa Mima equation is investigated to obtain bounce frequencies of the trapped particles. The Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for the two-dimensional case and finally the Sagdeev potential approach is used to obtain solitary structures. The theoretically obtained results have been analyzed numerically for different astrophysical plasma and quantizing magnetic field values.

  4. The effects of axial magnetic fields on the operating characteristics and downstream plasma parameters of DC plasma torches

    SciTech Connect

    Takakura, Y.; Ono, S.; Teii, S.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma torch is used in many industrial processes for high temperature sources. In the past, an application of magnetic field is experientially known to stabilize plasma torch operations. However, there is a little discussion regarding to magnetic field effects on plasma torch operating characteristics and plasma parameters. In this work, the influences of magnetic field and plasma gas flow rate on plasma torch current-voltage characteristics and downstream plasma parameters have been experimentally studied, and results are qualitatively analyzed based on the charged particle transport equation.

  5. Effects of the interplanetary magnetic field on the location of the open-closed field line boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Wang, J. Y.; Lopez, R. E.; Zhang, L. Q.; Tang, B. B.; Sun, T. R.; Li, H.

    2016-07-01

    Using global magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) simulation, we investigate the effect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the location of the open-closed field line boundary(OCB), in particular the duskside and dawnside OCB and their asymmetry. We first model the typical OCB-crossing events on 22 October 2001 and 24 October 2002 observed by DMSP. The MHD model presents a good estimate of OCB location under quasi-steady magnetospheric conditions. We then systemically study the location of the OCB under different IMF conditions. The model results show that the dawnside and duskside OCBs respond differently to IMF conditions when BY is present. An empirical expression describing the relationship between the OCB latitudes and IMF conditions has been obtained. It is found that the IMF conditions play an important role in determining the dawn-dusk OCB asymmetry, which is due to the magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. The differences between the dawn and dusk OCB latitudes from MHD predictions are in good agreement with the observations.

  6. Gravitational instability of a rotating partially-ionized plasma carrying a uniform magnetic field with Hall effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Nagendra; Srivastava, Krishna M.; Mittal, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of gravitational instability of an infinite homogeneous self-gravitating medium carrying a uniform magnetic field in the presence of Hall effect has been investigated to include the effect due to rotation. The dispersion relation has been obtained. It has been found that the Jeans's criterion for the instability remains unaffected even when the effect due to rotation is considered in the presence of Hall effect carrying a uniform magnetic.

  7. Effect of low transverse magnetic field on the confinement strength in a quasi-1D wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Thomas, K. J.; Smith, L. W.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Jones, G. A. C.; Griffiths, J.; Pepper, M.

    2013-12-04

    Transport measurements in a quasi-one dimensional (1D) quantum wire are reported in the presence of low transverse magnetic field. Differential conductance shows weak quantised plateaus when the 2D electrons are squeezed electrostatically. Application of a small transverse magnetic field (0.2T) enhances the overall degree of quantisation due to the formation of magneto-electric subbands. The results show the role of magnetic field to fine tune the confinement strength in low density wires when interaction gives rise to double row formation.

  8. Discernment of Possible Organic Magnetic Field Effect Mechanisms Using Polymer Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, R.; Subedi, R. C.; Liang, S.; Nguyen, T. D.

    2014-07-01

    We report studies of magnetic field effect (MFE) in polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (PLEC) using the "super-yellow" poly-(phenylene vynilene) (SY-PPV) polymer in vertical and planar device configurations. The purpose is to discern the existing MFE mechanisms in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) where the current and electroluminescence are strongly modulated by a small applied magnetic field. In particular, we investigate the mutual relationship between magneto-conductance (MC) and magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) by studying the role of polaron density dissociated from polaron pairs (PP) on these magnetic responses. In general, the dissociated polaron density is determined by the PP dissociation rate and the PP density. For the planar PLEC, which possesses a small dissociation rate, we observe small and negative MC at all applied voltages regardless of the emission intensity, while MEL becomes positive when electroluminescence quantum efficiency increases. The MC has a much narrower width than the MEL, indicating that the MC and MEL do not share a common origin. However, MC reverses and has the same width as MEL when the device is exposed to a threshold laser power. For the vertical PLEC, characterized by a large dissociation rate, MC and MEL are positive and have the same width. We discuss the results using the existing MFE mechanism in OLEDs. We show that the PP model can explain the positive MEL and MC, while the negative MC can be explained by the bipolaron model. Finally, we present a possibility to complete an all-organic PLEC magnetic sensor by using an inkjet printer.

