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Sample records for effective mass approximation

  1. Beyond the effective mass approximation: A predictive theory of the nonlinear optical response of conduction electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shukai; Heffernan, Kate H.; Talbayev, Diyar

    2017-03-01

    We present an experimental and computational study of the nonlinear optical response of conduction electrons to intense terahertz (THz) electric field. Our observations (saturable absorption and an amplitude-dependent group refractive index) can be understood on the qualitative level as the breakdown of the effective mass approximation. However, a predictive theoretical description of the nonlinear THz propagation has been missing. We propose a model based on the semiclassical electron dynamics, a realistic band structure, and the free electron Drude parameters to accurately calculate the experimental observables in InSb. Our results open a path to modeling of the conduction-electron optical nonlinearity that governs the THz propagation in semiconductors.

  2. Band Structures of Periodic Carbon Nanotube Junctions and Their Symmetries Analyzed by the Effective Mass Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Ryo; Tsukada, Masaru

    1999-03-01

    The band structures of the periodic nanotube junctions are investigated by the effective mass theory and the tight binding model. The periodic junctions are constructed by introducing pairs of a pentagonal defect and a heptagonal defect periodically in the carbon nanotube. We treat the periodic junctions composed by two kinds of metallic nanotubes with almost same radii, the ratio of which is between 0.7 and 1. The discussed energy region is near the undoped Fermi level. The energy bands are expressed with closed analytical forms by the effective mass theory. They are similar to the dispersion relation of Kronig-Penny model and coincide well with the numerical results by the tight binding model. The width of the gap and the band are in inverse proportion to the length of the unit cell. The degeneracy and repulsion between the two bands are determined only from symmetries.

  3. Two-loop QCD corrections to the MSSM Higgs masses beyond the effective-potential approximation.

    PubMed

    Degrassi, G; Di Vita, S; Slavich, P

    We compute the two-loop QCD corrections to the neutral Higgs-boson masses in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, including the effect of non-vanishing external momenta in the self-energies. We obtain corrections of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], i.e., all two-loop corrections that involve the strong gauge coupling when the only non-vanishing Yukawa coupling is the top one. We adopt either the [Formula: see text] renormalization scheme or a mixed on-shell (OS)-[Formula: see text] scheme where the top/stop parameters are renormalized on-shell. We compare our results with those of earlier calculations, pointing out an inconsistency in a recent result obtained in the mixed OS-[Formula: see text] scheme. The numerical impact of the new corrections on the prediction for the lightest-scalar mass is moderate, but already comparable to the accuracy of the Higgs-mass measurement at the Large Hadron Collider.

  4. The effect of mass loss on the dynamical evolution of a stellar system - Analytic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, J. G.

    1980-02-01

    If half or more of the mass of a virialized system is lost in less than one dynamical crossing time, the system dissociates. If the mass loss occurs in a collapsing protosystem with uniform density, no angular momentum, and relatively little radiation of energy, the minimum fractional mass loss required for dissociation is reduced to ΔM/M0 = Rc/(2R0). Here Rc is the radius of the system when the mass loss occurs and R0 is the radius it would have attained after virialization if no mass loss had occurred. A situation of this type is expected in a protocluster that forms from a collapsing interstellar cloud. The stars form when the protocluster is near its point of maximum compression. Any newly formed OB stars produce an H II region whose expansion dissipates the residual gas in the protocluster before the system reaches dynamical equilibrium. The angular momentum of the protosystem and any radiative losses from it prior to star formation will tend to stabilize it against mass loss by limiting the compression factor 2R0/Rc. The angular momentum places a lower limit on the radius Rc, and the radiative losses reduce the final equilibrium radius R0. However, observed infantile clusters such as the Trapezium are sufficiently compressed at the present time that a loss of as little as 10% of their mass is sufficient to dissociate them. This may explain why most young stars are not located in gravitationally bound clusters. If the protocluster gas contains an appreciable magnetic field, the compression of this field in the collapsing cloud drains off some of the gravitational energy that otherwise would go into the kinetic energy of collapse. This increases the minimum mass loss required to dissociate the system, but it is still very small for most systems. The mean terminal expansion velocity of an association produced by the breakup of a protocluster is usually comparable to the velocity dispersion in an open cluster and cannot be larger than the expansion velocity of

  5. Effective lepton flavor violating H ℓiℓj vertex from right-handed neutrinos within the mass insertion approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arganda, E.; Herrero, M. J.; Marcano, X.; Morales, R.; Szynkman, A.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we present a new computation of the lepton flavor violating Higgs boson decays that are generated radiatively to one-loop from heavy right-handed neutrinos. We work within the context of the inverse seesaw model with three νR and three extra singlets X , but the results could be generalized to other low scale seesaw models. The novelty of our computation is that it uses a completely different method by means of the mass insertion approximation which works with the electroweak interaction states instead of the usual 9 physical neutrino mass eigenstates of the inverse seesaw model. This method also allows us to write the analytical results explicitly in terms of the most relevant model parameters, that are the neutrino Yukawa coupling matrix Yν and the right-handed mass matrix MR, which is very convenient for a phenomenological analysis. This Yν matrix, being generically nondiagonal in flavor space, is the only one responsible for the induced charged lepton flavor violating processes of our interest. We perform the calculation of the decay amplitude up to order O (Yν2+Yν4). We also study numerically the goodness of the mass insertion approximation results. In the last part we present the computation of the relevant one-loop effective vertex H ℓiℓj for the lepton flavor violating Higgs decay which is derived from a large MR mass expansion of the form factors. We believe that our simple formula found for this effective vertex can be of interest for other researchers who wish to estimate the H →ℓiℓ¯j rates in a fast way in terms of their own preferred input values for the relevant model parameters Yν and MR.

  6. Study of Odor Approximation by Using Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Masashi; Nihei, Yasunori; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2011-09-01

    Since a set of odor components to cover wide range of smells has not been revealed yet, we studied the selection of odor components using essential-oil mass spectrum database. Basis vectors were extracted using non-negative matrix factorization method1 and then non-negative least squares method was used to determine the recipe. The odor approximations of three typical essential oils were confirmed by the sensory test. It was found that the mass spectrum data were correlated with the sensory test result. Moreover, this correlation was remarkable in the high m/z region.

  7. Dynamical mass generation in QED 3 beyond the instantaneous approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hai-Xiao; Li, Jian-Feng; Wei, Wei; Yin, Pei-Lin; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate dynamical mass generation in (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics at finite temperature. Many studies are carried out within the instantaneous-exchange approximation, which ignores all but the zero-frequency component of the boson propagator and fermion self-energy function. We extend these studies by taking the retardation effects into consideration. In this paper, we get the explicit frequency n and momentum p dependence of the fermion self-energy function and identify the critical temperature for different fermion flavors in the chiral limit. Also, the phase diagram for spontaneous symmetry breaking in the theory is presented in T c-N f space. The results show that the chiral condensate is just one-tenth of the scale of previous results, and the chiral symmetry is restored at a smaller critical temperature. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475085, 11535005, 11690030), Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province (BK20130387) and Jiangsu Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds (1501035B)

  8. Projected BCS-Tamm-Dancoff approximation with blocking effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, H.; Krmpotić, F.

    1982-05-01

    The blocking effect is introduced through a canonical transformation in the projected BCS-Tamm-Dancoff approximation. It is suggested that the blocking effect may play an important role in the description of the low-lying states in odd-mass nuclei. Present address: Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata, Argentina. Member of Carrera de Investigador Científico, CONICET, Argentina. Sponsored by Financiadora de Estudos e Projetos (FINEP), Brasil.

  9. Analytic approximate radiation effects due to Bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi I.

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide analytic approximate expressions that can provide quick estimates of the various effects of the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced relatively low energy electrons, such as the dumping of the beam into the beam stop at the ERL or field emission in superconducting cavities. The purpose of this work is not to replace a dependable calculation or, better yet, a measurement under real conditions, but to provide a quick but approximate estimate for guidance purposes only. These effects include dose to personnel, ozone generation in the air volume exposed to the radiation, hydrogen generation in the beam dump water cooling system and radiation damage to near-by magnets. These expressions can be used for other purposes, but one should note that the electron beam energy range is limited. In these calculations the good range is from about 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV. To help in the application of this note, calculations are presented as a worked out example for the beam dump of the R&D Energy Recovery Linac.

  10. On the Mass of Atoms in Molecules: Beyond the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, Arne; Agostini, Federica; Sebastiani, Daniel; Gross, E. K. U.; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2017-07-01

    Describing the dynamics of nuclei in molecules requires a potential energy surface, which is traditionally provided by the Born-Oppenheimer or adiabatic approximation. However, we also need to assign masses to the nuclei. There, the Born-Oppenheimer picture does not account for the inertia of the electrons, and only bare nuclear masses are considered. Nowadays, experimental accuracy challenges the theoretical predictions of rotational and vibrational spectra and requires the participation of electrons in the internal motion of the molecule. More than 80 years after the original work of Born and Oppenheimer, this issue has still not been solved, in general. Here, we present a theoretical and numerical framework to address this problem in a general and rigorous way. Starting from the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, we include electronic effects beyond the Born-Oppenheimer regime in a perturbative way via position-dependent corrections to the bare nuclear masses. This maintains an adiabaticlike point of view: The nuclear degrees of freedom feel the presence of the electrons via a single potential energy surface, whereas the inertia of electrons is accounted for and the total mass of the system is recovered. This constitutes a general framework for describing the mass acquired by slow degrees of freedom due to the inertia of light, bounded particles; thus, it is applicable not only in electron-nuclear systems but in light-heavy nuclei or ions as well. We illustrate this idea with a model of proton transfer, where the light particle is the proton and the heavy particles are the oxygen atoms to which the proton is bounded. Inclusion of the light-particle inertia allows us to gain orders of magnitude in accuracy. The electron-nuclear perspective is adopted, instead, to calculate position-dependent mass corrections using density functional theory for a few polyatomic molecules at their equilibrium geometry. These data can serve as input for the

  11. Mass distribution of fission fragments within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomorski, K.; Ivanyuk, F. A.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.

    2017-03-01

    The fission fragments mass-yield of 236 U is obtained by an approximate solution of the eigenvalue problem of the collective Hamiltonian that describes the dynamics of the fission process whose degrees of freedom are: the fission (elongation), the neck and mass-asymmetry modes. The macroscopic-microscopic method is used to evaluate the potential energy surface. The macroscopic energy part is calculated using the liquid drop model and the microscopic corrections are obtained using a Woods-Saxon single-particle levels. The four-dimensional modified Cassini ovals shape parametrization is used to describe the shape of the fissioning nucleus. The mass tensor is taken within a cranking-type approximation. The final fragment mass distribution is obtained by weighting the adiabatic density distribution in the collective space with the neck-dependent fission probability. The neck degree of freedom is found to play a significant role in determining the final fragment mass distribution.

  12. Simulation of mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apple: a power law approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi Souraki, B.; Tondro, H.; Ghavami, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, unsteady one-dimensional mass transfer during osmotic dehydration of apple was modeled using an approximate mathematical model. The mathematical model has been developed based on a power law profile approximation for moisture and solute concentrations in the spatial direction. The proposed model was validated by the experimental water loss and solute gain data, obtained from osmotic dehydration of infinite slab and cylindrical shape samples of apple in sucrose solutions (30, 40 and 50 % w/w), at different temperatures (30, 40 and 50 °C). The proposed model's predictions were also compared with the exact analytical and also a parabolic approximation model's predictions. The values of mean relative errors respect to the experimental data were estimated between 4.5 and 8.1 %, 6.5 and 10.2 %, and 15.0 and 19.1 %, for exact analytical, power law and parabolic approximation methods, respectively. Although the parabolic approximation leads to simpler relations, the power law approximation method results in higher accuracy of average concentrations over the whole domain of dehydration time. Considering both simplicity and precision of the mathematical models, the power law model for short dehydration times and the simplified exact analytical model for long dehydration times could be used for explanation of the variations of the average water loss and solute gain in the whole domain of dimensionless times.

  13. Perturbation theory of N point-mass gravitational lens systems without symmetry: small mass-ratio approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, H.

    2009-04-01

    This paper makes the first systematic attempt to determine using perturbation theory the positions of images by gravitational lensing due to arbitrary number of coplanar masses without any symmetry on a plane, as a function of lens and source parameters. We present a method of Taylor-series expansion to solve the lens equation under a small mass-ratio approximation. First, we investigate perturbative structures of a single-complex-variable polynomial, which has been commonly used. Perturbative roots are found. Some roots represent positions of lensed images, while the others are unphysical because they do not satisfy the lens equation. This is consistent with a fact that the degree of the polynomial, namely the number of zeros, exceeds the maximum number of lensed images if N = 3 (or more). The theorem never tells which roots are physical (or unphysical). In this paper, unphysical ones are identified. Secondly, to avoid unphysical roots, we re-examine the lens equation. The advantage of our method is that it allows a systematic iterative analysis. We determine image positions for binary lens systems up to the third order in mass ratios and for arbitrary N point masses up to the second order. This clarifies the dependence on parameters. Thirdly, the number of the images that admit a small mass-ratio limit is less than the maximum number. It is suggested that positions of extra images could not be expressed as Maclaurin series in mass ratios. Magnifications are finally discussed.

  14. Missing mass approximations for the partition function of stimulus driven Ising models.

    PubMed

    Haslinger, Robert; Ba, Demba; Galuske, Ralf; Williams, Ziv; Pipa, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Ising models are routinely used to quantify the second order, functional structure of neural populations. With some recent exceptions, they generally do not include the influence of time varying stimulus drive. Yet if the dynamics of network function are to be understood, time varying stimuli must be taken into account. Inclusion of stimulus drive carries a heavy computational burden because the partition function becomes stimulus dependent and must be separately calculated for all unique stimuli observed. This potentially increases computation time by the length of the data set. Here we present an extremely fast, yet simply implemented, method for approximating the stimulus dependent partition function in minutes or seconds. Noting that the most probable spike patterns (which are few) occur in the training data, we sum partition function terms corresponding to those patterns explicitly. We then approximate the sum over the remaining patterns (which are improbable, but many) by casting it in terms of the stimulus modulated missing mass (total stimulus dependent probability of all patterns not observed in the training data). We use a product of conditioned logistic regression models to approximate the stimulus modulated missing mass. This method has complexity of roughly O(LNNpat) where is L the data length, N the number of neurons and N pat the number of unique patterns in the data, contrasting with the O(L2 (N) ) complexity of alternate methods. Using multiple unit recordings from rat hippocampus, macaque DLPFC and cat Area 18 we demonstrate our method requires orders of magnitude less computation time than Monte Carlo methods and can approximate the stimulus driven partition function more accurately than either Monte Carlo methods or deterministic approximations. This advance allows stimuli to be easily included in Ising models making them suitable for studying population based stimulus encoding.

  15. Missing mass approximations for the partition function of stimulus driven Ising models

    PubMed Central

    Haslinger, Robert; Ba, Demba; Galuske, Ralf; Williams, Ziv; Pipa, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Ising models are routinely used to quantify the second order, functional structure of neural populations. With some recent exceptions, they generally do not include the influence of time varying stimulus drive. Yet if the dynamics of network function are to be understood, time varying stimuli must be taken into account. Inclusion of stimulus drive carries a heavy computational burden because the partition function becomes stimulus dependent and must be separately calculated for all unique stimuli observed. This potentially increases computation time by the length of the data set. Here we present an extremely fast, yet simply implemented, method for approximating the stimulus dependent partition function in minutes or seconds. Noting that the most probable spike patterns (which are few) occur in the training data, we sum partition function terms corresponding to those patterns explicitly. We then approximate the sum over the remaining patterns (which are improbable, but many) by casting it in terms of the stimulus modulated missing mass (total stimulus dependent probability of all patterns not observed in the training data). We use a product of conditioned logistic regression models to approximate the stimulus modulated missing mass. This method has complexity of roughly O(LNNpat) where is L the data length, N the number of neurons and Npat the number of unique patterns in the data, contrasting with the O(L2N) complexity of alternate methods. Using multiple unit recordings from rat hippocampus, macaque DLPFC and cat Area 18 we demonstrate our method requires orders of magnitude less computation time than Monte Carlo methods and can approximate the stimulus driven partition function more accurately than either Monte Carlo methods or deterministic approximations. This advance allows stimuli to be easily included in Ising models making them suitable for studying population based stimulus encoding. PMID:23898262

  16. Born-Oppenheimer approximation for mass scaling of cold-collision properties

    SciTech Connect

    Falke, Stephan; Tiemann, Eberhard; Lisdat, Christian

    2007-07-15

    Asymptotic levels of the A {sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +} state of the two isotopomers {sup 39}K{sub 2} and {sup 39}K{sup 41}K up to the dissociation limit are investigated with a Doppler-free high resolution laser-spectroscopic experiment in a molecular beam. The observed level structure can be reproduced correctly only if a mass dependent correction term is introduced for the interaction potential. The applied relative correction in the depth of the potential is 10{sup -6}, which is in the order of magnitude expected for corrections of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. A similar change in ground state potentials might lead to significant changes of mass-scaled properties describing cold collisions like the s-wave scattering length.

  17. Inertia and Compressibility Effects in the Boussinesq Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirgaonkar, Anup; Lele, Sanjiva

    2006-11-01

    The Boussinesq approximation is typically applied to flows where buoyancy is the dominant driving force. To extend its applicability to flows with substantial inertial perturbations, we examine the flow equations using perturbation analysis about the hydrostatic state. The physical effects corresponding to stratification, compressibility, small initial entropy perturbations, and inertia are characterized in terms of nondimensional parameters derived from the analysis. A simple and computationally efficient extension to the traditional Boussinesq approximation is proposed to include the interaction of buoyancy and inertia. The role of fluid compressibility in stratified low Mach number flows is highlighted and distinguished from the flow compressibility which is caused by motion. A nondimensional parameter is derived to demarcate compressible and nearly-incompressible hydrostatic states. The significance of the extended Boussinesq approximation is illustrated with numerical solutions to model problems. Application to the problem of aircraft vortex wake-exhaust jet interaction is discussed.

  18. Approximations for column effect in airplane wing spars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P; Short, Mac

    1927-01-01

    The significance attaching to "column effect" in airplane wing spars has been increasingly realized with the passage of time, but exact computations of the corrections to bending moment curves resulting from the existence of end loads are frequently omitted because of the additional labor involved in an analysis by rigorously correct methods. The present report represents an attempt to provide for approximate column effect corrections that can be graphically or otherwise expressed so as to be applied with a minimum of labor. Curves are plotted giving approximate values of the correction factors for single and two bay trusses of varying proportions and with various relationships between axial and lateral loads. It is further shown from an analysis of those curves that rough but useful approximations can be obtained from Perry's formula for corrected bending moment, with the assumed distance between points of inflection arbitrarily modified in accordance with rules given in the report. The discussion of general rules of variation of bending stress with axial load is accompanied by a study of the best distribution of the points of support along a spar for various conditions of loading.

  19. Damping effects in doped graphene: The relaxation-time approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupčić, I.

    2014-11-01

    The dynamical conductivity of interacting multiband electronic systems derived by Kupčić et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 90, 145602 (2013), 10.1088/0953-8984/25/14/145602] is shown to be consistent with the general form of the Ward identity. Using the semiphenomenological form of this conductivity formula, we have demonstrated that the relaxation-time approximation can be used to describe the damping effects in weakly interacting multiband systems only if local charge conservation in the system and gauge invariance of the response theory are properly treated. Such a gauge-invariant response theory is illustrated on the common tight-binding model for conduction electrons in doped graphene. The model predicts two distinctly resolved maxima in the energy-loss-function spectra. The first one corresponds to the intraband plasmons (usually called the Dirac plasmons). On the other hand, the second maximum (π plasmon structure) is simply a consequence of the Van Hove singularity in the single-electron density of states. The dc resistivity and the real part of the dynamical conductivity are found to be well described by the relaxation-time approximation, but only in the parametric space in which the damping is dominated by the direct scattering processes. The ballistic transport and the damping of Dirac plasmons are thus the problems that require abandoning the relaxation-time approximation.

  20. Approximate Solution to the Angular Speeds of a Nearly-Symmetric Mass-Varying Cylindrical Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanjangud, Angadh; Eke, Fidelis

    2017-06-01

    This paper examines the rotational motion of a nearly axisymmetric rocket type system with uniform burn of its propellant. The asymmetry comes from a slight difference in the transverse principal moments of inertia of the system, which then results in a set of nonlinear equations of motion even when no external torque is applied to the system. It is often difficult, or even impossible, to generate analytic solutions for such equations; closed form solutions are even more difficult to obtain. In this paper, a perturbation-based approach is employed to linearize the equations of motion and generate analytic solutions. The solutions for the variables of transverse motion are analytic and a closed-form solution to the spin rate is suggested. The solutions are presented in a compact form that permits rapid computation. The approximate solutions are then applied to the torque-free motion of a typical solid rocket system and the results are found to agree with those obtained from the numerical solution of the full non-linear equations of motion of the mass varying system.

  1. Approximate Solution to the Angular Speeds of a Nearly-Symmetric Mass-Varying Cylindrical Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanjangud, Angadh; Eke, Fidelis

    2016-11-01

    This paper examines the rotational motion of a nearly axisymmetric rocket type system with uniform burn of its propellant. The asymmetry comes from a slight difference in the transverse principal moments of inertia of the system, which then results in a set of nonlinear equations of motion even when no external torque is applied to the system. It is often difficult, or even impossible, to generate analytic solutions for such equations; closed form solutions are even more difficult to obtain. In this paper, a perturbation-based approach is employed to linearize the equations of motion and generate analytic solutions. The solutions for the variables of transverse motion are analytic and a closed-form solution to the spin rate is suggested. The solutions are presented in a compact form that permits rapid computation. The approximate solutions are then applied to the torque-free motion of a typical solid rocket system and the results are found to agree with those obtained from the numerical solution of the full non-linear equations of motion of the mass varying system.

  2. Nuclear energy surfaces at high-spin in the A{approximately}180 mass region

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.; Egido, J.L.; Robledo, L.M.

    1995-08-01

    We are studying nuclear energy surfaces at high spin, with an emphasis on very deformed shapes using two complementary methods: (1) the Strutinsky method for making surveys of mass regions and (2) Hartree-Fock calculations using a Gogny interaction to study specific nuclei that appear to be particularly interesting from the Strutinsky method calculations. The great advantage of the Strutinsky method is that one can study the energy surfaces of many nuclides ({approximately}300) with a single set of calculations. Although the Hartree-Fock calculations are quite time-consuming relative to the Strutinsky calculations, they determine the shape at a minimum without being limited to a few deformation modes. We completed a study of {sup 182}Os using both approaches. In our cranked Strutinsky calculations, which incorporate a necking mode deformation in addition to quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations, we found three well-separated, deep, strongly deformed minima. The first is characterized by nuclear shapes with axis ratios of 1.5:1; the second by axis ratios of 2.2:1 and the third by axis ratios of 2.9:1. We also studied this nuclide with the density-dependent Gogny interaction at I = 60 using the Hartree-Fock method and found minima characterized by shapes with axis ratios of 1.5:1 and 2.2:1. A comparison of the shapes at these minima, generated in the two calculations, shows that the necking mode of deformation is extremely useful for generating nuclear shapes at large deformation that minimize the energy. The Hartree-Fock calculations are being extended to larger deformations in order to further explore the energy surface in the region of the 2.9:1 minimum.

  3. Negative effective mass in acoustic metamaterial with nonlinear mass-in-mass subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cveticanin, L.; Zukovic, M.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper the dynamics of the nonlinear mass-in-mass system as the basic subsystem of the acoustic metamaterial is investigated. The excitation of the system is in the form of the Jacobi elliptic function. The corresponding model to this forcing is the mass-in-mass system with cubic nonlinearity of the Duffing type. Mathematical model of the motion is a system of two coupled strong nonlinear and nonhomogeneous second order differential equations. Particular solution to the system is obtained. The analytical solution of the problem is based on the simple and double integral of the cosine Jacobi function. In the paper the integrals are given in the form of series of trigonometric functions. These results are new one. After some modification the simplified solution in the first approximation is obtained. The result is convenient for discussion. Conditions for elimination of the motion of the mass 1 by connection of the nonlinear dynamic absorber (mass - spring system) are defined. In the consideration the effective mass ratio is introduced in the nonlinear mass-in-mass system. Negative effective mass ratio gives the absorption of vibrations with certain frequencies. The advantage of the nonlinear subunit in comparison to the linear one is that the frequency gap is significantly wider. Nevertheless, it has to be mentioned that the amplitude of vibration differs from zero for a small value. In the paper the analytical results are compared with numerical one and are in agreement.

  4. Effective medium approximation of anisotropic materials with radiative correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlček, J.; Otipka, P.; Lesňák, M.; Vávra, I.

    2015-05-01

    A measurable magneto-optical activity of nanoparticles made out of noble metals is observed when the localized plasmon waves are excited in the presence of external magnetic field. We confirmed these observations for quite general Au nanostructure on SiO2/Si substrate theoretically and by experimental way. The heterogeneous layer is formed as a field of cylindrical or spheroidal nanodots of various size having the same height and parallel symmetry axis. These properties enable to apply the Bruggeman's model of effective medium approximation, for which the size of dots (height, diameter) and fill-factor of nanodots were specified using the transmission electron microscopy image processing. Actually, this model is extended about the interaction of magnetic dipole moments simulated using discrete dipole approximation via geometrical averaging. Derived computational algorithm leads to better agreement with experimental data in the form of Kerr angles in polar configuration at visible spectral region. Obtained out-puts also illustrate the fact that extinction peak of plasmon excitation is located at the resonance wavelength of permittivity.

  5. Local approximations for effective scalar field equations of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berera, Arjun; Moss, Ian G.; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2007-10-01

    Fluctuation and dissipation dynamics is examined at all temperature ranges for the general case of a background time evolving scalar field coupled to heavy intermediate quantum fields which in turn are coupled to light quantum fields. The evolution of the background field induces particle production from the light fields through the action of the intermediate catalyzing heavy fields. Such field configurations are generically present in most particle physics models, including grand unified and supersymmetry theories, with application of this mechanism possible in inflation, heavy ion collision, and phase transition dynamics. The effective evolution equation for the background field is obtained and a fluctuation-dissipation theorem is derived for this system. The effective evolution, in general, is nonlocal in time. Appropriate conditions are found for when these time nonlocal effects can be approximated by local terms. Here careful distinction is made between a local expansion and the special case of a derivative expansion to all orders, which requires analytic behavior of the evolution equation in Fourier space.

  6. Stiff Spring Approximation Revisited: Inertial Effects in Nonequilibrium Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Nategholeslam, Mostafa; Gray, C G; Tomberli, Bruno

    2017-01-19

    Use of harmonic guiding potentials is the most commonly adopted method for implementing steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations, performed to obtain potentials of mean force (PMFs) using Jarzynski's equality and other nonequilibrium work (NEW) theorems. The stiff spring approximation (SSA) of Schulten and co-workers enables calculation of the PMF by using the work performed along many SMD trajectories in NEW theorems. We discuss and demonstrate how a high spring constant, k, required for the validity of the SSA can violate another requirement of SSA, the validity of Brownian dynamics in the system under study. These result in skewed work distributions with their width increasing with k. The skew and broadening of work distributions result in biased estimation (through invoking NEW theorems) of the PMF. Remarkably, the skewness and the broadening of work distributions are independent of the average drift velocity and physical asymmetries and can only be attributed to using too-stiff springs. We discuss the proper upper limit for k such that the inertial effects are minimized. In the presence of inertial effects, using the peak value (rather than the statistical mean) of the work distributions vastly reduces the bias in the calculated PMFs and improves the accuracy.

  7. Are there rapid feedback effects on Approximate Number System acuity?

    PubMed

    Lindskog, Marcus; Winman, Anders; Juslin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Humans are believed to be equipped with an Approximate Number System (ANS) that supports non-symbolic representations of numerical magnitude. Correlations between individual measures of the precision of the ANS and mathematical ability have raised the question of whether the precision can be improved by feedback training. A study (DeWind and Brannon, 2012) reported improvement in discrimination precision occurring within 600-700 trials of feedback, suggesting ANS malleability with rapidly improving acuity in response to feedback. We tried to replicate the rapid improvement in a control group design, while controlling for the use of perceptual cues. The results indicate no learning effects, but a minor constant advantage for the feedback group. The measures of motivation suggest that feedback has a positive effect on motivation and that the difference in discrimination is due to the greater motivation of participants with feedback. These results suggest that at least for adults the number sense may not respond to feedback in the short-term.

  8. Analytical approximations for effective relative permeability in the capillary limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Avinoam; Li, Boxiao; Durlofsky, Louis J.

    2016-10-01

    We present an analytical method for calculating two-phase effective relative permeability, krjeff, where j designates phase (here CO2 and water), under steady state and capillary-limit assumptions. These effective relative permeabilities may be applied in experimental settings and for upscaling in the context of numerical flow simulations, e.g., for CO2 storage. An exact solution for effective absolute permeability, keff, in two-dimensional log-normally distributed isotropic permeability (k) fields is the geometric mean. We show that this does not hold for krjeff since log normality is not maintained in the capillary-limit phase permeability field (Kj=k·krj) when capillary pressure, and thus the saturation field, is varied. Nevertheless, the geometric mean is still shown to be suitable for approximating krjeff when the variance of ln⁡k is low. For high-variance cases, we apply a correction to the geometric average gas effective relative permeability using a Winsorized mean, which neglects large and small Kj values symmetrically. The analytical method is extended to anisotropically correlated log-normal permeability fields using power law averaging. In these cases, the Winsorized mean treatment is applied to the gas curves for cases described by negative power law exponents (flow across incomplete layers). The accuracy of our analytical expressions for krjeff is demonstrated through extensive numerical tests, using low-variance and high-variance permeability realizations with a range of correlation structures. We also present integral expressions for geometric-mean and power law average krjeff for the systems considered, which enable derivation of closed-form series solutions for krjeff without generating permeability realizations.

  9. Quantitative microwave impedance microscopy with effective medium approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. S.; Pérez, C. R.; Santiago-Avilés, J. J.

    2017-02-01

    Microwave impedance microscopy (MIM) is a scanning probe technique to measure local changes in tip-sample admittance. The imaginary part of the reported change is calibrated with finite element simulations and physical measurements of a standard capacitive sample, and thereafter the output Δ Y is given a reference value in siemens. Simulations also provide a means of extracting sample conductivity and permittivity from admittance, a procedure verified by comparing the estimated permittivity of polytetrafluoroethlyene (PTFE) to the accepted value. Simulations published by others have investigated the tip-sample system for permittivity at a given conductivity, or conversely conductivity and a given permittivity; here we supply the full behavior for multiple values of both parameters. Finally, the well-known effective medium approximation of Bruggeman is considered as a means of estimating the volume fractions of the constituents in inhomogeneous two-phase systems. Specifically, we consider the estimation of porosity in carbide-derived carbon, a nanostructured material known for its use in energy storage devices.

  10. Disorder and size effects in the envelope-function approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargam, T. G.; Capaz, R. B.; Koiller, Belita

    1997-10-01

    We investigate the validity and limitations of the envelope-function approximation (EFA), widely accepted for the description of the electronic states of semiconductor heterostructures. We consider narrow quantum wells of GaAs confined by AlxGa1-xAs barriers. Calculations performed within the tight-binding approximation using ensembles of supercells are compared to the EFA results. Results for miniband widths in superlattices obtained in different approximations are also discussed. The main source of discrepancy for narrow wells is the treatment of alloy disorder within the virtual crystal approximation. We also test the two key assumptions of the EFA: (a) that the electronic wave functions have Bloch symmetry with well-defined k--> in the alloy region; (b) that the periodic parts of the Bloch functions are the same throughout the heterostructure. We show that inaccuracies are mainly due to the former assumption.

  11. Accuracy of the Michaelis-Menten approximation when analysing effects of molecular noise.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Michael J; Petzold, Linda; Hellander, Andreas

    2015-05-06

    Quantitative biology relies on the construction of accurate mathematical models, yet the effectiveness of these models is often predicated on making simplifying approximations that allow for direct comparisons with available experimental data. The Michaelis-Menten (MM) approximation is widely used in both deterministic and discrete stochastic models of intracellular reaction networks, owing to the ubiquity of enzymatic activity in cellular processes and the clear biochemical interpretation of its parameters. However, it is not well understood how the approximation applies to the discrete stochastic case or how it extends to spatially inhomogeneous systems. We study the behaviour of the discrete stochastic MM approximation as a function of system size and show that significant errors can occur for small volumes, in comparison with a corresponding mass-action system. We then explore some consequences of these results for quantitative modelling. One consequence is that fluctuation-induced sensitivity, or stochastic focusing, can become highly exaggerated in models that make use of MM kinetics even if the approximations are excellent in a deterministic model. Another consequence is that spatial stochastic simulations based on the reaction-diffusion master equation can become highly inaccurate if the model contains MM terms.

  12. Accuracy of the Michaelis–Menten approximation when analysing effects of molecular noise

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Michael J.; Petzold, Linda; Hellander, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative biology relies on the construction of accurate mathematical models, yet the effectiveness of these models is often predicated on making simplifying approximations that allow for direct comparisons with available experimental data. The Michaelis–Menten (MM) approximation is widely used in both deterministic and discrete stochastic models of intracellular reaction networks, owing to the ubiquity of enzymatic activity in cellular processes and the clear biochemical interpretation of its parameters. However, it is not well understood how the approximation applies to the discrete stochastic case or how it extends to spatially inhomogeneous systems. We study the behaviour of the discrete stochastic MM approximation as a function of system size and show that significant errors can occur for small volumes, in comparison with a corresponding mass-action system. We then explore some consequences of these results for quantitative modelling. One consequence is that fluctuation-induced sensitivity, or stochastic focusing, can become highly exaggerated in models that make use of MM kinetics even if the approximations are excellent in a deterministic model. Another consequence is that spatial stochastic simulations based on the reaction–diffusion master equation can become highly inaccurate if the model contains MM terms. PMID:25833240

  13. Mass-independent isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L

    2013-02-28

    Three fundamental properties of atomic nuclei-mass, spin (and related magnetic moment), and volume-are the source of isotope effects. The mostly deserved and popular, with almost hundred-year history, is the mass-dependent isotope effect. The first mass-independent isotope effect which chemically discriminates isotopes by their nuclear spins and nuclear magnetic moments rather than by their masses was detected in 1976. It was named as the magnetic isotope effect because it is controlled by magnetic interaction, i.e., electron-nuclear hyperfine coupling in the paramagnetic species, the reaction intermediates. The effect follows from the universal physical property of chemical reactions to conserve angular momentum (spin) of electrons and nuclei. It is now detected for oxygen, silicon, sulfur, germanium, tin, mercury, magnesium, calcium, zinc, and uranium in a great variety of chemical and biochemical reactions including those of medical and ecological importance. Another mass-independent isotope effect was detected in 1983 as a deviation of isotopic distribution in reaction products from that which would be expected from the mass-dependent isotope effect. On the physical basis, it is in fact a mass-dependent effect, but it surprisingly results in isotope fractionation which is incompatible with that predicted by traditional mass-dependent effects. It is supposed to be a function of dynamic parameters of reaction and energy relaxation in excited states of products. The third, nuclear volume mass-independent isotope effect is detected in the high-resolution atomic and molecular spectra and in the extraction processes, but there are no unambiguous indications of its importance as an isotope fractionation factor in chemical reactions.

  14. Analytical mass formula and nuclear surface properties in the ETF approximation. Part II: asymmetric nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aymard, François; Gulminelli, Francesca; Margueron, Jérôme

    2016-08-01

    We have recently addressed the problem of the determination of the nuclear surface energy for symmetric nuclei in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) approximation using Skyrme functionals. We presently extend this formalism to the case of asymmetric nuclei and the question of the surface symmetry energy. We propose an approximate expression for the diffuseness and the surface energy. These quantities are analytically related to the parameters of the energy functional. In particular, the influence of the different equation of state parameters can be explicitly quantified. Detailed analyses of the different energy components (local/non-local, isoscalar/isovector, surface/curvature and higher order) are also performed. Our analytical solution of the ETF integral improves previous models and leads to a precision of better than 200 keV per nucleon in the determination of the nuclear binding energy for dripline nuclei.

  15. Diffusive approximation for unsteady mud flows with backwater effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cristo, Cristiana; Iervolino, Michele; Vacca, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    The adoption of the Diffusive Wave (DW) instead of the Full Dynamic (FD) model in the analysis of mud flood routing within the shallow-water framework may provide a significant reduction of the computational effort, and the knowledge of the conditions in which this approximation may be employed is therefore important. In this paper, the applicability of the DW approximation of a depth-integrated Herschel-Bulkley model is investigated through linear analysis. Assuming as the initial condition a steady hypocritical decelerated flow, induced by downstream backwater, the propagation characteristics of a small perturbation predicted by the DW and FD models are compared. The results show that the spatial variation on the initial profile may preclude the application of DW model with a prescribed accuracy. Whenever the method is applicable, the rising time of the mud flood must satisfy additional constraints, whose dependence on the flow depth, along with the Froude number and the rheological parameters, is deeply analyzed and discussed.

  16. Superdeformation in the a Approximately 190 Mass Region and Shape Coexistence in LEAD-194

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, Matthew James

    Near-yrast states in ^{194 }Pb have been identified up to a spin of {~}35hbar following the ^{176}Yb(^ {24}Mg,6n)^{194} Pb^{*} reaction at a beam energy of 134 MeV, measured with the High Energy -Resolution Array located at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron facility. Eighteen new transitions were placed. Examples of non-collective prolate and oblate and collective oblate excitations are seen. In addition a rotational band consisting of twelve transitions, with energy spacings characteristic of superdeformed shapes, were also seen. These results have been interpreted using both Nilsson model calculations and previously published potential energy surface calculations. The superdeformed bands in the A ~ 190 mass region are discussed with primary emphasis on ten superdeformed bands in ^{192,193,194 }Hg and ^{192,194,196,198 }Pb discovered or codiscovered by our collaboration. The discussion of superdeformation in these nuclei have been broken into three portions, focusing on the population of, the physics associated with, and the depopulation of these bands, respectively. The population behavior of the superdeformed structures is presented, and discussed with respect to theoretical predictions for nuclei near A ~ 190 expected to support superdeformation. A detailed analysis of the population of the ^{193} Hg^{rm 1a} band is provided, and the results are compared with statistical model calculations predictions. Significant differences were found between the population of the superdeformed bands in the A ~ 150 and 190 mass regions. The systematics of the intraband region are presented. Nilsson model calculations are carried out, with nucleon configurations for the primary superdeformed bands proposed. A discussion of possible mechanisms for reproducing the smooth increase in dynamic moments of inertia observed in all superdeformed bands in this mass region is provided. A number of superdeformed bands in the A ~ 190 mass region have transition energies

  17. Prediction of kinetics and kinematics of running animals using an analytical approximation to the planar spring-mass system.