  9. Effects of the galactic magnetic field upon large scale anisotropies of extragalactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, D.; Mollerach, S.; Roulet, E. E-mail: mollerach@cab.cnea.gov.ar

    2010-11-01

    The large scale pattern in the arrival directions of extragalactic cosmic rays that reach the Earth is different from that of the flux arriving to the halo of the Galaxy as a result of the propagation through the galactic magnetic field. Two different effects are relevant in this process: deflections of trajectories and (de)acceleration by the electric field component due to the galactic rotation. The deflection of the cosmic ray trajectories makes the flux intensity arriving to the halo from some direction to appear reaching the Earth from another direction. This applies to any intrinsic anisotropy in the extragalactic distribution or, even in the absence of intrinsic anisotropies, to the dipolar Compton-Getting anisotropy induced when the observer is moving with respect to the cosmic rays rest frame. For an observer moving with the solar system, cosmic rays traveling through far away regions of the Galaxy also experience an electric force coming from the relative motion (due to the rotation of the Galaxy) of the local system in which the field can be considered as being purely magnetic. This produces small changes in the particles momentum that can originate large scale anisotropies even for an isotropic extragalactic flux.

  10. Combined effect of demagnetizing field and induced magnetic anisotropy on the magnetic properties of manganese-zinc ferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, V.; Kazantseva, N. E.; Moučka, R.; Sapurina, I.; Spivak, Yu. M.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of factors responsible for the high-frequency shift of the complex permeability (μ*) dispersion region in polymer composites of manganese-zinc (MnZn) ferrite, as well as to the increase in their thermomagnetic stability. The magnetic spectra of the ferrite and its composites with polyurethane (MnZn-PU) and polyaniline (MnZn-PANI) are measured in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 3 GHz in a longitudinal magnetization field of up to 700 Ое and in the temperature interval from -20 °С to +150 °С. The approximation of the magnetic spectra by a model, which takes into account the role of domain wall motion and magnetization rotation, allows one to determine the specific contribution of resonance processes associated with domain wall motion and the natural ferromagnetic resonance to the μ*. It is established that, at high frequencies, the μ* of the MnZn ferrite is determined solely by magnetization rotation, which occurs in the region of natural ferromagnetic resonance when the ferrite is in the “single domain” state. In the polymer composites of the MnZn ferrite, the high-frequency permeability is also determined mainly by the magnetization rotation; however, up to high values of magnetizing fields, there is a contribution of domain wall motion, thus the “single domain” state in ferrite is not reached. The frequency and temperature dependence of μ* in polymer composites are governed by demagnetizing field and the induced magnetic anisotropy. The contribution of the induced magnetic anisotropy is crucial for MnZn-PANI. It is attributed to the elastic stresses that arise due to the domain wall pinning by a polyaniline film adsorbed on the surface of the ferrite during in-situ polymerization.

  11. Pairing of Fermions with Unequal Effective Charges in an Artificial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, F. Nur; Oktel, M. Ö.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial magnetic fields (AMFs) created for ultracold systems depend sensitively on the internal structure of the atoms. In a mixture, each component experiences a different AMF depending on its internal state. This enables the study of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing of fermions with unequal effective charges. In this Letter, we investigate the superconducting (SC) transition of a system formed by such pairs as a function of field strength. We consider a homogeneous two-component Fermi gas of unequal effective charges but equal densities with attractive interactions. We find that the phase diagram is altered drastically compared to the usual balanced charge case. First, for some AMFs there is no SC transition and isolated SC phases are formed, reflecting the discrete Landau level (LL) structure. SC phases become reentrant both in AMF and temperature. For extremely high fields where both components are confined to their lowest LLs, the effect of the charge imbalance is suppressed. Charge asymmetry reduces the critical temperature even in the low-field semiclassical regime. We discuss a pair breaking mechanism due to the unequal Lorentz forces acting on the components of the Cooper pairs to identify the underlying physics.

  12. Particle-in-cell simulation for different magnetic mirror effects on the plasma distribution in a cusped field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Chen, Peng-Bo; Zhao, Yin-Jian; Yu, Da-Ren

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic mirror used as an efficient tool to confine plasma has been widely adopted in many different areas especially in recent cusped field thrusters. In order to check the influence of magnetic mirror effect on the plasma distribution in a cusped field thruster, three different radii of the discharge channel (6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm) in a cusped field thruster are investigated by using Particle-in-Cell Plus Monte Carlo (PIC-MCC) simulated method, under the condition of a fixed axial length of the discharge channel and the same operating parameters. It is found that magnetic cusps inside the small radius discharge channel cannot confine electrons very well. Thus, the electric field is hard to establish. With the reduction of the discharge channel’s diameter, more electrons will escape from cusps to the centerline area near the anode due to a lower magnetic mirror ratio. Meanwhile, the leak width of the cusped magnetic field will increase at the cusp. By increasing the magnetic field strength in a small radius model of a cusped field thruster, the negative effect caused by the weak magnetic mirror effect can be partially compensated. Therefore, according to engineering design, the increase of magnetic field strength can contribute to obtaining a good performance, when the radial distance between the magnets and the inner surface of the discharge channel is relatively big. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51006028) and the Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51121004).

  13. Development and evaluation of intermediate frequency magnetic field exposure system for studies of in vitro biological effects.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Atsushi; Hirota, Izuo; Kawahara, Yoshinobu; Omori, Hideki

    2007-10-01

    We have developed an intermediate frequency (IF) magnetic field exposure system for in vitro studies. Since there are no previous studies on exposure to heating-frequency magnetic fields generated from an induction heating (IH) cook top, there is a strong need for such an exposure system and for biological studies of IF magnetic fields. This system mainly consists of a magnetic-field-generating coil housed inside an incubator, inside which cultured cells can be exposed to magnetic field. Two systems were prepared to allow the experiment to be conducted in a double-blind manner. The level of the generated magnetic field was set to 532 microT rms in the exposure space, 23 kHz, 80 times the value in the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines, with a spatial field uniformity better than 3.8%. The waveforms were nearly sinusoidal. It was also confirmed that the parasitic electric field was 157 V/m rms and the induced electric field was 1.9 V/m rms. The temperature was maintained at 36.5 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 2 h. Furthermore, leaked magnetic flux density was 0.7 microT rms or lower at extremely low frequency (ELF) and IF in the stopped system when the other system was being operated, and the environmental magnetic flux density was 0.1 microT rms or lower at the center of the coils. As a result, it was confirmed that this system could be successfully used to evaluate the biological effects of exposure to IF magnetic fields.

  14. Novel effects of weak magnetic fields on post-implantation damage in semiconductors and superconducting ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khait, Yu. L.

    1996-08-01

    Novel experimentally verifiable and theoretically explained effects of weak static magnetic fields (WSMFs) acting during ion implantation of semiconductors and superconducting ceramics (SCC) at 300 K, moderate ion energies (e.g. 200-400 keV) and low dosage (e.g. 10 11-10 13 m -2) on the post-implantation radiation damage (PIRD) and material parameters are discussed. The WSMF of strength of H ≈ 1 kOe reduces, as previously reported, the PIRD in Hg 08Cd 02Te and InSb by factors of 2 and 1.54, respectively, and can increase the PIRD and change material parameters in SCCs. The WSMF effects on the radiation damage is a generic consequence of the kinetic electron-related theory of atomic rate processes in solids which shows that local electron transitions (LETs) in the nanometer vicinity of hopping atoms (defects) influence exponentially defect formation and migration rates. The magnetic field changing the LET number affects exponentially the rates of formation, migration and agglomeration of point defects and thus change the radiation damage.