    PubMed

    Robilliard, Justine J; Wilson, Alan M

    2005-12-01

    The spring-mass model is often used to describe bouncing gaits. Although at first inspection the mechanical system appears simple, the solution to the motion cannot be derived easily. An analytical solution would provide a fast and intuitive method to determine the kinetic and kinematics of the centre of mass of terrestrial animals during over-ground steady state locomotion. Here, an analytical approximation using sine wave simplifications for the motion is presented. The analytical solution was almost indistinguishable from the numerical solution across initial leg angles of 17.5-30 degrees ; percentage differences between the analytical solution and the numerical solution were less than 1% for total mechanical energy, centre of mass position, total limb compression and centre of mass velocity and less than 2% different for resultant limb force and vertical acceleration of the centre of mass. The solution matched the relationship between stance time and speed collected from a trotting racehorse and accurately characterised previously published biological data. This study has shown that a simple analytical solution can predict the kinetics and kinematics of a spring-mass system over the range of biologically relevant sweep angles and horizontal velocities, and could be used to further understanding of limb deployment and gait selection. Using this analytical solution not only the force profile but also the changes in mechanical energy can be calculated from easily observed morphological and kinematic data.

  18. Approximations in seismic interferometry and their effects on surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimman, W. P.; Trampert, J.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate common approximations and assumptions in seismic interferometry. The interferometric equation, valid for the full elastic wavefield, gives the Green's function between two arbitrary points by cross-correlating signals recorded at each point. The relation is exact, even for complicated lossless media, provided the signals are generated on a closed surface surrounding the two points and are from both unidirectional point-forces and deformation-rate-tensor sources. A necessary approximation to the exact interferometric equation is the use of signals from point-force sources only. Even in simple layered media, the Green's function retrieval can then be imperfect, especially for waves other than fundamental mode surface waves. We show that this is due to cross terms between different modes that occur even if a full source boundary is present. When sources are located at the free surface only, a realistic scenario for ambient noise, the cross terms can overwhelm the higher mode surface waves. Sources then need to be very far away, or organized in a band rather than a surrounding surface to overcome this cross-term problem. If sources are correlated, convergence of higher modes is very hard to achieve. In our examples of simultaneously acting sources, the phase of the higher modes only converges correctly towards the true solution if sources are acting in the stationary phase regions. This offers an explanation for some recent body wave observations, where only interstation paths in-line with the prevailing source direction were considered. The phase error resulting from incomplete distributions around the stationary phase region generally leads to an error smaller than 1 per cent for realistic applications.

  19. Electron correlation effects beyond the random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. D.; Malozovsky, Y. M.

    2016-04-01

    The methods that have been used to deal with a many-particle system can be basically sorted into three types: Hamiltonian, field theory and phenomenological method. The first two methods are more popular. Traditionally, the Hamiltonian method has been widely adopted in the conventional electronic theory for metals, alloys and semiconductors. Basically, the mean-field approximation (MFA) that has been working well for a weakly coupled system like a metal is employed to simplify a Hamiltonian corresponding to a particular electron system. However, for a strongly coupled many-particle system like a cuprate superconductor MFA should in principle not apply. Therefore, the field theory on the basis of Green’s function and the Feynman diagrams must be invoked. In this method, one is however more familiar with the random phase approximation (RPA) that gives rise to the same results as MFA because of being short of the information for higher-order terms of interaction. For a strongly coupled electron system, it is obvious that one has to deal with higher-order terms of a pair interaction to get a correct solution. Any ignorance of the higher-order terms implies that the more sophisticated information contained in those terms is discarded. However, to date one has not reached a consensus on how to deal with the higher-order terms beyond RPA. We preset here a method that is termed the diagrammatic iteration approach (DIA) and able to derive higher-order terms of the interaction from the information of lower-order ones on the basis of Feynman diagram, with which one is able to go beyond RPA step by step. It is in principle possible that all of higher-order terms can be obtained, and then sorted to groups of diagrams. It turns out that each of the groups can be replaced by an equivalent one, forming a diagrammatic Dyson-equation-like relation. The diagrammatic solution is eventually “translated” to a four-dimensional integral equation. The method can be applied to a

  20. Energy loss and (de)coherence effects beyond eikonal approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolinário, Liliana; Armesto, Néstor; Milhano, Guilherme; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2014-11-01

    The parton branching process is known to be modified in the presence of a medium. Colour decoherence processes are known to determine the process of energy loss when the density of the medium is large enough to break the correlations between partons emitted from the same parent. In order to improve existing calculations that consider eikonal trajectories for both the emitter and the hardest emitted parton, we provide in this work the calculation of all finite energy corrections for the gluon radiation off a quark in a QCD medium that exist in the small angle approximation and for static scattering centres. Using the path integral formalism, all particles are allowed to undergo Brownian motion in the transverse plane and the offspring is allowed to carry an arbitrary fraction of the initial energy. The result is a general expression that contains both coherence and decoherence regimes that are controlled by the density of the medium and by the amount of broadening that each parton acquires independently.

  1. Kondo effect in coupled quantum dots: A noncrossing approximation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, Ramón; Langreth, David C.

    2003-06-01

    The out-of-equilibrium transport properties of a double quantum dot system in the Kondo regime are studied theoretically by means of a two-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian with interimpurity hopping. The Hamiltonian, formulated in slave-boson language, is solved by means of a generalization of the noncrossing approximation (NCA) to the present problem. We provide benchmark calculations of the predictions of the NCA for the linear and nonlinear transport properties of coupled quantum dots in the Kondo regime. We give a series of predictions that can be observed experimentally in linear and nonlinear transport measurements through coupled quantum dots. Importantly, it is demonstrated that measurements of the differential conductance G=dI/dV, for the appropriate values of voltages and interdot tunneling couplings, can give a direct observation of the coherent superposition between the many-body Kondo states of each dot. This coherence can be also detected in the linear transport through the system: the curve linear conductance vs temperature is nonmonotonic, with a maximum at a temperature T* characterizing quantum coherence between both the Kondo states.

  2. Effective moduli of particulate solids: Lubrication approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, F.; Phan-Thien, N.; X. J. Fan

    To efficiently calculate the effective properties of a composite, which consists of rigid spherical inclusions not necessarily of the same sizes in a homogeneous isotropic elastic matrix, a method based on the lubrication forces between neighbouring particles has been developed. The method is used to evaluate the effective Lamé moduli and the Poisson's ratio of the composite, for the particles in random configurations and in cubic lattices. A good agreement with experimental results given by Smith (1975) for particles in random configurations is observed, and also the numerical results on the effective moduli agree well with the results given by Nunan & Keller (1984) for particles in cubic lattices.

  3. Accuracy of the post-Newtonian approximation for extreme mass ratio inspirals from a black-hole perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sago, Norichika; Fujita, Ryuichi; Nakano, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    We revisit the accuracy of the post-Newtonian (PN) approximation and its region of validity for quasicircular orbits of a point particle in the Kerr spacetime, by using an analytically known highest post-Newtonian order gravitational energy flux and accurate numerical results in the black hole perturbation approach. It is found that regions of validity become larger for higher PN order results although there are several local maximums in regions of validity for relatively low-PN order results. This might imply that higher PN order calculations are also encouraged for comparable-mass binaries.

  4. Effective mass of quasiparticles from thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eich, F. G.; Holzmann, Markus; Vignale, G.

    2017-07-01

    We discuss the potential advantages of calculating the effective mass of quasiparticles in the interacting electron liquid from the low-temperature free energy vis-a-vis the conventional approach, in which the effective mass is obtained from approximate calculations of the self-energy, or from a quantum Monte Carlo evaluation of the energy of a variational "quasiparticle wave function". While raw quantum Monte Carlo data are presently too sparse to allow for an accurate determination of the effective mass, the values estimated by this method are numerically close to the ones obtained in previous calculations using diagrammatic many-body theory. In contrast to this, a recently published parametrization of quantum Monte Carlo data for the free energy of the homogeneous electron liquid yields effective masses that considerably deviate from previous calculations and even change sign for low densities, reflecting an unphysical negative entropy. We suggest that this anomaly is related to the treatment of the exchange energy at finite temperature.

  5. Analytical approximation of the neutrino oscillation matter effects at large θ 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Kao, Yee; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2014-04-01

    We argue that the neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter are best understood by allowing the mixing angles and mass-squared differences in the standard parametrization to `run' with the matter effect parameter a = , where N e is the electron density in matter and E is the neutrino energy. We present simple analytical approximations to these `running' parameters. We show that for the moderately large value of θ 13, as discovered by the reactor experiments, the running of the mixing angle θ 23 and the CP violating phase δ can be neglected. It simplifies the analysis of the resulting expressions for the oscillation probabilities considerably. Approaches which attempt to directly provide approximate analytical expressions for the oscillation probabilities in matter suffer in accuracy due to their reliance on expansion in θ 13, or in simplicity when higher order terms in θ 13 are included. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method by comparing it to the exact numerical result, as well as the direct approximations of Cervera et al., Akhmedov et al., Asano and Minakata, and Freund. We also discuss the utility of our approach in figuring out the required baseline lengths and neutrino energies for the oscillation probabilities to exhibit certain desirable features.

  6. Approximate analysis of the ortho-wedgetron effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, G. A.; Pivovarova, A. G.

    The ortho-wedgetron was observed and named by Kirichenko and Solodovnik (1981) in a study of the effect of the entry angle of the electron beam on the starting current of a traveling wave tube. In the present work, this effect is analyzed theoretically in the case of collective interaction, taking into account the three-dimensionality of the motion of the electrons along helical trajectories in the steady-state regime. This analysis is carried out in the framework of the kinematic approach with application to an O-type resonance oscillator with an infinitely thin electron beam.

  7. Effective medium approximation for effective propagation constant calculation in a dense random medium. [electromagnetic wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) formalism developed for scalar wave calculations in solid state physics is generalized to electromagnetic wave scattering in a dense random medium. Results are applied to compute the effective propagation constant in a dense medium involving discrete spherical scatterers. When compared with a common quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), it is found that EMA accounts for backward scattering and the effect of correlation among three scatterers which are not available in QCA. It is also found that there is not much difference in the calculated normalized phase velocity between the use of these two approximations. However, there is a significant difference in the computed effective loss tangent in a nonabsorptive random medium. The computed effective loss tangent using EMA and measurements from a snow medium are compared, showing good agreement.

  8. Effective medium approximation for effective propagation constant calculation in a dense random medium. [electromagnetic wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) formalism developed for scalar wave calculations in solid state physics is generalized to electromagnetic wave scattering in a dense random medium. Results are applied to compute the effective propagation constant in a dense medium involving discrete spherical scatterers. When compared with a common quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), it is found that EMA accounts for backward scattering and the effect of correlation among three scatterers which are not available in QCA. It is also found that there is not much difference in the calculated normalized phase velocity between the use of these two approximations. However, there is a significant difference in the computed effective loss tangent in a nonabsorptive random medium. The computed effective loss tangent using EMA and measurements from a snow medium are compared, showing good agreement.

  9. Approximate formulas for rotational effects in earthquake engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falamarz-Sheikhabadi, Mohammad Reza; Ghafory-Ashtiany, Mohsen

    2012-10-01

    The paper addresses the issue of researching into the engineering characteristics of rotational strong ground motion components and rotational effects in structural response. In this regard, at first, the acceleration response spectra of rotational components are estimated in terms of translational ones. Next, new methods in order to consider the effects of rotational components in seismic design codes are presented by determining the effective structural parameters in the rotational loading of structures due only to the earthquake rotational components. Numerical results show that according to the frequency content of rotational components, the contribution of the rocking components to the seismic excitation of short period structures can never be ignored. During strong earthquakes, these rotational motions may lead to the unexpected overturning or local structural damages for the low-rise multi-story buildings located on soft soil. The arrangement of lateral-load resisting system in the plan, period, and aspect ratio of the system can severely change the seismic loading of wide symmetric buildings under the earthquake torsional component.

  10. On exact and approximated formulations for scaling-mode shapes in operational modal analysis by mass and stiffness change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Aenlle, M.; Brincker, R.; Pelayo, F.; Canteli, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    When operational modal analysis (OMA) is used to estimate modal parameters, mode shapes cannot be mass normalized. In the past few years, some equations have been proposed to scale mode shapes using the mass-change method, which consists of repeating modal testing after changing the mass at different points of the structure where the mode shapes are known. In this paper, the structural-dynamic-modification theory is used to derive a set of equations, from which all the existing formulations can be derived. It is shown that the known equations can be divided into two types, the exact and the approximated equations, where the former type does in fact fulfill the equations derived from the theory of structural modification, whereas the remaining equations do not, mainly because the change of the mode shapes of the modified structure is not properly taken into account. By simulations, the paper illustrates the large difference in accuracy between the approximate and the exact formulations. The paper provides two new exact formulations for the scaling factors, one for the non-modified structure and - for the first time in the literature - one for the modified structure. The simulations indicate the influence of errors from the measured natural frequencies and mode shapes on the estimation of the scaling factors using the two exact formulations from the literature and the new exact formulation proposed in this paper. In addition, the paper illustrates statistics of the errors on mode-shape scaling. All simulations were carried out using a plate with closely spaced modes.

  11. Sub-luminous type Ia supernovae from the mergers of equal-mass white dwarfs with mass approximately 0.9M[symbol: see text].

    PubMed

    Pakmor, Rüdiger; Kromer, Markus; Röpke, Friedrich K; Sim, Stuart A; Ruiter, Ashley J; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang

    2010-01-07

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to result from thermonuclear explosions of carbon-oxygen white dwarf stars. Existing models generally explain the observed properties, with the exception of the sub-luminous 1991bg-like supernovae. It has long been suspected that the merger of two white dwarfs could give rise to a type Ia event, but hitherto simulations have failed to produce an explosion. Here we report a simulation of the merger of two equal-mass white dwarfs that leads to a sub-luminous explosion, although at the expense of requiring a single common-envelope phase, and component masses of approximately 0.9M[symbol: see text]. The light curve is too broad, but the synthesized spectra, red colour and low expansion velocities are all close to what is observed for sub-luminous 1991bg-like events. Although the mass ratios can be slightly less than one and still produce a sub-luminous event, the masses have to be in the range 0.83M[symbol: see text] to 0.9M[symbol: see text].

  12. Analytical Method of Approximating the Motion of a Spinning Vehicle with Variable Mass and Inertia Properties Acted Upon by Several Disturbing Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, James J.; Young, George R.; Timmons, Jesse D.; Brinkworth, Helen S.

    1961-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed which approximates the dispersion of a spinning symmetrical body in a vacuum, with time-varying mass and inertia characteristics, under the action of several external disturbances-initial pitching rate, thrust misalignment, and dynamic unbalance. The ratio of the roll inertia to the pitch or yaw inertia is assumed constant. Spin was found to be very effective in reducing the dispersion due to an initial pitch rate or thrust misalignment, but was completely Ineffective in reducing the dispersion of a dynamically unbalanced body.

  13. Gravitational self-force meets the post-Newtonian approximation in extreme-mass ratio inspiral of binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detweiler, Steven

    2010-02-01

    Post-Newtonian analysis, numerical relativity and, now, perturbation-based gravitational self-force analysis are all being used to describe various aspects of black hole binary systems. Recent comparisons between self-force analysis, with m1m2, and post-Newtonian analysis, with v/c 1 show excellent agreement in their common domain of validity. This lends credence to the two very different regularization procedures which are invoked in these approximations. When self-force analysis is able to create gravitational waveforms from extreme mass-ratio inspiral, then unprecedented cross cultural comparisons of these three distinct approaches to understanding gravitational waves will reveal the strengths and weaknesses of each. )

  14. Model of neutrino effective masses

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh Nguyen Dinh; Nguyen Thi Hong Van; Nguyen Anh Ky; Phi Quang Van

    2006-10-01

    It is shown that an effective (nonrenormalizable) coupling of lepton multiplets to scalar triplets in the 331 model with sterile/exotic neutrinos, can be a good way for generating neutrino masses of different types. The method is simple and avoids radiative/loop calculations which, sometimes, are long and complicated. Basing on some astrophysical arguments it is also stated that the scale of SU(3){sub L} symmetry breaking is at TeV scale, in agreement with earlier investigations. Or equivalently, starting from this symmetry breaking scale we could have sterile/exotic neutrinos with mass of a few keV's which could be used to explain several astrophysical and cosmological puzzles, such as the dark matter, the fast motion of the observed pulsars, the re-ionization of the Universe, etc.

  15. Cost effective mass standard calibration intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, A.H.; Clark, J.P.

    1995-11-01

    National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable standard weights serve as the foundation of mass measurement control programs. These standards are normally recalibrated annually at a cost of approximately $100 per weight. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has more than 4,000 standard weights. Most have recalibration intervals of 1 year. The cost effectiveness of the current practice was questioned. Are these mass standards being calibrated too often, and are all of these standards needed for calibration and QC activities? Statistical analyses of data from the calibration histories were performed on a random sample of eight weight sets. The analyses indicated no time effects or significant trends in the weight masses for periods of from 5 to 8 years. In other words, calibration checks were being performed too frequently. In addition, current electronic balance technology does not require a traditional set of standard weights that cover the entire weighing range of a balance. At the most, only 2 or 3 standards are needed for most weighing systems. Hence, by increasing weight set recalibration frequencies from 1 to 3 years, and by reducing the number standards calibrated by 80%, annual cost savings of over $400,000 are attainable at SRS. Details of the data analysis, technological advances, and cost savings are included in the paper.

  16. Dynamic effective mass of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David; Ingale, Rohit; Valenza, John; Hsu, Chaur-Jian; Gland, Nicolas; Makse, Hernan

    2009-03-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of the frequency-dependent effective mass, M(φ), of loose granular particles which occupy a rigid cavity to a filling fraction of 48%, the remaining volume being air of differing humidities. We demonstrate that this is a sensitive and direct way to measure those properties of the granular medium that are the cause of the changes in acoustic properties of structures containing grain-filled cavities. Specifically, we apply this understanding to the case of the flexural resonances of a rectangular bar with a grain-filled cavity within it. The dominant features of M(φ) are a sharp resonance and a broad background, which we analyze within the context of simple models. We find that: a) These systems may be understood in terms of a height-dependent and diameter-dependent effective sound speed (˜130 m/s) and an effective viscosity (˜2x10^4 Poise). b) There is a dynamic Janssen effect in the sense that, at any frequency, and depending on the method of sample preparation, approximately one-half of the effective mass is borne by the side walls of the cavity and one-half by the bottom. c) On a fundamental level, dissipation is dominated by adsorbed films of water at grain-grain contacts in our experiments.

  17. Gravitational scattering, post-Minkowskian approximation, and effective-one-body theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault

    2016-11-01

    A novel approach to the effective-one-body description of gravitationally interacting two-body systems is introduced. This approach is based on the post-Minkowskian approximation scheme (perturbation theory in G , without assuming small velocities) and employs a new dictionary focussing on the functional dependence of the scattering angle on the total energy and the total angular momentum of the system. Using this approach, we prove to all orders in v /c two results that were previously known to hold only to a limited post-Newtonian accuracy: (i) the relativistic gravitational dynamics of a two-body system is equivalent, at first post-Minkowskian order, to the relativistic dynamics of an effective test particle moving in a Schwarzschild metric, and (ii) this equivalence requires the existence of an exactly quadratic map between the real (relativistic) two-body energy and the (relativistic) energy of the effective particle. The same energy map is also shown to apply to the effective-one-body description of two masses interacting via tensor-scalar gravity.

  18. Virtual mass effect in dynamic micromechanical mass sensing in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiker, P.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2016-06-01

    Weighing individual micro- or nanoscale particles in solution using dynamic micromechanical sensors is quite challenging: viscous losses dramatically degrade the sensor's performance by both broadening the resonance peak and increasing the effective total mass of the resonator by the dragged liquid. While the virtual mass of the resonator was discussed frequently, little attention has been paid to the virtual mass of particles attached to the resonator's surface and its impact on the accuracy of mass sensing. By means of the in situ detection of a polystyrene microbead in water using a bridge-based microresonator, we demonstrate that the virtual mass of the bead significantly affects the observed frequency shift. In fact, 55 % of the frequency shift was caused by the virtual mass of the adsorbed bead, predicted by Stoke's theory. Based on the observed shift in the resonator's quality factor during particle adsorption, we confirm this significant effect of the virtual mass. Thus, a quantitative analysis of the mass of a single adsorbed particle is strongly diminished if dynamic micromechanical sensors are operated in a liquid environment.

  19. Effective medium approximation of anisotropic lamellar nanogratings based on Fourier factorization.

    PubMed

    Foldyna, Martin; Ossikovski, Razvigor; De Martino, Antonello; Drevillon, Bernard; Postava, Kamil; Ciprian, Dalibor; Pistora, Jaromír; Watanabe, Koki

    2006-04-17

    Anisotropic lamellar sub-wavelength gratings (nanogratings) are described by Effective Medium Approximation (EMA). Analytical formulas for effective medium optical parameters of nanogratings from arbitrary anisotropic materials are derived using approximation of zero-order diffraction mode. The method is based on Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) combined with proper Fourier factorization method. Good agreement between EMA and the rigorous model is observed, where slight differences are explained by the influence of evanescent higher Fourier harmonics in the nanograting.

  20. Association of evaluation methods of the effective permittivity of heterogeneous media on the basis of a generalized singular approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, V. I.; Yakovlev, V. B.; Bardushkin, V. V.; Lavrov, I. V.; Sychev, A. P.; Yakovleva, E. N.

    2013-09-01

    Various methods for evaluation of the effective permittivity of heterogeneous media, namely, the effective medium approximation (Bruggeman's approximation), the Maxwell-Garnett approximation, Wiener's bounds, and the Hashin-Shtrikman variational bounds (for effective static characteristics) are combined on the basis of a generalized singular approximation.

  1. Approximate Coulomb distortion effects in (e,e{sup {prime}}p) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.S.; Wright, L.E.

    1997-07-01

    In this paper we apply a well-tested approximation of electron Coulomb distortion effects to the exclusive reaction (e,e{sup {prime}}p) in the quasielastic region. We compare the approximate treatment of Coulomb distortion effects to the exact distorted wave Born approximation evaluated by means of partial wave analysis to gauge the quality of our approximate treatment. We show that the approximate Mo/ller potential has a plane-wave-like structure and hence permits the separation of the cross section into five terms which depend on bilinear products of transforms of the transition four current elements. These transforms reduce to Fourier transforms when Coulomb distortion is not present, but become modified with the inclusion of Coulomb distortion. We investigate the application of the approximate formalism to a model of {sup 208}Pb(e,e{sup {prime}}p) using Dirac-Hartree single particle wave functions for the ground state and relativistic optical model wave functions for the continuum proton. We show that it is still possible to extract, albeit with some approximation, the various structure functions from the experimentally measured data even for heavy nuclei. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Mass Fractionation Laws, Mass-Independent Effects, and Isotopic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Schauble, Edwin A.

    2016-06-01

    Isotopic variations usually follow mass-dependent fractionation, meaning that the relative variations in isotopic ratios scale with the difference in mass of the isotopes involved (e.g., δ17O ≈ 0.5×δ18O). In detail, however, the mass dependence of isotopic variations is not always the same, and different natural processes can define distinct slopes in three-isotope diagrams. These variations are subtle, but improvements in analytical capabilities now allow precise measurement of these effects and make it possible to draw inferences about the natural processes that caused them (e.g., reaction kinetics versus equilibrium isotope exchange). Some elements, in some sample types, do not conform to the regularities of mass-dependent fractionation. Oxygen and sulfur display a rich phenomenology of mass-independent fractionation, documented in the laboratory, in the rock record, and in the modern atmosphere. Oxygen in meteorites shows isotopic variations that follow a slope-one line (δ17O ≈ δ18O) whose origin may be associated with CO photodissociation. Sulfur mass-independent fractionation in ancient sediments provides the tightest constraint on the oxygen partial pressure in the Archean and the timing of Earth's surface oxygenation. Heavier elements also show departures from mass fractionation that can be ascribed to exotic effects associated with chemical reactions such as magnetic effects (e.g., Hg) or the nuclear field shift effect (e.g., U or Tl). Some isotopic variations in meteorites and their constituents cannot be related to the terrestrial composition by any known process, including radiogenic, nucleogenic, and cosmogenic effects. Those variations have a nucleosynthetic origin, reflecting the fact that the products of stellar nucleosynthesis were not fully homogenized when the Solar System formed. Those anomalies are found at all scales, from nanometer-sized presolar grains to bulk terrestrial planets. They can be used to learn about stellar

  3. Optical properties of solids within the independent-quasiparticle approximation: Dynamical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Sole, R.; Girlanda, Raffaello

    1996-11-01

    The independent-quasiparticle approximation to calculating the optical properties of solids is extended to account for dynamical effects, namely, the energy dependence of the GW self-energy. We use a simple but realistic model of such energy dependence. We find that the inclusion of dynamical effects reduces considerably the calculated absorption spectrum and makes the agreement with experiment worse.

  4. The effects of body mass on cremation weight.

    PubMed

    May, Shannon E

    2011-01-01

    Cremains have become increasingly frequent in forensic contexts, while higher body mass in the general population has simultaneously made cremation a more cost-effective mortuary practice. This study analyzed the relationship between body mass and bone mass, as reflected through cremation weight. Antemortem data were recorded for samples used in the multi-regional data set. Each was rendered through commercial crematoriums and reweighed postincineration. Pearson's correlation demonstrates clear association between body mass and cremation weight (r=0.56; p<0.0001). However, multiple linear regression revealed sex and age variables also have a significant relationship (t=7.198; t=-2.5, respectively). Regressed in conjunction, body mass, sex, and age contribute approximately 67% of all variation observed in cremation weight (r=0.668). Analysis of covariance indicates significant regional variation in body and cremation weight. Explanations include bone modification resulting from increased loading stress, as well as glucose intolerance and altered metabolic pathways related to obesity.

  5. Measuring the Mass Distribution in Z is Approximately 0.2 Cluster Lenses with XMM, HST and CFHT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Being the most massive gravitationally bound objects in the Universe, clusters of galaxies are prime targets for studies of structure formation and evolution. Specifically the comoving space density of virialized clusters of a given mass (or X-ray temperature), but also the frequency and degree of substructure, as well as the shape of the cluster mass profile are quantities whose current values and evolution as a function of lookback time can provide important constraints on the cosmological and physical parameters of structure formation theories. The project funded by NASA grant NAG 5-10041 intended to take such studies to a new level by combining observations of a well-selected cluster sample by three state-of-the-art telescopes: HST, to accurately measure the mass distribution in the cluster core (approx. 0.5 h(sup -1)(sub 50) Mpc) via strong gravitational lensing; CFHT, to measure the large scale mass distribution out to approx. 3 Mpc via weak lensing; and XMM, to measure the gas density and temperature distribution accurately on intermediate scales < 1.5 Mpc. XMM plays a pivotal role in this context as the calibration of X-ray mass measurements through accurate, spatially resolved X-ray temperature measurements (particularly in the cosmologically most sensitive range of kT> 5 keV) is central to the questions outlined above. This set of observations promised to yield the best cluster mass measurements obtained so far for a representative sample, thus allowing us to: 1) Measure the high-mass end of the local cluster mass function; 2) Test predictions of a universal cluster mass profile; 3) calibrate the mass-temperature and temperature-luminosity relations for clusters and the scatter around these relations, which is vital for studies of cluster evolution using the X-ray temperature and X-ray luminosity functions.

  6. Revisiting the effective medium approximation in all-dielectric subwavelength multilayers: Breakdown and rebuilding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xinrui; Mao, Lei; Lu, Yonghua; Wang, Pei

    2017-07-01

    Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the effective medium approximation (EMA) breakdown in all-dielectric deep-subwavelength multilayers made of alternating layers by means of the transfer matrix method. We demonstrated that the approximation is invalid at the vicinity of the effective medium's critical angle for total internal reflection and obtained an analytical criterion for the breakdown of the EMA, which depends on the layer thickness, the incident angle, and the permittivity difference between the alternate layers. We rebuilt the EMA by adding higher-order correction onto the traditional effective permittivity. Furthermore, we found that the EMA breakdown that arises from the boundary effect cannot be repaired in the traditional homogenization strategy with only one layer of effective medium. By adding an artificial matched layer after the conventional effective layer, the boundary effect breakdown was neatly removed.

  7. Derivative expansion at small mass for the spinor effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Huet, Adolfo; Hur, Jin; Min, Hyunsoo

    2011-05-15

    We study the small-mass limit of the one-loop spinor effective action, comparing the derivative expansion approximation with exact numerical results that are obtained from an extension to spinor theories of the partial-wave cutoff method. In this approach, one can compute numerically the renormalized one-loop effective action for radially separable gauge field background fields in spinor QED. We highlight an important difference between the small-mass limit of the derivative expansion for spinor and scalar theories.

  8. Effective Mass of an Oscillating Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Eduardo E.; Gesnouin, Gabriel A.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental method to obtain the effective mass of an unloaded oscillating spring. We measure the period "T"("n") of the partial springs that result when hanging "n" of the total "N" coils of a given spring. Data are correlated with the expectation of a simple model for "T"("n") that takes into account the effective mass of the…

  9. Comparisons of interacting-boson-fermion approximation and triaxial calculations for odd-mass N =80 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Aryaeinejad, R.; Chou, W.; McHarris, W.C. )

    1989-09-01

    The interacting-boson-fermion-approximation and triaxial models were used to calculate excitation energies and mixing ratios for the {ital N}=80 nuclei, {sup 139}Pr, {sup 141}Pm, and {sup 143}Eu. For low-lying negative- and positive-parity states both models yield roughly the same numbers, in good agreement with experimental results. For high-lying states we find that the interacting-boson-fermion-approximation model describes the level structure considerably better than the triaxial model. On the other hand, the triaxial model gives more satisfactory results in predicting the mixing ratios.

  10. The Effects of Computer Assisted Instruction Materials on Approximate Number Skills of Students with Dyscalculia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutlu, Yilmaz; Akgün, Levent

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of computer assisted instruction materials on approximate number skills of students with mathematics learning difficulties. The study was carried out with pretest-posttest quasi experimental method with a single subject. The participants of the study consist of a girl and two boys who attend 3rd…

  11. Operator approach to effective medium theory to overcome a breakdown of Maxwell Garnett approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Vladislav; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.; Novitsky, Andrey

    2016-08-01

    We elaborate on an operator approach to effective medium theory for homogenization of the periodic multilayered structures composed of nonmagnetic isotropic materials, which is based on equating the spatial evolution operators for the original structure and its effective alternative. We show that the zeroth-, first-, and second-order approximations of the operator effective medium theory correspond to electric dipoles, chirality, and magnetic dipoles plus electric quadrupoles, respectively. We discover that the spatially dispersive bianisotropic effective medium obtained in the second-order approximation perfectly replaces a multilayered composite and does not suffer from the effective medium approximation breakdown that happened near the critical angle of total internal reflection found previously in the conventional effective medium theory. We establish the criterion of the validity of the conventional effective medium theory depending on the ratio of unit-cell length to the wavelength, the number of unit cells, and the angle of incidence. The operator approach to effective medium theory is applicable for periodic and nonperiodic layered systems, being a fruitful tool in the fields of metamaterials and subwavelength nanophotonics.

  12. An Extension of the Krieger-Li-Iafrate Approximation to the Optimized-Effective-Potential Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.G.

    1999-11-11

    The Krieger-Li-Iafrate approximation can be expressed as the zeroth order result of an unstable iterative method for solving the integral equation form of the optimized-effective-potential method. By pre-conditioning the iterate a first order correction can be obtained which recovers the bulk of quantal oscillations missing in the zeroth order approximation. A comparison of calculated total energies are given with Krieger-Li-Iafrate, Local Density Functional, and Hyper-Hartree-Fock results for non-relativistic atoms and ions.

  13. Approximate analytical effective phase function obtained for a thin slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudelle, F.

    2017-05-01

    The reflection and transmission of light from a slab containing a turbid medium provide a scattering effective phase function from which the true optical anisotropy factor may not be always easily retrieved. From the statistical Poissonian theory and thanks to approximations about the optical path related to the first scattering events, a simplified relationship is established between angular phase function and effective phase function. Therefore, with a modified Gegenbauer or a Two-Terms Henyey-Greenstein phase function, some adjustable analytic functions are proposed in order to fit the measurements linked to the true effective phase function. An efficiency of the approximate analytical function is proved, thanks to the light modelling by Monte Carlo method, for optical thickness lower or equal to 2. This is confirmed by comparisons of the anisotropy retrieval with other methods. Concerning applications, several fits were made on experimental effective phase functions corresponding to goniometric measurements from usual diffusing materials and biological tissues.

  14. Effects of the Mass Media of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Walter

    The mass media are considered to be television, radio, movies, and newspapers. They may generate changes in cognition and comprehension. They do effect emotional arousal, sex and behavior identification, and changes in allocation of time, consumer purchase, and voting behavior. The only data which show a clear relationship between the mass media…

  15. Effects of the Mass Media of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Walter

    The mass media are considered to be television, radio, movies, and newspapers. They may generate changes in cognition and comprehension. They do effect emotional arousal, sex and behavior identification, and changes in allocation of time, consumer purchase, and voting behavior. The only data which show a clear relationship between the mass media…

  16. Approximating the near-edge mass absorption coefficients for Ni using an ultra-thin bimetal foil

    SciTech Connect

    Alkire, Randall W.

    2016-11-01

    In an effort to improve the characteristics of a fluorescing metal-foil-based beam position monitor, a new bimetal ultra-thin (0.98/0.67 µm) Ti–Ni foil was introduced to replace an existing single-element ultra-thin 0.5 µm thick Cr foil. During characterization it was determined that absorption measurements on the bimetal foil could be used to fit the Ni mass absorption coefficients accurately in the vicinity of the NiKedge. Comparison with experimental results from the literature demonstrated that the fitting procedure produced coefficients with uncertainties of the order of ±1%. Once determined, these fit coefficients allowed the thickness of an independently mounted 8 µm thick Ni foil to be computed from absorption measurements instead of relying on a tool-based measurement of the foil thickness. Using the 8 µm thick foil, a continuous map of Ni mass absorption coefficients was produced at 1 eV resolution throughout the near-edge region. Lastly, this high-resolution map marks a significant improvement over the existing NIST XCOM or FFAST database mass absorption coefficients, which have estimated errors of 10–20% for the near-edge region.

  17. Approximating the near-edge mass absorption coefficients for Ni using an ultra-thin bimetal foil

    DOE PAGES

    Alkire, Randall W.

    2016-11-01

    In an effort to improve the characteristics of a fluorescing metal-foil-based beam position monitor, a new bimetal ultra-thin (0.98/0.67 µm) Ti–Ni foil was introduced to replace an existing single-element ultra-thin 0.5 µm thick Cr foil. During characterization it was determined that absorption measurements on the bimetal foil could be used to fit the Ni mass absorption coefficients accurately in the vicinity of the NiKedge. Comparison with experimental results from the literature demonstrated that the fitting procedure produced coefficients with uncertainties of the order of ±1%. Once determined, these fit coefficients allowed the thickness of an independently mounted 8 µm thickmore » Ni foil to be computed from absorption measurements instead of relying on a tool-based measurement of the foil thickness. Using the 8 µm thick foil, a continuous map of Ni mass absorption coefficients was produced at 1 eV resolution throughout the near-edge region. Lastly, this high-resolution map marks a significant improvement over the existing NIST XCOM or FFAST database mass absorption coefficients, which have estimated errors of 10–20% for the near-edge region.« less

  18. Comparative Analysis and Approximations of Space -Charge Formation in Langmuir Electrodes Including Temperature Effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdeblànquez, Eder

    2001-10-01

    Eder Valdeblànquez,Universidad del Zulia,Apartado 4011-A 526,Maracaibo,Venezuela. ABSTRACT: In this paper by space charge effect in Langmuir probes are compared for different kind of symmetries; plane, cylindrical and spherical. A detailed analysis is performed here including temperature effects, and therefore kinetic theory is used instead of fluid equations as other authors. The strongly non-linear equations obtained here have been solved first by numerical analysis and later by approximations using Bessel functions. The accuracy of each approximaton is also discussed. Space Charge effects are important in plane geometries than in the case of cylindrical or spherical symmetries.

  19. Effective cluster interactions using the generalized perturbation method in the atomic-sphere approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, P.P.; Gonis, A. )

    1993-03-15

    We describe the generalized perturbation method in the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA) for calculating the effective cluster interactions. Based on our development of Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent-potential approximation in the ASA [Singh [ital et] [ital al]., Phys. Rev. B 44, 8578 (1991)], the present approach is the next step towards developing a first-principles method that can be easily applied to describe substitutionally disordered alloys based on simple lattice structures as well as complex lattice structures with low symmetry. To test the accuracy of the ASA results, we have calculated the effective pair interactions (EPI) up to fourth-nearest neighbors for the substitutionally disordered Pd[sub 0.5]V[sub 0.5] and Pd[sub 0.75]Rh[sub 0.25] alloys. Our calculated EPI's are in good agreement with the respective muffin-tin results.

  20. A Simple and Effective Technique for Anatomical Approximation of the Upper Pericardium Using Hemostatic Clips.

    PubMed

    Husain, Mubassher; Acharya, Metesh Nalin; Cummings, Ian; Raja, Shahzad Gull

    Closure of the pericardium is important to protect bypass grafts, the great vessels, and the heart from injury due to sternal dehiscence. Furthermore, it is reported to reduce the formation of pericardial adhesions and thus facilitate entry into the chest at resternotomy. We here describe a simple, reproducible, and effective technique for tension-free approximation of the upper pericardium by applying small hemostatic clips to the preserved thymic fascia overlying the pericardium.

  1. The generalized effective liquid approximation for the freezing of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baus, M.

    1990-12-01

    The generalized effective liquid approximation (GELA) to the density functional theory of classical nonuniform systems reproduces all the formal properties of the free energy and requires only the direct correlation function of the uniform system as input. In the case of the freezing of hard spheres very accurate free energies, pressures and fluid-solid coexistence data can be obtained from the GELA. The theory predicts, besides the equilibrium FCC solid, metastable BCC and SC phases also.

  2. The Zeeman effect in the Sobolev approximation: applications to spherical stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.

    2003-05-01

    Modern spectropolarimeters are capable of detecting subkilogauss field strengths using the Zeeman effect in line profiles from the static photosphere, but supersonic Doppler broadening makes it more difficult to detect the Zeeman effect in the wind lines of hot stars. Nevertheless, the recent advances in observational capability motivate an assessment of the potential for detecting the magnetic fields threading such winds. We incorporate the weak-field longitudinal Zeeman effect in the Sobolev approximation to yield integral expressions for the flux of circularly polarized emission. To illustrate the results, two specific wind flows are considered: (i) spherical constant expansion with v(r) =v∞ and (ii) homologous expansion with v(r) ~r. Axial and split monopole magnetic fields are used to schematically illustrate the polarized profiles. For constant expansion, optically thin lines yield the well-known `flat-topped' total intensity emission profiles and an antisymmetric circularly polarized profile. For homologous expansion, we include occultation and wind absorption to provide a more realistic observational comparison. Occultation severely reduces the circularly polarized flux in the redshifted component, and in the blueshifted component, the polarization is reduced by partially offsetting emission and absorption contributions. We find that for a surface field of approximately 100 G, the largest polarizations result for thin but strong recombination emission lines. Peak polarizations are approximately 0.05 per cent, which presents a substantial although not inconceivable sensitivity challenge for modern instrumentation.

  3. Validity of approximate methods in molecular scattering. III - Effective potential and coupled states approximations for differential and gas kinetic cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monchick, L.; Green, S.

    1977-01-01

    Two dimensionality-reducing approximations, the j sub z-conserving coupled states (sometimes called the centrifugal decoupling) method and the effective potential method, were applied to collision calculations of He with CO and with HCl. The coupled states method was found to be sensitive to the interpretation of the centrifugal angular momentum quantum number in the body-fixed frame, but the choice leading to the original McGuire-Kouri expression for the scattering amplitude - and to the simplest formulas - proved to be quite successful in reproducing differential and gas kinetic cross sections. The computationally cheaper effective potential method was much less accurate.

  4. Spatial averaging effects of hydrophone on field characterization of planar transducer using Fresnel approximation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Guangzhen; Yang, Ping; He, Longbiao; Feng, Xiujuan

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve the existing models that allow spatial averaging effects of piezoelectric hydrophones to be accounted for. The model derived in the present study is valid for a planar source and was verified using transducers operating at 5 and 20MHz. It is based on Fresnel approximation and enables corrections for both on-axis and off-axis measurements. A single-integral approximate formula for the axial acoustic pressure was derived, and the validity of the Fresnel approximation in the near field of the planar transducer was examined. The numerical results obtained using 5 and 20MHz planar transmitters with an effective diameter of 12.7mm showed that the derived model could account for spatial averaging effects to within 0.2% with Beissner's exact integral (Beissner, 1981), for k(a+b)2≫π (where k is the circular wavenumber, and a and b are the effective radii of the transmitter and hydrophone, respectively). The field distributions along the acoustic axis and the beam directivity patterns are also included in the model. The spatial averaging effects of the hydrophone were generally observed to cause underestimation of the absolute pressure amplitudes of the acoustic beam, and overestimation of the cross-sectional size of the beam directivity pattern. However, the cross-sectional size of the directivity pattern was also found to be underestimated in the "far zone" (beyond Y0=a(2)/λ) of the transmitter. The results of this study indicate that the spatial averaging effect on the beam directivity pattern is negligible for π(γ(2)+4γ)s≪1 (where γ=b/a, and s is the normalized distance to the planar transducer).

  5. Dielectric Matrix Formulation of Correlation Energies in the Random Phase Approximation: Inclusion of Exchange Effects.

    PubMed

    Mussard, Bastien; Rocca, Dario; Jansen, Georg; Ángyán, János G

    2016-05-10

    Starting from the general expression for the ground state correlation energy in the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem (ACFDT) framework, it is shown that the dielectric matrix formulation, which is usually applied to calculate the direct random phase approximation (dRPA) correlation energy, can be used for alternative RPA expressions including exchange effects. Within this famework, the ACFDT analog of the second order screened exchange (SOSEX) approximation leads to a logarithmic formula for the correlation energy similar to the direct RPA expression. Alternatively, the contribution of the exchange can be included in the kernel used to evaluate the response functions. In this case, the use of an approximate kernel is crucial to simplify the formalism and to obtain a correlation energy in logarithmic form. Technical details of the implementation of these methods are discussed, and it is shown that one can take advantage of density fitting or Cholesky decomposition techniques to improve the computational efficiency; a discussion on the numerical quadrature made on the frequency variable is also provided. A series of test calculations on atomic correlation energies and molecular reaction energies shows that exchange effects are instrumental for improvement over direct RPA results.

  6. On the unreasonable effectiveness of the post-Newtonian approximation in gravitational physics.

    PubMed

    Will, Clifford M

    2011-04-12

    The post-Newtonian approximation is a method for solving Einstein's field equations for physical systems in which motions are slow compared to the speed of light and where gravitational fields are weak. Yet it has proven to be remarkably effective in describing certain strong-field, fast-motion systems, including binary pulsars containing dense neutron stars and binary black hole systems inspiraling toward a final merger. The reasons for this effectiveness are largely unknown. When carried to high orders in the post-Newtonian sequence, predictions for the gravitational-wave signal from inspiraling compact binaries will play a key role in gravitational-wave detection by laser-interferometric observatories.

  7. Experimental test for approximately dispersionless forces in the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Maria; Batelaan, Herman

    2016-07-01

    A new class of forces, approximately dispersionless forces, were recently predicted as part of a semiclassical description of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Electron time-of-flight measurements have been performed that test for such forces. Magnetized iron cores used in the previous time-of-flight experiment may affect potential back-action forces and have, therefore, been eliminated. We report that no forces were detected. This finding supports the local and nonlocal, quantum descriptions of the AB effect and rules out local, semiclassical descriptions.

  8. Core polarization effects in the Hartree--Fock--random phase approximation schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Lipparini, E.; Stringari, S.

    1987-02-01

    Core polarization effects in odd nuclei are investigated in the framework of the Hartree--Fock and random phase approximation schemes. The results of the particle vibration coupling model are recovered by linearizing the equations of motion in the interaction Hamiltonian between the external and the core particles. The formalism is used to study the renormalization of diagonal and off-diagonal M1 matrix elements. It is found that M1 polarization effects exhibit a very strong dependence on the range of the force. Copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc.

  9. The effects of hyper-spherical approximation of Yukawa potential to diffusion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In Gee; Murillo, Michael S.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of Yukawa potential to the diffusion properties of binary ionic mixtures are investigated in terms of both the classical molecular dynamics and the kinetic theory. The Yukawa interatomic potential is treated by means of the hyper-spherical approximation, which replaces the Ewald summation by a multiple of the hyperbolic trigonometric functions and the lattice summation of screening. The influence of the hyper-spherical approximation of the Yukawa potential is able to be understood through the calculations of transport coefficients with the relationship to Coulomb logarithm. Numerical studies over a various range of the Debye-Hückel screening parameter and of the plasma coupling parameter to binary ionic mixtures will be provided. We consider primarily the interdiffusion coefficients and then discuss about the mixing properties of self-diffusion coefficients.

  10. Hamiltonian theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect: Conserving approximation for incompressible fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Ganpathy

    2001-11-01

    A microscopic Hamiltonian theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect developed by Shankar and the present author based on the fermionic Chern-Simons approach has recently been quite successful in calculating gaps and finite-tempertature properties in fractional quantum Hall states. Initially proposed as a small-q theory, it was subsequently extended by Shankar to form an algebraically consistent theory for all q in the lowest Landau level. Such a theory is amenable to a conserving approximation in which the constraints have vanishing correlators and decouple from physical response functions. Properties of the incompressible fractions are explored in this conserving approximation, including the magnetoexciton dispersions and the evolution of the small-q structure factor as ν-->12. Finally, a formalism capable of dealing with a nonuniform ground-state charge density is developed and used to show how the correct fractional value of the quasiparticle charge emerges from the theory.

  11. Effective vortex mass from microscopic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung Hoon; Kim, June Seo; Kim, Min Jae; Ao, Ping

    2005-03-01

    We calculate the effective mass of a single quantized vortex in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductor at finite temperature. Based on effective action approach, we arrive at the effective mass of a vortex as integral of the spectral function J(ω) divided by ω3 over frequency. The spectral function is given in terms of the quantum-mechanical transition elements of the gradient of the Hamiltonian between two Bogoliubov-deGennes (BdG) eigenstates. Based on self-consistent numerical diagonalization of the BdG equation we find that the effective mass per unit length of vortex at zero temperature is of order m(kfξ0)2 ( kf=Fermi momentum, ξ0=coherence length), essentially equaling the electron mass displaced within the coherence length from the vortex core. Transitions between the core states are responsible for most of the mass. The mass reaches a maximum value at T≈0.5Tc and decreases continuously to zero at Tc .

  12. Type-II superlattice hole effective masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2017-08-01

    A long wavelength infrared (LWIR) type-II superlattice (T2SL) is typically characterized by a very large valence-band-edge curvature effective mass, which is often assumed to lead to poor hole mobility. A detailed examination of the LWIR T2SL heavy-hole 1 (hh1) band structure reveals that a hole with non-zero in-plane momentum (k‖ ≠ 0) can move with a much larger group velocity component along the growth direction than one at the band edge (k‖ = 0), and that the hh1 miniband width can exhibit a very strong dependence on the in-plane wavevector k‖ . To distill the band structure effects relevant to hole transport into a simple quantity, we describe a formulation for computing the thermally averaged conductivity effective mass. We show that the LWIR T2SL hole conductivity effective masses along the growth direction can be orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding band-edge curvature effective masses. We compare the conductivities effective masses of InAs/GaSb T2SL and InAs/InAsSb T2SL grown pseudomorphically on GaSb substrate, as well as the metamorphic bulk InAsSb and InAs/InAsSb T2SL.

  13. Pressure effects on hole-burning spectra in glasses: Calculation beyond the Gaussian approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kador, L.

    1991-07-01

    In a recent publication, Laird and Skinner [J. Chem. Phys. 90, 3274 (1990)] proposed a microscopic statistical theory describing the effects of external hydrostatic pressure on hole-burning spectra of impurity molecules in amorphous solids. Using the so-called Gaussian approximation, which is valid in the limit that the density of the solvent molecules is high, the theory predicts the pressure kernel of a hole spectrum as well as the shape of the inhomogeneous band to be characterized by Gaussian profiles. Whereas the maximum position of the kernel increases from lower to higher solvent shift values in the inhomogeneous distribution, its width is constant. Numerical calculations performed without this approximation, however, show that for the data of poly(ethylene) and poly(styrene) doped with free-base phthalocyanine, not only the pressure shift but also the pressure broadening of hole-burning spectra increases from the blue to the red edge of the absorption band. Moreover, the hole spectra are predicted to become asymmetric when the sample is exposed to hydrostatic pressure. These deviations from the results of the Gaussian approximation are distinctly more pronounced than the deviations of the inhomogeneous band shapes from Gaussian profiles.

  14. Magnetocaloric effect (MCE): Microscopic approach within Tyablikov approximation for anisotropic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelnikova, O. A.; Prudnikov, V. N.; Rudoy, Yu. G.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to generalize the microscopic approach to the description of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) started by Kokorina and Medvedev (E.E. Kokorina, M.V. Medvedev, Physica B 416 (2013) 29.) by applying it to the anisotropic ferromagnet of the "easy axis" type in two settings-with external magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the axis of easy magnetization. In the last case there appears the field induced (or spin-reorientation) phase transition which occurs at the critical value of the external magnetic field. This value is proportional to the exchange anisotropy constant at low temperatures, but with the rise of temperature it may be renormalized (as a rule, proportional to the magnetization). We use the explicit form of the Hamiltonian of the anisotropic ferromagnet and apply widely used random phase approximation (RPA) (known also as Tyablikov approximation in the Green function method) which is more accurate than the well known molecular field approximation (MFA). It is shown that in the first case the magnitude of MCE is raised whereas in the second one the MCE disappears due to compensation of the critical field renormalized with the magnetization.

  15. Simulating the Effect of Uncertain Model Drivers on Hydrologic Predictions via an Approximate Bayesian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, L. A.; Nott, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the extent and effect of observational uncertainty remains a key concern in hydrologic model specification. Advances have been made in developing robust Bayesian approaches for characterizing the impact of uncertain climatological drivers on hydrologic predictions and parameters. However, these approaches are typically very high dimensional, requiring specification of large numbers of variables that represent statistical uncertainty in the model inputs. Recent developments in approximate Bayesian methods offer an elegant alternative to the fully Bayesian approach. Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) is commonly used in situations where a model is easy to simulate from, but where the likelihood is difficult or impossible to calculate. The ABC approach provides an opportunity to develop novel hydrologic statistics for model inference and to develop efficient methods for parameter identification in high dimensional hydrologic models. In this study, we demonstrate the use of approximate Bayesian methods for characterizing uncertain model inputs across multiple hydrologic case studies. Model inference is conducted via statistics that capture hydroclimatic and hydrologic functioning. Our analysis investigates the utility of ABC for model assessment, parameter identification and uncertainty characterization when dealing with potentially large observational uncertainties in hydroclimatic applications.

  16. The self-consistent effective medium approximation (SEMA): New tricks from an old dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, David J.

    2007-05-01

    The fact that the self-consistent effective medium approximation (SEMA) leads to incorrect values for the percolation threshold, as well as for the critical exponents which characterize that threshold, has led to a decline in using that approximation. In this article I argue that SEMA has the unique capability, which is lacking in other approximation schemes for macroscopic response of composite media, of leading to the discovery or prediction of new critical points. This is due to the fact that SEMA can often lead to explicit equations for the macroscopic response of a composite medium, even when that medium has a rather complicated character. In such cases, the SEMA equations are usually coupled and nonlinear, often even transcendental in character. Thus there is no question of finding exact solutions. Nevertheless, a useful ansatz, leading to a closed form asymptotic solution, can often be made. In this way, singularities in the macroscopic response can be identified from a theoretical or mathematical treatment of the physical problem. This is demonstrated for two problems of magneto-transport in a composite medium, where the SEMA equations are solved using asymptotic analysis, leading to new types of critical points and critical behavior.

  17. The Effect of Increasing Mass upon Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Hagan, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if increasing body mass while maintaining bodyweight would affect ground reaction forces and joint kinetics during walking and running. It was hypothesized that performing gait with increased mass while maintaining body weight would result in greater ground reaction forces, and would affect the net joint torques and work at the ankle, knee and hip when compared to gait with normal mass and bodyweight. Vertical ground reaction force was measured for ten subjects (5M/5F) during walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on a treadmill. Subjects completed one minute of locomotion at normal mass and bodyweight and at four added mass (AM) conditions (10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of body mass) in random order. Three-dimensional joint position data were collected via videography. Walking and running were analyzed separately. The addition of mass resulted in several effects. Peak impact forces and loading rates increased during walking, but decreased during running. Peak propulsive forces decreased during walking and did not change during running. Stride time increased and hip extensor angular impulse and positive work increased as mass was added for both styles of locomotion. Work increased at a greater rate during running than walking. The adaptations to additional mass that occur during walking are different than during running. Increasing mass during exercise in microgravity may be beneficial to increasing ground reaction forces during walking and strengthening hip musculature during both walking and running. Future study in true microgravity is required to determine if the adaptations found would be similar in a weightless environment.

  18. An effective two-flavor approximation for neutrino survival probabilities in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakata, Hisakazu

    2017-05-01

    It is known in vacuum that the three-flavor neutrino survival probability can be approximated by the effective two-flavor form to first orders in ɛ≡ Δm 21 2 / Δm 31 2 , with introduction of the effective Δm αα 2 ( α = e, μ, τ), in regions of neutrino energy E and baseline L such that Δm 31 2 L/2 E ˜ π. Here, we investigate the question of whether the similar effective two-flavor approximation can be formulated for the survival probability in matter. Using a perturbative framework with the expansion parameters ɛ and {s}_{13}∝ √{ɛ} , we give an affirmative answer to this question and the resultant two-flavor form of the probability is valid to order ɛ. However, we observe a contrived feature of the effective Δm αα 2 ( a) in matter. It ceases to be a combination of the fundamental parameters and has energy dependence, which may be legitimate because it comes from the matter potential. But, it turned out that Δm μμ 2 ( a) becomes L-dependent, though Δm ee 2 ( a) is not, which casts doubt on adequacy of the concept of effective Δ m 2 in matter. We also find that the appearance probability in vacuum admits, to order ɛ, the similar effective two-flavor form with a slightly different effective Δm βα 2 from the disappearance channel. A general result is derived to describe suppression of the matter effect in the oscillation probability.

  19. [Approximate entropy of the placebo effect in clinical trials of newer antidepressants].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Maria Eloisa; Cuestas, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Recent research concluded that antidepressant drugs are ineffective in treating moderate or severe depression. Statistically, there are no differences between the results with active drugs or placebo. Some authors have attributed this fail to variability or irregularity of the placebo effect in depressed patients or artifacts induced by meta-analysis. This fact highlights the difficulties faced by the research of psychoactive drugs in depression and revives the debate about the usefulness of the employ of placebo in these studies. This study aimed to determine the variability of the placebo effect in antidepressant clinical trials in simple linear and non-linear complex models. We performed a secondary analysis of data from 35 trials presented as evidence to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for approval of new generation antidepressants, all double-blind controlled with placebo in patients with unipolar mild or moderate depressive disorder, according to the criteria of "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).Articles reviewed included 5133 patients . We have calculated the coefficient of variability, autocorrelation and approximate entropy of the placebo and treatment effects to determine whether the variability or regularity between different studies should be attributed to meta-analytical methods, placebo effect or ineffective treatment itself. The coefficient of variability in the placebo group was 26.49% and 18.81% in the treatment group. The placebo effect autocorrelation was within the confidential limits while the treatment group was outside showed cyclical variation. The approximate entropy value (ApEn N=35,m=2,R=2) in the placebo group was 0.5579 and 0.5744 in treatment group, leading to the conclusion that placebo effect is highly consistent and regular in complex non-linear models. The apparent variability of the placebo effect in depressed patients should be due to artifacts induced by simple linear models analysis.

  20. p-barp-Annihilation processes in the tree approximation of SU(3) chiral effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, V. E.; Kudryavtsev, A. E. Romanov, A. I.; Weinberg, V. M.

    2012-12-15

    The p-barp-annihilation reactions p-barp {yields} {eta}{eta} {eta} and p-barp {yields} {eta}KK-bar at rest are considered in the tree approximation in the framework of SU(3) chiral effective theory at leading order. The calculated branchings are compared with the data. The results for neutral ({eta}{eta}{eta}, K{sup 0}K-bar{sup 0}{sub {eta}}) and charged (K{sup +}K{sup -}{sub {eta}}) channels are essentially different.

  1. Structure of plasmonic aerogel and the breakdown of the effective medium approximation.

    PubMed

    Grogan, Michael D W; Heck, Susannah C; Hood, Katie M; Maier, Stefan A; Birks, Tim A

    2011-02-01

    A method for making aerogel doped with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) produces a composite material with a well-defined localized surface plasmon resonance peak at 520 nm. The width of the extinction feature indicates the GNPs are well dispersed in the aerogel, making it suited to optical study. A simple effective medium approximation cannot explain the peak extinction wavelengths. The plasmonic field extends on a scale where aerogel cannot be considered isotropic, so a new model is required: a 5 nm glass coating on the GNPs models the extinction spectrum of the composite material, with air (aerogel), methanol (alcogel), or toluene filling the pores.

  2. Improving the In-Medium Similarity Renormalization Group via approximate inclusion of three-body effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Titus; Bogner, Scott

    2016-09-01

    The In-Medium Similarity Renormalization Group (IM-SRG) has been applied successfully to the ground state of closed shell finite nuclei. Recent work has extended its ability to target excited states of these closed shell systems via equation of motion methods, and also complete spectra of the whole SD shell via effective shell model interactions. A recent alternative method for solving of the IM-SRG equations, based on the Magnus expansion, not only provides a computationally feasible route to producing observables, but also allows for approximate handling of induced three-body forces. Promising results for several systems, including finite nuclei, will be presented and discussed.

  3. Improving the In-Medium Similarity Renormalization Group via approximate inclusion of three-body effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Titus; Bogner, Scott

    2015-10-01

    The In-Medium Similarity Renormalization Group (IM-SRG) has been applied successfully not only to several closed shell finite nuclei, but has recently been used to produce effective shell model interactions that are competitive with phenomenological interactions in the SD shell. A recent alternative method for solving of the IM-SRG equations, called the Magnus expansion, not only provides a computationally feasible route to producing observables, but also allows for approximate handling of induced three-body forces. Promising results for several systems, including finite nuclei, will be presented and discussed.

  4. From Mie to Fresnel through effective medium approximation with multipole contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malasi, Abhinav; Kalyanaraman, Ramki; Garcia, Hernando

    2014-06-01

    The Mie theory gives the exact solution to scattering from spherical particles while the Fresnel theory provides the solution to optical behavior of multilayer thin film structures. Often, the bridge between the two theories to explain the behavior of materials such as nanoparticles in a host dielectric matrix, is done by effective medium approximation (EMA) models which exclusively rely on the dipolar response of the scattering objects. Here, we present a way to capture multipole effects using EMA. The effective complex dielectric function of the composite is derived using the Clausius-Mossotti relation and the multipole coefficients of the approximate Mie theory. The optical density (OD) of the dielectric slab is then calculated using the Fresnel approach. We have applied the resulting equation to predict the particle size dependent dipole and quadrupole behavior for spherical Ag nanoparticles embedded in glass matrix. This dielectric function contains the relevant properties of EMA and at the same time predicts the multipole contributions present in the single particle Mie model.

  5. Long-range effective interactions in a lattice in the semiclassical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamani, Evaristo; Calcina-Nogales, M.; Sanjinés, Diego

    2017-06-01

    We consider the semiclassical model of an extended tight-binding Hamiltonian comprising nearest- and next-to-nearest-neighbor interactions for a charged particle hopping in a lattice in the presence of a static arbitrary field and a rapidly oscillating uniform field. The application of Kapitza’s method yields a time-independent effective Hamiltonian with long-range hopping elements that depend on the external static and oscillating fields. Our calculations show that the semiclassical approximation is quite reliable as it yields, for a homogeneous oscillating field, the same effective hopping elements as those derived within the quantum approach. Besides, by controlling the oscillating field, we can engineer the interactions so as to suppress the otherwise dominant interactions (nearest neighbors) and leave as observable effects those due to the otherwise remanent interactions (distant neighbors).

  6. Effective-medium approximation for lattice random walks with long-range jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Felix; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the random walk on a lattice with random transition rates and arbitrarily long-range jumps. We employ Bruggeman's effective-medium approximation (EMA) to find the disorder-averaged (coarse-grained) dynamics. The EMA procedure replaces the disordered system with a cleverly guessed reference system in a self-consistent manner. We give necessary conditions on the reference system and discuss possible physical mechanisms of anomalous diffusion. In the case of a power-law scaling between transition rates and distance, lattice variants of Lévy-flights emerge as the effective medium, and the problem is solved analytically, bearing the effective anomalous diffusivity. Finally, we discuss several example distributions and demonstrate very good agreement with numerical simulations.

  7. Effects of Non-Symbolic Approximate Number Practice on Symbolic Numerical Abilities in Pakistani Children.

    PubMed

    Khanum, Saeeda; Hanif, Rubina; Spelke, Elizabeth S; Berteletti, Ilaria; Hyde, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Current theories of numerical cognition posit that uniquely human symbolic number abilities connect to an early developing cognitive system for representing approximate numerical magnitudes, the approximate number system (ANS). In support of this proposal, recent laboratory-based training experiments with U.S. children show enhanced performance on symbolic addition after brief practice comparing or adding arrays of dots without counting: tasks that engage the ANS. Here we explore the nature and generality of this effect through two brief training experiments. In Experiment 1, elementary school children in Pakistan practiced either a non-symbolic numerical addition task or a line-length addition task with no numerical content, and then were tested on symbolic addition. After training, children in the numerical training group completed the symbolic addition test faster than children in the line length training group, suggesting a causal role of brief, non-symbolic numerical training on exact, symbolic addition. These findings replicate and extend the core findings of a recent U.S. laboratory-based study to non-Western children tested in a school setting, attesting to the robustness and generalizability of the observed training effects. Experiment 2 tested whether ANS training would also enhance the consistency of performance on a symbolic number line task. Over several analyses of the data there was some evidence that approximate number training enhanced symbolic number line placements relative to control conditions. Together, the findings suggest that engagement of the ANS through brief training procedures enhances children's immediate attention to number and engagement with symbolic number tasks.

  8. Effects of Non-Symbolic Approximate Number Practice on Symbolic Numerical Abilities in Pakistani Children

    PubMed Central

    Khanum, Saeeda; Hanif, Rubina; Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Berteletti, Ilaria; Hyde, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Current theories of numerical cognition posit that uniquely human symbolic number abilities connect to an early developing cognitive system for representing approximate numerical magnitudes, the approximate number system (ANS). In support of this proposal, recent laboratory-based training experiments with U.S. children show enhanced performance on symbolic addition after brief practice comparing or adding arrays of dots without counting: tasks that engage the ANS. Here we explore the nature and generality of this effect through two brief training experiments. In Experiment 1, elementary school children in Pakistan practiced either a non-symbolic numerical addition task or a line-length addition task with no numerical content, and then were tested on symbolic addition. After training, children in the numerical training group completed the symbolic addition test faster than children in the line length training group, suggesting a causal role of brief, non-symbolic numerical training on exact, symbolic addition. These findings replicate and extend the core findings of a recent U.S. laboratory-based study to non-Western children tested in a school setting, attesting to the robustness and generalizability of the observed training effects. Experiment 2 tested whether ANS training would also enhance the consistency of performance on a symbolic number line task. Over several analyses of the data there was some evidence that approximate number training enhanced symbolic number line placements relative to control conditions. Together, the findings suggest that engagement of the ANS through brief training procedures enhances children's immediate attention to number and engagement with symbolic number tasks. PMID:27764117

  9. On the unreasonable effectiveness of the post-Newtonian approximation in gravitational physics

    PubMed Central

    Will, Clifford M.

    2011-01-01

    The post-Newtonian approximation is a method for solving Einstein’s field equations for physical systems in which motions are slow compared to the speed of light and where gravitational fields are weak. Yet it has proven to be remarkably effective in describing certain strong-field, fast-motion systems, including binary pulsars containing dense neutron stars and binary black hole systems inspiraling toward a final merger. The reasons for this effectiveness are largely unknown. When carried to high orders in the post-Newtonian sequence, predictions for the gravitational-wave signal from inspiraling compact binaries will play a key role in gravitational-wave detection by laser-interferometric observatories. PMID:21447714

  10. Effects of Approximate Filtering on the Appearance of Bidirectional Texture Functions.

    PubMed

    Jarabo, Adrian; Wu, Hongzhi; Dorsey, Julie; Rushmeier, Holly; Gutierrez, Diego

    2014-06-01

    The BTF data structure was a breakthrough for appearance modeling in computer graphics. More research is needed though to make BTFs practical in rendering applications. We present the first systematic study of the effects of Approximate filtering on the appearance of BTFs, by exploring the spatial, angular and temporal domains over a varied set of stimuli. We perform our initial experiments on simple geometry and lighting, and verify our observations on more complex settings. We consider multi-dimensional filtering versus conventional mipmapping, and find that multi-dimensional filtering produces superior results. We examine the tradeoff between under- and oversampling, and find that different filtering strategies can be applied in each domain, while maintaining visual equivalence with respect to a ground truth. For example, we find that preserving contrast is more important in static than dynamic images, indicating greater levels of spatial filtering are possible for animations. We find that filtering can be performed more aggressively in the angular domain than in the spatial. Additionally, we find that high-level visual descriptors of the BTF are linked to the perceptual performance of pre-filtered approximations. In turn, some of these high-level descriptors correlate with low level statistics of the BTF. We show six different practical applications of applying our findings to improving filtering, rendering and compression strategies.

  11. Thermal conductivity in porous media: Percolation-based effective-medium approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Daigle, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of porosity and saturation-dependent thermal conductivities is necessary to investigate heat and water transfer in natural porous media such as rocks and soils. Thermal conductivity in a porous medium is affected by the complicated relationship between the topology and geometry of the pore space and the solid matrix. However, as water content increases from completely dry to fully saturated, the effect of the liquid phase on thermal conductivity may increase substantially. Although various methods have been proposed to model the porosity and saturation dependence of thermal conductivity, most are empirical or quasiphysical. In this study, we present a theoretical upscaling framework from percolation theory and the effective-medium approximation, which is called percolation-based effective-medium approximation (P-EMA). The proposed model predicts the thermal conductivity in porous media from endmember properties (e.g., air, solid matrix, and saturating fluid thermal conductivities), a scaling exponent, and a percolation threshold. In order to evaluate our porosity and saturation-dependent models, we compare our theory with 193 porosity-dependent thermal conductivity measurements and 25 saturation-dependent thermal conductivity data sets and find excellent match. We also find values for the scaling exponent different than the universal value of 2, in insulator-conductor systems, and also different from 0.76, the exponent in conductor-superconductor mixtures, in three dimensions. These results indicate that the thermal conductivity under fully and partially saturated conditions conforms to nonuniversal behavior. This means the value of the scaling exponent changes from medium to medium and depends not only on structural and geometrical properties of the medium but also characteristics (e.g., wetting or nonwetting) of the saturating fluid.

  12. Degeneracy effects of neutrino mass ejection in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurek, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    A neutrino mechanism is discussed in order to explain supernovae in massive stars. An argument is presented for supernova mass ejection through leptonic neutrino transport characteristics suppressed by the arbitrary zero chemical potential condition. Results show that lepton conservation effects may be important in supernova neutrino transport. At low temperature and density the diffusion approximation becomes less precise because of the long mean free paths of low energy neutrinos. The amount of equilibrium neutrino spectrum affected here is small over most of the collapsing supernova structure.

  13. Gravitational and mass distribution effects on stationary superwinds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Añorve-Zeferino, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    Here, we model the effect of non-uniform dynamical mass distributions and their associated gravitational fields on the stationary galactic superwind solution. We do this by considering an analogue injection of mass and energy from stellar winds and SNe. We consider both compact dark-matter and baryonic haloes that does not extend further from the galaxies optical radii Ropt as well as extended gravitationally interacting ones. We consider halo profiles that emulate the results of recent cosmological simulations and coincide also with observational estimations from galaxy surveys. This allows us to compare the analytical superwind solution with outflows from different kinds of galaxies. We give analytical formulae that establish when an outflow is possible and also characterize distinct flow regimes and enrichment scenarios. We also constraint the parameter space by giving approximate limits above which gravitation, self-gravitation and radiative cooling can inhibit the stationary flow. We obtain analytical expressions for the free superwind hydrodynamical profiles. We find that the existence or inhibition of the superwind solution highly depends on the steepness and concentration of the dynamical mass and the mass and energy injection rates. We compare our results with observational data and a recent numerical work. We put our results in the context of the mass-metallicity relationship to discuss observational evidence related to the selective loss of metals from the least massive galaxies and also discuss the case of massive galaxies.

  14. Spin memory effect for compact binaries in the post-Newtonian approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, David A.

    2017-04-01

    The spin memory effect is a recently predicted relativistic phenomenon in asymptotically flat spacetimes that become nonradiative infinitely far in the past and future. Between these early and late times, the magnetic-parity part of the time integral of the gravitational-wave strain can undergo a nonzero change; this difference is the spin memory effect. Families of freely falling observers around an isolated source can measure this effect, in principle, and fluxes of angular momentum per unit solid angle (or changes in superspin charges) generate the effect. The spin memory effect had not been computed explicitly for astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, such as compact binaries. In this paper, we compute the spin memory in terms of a set of radiative multipole moments of the gravitational-wave strain. The result of this calculation allows us to establish the following results about the spin memory: (i) We find that the accumulation of the spin memory behaves in a qualitatively different way from that of the displacement memory effect for nonspinning, quasicircular compact binaries in the post-Newtonian approximation: the spin memory undergoes a large secular growth over the duration of the inspiral, whereas for the displacement effect this increase is small. (ii) The rate at which the spin memory grows is equivalent to a nonlinear, but nonoscillatory and nonhereditary effect in the gravitational waveform that had been previously calculated for nonspinning, quasicircular compact binaries. (iii) This rate of buildup of the spin memory could potentially be detected by future gravitational-wave detectors by carefully combining the measured waveforms from hundreds of gravitational-wave detections of compact binaries.

  15. Parametric effects of CFL number and artificial smoothing on numerical solutions using implicit approximate factorization algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, E. O.

    1986-01-01

    An implicit approximate factorization algorithm is employed to quantify the parametric effects of Courant number and artificial smoothing on numerical solutions of the unsteady 3-D Euler equations for a windmilling propeller (low speed) flow field. The results show that propeller global or performance chracteristics vary strongly with Courant number and artificial dissipation parameters, though the variation is such less severe at high Courant numbers. Candidate sets of Courant number and dissipation parameters could result in parameter-dependent solutions. Parameter-independent numerical solutions can be obtained if low values of the dissipation parameter-time step ratio are used in the computations. Furthermore, it is realized that too much artificial damping can degrade numerical stability. Finally, it is demonstrated that highly resolved meshes may, in some cases, delay convergence, thereby suggesting some optimum cell size for a given flow solution. It is suspected that improper boundary treatment may account for the cell size constraint.

  16. Two-effective-center approximation for proton-impact single ionization of hydrogen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari-Adivi, Ebrahim

    2015-10-01

    Some closed-form expressions are derived for the partial direct and indirect transition amplitudes for proton-impact single ionization of the hydrogen molecules using a first-order two-effective center continuum-wave approximation. The method satisfies the correct boundary conditions in the entrance channel. The basic assumption in this model is that when the active electron is ionized from one of the atomic centers in the molecule, the other scattering center is completely screened by the passive electron. Consequently, the transition amplitude can be expressed as a superposition of the partial ionization amplitudes from two independent scattering centers located at a constant distance from each other. The superposition of the partial amplitudes leads to different interference patterns for various orientations of the molecular target. The calculated cross sections are compared with the experiments and also with other theories. The comparison shows that the present results are reliable.

  17. Isotopic mass and alpha heating effects in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1994-09-01

    Sets of similar TFTR discharges with varying amounts of D and T are compared. The T content is altered by varying the mix of D and T NBI at approximately constant total NBI power. The total plasma current, toroidal field, central Z{sub eff}, and wall conditions are very similar in each set. The electron density profiles are approximately similar. The sets contain pairs of discharges with D-only and DT-NBI. Several sets also contain discharges with T-only NBI. The discharges are analyzed using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Good agreement with measured parameters is achieved. Profiles are computed for the isotopic mass of the hydrogenic thermal species A, and for the hydrogenic thermal plus beam species A{sub tot}. Their volume averages increase approximately linearly as the fraction of T-NBI power increases, and they are slightly peaked for DT and T-only NBI discharges. The total energy and the total energy confinement time increase approximately linearly with A{sub tot} up to 30%. The beam fraction of the total energy at 0.5 sec of NBI remains relatively constant, {approx} 40--50% as A{sub tot} varies. The thermal ion fraction increases slightly, and the electron fraction decreases. The isotopic and alpha heating effects contribute in roughly equal amounts to the increase in central T{sub e}.

  18. Applicability of the Effective-Medium Approximation to Heterogeneous Aerosol Particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The effective-medium approximation (EMA) is based on the assumption that a heterogeneous particle can have a homogeneous counterpart possessing similar scattering and absorption properties. We analyze the numerical accuracy of the EMA by comparing superposition T-matrix computations for spherical aerosol particles filled with numerous randomly distributed small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie computations based on the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule. We verify numerically that the EMA can indeed be realized for inclusion size parameters smaller than a threshold value. The threshold size parameter depends on the refractive-index contrast between the host and inclusion materials and quite often does not exceed several tenths, especially in calculations of the scattering matrix and the absorption cross section. As the inclusion size parameter approaches the threshold value, the scattering-matrix errors of the EMA start to grow with increasing the host size parameter and or the number of inclusions. We confirm, in particular, the existence of the effective-medium regime in the important case of dust aerosols with hematite or air-bubble inclusions, but then the large refractive-index contrast necessitates inclusion size parameters of the order of a few tenths. Irrespective of the highly restricted conditions of applicability of the EMA, our results provide further evidence that the effective-medium regime must be a direct corollary of the macroscopic Maxwell equations under specific assumptions.

  19. Applicability of the effective-medium approximation to heterogeneous aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Liu, Li

    2016-07-01

    The effective-medium approximation (EMA) is based on the assumption that a heterogeneous particle can have a homogeneous counterpart possessing similar scattering and absorption properties. We analyze the numerical accuracy of the EMA by comparing superposition T-matrix computations for spherical aerosol particles filled with numerous randomly distributed small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie computations based on the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule. We verify numerically that the EMA can indeed be realized for inclusion size parameters smaller than a threshold value. The threshold size parameter depends on the refractive-index contrast between the host and inclusion materials and quite often does not exceed several tenths, especially in calculations of the scattering matrix and the absorption cross section. As the inclusion size parameter approaches the threshold value, the scattering-matrix errors of the EMA start to grow with increasing the host size parameter and/or the number of inclusions. We confirm, in particular, the existence of the effective-medium regime in the important case of dust aerosols with hematite or air-bubble inclusions, but then the large refractive-index contrast necessitates inclusion size parameters of the order of a few tenths. Irrespective of the highly restricted conditions of applicability of the EMA, our results provide further evidence that the effective-medium regime must be a direct corollary of the macroscopic Maxwell equations under specific assumptions.

  20. Effect of rheological approximations on slab detachment in 3D numerical simulations of continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2017-04-01

    It is commonly accepted that slab detachment results from the development of extensional stresses within the subducting slab. Subduction slowdown due to arrival of buoyant continental material at the trench is considered to cause such stress build up in the slab. Following slab detachment, slab pull partially or completely loses its strength and hot asthenosphere may flow through the slab window, which can have major consequences for continental collision. The dynamics of slab detachment has been extensively studied in 2D (i.e. analytical and numerical), but 3D models of slab detachment during continental collision remain largely unexplored. Some of the previous 3D models have investigated the role of an asymmetric margin on the propagation of slab detachment (van Hunen and Allen, 2011), the impact of slab detachment on the curvature of orogenic belts (Capitanio and Replumaz, 2013), the role of the collision rate on slab detachment depth (Li et al., 2013) or the effect of along-trench variations on slab detachment (Duretz et al., 2014). However, rheology of mantle and lithosphere is known to have a major influence on the dynamics of subduction. Here, we explore a range of different rheological approximations to understand their sensitivity on the possible scenarios. We employ the code LaMEM (Kaus et al., 2016) to perform 3D simulations of subduction/continental collision in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. The models exhibit a wide range of behaviours depending on the rheological law employed: from linear, to temperature-dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheology that takes into account both diffusion and dislocation creep. For example, we find that slab dynamics varies drastically between end member models: in viscous approximations, slab detachment is slow, dominated by viscous thinning, while for a non-linear visco-elasto-plastic rheology, slab detachment is relatively fast, dominated by plastic breaking and inducing strong mantle flow in

  1. The effect of using approximate gametic variance covariance matrices on marker assisted selection by BLUP.

    PubMed

    Totir, Liviu R; Fernando, Rohan L; Dekkers, Jack C M; Fernández, Soledad A; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt

    2004-01-01

    Under additive inheritance, the Henderson mixed model equations (HMME) provide an efficient approach to obtaining genetic evaluations by marker assisted best linear unbiased prediction (MABLUP) given pedigree relationships, trait and marker data. For large pedigrees with many missing markers, however, it is not feasible to calculate the exact gametic variance covariance matrix required to construct HMME. The objective of this study was to investigate the consequences of using approximate gametic variance covariance matrices on response to selection by MABLUP. Two methods were used to generate approximate variance covariance matrices. The first method (Method A) completely discards the marker information for individuals with an unknown linkage phase between two flanking markers. The second method (Method B) makes use of the marker information at only the most polymorphic marker locus for individuals with an unknown linkage phase. Data sets were simulated with and without missing marker data for flanking markers with 2, 4, 6, 8 or 12 alleles. Several missing marker data patterns were considered. The genetic variability explained by marked quantitative trait loci (MQTL) was modeled with one or two MQTL of equal effect. Response to selection by MABLUP using Method A or Method B were compared with that obtained by MABLUP using the exact genetic variance covariance matrix, which was estimated using 15,000 samples from the conditional distribution of genotypic values given the observed marker data. For the simulated conditions, the superiority of MABLUP over BLUP based only on pedigree relationships and trait data varied between 0.1% and 13.5% for Method A, between 1.7% and 23.8% for Method B, and between 7.6% and 28.9% for the exact method. The relative performance of the methods under investigation was not affected by the number of MQTL in the model.