  15. Effects of self generated magnetic fields and non local heat transport in laser experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurtz, Guy; Nicolai, Philippe; Dattolo, Evelyne; Babonneau, Danielle

    2002-11-01

    Electron conduction is known to be a leading transport process in laser created plasmas. Several effects may cause the heat flux to depart from the classical linear Spitzer-Harm theory. First of all, kinetic effects result in the non locality of the heat flux in case of strong temperature gradients. A two dimensionnal non local model has been developed by the authors and implemented in the FCI2 hydrocode (G.P. Schurtz et al., Ph.Plasmas,7,10,4238, 2000). Conduction may also be affected by magnetic fields. FCI2 simulations including a MHD model and Braginskii conduction indicate that magnetic fields with intensities up to several MG may be generated and strongly inhibit electron heat flow. In this communication, we briefly discuss the strategy we use in FCI2 in order to couple both models and compare code predictions to experimental data over a wide range of experiments in open and close (hohlraum) geometries. As compared to flux limited Spitzer Harm conduction, this new model succeeds as well in restituting global energy balance (e.g. radiation production in hohlraums) but predicts large differences in hydrodynamics, which are actually observed in experiments.

  16. Effect of thermionic cathode heating current self-magnetic field on gaseous plasma generator characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatin, I. V. Akhmadeev, Yu. H.; Koval, N. N.

    2015-10-15

    The performance capabilities of the PINK, a plasma generator with a thermionic cathode mounted in the cavity of a hollow cathode, depending for its operation on a non-self-sustained low-pressure gas discharge have been investigated. It has been shown that when a single-filament tungsten cathode 2 mm in diameter is used and the peak filament current is equal to or higher than 100 A, the self-magnetic field of the filament current significantly affects the discharge current and voltage waveforms. This effect is due to changes in the time and space distributions of the emission current density from the hot cathode. When the electron mean free path is close to the characteristic dimensions of the thermionic cathode, the synthesized plasma density distribution is nonuniform and the cathode is etched nonuniformly. The cathode lifetime in this case is 8–12 h. Using a cathode consisting of several parallel-connected tungsten filaments ∼0.8 mm in diameter moderates the effect of the self-magnetic field of the filament current and nearly doubles the cathode lifetime. The use of this type of cathode together with a discharge igniting electrode reduces the minimum operating pressure in the plasma generator to about one third of that required for the generator operation with a single-filament cathode (to 0.04 Pa)

  17. Effect of thermionic cathode heating current self-magnetic field on gaseous plasma generator characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lopatin, I V; Akhmadeev, Yu H; Koval, N N

    2015-10-01

    The performance capabilities of the PINK, a plasma generator with a thermionic cathode mounted in the cavity of a hollow cathode, depending for its operation on a non-self-sustained low-pressure gas discharge have been investigated. It has been shown that when a single-filament tungsten cathode 2 mm in diameter is used and the peak filament current is equal to or higher than 100 A, the self-magnetic field of the filament current significantly affects the discharge current and voltage waveforms. This effect is due to changes in the time and space distributions of the emission current density from the hot cathode. When the electron mean free path is close to the characteristic dimensions of the thermionic cathode, the synthesized plasma density distribution is nonuniform and the cathode is etched nonuniformly. The cathode lifetime in this case is 8-12 h. Using a cathode consisting of several parallel-connected tungsten filaments ∼0.8 mm in diameter moderates the effect of the self-magnetic field of the filament current and nearly doubles the cathode lifetime. The use of this type of cathode together with a discharge igniting electrode reduces the minimum operating pressure in the plasma generator to about one third of that required for the generator operation with a single-filament cathode (to 0.04 Pa).

  18. Effect of thermionic cathode heating current self-magnetic field on gaseous plasma generator characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatin, I. V.; Akhmadeev, Yu. H.; Koval, N. N.