  2. Constrained approximation of effective generators for multiscale stochastic reaction networks and application to conditioned path sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, Simon L.

    2016-10-15

    Efficient analysis and simulation of multiscale stochastic systems of chemical kinetics is an ongoing area for research, and is the source of many theoretical and computational challenges. In this paper, we present a significant improvement to the constrained approach, which is a method for computing effective dynamics of slowly changing quantities in these systems, but which does not rely on the quasi-steady-state assumption (QSSA). The QSSA can cause errors in the estimation of effective dynamics for systems where the difference in timescales between the “fast” and “slow” variables is not so pronounced. This new application of the constrained approach allows us to compute the effective generator of the slow variables, without the need for expensive stochastic simulations. This is achieved by finding the null space of the generator of the constrained system. For complex systems where this is not possible, or where the constrained subsystem is itself multiscale, the constrained approach can then be applied iteratively. This results in breaking the problem down into finding the solutions to many small eigenvalue problems, which can be efficiently solved using standard methods. Since this methodology does not rely on the quasi steady-state assumption, the effective dynamics that are approximated are highly accurate, and in the case of systems with only monomolecular reactions, are exact. We will demonstrate this with some numerics, and also use the effective generators to sample paths of the slow variables which are conditioned on their endpoints, a task which would be computationally intractable for the generator of the full system.

  3. Effects of model approximations for electron, hole, and photon transport in swift heavy ion tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymzhanov, R. A.; Medvedev, N. A.; Volkov, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    The event-by-event Monte Carlo code, TREKIS, was recently developed to describe excitation of the electron subsystems of solids in the nanometric vicinity of a trajectory of a nonrelativistic swift heavy ion (SHI) decelerated in the electronic stopping regime. The complex dielectric function (CDF) formalism was applied in the used cross sections to account for collective response of a matter to excitation. Using this model we investigate effects of the basic assumptions on the modeled kinetics of the electronic subsystem which ultimately determine parameters of an excited material in an SHI track. In particular, (a) effects of different momentum dependencies of the CDF on scattering of projectiles on the electron subsystem are investigated. The 'effective one-band' approximation for target electrons produces good coincidence of the calculated electron mean free paths with those obtained in experiments in metals. (b) Effects of collective response of a lattice appeared to dominate in randomization of electron motion. We study how sensitive these effects are to the target temperature. We also compare results of applications of different model forms of (quasi-) elastic cross sections in simulations of the ion track kinetics, e.g. those calculated taking into account optical phonons in the CDF form vs. Mott's atomic cross sections. (c) It is demonstrated that the kinetics of valence holes significantly affects redistribution of the excess electronic energy in the vicinity of an SHI trajectory as well as its conversion into lattice excitation in dielectrics and semiconductors. (d) It is also shown that induced transport of photons originated from radiative decay of core holes brings the excess energy faster and farther away from the track core, however, the amount of this energy is relatively small.

  4. Two-particle irreducible effective action approach to nonlinear current-conserving approximations in driven systems.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Ramos, J; Calzetta, E

    2009-05-27

    Using closed-time-path two-particle irreducible coarse-grained effective action (CTP 2PI CGEA) techniques, we study the response of an open interacting electronic system to time-dependent external electromagnetic fields. We show that the CTP 2PI CGEA is invariant under a simultaneous gauge transformation of the external field and the full Schwinger-Keldysh propagator, and that this property holds even when the loop expansion of the CTP 2PI CGEA is truncated at arbitrary order. The effective action approach provides a systematic way of calculating the propagator and response functions of the system, via the Schwinger-Dyson equation and the Bethe-Salpeter equations, respectively. We show that, due to the invariance of the CTP 2PI CGEA under external gauge transformations, the response functions calculated from it satisfy the Ward-Takahashi hierarchy, thus warranting the conservation of the electronic current beyond the expectation value level. We also clarify the connection between nonlinear response theory and the WT hierarchy, and discuss an example of an ad hoc approximation that violates it. These findings may be useful in the study of current fluctuations in correlated electronic pumping devices.

  5. Perturbative approximation to hybrid equation of motion coupled cluster/effective fragment potential method

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Debashree

    2014-03-07

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods provide an attractive way to closely retain the accuracy of the QM method with the favorable computational scaling of the MM method. Therefore, it is not surprising that QM/MM methods are being increasingly used for large chemical/biological systems. Hybrid equation of motion coupled cluster singles doubles/effective fragment potential (EOM-CCSD/EFP) methods have been developed over the last few years to understand the effect of solvents and other condensed phases on the electronic spectra of chromophores. However, the computational cost of this approach is still dominated by the steep scaling of the EOM-CCSD method. In this work, we propose and implement perturbative approximations to the EOM-CCSD method in this hybrid scheme to reduce the cost of EOM-CCSD/EFP. The timings and accuracy of this hybrid approach is tested for calculation of ionization energies, excitation energies, and electron affinities of microsolvated nucleic acid bases (thymine and cytosine), phenol, and phenolate.

  6. Solving effective field theory of interacting QCD pomerons in the semiclassical approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S.; Motyka, L.

    2007-06-01

    Effective field theory of Balitsky, Fadin, Kuraev, and Lipatov (BFKL) pomerons interacting by QCD triple pomeron vertices is investigated. Classical equations of motion for the effective pomeron fields are presented being a minimal extension of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation that incorporates both merging and splitting of the pomerons and that is self-dual. The equations are solved for symmetric boundary conditions. The solutions provide the dominant contribution to the scattering amplitudes in the semiclassical approximation. We find that for rapidities of the scattering larger than a critical value Y{sub c} at least two classical solutions exist. Curiously, for each of the two classical solutions with the lowest action the symmetry between the projectile and the target is found to be spontaneously broken, being however preserved for the complete set of classical solutions. The solving configurations at rapidities Y>Y{sub c} consist of a Gribov field being strongly suppressed even at very large gluon momenta and the complementary Gribov field that converges at high Y to a solution of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. Interpretation of the results is given and possible consequences are shortly discussed.

  7. Automatic Single Event Effects Sensitivity Analysis of a 13-Bit Successive Approximation ADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, F.; Muñoz, F.; Palomo, F. R.; Sanz, L.; López-Morillo, E.; Aguirre, M. A.; Jiménez, A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents Analog Fault Tolerant University of Seville Debugging System (AFTU), a tool to evaluate the Single-Event Effect (SEE) sensitivity of analog/mixed signal microelectronic circuits at transistor level. As analog cells can behave in an unpredictable way when critical areas interact with the particle hitting, there is a need for designers to have a software tool that allows an automatic and exhaustive analysis of Single-Event Effects influence. AFTU takes the test-bench SPECTRE design, emulates radiation conditions and automatically evaluates vulnerabilities using user-defined heuristics. To illustrate the utility of the tool, the SEE sensitivity of a 13-bits Successive Approximation Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) has been analysed. This circuit was selected not only because it was designed for space applications, but also due to the fact that a manual SEE sensitivity analysis would be too time-consuming. After a user-defined test campaign, it was detected that some voltage transients were propagated to a node where a parasitic diode was activated, affecting the offset cancelation, and therefore the whole resolution of the ADC. A simple modification of the scheme solved the problem, as it was verified with another automatic SEE sensitivity analysis.

  8. Extension of the KLI approximation toward the exact optimized effective potential.

    PubMed

    Iafrate, G J; Krieger, J B

    2013-03-07

    The integral equation for the optimized effective potential (OEP) is utilized in a compact form from which an accurate OEP solution for the spin-unrestricted exchange-correlation potential, Vxcσ, is obtained for any assumed orbital-dependent exchange-correlation energy functional. The method extends beyond the Krieger-Li-Iafrate (KLI) approximation toward the exact OEP result. The compact nature of the OEP equation arises by replacing the integrals involving the Green's function terms in the traditional OEP equation by an equivalent first-order perturbation theory wavefunction often referred to as the "orbital shift" function. Significant progress is then obtained by solving the equation for the first order perturbation theory wavefunction by use of Dalgarno functions which are determined from well known methods of partial differential equations. The use of Dalgarno functions circumvents the need to explicitly address the Green's functions and the associated problems with "sum over states" numerics; as well, the Dalgarno functions provide ease in dealing with inherent singularities arising from the origin and the zeros of the occupied orbital wavefunctions. The Dalgarno approach for finding a solution to the OEP equation is described herein, and a detailed illustrative example is presented for the special case of a spherically symmetric exchange-correlation potential. For the case of spherical symmetry, the relevant Dalgarno function is derived by direct integration of the appropriate radial equation while utilizing a user friendly method which explicitly treats the singular behavior at the origin and at the nodal singularities arising from the zeros of the occupied states. The derived Dalgarno function is shown to be an explicit integral functional of the exact OEP Vxcσ, thus allowing for the reduction of the OEP equation to a self-consistent integral equation for the exact exchange-correlation potential; the exact solution to this integral equation can be

  9. Effective restoration of dipole sum rules within the renormalized random-phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, N. Quang; Dang, N. Dinh; Hao, T. V. Nhan; Phuc, L. Tan

    2016-12-01

    The dipole excitations for calcium and zirconium isotopes are studied within the fully self-consistent Hartree-Fock mean field incorporated with the renormalized random-phase approximation (RRPA) using the Skyrme interaction SLy5. The RRPA takes into account the effect of ground-state correlations beyond RPA owing to the Pauli principle between the particle-hole pairs that form the RPA excitations as well as the correlations due to the particle-particle and hole-hole transitions, whose effects are treated here in an effective way. By comparing the RPA results with the RRPA ones, which are obtained for isoscalar (IS) and isovector (IV) dipole excitations in 48,52,58Ca and 90,96,110Zr, it is shown that ground-state correlations beyond the RPA reduce the IS transition strengths. They also shift up the energy of the lowest IV dipole state and slightly push down the peak energy of the IV giant dipole resonance. As the result, the energy-weighted sums of strengths of both IS and IV modes decrease, causing the violation of the corresponding energy-weighted sum rules (EWSR). It is shown that this sum rule violation can be eliminated by taking into account the contribution of the particle-particle and hole-hole excitations together with the particle-hole ones in a simple and perturbative way. Consequently, the ratio of the energy-weighted sum of strengths of the pygmy dipole resonance to that of the giant dipole resonance increases.

  10. The relation between degree-2160 spectral models of Earth's gravitational and topographic potential: a guide on global correlation measures and their dependency on approximation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Christian; Rexer, Moritz; Claessens, Sten; Rummel, Reiner

    2017-10-01

    Comparisons between high-degree models of the Earth's topographic and gravitational potential may give insight into the quality and resolution of the source data sets, provide feedback on the modelling techniques and help to better understand the gravity field composition. Degree correlations (cross-correlation coefficients) or reduction rates (quantifying the amount of topographic signal contained in the gravitational potential) are indicators used in a number of contemporary studies. However, depending on the modelling techniques and underlying levels of approximation, the correlation at high degrees may vary significantly, as do the conclusions drawn. The present paper addresses this problem by attempting to provide a guide on global correlation measures with particular emphasis on approximation effects and variants of topographic potential modelling. We investigate and discuss the impact of different effects (e.g., truncation of series expansions of the topographic potential, mass compression, ellipsoidal versus spherical approximation, ellipsoidal harmonic coefficient versus spherical harmonic coefficient (SHC) representation) on correlation measures. Our study demonstrates that the correlation coefficients are realistic only when the model's harmonic coefficients of a given degree are largely independent of the coefficients of other degrees, permitting degree-wise evaluations. This is the case, e.g., when both models are represented in terms of SHCs and spherical approximation (i.e. spherical arrangement of field-generating masses). Alternatively, a representation in ellipsoidal harmonics can be combined with ellipsoidal approximation. The usual ellipsoidal approximation level (i.e. ellipsoidal mass arrangement) is shown to bias correlation coefficients when SHCs are used. Importantly, gravity models from the International Centre for Global Earth Models (ICGEM) are inherently based on this approximation level. A transformation is presented that enables a

  11. Search for Effects Beyond the Born Approximation in Polarization Transfer Observables in ep Elastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, Mehdi

    Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, GE/GM, obtained separately from cross section and polarization transfer measurements. One possible explanation for this difference is a two-photon-exchange (TPEX) contribution. In an effort to search for effects beyond the one-photon-exchange or Born approximation, this thesis reports measurements, of the GEp2gamma experiment, of polarization transfer observables in the elastic H ( e⃗,e' p⃗ ) reaction for three different beam energies at a fixed squared momentum transfer Q² = 2.5 GeV², spanning a wide range of the virtual photon polarization parameter, epsilon. The scattered electrons were detected in coincidence with the protons by the new electromagnetic lead-glass calorimeter BigCal and the High Momentum Spectrometer (HMS), respectively. We extract the polarization of the recoil proton by measuring the azymuthal asymmetry in the angular distribution after a secondary scattering in the CH2 analyzer blocks of the new, double focal plane polarimeter (FPP) installed in the detector hut of the HMS.

  12. Electrical transport anisotropy of uniaxial polycrystalline samples and the effective medium approximation: An application to HTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-García, A.; Muné, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we have applied the effective medium approximation (EMA) to a polycrystalline sample made up of uniaxial crystallites with similar behavior to the high critical temperature superconductors (HTS) at the normal state (σab ≫ σc). As a result the dependence of the anisotropy parameter at the level of the sample, μ =σx /σz , on orientation probability of the grains' a-axes along a certain preferential direction, γxa is obtained. The intrinsic and shape anisotropy parameters of the crystallites constitute input data. In addition, the dependence of the orientation factor, f, which has been introduced in current models on the transport properties of HTS, is calculated as a function of γxa. These results offer a tool to interpret electrical transport measurements at normal state in granular uniaxial superconducting materials with certain texture degree, by means of the correlation between microstructure and electrical transport properties. Moreover, the comparison between the model and some experimental data suggests the presence of intragranular planar defects in the polycrystalline superconductors. They may affect the measurement of paracoherent resistivity and consequently the determination of f mainly in Bi based samples.

  13. X-ray Reflectivity Measurements of Nanoscale Structures: Limits of the Effective Medium Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-Jeong; Soles, Christopher L.; Kang, Shuhui; Wook Ro, Hyun; Lin, Eric K.; Wu, Wen-li

    2007-09-26

    Specular X-ray reflectivity (SXR) can be used, in the limit of the effective medium approximation (EMA), as a high-resolution shape metrology for periodic patterns on a smooth substrate. The EMA means that the density of the solid patterns and the spaces separating the periodic patterns are averaged together. In this limit the density profile as a function of pattern height obtained by SXR can be used to extract quantitative pattern profile information. Here we explore the limitations of SXR as a pattern shape metrology by studying a series of linear grating structures with periodicities ranging from 300 nm to 16 {mu}m and determining at which length scales the EMA breaks down. We also study the angular dependence of the grating orientation with respect to the incident X-ray beam. The gratings systematically are rotated through a series of azimuthal angles with the incident X-ray beams ranging from 0 deg. to 90 deg. . The applicability of the EMA is related to the coherence length of the X-ray source. When the coherence length of beam is larger than the physical dimension of grating periodicities, EMA can be applied for characterizing nanostructures. For our slit-collimated X-ray source, the coherence length in the direction parallel to the long axis of the slit is on the order of 900 nm while the coherence length along the main axis of the beam appears to be in the range of (22 to 26) {mu}m.

  14. Beyond the born approximation: Measuring the two-photon exchange effect at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Robert Paul

    2012-04-01

    Recent results from experiments at Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News VA, which measured the ratio of the electric to magnetic form factors of the proton, G{sub E}/G{sub M}, have forced us to reexamine the single photon exchange approximation in lepton-proton elastic scattering. Discrepancies between the ratio obtained via the time-tested Rosenbluth separation method and newer polarization transfer measurements, which differ by as much as a factor of three, may be resolved by considering the effect of two photon exchange (TPE) processes. The CLAS TPE experiment at Jefferson Laboratory, will determine the effect of two-photon exchange in elastic lepton-proton scattering by precisely measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic cross sections over a large kinematic range (0.1 < {xi} < 0.96, 0.2 {ge} Q{sup 2} {le} 2.0 GeV{sup 2}). We accomplish this by directing the 5.5 GeV primary electron beam, provided by the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), onto a set of radiators and converters to produce simultaneous and identical beams of electron and positrons which collide with our proton target. Acceptance and efficiency concerns are minimized by only considering the ratios of the elastic cross sections and by switching polarity of magnets in the beamline and the spectrometer. Guided by the results of a short 2006 test run and extensive GEANT based modeling, new shielding and beamline components were designed to maximize luminosity. We took data from November 2010 - February 2011. The unique experimental design and challenges of the TPE experiment and the current analysis status will be presented.

  15. Asymmetry distributions and mass effects in dijet events at a polarized HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maul, M.; Schäfer, A.; Mirkes, E.; Rädel, G.

    1998-09-01

    The asymmetry distributions for several kinematic variables are considered for finding a systematic way to maximize the signal for the extraction of the polarized gluon density. The relevance of mass effects for the corresponding dijet cross section is discussed and the different approximations for including mass effects are compared. We also compare via the programs Pepsi and Mepjet two different Monte Carlo (MC) approaches for simulating the expected signal in the dijet asymmetry at a polarized HERA.

  16. Effective Approximation of Molecular Volume Using Atom-Centered Dielectric Functions in Generalized Born Models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianhan

    2010-09-14

    The generalized Born (GB) theory is a prime choice for implicit treatment of solvent that provides a favorable balance between efficiency and accuracy for reliable simulation of protein conformational equilibria. In GB, the dielectric boundary is a key physical property that needs to be properly described. While it is widely accepted that the molecular surface (MS) should provide the most physical description, most existing GB models are based on van der Waals (vdW)-like surfaces for computational simplicity and efficiency. A simple and effective approximation to molecular volume is explored here using atom-centered dielectric functions within the context of a generalized Born model with simple switching (GBSW). The new model, termed GBSW/MS2, is as efficient as the original vdW-like-surface-based GBSW model, but is able to reproduce the Born radii calculated from the "exact" Poisson-Boltzmann theory with a correlation of 0.95. More importantly, examination of the potentials of mean force of hydrogen-bonding and charge-charge interactions demonstrates that GBSW/MS2 correctly captures the first desolvation peaks, a key signature of true MS. Physical parameters including atomic input radii and peptide backbone torsion were subsequently optimized on the basis of solvation free energies of model compounds, potentials of mean force of their interactions, and conformational equilibria of a set of helical and β-hairpin model peptides. The resulting GBSW/MS2 protein force field reasonably recapitulates the structures and stabilities of these model peptides. Several remaining limitations and possible future developments are also discussed.

  17. Modeling relative permeability of water in soil: Application of effective-medium approximation and percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Sahimi, Muhammad; Daigle, Hugh

    2016-07-01

    Accurate prediction of the relative permeability to water under partially saturated condition has broad applications and has been studied intensively since the 1940s by petroleum, chemical, and civil engineers, as well as hydrologists and soil scientists. Many models have been developed for this purpose, ranging from those that represent the pore space as a bundle of capillary tubes, to those that utilize complex networks of interconnected pore bodies and pore throats with various cross-section shapes. In this paper, we propose an approach based on the effective-medium approximation (EMA) and percolation theory in order to predict the water relative permeability. The approach is general and applicable to any type of porous media. We use the method to compute the water relative permeability in porous media whose pore-size distribution follows a power law. The EMA is invoked to predict the relative permeability from the fully saturated pore space to some intermediate water saturation that represents a crossover from the EMA to what we refer to as the "critical region." In the critical region below the crossover water saturation Swx, but still above the critical water saturation Swc (the residual saturation or the percolation threshold of the water phase), the universal power law predicted by percolation theory is used to compute the relative permeability. To evaluate the accuracy of the approach, data for 21 sets of undisturbed laboratory samples were selected from the UNSODA database. For 14 cases, the predicted relative permeabilities are in good agreement with the data. For the remaining seven samples, however, the theory underestimates the relative permeabilities. Some plausible sources of the discrepancy are discussed.

  18. Percolation in the effective-medium approximation: Crossover between phonon and fracton excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.; Orbach, R.; Yu, Kin-Wah

    1984-06-01

    The d-dimensional bond-percolating network has been examined with the use of the effective-medium approximation (EMA) of Odagaki and Lax and of Webman. We have found that the fracton dimensionality d――=1 for 2 for all times of order (p-pc)-2. It is found to be a smooth function of time between the fractal and homogeneous diffusion regimes.

  19. The effect of Fisher information matrix approximation methods in population optimal design calculations.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, Eric A; Nyberg, Joakim; Hooker, Andrew C

    2016-12-01

    With the increasing popularity of optimal design in drug development it is important to understand how the approximations and implementations of the Fisher information matrix (FIM) affect the resulting optimal designs. The aim of this work was to investigate the impact on design performance when using two common approximations to the population model and the full or block-diagonal FIM implementations for optimization of sampling points. Sampling schedules for two example experiments based on population models were optimized using the FO and FOCE approximations and the full and block-diagonal FIM implementations. The number of support points was compared between the designs for each example experiment. The performance of these designs based on simulation/estimations was investigated by computing bias of the parameters as well as through the use of an empirical D-criterion confidence interval. Simulations were performed when the design was computed with the true parameter values as well as with misspecified parameter values. The FOCE approximation and the Full FIM implementation yielded designs with more support points and less clustering of sample points than designs optimized with the FO approximation and the block-diagonal implementation. The D-criterion confidence intervals showed no performance differences between the full and block diagonal FIM optimal designs when assuming true parameter values. However, the FO approximated block-reduced FIM designs had higher bias than the other designs. When assuming parameter misspecification in the design evaluation, the FO Full FIM optimal design was superior to the FO block-diagonal FIM design in both of the examples.

  20. The lens effect of a big spherical inhomogeneity in the linear approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Portilla, M. )

    1990-04-01

    The paper addresses a large gravitational lens, of dimensions comparable with observer-lens-source distances, for arbitrary lens-observer-source angles. The lens is approximated by a small, pressureless, spsherically symmetric perturbation in a Einstein-de Sitter universe. The deflection angle contains essential terms which do not appear when the lens is approximated by an isolated body in a Minkowskian space. These terms should be considered to study the optical appearance of the inhomogeneity. The lens equation explicitly conserves brightness over the whole celestial sphere of the observer. 8 refs.

  1. Dynamic Effective Mass of Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chaur-Jian; Johnson, David L.; Ingale, Rohit A.; Valenza, John J.; Gland, Nicolas; Makse, Hernán A.

    2009-02-01

    We develop the concept of frequency dependent effective mass, Mtilde (ω), of jammed granular materials which occupy a rigid cavity to a filling fraction of 48%, the remaining volume being air of normal room condition or controlled humidity. The dominant features of Mtilde (ω) provide signatures of the dissipation of acoustic modes, elasticity, and aging effects in the granular medium. We perform humidity controlled experiments and interpret the data in terms of a continuum model and a “trap” model of thermally activated capillary bridges at the contact points. The results suggest that attenuation of acoustic waves in granular materials can be influenced significantly by the kinetics of capillary condensation between the asperities at the contacts.

  2. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, A. C., III; Britt, P. F.; Thomas, K. B.

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors' laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane (approximately Ph(CH2)3Ph, or approximately DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  3. Approximation algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Andreas S.; Shmoys, David B.; Williamson, David P.

    1997-01-01

    Increasing global competition, rapidly changing markets, and greater consumer awareness have altered the way in which corporations do business. To become more efficient, many industries have sought to model some operational aspects by gigantic optimization problems. It is not atypical to encounter models that capture 106 separate “yes” or “no” decisions to be made. Although one could, in principle, try all 2106 possible solutions to find the optimal one, such a method would be impractically slow. Unfortunately, for most of these models, no algorithms are known that find optimal solutions with reasonable computation times. Typically, industry must rely on solutions of unguaranteed quality that are constructed in an ad hoc manner. Fortunately, for some of these models there are good approximation algorithms: algorithms that produce solutions quickly that are provably close to optimal. Over the past 6 years, there has been a sequence of major breakthroughs in our understanding of the design of approximation algorithms and of limits to obtaining such performance guarantees; this area has been one of the most flourishing areas of discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. PMID:9370525

  4. Molecular effects in the neutrino mass determination from beta-decay of the tritium molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Fackler, O.; Jeziorski, B.; Kolos, W.; Szalewicz, K.; Monkhorst, H.J.; Mugge, M.

    1986-03-01

    Molecular final state energies and transition probabilities have been computed for beta-decay of the tritium molecule. The results are of sufficient accuracy to make a determination of the electron neutrino rest mass with an error not exceeding a few tenths of an electron volt. Effects of approximate models of tritium beta-decay on the neutrino mass determination are discussed. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Systematic effects of the quenched approximation on the strong penguin contribution to epsilon-prime / epsilon

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Christ, N.H.; Dawson, C.; Laiho, J.W.; Noaki, J.; Li, S.; Soni, A.; /Brookhaven

    2006-03-01

    We discuss the implementation and properties of the quenched approximation in the calculation of the left-right, strong penguin contributions (i.e. Q{sub 6}) to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}. The coefficient of the new chiral logarithm, discovered by Golterman and Pallante, which appears at leading order in quenched chiral perturbation theory is evaluated using both the method proposed by those authors and by an improved approach which is free of power divergent corrections. The result implies a large quenching artifact in the contribution of Q{sub 6} to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}. This failure of the quenched approximation affects only the strong penguin operators and so does not affect the Q8 contribution to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} nor ReA{sub 0}, ReAP{sub 2} and thus, the {Delta}I = 1/2 rule at tree level in chiral perturbation theory.

  6. Systematic effects of the quenched approximation on the strong penguin contribution to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Christ, N. H.; Li, S.; Dawson, C.; Noaki, J.; Laiho, J. W.; Soni, A.

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the implementation and properties of the quenched approximation in the calculation of the left-right, strong penguin contributions (i.e. Q{sub 6}) to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}. The coefficient of the new chiral logarithm, discovered by Golterman and Pallante, which appears at leading order in quenched chiral perturbation theory is evaluated using both the method proposed by those authors and by an improved approach which is free of power divergent corrections. The result implies a large quenching artifact in the contribution of Q{sub 6} to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}. This failure of the quenched approximation affects only the strong penguin operators and so does not affect the Q{sub 8} contribution to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon} nor ReA{sub 0}, ReA{sub 2} and thus, the {delta}I=1/2 rule at tree level in chiral perturbation theory.

  7. Calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants within the regular approximation for relativistic effects.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2004-06-22

    A new method for calculating the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constant within the regular approximation to the exact relativistic Hamiltonian is presented. The method is completely analytic in the sense that it does not employ numeric integration for the evaluation of relativistic corrections to the molecular Hamiltonian. It can be applied at the level of conventional wave function theory or density functional theory. In the latter case, both pure and hybrid density functionals can be used for the calculation of the quasirelativistic spin-spin coupling constants. The new method is used in connection with the infinite-order regular approximation with modified metric (IORAmm) to calculate the spin-spin coupling constants for molecules containing heavy elements. The importance of including exact exchange into the density functional calculations is demonstrated.

  8. Challenges within the linear response approximation when studying enzyme catalysis and effects of mutations.

    PubMed

    Sharir-Ivry, Avital; Varatharaj, Rajapandian; Shurki, Avital

    2015-01-13

    Various aspects of the linear response approximation (LRA) approach were examined when calculating reaction barriers within an enzyme and its different mutants. Scaling the electrostatic interactions is shown to slightly affect the absolute values of the barriers but not the overall trend when comparing wild-type and mutants. Convergence of the overall energetics was shown to depend on the sampling. Finally, the contribution of particular residues was shown to be significant, despite its small value.

  9. Parametrized-4.5PN TaylorF2 approximants and tail effects to quartic nonlinear order from the effective one body formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Francesco; Nagar, Alessandro

    2017-06-01

    By post-Newtonian (PN) expanding the well-known, factorized and resummed, effective-one-body energy flux for circularized binaries, we show that (i) because of the presence of the resummed tail factor, the 4.5PN-accurate tails-of-tails-of-tails contribution to the energy flux recently computed by Marchand et al. [Classical Quantum Gravity 33, 244003 (2016), 10.1088/0264-9381/33/24/244003] is actually contained in the resummed expression; this is also the case of the next-to-leading-order tail-induced spin-orbit term of Marsat et al. [Classical Quantum Gravity 31, 025023 (2014), 10.1088/0264-9381/31/2/025023]; (ii) in performing this expansion, we also obtain, for the first time, the explicit 3.5PN leading-order tail-induced spin-spin flux term; and (iii) pushing the PN expansion of the (nonspinning) EOB flux up to 5.5PN order, we compute 4PN, 5PN, and 5.5PN contributions to the energy flux, though in a form that explicitly depends on, currently unknown, 4PN and 5PN non-test-mass corrections to the factorized waveform amplitudes. Within this (parametrized) 4.5PN accuracy, we calculate the Taylor F2 approximant. Focusing for simplicity on the nonspinning case and using the numerical-relativity calibrated IMRPhenomD waveform model as a benchmark, we demonstrate that it is possible to reproduce the derivative of the IMRPhenomD phase (say up to the frequency of the Schwarzschild last-stable-orbit) by flexing only a 4PN "effective" waveform amplitude parameter. A preliminary analysis also illustrates that similar results can be obtained for the spin-aligned case provided only the leading-order spin-orbit and spin-spin terms are kept. Our findings suggest that these types of EOB-derived, parametrized, higher-order, PN approximants may serve as promising tools to construct inspiral-merger-ringdown phenomenological models or even to replace the standardly used 3.5PN-accurate TaylorF2 approximant in searches of small-mass binaries.

  10. Multiscale computations of mass accumulation effect on mass transfer in bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulhasanzadeh, Bahman; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2014-11-01

    Mass transfer in bubbly flow generally takes place on a much smaller length and time scale than the length and time scale of the momentum flow, resulting in a thin mass boundary layer around the bubbles. We developed a multiscale model to solve a boundary layer equation for the mass boundary layer next to the bubble interface, assuming zero mass concentration in the far field, which couples with the rest of domain using a source/sink term. Here, we extend our model to account for non-zero concentration next to the mass boundary layer. Comparison of simple case studies in 1D and 2D problems show good agreement between the fully resolved solution and the solution on a much coarser grid using our model. We study the effect of mass accumulation in a domain and also the effect of bubble moving into the wake of another bubble on the mass transfer. This study was funded by NSF Grant CBET-1132410.

  11. Linear response approximation in effective field theory for the calculation of elastically mediated interactions in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Koleski, Goce; Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-05-01

    The linear response approximation, used within effective field theory to calculate mediated interactions between inclusions, is studied for an exactly solvable one-dimensional model. We show that it works poorly in the case of inclusions imposing absolute deformations to the field, while it works well for massless theories in the case of inclusions imposing relative deformations to the field.

  12. Charts and approximate formulas for the estimation of aeroelastic effects on the loading of swept and unswept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diederich, Franklin W; Foss, Kenneth A

    1953-01-01

    Charts and approximate formulas are presented for the estimation of aeroelastic effects on the spanwise lift distribution, lift-curve slope, aerodynamic center, and damping in roll of swept and unswept wings at subsonic and supersonic speeds. Some design considerations brought out by the results of this report are discussed.

  13. Optical characterization of randomly microrough surfaces covered with very thin overlayers using effective medium approximation and Rayleigh-Rice theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlídal, Ivan; Vohánka, Jiří; Čermák, Martin; Franta, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    The modification of the effective medium approximation for randomly microrough surfaces covered by very thin overlayers based on inhomogeneous fictitious layers is formulated. The numerical analysis of this modification is performed using simulated ellipsometric data calculated using the Rayleigh-Rice theory. The system used to perform this numerical analysis consists of a randomly microrough silicon single crystal surface covered with a SiO2 overlayer. A comparison to the effective medium approximation based on homogeneous fictitious layers is carried out within this numerical analysis. For ellipsometry of the system mentioned above the possibilities and limitations of both the effective medium approximation approaches are discussed. The results obtained by means of the numerical analysis are confirmed by the ellipsometric characterization of two randomly microrough silicon single crystal substrates covered with native oxide overlayers. It is shown that the effective medium approximation approaches for this system exhibit strong deficiencies compared to the Rayleigh-Rice theory. The practical consequences implied by these results are presented. The results concerning the random microroughness are verified by means of measurements performed using atomic force microscopy.

  14. Space inhomogeneity and detuning effects in a laser with a saturable absorber: a first-order approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Fernandez, P.; Velarde, M.G.

    1988-05-01

    To a first approximation the effects of detuning and/or space inhomogeneity on the stability domain of a model for a laser with a saturable absorber are presented. It appears that the space dependence increases the domain of the emissionless state, thus delaying the laser action.

  15. Effect of monitor display on detection of approximal caries lesions in digital radiographs.

    PubMed

    Isidor, S; Faaborg-Andersen, M; Hintze, H; Kirkevang, L-L; Frydenberg, M; Haiter-Neto, F; Wenzel, A

    2009-12-01

    The aim was to compare the accuracy of five flat panel monitors for detection of approximal caries lesions. Five flat panel monitors, Mermaid Ventura (15 inch, colour flat panel, 1024 x 768, 32 bit, analogue), Olórin VistaLine (19 inch, colour, 1280 x 1024, 32 bit, digital), Samsung SyncMaster 203B (20 inch, colour, 1024 x 768, 32 bit, analogue), Totoku ME251i (21 inch, greyscale, 1400 x 1024, 32 bit, digital) and Eizo FlexScan MX190 (19 inch, colour, 1280 x 1024, 32 bit, digital), were assessed. 160 approximal surfaces of human teeth were examined with a storage phosphor plate system (Digora FMX, Soredex) and assessed by seven observers for the presence of caries lesions. Microscopy of the teeth served as validation for the presence/absence of a lesion. The sensitivities varied between observers (range 7-25%) but the variation between the monitors was not large. The Samsung monitor obtained a significantly higher sensitivity than the Mermaid and Olórin monitors (P<0.02) and a lower specificity than the Eizo and Totoku monitors (P<0.05). There were no significant differences between any other monitors. The percentage of correct scores was highest for the Eizo monitor and significantly higher than for the Mermaid and Olórin monitors (P<0.03). There was no clear relationship between the diagnostic accuracy and the resolution or price of the monitor. The Eizo monitor was associated with the overall highest percentage of correct scores. The standard analogue flat panel monitor, Samsung, had higher sensitivity and lower specificity than some of the other monitors, but did not differ in overall accuracy for detection of carious lesions.

  16. Effective Utilization of the Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Norma Haston

    The question of whether or not the mass media can successfully be used as a vehicle for creative social and individual change is discussed and brief descriptions are given of successful and unsuccessful campaigns that attempted to improve public attitudes toward certain health problems. Ten recommendations are made for using the mass media…

  17. Effects of internal mixing and aggregate morphology on optical properties of black carbon using a discrete dipole approximation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarnato, B.; Vahidinia, S.; Richard, D. T.; Kirchstetter, T. W.

    2012-10-01

    According to recent studies, internal mixing of black carbon (BC) with other aerosol materials in the atmosphere alters its aggregate shape, absorption of solar radiation, and radiative forcing. These mixing state effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we characterize the morphology and mixing state of bare BC and BC internally mixed with sodium chloride (NaCl) using electron microscopy and examine the sensitivity of optical properties to BC mixing state and aggregate morphology using a discrete dipole approximation model (DDSCAT). DDSCAT predicts a higher mass absorption coefficient, lower single scattering albedo (SSA), and higher absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) for bare BC aggregates that are lacy rather than compact. Predicted values of SSA at 550 nm range between 0.18 and 0.27 for lacy and compact aggregates, respectively, in agreement with reported experimental values of 0.25 ± 0.05. The variation in absorption with wavelength does not adhere precisely to a power law relationship over the 200 to 1000 nm range. Consequently, AAE values depend on the wavelength region over which they are computed. In the 300 to 550 nm range, AAE values ranged in this study from 0.70 for compact to 0.95 for lacy aggregates. The SSA of BC internally mixed with NaCl (100-300 nm in radius) is higher than for bare BC and increases with the embedding in the NaCl. Internally mixed BC SSA values decrease in the 200-400 nm wavelength range, a feature also common to the optical properties of dust and organics. Linear polarization features are also predicted in DDSCAT and are dependent on particle morphology. The bare BC (with a radius of 80 nm) presents in the linear polarization a bell shape feature, which is a characteristic of the Rayleigh regime (for particles smaller than the wavelength of incident radiation). When BC is internally mixed with NaCl (100-300 nm in radius), strong depolarization features for near-VIS incident radiation are evident, such as a decrease

  18. Effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation for a focused laser pulse in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kunwar Pal; Arya, Rashmi; Malik, Anil K.

    2015-09-14

    We have investigated the effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation to study electron acceleration by a focused laser pulse in vacuum using a three dimensional test-particle simulation code. The error is obtained by comparing the energy of the electron for paraxial approximation and seventh-order correction description of the fields of Gaussian laser. The paraxial approximation predicts wrong laser divergence and wrong electron escape time from the pulse which leads to prediction of higher energy. The error shows strong phase dependence for the electrons lying along the axis of the laser for linearly polarized laser pulse. The relative error may be significant for some specific values of initial phase even at moderate values of laser spot sizes. The error does not show initial phase dependence for a circularly laser pulse.

  19. Influence of the superposition approximation on calculated effective dose rates from galactic cosmic rays at aerospace-related altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Kyle

    2015-07-01

    The superposition approximation was commonly employed in atmospheric nuclear transport modeling until recent years and is incorporated into flight dose calculation codes such as CARI-6 and EPCARD. The useful altitude range for this approximation is investigated using Monte Carlo transport techniques. CARI-7A simulates atmospheric radiation transport of elements H-Fe using a database of precalculated galactic cosmic radiation showers calculated with MCNPX 2.7.0 and is employed here to investigate the influence of the superposition approximation on effective dose rates, relative to full nuclear transport of galactic cosmic ray primary ions. Superposition is found to produce results less than 10% different from nuclear transport at current commercial and business aviation altitudes while underestimating dose rates at higher altitudes. The underestimate sometimes exceeds 20% at approximately 23 km and exceeds 40% at 50 km. Thus, programs employing this approximation should not be used to estimate doses or dose rates for high-altitude portions of the commercial space and near-space manned flights that are expected to begin soon.

  20. An isotopic mass effect on the intermolecular potential

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Michael F.; Currier, Robert Patrick; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-09-28

    The impact of isotopic variation on the electronic energy and intermolecular potentials is often suppressed when calculating isotopologue thermodynamics. Intramolecular potential energy surfaces for distinct isotopologues are in fact equivalent under the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, which is sometimes used to imply that the intermolecular interactions are independent of isotopic mass. In this paper, the intermolecular dipole–dipole interaction between hetero-nuclear diatomic molecules is considered. It is shown that the intermolecular potential contains mass-dependent terms even though each nucleus moves on a Born–Oppenheimer surface. Finally, the analysis suggests that mass dependent variations in intermolecular potentials should be included in comprehensive descriptions of isotopologue thermodynamics.

  1. Minimization of the effect of errors in approximate radiation view factors

    SciTech Connect

    Clarksean, R.; Solbrig, C.

    1993-09-01

    The maximum temperature of irradiated fuel rods in storage containers was investigated taking credit only for radiation heat transfer. Estimating view factors is often easy but in many references the emphasis is placed on calculating the quadruple integrals exactly. Selecting different view factors in the view factor matrix as independent, yield somewhat different view factor matrices. In this study ten to twenty percent error in view factors produced small errors in the temperature which are well within the uncertainty due to the surface emissivities uncertainty. However, the enclosure and reciprocity principles must be strictly observed or large errors in the temperatures and wall heat flux were observed (up to a factor of 3). More than just being an aid for calculating the dependent view factors, satisfying these principles, particularly reciprocity, is more important than the calculation accuracy of the view factors. Comparison to experiment showed that the result of the radiation calculation was definitely conservative as desired in spite of the approximations to the view factors.

  2. Kondo effect in coupled quantum dots: a Non-crossing approximation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, Ramon; Langreth, David

    2003-03-01

    The out-of-equilibrium transport properties of a double quantum dot system in the Kondo regime are studied theoretically by means of a two-impurity Anderson Hamiltonian with inter-impurity hopping. The Hamiltonian, formulated in slave-boson language, is solved by means of a generalization of the non-crossing approximation (NCA) to the present problem. We provide benchmark calculations of the predictions of the NCA for the linear and nonlinear transport properties of coupled quantum dots in the Kondo regime. We give a series of predictions that can be observed experimentally in linear and nonlinear transport measurements through coupled quantum dots. Importantly, it is demonstrated that measurements of the differential conductance G=dI/dV, for the appropriate values of voltages and inter-dot tunneling couplings, can give a direct observation of the coherent superposition between the many-body Kondo states of each dot. This coherence can be also detected in the linear transport through the system: the curve linear conductance vs temperature is non-monotonic, with a maximum at a temperature T characterizing quantum coherence between both Kondo states.

  3. Mass loss from warm giants: Magnetic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Among warm giant stars, rapid mass loss sets in along a well defined velocity dividing line (VDL). Hot corona also disappear close to the VDL and thermal pressure cannot drive the observed rapid mass loss in these stars. The VDL may be associated with magnetic fields changing from closed to open. Such a change is consistent with the lack of X-rays from late-type giants. A magnetic transition locus based on Pneuman's work on helmet streamer stability agrees well with the empirical VDL. The change from closed to open fields not only makes rapid mass loss possible, but also contributes to energizing the mass loss in the form of discrete bubbles.

  4. The thermodynamic effect of atmospheric mass on early Earth's temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemke, R.; Kaspi, Y.; Halevy, I.

    2016-11-01

    Observations suggest that Earth's early atmospheric mass differed from the present day. The effects of a different atmospheric mass on radiative forcing have been investigated in climate models of variable sophistication, but a mechanistic understanding of the thermodynamic component of the effect of atmospheric mass on early climate is missing. Using a 3-D idealized global circulation model (GCM), we systematically examine the thermodynamic effect of atmospheric mass on near-surface temperature. We find that higher atmospheric mass tends to increase the near-surface temperature mostly due to an increase in the heat capacity of the atmosphere, which decreases the net radiative cooling effect in the lower layers of the atmosphere. Additionally, the vertical advection of heat by eddies decreases with increasing atmospheric mass, resulting in further near-surface warming. As both net radiative cooling and vertical eddy heat fluxes are extratropical phenomena, higher atmospheric mass tends to flatten the meridional temperature gradient.

  5. Pump Effects in Planetary Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Harpold, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Mass spectrometers provide a useful tool in solar system exploration since fundamental questions of Solar System formation and evolution may be constrained by models based on the chemical and isotopic data provided by these instruments. For example, comparison of such data between the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets enables an understanding of mechanisms of atmospheric loss to space and production sources such as from planetary outgassing and from infall from objects such as comets. Over the past 25 years, mass spectrometers have been sent to Mars, Venus, Comet Halley, and Jupiter and are presently in transit to the Saturnian system to sample the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan. The quality of data derived from a very small, lightweight, and rugged instrument is constrained not only by the mass analyzer itself, but also by the performance of its gas sampling and pumping systems. A comparison of several planetary mass spectrometer experiments is provided with a focus on the demands placed on the gas processing and pumping systems. For example, the figure below is a mass spectrum from deep in the atmosphere of Jupiter obtained from a quadrupole mass spectrometer developed in the early 1980's for the Galileo Probe (Niemann et al., Space Sci. Rev., 60, 111-142 (1992)). Measurements of Jovian noble gases and other species with this system is described.

  6. Effects of internal mixing and aggregate morphology on optical properties of black carbon using a discrete dipole approximation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarnato, B. V.; Vahidinia, S.; Richard, D. T.; Kirchstetter, T. W.

    2013-05-01

    According to recent studies, internal mixing of black carbon (BC) with other aerosol materials in the atmosphere alters its aggregate shape, absorption of solar radiation, and radiative forcing. These mixing state effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we characterize the morphology and mixing state of bare BC and BC internally mixed with sodium chloride (NaCl) using electron microscopy and examine the sensitivity of optical properties to BC mixing state and aggregate morphology using a discrete dipole approximation model (DDSCAT). DDSCAT is flexible in simulating the geometry and refractive index of particle aggregates. DDSCAT predicts a higher mass absorption coefficient (MAC), lower single scattering albedo (SSA), and higher absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) for bare BC aggregates that are lacy rather than compact. Predicted values of SSA at 550 nm range between 0.16 and 0.27 for lacy and compact aggregates, respectively, in agreement with reported experimental values of 0.25 ± 0.05. The variation in absorption with wavelength does not adhere precisely to a power law relationship over the 200 to 1000 nm range. Consequently, AAE values depend on the wavelength region over which they are computed. The MAC of BC (averaged over the 200-1000 nm range) is amplified when internally mixed with NaCl (100-300 nm in radius) by factors ranging from 1.0 for lacy BC aggregates partially immersed in NaCl to 2.2 for compact BC aggregates fully immersed in NaCl. The SSA of BC internally mixed with NaCl is higher than for bare BC and increases with the embedding in the NaCl. Internally mixed BC SSA values decrease in the 200-400 nm wavelength range, a feature also common to the optical properties of dust and organics. Linear polarization features are also predicted in DDSCAT and are dependent on particle size and morphology. This study shows that DDSCAT predicts complex morphology and mixing state dependent aerosol optical properties that have been reported

  7. The effect of Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolutionary masses of RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Sukyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Demarque, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the new Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars. This work was motivated by the recent stellar pulsation calculations using the new Livermore opacities, which suggest that the masses of double-mode RR Lyrae stars are 0.1-0.2 solar mass larger than those based on earlier opacities. Unlike the pulsation calculations, we find that the effect of opacity change on the evolution of HB stars is not significant. In particular, the effect of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars is very small, showing a decrease of only 0.01-0.02 solar mass compared to the models based on old Cox-Stewart opacities. Consequently, with the new Livermore OPAL opacities, both the stellar pulsation and evolution models now predict approximately the same masses for the RR Lyrae stars. Our evolutionary models suggest that the mean masses of the RR Lyrae stars are about 0.76 and about 0.71 solar mass for M15 (Oosterhoff group II) and M3 (group I), respectively. If (alpha/Fe) = 0.4, these values are decreased by about 0.03 solar mass. Variations of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars with HB morphology and metallicity are also presented.

  8. The effect of Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolutionary masses of RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Sukyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Demarque, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the new Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars. This work was motivated by the recent stellar pulsation calculations using the new Livermore opacities, which suggest that the masses of double-mode RR Lyrae stars are 0.1-0.2 solar mass larger than those based on earlier opacities. Unlike the pulsation calculations, we find that the effect of opacity change on the evolution of HB stars is not significant. In particular, the effect of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars is very small, showing a decrease of only 0.01-0.02 solar mass compared to the models based on old Cox-Stewart opacities. Consequently, with the new Livermore OPAL opacities, both the stellar pulsation and evolution models now predict approximately the same masses for the RR Lyrae stars. Our evolutionary models suggest that the mean masses of the RR Lyrae stars are about 0.76 and about 0.71 solar mass for M15 (Oosterhoff group II) and M3 (group I), respectively. If (alpha/Fe) = 0.4, these values are decreased by about 0.03 solar mass. Variations of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars with HB morphology and metallicity are also presented.

  9. Analytical approximations for matter effects on CP violation in the accelerator-based neutrino oscillations with E ≲ 1 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhi-zhong; Zhu, Jing-yu

    2016-07-01

    Given an accelerator-based neutrino experiment with the beam energy E ≲ 1 GeV, we expand the probabilities of ν μ → ν e and {overline{ν}}_{μ}to {overline{ν}}_e oscillations in matter in terms of two small quantities Δ21 /Δ31 and A/Δ31, where Δ 21≡ m 2 2 - m 1 2 and Δ 31≡ m 3 2 - m 1 2 are the neutrino mass-squared differences, and A measures the strength of terrestrial matter effects. Our analytical approximations are numerically more accurate than those made by Freund in this energy region, and thus they are particularly applicable for the study of leptonic CP violation in the low-energy MOMENT, ESS νSM and T2K oscillation experiments. As a by-product, the new analytical approximations help us to easily understand why the matter-corrected Jarlskog parameter tilde{J} peaks at the resonance energy E ∗ ≃ 0 .14GeV (or 0 .12 GeV) for the normal (or inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, and how the three Dirac unitarity triangles are deformed due to the terrestrial matter contamination. We also affirm that a medium-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment with the beam energy E lying in the E ∗ ≲ E ≲ 2 E ∗ range is capable of exploring leptonic CP violation with little matter-induced suppression.

  10. An approximate method for treating spin-orbit effects in platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Christoph; Koch, Wolfram; Schwarz, Helmut

    1995-11-01

    Spin-orbit coupling in platinum-containing species can be treated via a one-electron spin-orbit operator and a single scaling parameter Z eff(Pt) in conjunction with an effective core potential for the description of scalar relativistic effects. Our calibration calculations cover the five low-lying electronic states of platinum hydride PtH and the lowest fourteen levels in the atomic spectrum of the platinum atom Pt. Here, qualitative and semi-quantitative agreement between the presented semi-empirical approach and four-component Dirac-Fock calculations is found if Z eff(Pt) is chosen between 950 and 1200. Further applications concern the low-lying levels of the platinum cation Pt +, the theoretical determination of ground states for the diatomic oxides PtO and PtO + as well as spin-orbit effects in the cationic carbene complex PtCH 2+.

  11. Theoretical re-evaluations of the black hole mass-bulge mass relation - I. Effect of seed black hole mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakata, Hikari; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Takashi; Makiya, Ryu; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Nagashima, Masahiro; Enoki, Motohiro; Oogi, Taira; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the effect of varying the mass of a seed black hole on the resulting black hole mass-bulge mass relation at z ˜ 0, using a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation combined with large cosmological N-body simulations. We constrain our model by requiring that the observed properties of galaxies at z ˜ 0 are reproduced. In keeping with previous semi-analytic models, we place a seed black hole immediately after a galaxy forms. When the mass of the seed is set at 105 M⊙, we find that the model results become inconsistent with recent observational results of the black hole mass-bulge mass relation for dwarf galaxies. In particular, the model predicts that bulges with ˜109 M⊙ harbour larger black holes than observed. On the other hand, when we employ seed black holes of 103 M⊙ or select their mass randomly within a 103-5 M⊙ range, the resulting relation is consistent with observation estimates, including the observed dispersion. We find that, to obtain stronger constraints on the mass of seed black holes, observations of less massive bulges at z ˜ 0 are a more powerful comparison than the relations at higher redshifts.

  12. Direct Demonstration of the Concept of Unrestricted Effective-Medium Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Zhanna M.; Zakharova, Nadezhda T.

    2014-01-01

    The modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index is defined as one that yields accurate values of a representative set of far-field scattering characteristics (including the scattering matrix) for an object made of randomly heterogeneous materials. We validate the concept of the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index by comparing numerically exact superposition T-matrix results for a spherical host randomly filled with a large number of identical small inclusions and Lorenz-Mie results for a homogeneous spherical counterpart. A remarkable quantitative agreement between the superposition T-matrix and Lorenz-Mie scattering matrices over the entire range of scattering angles demonstrates unequivocally that the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index is a sound (albeit still phenomenological) concept provided that the size parameter of the inclusions is sufficiently small and their number is sufficiently large. Furthermore, it appears that in cases when the concept of the modified unrestricted effective-medium refractive index works, its actual value is close to that predicted by the Maxwell-Garnett mixing rule.

  13. Statistical analysis of β decays and the effective value of gA in the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppisch, Frank F.; Suhonen, Jouni

    2016-11-01

    We perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) statistical analysis of a number of measured ground-state-to-ground-state single β+/electron-capture and β- decays in the nuclear mass range of A =62 -142 . The corresponding experimental comparative half-lives (logf t values) are compared with the theoretical ones obtained by the use of the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (p n QRPA ) with G -matrix-based effective interactions. The MCMC analysis is performed separately for 47 isobaric triplets and 28 more extended isobaric chains of nuclei to extract values and uncertainties for the effective axial-vector coupling constant gA in nuclear-structure calculations performed in the p n QRPA framework. As far as available, measured half-lives for two-neutrino β β- decays occurring in the studied isobaric chains are analyzed as well.

  14. The approximation of radiative effects in relativistic gravity - Gravitational radiation reaction and energy loss in nearly Newtonian systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, M.; Will, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    An argument is presented to determine the accuracy with which a solution of Einstein's field equations of gravitation must be approximated in order to describe the dominant effects of gravitational radiation emission from weak-field systems. Several previous calculations are compared in the light of this argument, and some apparent discrepancies among them are resolved. The majority of these calculations support the 'quadrupole formulae' for gravitational radiation energy loss and radiation reaction.

  15. Effects of {beta}-{gamma} coupling in transitional nuclei and the validity of the approximate separation of variables

    SciTech Connect

    Caprio, M.A.

    2005-11-01

    Exact numerical diagonalization is carried out for the Bohr Hamiltonian with a {beta}-soft, axially stabilized potential. Wave function and observable properties are found to be dominated by strong {beta}-{gamma} coupling effects. The validity of the approximate separation of variables introduced with the X(5) model, extensively applied in recent analyses of axially stabilized transitional nuclei, is examined, and the reasons for its breakdown are analyzed.

  16. Assessment of density-functional approximations: Long-range correlations and self-interaction effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Godby, R.W.

    2004-05-01

    The complex nature of electron-electron correlations is made manifest in the very simple but nontrivial problem of two electrons confined within a sphere. The description of highly nonlocal correlation and self-interaction effects by widely used local and semilocal exchange-correlation energy density functionals is shown to be unsatisfactory in most cases. Even the best such functionals exhibit significant errors in the Kohn-Sham potentials and density profiles.

  17. Computational criterion for application of the characteristic effective medium approximation to ultrathin Co Au multi-bilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haija, A. J.; Larry Freeman, W.; DeNinno, Matthew

    2008-11-01

    The basic optical properties, reflectivity and transmissivity, of three sets of Co-Au bilayer structures are calculated for normal incidence in the wavelength range 300-700 nm. Each set consists of a total number of bilayer identity periods m=1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. The thickness of the bilayer in each set is 5, 7, and 9 nm. The composition of the bilayer is kept fixed: 40% Co and 60% Au. The calculations are done for ideal layered Co-Au stacks using the characteristic matrix technique. Calculations for each stack based on the thicknesses of the two composite layers and their optical constants are contrasted against calculations using the characteristic effective medium approximation, CEMA. A third calculation of the optical properties for each stack is performed, again using the CEMA, but when the whole stack, called the effective stack, ES, is treated as one uniform medium of effective optical constants. The comparison of the three sets of calculations for all sets is intended to shed more light onto the validity of the CEMA approximation that has been established for thin bilayer structures whose constituents have thicknesses much less than the wavelength of the incident radiation. The study establishes a limit based on the product of the number of layers m and the identity period of the stack h, beyond which the CEMA approximation cannot be applied. This limit is consistent with a previous study carried out on Ag-SiO ultrathin stacks.

  18. Effect of mass gain on stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.; Zinnecker, H.

    A fully hydrodynamical treatment is given of the stationary isothermal accretion problem onto a moving gravitating point mass. It is noted that the derivation is purely analytical. It is found that the accretion rate is more than a factor of 50 higher than the accretion rate derived from the partially nonhydrodynamical treatment by Hoyle and Lyttleton (1939) or Bondi and Hoyle (1944). It is thought that his result may have some bearing on the evolutionary tracks of young pre-Main Sequence stars still embedded in their parent protocluster cloud. Also discussed is the work of Federova (1979), who investigated the pre-Main Sequence evolution of degenerate low mass 'stars' with strong accretion of protocluster cloud material. It is suggested that the stars that lie below the Main Sequence in young clusters could strongly accrete matter at the pre-Main Sequence stage. It is also suggested that the observed lack of low mass stars in open galactic clusters (van den Bergh, 1961) compared to the field may derive from the accretion of residual gas preferentially by low mass stars.

  19. Intrinsic Carrier Concentration and Electron Effective Mass in Hg(1-x) Zn(x) Te

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sha, Yi-Gao; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    In this work, the intrinsic carrier concentration and electron effective mass in Hg(l-x)Zn(x)Te were numerically calculated. We adopt the procedures similar to those used by Su et. al. for calculating intrinsic carrier concentrations in Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te which solve the exact dispersion relation in Kane model for the calculation of the conduction band electron concentrations and the corresponding electron effective masses. No approximation beyond those inherent in the k centered dot p model was used here.

  20. Effect of various approximations on predicted progressive failure in plain weave composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John; Srirengan, Kanthikannan

    1995-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to simulate progressive failure of a plain weave composite subjected to in-plane extension. The loading was parallel to one of the tow directions. The effects of various characteristics of the finite element model on predicted behavior were examined. The predicted behavior was found to be sensitive to quadrature order, mesh refinement, and the material degradation model. Also the sensitivity of the predictions to the tow waviness was studied. The predicted strength decreased considerably with increased waviness. More numerical studies and comparisons with experimental data are needed to establish reliable guidelines for accurate progressive failure prediction.

  1. Alternative approximation concepts for space frame synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lust, R. V.; Schmit, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    A method for space frame synthesis based on the application of a full gamut of approximation concepts is presented. It is found that with the thoughtful selection of design space, objective function approximation, constraint approximation and mathematical programming problem formulation options it is possible to obtain near minimum mass designs for a significant class of space frame structural systems while requiring fewer than 10 structural analyses. Example problems are presented which demonstrate the effectiveness of the method for frame structures subjected to multiple static loading conditions with limits on structural stiffness and strength.

  2. Approximate light cone effects in a nonrelativistic quantum field theory after a local quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    We study the spreading of correlations after a local quench in a nonrelativistic quantum field theory. We focus on noninteracting nonrelativistic fermions and study the time evolution after two identical systems in their ground states are suddenly joined together with a localized impurity at the junction. We find that, even if the quasiparticles of the system have unbounded dispersion, the correlations show light cone effects. We carry out a detailed study of these effects by developing an accurate asymptotic expansion of the two-point function and determining exactly the density of particles at any time after the quench. In particular, we find that the width of the light cone region is ∝t1 /2 . The structure of correlations, however, does not show a pure light cone form: "superluminal corrections" are much larger than in the bounded-dispersion case. These findings can be explained by inspecting the structure of excitations generated by the initial state. We show that a similar picture also emerges in the presence of a harmonic trapping potential and when more than two systems are suddenly joined at a single point.

  3. Effective three-wave-mixing picture and first Born approximation for femtosecond supercontinua from microstructured fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesik, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Tartara, L.

    2010-10-15

    The theory of supercontinuum generation in microstructured fibers is based on notions of soliton fission and subsequent dispersive wave radiation. In bulk media, in contrast, the paradigm of effective three-wave mixing (ETWM) proves useful for understanding the supercontinuum spectral properties and revealing the dynamics within the high-intensity core of the collapsing filament. Previously, it has been shown that the bulk theory applies accurately even to so-called glass-membrane fibers in which the guided light is free to diffract in one dimension. In the same spirit, this work extends that result and brings the fiber and bulk supercontinuum approaches closer together. Specifically, we demonstrate that the ETWM paradigm can be modified for fibers, where it provides an accurate analytic description of the supercontinuum component due to dispersive waves.

  4. Investigating the Effectiveness of Wavelet Approximations in Resizing Images for Ultrasound Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Umar; Nefti, Samia; Ferdinando, Milella

    2016-10-01

    Images are difficult to classify and annotate but the availability of digital image databases creates a constant demand for tools that automatically analyze image content and describe it with either a category or a set of variables. Ultrasound Imaging is very popular and is widely used to see the internal organ(s) condition of the patient. The main target of this research is to develop a robust image processing techniques for a better and more accurate medical image retrieval and categorization. This paper looks at an alternative to feature extraction for image classification such as image resizing technique. A new mean for image resizing using wavelet transform is proposed. Results, using real medical images, have shown the effectiveness of the proposed technique for classification task comparing to bi-cubic interpolation and feature extraction.

  5. Total Ionizing Dose Effects in 12-Bit Successive-Approximation Analog-To-Digital Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. I.; Rax, B. G.; Johnston, A. H.

    1993-01-01

    Analog-to-digital (A/D) converters are critical components in many space and military systems, and there have been numerous advances in A/D converter technology that have increased the resolution and conversion time. The increased performance is due to two factors: (1) advances in circuit design and complexity, which have increased the number of components and the integration density; and (2) new process technologies, such as BiCMOS, which provide better performance, cost, and smaller size in mixed-signal circuits. High-speed A/D converters, with conversion rates above 1 MHz, present a challenge to circuit designers and test engineers. Their complex architectures and high-performance specifications result in numerous possible failure modes when they are subjected to ionizing radiation. The dominant failure mode may depend on the specific application because the fundamental effects on MOS and bipolar transistors are strongly affected by bias conditions.

  6. Total Ionizing Dose Effects in 12-Bit Successive-Approximation Analog-To-Digital Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. I.; Rax, B. G.; Johnston, A. H.

    1993-01-01

    Analog-to-digital (A/D) converters are critical components in many space and military systems, and there have been numerous advances in A/D converter technology that have increased the resolution and conversion time. The increased performance is due to two factors: (1) advances in circuit design and complexity, which have increased the number of components and the integration density; and (2) new process technologies, such as BiCMOS, which provide better performance, cost, and smaller size in mixed-signal circuits. High-speed A/D converters, with conversion rates above 1 MHz, present a challenge to circuit designers and test engineers. Their complex architectures and high-performance specifications result in numerous possible failure modes when they are subjected to ionizing radiation. The dominant failure mode may depend on the specific application because the fundamental effects on MOS and bipolar transistors are strongly affected by bias conditions.

  7. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  8. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  9. Effective Stress Approximation using Geomechanical Formulation of Fracturing Technology (GFFT) in Petroleum Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, A.; Asef, M.; Kharrat, R.

    2010-12-01

    Recently, rock mechanics and geophysics contribution in petroleum industry has been significantly increased. Wellbore stability analysis in horizontal wells, sand production problem while extracting hydrocarbon from sandstone reservoirs, land subsidence due to production induced reservoir compaction, reservoir management, casing shearing are samples of these contributions. In this context, determination of the magnitude and orientation of the in-situ stresses is an essential parameter. This paper is presenting new method to estimate the magnitude of in-situ stresses based on fracturing technology data. Accordingly, kirsch equations for the circular cavities and fracturing technology models in permeable formations have been used to develop an innovative Geomechanical Formulation (GFFT). GFFT introduces a direct reasonable relation between the reservoir stresses and the breakdown pressure of fracture, while the concept of effective stress was employed. Thus, this complex formula contains functions of some rock mechanic parameters such as poison ratio, Biot’s coefficient, Young’s modulus, rock tensile strength, depth of reservoir and breakdown/reservoir pressure difference. Hence, this approach yields a direct method to estimate maximum and minimum effective/insitu stresses in an oil field and improves minimum in-situ stress estimation compared to previous studies. In case of hydraulic fracturing; a new stress analysis method is developed based on well known Darcy equations for fluid flow in porous media which improves in-situ stress estimation using reservoir parameters such as permeability, and injection flow rate. The accuracy of the method would be verified using reservoir data of a case history. The concepts discussed in this research would eventually suggest an alternative methodology with sufficient accuracy to derive in-situ stresses in hydrocarbon reservoirs, while no extra experimental work is accomplished for this purpose.

  10. A non-resonant mass sensor to eliminate the "missing mass" effect during mass measurement of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Shrikanth, V; Bobji, M S

    2014-10-01

    Resonant sensors and crystal oscillators for mass detection need to be excited at very high natural frequencies (MHz). Use of such systems to measure mass of biological materials affects the accuracy of mass measurement due to their viscous and/or viscoelastic properties. The measurement limitation of such sensor system is the difficulty in accounting for the "missing mass" of the biological specimen in question. A sensor system has been developed in this work, to be operated in the stiffness controlled region at very low frequencies as compared to its fundamental natural frequency. The resulting reduction in the sensitivity due to non-resonant mode of operation of this sensor is compensated by the high resolution of the sensor. The mass of different aged drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is measured. The difference in its mass measurement during resonant mode of operation is also presented. That, viscosity effects do not affect the working of this non-resonant mass sensor is clearly established by direct comparison.

  11. A non-resonant mass sensor to eliminate the "missing mass" effect during mass measurement of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrikanth, V.; Bobji, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    Resonant sensors and crystal oscillators for mass detection need to be excited at very high natural frequencies (MHz). Use of such systems to measure mass of biological materials affects the accuracy of mass measurement due to their viscous and/or viscoelastic properties. The measurement limitation of such sensor system is the difficulty in accounting for the "missing mass" of the biological specimen in question. A sensor system has been developed in this work, to be operated in the stiffness controlled region at very low frequencies as compared to its fundamental natural frequency. The resulting reduction in the sensitivity due to non-resonant mode of operation of this sensor is compensated by the high resolution of the sensor. The mass of different aged drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is measured. The difference in its mass measurement during resonant mode of operation is also presented. That, viscosity effects do not affect the working of this non-resonant mass sensor is clearly established by direct comparison.

  12. Free vibrations of a cantilevered SWCNT with distributed mass in the presence of nonlocal effect.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, M A; Lippiello, M; Martin, H D

    2015-01-01

    The Hamilton principle is applied to deduce the free vibration frequencies of a cantilever single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) in the presence of an added mass, which can be distributed along an arbitrary part of the span. The nonlocal elasticity theory by Eringen has been employed, in order to take into account the nanoscale effects. An exact formulation leads to the equations of motion, which can be solved to give the frequencies and the corresponding vibration modes. Moreover, two approximate semianalytical methods are also illustrated, which can provide quick parametric relationships. From a more practical point of view, the problem of detecting the mass of the attached particle has been solved by calculating the relative frequency shift due to the presence of the added mass: from it, the mass value can be easily deduced. The paper ends with some numerical examples, in which the nonlocal effects are thoroughly investigated.

  13. Covariant approximation averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani, Eigo; Arthur, Rudy; Blum, Thomas; Izubuchi, Taku; Jung, Chulwoo; Lehner, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    We present a new class of statistical error reduction techniques for Monte Carlo simulations. Using covariant symmetries, we show that correlation functions can be constructed from inexpensive approximations without introducing any systematic bias in the final result. We introduce a new class of covariant approximation averaging techniques, known as all-mode averaging (AMA), in which the approximation takes account of contributions of all eigenmodes through the inverse of the Dirac operator computed from the conjugate gradient method with a relaxed stopping condition. In this paper we compare the performance and computational cost of our new method with traditional methods using correlation functions and masses of the pion, nucleon, and vector meson in Nf=2 +1 lattice QCD using domain-wall fermions. This comparison indicates that AMA significantly reduces statistical errors in Monte Carlo calculations over conventional methods for the same cost.

  14. Effective shear modulus reconstruction obtained with approximate mean normal stress remaining unknown.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Chikayoshi

    2007-11-01

    We previously reported Methods A and B for reconstructing tissue shear modulus and density using mean normal stress as an unknown. The use of Method A enables us to obtain such reconstructions with the mean normal stress remaining unknown by using an iterative method to solve algebraic equations. However, Method A results in a low convergence speed and a low reconstruction accuracy compared with Method B that enables a reconstruction of mean normal stress together. Thus, in this report, we describe a new, rapid and accurate method, Method C, that enables the reconstructions of shear modulus and density in real time with a higher accuracy than Method A. In Method A, no reference mean normal stress is used. In Method C, an arbitrary finite value is used as a quasireference mean normal stress at an arbitrary point (i.e., a quasireference point) or an arbitrary region (i.e., a quasireference region) in the region of interest on the basis of the fact that the gradient operator implemented on the mean normal stress becomes positive-definite. When a quasireference region can be realized, Method C enables such reconstructions with a high accuracy and a high convergence speed similar to Method B. The effectiveness of Method C was verified using simulated phantom deformation data. Method C must be used instead of Method A as a practical method, in combination with Method B.

  15. Effective medium approximation of the optical properties of electrochromic cerium-titanium oxide compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Rottkay, K. von; Richardson, T.; Rubin, M.; Slack, J.

    1997-07-01

    Cerium titanium oxide samples derived from a solution have been compared against sputtered films over a wide range of different compositions. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the structural properties of the compound material existing in a two-phase mixture M{sub A}O{sub 2}-M{sub B}O{sub 2}. The optical properties were evaluated over the whole solar spectrum by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry combined with spectrophotometry. The spectral complex refractive index was determined for CeO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}, as well as for their compounds. To reduce the large number of permutations in composition of multi-component oxides it would be useful to be able to predict the properties of the mixtures from the pure oxide components. Therefore these results were compared to those obtained by effective medium theory utilizing the optical constants of CeO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}. In order to investigate the performance as passive counter-electrode in Li{sup +} based electrochromic devices the films were tested by cyclic voltammetry with in-situ transmission control. Chemical composition was measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Surface morphology was analyzed by atomic force microscopy.

  16. Correction of Overlapping Multispectral LIDAR Intensity Data: Polynomial Approximation of Range and Angle Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, W. Y.; Shaker, A.

    2017-07-01

    Recent development of radiometric calibration, correction and normalization approaches have facilitated the use of monochromatic LiDAR intensity and waveform data for land surface analysis and classification. Despite the recent successful attempts, the majority of existing approaches are mainly tailor made for monochromatic LiDAR toward specific land surface scenario. In view of the latest development of multispectral LiDAR sensor, such as the Optech Titan manufactured by Teledyne Optech, a more generic approach should be developed so that the radiometric correction model is able to handle and compensate the laser energy loss with respect to different wavelengths. In this study, we propose a semi-physical approach that aims to utilize high order polynomial functions to model the distortion effects due to the range and the angle. To estimate the parameters of the respect polynomial functions for the range and angle, our approach first locates a pair of closest points within the overlapping LiDAR data strips and subsequently uses a non-linear least squares adjustment to retrieve the polynomial parameters based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The approach was tested on a multispectral airborne LiDAR dataset collected by the Optech Titan for the Petawawa Research Forest located in Ontario, Canada. The experimental results demonstrated that the coefficient of variation of the intensity of channel 1 (1550 nm), channel 2 (1064 nm) and channel 3 (532 nm) were reduced by 0.1 % to 39 %, 10 % to 45 % and 12 % to 54 %, respectively. The striping noises, no matter found within single strip and overlapping strips, were significantly reduced after implementing the proposed radiometric correction.

  17. An Approximation of the Smoothing Effect on the Output Variation of Photovoltaic Generation Systems Installed Densely in a Bounded Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Akinobu; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Otani, Kenji

    The purpose of this study is to propose a method to evaluate approximately a geographical smoothing effect on the output fluctuation of photovoltaic generation systems installed densely in a bounded area. This paper comprises two parts. The first part shows the result of analysis about output fluctuation, which is observed during four months in summer at ten groups of photovoltaic generation systems, located in AIST Tsukuba Central and totaling 844kW, and presents findings about a geographical smoothing effect on output fluctuation in the light of statistical characteristics such as the standard deviation of output variation and correlation factors between the output variations of different systems. The second part contains a mathematical modeling of a geographical smoothing effect in a bounded area based on the findings presented in the previous part and proposes a set of formulas to evaluate approximately a geographical smoothing effect on the output fluctuation of photovoltaic generation systems installed densely in a bounded area only using geometrical information about the area.

  18. Approximate confidence intervals for moment-based estimators of the between-study variance in random effects meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dan; Bowden, Jack; Baker, Rose

    2015-12-01

    Moment-based estimators of the between-study variance are very popular when performing random effects meta-analyses. This type of estimation has many advantages including computational and conceptual simplicity. Furthermore, by using these estimators in large samples, valid meta-analyses can be performed without the assumption that the treatment effects follow a normal distribution. Recently proposed moment-based confidence intervals for the between-study variance are exact under the random effects model but are quite elaborate. Here, we present a much simpler method for calculating approximate confidence intervals of this type. This method uses variance-stabilising transformations as its basis and can be used for a very wide variety of moment-based estimators in both the random effects meta-analysis and meta-regression models.

  19. Search for effects beyond the Born approximation in polarization transfer observables in $\\vec{e}p$ elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, M; Brash, E J; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Puckett, A J.R.; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Ates, O; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbothan, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Kang, H; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnick, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nuruzzaman,; Nedev, S; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Vanderhaeghen, M; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2011-04-01

    Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, $G_{E}/G_{M}$, obtained separately from cross section and polarization transfer measurements. One possible explanation for this difference is a two-photon-exchange (TPEX) contribution. In an effort to search for effects beyond the one-photon-exchange or Born approximation, we report measurements of polarization transfer observables in the elastic $H(\\vec{e},e'\\vec{p})$ reaction for three different beam energies at a fixed squared momentum transfer $Q^2 = 2.5$ GeV$^2$, spanning a wide range of the virtual photon polarization parameter, $\\epsilon$. From these measured polarization observables, we have obtained separately the ratio $R$, which equals $\\mu_p G_{E}/G_{M}$ in the Born approximation, and the longitudinal polarization transfer component $P_\\ell$, with statistical and systematic uncertainties of $\\Delta R \\approx \\pm 0.01 \\mbox{(stat)} \\pm 0.013 \\mbox{(syst)}$ and $\\Delta P_\\ell/P^{Born}_{\\ell} \\approx \\pm 0.006 \\mbox{(stat)}\\pm 0.01 \\mbox{(syst)}$. The ratio $R$ is found to be independent of $\\epsilon$ at the 1.5% level, while the $\\epsilon$ dependence of $P_\\ell$ shows an enhancement of $(2.3 \\pm 0.6) %$ relative to the Born approximation at large $\\epsilon$.

  20. The Effect of Approximating Some Molecular Integrals in Coupled-Cluster Calculations: Fundamental Frequencies and Rovibrational Spectroscopic Constants of Cyclopropenylidene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    The singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, denoted CCSD(T), has been used, in conjunction with approximate integral techniques, to compute highly accurate rovibrational spectroscopic constants of cyclopropenylidene, C3H2. The approximate integral technique was proposed in 1994 by Rendell and Lee in order to avoid disk storage and input/output bottlenecks, and today it will also significantly aid in the development of algorithms for distributed memory, massively parallel computer architectures. It is shown in this study that use of approximate integrals does not impact the accuracy of CCSD(T) calculations. In addition, the most accurate spectroscopic data yet for C3H2 is presented based on a CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ quartic force field that is modified to include the effects of core-valence electron correlation. Cyclopropenylidene is of great astronomical and astrobiological interest because it is the smallest aromatic ringed compound to be positively identified in the interstellar medium, and is thus involved in the prebiotic processing of carbon and hydrogen. The singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of

  1. Search for Effects Beyond the Born Approximation in Polarization Transfer Observables in e-vectorp Elastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, M.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Brash, E. J.; Gilman, R.; Jones, M. K.; Bosted, P.; Covrig, S.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Gaskell, D.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Horn, T.; Meekins, D.; Smith, G.; Suleiman, R.; Wojtsekhowski, B. B.; Wood, S.; Luo, W.; Hu, B.

    2011-04-01

    Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G{sub E}/G{sub M}, obtained separately from cross section and polarization transfer measurements. One possible explanation for this difference is a two-photon-exchange contribution. In an effort to search for effects beyond the one-photon-exchange or Born approximation, we report measurements of polarization transfer observables in the elastic H(e-vector,e{sup '}p-vector) reaction for three different beam energies at a Q{sup 2}=2.5 GeV{sup 2}, spanning a wide range of the kinematic parameter {epsilon}. The ratio R, which equals {mu}{sub p}G{sub E}/G{sub M} in the Born approximation, is found to be independent of {epsilon} at the 1.5% level. The {epsilon} dependence of the longitudinal polarization transfer component P{sub l} shows an enhancement of (2.3{+-}0.6)% relative to the Born approximation at large {epsilon}.

  2. The Effect of Approximating Some Molecular Integrals in Coupled-Cluster Calculations: Fundamental Frequencies and Rovibrational Spectroscopic Constants of Cyclopropenylidene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    The singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations, denoted CCSD(T), has been used, in conjunction with approximate integral techniques, to compute highly accurate rovibrational spectroscopic constants of cyclopropenylidene, C3H2. The approximate integral technique was proposed in 1994 by Rendell and Lee in order to avoid disk storage and input/output bottlenecks, and today it will also significantly aid in the development of algorithms for distributed memory, massively parallel computer architectures. It is shown in this study that use of approximate integrals does not impact the accuracy of CCSD(T) calculations. In addition, the most accurate spectroscopic data yet for C3H2 is presented based on a CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ quartic force field that is modified to include the effects of core-valence electron correlation. Cyclopropenylidene is of great astronomical and astrobiological interest because it is the smallest aromatic ringed compound to be positively identified in the interstellar medium, and is thus involved in the prebiotic processing of carbon and hydrogen. The singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of

  3. Many-Body Effects in Iron Pnictides and Chalcogenides: Nonlocal Versus Dynamic Origin of Effective Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, Jan M.; van Schilfgaarde, M.; Kotliar, G.

    2012-12-01

    We apply the quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation (QSGW) to some of the iron pnictide and chalcogenide superconductors. We compute Fermi surfaces and density of states, and find excellent agreement with experiment, substantially improving over standard band-structure methods. Analyzing the QSGW self-energy we discuss nonlocal and dynamic contributions to effective masses. We present evidence that the two contributions are mostly separable, since the quasiparticle weight is found to be essentially independent of momentum. The main effect of nonlocality is captured by the static but nonlocal QSGW effective potential. Moreover, these nonlocal self-energy corrections, absent in, e.g., dynamical mean field theory, can be relatively large. We show, on the other hand, that QSGW only partially accounts for dynamic renormalizations at low energies. These findings suggest that QSGW combined with dynamical mean field theory will capture most of the many-body physics in the iron pnictides and chalcogenides.

  4. Determination of effective mass density and modulus for resonant metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeongwon; Park, Buhm; Kim, Deokman; Park, Junhong

    2012-10-01

    This work presents a method to determine the effective dynamic properties of resonant metamaterials. The longitudinal vibration of a rod with periodically attached oscillators was predicted using wave propagation analysis. The effective mass density and modulus were determined from the transfer function of vibration responses. Predictions of these effective properties compared favorably with laboratory measurements. While the effective mass density showed significant frequency dependent variation near the natural frequency of the oscillators, the elastic modulus was largely unchanged for the setup considered in this study. The effective mass density became complex-numbered when the spring element of the oscillator was viscoelastic. As the real part of the effective mass density became negative, the propagating wavenumber components disappeared, and vibration transmission through the metamaterial was prohibited. The proposed method provides a consistent approach for evaluating the effective parameters of resonant metamaterials using a small number of vibration measurements.