    2015-10-01

    The performance capabilities of the PINK, a plasma generator with a thermionic cathode mounted in the cavity of a hollow cathode, depending for its operation on a non-self-sustained low-pressure gas discharge have been investigated. It has been shown that when a single-filament tungsten cathode 2 mm in diameter is used and the peak filament current is equal to or higher than 100 A, the self-magnetic field of the filament current significantly affects the discharge current and voltage waveforms. This effect is due to changes in the time and space distributions of the emission current density from the hot cathode. When the electron mean free path is close to the characteristic dimensions of the thermionic cathode, the synthesized plasma density distribution is nonuniform and the cathode is etched nonuniformly. The cathode lifetime in this case is 8-12 h. Using a cathode consisting of several parallel-connected tungsten filaments ˜0.8 mm in diameter moderates the effect of the self-magnetic field of the filament current and nearly doubles the cathode lifetime. The use of this type of cathode together with a discharge igniting electrode reduces the minimum operating pressure in the plasma generator to about one third of that required for the generator operation with a single-filament cathode (to 0.04 Pa).

  19. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  20. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  1. Heat current characteristics in nanojunctions: The effect of external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, D. Melisa; Restrepo, Juliana; Rodriguez, Boris A.; Chitra, R.

    We study the heat current in the simplest hybrid device of a two level system weakly coupled to two heat baths. We consider both metallic and semiconducting baths with external magnetic fields applied on the central spin and the baths. By using a reduced density matrix approach together with a simple Born-Markov approximation we calculate the heat current. Our goal is to investigate the effect of the applied fields in the transient and steady state heat current, the ensuing rectification and the possibility of using our setup as a building block for a quantum thermal diode. 1This work was supported by the Vicerrectoria de Investigacion of the Universidad Antonio Narino, Colombia under Project Number 20141031 and by COLCIENCIAS under Grant Number 111556934912.

  2. Effect of the interplanetary magnetic field y component on the high-latitude nightside convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Beaujardiere, O.; Wickwar, V. B.; Kelly, J. D.; King, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Sondrestrom radar observations reveal that the dawn-dusk (By) component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) strongly influences the nightside polar convection. This effect is quite complex. The convection for one orientation of By is not the mirror image of the other orientation. A positive By (i.e., pointing toward dusk) seems to organize the velocities such that, at all local times, they are predominantly westward within the radar field-of-view (approximately 68 deg-to-82 deg invariant latitude). Between dusk and midnight, on one such occasion, sunward flow is observed within the polar cap. In the midnight and dawn sectors, when By is negative, the plasma velocities often appear shifted toward early hours such that large southward velocities are observed about 3 hours before midnight. These are the only times when the predominant velocity component is southward.

  3. Effect of a magnetic field on the resonant multistep selective photoionization of gadolinium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guyadec, E.; Ravoire, J.; Botter, R.; Lambert, F.; Petit, A.

    1990-04-01

    A multistep photoionization with three resonant polarized photons has been used to separate the odd and even isotopes of gadolinium. Due to their hyperfine structure ( I= {3}/{2}), the 155,157Gd isotopes can be photoionized via a J=2→2→1→0 scheme with three п photons whereas the even isotopes cannot. If a time delay is introduced between the three laser pulses we show that the presence of a low intensity dc magnetic field affects the selectivity. The effect of this weak field on the 156Gd photoionization rate has been calculated independently of the optical pumping and the result is in good agreement with the experiment.

  4. Numerical simulations of Hall-effect plasma accelerators on a magnetic-field-aligned mesh.

    PubMed

    Mikellides, Ioannis G; Katz, Ira

    2012-10-01

    The ionized gas in Hall-effect plasma accelerators spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and exhibits diverse physics some of which remain elusive even after decades of research. Inside the acceleration channel a quasiradial applied magnetic field impedes the current of electrons perpendicular to it in favor of a significant component in the E×B direction. Ions are unmagnetized and, arguably, of wide collisional mean free paths. Collisions between the atomic species are rare. This paper reports on a computational approach that solves numerically the 2D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law with no assumptions regarding the resistance to classical electron transport in the parallel relative to the perpendicular direction. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations on a computational mesh that is aligned with the applied magnetic field. This approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction and encompasses the cathode boundary where the lines of force can become nonisothermal. It also allows for the self-consistent solution of the plasma conservation laws near the anode boundary, and for simulations in accelerators with complex magnetic field topologies. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for the ion drag in the momentum equation due to ion-neutral (charge-exchange) and ion-ion collisions. The density of the atomic species is determined using an algorithm that eliminates the statistical noise associated with discrete-particle methods. Numerical simulations are presented that illustrate the impact of the above-mentioned features on our understanding of the plasma in these accelerators.

  5. Numerical simulations of Hall-effect plasma accelerators on a magnetic-field-aligned mesh.

    PubMed

    Mikellides, Ioannis G; Katz, Ira

    2012-10-01

    The ionized gas in Hall-effect plasma accelerators spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and exhibits diverse physics some of which remain elusive even after decades of research. Inside the acceleration channel a quasiradial applied magnetic field impedes the current of electrons perpendicular to it in favor of a significant component in the E×B direction. Ions are unmagnetized and, arguably, of wide collisional mean free paths. Collisions between the atomic species are rare. This paper reports on a computational approach that solves numerically the 2D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law with no assumptions regarding the resistance to classical electron transport in the parallel relative to the perpendicular direction. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations on a computational mesh that is aligned with the applied magnetic field. This approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction and encompasses the cathode boundary where the lines of force can become nonisothermal. It also allows for the self-consistent solution of the plasma conservation laws near the anode boundary, and for simulations in accelerators with complex magnetic field topologies. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for the ion drag in the momentum equation due to ion-neutral (charge-exchange) and ion-ion collisions. The density of the atomic species is determined using an algorithm that eliminates the statistical noise associated with discrete-particle methods. Numerical simulations are presented that illustrate the impact of the above-mentioned features on our understanding of the plasma in these accelerators. PMID:23214706

  6. Magnetic field perturbartions in closed-field-line systems with zero toroidal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mauel, M; Ryutov, D; Kesner, J

    2003-12-02

    In some plasma confinement systems (e.g., field-reversed configurations and levitated dipoles) the confinement is provided by a closed-field-line poloidal magnetic field. We consider the influence of the magnetic field perturbations on the structure of the magnetic field in such systems and find that the effect of perturbations is quite different from that in the systems with a substantial toroidal field. In particular, even infinitesimal perturbations can, in principle, lead to large radial excursions of the field lines in FRCs and levitated dipoles. Under such circumstances, particle drifts and particle collisions may give rise to significant neoclassical transport. Introduction of a weak regular toroidal magnetic field reduces radial excursions of the field lines and neoclassical transport.

  7. THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R.

    2012-12-10

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  8. The Martian magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the Martian magnetic field measurements and the criticisms made of them. The measurements of the Mars 2, 3, and 5 spacecraft were interpreted by Dolginov et al. (1976, 1978) to be consistent with an intrinsic planetary magnetic moment of 2.5 times 10 to the 22nd power gauss cu cm, basing this result on the apparent size of the obstacle responsible for deflecting the solar wind and an apparent encounter of the spacecraft with the planetary field. It is shown that if the dependence of the Martian magnetic moment on the rotation rate was linear, the estimate of the moment would be far larger than reported by Dolginov et al. An upper limit of 250 km is calculated for the dynamo radius using the similarity law, compared with 500 km obtained by Dolginov et al. It is concluded that the possible strength of a Martian dynamo is below expectations, and it is likely that the Mars dynamo is not presently operative.

  9. Self-Magnetic Field Effects on Electron Emission as the Critical Current is Approached

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, P. F.; Cooperstein, G.; Schumer, J. W.; Swanekamp, S. B.

    2001-09-28

    The self-magnetic field associated with the current in a planar diode is shown to reduce electron emission below the Child-Langmuir current density. As the magnetic field increases, the diode current is limited to the critical current. Here, a ID analysis is carried out to calculate the suppressed current density in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. The problem is shown to be similar to that of the limiting current (i.e., Hull current) calculated in a crossed field gap, in which a constant transverse magnetic field is applied across the gap to insulate the electron flow. In the case considered here, the magnetic field is produced by the diode current itself and this self-magnetic field decreases with distance along the gap. It is shown that the emitted current density is only modestly reduced from the Child-Langmuir current density. The 1-D analysis remains valid until critical current is approached, at which point orbit crossing occurs and a 2-D kinetic analysis is required. The minimum diode length required to reach critical current is also derived.