  5. Gravitational waves and mass ejecta from binary neutron star mergers: Effect of the mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tim; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Brügmann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    We present new (3 +1 )D numerical relativity simulations of the binary neutron star (BNS) merger and postmerger phase. We focus on a previously inaccessible region of the binary parameter space spanning the binary's mass ratio q ˜1.00 - 1.75 for different total masses and equations of state, and up to q ˜2 for a stiff BNS system. We study the mass ratio effect on the gravitational waves (GWs) and on the possible electromagnetic (EM) emission associated with dynamical mass ejecta. We compute waveforms, spectra, and spectrograms of the GW strain including all the multipoles up to l =4 . The mass ratio has a specific imprint on the GW multipoles in the late-inspiral-merger signal, and it affects qualitatively the spectra of the merger remnant. The multipole effect is also studied by considering the dependency of the GW spectrograms on the source's sky location. Unequal mass BNSs produce more ejecta than equal mass systems with ejecta masses and kinetic energies depending almost linearly on q . We estimate luminosity peaks and light curves of macronova events associated with the mergers using a simple approach. For q ˜2 the luminosity peak is delayed for several days and can be up to 4 times larger than for the q =1 cases. The macronova emission associated with the q ˜2 BNS is more persistent in time and could be observed for weeks instead of a few days (q =1 ) in the near infrared. Finally, we estimate the flux of possible radio flares produced by the interaction of relativistic outflows with the surrounding medium. Also in this case a large q can significantly enhance the emission and delay the peak luminosity. Overall, our results indicate that the BNS merger with a large mass ratio has EM signatures distinct from the equal mass case and more similar to black hole-neutron star binaries.

  6. Many-Body Effects on Bandgap Shrinkage, Effective Masses, and Alpha Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Ning, C. Z.; Woo, Alex C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many-body Coulomb effects influence the operation of quantum-well (QW) laser diode (LD) strongly. In the present work, we study a two-band electron-hole plasma (EHP) within the Hatree-Fock approximation and the single plasmon pole approximation for static screening. Full inclusion of momentum dependence in the many-body effects is considered. An empirical expression for carrier density dependence of the bandgap renormalization (BGR) in an 8 nm GaAs/Al(0.3)G(4.7)As single QW will be given, which demonstrates a non-universal scaling behavior for quasi-two-dimension structures, due to size-dependent efficiency of screening. In addition, effective mass renormalization (EMR) due to momentum-dependent self-energy many-body correction, for both electrons and holes is studied and serves as another manifestation of the many-body effects. Finally, the effects on carrier density dependence of the alpha factor is evaluated to assess the sensitivity of the full inclusion of momentum dependence.

  7. Study of bottleneck effect at an emergency evacuation exit using cellular automata model, mean field approximation analysis, and game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Jun; Hagishima, Aya; Tanaka, Yasukaka

    2010-12-01

    An improved cellular automaton model for pedestrian dynamics was established, where both static floor field and collision effect derived from game theory were considered. Several model parameters were carefully determined by previous studies. Results obtained through model-based simulation and analytical approach (derived from mean field approximation) proved that outflow rate from an evacuation exit, which is usually estimated using outflow coefficient in building codes in Japan, can be improved by placing an appropriate obstacle in front of the exit. This can reduce collision probability at the exit by increasing collisions around the obstacles ahead of the exit.

  8. Charts and approximate formulas for the estimation of aeroelastic effects of the lateral control of swept and unswept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, Kenneth A; Diederich, Franklin W

    1953-01-01

    Charts and approximate formulas are presented for the estimation of static aeroelastic effects on the spanwise lift distribution, rolling-moment coefficient, and rate of roll due to the deflection of ailerons on swept and unswept wings at subsonic and supersonic speeds. Some design considerations brought out by the results of this report are discussed. This report treats the lateral-control case in a manner similar to that employed in NACA Report 1140 for the symmetric-flight case, and is intended to be used in conjunction with NACA Report 1140 and the charts and formulas presented therein.

  9. Gas and solute diffusion in partially saturated porous media: Percolation theory and Effective Medium Approximation compared with lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Daigle, Hugh; Hunt, Allen G.; Ewing, Robert P.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and accurate prediction of gas or liquid phase (solute) diffusion are essential to accurate prediction of contaminant transport in partially saturated porous media. In this study, we propose analytical equations, using concepts from percolation theory and the Effective Medium Approximation (EMA) to model the saturation dependence of both gas and solute diffusion in porous media. The predictions of our theoretical approach agree well with the results of nine lattice Boltzmann simulations. We find that the universal quadratic scaling predicted by percolation theory, combined with the universal linear scaling predicted by the EMA, describes diffusion in porous media with both relatively broad and extremely narrow pore size distributions.

  10. Spin-current Seebeck effect in an interacting quantum dot: Atomic approximation for the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, E.; Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Siqueira, E. C.; Figueira, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    We study the spin-current Seebeck effect through an immersed gate defined quantum dot, employing the U-finite atomic method for the single impurity Anderson model. Our description qualitatively confirms some of the results obtained by an earlier Hartree-Fock work, but as our calculation includes the Kondo effect, some new features will appear in the spin-current Seebeck effect S, which as a function of the gate voltage present an oscillatory shape. At intermediate temperatures, our results show a three zero structure and at low temperatures, our results are governed by the emergence of the Kondo peak in the transmittance, which defines the behavior of the shape of the S coefficient as a function of the parameters of the model. The oscillatory behavior obtained by the Hartree-Fock approximation reproduces the shape obtained by us in a non-interacting system (U=0). The S sign is sensitive to different polarization of the quantum dot, and as a consequence the device could be employed to experimentally detect the polarization states of the system. Our results also confirm that the large increase of S upon increasing U, obtained by the mean field approximation, is correct only for low temperatures. We also discuss the role of the Kondo peak in defining the behavior of the spin thermopower at low temperatures.

  11. On top quark mass effects to gg → ZH at NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselhuhn, Alexander; Luthe, Thomas; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We compute next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the process gg → ZH. In the effective-theory approach we confirm the results in the literature. We consider top quark mass corrections via an asymptotic expansion and show that there is a good convergence below the top quark threshold which describes approximately a quarter of the total cross section. Our corrections are implemented in the publicly available C++ program ggzh.

  12. Gluon transport equation with effective mass and dynamical onset of Bose–Einstein condensation

    DOE PAGES

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we study the transport equation describing a dense system of gluons, in the small scattering angle approximation, taking into account medium-generated effective masses of the gluons. We focus on the case of overpopulated systems that are driven to Bose–Einstein condensation on their way to thermalization. Lastly, the presence of a mass modifies the dispersion relation of the gluon, as compared to the massless case, but it is shown that this does not change qualitatively the scaling behavior in the vicinity of the onset.

  13. The effect of flow and mass transport in thrombogenesis.

    PubMed

    Basmadjian, D

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical analysis of the contributions of flow and mass transport to a single reactive event at a blood vessel wall. The intent is to prepare the ground for a comprehensive study of the intertwining of these contributions with the reaction network of the coagulation cascade. We show that in all vessels with local mural activity, or in "large" vessels (d greater than 0.1 mm) with global reactivity, events at the tubular wall can be rigorously described by algebraic equations under steady conditions, or by ordinary differential forms (ODEs) during transient conditions. This opens up important ways for analyzing the combined roles of flow, transport, and coagulation reactions in thrombosis, a task hitherto considered to be completely intractable. We report extensively on the dependence of transport coefficient kL and mural coagulant concentration Cw on flow, vessel geometry, and reaction kinetics. It is shown that for protein transport, kL varies only weakly with shear rate gamma in large vessels, and not at all in the smaller tubes (d less than 10(-2) mm). For a typical protein, kL approximately 10(-3) cm s-1 within a factor of 3 in most geometries, irrespective of the mural reaction kinetics. Significant reductions in kL (1/10-1/1,000) leading to high-coagulant accumulation are seen mainly in stagnant zones vicinal to abrupt expansions and in small elliptical tubules. This is in accord with known physical observations. More unexpected are the dramatic increases in accumulation which can come about through the intervention of an autocatalytic reaction step, with Cw rising sharply toward infinity as the ratio of reaction to transport coefficient approaches unity. Such self-catalyzed reactions have the ability to act as powerful amplifiers of an otherwise modest influence of flow and transport on coagulant concentration. The paper considers as well the effect on mass transport of transient conditions occasioned by coagulation initiation or

  14. An isotopic mass effect on the intermolecular potential

    DOE PAGES

    Herman, Michael F.; Currier, Robert Patrick; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-09-28

    The impact of isotopic variation on the electronic energy and intermolecular potentials is often suppressed when calculating isotopologue thermodynamics. Intramolecular potential energy surfaces for distinct isotopologues are in fact equivalent under the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, which is sometimes used to imply that the intermolecular interactions are independent of isotopic mass. In this paper, the intermolecular dipole–dipole interaction between hetero-nuclear diatomic molecules is considered. It is shown that the intermolecular potential contains mass-dependent terms even though each nucleus moves on a Born–Oppenheimer surface. Finally, the analysis suggests that mass dependent variations in intermolecular potentials should be included in comprehensive descriptions of isotopologuemore » thermodynamics.« less

  15. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    A method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response is described. The key to this method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in most cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacements are used to approximate bending stresses.

  16. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    George Fleming, Saul Cohen, Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-10-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  17. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, George; Cohen, Saul; Lin, Huey-Wen

    2009-01-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  18. Seasonality and the effectiveness of mass vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dennis L; Dimitrov, Dobromir T

    2016-04-01

    Many infectious diseases have seasonal outbreaks, which may be driven by cyclical environmental conditions (e.g., an annual rainy season) or human behavior (e.g., school calendars or seasonal migration). If a pathogen is only transmissible for a limited period of time each year, then seasonal outbreaks could infect fewer individuals than expected given the pathogen's in-season transmissibility. Influenza, with its short serial interval and long season, probably spreads throughout a population until a substantial fraction of susceptible individuals are infected. Dengue, with a long serial interval and shorter season, may be constrained by its short transmission season rather than the depletion of susceptibles. Using mathematical modeling, we show that mass vaccination is most efficient, in terms of infections prevented per vaccine administered, at high levels of coverage for pathogens that have relatively long epidemic seasons, like influenza, and at low levels of coverage for pathogens with short epidemic seasons, like dengue. Therefore, the length of a pathogen's epidemic season may need to be considered when evaluating the costs and benefits of vaccination programs.

  19. Effects of BMI, Fat Mass, and Lean Mass on Asthma in Childhood: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Raquel; Henderson, A. John; Evans, David M.; Smith, George Davey; Ness, Andrew R.; Lewis, Sarah; Palmer, Tom M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies have reported associations between body mass index (BMI) and asthma, but confounding and reverse causality remain plausible explanations. We aim to investigate evidence for a causal effect of BMI on asthma using a Mendelian randomization approach. Methods and Findings We used Mendelian randomization to investigate causal effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on current asthma at age 7½ y in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A weighted allele score based on 32 independent BMI-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was derived from external data, and associations with BMI, fat mass, lean mass, and asthma were estimated. We derived instrumental variable (IV) estimates of causal risk ratios (RRs). 4,835 children had available data on BMI-associated SNPs, asthma, and BMI. The weighted allele score was strongly associated with BMI, fat mass, and lean mass (all p-values<0.001) and with childhood asthma (RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.38–4.76 per unit score, p = 0.003). The estimated causal RR for the effect of BMI on asthma was 1.55 (95% CI 1.16–2.07) per kg/m2, p = 0.003. This effect appeared stronger for non-atopic (1.90, 95% CI 1.19–3.03) than for atopic asthma (1.37, 95% CI 0.89–2.11) though there was little evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.31). The estimated causal RRs for the effects of fat mass and lean mass on asthma were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11–1.79) per 0.5 kg and 2.25 (95% CI 1.23–4.11) per kg, respectively. The possibility of genetic pleiotropy could not be discounted completely; however, additional IV analyses using FTO variant rs1558902 and the other BMI-related SNPs separately provided similar causal effects with wider confidence intervals. Loss of follow-up was unlikely to bias the estimated effects. Conclusions Higher BMI increases the risk of asthma in mid-childhood. Higher BMI may have contributed to the increase in asthma risk toward the end of the 20th century. Please see

  20. Effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on asthma in childhood: a Mendelian randomization study.

    PubMed

    Granell, Raquel; Henderson, A John; Evans, David M; Smith, George Davey; Ness, Andrew R; Lewis, Sarah; Palmer, Tom M; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2014-07-01

    Observational studies have reported associations between body mass index (BMI) and asthma, but confounding and reverse causality remain plausible explanations. We aim to investigate evidence for a causal effect of BMI on asthma using a Mendelian randomization approach. We used Mendelian randomization to investigate causal effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on current asthma at age 7½ y in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A weighted allele score based on 32 independent BMI-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was derived from external data, and associations with BMI, fat mass, lean mass, and asthma were estimated. We derived instrumental variable (IV) estimates of causal risk ratios (RRs). 4,835 children had available data on BMI-associated SNPs, asthma, and BMI. The weighted allele score was strongly associated with BMI, fat mass, and lean mass (all p-values<0.001) and with childhood asthma (RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.38-4.76 per unit score, p = 0.003). The estimated causal RR for the effect of BMI on asthma was 1.55 (95% CI 1.16-2.07) per kg/m2, p = 0.003. This effect appeared stronger for non-atopic (1.90, 95% CI 1.19-3.03) than for atopic asthma (1.37, 95% CI 0.89-2.11) though there was little evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.31). The estimated causal RRs for the effects of fat mass and lean mass on asthma were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11-1.79) per 0.5 kg and 2.25 (95% CI 1.23-4.11) per kg, respectively. The possibility of genetic pleiotropy could not be discounted completely; however, additional IV analyses using FTO variant rs1558902 and the other BMI-related SNPs separately provided similar causal effects with wider confidence intervals. Loss of follow-up was unlikely to bias the estimated effects. Higher BMI increases the risk of asthma in mid-childhood. Higher BMI may have contributed to the increase in asthma risk toward the end of the 20th century. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  1. Observables of a test mass along an inclined orbit in a post-Newtonian-approximated Kerr spacetime including the linear and quadratic spin terms.

    PubMed

    Hergt, Steven; Shah, Abhay; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2013-07-12

    The orbital motion is derived for a nonspinning test mass in the relativistic, gravitational field of a rotationally deformed body not restricted to the equatorial plane or spherical orbit. The gravitational field of the central body is represented by the Kerr metric, expanded to second post-Newtonian order including the linear and quadratic spin terms. The orbital period, the intrinsic periastron advance, and the precession of the orbital plane are derived with the aid of novel canonical variables and action-based methods.

  2. Nucleon effective E-mass in neutron-rich matter from the Migdal–Luttinger jump

    DOE PAGES

    Cai, Bao-Jun; Li, Bao-An

    2016-03-25

    The well-known Migdal-Luttinger theorem states that the jump of the single-nucleon momentum distribution at the Fermi surface is equal to the inverse of the nucleon effective E-mass. Recent experiments studying short-range correlations (SRC) in nuclei using electron-nucleus scatterings at the Jefferson National Laboratory (JLAB) together with model calculations constrained significantly the Migdal-Luttinger jump at saturation density of nuclear matter. We show that the corresponding nucleon effective E-mass is consequently constrained to M-0(*,E)/M approximate to 2.22 +/- 0.35 in symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) and the E-mass of neutrons is smaller than that of protons in neutron-rich matter. Moreover, the average depletionmore » of the nucleon Fermi sea increases (decreases) approximately linearly with the isospin asymmetry delta according to kappa(p/n) approximate to 0.21 +/- 0.06 +/- (0.19 +/- 0.08)delta for protons (neutrons). These results will help improve our knowledge about the space-time non-locality of the single-nucleon potential in neutron-rich nucleonic matter Useful in both nuclear physics and astrophysics. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Funded by SCOAP(3).« less

  3. Mass-Imbalanced Superconductivity in Effective Two-Channel Kondo Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusunose, Hiroaki

    2016-11-01

    We propose that mass-imbalanced superconductivity is realized in an effective two-channel Kondo lattice, and its characteristic property appears in electromagnetic responses such as the Meissner effect. Starting from an effective two-channel Kondo lattice model as a low-energy effective theory, and approximating it with two mean-field order parameter components in a self-consistent fashion, it is shown that the balance of the two components is sensitively reflected in the magnitude of the Meissner kernel, while thermodynamic properties are little affected by the balance. This remarkable behavior is understood by the localized character of one partner in the Cooper pair, namely, the effect of the mass imbalance. We briefly mention the relevance to the huge enhancement of the upper critical field under pressure observed in Pr 1-2-20 systems.

  4. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  5. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  6. The effect of rheological approximations on the dynamics and topography in 3D subduction-collision models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Popov, Anton A.

    2016-04-01

    Most of the major mountain belts and orogenic plateaus are found within the overlying plate of active or fossil subduction and/or collision zones. Moreover, they evolve differently from one another as the result of specific combinations of surface and mantle processes. These differences arise for several reasons, such as different rheological properties, different amounts of regional isostatic compensation, and different mechanisms by which forces are applied to the convergent plates. Previous 3D geodynamic models of subduction/collision processes have used various rheological approximations, making numerical results difficult to compare, since there is no clear image on the extent of these approximations on the dynamics. Here, we employ the code LaMEM to perform high-resolution long-term 3D simulations of subduction/continental collision in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. We test the effect of rheological approximations on mantle and lithosphere dynamics in a geometrically simplified model setup that resembles a tectonic map of the India-Asia collision zone. We use the "sticky-air" approach to allow for the development of topography and the dynamics of subduction and collision is entirely driven by slab-pull (i.e. "free subduction"). The models exhibit a wide range of behaviours depending on the rheological law employed: from linear to temperature-dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheology that takes into account both diffusion and dislocation creep. For example, we find that slab dynamics varies drastically between end member models: in viscous approximations, slab detachment is slow following a viscous thinning, while for a non-linear visco-elasto-plastic rheology, slab detachment is relatively fast, inducing strong mantle flow in the slab window. We also examine the stress states in the subducting and overriding plates and topography evolution in the upper plate, and we discuss the implications on lithosphere dynamics at convergent margins

  7. Effective pion mass term and the trace anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we developed an effective theory of pions and a light dilatonic meson for gauge theories with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry that are close to the conformal window. The pion mass term in this effective theory depends on an exponent y . We derive the transformation properties under dilatations of the renormalized fermion mass and use this to rederive y =3 -γm* , where γm* is the fixed-point value of the mass anomalous dimension at the sill of the conformal window. This value for y is consistent with the trace anomaly of the underlying near-conformal gauge theory.

  8. Quantum-gravitational effects on gauge-invariant scalar and tensor perturbations during inflation: The slow-roll approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizuela, David; Kiefer, Claus; Krämer, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    We continue our study on corrections from canonical quantum gravity to the power spectra of gauge-invariant inflationary scalar and tensor perturbations. A direct canonical quantization of a perturbed inflationary universe model is implemented, which leads to a Wheeler-DeWitt equation. For this equation, a semiclassical approximation is applied in order to obtain a Schrödinger equation with quantum-gravitational correction terms, from which we calculate the corrections to the power spectra. We go beyond the de Sitter case discussed earlier and analyze our model in the first slow-roll approximation, considering terms linear in the slow-roll parameters. We find that the dominant correction term from the de Sitter case, which leads to an enhancement of power on the largest scales, gets modified by terms proportional to the slow-roll parameters. A correction to the tensor-to-scalar ratio is also found at second order in the slow-roll parameters. Making use of the available experimental data, the magnitude of these quantum-gravitational corrections is estimated. Finally, the effects for the temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background are qualitatively obtained.

  9. Effective mass measurement: the influence of hole band nonparabolicity in SiGe/Ge quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössner, Benjamin; von Känel, Hans; Chrastina, Daniel; Isella, Giovanni; Batlogg, Bertram

    2007-01-01

    We show that the common practice of identifying effective masses derived from Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) and cyclotron resonance measurements with zero-field effective density of states (DOS) masses must be scrutinized when nonparabolicity effects come into play. To this end, the temperature dependence of theoretical SdH oscillations expected for strained-Ge quantum wells is explicitly simulated from calculations of the Landau level structure, giving rise to theoretical masses in exact analogy to a SdH measurement. The calculations are performed within a 6 × 6 envelope function approximation (EFA). The same method is used to calculate the zero-field DOS mass. Our analysis shows that the pronounced nonparabolicity of the heavy hole band leads to a nonlinear magnetic field dependence of Landau level energies invalidating the assumption of equal cyclotron and DOS masses. In particular, we show that at high carrier density the DOS mass is significantly underestimated in a SdH measurement.

  10. Femtolensing: Beyond the semiclassical approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Andrew; Goodman, Jeremy

    1995-01-01

    Femtolensoing is a gravitational lensing effect in which the magnification is a function not only of the position and sizes of the source and lens, but also of the wavelength of light. Femtolensing is the only known effect of 10(exp -13) - 10(exp -16) solar mass) dark-matter objects and may possibly be detectable in cosmological gamma-ray burst spectra. We present a new and efficient algorithm for femtolensing calculation in general potentials. The physical optics results presented here differ at low frequencies from the semiclassical approximation, in which the flux is attributed to a finite number of mutually coherent images. At higher frequencies, our results agree well with the semicalssical predictions. Applying our method to a point-mass lens with external shear, we find complex events that have structure at both large and small spectral resolution. In this way, we show that femtolensing may be observable for lenses up to 10(exp -11) solar mass, much larger than previously believed. Additionally, we discuss the possibility of a search femtolensing of white dwarfs in the Large Magellanic Cloud at optical wavelengths.

  11. A Derivation of Aharonov-Casher Phase and Another Adiabatic Approximation for Pure Gauge Under General Rashba Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    Spin filters using spin-orbit interaction (SOI) are very important in the field of spintronics. Therefore, a theory of devices using SOI is necessary for designing the spin filters. The spin-filtering devices can be used to generate and detect spin polarized currents. Many researchers have reported on the spin-filters using linear Rashba SOI. However, the spin-filters using square and cubic Rashba SOIs are not yet reported. This is surely because the Aharonov-Casher (AC) phases acquired under square and cubic Rashba SOIs are ambiguous. In this paper, we try to derive the AC phases acquired under nth order Rashba SOIs, which we call general Rashba SOIs, using non-Abelian SU (2) gauge theory. As a result, we have successfully derived these AC phases without completing the square methods which is useless except for linear Rashba SOI. In the process of derivation of AC phases, we have also found another expression of adiabatic approximation for a pure gauge. This finding will lead to the starting point for deeply understanding the adiabatic approximation. Using the above AC phases under general Rashba SOIs, we investigate the spin filter effect in Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring with double quantum dots (QDs) under general Rashba SOIs. The spin transport is investigated from left nanowire to right nanowire in this structure within tight binding approximation. Especially, we focus on the difference of spin filter effects among general Rashba SOIs. We have obtained the penetrating magnetic flux dependence of spin polarization for the AB ring subject to general Rashba SOIs. It is found that the perfect spin filtering is achieved for all the Rashba SOIs. This result indicates that this AB ring under general Rashba SOIs can be a promising device for spin current generation without ferromagnetic metals. Moreover, this device under different order Rashba SOI behaves in totally different ways in response to penetrating magnetic flux, which is attributed to n times rotation of

  12. Approximate kernel competitive learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Sheng; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Lai, Jian-Huang

    2015-03-01

    Kernel competitive learning has been successfully used to achieve robust clustering. However, kernel competitive learning (KCL) is not scalable for large scale data processing, because (1) it has to calculate and store the full kernel matrix that is too large to be calculated and kept in the memory and (2) it cannot be computed in parallel. In this paper we develop a framework of approximate kernel competitive learning for processing large scale dataset. The proposed framework consists of two parts. First, it derives an approximate kernel competitive learning (AKCL), which learns kernel competitive learning in a subspace via sampling. We provide solid theoretical analysis on why the proposed approximation modelling would work for kernel competitive learning, and furthermore, we show that the computational complexity of AKCL is largely reduced. Second, we propose a pseudo-parallelled approximate kernel competitive learning (PAKCL) based on a set-based kernel competitive learning strategy, which overcomes the obstacle of using parallel programming in kernel competitive learning and significantly accelerates the approximate kernel competitive learning for large scale clustering. The empirical evaluation on publicly available datasets shows that the proposed AKCL and PAKCL can perform comparably as KCL, with a large reduction on computational cost. Also, the proposed methods achieve more effective clustering performance in terms of clustering precision against related approximate clustering approaches.

  13. Terrestrial Planet Formation around Low-Mass Stars: Effect of the Mass of Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshino, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Yuji; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2015-12-01

    The Kepler space telescope has detected several thousand planets and candidates.Their central stars are mainly FGK-type stars.It is difficult to observe M-stars by using visible light since M-stars have their peak radiation in the infrared region.However, recently there are several survey projects for planets around M-stars such as the InfraRed Doppler (IRD) survey of the Subaru telescope.Therefore it is expected that the number of planets around M-stars will increase in the near future.The habitable zone of M-stars is closer to the stars than that of G-stars.For this reason, the possibility of finding habitable planets is expected to be higher.Here we study the formation of close-in terrestrial planets by giant impacts of protoplanets around low-mass stars by using N-body simulations.An important parameter that controls formation processes is the ratio between the physical radius of a planet and its Hill radius, which decreases with the stellar mass.We systematically change the mass of the central stars and investigate its effects on terrestrial planet formation.We find that the mass of the maximum planet decreases with the mass of central stars, while the number of planets in the system increases.We also find that the orbital separation of adjacent planets normalized by their Hill radius increases with the stellar mass.

  14. An Approach to Rapid Calculation of Temperature Change in Tissue Using Spatial Filters to Approximate Effects of Thermal Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Carluccio, Giuseppe; Erricolo, Danilo; Oh, Sukhoon

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach to performing rapid calculations of temperature within tissue by interleaving, at regular time intervals, 1) an analytical solution to the Pennes (or other desired) bioheat equation excluding the term for thermal conduction and 2) application of a spatial filter to approximate the effects of thermal conduction. Here, the basic approach is presented with attention to filter design. The method is applied to a few different cases relevant to magnetic resonance imaging, and results are compared to those from a full finite-difference (FD) implementation of the Pennes bio-heat equation. It is seen that results of the proposed method are in reasonable agreement with those of the FD approach, with about 15% difference in the calculated maximum temperature increase, but are calculated in a fraction of the time, requiring less than 2% of the calculation time for the FD approach in the cases evaluated. PMID:23358947

  15. Fitting-determined formulation of effective medium approximation for 3D trench structures in model-based infrared reflectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanwei; Liu, Shiyuan; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong

    2011-02-01

    The success of the model-based infrared reflectrometry (MBIR) technique relies heavily on accurate modeling and fast calculation of the infrared metrology process, which continues to be a challenge, especially for three-dimensional (3D) trench structures. In this paper, we present a simplified formulation for effective medium approximation (EMA), determined by a fitting-based method for the modeling of 3D trench structures. Intensive investigations have been performed with an emphasis on the generality of the fitting-determined (FD)-EMA formulation in terms of trench depth, trench pitch, and incidence angle so that its application is not limited to a particular configuration. Simulations conducted on a taper trench structure have further verified the proposed FD-EMA and demonstrated that the MBIR metrology with the FD-EMA-based model achieves an accuracy one order higher than that of the conventional zeroth-order EMA-based model.

  16. Verification of the adiabatic invariant approximation for computing effective horizontal sound speeds in a range dependent environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northrop, J.; Shockley, R. C.; Hansen, P. G.

    1980-09-01

    Use of the Adiabatic Invariant Approximation (AIA) for determining horizontal sound speeds in a range dependent environment was proposed. Because the method provides a great savings in computer time over conventional ray tracing techniques, it was applied to two very-long-range paths, from Perth, Australia, to Bermuda and to Fernando de Noronha (19763.0 and 14549.3 km, respectively), where measured travel times are available. Results show that the AIA method predicts effective horizontal sound speeds of 1482.3m/s and 1480.4m/s, respectively, for the two propagation paths. These results compare favorably with the measured values of 1484.7 - or - 3.7 m/s and 1480.1 + or - 0.9 m/s.

  17. Models, figures and gravitational moments of Jupiter’s satellite Io: Effects of the second order approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, V. N.; Gudkova, T. V.

    2010-08-01

    The effects of the equilibrium figure theory to within terms of the second order in a small parameter α on figure parameters and gravitational moments of the Galilean satellite Io have been considered. Integro-differential equations of the theory of figure to second order have been first solved numerically. Relations between the low-order coefficients of the gravitational field for satellites in hydrostatic equilibrium are generalized according to the second order theory. To show the effects of the second approximation, two three-layer trial models of Io are used. The considered models of the Io's interiors differ by the size and density of the core, while having the same thickness and density of the crust, and the mantle density difference is only 20 kg/m 3. The corrections of second order in smallness to the gravitational moments J2 and C22 decrease the third decimal digit of model gravitational moments by two units. As the effects of third and forth harmonics are determined mostly by outer layers of Io, to distinguish between model mantle density, the gravitational moments J4, C42 and C44 should be determined to accuracy with three or four decimal digits. The second order corrections mostly effect the semi-axis a, and less the semi-axes b and c.

  18. Safe and cost-effective laparoscopic removal of adnexal masses.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, D J; Townsend, D E; Johnson, G H

    1997-02-01

    To evaluate laparoscopic removal of adnexal masses using a plastic bag to avoid peritoneal spillage. An observational study. A university-affiliated private hospital. Thirty-one women (mean age 48.7 yrs) with adnexal masses. Laparoscopic removal of adnexal masses ranging from 3 to 12 cm (18 complex, 5 septated cystic masses, 8 persistent simple cysts). The masses were placed in plastic sandwich bag and removed through the umbilical incision. Hospital costs, length of stay and operating times were compared with those of 24 patients undergoing the removal of similar masses by laparotomy. Three masses were functional cysts, 4 were tubal cysts, 4 were endometriomas, and 20 were benign ovarian neoplasms. There were no malignancies. Peritoneal spillage occurred during one ovarian cystectomy. The only complication was bleeding from the cannula site. Comparing laparoscopy and laparotomy, average operating time was 73.45 minutes (range 34-148 min) and 81 minutes, average length of hospital stay was 17.4 hours (range 6-73 hrs) and 2.92 days, and average hospital cost was $2401 and $3539, respectively. Laparoscopic access provides a cost-effective method of removing adnexal masses with a very small risk of peritoneal spillage. When managed in this manner, rather than laparotomy, the cost reduction was significant.

  19. Visual stimulus parameters seriously compromise the measurement of approximate number system acuity and comparative effects between adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Szűcs, Dénes; Nobes, Alison; Devine, Amy; Gabriel, Florence C.; Gebuis, Titia

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that a simple non-symbolic magnitude comparison task is sufficient to measure the acuity of a putative Approximate Number System (ANS). A proposed measure of the ANS, the so-called “internal Weber fraction” (w), would provide a clear measure of ANS acuity. However, ANS studies have never presented adequate evidence that visual stimulus parameters did not compromise measurements of w to such extent that w is actually driven by visual instead of numerical processes. We therefore investigated this question by testing non-symbolic magnitude discrimination in seven-year-old children and adults. We manipulated/controlled visual parameters in a more stringent manner than usual. As a consequence of these controls, in some trials numerical cues correlated positively with number while in others they correlated negatively with number. This congruency effect strongly correlated with w, which means that congruency effects were probably driving effects in w. Consequently, in both adults and children congruency had a major impact on the fit of the model underlying the computation of w. Furthermore, children showed larger congruency effects than adults. This suggests that ANS tasks are seriously compromised by the visual stimulus parameters, which cannot be controlled. Hence, they are not pure measures of the ANS and some putative w or ratio effect differences between children and adults in previous ANS studies may be due to the differential influence of the visual stimulus parameters in children and adults. In addition, because the resolution of congruency effects relies on inhibitory (interference suppression) function, some previous ANS findings were probably influenced by the developmental state of inhibitory processes especially when comparing children with developmental dyscalculia and typically developing children. PMID:23882245

  20. Spin-orbit coupling induced by effective mass gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos-Abiague, A.

    2010-04-01

    The existence of a spin-orbit coupling (SOC) induced by the gradient of the effective mass in low-dimensional heterostructures is revealed. In structurally asymmetric quasi-two-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures the presence of a mass gradient across the interfaces results in a SOC which competes with the SOC created by the electric field in the valence band. However, in graded quantum wells subjected to an external electric field, the mass-gradient-induced SOC can be finite even when the electric field in the valence band vanishes.

  1. Is effective mass in combat sports punching above its weight?

    PubMed

    Lenetsky, Seth; Nates, Roy J; Brughelli, Matt; Harris, Nigel K

    2015-04-01

    The segmental and muscular complexity of the human body can result in challenges when examining the kinetics of impacts. To better understand this complexity, combat sports literature has selected effective mass as a measure of an athlete's inertial contribution to the momentum transfer during the impact of strikes. This measure helps to clarify the analysis of striking kinetics in combat sports. This paper will review: (1) effective mass as a concept and its usage as a measure of impact intensity in combat sports, (2) the neuromuscular pattern known as "double peak muscle activation" which has been theorized to help enhance initial hand velocity upon impact and joint stiffening during impact, (3) the methods and equations used to calculate effective mass, and (4) practitioner recommendations based on the literature. We will argue in this manuscript that the act of punching presents unique challenges to the current understanding of effective mass due to additional force application during impact. This review will improve the understanding of effective mass and its roles in effective striking serving to underpin future research into performance enhancement in striking based combat sports.

  2. Effective kaon masses in dense nuclear and neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waas, T.; Kaiser, N.; Weise, W.

    1996-02-01

    The effective mass and decay width of kaonic modes in baryonic matter are studied within a coupled-channel approach based on the Chiral SU(3) Effective Lagrangian which describes all available low energy data of the coupled overlineKN, π∑, πΛ system. Including Pauli blocking and Fermi motion in the kaon dispersion relation, we find a strong non-linear density dependence of the K - effective mass and decay width in symmetric nuclear matter at densities around 0.1 times normal nuclear matter density ϱ0 due to the in-medium dynamics of the Λ(1405) resonance. At higher densities the K - effective mass decreases slowly but stays above 0.5 mK at least up to densities below 3 ϱ0. In neutron matter the K - effective mass decreases almost linearly with increasing density but remains relatively large ( m K∗ > 0.65 m K) for ϱn ≲ 3 ϱ0. The K + effective mass turns out to increase very slowly with rising density.

  3. Approximate convective heating equations for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Moss, J. N.; Sutton, K.

    1979-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent heating-rate equations appropriate for engineering predictions of the convective heating rates about blunt reentry spacecraft at hypersonic conditions are developed. The approximate methods are applicable to both nonreacting and reacting gas mixtures for either constant or variable-entropy edge conditions. A procedure which accounts for variable-entropy effects and is not based on mass balancing is presented. Results of the approximate heating methods are in good agreement with existing experimental results as well as boundary-layer and viscous-shock-layer solutions.

  4. Effects of local mass anomalies in Eoetvoes-like experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, C.; Aronson, S.H.; Fischbach, E.

    1986-05-26

    We consider in detail the effects of local mass anomalies in Eoetvoes-like experiments. It is shown that in the presence of an intermediate-range non-gravitational force, the dominant contributions to both the sign and magnitude of the Eoetvoes anomaly may come from nearby masses and not from the earth as a whole. This observation has important implications in the design and interpretation of future experiments, and in the formulation of unified theories incorporating new intermediate-range forces.

  5. A special case of the Poisson PDE formulated for Earth's surface and its capability to approximate the terrain mass density employing land-based gravity data, a case study in the south of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AllahTavakoli, Yahya; Safari, Abdolreza; Vaníček, Petr

    2016-12-01

    This paper resurrects a version of Poisson's Partial Differential Equation (PDE) associated with the gravitational field at the Earth's surface and illustrates how the PDE possesses a capability to extract the mass density of Earth's topography from land-based gravity data. Herein, first we propound a theorem which mathematically introduces this version of Poisson's PDE adapted for the Earth's surface and then we use this PDE to develop a method of approximating the terrain mass density. Also, we carry out a real case study showing how the proposed approach is able to be applied to a set of land-based gravity data. In the case study, the method is summarized by an algorithm and applied to a set of gravity stations located along a part of the north coast of the Persian Gulf in the south of Iran. The results were numerically validated via rock-samplings as well as a geological map. Also, the method was compared with two conventional methods of mass density reduction. The numerical experiments indicate that the Poisson PDE at the Earth's surface has the capability to extract the mass density from land-based gravity data and is able to provide an alternative and somewhat more precise method of estimating the terrain mass density.

  6. Effective Schrödinger equation with general ordering ambiguity position-dependent mass Morse potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhdair, Sameer M.

    2012-07-01

    We solve the parametric generalized effective Schrödinger equation with a specific choice of position-dependent mass function and Morse oscillator potential by means of the Nikiforov-Uvarov method combined with the Pekeris approximation scheme. All bound-state energies are found explicitly and all corresponding radial wave functions are built analytically. We choose the Weyl or Li and Kuhn ordering for the ambiguity parameters in our numerical work to calculate the energy spectrum for a few (H2, LiH, HCl and CO) diatomic molecules with arbitrary vibration n and rotation l quantum numbers and different position-dependent mass functions. Two special cases including the constant mass and the vibration s-wave (l = 0) are also investigated.

  7. Effective mass discontinuity and current oscillations in stratified systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halilov, S.; Mil'shtein, S.

    2015-11-01

    Tunnelling transport in modulated film, which occurs either stoichiometrically or due to a stress field, is analysed in terms of the variable carrier effective mass tensor. It is shown that the mass tensor discontinuity alone, i.e. with no actual potential barrier present, may lead to current oscillations versus the size of the modulated region. While both effects of mass discontinuity and the band offset upon the carrier flow are formally described in terms of wave mechanics, their mechanisms are quite distinct: the magnitude of the current oscillations due to mass disruption is determined by the differential mass across the interface, i.e. by change in the covalency due to structural modulation, whereas the band offset is generally an effect of the affinity change across the interface. Both effects are superimposed by the 3D kinematic coupling of the orthogonal transport, either constructively or destructively, leading to an oscillatory dependence of the current magnitude on the film dimension. As an illustration, the analysis is applied to a Si1-x Ge x /Si stratified structure to demonstrate the effect of quasi-bound states on the transport. The modelling is corroborated by a device simulation of a SiGe system in a heterojunction bipolar transistor setting. The findings can be used as a general method to control anisotropic tunnelling transport in stratified structures.

  8. The effects of injury and illness on haemoglobin mass.

    PubMed

    Gough, C E; Sharpe, K; Garvican, L A; Anson, J M; Saunders, P U; Gore, C J

    2013-09-01

    This study sought to quantify the effects of reduced training, surgery and changes in body mass on haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) in athletes. Hbmass of 15 athletes (6 males, 9 females) was measured 9±6 (mean±SD) times over 162±198 days, during reduced training following injury or illness. Additionally, body mass (n=15 athletes) and episodes of altitude training (n=2), iron supplementation (n=5), or surgery (n=3) were documented. Training was recorded and compared with pre-injury levels. Analysis used linear mixed models for ln(Hbmass), with Sex, Altitude, Surgery, Iron, Training and log(Body Mass) as fixed effects, and Athlete as a fixed and random effect. Reduced training and surgery led to 2.3% (p=0.02) and 2.7% (p=0.04) decreases in Hbmass, respectively. Altitude and iron increased Hbmass by 2.4% (p=0.03) and 4.2% (p=0.05), respectively. The effect of changes in body mass on Hbmass was not statistically significant (p=0.435).The estimates for the effects of surgery and altitude on Hbmass should be confirmed by future research using a larger sample of athletes. These estimates could be used to inform the judgements of experts examining athlete biological passports, improving their interpretation of Hbmass perturbations, which athletes claim are related to injury, thereby protecting innocent athletes from unfair sanctioning.

  9. Defining the effective impact mass of elbow and shoulder strikes in ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Philippe; Hoshizaki, Thomas B

    2015-03-01

    Reconstruction of real-life events can be used to investigate the relationship between the mechanical parameters of the impact and concussion risk. Striking mass has typically been approximated as being the mass of the body part coming into contact with the head without accounting for the force applied by the striking athlete. Thus, the purpose of this study was to measure the effective impact mass of three common striking techniques in ice hockey. Fifteen participants were instructed to strike a suspended 50th percentile Hybrid III headform at least three times with their elbow or shoulder. Effective impact mass was calculated by measuring the change in velocity of the player and the headform. Mean effective impact mass for the extended elbow, tucked-in elbow, and shoulder check conditions were 4.8, 3.0, and 12.9 kg, respectively. Peak linear accelerations were lower than the values associated with concussion in American football which could be a reflection of the methodology used in this study as well as inherent differences between both sports.

  10. Estimation of a 2p2h effect on Gamow-Teller transitions within the second Tamm-Dancoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, F.

    2016-04-01

    Two-particle two-hole (2p2h) effect on the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition for neutron-rich nuclei is studied by the second Tamm-Dancoff approximation (STDA) with the Skyrme interaction. Unstable 24O and 34Si and stable 48Ca nuclei are chosen to study the quenching and fragmentation of the GT strengths. Correlation of the 2p2h configurations causes about 20 % quenching and downward shift of GT giant resonances (GTGRs). The residual interaction changing relative angular momentum that appeared in the tensor force part gives a meaningful effect to the GT strength distributions. In this work, 17 - 26 % of the total GT strengths are brought to high-energy region above GTGRs. In particular, the tensor force brings strengths to high energy more than 50 MeV. STDA calculation within a small model space for 2p2h configuration is also performed and experimental data of 48Ca is reproduced reasonably.

  11. Anisotropy of effective electron masses in highly doped nonpolar GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Feneberg, Martin Lange, Karsten; Lidig, Christian; Wieneke, Matthias; Witte, Hartmut; Bläsing, Jürgen; Dadgar, Armin; Krost, Alois; Goldhahn, Rüdiger

    2013-12-02

    The anisotropic effective electron masses in wurtzite GaN are determined by generalized infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. Nonpolar (112{sup ¯}0) oriented thin films allow accessing both effective masses, m{sub ⊥}{sup *} and m{sub ∥}{sup *}, by determining the screened plasma frequencies. A n-type doping range up to 1.7 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} is investigated. The effective mass ratio m{sub ⊥}{sup *}/m{sub ∥}{sup *} is obtained with highest accuracy and is found to be 1.11 independent on electron concentration up to 1.2 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. For higher electron concentrations, the conduction band non-parabolicity is mirrored in changes. Absolute values for effective electron masses depend on additional input of carrier concentrations determined by Hall effect measurements. We obtain m{sub ⊥}{sup *}=(0.239±0.004)m{sub 0} and m{sub ∥}{sup *}=(0.216±0.003)m{sub 0} for the parabolic range of the GaN conduction band. Our data are indication of a parabolic GaN conduction band up to an energy of approximately 400 meV above the conduction band minimum.

  12. Effect of ultra-low Pt loading on mass activity of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriston, Ákos; Xie, Tianyuan; Gamliel, David; Ganesan, Prabhu; Popov, Branko N.

    2013-12-01

    The mass activity is intensively used as characterization parameters for evaluation of the effectiveness of the cathode catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. In this work, the dependence of mass activity on platinum loading was studied at the cathode. The results indicated that the mass activity and the utilized electrochemical surface area of the catalyst are not independent of the catalyst loading. The electrochemical specific surface area (ECSA) and the mass activity increase as the loading is decreased. The increase of the ECSA is attributed to the increase of the utilization of the catalyst. The commonly applied Tafel-approximation cannot be used to fit the result because the mass activity is controlled not only by RΩ and the ORR kinetics, but also the utilization of the catalyst, which in turn depends on catalyst loading, the structure of the catalyst layer, the degree of agglomeration, and screening of the catalyst particles. A detailed and more precise definition of mass activity (MA) is given to elucidate the variation of MA with catalyst loading.

  13. Active and sterile neutrino mass effects on beta decay spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Boillos, Juan Manuel; Moya de Guerra, Elvira

    2013-06-10

    We study the spectra of the emitted charged leptons in charge current weak nuclear processes to analyze the effect of neutrino masses. Standard active neutrinos are studied here, with masses of the order of 1 eV or lower, as well as sterile neutrinos with masses of a few keV. The latter are warm dark matter (WDM) candidates hypothetically produced or captured as small mixtures with the active neutrinos. We compute differential decay or capture rates spectra in weak charged processes of different nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 187}Re, {sup 107}Pd, {sup 163}Ho, etc) using different masses of both active and sterile neutrinos and different values of the mixing parameter.

  14. Higgs mechanism and the added-mass effect

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswami, Govind S.; Phatak, Sachin S.

    2015-01-01

    In the Higgs mechanism, mediators of the weak force acquire masses by interacting with the Higgs condensate, leading to a vector boson mass matrix. On the other hand, a rigid body accelerated through an inviscid, incompressible and irrotational fluid feels an opposing force linearly related to its acceleration, via an added-mass tensor. We uncover a striking physical analogy between the two effects and propose a dictionary relating them. The correspondence turns the gauge Lie algebra into the space of directions in which the body can move, encodes the pattern of gauge symmetry breaking in the shape of an associated body and relates symmetries of the body to those of the scalar vacuum manifold. The new viewpoint is illustrated with numerous examples, and raises interesting questions, notably on the fluid analogues of the broken symmetry and Higgs particle, and the field-theoretic analogue of the added mass of a composite body. PMID:27547077

  15. Quark mass correction to chiral separation effect and pseudoscalar condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-dong; Lin, Shu

    2017-01-01

    We derived an analytic structure of the quark mass correction to chiral separation effect (CSE) in small mass regime. We confirmed this structure by a D3/D7 holographic model study in a finite density, finite magnetic field background. The quark mass correction to CSE can be related to correlators of pseudo-scalar condensate, quark number density and quark condensate in static limit. We found scaling relations of these correlators with spatial momentum in the small momentum regime. They characterize medium responses to electric field, inhomogeneous quark mass and chiral shift. Beyond the small momentum regime, we found existence of normalizable mode, which possibly leads to formation of spiral phase. The normalizable mode exists beyond a critical magnetic field, whose magnitude decreases with quark chemical potential.

  16. Higgs mechanism and the added-mass effect.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswami, Govind S; Phatak, Sachin S

    2015-04-08

    In the Higgs mechanism, mediators of the weak force acquire masses by interacting with the Higgs condensate, leading to a vector boson mass matrix. On the other hand, a rigid body accelerated through an inviscid, incompressible and irrotational fluid feels an opposing force linearly related to its acceleration, via an added-mass tensor. We uncover a striking physical analogy between the two effects and propose a dictionary relating them. The correspondence turns the gauge Lie algebra into the space of directions in which the body can move, encodes the pattern of gauge symmetry breaking in the shape of an associated body and relates symmetries of the body to those of the scalar vacuum manifold. The new viewpoint is illustrated with numerous examples, and raises interesting questions, notably on the fluid analogues of the broken symmetry and Higgs particle, and the field-theoretic analogue of the added mass of a composite body.

  17. Asymmetric pendulum effect and transparency change of P T -symmetric photonic crystals under dynamical Bragg diffraction beyond the paraxial approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushuev, V. A.; Dergacheva, L. V.; Mantsyzov, B. I.

    2017-03-01

    Light propagating in P T -symmetric photonic crystals (PhCs) under Bragg diffraction in the Laue geometry has been studied theoretically using the spectral method. The P T -symmetric solutions describing propagating modes have been found in the PhCs with gain and loss beyond paraxial approximation. We described the pendulum effect—the periodical spatial localization of the total field intensity in a PhC—near the P T -symmetry-breaking point. It is shown that, due to P T -symmetric properties of the medium, an asymmetric change in the amplitudes of the diffracted waves in PhCs is observed when the sign of the Bragg incidence angle is changed from positive to negative. Thus, the intensity of a spatially periodic field in a medium radically alters under the pendulum effect. Moreover, when the sign of the Bragg incidence angle changes, a PhC of a certain thickness is turned from an absorbing structure into an amplifying one, also a PhC of any thickness evolves from completely transparent into amplifying in the vicinity of the P T -symmetry-breaking point. Under a small change of the imaginary part of permittivity, the light switching from a transmitted wave into a gain or loss diffracted wave is possible in a diffraction-thick PhC.

  18. On the validity of the effective density fluid model as an approximation of a poroelastic sediment layer.

    PubMed

    Bonomo, Anthony L; Chotiros, Nicholas P; Isakson, Marcia J

    2015-08-01

    The effective density fluid model (EDFM) was developed to approximate the behavior of sediments governed by Biots theory of poroelasticity. Previously, it has been shown that the EDFM predicts reflection coefficients and backscattering strengths that are in close agreement with those of the full Biot model for the case of a homogeneous poroelastic half-space. However, it has not yet been determined to what extent the EDFM can be used in place of the full Biot-Stoll model for other cases. Using the finite element method, the flat-interface reflection and rough-interface backscattering predictions of the Biot-Stoll model and the EDFM are compared for the case of a poroelastic layer overlying an elastic substrate. It is shown that considerable differences between the predictions of the two models can exist when the layer is very thin and has a thickness comparable to the wavelength of the shear wave supported by the layer, with a particularly strong disparity under the conditions of a shear wave resonance. For thicker layers, the predictions of the two models are found to be in closer agreement, approaching nearly exact agreement as the layer thickness increases.

  19. Increasing Protein Distribution Has No Effect on Changes in Lean Mass During a Rugby Preseason.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie-Shalders, Kristen L; King, Neil A; Byrne, Nuala M; Slater, Gary J

    2016-02-01

    Increasing the frequency of protein consumption is recommended to stimulate muscle hypertrophy with resistance exercise. This study manipulated dietary protein distribution to assess the effect on gains in lean mass during a rugby preseason. Twenty-four developing elite rugby athletes (age 20.1 ± 1.4 years, mass 101.6 ± 12.0 kg; M ± SD) were instructed to consume high biological value (HBV) protein at their main meals and immediately after resistance exercise while limiting protein intake between meals. To manipulate protein intake frequency, the athletes consumed 3 HBV liquid protein supplements (22 g protein) either with main meals (bolus condition) or between meals (frequent condition) for 6 weeks in a 2 × 2 crossover design. Dietary intake and change in lean mass values were compared between conditions by analysis of covariance and correlational analysis. The dietary manipulation successfully altered the protein distribution score (average number of eating occasions containing > 20 g of protein) to 4.0 ± 0.8 and 5.9 ± 0.7 (p < .01) for the bolus and frequent conditions, respectively. There was no difference in gains in lean mass between the bolus (1.4 ± 1.5 kg) and frequent (1.5 ± 1.4 kg) conditions (p = .91). There was no clear effect of increasing protein distribution from approximately 4-6 eating occasions on changes in lean mass during a rugby preseason. However, other dietary factors may have augmented adaptation.

  20. Microstructure evolution of irradiated tungsten: Crystal effects in He and H implantation as modelled in the Binary Collision Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, M.; Ortiz, C. J.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; Sarkar, U.; Debacker, A.

    2010-08-01

    It is important to develop an understanding of the evolution of W microstructure the conditions the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as well as the DEMOnstration Power Plan (DEMO), and modelling techniques can be very helpful. In this paper, the Binary Collision Approximation of Molecular Dynamics as implemented in the Marlowe code is used to model the slowing down of atomic helium and hydrogen on tungsten in the 1-100 keV range. The computed helium and Frenkel Pairs (FP) distributions are then used as input for the simulation of isochronal annealing experiments with an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model. Parameterisation is discussed in a companion paper to this one. To model inelastic energy losses beyond the Lindhard regime, a new module has been implemented in the Marlowe code which is presented here, along with a discussion on various parameters of the model important in the modelling of channelled trajectories. For a given total inelastic stopping cross section, large differences in low energy channelling ranges are identified depending on whether inelastic energy loss is considered to be purely continuous or to also occur during the atomic collisions. In polycrystals, the channelling probability is shown to be significant over the whole range of slowing down energies considered. Channelling together with short replacement sequences has the effect of reducing the FP production efficiency by more than a factor two in polycrystalline as compared with an hypothetical structureless tungsten. This has a crucial effect on the helium isochronal desorption spectra predicted by the OKMC simulations. Those predicted with structureless tungsten are at variance with experiment, due to the overestimation of He trapping on the radiation induced defects.

  1. Cross-approximate entropy of cortical local field potentials quantifies effects of anesthesia--a pilot study in rats.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Matthias; Hentschke, Harald; Antkowiak, Bernd; Schwarz, Cornelius; Kochs, Eberhard F; Schneider, Gerhard

    2010-09-23

    Anesthetics dose-dependently shift electroencephalographic (EEG) activity towards high-amplitude, slow rhythms, indicative of a synchronization of neuronal activity in thalamocortical networks. Additionally, they uncouple brain areas in higher (gamma) frequency ranges possibly underlying conscious perception. It is currently thought that both effects may impair brain function by impeding proper information exchange between cortical areas. But what happens at the local network level? Local networks with strong excitatory interconnections may be more resilient towards global changes in brain rhythms, but depend heavily on locally projecting, inhibitory interneurons. As anesthetics bias cortical networks towards inhibition, we hypothesized that they may cause excessive synchrony and compromise information processing already on a small spatial scale. Using a recently introduced measure of signal independence, cross-approximate entropy (XApEn), we investigated to what degree anesthetics synchronized local cortical network activity. We recorded local field potentials (LFP) from the somatosensory cortex of three rats chronically implanted with multielectrode arrays and compared activity patterns under control (awake state) with those at increasing concentrations of isoflurane, enflurane and halothane. Cortical LFP signals were more synchronous, as expressed by XApEn, in the presence of anesthetics. Specifically, XApEn was a monotonously declining function of anesthetic concentration. Isoflurane and enflurane were indistinguishable; at a concentration of 1 MAC (the minimum alveolar concentration required to suppress movement in response to noxious stimuli in 50% of subjects) both volatile agents reduced XApEn by about 70%, whereas halothane was less potent (50% reduction). The results suggest that anesthetics strongly diminish the independence of operation of local cortical neuronal populations, and that the quantification of these effects in terms of XApEn has a similar

  2. Relation between meteor head echo mass-velocity selection effects, shower mass distribution indices, and mass threshold of the MU radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Observations are described that led to a study of the relationship between the head echo mass-velocity selection effect, the mass distribution indices of the Geminid and Orionid meteor showers, and the mass threshold of the MU radar, published by Kero et al. (2013).

  3. Effects of First-Order Approximations on Head and Specific Discharge Covariances in High-Contrast Log Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lent, Thomas; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    1996-05-01

    The hydraulic head and the specific discharge fluctuations depend nonlinearly on the hydraulic conductivity. However, the methods most commonly used in the stochastic analysis of groundwater flow are based upon the linearization of these relations. In this paper we apply a numerical spectral approach to investigate the range of validity of the small perturbation approximation for head and specific discharge moments in two-dimensional finite domains. We find that the small perturbation approximation tends to underestimate the variance of large-scale head and specific discharge fluctuations and error increases with increasing log-conductivity variance and increasing domain size. The head fluctuations do not appear ergodic even when the small perturbation approximation predicts they will be ergodic. The specific discharge fluctuations, on the other hand, do appear ergodic. The small perturbation approximation performs well in estimating specific discharge variance in the longitudinal direction but significantly underestimates transverse specific discharge variance.

  4. Effects of mass loss for highly-irradiated giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Hattori, M. F.; Burrows, A.; Hubeny, I.; Sudarsky, D.

    2007-04-01

    We present calculations for the evolution and surviving mass of highly-irradiated extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) at orbital semimajor axes ranging from 0.023 to 0.057 AU using a generalized scaled theory for mass loss, together with new surface-condition grids for hot EGPs and a consistent treatment of tidal truncation. Theoretical estimates for the rate of energy-limited hydrogen escape from giant-planet atmospheres differ by two orders of magnitude, when one holds planetary mass, composition, and irradiation constant. Baraffe et al. [Baraffe, I., Selsis, F., Chabrier, G., Barman, T.S., Allard, F., Hauschildt, P.H., Lammer, H., 2004. Astron. Astrophys. 419, L13-L16] predict the highest rate, based on the theory of Lammer et al. [Lammer, H., Selsis, F., Ribas, I., Guinan, E.F., Bauer, S.J., Weiss, W.W., 2003. Astrophys. J. 598, L121-L124]. Scaling the theory of Watson et al. [Watson, A.J., Donahue, T.M., Walker, J.C.G., 1981. Icarus 48, 150-166] to parameters for a highly-irradiated exoplanet, we find an escape rate ˜10 lower than Baraffe's. With the scaled Watson theory we find modest mass loss, occurring early in the history of a hot EGP. In this theory, mass loss including the effect of Roche-lobe overflow becomes significant primarily for masses below a Saturn mass, for semimajor axes ⩾0.023 AU. This contrasts with the Baraffe model, where hot EGPs are claimed to be remnants of much more massive bodies, originally several times Jupiter and still losing substantial mass fractions at present.

  5. The effect of gas physics on the halo mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, R.; Rudd, D.; Evrard, A. E.

    2009-03-01

    Cosmological tests based on cluster counts require accurate calibration of the space density of massive haloes, but most calibrations to date have ignored complex gas physics associated with halo baryons. We explore the sensitivity of the halo mass function to baryon physics using two pairs of gas-dynamic simulations that are likely to bracket the true behaviour. Each pair consists of a baseline model involving only gravity and shock heating, and a refined physics model aimed at reproducing the observed scaling of the hot, intracluster gas phase. One pair consists of billion-particle resimulations of the original 500h-1Mpc Millennium Simulation of Springel et al., run with the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code GADGET-2 and using a refined physics treatment approximated by pre-heating (PH) at high redshift. The other pair are high-resolution simulations from the adaptive-mesh refinement code ART, for which the refined treatment includes cooling, star formation and supernova feedback (CSF). We find that, although the mass functions of the gravity-only (GO) treatments are consistent with the recent calibration of Tinker et al. (2008), both pairs of simulations with refined baryon physics show significant deviations. Relative to the GO case, the masses of ~1014h-1Msolar haloes in the PH and CSF treatments are shifted by the averages of -15 +/- 1 and +16 +/- 2 per cent, respectively. These mass shifts cause ~30 per cent deviations in number density relative to the Tinker function, significantly larger than the 5 per cent statistical uncertainty of that calibration.

  6. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    PubMed

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect.

  7. Effects of the tidal mass redistribution on the Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baenas, T.; Ferrándiz, J.; Escapa, A.; Getino, J.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of the tidal mass redistributions on the Earth precession and nutations are revisited, under various hypothesis on the elastic response of the Earth and using the Hamiltonian approach. New non-negligible secular and periodic contributions have been found.

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Mass Media Ethics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Byung; Padgett, George

    2000-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of an ethics education component in a media law and ethics course. Suggests that a short-term mass media ethics study could not develop values considered essential for ethical behavior. Argues that students developed more complexity in their reasoning not measurable by the scale. Suggests a course or module on ethics…

  9. Resonance Effects in Magnetically Driven Mass-Spring Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Resonance effects are among the most intriguing phenomena in physics and engineering. The classical case of a mass-spring oscillator driven at its resonant frequency is one of the earliest examples that students encounter. Perhaps the most commonly depicted method of driving the vibrating system is mechanical. An alternative approach presented in…

  10. Resonance Effects in Magnetically Driven Mass-Spring Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Resonance effects are among the most intriguing phenomena in physics and engineering. The classical case of a mass-spring oscillator driven at its resonant frequency is one of the earliest examples that students encounter. Perhaps the most commonly depicted method of driving the vibrating system is mechanical. An alternative approach presented in…

  11. Nanoscale elastic modulus mapping revisited: The concept of effective mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnikov, I.; Fratzl, P.; Zolotoyabko, E.

    2014-09-01

    We introduce the effective mass of the nanoindenter tip/sample assembly into the nanoscale dynamic modulus mapping technique that allows us to extract the correct storage modulus from the measured contact stiffness. We show that the developed approach successfully works for both stiff ceramics, such as fused quartz, and much compliant polymer materials, such as polycarbonate (PC) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA).

  12. Neutrino mass effects on the CMB polarization with PMF

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Kazuhiko; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2009-05-04

    Our previous work showed that if a primordial magnetic field (PMF) was present during photon decoupling and afterward, massive neutrinos affect all modes of the CMB. This is because of the compensation of anisotropic stress between the neutrinos and the PMF. In order to study the observability of this new effect, we need careful analysis of the passive mode generated by the PMF. Here, we focus on the polarization of the CMB and study the observability of the finite neutrino mass effect.

  13. Interpolation and Approximation Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaijser, Sten

    1991-01-01

    Introduced are the basic ideas of interpolation and approximation theory through a combination of theory and exercises written for extramural education at the university level. Topics treated are spline methods, Lagrange interpolation, trigonometric approximation, Fourier series, and polynomial approximation. (MDH)

  14. Mass discrimination effects in MBMS study of rich premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Vovelle, C.; Doute, C.; Delfau, J.L.

    1995-03-01

    Sampling by formation of a molecular beam in mixtures containing both light and heavy species can be affected by mass discrimination effects. This situation is faced in rich premixed flames where H{sub 2} and H atoms are present in high concentration in mixture with heavier combustion products. This paper describes the results of a specific study carried out to derive a procedure that takes into account these effects and improves the accuracy of H{sub 2} and H measurements in flames. A three stage Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometer (MBMS) apparatus especially designed for the experimental determination of the structure of low pressure premixed flames has been used to study the effect of temperature (T) and mean molar mass (M) on the signals measured for species in mixtures of known composition. Variations of T and M where aimed at reproducing the evolution observed in flames when the sampling probe is moved from unburned, (low T, high M) to burned gases (high T, low M). However, as temperature variations were limited to the range 300-800K, the pressure was also varied from 13 down to 0.8 kPa to create sample density conditions equivalent to those prevailing in post flame gases. Most measurements have been performed with H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/Ar/CO{sub 2} mixtures while variations of the mean molar mass were achieved with binary H{sub 2}/Ar mixtures.

  15. Negative ion photodetachment and the electron effective mass in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, J.K.

    1983-07-01

    The electron photodetachment cross section for a negative ion in the gas phase is compared with the photodetachment cross section for the same ion when it is dissolved in a liquid supporting ''free'' electron propagation. The ratio of the amplitudes of these two cross sections near threshold is found to depend upon the effective mass m* of an electron in the conduction band of the liquid. We apply this result to electron photodetachment from O/sub 2//sup -/. In terms of the electron's free mass m, we find for liquid argon at 87 K (m* = 0.26 m), 2,2-dimethylbutane at 296 K (m* = 0.27 m), 2,2,4-trimethylpentane at 296 K (m* = 0.27 m), and tetramethylsilane at 296 K (m* = 0.27 m). At 200 K, the effective mass in tetramethylsilane decreases to m* = 0.21 m. In the case of liquid argon, the effective mass calculated herein agrees qualitatively with values which can be estimated from measurements of the electron mobility and exciton spectrum.

  16. Precise effective masses from density functional perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gillet, Y.; Poncé, S.; Martin, A.; Torrent, M.; Gonze, X.

    2016-05-01

    The knowledge of effective masses is a key ingredient to analyze numerous properties of semiconductors, like carrier mobilities, (magneto)transport properties, or band extrema characteristics yielding carrier densities and density of states. Currently, these masses are usually calculated using finite-difference estimation of density functional theory (DFT) electronic band curvatures. However, finite differences require an additional convergence study and are prone to numerical noise. Moreover, the concept of effective mass breaks down at degenerate band extrema. We assess the former limitation by developing a method that allows to obtain the Hessian of DFT bands directly, using density functional perturbation theory. Then, we solve the latter issue by adapting the concept of "transport equivalent effective mass" to the k .p ̂ framework. The numerical noise inherent to finite-difference methods is thus eliminated, along with the associated convergence study. The resulting method is therefore more general, more robust, and simpler to use, which makes it especially appropriate for high-throughput computing. After validating the developed techniques, we apply them to the study of silicon, graphane, and arsenic. The formalism is implemented into the abinit software and supports the norm-conserving pseudopotential approach, the projector augmented-wave method, and the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. The derived expressions also apply to the ultrasoft pseudopotential method.

  17. Gravity effects on neutrino masses in split supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Koch, Benjamin; Panes, Boris

    2009-06-01

    The mass differences and mixing angles of neutrinos can neither be explained by R-parity violating split supersymmetry nor by flavor blind quantum gravity alone. It is shown that combining both effects leads, within the allowed parameter range, to good agreement with the experimental results. The atmospheric mass is generated by supersymmetry through mixing between neutrinos and neutralinos, while the solar mass is generated by gravity through flavor blind dimension five operators. Maximal atmospheric mixing forces the tangent squared of the solar angle to be equal to 1/2. The scale of the quantum gravity operator is predicted within a 5% error, implying that the reduced Planck scale should lie around the grand unified theory scale. In this way, the model is very predictive and can be tested at future experiments.

  18. Torsion effects on a relativistic position-dependent mass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitória, R. L. L.; Bakke, K.

    2016-12-01

    We analyse a relativistic scalar particle with a position-dependent mass in a spacetime with a space-like dislocation by showing that relativistic bound states solutions can be achieved. Further, we consider the presence of the Coulomb potential and analyse the relativistic position-dependent mass system subject to the Coulomb potential in the spacetime with a space-like dislocation. We also show that a new set of relativistic bound states solutions can be obtained, where there also exists the influence of torsion of the relativistic energy levels. Finally, we investigate an analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect for bound states in this position-dependent mass in a spacetime with a space-like dislocation.

  19. Effective field theory for vibrations in odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coello Pérez, E. A.; Papenbrock, T.

    2016-11-01

    Heavy even-even nuclei exhibit low-energy collective excitations that are separated in scale from the microscopic (fermion) degrees of freedom. This separation of scale allows us to approach nuclear vibrations within an effective field theory (EFT). In odd-mass nuclei collective and single-particle properties compete at low energies, and this makes their description more challenging. In this article we describe spherical odd-mass nuclei with ground-state spin I =1/2 by means of an EFT that couples a fermion to the collective degrees of freedom of an even-even core. The EFT relates observables such as energy levels, electric quadrupole transition strengths, and magnetic dipole moments of the odd-mass nucleus to those of its even-even neighbor and allows us to quantify theoretical uncertainties. For isotopes of rhodium and silver the theoretical description is consistent with data within experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Several testable predictions are made.

  20. The Effect of Body Mass on Outdoor Adult Human Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Spencer, Jessica R; Dabbs, Gretchen R

    2017-02-23

    Forensic taphonomy explores factors impacting human decomposition. This study investigated the effect of body mass on the rate and pattern of adult human decomposition. Nine males and three females aged 49-95 years ranging in mass from 73 to 159 kg who were donated to the Complex for Forensic Anthropology Research between December 2012 and September 2015 were included in this study. Kelvin accumulated degree days (KADD) were used to assess the thermal energy required for subjects to reach several total body score (TBS) thresholds: early decomposition (TBS ≥6.0), TBS ≥12.5, advanced decomposition (TBS ≥19.0), TBS ≥23.0, and skeletonization (TBS ≥27.0). Results indicate no significant correlation between body mass and KADD at any TBS threshold. Body mass accounted for up to 24.0% of variation in decomposition rate depending on stage, and minor differences in decomposition pattern were observed. Body mass likely has a minimal impact on postmortem interval estimation.

  1. Effect of body mass and clothing on carrion entomofauna.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Szymon; Frątczak, Katarzyna; Konwerski, Szymon; Bajerlein, Daria; Szpila, Krzysztof; Jarmusz, Mateusz; Szafałowicz, Michał; Grzywacz, Andrzej; Mądra, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Carcass mass largely affects pattern and rate of carrion decomposition. Supposedly, it is similarly important for carrion entomofauna; however, most of its likely effects have not been tested experimentally. Here, simultaneous effects of carcass mass and clothing are analyzed. A factorial block experiment with four levels of carcass mass (small carcasses 5-15 kg, medium carcasses 15.1-30 kg, medium/large carcasses 35-50 kg, large carcasses 55-70 kg) and two levels of carcass clothing (clothed and unclothed) was made in a grassland habitat of Western Poland. Pig carcasses (N = 24) were grouped into spring, early summer, and late summer blocks. Insects were sampled manually and with pitfall traps. Results demonstrate that insect assemblages are more complex, abundant, and long-lasting on larger carcasses, whereas clothing is of minor importance in this respect. Only large or medium/large carcasses were colonized by all guilds of carrion insects, while small or medium carcasses revealed high underrepresentation of late-colonizing insects (e.g., Cleridae or Nitidulidae). This finding indicates that carcasses weighing about 23 kg-a standard in forensic decomposition studies-give an incomplete picture of carrion entomofauna. Residencies of all forensically relevant insects were distinctly prolonged on larger carcasses, indicating that cadaver mass is a factor of great importance in this respect. The pre-appearance interval of most taxa was found to be unrelated to mass or clothing of a carcass. Moreover, current results suggest that rate of larval development is higher on smaller carcasses. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that carcass mass is a factor of crucial importance for carrion entomofauna, whereas the importance of clothing is small.

  2. Homogenization limit for a multiband effective mass model in heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, O.

    2014-06-15

    We study the homogenization limit of a multiband model that describes the quantum mechanical motion of an electron in a quasi-periodic crystal. In this approach, the distance among the atoms that constitute the material (lattice parameter) is considered a small quantity. Our model include the description of materials with variable chemical composition, intergrowth compounds, and heterostructures. We derive the effective multiband evolution system in the framework of the kp approach. We study the well posedness of the mathematical problem. We compare the effective mass model with the standard kp models for uniform and non-uniforms crystals. We show that in the limit of vanishing lattice parameter, the particle density obtained by the effective mass model, converges to the exact probability density of the particle.

  3. Lepton mass effects in elastic lepton-proton scattering beyond the leading order of QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshchii, Oleksandr; Afanasev, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    The future MUSE experiment is devised to solve the ``Proton Radius Puzzle'' by considering simultaneously elastic e+/- p and μ+/- p scattering. This experiment requires a per cent level accuracy in comparison of electron-proton and muon-proton scattering. Our goal is to provide all the relevant radiative corrections calculations for MUSE without using ultrarelativistic (ml -> 0) approximation. This approximation is not applicable for the scattering of muons in kinematics of MUSE. In this talk, we will present our up-to-date results on radiative corrections calculations obtained by using a Monte Carlo generator ELRADGEN modified to treat the lepton mass effects with no ultra-relativistic approximation. Next, we will discuss our estimations of the important helicity-flip contribution represented by a scalar σ meson exchange in the t-channel. This term vanishes in the ultra-relativistic and/or one-photon exchange approximation, and makes a difference in comparison of electron vs muon scattering in MUSE. This work was supported by the NSF under Grants Nos. PHY-1404342, PHY-1309130 and by The George Washington University through the Gus Weiss endowment.

  4. Energy spectrum and effective mass of carriers in the InSe/GaSe superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashimzade, F. M.; Mustafaev, N. B.

    1995-03-01

    Within an effective mass approximation the energy spectrum and mass of carriers in the InSe/GaSe superlattice have been calculated. The superlattice belongs to type II: electrons are primarily confined to the InSe layers whereas the holes are mosfly confined to the GaSe layers. The characteristic feature of electronic structure of the superlattice is the existence of minibands of light carriers at the θ point of the Brillouin zone and minibands of heavy carriers at the M point. The dependence of the miniband structure on thickness of layers has been computed. It is shown that the minibands of light and heavy carriers compete with one another in energy. A general conclusion is made concerning the influence of the competition between the minibands on optic and kinetic properties of the superlattice.

  5. Mass Limited Target Effects on Proton Acceleration with Femtosecond Laser Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulick, Calvin; Raymond, A.; McKelvey, A.; Willingale, L.; Chvykov, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments at the HERCULES laser facility have been performed to measure the effect of reduced mass targets on proton acceleration through the use of foil, grid, and wire targets in femtosecond laser plasma interactions. The target thickness was held approximately constant at 12 . 5 μm, while the lateral extent of the target was varied. The electron current density was measured with an imaging Cu Kα crystal. Higher current densities were observed as the target mass was reduced which corresponded to an increase in the temperature of the accelerated proton beam. Additionally, a line focusing feature was observed in the spatial distribution of protons accelerated to from the wire target, believed to be a result of azimuthal magnetic fields generated by electron currents in the wire. Particle-in-cell and Vlasov-Fokker-Plank simulations were performed in order to investigate the focusing magnetic field as well as the complex sheath formation dynamics on the mesh target.

  6. Multiple scattering effects in quasifree scattering from halo nuclei: A test of the distorted-wave impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, R.; Deltuva, A.; Cravo, E.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Fonseca, A. C.

    2008-02-15

    Full Faddeev-type calculations are performed for {sup 11}Be breakup on a proton target at 38.4, 100, and 200 MeV/u incident energies. The convergence of the multiple scattering expansion is investigated. The results are compared with those of other frameworks like distorted-wave impulse approximation that are based on an incomplete and truncated multiple scattering expansion.

  7. Topics in Metric Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeb, William Edward

    This thesis develops effective approximations of certain metrics that occur frequently in pure and applied mathematics. We show that distances that often arise in applications, such as the Earth Mover's Distance between two probability measures, can be approximated by easily computed formulas for a wide variety of ground distances. We develop simple and easily computed characterizations both of norms measuring a function's regularity -- such as the Lipschitz norm -- and of their duals. We are particularly concerned with the tensor product of metric spaces, where the natural notion of regularity is not the Lipschitz condition but the mixed Lipschitz condition. A theme that runs throughout this thesis is that snowflake metrics (metrics raised to a power less than 1) are often better-behaved than ordinary metrics. For example, we show that snowflake metrics on finite spaces can be approximated by the average of tree metrics with a distortion bounded by intrinsic geometric characteristics of the space and not the number of points. Many of the metrics for which we characterize the Lipschitz space and its dual are snowflake metrics. We also present applications of the characterization of certain regularity norms to the problem of recovering a matrix that has been corrupted by noise. We are able to achieve an optimal rate of recovery for certain families of matrices by exploiting the relationship between mixed-variable regularity conditions and the decay of a function's coefficients in a certain orthonormal basis.

  8. Indirect effects of trait impulsivity on body mass.

    PubMed

    Meule, Adrian; Blechert, Jens

    2017-08-01

    Trait impulsivity has been suggested as a risk factor for weight gain. However, it is implausible that a construct that does not cover energy intake or expenditure affects fat mass directly. Instead, it is likely that eating-related variables mediate the effect of impulsivity on body mass. In the current study, a serial mediation model tested two eating-related variables (trait food craving and perceived self-regulatory success in weight regulation) as mediators of the relationship between trait impulsivity and body mass. Participants (n=432, 88% female, 79% students) completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale - short form, the Food Cravings Questionnaire-Trait-reduced, and the Perceived Self-Regulatory Success in Dieting Scale (PSRS), in addition to providing sociodemographic and anthropometric data. Trait impulsivity did not correlate with body mass index (BMI), but was indirectly related to BMI via food cravings and PSRS scores. Specifically, higher impulsivity predicted more frequent food cravings, which in turn predicted lower perceived self-regulatory success in eating and weight regulation, which in turn predicted higher BMI. Findings suggest possible mechanisms that mediate the association between impulsivity and BMI. Importantly, they show that impulsivity can indirectly affect BMI via eating-related variables, even in the absence of a total effect. Longitudinal studies are needed that support these assumed causal directions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tuning The Properties of Quantum Dots Via The Effective Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. A.; Sinha, Abhinav; Pathak, Praveen

    2011-07-01

    In the present work we revisit effective mass theory (EMT) for a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) and employ the BenDaniel-Duke (BDD) boundary condition. In effective mass theory mass mi inside the dot of radius R is different from the mass mo outside the dot. That gives us a crucial factor in determining the electronic spectrum namely β = mi/m0. We show both by numerical calculations and asymptotic analysis that the ground state energy and the surface charge density, ρ(r) can be large. We also show that the dependence of the ground state energy on the radius of the well is infraquadratic. We demonstrate that the significance of BDD condition is pronounced at large R. We also study the dependence of excited state on the radius as well as the difference between energy states. Both exhibit an infra quadratic behavior with radius. The energy difference is important in study of absorption and emission spectra. We find that the BDD condition substantially alters the energy difference. Hence the interpretation of experimental result may need to be reexamined.

  10. Tuning The Properties of Quantum Dots Via The Effective Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R. A.; Sinha, Abhinav; Pathak, Praveen

    2011-07-15

    In the present work we revisit effective mass theory (EMT) for a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) and employ the BenDaniel-Duke (BDD) boundary condition. In effective mass theory mass m{sub i} inside the dot of radius R is different from the mass m{sub o} outside the dot. That gives us a crucial factor in determining the electronic spectrum namely {beta} = m{sub i}/m{sub 0}. We show both by numerical calculations and asymptotic analysis that the ground state energy and the surface charge density, {rho}(r) can be large. We also show that the dependence of the ground state energy on the radius of the well is infraquadratic. We demonstrate that the significance of BDD condition is pronounced at large R. We also study the dependence of excited state on the radius as well as the difference between energy states. Both exhibit an infra quadratic behavior with radius. The energy difference is important in study of absorption and emission spectra. We find that the BDD condition substantially alters the energy difference. Hence the interpretation of experimental result may need to be reexamined.

  11. Convective heat and mass transfer on MHD peristaltic flow of Williamson fluid with the effect of inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veera Krishna, M.; Swarnalathamma, B. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discussed the peristaltic MHD flow of an incompressible and electrically conducting Williamson fluid in a symmetric planar channel with heat and mass transfer under the effect of inclined magnetic field. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are also taken into consideration. Mathematical model is presented by using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The differential equations governing the flow are highly nonlinear and thus perturbation solution for small Weissenberg number (We < 1) is presented. Effects of the heat and mass transfer on the longitudinal velocity, temperature and concentration are studied in detail. Main observations are presented in the concluding section. The streamlines pattern is also given due attention.