  10. Effects of static magnetic fields on light scattering in red chromatophore of goldfish scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.

    2010-05-01

    Light scattering in a guanine crystal plate of goldfish scales was observed with and without static magnetic field exposure. Under a microscopic image with dark-field-illumination, the structural color of the scale by guanine plates was observed, and isolated chromatophores showed a twinkling which was the intermittent light scattering of the light from the side. The light scattering was quenched by static magnetic fields of more than 0.26 tesla (T). The quenching was reversibly occurred when the applied external magnetic fields were changed between ambient fields and 5 T. The quenched light scattering did not improve when the magnetic field was decreased from 5 to 0.3 T. It recovered to the original twinkling state about one minute after reaching an ambient geomagnetic field level. The mechanism of the quenched light scattering was speculated to be concerned with the possible magnetic orientation of guanine crystal plates, which were sustained by protein fibers in the red chromatophore. The diamagnetic complex of guanine crystal plates and protein fibers are the candidates for the nanosized light scattering controller based on the magnetic orientation mechanism.

  11. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  12. Effect of 10-T magnetic fields on structural colors in guanine crystals of fish scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Miyashita, Y.; Kudo, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    This work reports the magnetically modulated structural colors in the chromatophore of goldfish scales under static magnetic fields up to 10 T. A fiber optic system for spectroscopy measurements and a CCD microscope were set in the horizontal bore of a 10-T superconducting magnet. One leaf of a fish scale was set in a glass chamber, exposed to visible light from its side direction, and then static magnetic fields were applied perpendicular to the surface of the scale. In addition, an optical fiber for spectroscopy was directed perpendicular to the surface. During the magnetic field sweep-up, the aggregate of guanine thin plates partially showed a rapid light quenching under 0.26 to 2 T; however, most of the thin plates continued to scatter the side-light and showed changing iridescence, which was displayed individually by each guanine plate. For example, an aggregate in the chromatophore exhibited a dynamic change in structural color from white-green to dark blue when the magnetic fields changed from 2 to 10 T. The spectrum profile, which was obtained by the fiber optic system, confirmed the image color changes under magnetic field exposure. Also, a linearly polarized light transmission was measured on fish scales by utilizing an optical polarizer and analyzer. The transmitted polarized light intensities increased in the range of 500-550 nm compared to the intensity at 700 nm during the magnetic field sweep-up. These results indicate that the multi-lamella structure of nano-mirror plates in guanine hexagonal micro-plates exhibit diamagnetically modulated structure changes, and its light interference is affected by strong magnetic fields.

  13. Cryptochromes and Hormone Signal Transduction under Near-Zero Magnetic Fields: New Clues to Magnetic Field Effects in a Rice Planthopper

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Gui-Jun; Wang, Wen-Jing; Xu, Jing-Jing; Yang, Quan-Feng; Dai, Ming-Jiang; Zhang, Feng-Jiao; Sword, Gregory A.; Pan, Wei-Dong; Chen, Fa-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although there are considerable reports of magnetic field effects (MFE) on organisms, very little is known so far about the MFE-related signal transduction pathways. Here we establish a manipulative near-zero magnetic field (NZMF) to investigate the potential signal transduction pathways involved in MFE. We show that exposure of migratory white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera, to the NZMF results in delayed egg and nymphal development, increased frequency of brachypterous females, and reduced longevity of macropterous female adults. To understand the changes in gene expression underlying these phenotypes, we examined the temporal patterns of gene expression of (i) CRY1 and CRY2 as putative magnetosensors, (ii) JHAMT, FAMeT and JHEH in the juvenile hormone pathway, (iii) CYP307A1 in the ecdysone pathway, and (iv) reproduction-related Vitellogenin (Vg). The significantly altered gene expression of CRY1 and CRY2 under the NZMF suggest their developmental stage-specific patterns and potential upstream location in magnetic response. Gene expression patterns of JHAMT, JHEH and CYP307A1 were consistent with the NZMF-triggered delay in nymphal development, higher proportion of brachypterous female adults, and the shortened longevity of macropterous female adults, which show feasible links between hormone