  12. Galaxy Cluster Gas Mass Fractions From Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Measurements: Constraints on Omega(M)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Holzapfel, William L.; Joy, Marshall K.; Mohr, Joseph J.; Patel, Sandeep

    2001-01-01

    Using sensitive centimeter-wave receivers mounted on the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association millimeter arrays, we have obtained interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich(SZ) effect toward massive galaxy clusters. We use the SZ data to determine the pressure distribution of the cluster gas and, in combination with published X-ray temperatures, to infer the gas mass and total gravitational mass of 18 clusters. The gas mass fraction, f(g), is calculated for each cluster and is extrapolated to the fiducial radius r(500) using the results of numerical simulations. The mean f(g) within r(500) is 0.081(+ 0.009 / - 0.011) per h(100) (statistical uncertainty at 68% confidence level, assuming Omega(M) = 0.3, Omega(Lambda) = 0.7). We discuss possible sources of systematic errors in the mean f(sub g) measurement. We derive an upper limit for Omega(M) from this sample under the assumption that the mass composition of clusters within r(500) reflects the universal mass composition: Omega(M)h is less than or equal to Omega(B)/f(g). The gas mass fractions depend on cosmology through the angular diameter distance and the r(500) correction factors. For a flat universe (Omega(Lambda) is identical with 1 - Omega(M)) and h = 0.7, we find the measured gas mass fractions are consistent with Omega(M) is less than 0.40, at 68% confidence. Including estimates of the baryons contained in galaxies and the baryons which failed to become bound during the cluster formation process, we find Omega(M) is approximately equal to 0.25.

  13. Galaxy Cluster Gas Mass Fractions From Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Measurements: Constraints on Omega(M)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Holzapfel, William L.; Joy, Marshall K.; Mohr, Joseph J.; Patel, Sandeep

    2001-01-01

    Using sensitive centimeter-wave receivers mounted on the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association millimeter arrays, we have obtained interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich(SZ) effect toward massive galaxy clusters. We use the SZ data to determine the pressure distribution of the cluster gas and, in combination with published X-ray temperatures, to infer the gas mass and total gravitational mass of 18 clusters. The gas mass fraction, f(g), is calculated for each cluster and is extrapolated to the fiducial radius r(500) using the results of numerical simulations. The mean f(g) within r(500) is 0.081(+ 0.009 / - 0.011) per h(100) (statistical uncertainty at 68% confidence level, assuming Omega(M) = 0.3, Omega(Lambda) = 0.7). We discuss possible sources of systematic errors in the mean f(sub g) measurement. We derive an upper limit for Omega(M) from this sample under the assumption that the mass composition of clusters within r(500) reflects the universal mass composition: Omega(M)h is less than or equal to Omega(B)/f(g). The gas mass fractions depend on cosmology through the angular diameter distance and the r(500) correction factors. For a flat universe (Omega(Lambda) is identical with 1 - Omega(M)) and h = 0.7, we find the measured gas mass fractions are consistent with Omega(M) is less than 0.40, at 68% confidence. Including estimates of the baryons contained in galaxies and the baryons which failed to become bound during the cluster formation process, we find Omega(M) is approximately equal to 0.25.

  14. Improved approximations for control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for control-augmented structural synthesis is presented for structure-control systems which can be modeled as an assemblage of beam, truss, and nonstructural mass elements augmented by a noncollocated direct output feedback control system. Truss areas, beam cross sectional dimensions, nonstructural masses and rotary inertias, and controller position and velocity gains are treated simultaneously as design variables. The structural mass and a control-system performance index can be minimized simultaneously, with design constraints placed on static stresses and displacements, dynamic harmonic displacements and forces, structural frequencies, and closed-loop eigenvalues and damping ratios. Intermediate design-variable and response-quantity concepts are used to generate new approximations for displacements and actuator forces under harmonic dynamic loads and for system complex eigenvalues. This improves the overall efficiency of the procedure by reducing the number of complete analyses required for convergence. Numerical results which illustrate the effectiveness of the method are given.

  15. Improved approximations for control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for control-augmented structural synthesis is presented for structure-control systems which can be modeled as an assemblage of beam, truss, and nonstructural mass elements augmented by a noncollocated direct output feedback control system. Truss areas, beam cross sectional dimensions, nonstructural masses and rotary inertias, and controller position and velocity gains are treated simultaneously as design variables. The structural mass and a control-system performance index can be minimized simultaneously, with design constraints placed on static stresses and displacements, dynamic harmonic displacements and forces, structural frequencies, and closed-loop eigenvalues and damping ratios. Intermediate design-variable and response-quantity concepts are used to generate new approximations for displacements and actuator forces under harmonic dynamic loads and for system complex eigenvalues. This improves the overall efficiency of the procedure by reducing the number of complete analyses required for convergence. Numerical results which illustrate the effectiveness of the method are given.

  16. Effective Power-Law Dependence of Lyapunov Exponents on the Central Mass in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Kalapotharakos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Using both numerical and analytical approaches, we demonstrate the existence of an effective power-law relation L alpha m(sup p) between themean Lyapunov exponent L of stellar orbits chaotically scattered by a supermassive black hole (BH) in the centre of a galaxy and the mass parameter m, i.e. ratio of the mass of the BH over the mass of the galaxy. The exponent p is found numerically to obtain values in the range p approximately equals 0.3-0.5. We propose a theoretical interpretation of these exponents, based on estimates of local 'stretching numbers', i.e. local Lyapunov exponents at successive transits of the orbits through the BH's sphere of influence. We thus predict p = 2/3 - q with q approximately equaling 0.1-0.2. Our basic model refers to elliptical galaxy models with a central core. However, we find numerically that an effective power-law scaling of L with m holds also in models with central cusp, beyond a mass scale up to which chaos is dominated by the influence of the cusp itself. We finally show numerically that an analogous law exists also in disc galaxies with rotating bars. In the latter case, chaotic scattering by the BH affects mainly populations of thick tube-like orbits surrounding some low-order branches of the x(sub 1) family of periodic orbits, as well as its bifurcations at low-order resonances, mainly the inner Lindblad resonance and the 4/1 resonance. Implications of the correlations between L and m to determining the rate of secular evolution of galaxies are discussed.

  17. Effective Power-Law Dependence of Lyapunov Exponents on the Central Mass in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Kalapotharakos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Using both numerical and analytical approaches, we demonstrate the existence of an effective power-law relation L alpha m(sup p) between themean Lyapunov exponent L of stellar orbits chaotically scattered by a supermassive black hole (BH) in the centre of a galaxy and the mass parameter m, i.e. ratio of the mass of the BH over the mass of the galaxy. The exponent p is found numerically to obtain values in the range p approximately equals 0.3-0.5. We propose a theoretical interpretation of these exponents, based on estimates of local 'stretching numbers', i.e. local Lyapunov exponents at successive transits of the orbits through the BH's sphere of influence. We thus predict p = 2/3 - q with q approximately equaling 0.1-0.2. Our basic model refers to elliptical galaxy models with a central core. However, we find numerically that an effective power-law scaling of L with m holds also in models with central cusp, beyond a mass scale up to which chaos is dominated by the influence of the cusp itself. We finally show numerically that an analogous law exists also in disc galaxies with rotating bars. In the latter case, chaotic scattering by the BH affects mainly populations of thick tube-like orbits surrounding some low-order branches of the x(sub 1) family of periodic orbits, as well as its bifurcations at low-order resonances, mainly the inner Lindblad resonance and the 4/1 resonance. Implications of the correlations between L and m to determining the rate of secular evolution of galaxies are discussed.

  18. Strong washout approximation to resonant leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, Björn; Gautier, Florian; Klaric, Juraj

    2014-09-01

    We show that the effective decay asymmetry for resonant Leptogenesis in the strong washout regime with two sterile neutrinos and a single active flavour can in wide regions of parameter space be approximated by its late-time limit ɛ=Xsin(2varphi)/(X2+sin2varphi), where X=8πΔ/(|Y1|2+|Y2|2), Δ=4(M1-M2)/(M1+M2), varphi=arg(Y2/Y1), and M1,2, Y1,2 are the masses and Yukawa couplings of the sterile neutrinos. This approximation in particular extends to parametric regions where |Y1,2|2gg Δ, i.e. where the width dominates the mass splitting. We generalise the formula for the effective decay asymmetry to the case of several flavours of active leptons and demonstrate how this quantity can be used to calculate the lepton asymmetry for phenomenological scenarios that are in agreement with the observed neutrino oscillations. We establish analytic criteria for the validity of the late-time approximation for the decay asymmetry and compare these with numerical results that are obtained by solving for the mixing and the oscillations of the sterile neutrinos. For phenomenologically viable models with two sterile neutrinos, we find that the flavoured effective late-time decay asymmetry can be applied throughout parameter space.

  19. Effects of the gut microbiota on bone mass.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Claes; Sjögren, Klara

    2015-02-01

    The gut microbiota (GM), the commensal bacteria living in our intestine, performs numerous useful functions, including modulating host metabolism and immune status. Recent studies demonstrate that the GM is also a regulator of bone mass and it is proposed that the effect of the GM on bone mass is mediated via effects on the immune system, which in turn regulates osteoclastogenesis. Under normal conditions, the skeleton is constantly remodeled by bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) and bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCLs), and imbalances in this process may lead to osteoporosis. Here we review current knowledge on the possible role for the GM in the regulation of bone metabolism and propose that the GM might be a novel therapeutic target for osteoporosis and fracture prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effective Mass of a Single π0 Interacting With Itself

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldridge, J. M.; Orginos, K.

    2014-09-01

    The effective mass of a single π0 π on when interacting with itself has been calculated. The calculation was done using C++ and It++, a C++ library extension which attempts to emulate MATLAB. This calculation was done by generating a matrix G from a database, and two meson state matrices M0, and M1. G, M0, and M1 are each 1584 × 1584 , however, careful algebra, knowing the properties of these matrices, enables only the top left 792 × 792 block of each to be created, saving computation time and reducing numerical error. The π0 self-interacting-effective-mass has been calculated to be 0.0755(190).

  1. Effective photon mass from black-hole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, Slava

    2017-06-01

    We compute the value of effective photon mass mγ at one-loop level in QED in the background of small (1010 g ≲ M ≪1016 g) spherically symmetric black hole in asymptotically flat spacetime. This effect is associated with the modification of electron/positron propagator in presence of event horizon. Physical manifestations of black-hole environment are compared with those of hot neutral plasma. We estimate the distance to the nearest black hole from the upper bound on mγ obtained in the Coulomb-law test. We also find that corrections to electron mass me and fine structure constant α at one-loop level in QED are negligible in the weak gravity regime.

  2. The effects of baryons on the halo mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Weiguang; Borgani, Stefano; Dolag, Klaus; Murante, Giuseppe; Tornatore, Luca

    2012-07-01

    We present an analysis of the effects of baryon physics on the halo mass function. The analysis is based on simulations of a cosmological volume having a comoving size of 410 h-1 Mpc, which have been carried out with the TREE-PM/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-3, for a Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe-7 Λ cold dark matter cosmological model. Besides a dark matter (DM)-only simulation, we also carry out two hydrodynamical simulations: the first one includes non-radiative physics, with gas heated only by gravitational processes; the second one includes radiative cooling, star formation and kinetic feedback in the form of galactic ejecta triggered by supernova explosions. All simulations follow the evolution of two populations of 10243 particles each, with mass ratio such that to reproduce the assumed baryon density parameter, with the population of lighter particles assumed to be collisional in the hydrodynamical runs. We identified haloes using a spherical overdensity algorithm and their masses are computed at three different overdensities (with respect to the critical one), Δc= 200, 500 and 1500. We find the fractional difference between halo masses in the hydrodynamical and in the DM simulations to be almost constant, at least for haloes more massive than ?. In this range, mass increase in the hydrodynamical simulations is of about 4-5 per cent at Δc= 500 and ˜1-2 per cent at Δc= 200. Quite interestingly, these differences are nearly the same for both radiative and non-radiative simulations. Mass variations depend on halo mass and physics included for higher overdensity, Δc= 1500, and smaller masses. Such variations of halo masses induce corresponding variations of the halo mass function (HMF). At z= 0, the HMFs for gravitational heating and cooling and star formation simulations are close to the DM one, with differences of ≲3 per cent at Δc= 200, and ≃7 per cent at Δc= 500, with ˜10-20 per cent differences reached at Δc= 1500. At

  3. Application of the weighted-density approximation to the accurate description of electron-positron correlation effects in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callewaert, Vincent; Saniz, Rolando; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Bansil, Arun; Partoens, Bart

    2017-08-01

    We discuss positron-annihilation lifetimes for a set of illustrative bulk materials within the framework of the weighted-density approximation (WDA). The WDA can correctly describe electron-positron correlations in strongly inhomogeneous systems, such as surfaces, where the applicability of (semi-)local approximations is limited. We analyze the WDA in detail and show that the electrons which cannot screen external charges efficiently, such as the core electrons, cannot be treated accurately via the pair correlation of the homogeneous electron gas. We discuss how this problem can be addressed by reducing the screening in the homogeneous electron gas by adding terms depending on the gradient of the electron density. Further improvements are obtained when core electrons are treated within the LDA and the valence electron using the WDA. Finally, we discuss a semiempirical WDA-based approach in which a sum rule is imposed to reproduce the experimental lifetimes.

  4. Isotope mass and charge effects in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Candy, J.; Gohil, P.

    2011-12-15

    The effect of primary ion species of differing charge and mass - specifically, deuterium, hydrogen, and helium - on instabilities and transport is studied in DIII-D plasmas through gyrokinetic simulations with gyro [J. Candy and E. Belli, General Atomics Technical Report No. GA-A26818, 2010]. In linear simulations under imposed similarity of the profiles, there is an isomorphism between the linear growth rates of hydrogen isotopes, but the growth rates are higher for Z > 1 main ions due to the appearance of the charge in the Poisson equation. On ion scales the most significant effect of the different electron-to-ion mass ratio appears through collisions stabilizing trapped electron modes. In nonlinear simulations, significant favorable deviations from pure gyro-Bohm scaling are found due to electron-to-ion mass ratio effects and collisions. The presence of any non-trace impurity species cannot be neglected in a comprehensive simulation of the transport; including carbon impurity in the simulations caused a dramatic reduction of energy fluxes. The transport in the analyzed deuterium and helium discharges could be well reproduced in gyrokinetic and gyrofluid simulations while the significant hydrogen discrepancy is the subject of ongoing investigation.

  5. Fractionated Mercury Isotopes in Fish: The Effects of Nuclear Mass, Spin, and Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, R.; Odom, A. L.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury is long known as a common environmental contaminant. In methylated form it is even more toxic and the methylation process is facilitated by microbial activities. Methyl mercury easily crosses cell membrane and accumulates in soft tissues of fishes and finally biomagnifies with increasing trophic levels. Natural variations in the isotopic composition of mercury have been reported and such variations have emphasized mass dependent fractionations, while theory and laboratory experiments indicate that mass-independent isotopic fractionation (MIF) effects are likely to be found as well. This study focuses on the MIF of mercury isotopes in the soft tissues of fishes. Samples include both fresh water and marine fish, from different continents and oceans. Approximately 1 gm of fish soft tissue was dissolved in 5 ml of conc. aqua regia for 24 hrs and filtered through a ¬¬¬100 μm filter paper and diluted with DI water. Hg is measured as a gaseous phase generated by reduction of the sample with SnCl2 in a continuous- flow cold-vapor generator connected to a Thermo-Finnigan Neptune MC-ICPMS. To minimize instrumental fractionation isotope ratios were measured by sample standard bracketing and reported as δ‰ relative to NIST SRM 3133 Hg standard where δAHg = [(A Hg/202Hg)sample/(A Hg/202Hg)NIST313] -1 ×1000‰. In this study we have measured the isotope ratios 198Hg/202Hg, 199Hg/202Hg, 200Hg/202Hg, 201Hg/202Hg and 204Hg/202Hg. In all the fish samples δ198Hg, δ200Hg, δ202Hg, δ204Hg define a mass- dependent fractionation sequence, where as the δ199Hg and δ201Hg depart from the mass- dependent fractionation line and indicate an excess of the odd-N isotopes. The magnitude of the deviation (ΔAHg where A=199 or 201) as obtained by difference between the measured δ199Hg and δ201Hg of the samples and the value obtained by linear scaling defined by the even-N isotopes ranges from approximately 0.2 ‰ to 3‰. The ratios of Δ199Hg /Δ201Hg range from 0.8 to 1

  6. The Effect of Protein Mass Modulation on Human Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Kevin; Sapienza, Paul J.; Lee, Andrew L.; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli has long served as a model enzyme with which to elucidate possible links between protein dynamics and the catalyzed reaction. Such physical properties of its human counterpart have not been rigorously studied so far, but recent computer-based simulations suggest that these two DHFRs differ significantly in how closely coupled the protein dynamics and the catalyzed C-H→C hydride transfer step are. To test this prediction, two contemporary probes for studying the effect of protein dynamics on catalysis were combined here: temperature dependence of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) that are sensitive to the physical nature of the chemical step, and protein mass-modulation that slows down fast dynamics (femto- to picosecond timescale) throughout the protein. The intrinsic H/T KIEs of human DHFR, like those of E. coli DHFR, are shown to be temperature-independent in the range from 5–45 °C, indicating fast sampling of donor and acceptor distances (DADs) at the reaction’s transition state (or tunneling ready state – TRS). Mass modulation of these enzymes through isotopic labeling with 13C, 15N, and 2H at nonexchangeable hydrogens yield an 11% heavier enzyme. The additional mass has no effect on the intrinsic KIEs of the human enzyme. This finding indicates that the mass-modulation of the human DHFR affects neither DAD distribution nor the DAD’s conformational sampling dynamics. Furthermore, reduction in the enzymatic turnover number and the dissociation rate constant for the product indicate that the isotopic substitution affects kinetic steps that are not the catalyzed C-H→C hydride transfer. The findings are discussed in terms of fast dynamics and their role in catalysis, the comparison of calculations and experiments, and the interpretation of isotopically-modulated heavy enzymes in general. PMID:26813442

  7. Approximate analysis of effects of large deflections and initial twist on torsional stiffness of a cantilever plate subjected to thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenfels, Richard R; Vosteen, Louis F

    1958-01-01

    An approximate analysis of the nonlinear effects of initial twist and large deflections on the torsional stiffness of a cantilever plate subjected to a nonuniform temperature distribution is presented. The Von Karman large-deflection equations are satisfied through the use of a variational principle. The results show that initial twist and applied moments can have significant effects on the changes in stiffness produced by nonuniform heating, particularly in the region of the buckling temperature difference. Results calculated by this approximate analysis are in satisfactory agreement with measured torsional deformations and changes in natural frequency. (author)

  8. Effects of Distortion on Mass Flow Plug Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Davis, David O.; Barnhart, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical, and experimental investigation to study the effects of flow distortion on a Mass Flow Plug (MFP) used to control and measure mass-flow during an inlet test has been conducted. The MFP was first calibrated using the WIND-US flow solver for uniform (undistorted) inflow conditions. These results are shown to compare favorably with an experimental calibration under similar conditions. The effects of distortion were investigated by imposing distorted flow conditions taken from an actual inlet test to the inflow plane of the numerical simulation. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) based distortion study only showed the general trend in mass flow rate. The study used only total pressure as the upstream boundary condition, which was not enough to define the flow. A better simulation requires knowledge of the turbulence structure and a specific distortion pattern over a range of plug positions. It is recommended that future distortion studies utilize a rake with at least the same amount of pitot tubes as the AIP rake.

  9. Quantum confinement in nonadditive space with a spatially dependent effective mass for Si and Ge quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbagiovanni, E. G.; Filho, R. N. Costa

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the effect of a spatially dependent effective mass (SPDEM) [adapted from Costa Filho et al. (2011)] on an electron and a hole confined in a quantum well (QW). In the work of Costa Filho et al., the translation operator is modified to include an inverse character length scale, γ, which defines the SPDEM. The introduction of γ means that translations are no longer additive. In nonadditive space, we choose a 'skewed' Gaussian confinement potential defined by the replacement x →γ-1 ln(1 + γx) in the usual Gaussian potential. Within the parabolic approximation γ is inversely related to the QW thickness and we obtain analytic solutions to our confinement Hamiltonian. Our calculation yields a reduced dispersion relation for the gap energy (EG) as a function of QW thickness, D :EG D-1, compared to the effective mass approximation: EG D-2. Additionally, nonadditive space contracts the position space metric thus increasing the occupied momentum space and reducing the effective mass, in agreement with the relation: mo*-1 ∝∂2 E / ∂k2. The change in the effective mass is shown to be a function of the confinement potential via a point canonical transformation. Our calculation agrees with experimental measurements of EG for Si and Ge QWs.

  10. Mass discharge assessment at a brominated DNAPL site: Effects of known DNAPL source mass removal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C D; Davis, G B; Bastow, T P; Woodbury, R J; Rao, P S C; Annable, M D; Rhodes, S

    2014-08-01

    Management and closure of contaminated sites is increasingly being proposed on the basis of mass flux of dissolved contaminants in groundwater. Better understanding of the links between source mass removal and contaminant mass fluxes in groundwater would allow greater acceptance of this metric in dealing with contaminated sites. Our objectives here were to show how measurements of the distribution of contaminant mass flux and the overall mass discharge emanating from the source under undisturbed groundwater conditions could be related to the processes and extent of source mass depletion. In addition, these estimates of mass discharge were sought in the application of agreed remediation targets set in terms of pumped groundwater quality from offsite wells. Results are reported from field studies conducted over a 5-year period at a brominated DNAPL (tetrabromoethane, TBA; and tribromoethene, TriBE) site located in suburban Perth, Western Australia. Groundwater fluxes (qw; L(3)/L(2)/T) and mass fluxes (Jc; M/L(2)/T) of dissolved brominated compounds were simultaneously estimated by deploying Passive Flux Meters (PFMs) in wells in a heterogeneous layered aquifer. PFMs were deployed in control plane (CP) wells immediately down-gradient of the source zone, before (2006) and after (2011) 69-85% of the source mass was removed, mainly by groundwater pumping from the source zone. The high-resolution (26-cm depth interval) measures of qw and Jc along the source CP allowed investigation of the DNAPL source-zone architecture and impacts of source mass removal. Comparable estimates of total mass discharge (MD; M/T) across the source zone CP reduced from 104gday(-1) to 24-31gday(-1) (70-77% reductions). Importantly, this mass discharge reduction was consistent with the estimated proportion of source mass remaining at the site (15-31%). That is, a linear relationship between mass discharge and source mass is suggested. The spatial detail of groundwater and mass flux distributions

  11. Mass discharge assessment at a brominated DNAPL site: Effects of known DNAPL source mass removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, C. D.; Davis, G. B.; Bastow, T. P.; Woodbury, R. J.; Rao, P. S. C.; Annable, M. D.; Rhodes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Management and closure of contaminated sites is increasingly being proposed on the basis of mass flux of dissolved contaminants in groundwater. Better understanding of the links between source mass removal and contaminant mass fluxes in groundwater would allow greater acceptance of this metric in dealing with contaminated sites. Our objectives here were to show how measurements of the distribution of contaminant mass flux and the overall mass discharge emanating from the source under undisturbed groundwater conditions could be related to the processes and extent of source mass depletion. In addition, these estimates of mass discharge were sought in the application of agreed remediation targets set in terms of pumped groundwater quality from offsite wells. Results are reported from field studies conducted over a 5-year period at a brominated DNAPL (tetrabromoethane, TBA; and tribromoethene, TriBE) site located in suburban Perth, Western Australia. Groundwater fluxes (qw; L3/L2/T) and mass fluxes (Jc; M/L2/T) of dissolved brominated compounds were simultaneously estimated by deploying Passive Flux Meters (PFMs) in wells in a heterogeneous layered aquifer. PFMs were deployed in control plane (CP) wells immediately down-gradient of the source zone, before (2006) and after (2011) 69-85% of the source mass was removed, mainly by groundwater pumping from the source zone. The high-resolution (26-cm depth interval) measures of qw and Jc along the source CP allowed investigation of the DNAPL source-zone architecture and impacts of source mass removal. Comparable estimates of total mass discharge (MD; M/T) across the source zone CP reduced from 104 g day- 1 to 24-31 g day- 1 (70-77% reductions). Importantly, this mass discharge reduction was consistent with the estimated proportion of source mass remaining at the site (15-31%). That is, a linear relationship between mass discharge and source mass is suggested. The spatial detail of groundwater and mass flux distributions also

  12. Approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We discuss the idea of approximate flavor symmetries. Relations between approximate flavor symmetries and natural flavor conservation and democracy models is explored. Implications for neutrino physics are also discussed.

  13. Breakdown of the quasistatic approximation at high densities and its effect on the heliumlike K{alpha} complex of nickel, iron, and calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Oelgoetz, Justin; Fontes, Christopher J.; Zhang Honglin; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2007-12-15

    Recent work to include R-matrix data within a larger model comprised mostly of distorted-wave and plane-wave Born data has resulted in the general spectral modeling (GSM) code. It employs a quasistatic approximation, a standard, low-density methodology that assumes the ionization balance is separable from a determination of the excited-state populations that give rise to the spectra. GSM further allows for some states to be treated statistically as contributions to effective rates, instead of being included explicitly in the kinetics model. While these two approximations are known to be valid at low densities, this work investigates using such methods to model high-density, non-LTE emission spectra and determines at what point the approximations break down by comparing to spectra produced by the Los Alamos National Laboratory code ATOMIC which makes no such approximations. As both approximations are used by other astrophysical and low-density modeling codes, the results should be of broad interest. He-like K{alpha} emission spectra are presented for three elements, Ni, Fe, and Ca, in order to gauge the effect of both the statistical methods and the ground-state-only, quasistatic approximation employed in GSM. This work confirms that at and above the temperature of maximum abundance of the He-like ionization stage, the range of validity for both approximations is sufficient for modeling the low- and moderate-density regimes one typically finds in astrophysical and magnetically confined fusion plasmas. However, a breakdown does occur for sufficiently high densities; we obtain quantitative limits that are significantly higher than previous works. Additionally, this work demonstrates that, while the range of validity for both approximations is sufficient to accurately predict the density-dependent quenching of the z line, the approximations begin to break down at higher densities. Thus, these approximations should be used with greater care when modeling high

  14. Identifying neutrino mass hierarchy at extremely small theta13 through earth matter effects in a supernova signal.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Dighe, Amol; Mirizzi, Alessandro

    2008-10-24

    Collective neutrino flavor transformations deep inside a supernova are sensitive to the neutrino mass hierarchy even at extremely small values of theta_(13). Exploiting this effect, we show that comparison of the antineutrino signals from a galactic supernova in two megaton class water Cherenkov detectors, one of which is shadowed by Earth, will enable us to distinguish between the hierarchies if sin(2)theta_(13) < or approximately 10(-5), where long baseline neutrino experiments would be ineffectual.

  15. Oxygen in egg masses: interactive effects of temperature, age, and egg-mass morphology on oxygen supply to embryos.

    PubMed

    Moran, Amy L; Woods, H Arthur

    2007-02-01

    Embryos of many marine invertebrates are encased in gelatinous masses for part or all of development. Because gel and intervening embryos retard oxygen flux, such a life-history mode profoundly affects partial pressures of metabolic gases surrounding embryos. However, little is known about relationships between egg-mass structure and the opportunities and constraints imposed on structure by metabolic gas transport. We examined the effects of four factors (temperature, embryo age, embryo density and egg-mass size) on the metabolism of egg masses using both natural egg masses of a nudibranch and artificial egg masses made from sand dollar embryos and low-melting point agarose. Both temperature and embryo age strongly affected metabolic rates of nudibranch embryos. For embryos of a given age (stage), rates of oxygen consumption roughly doubled between 12 and 21 degrees C; from early cleavage to the veliger stage, consumption rose two- to fourfold, depending on temperature. Oxygen profiles in egg masses showed that advanced embryonic age, and to a lesser extent high temperature, both led to steeper oxygen gradients into egg masses. Egg masses containing advanced embryos at 21 degrees C had very low central oxygen levels. Small-diameter artificial masses (2 mm diameter) had virtually no internal oxygen gradients regardless of embryo density or temperature, while medium (4 mm) and large diameter (10 mm) artificial masses had oxygen profiles that depended strongly and interactively on embryo density and temperature. Together, our data on natural and artificial egg masses suggest that (i) multiple factors have strong effects on metabolic rate; (ii) rates of oxygen transport are relatively invariant with temperature in simple, artificial systems but may vary more strongly with temperature in natural egg masses; and (iii) the four factors--temperature, embryo age, embryo density and egg-mass size--interact in important ways bearing on egg mass design. A simple mathematical

  16. Effect of projectile mass on amorphization of CuTi

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.; Okamoto, P.R.; Meshii, M.

    1988-09-01

    Various intermetallic compounds are shown to be amorphized by electron and ion irradiations below a critical temperature. the critical temperature for amorphization is higher for ion irradiation than for electron irradiation. In the present work, the effect of projectile mass is studied in amorphization of CuTi with electron, Ne , Kr and Xe . The critical temperature was found to increase monotonically with projectile mass from 185K for electron to 543K for Kr and Xe . The kinetics of crystalline to amorphous transition was studied by measuring the integrated intensity of diffuse rings on electron diffraction patterns. The analysis of the results of this measurement by Gibbons model indicated that the direct amorphization occurs in a single damage zone with Kr , while overlapping of three damage zones is required for amorphization with Ne . In the light of these observations, the relation between the structure of irradiation damage and the crystalline to amorphous transition, and the projectile mass dependence of the critical temperature for irradiation-induced amorphization will be discussed. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  17. TRIMS: Validating T2 Molecular Effects for Neutrino Mass Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Ting; Bodine, Laura; Enomoto, Sanshiro; Kallander, Matthew; Machado, Eric; Parno, Diana; Robertson, Hamish; Trims Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The upcoming KATRIN and Project 8 experiments will measure the model-independent effective neutrino mass through the kinematics near the endpoint of tritium beta-decay. A critical systematic, however, is the understanding of the molecular final-state distribution populated by tritium decay. In fact, the current theory incorporated in the KATRIN analysis framework predicts an observable that disagrees with an experimental result from the 1950s. The Tritium Recoil-Ion Mass Spectrometer (TRIMS) experiment will reexamine branching ratio of the molecular tritium (T2) beta decay to the bound state (3HeT+). TRIMS consists of a magnet-guided time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a detector located on each end. By measuring the kinetic energy and time-of-flight difference of the ions and beta particles reaching the detectors, we will be able to distinguish molecular ions from atomic ones and hence derive the ratio in question.We will give an update on simulation software, analysis tools, and the apparatus, including early commissioning results. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  18. Symmetry effects in electrostatic interactions between two arbitrarily charged spherical shells in the Debye-Hückel approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lošdorfer Božič, Anže; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2013-02-01

    Inhomogeneous charge distributions have important repercussions on electrostatic interactions in systems of charged particles but are often difficult to examine theoretically. We investigate how electrostatic interactions are influenced by patchy charge distributions exhibiting certain point group symmetries. We derive a general form of the electrostatic interaction energy of two permeable, arbitrarily charged spherical shells in the Debye-Hückel approximation and apply it to the case of particles with icosahedral, octahedral, and tetrahedral inhomogeneous charge distributions. We analyze in detail how charge distribution symmetry modifies the interaction energy and find that local charge inhomogeneities reduce the repulsion of two overall equally charged particles, while sufficient orientational variation in the charge distribution can turn the minimum interaction energy into an attraction. Additionally, we show that larger patches and thus lower symmetries and wave numbers result in bigger attraction given the same variation.

  19. Approximation of Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niiniluoto, Ilkka

    2014-03-01

    Approximation of laws is an important theme in the philosophy of science. If we can make sense of the idea that two scientific laws are "close" to each other, then we can also analyze such methodological notions as approximate explanation of laws, approximate reduction of theories, approximate empirical success of theories, and approximate truth of laws. Proposals for measuring the distance between quantitative scientific laws were given in Niiniluoto (1982, 1987). In this paper, these definitions are reconsidered as a response to the interesting critical remarks by Liu (1999).

  20. Erratum: Parametrized-4.5PN TaylorF2 approximants and tail effects to quartic nonlinear order from the effective one body formalism [Phys. Rev. D 95, 124001 (2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Francesco; Nagar, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    By post-Newtonian (PN) expanding the well-known, factorized and resummed, effective-one-body energy flux for circularized binaries we show that: (i) because of the presence of the resummed tail factor, the 4.5PN-accurate tails-of-tails-of-tails contribution to the energy flux recently computed by Marchand et al. [Class. Q. Grav. 33 (2016) 244003] is actually contained in the resummed expression; this is also the case of the the next-to-leading-order tail-induced spin-orbit term of Marsat et al. [Class. Q. Grav. 31 (2014) 025023]; (ii) in performing this expansion, we also obtain, for the first time, the explicit 3.5PN leading-order tail-induced spin-spin flux term; (iii) pushing the PN expansion of the (nonspinning) EOB flux up to 5.5PN order, we compute 4PN, 5PN and 5.5PN contributions to the energy flux, though in a form that explicitly depends on, currently unknown, 4PN and 5PN non-test-mass corrections to the factorized waveform amplitudes. Within this (parametrized) 4.5PN accuracy, we calculate the TaylorF2 approximant. Focusing for simplicity on the nonspinning case and using the numerical-relativity calibrated IMRPhenomD waveform model as benchmark, we demonstrate that it is possible to reproduce the derivative of the IMRPhenomD phase (say up to the frequency of the Schwarzschild last-stable-orbit) by flexing only a 4PN "effective" waveform amplitude parameter. A preliminary analysis also illustrates that similar results can be obtained for the spin-aligned case provided only the leading-order spin-orbit and spin-spin terms are kept. Our findings suggest that this kind of, EOB-derived, (parametrized), higher-order, PN approximants may serve as promising tools to construct Inspiral-Merger-Ringdown phenomenological models or even to replace the standardly used 3.5PN-accurate TaylorF2 approximant in searches of small-mass binaries.

  1. Isotope mass and charge effects in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusztai, I.; Candy, J.; Gohil, P.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of primary ion species of differing charge and mass—specifically, deuterium, hydrogen, and helium—on instabilities and transport is studied in DIII-D plasmas through gyrokinetic simulations with gyro [J. Candy and E. Belli, General Atomics Technical Report No. GA-A26818, 2010]. In linear simulations under imposed similarity of the profiles, there is an isomorphism between the linear growth rates of hydrogen isotopes, but the growth rates are higher for Z > 1 main ions due to the appearance of the charge in the Poisson equation. On ion scales the most significant effect of the different electron-to-ion mass ratio appears through collisions stabilizing trapped electron modes. In nonlinear simulations, significant favorable deviations from pure gyro-Bohm scaling are found due to electron-to-ion mass ratio effects and collisions. The presence of any non-trace impurity species cannot be neglected in a comprehensive simulation of the transport; including carbon impurity in the simulations caused a dramatic reduction of energy fluxes. The transport in the analyzed deuterium and helium discharges could be well reproduced in gyrokinetic and gyrofluid simulations while the significant hydrogen discrepancy is the subject of ongoing investigation.

  2. Effective Mass of an Electron Bubble in Superfluid Helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunhu; Maris, Humphrey J.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of computer simulations of the motion of an electron bubble through superfluid helium-4 when acted upon by an electric field. The simulations are based on an extended version of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The temperature is assumed to be sufficiently low for the drag exerted on the bubble by thermal excitations to be negligible, and the calculations are made for velocities below the critical velocitie for nucleation of vortices and roton production. We calculate the effective mass m* of the bubble and obtain results in excellent agreement with the measurements of Poitrenaud and Williams, and Ellis, McClintock, and Bowley.

  3. Violence and mass media: are laws and regulations effective?

    PubMed

    Wulff, Christian

    2007-10-01

    In Germany, there are several laws and legal and administrative regulations restricting presentation and propagation of violence in mass media. They have proven to be partly effective. Whilst control and supervision of public media is feasible, the containment of what is distributed over the internet proves to be very difficult. It is well recognized that laws and regulations can be only one part of protection for children and youngsters; school, kindergarten and above all the parents must be educated and held responsible for creating media competence in children and adolescents.

  4. Analysis of the spin Hall effect in CuIr alloys: Combined approach of density functional theory and Hartree-Fock approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhuo Gu, Bo; Mori, Michiyasu; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Ziman, Timothy

    2015-05-07

    We analyze the spin Hall effect in CuIr alloys in theory by the combined approach of the density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. The spin Hall angle (SHA) is obtained to be negative without the local correlation effects. After including the local correlation effects of the 5d orbitals of Ir impurities, the SHA becomes positive with realistic correlation parameters and consistent with experiment [Niimi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 126601 (2011)]. Moreover, our analysis shows that the DFT + HF approach is a convenient and general method to study the influence of local correlation effects on the spin Hall effect.

  5. The Effect of Feedback and Reionization on Star Formation in Low-mass Dwarf Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Christine M.; Bryan, G.; Johnston, K. V.; Smith, B. D.; Mac Low, M.; Sharma, S.; Tumlinson, J.

    2013-01-01

    I will present a set of high resolution simulations of a 109 M⊙ dark matter halo in a cosmological setting done with an adaptive-mesh refinement code as a mass analogue to local low-luminosity dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The primary goal of our simulations is to investigate the roles of reionization and supernova feedback in determining the star formation histories of low mass dwarf galaxies. We include a wide range of physical effects, including metal cooling, molecular hydrogen formation and cooling, photoionization and photodissociation from a metagalactic (but not local) background, a simple prescription for self-shielding, star formation, and a simple model for supernova driven energetic feedback. We find that reionization is primarily responsible for expelling most of the gas in our simulations, but that supernova feedback is required to disperse the dense, cold gas in the core of the halo. Moreover, we show that the timing of reionization can produce an order of magnitude difference in the final stellar mass of the system. For our full physics run with reionization at z=9, we find a stellar mass of about 105 M⊙ at z=0, and a mass-to-light ratio within the half-light radius of approximately 130 M⊙/L⊙, consistent with observed low-luminosity dwarfs. However, the resulting median stellar metallicity is 0.06 Z⊙, considerably larger than observed systems. In addition, we find star formation is truncated between redshifts 4 and 7, at odds with the observed late time star formation in isolated dwarf systems but in agreement with Milky Way ultrafaint dwarf spheroidals. We investigate the efficacy of energetic feedback in our simple thermal-energy driven feedback scheme, and suggest that it may still suffer from excessive radiative losses, despite reaching stellar particle masses of about 100 M⊙, and a comoving spatial resolution of 11 pc. This has led us to pursue improvements in our supernova feedback model to include kinetic as well as thermal energy in

  6. A Varifold Approach to Surface Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buet, Blanche; Leonardi, Gian Paolo; Masnou, Simon

    2017-06-01

    We show that the theory of varifolds can be suitably enriched to open the way to applications in the field of discrete and computational geometry. Using appropriate regularizations of the mass and of the first variation of a varifold we introduce the notion of approximate mean curvature and show various convergence results that hold, in particular, for sequences of discrete varifolds associated with point clouds or pixel/voxel-type discretizations of d-surfaces in the Euclidean n-space, without restrictions on dimension and codimension. The variational nature of the approach also allows us to consider surfaces with singularities, and in that case the approximate mean curvature is consistent with the generalized mean curvature of the limit surface. A series of numerical tests are provided in order to illustrate the effectiveness and generality of the method.

  7. Effect of semi-annual applications of a chlorhexidine/fluoride varnish mixture on approximal caries incidence in schoolchildren. A three-year radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Petersson, L G; Magnusson, K; Andersson, H; Deierborg, G; Twetman, S

    1998-04-01

    Development and progression of approximal caries is still difficult to prevent and control even in societies with declining caries prevalence. In this study, a test group of 115 12-yr old children were treated semi-annually with a mixture (1:1) of a varnish containing 0.1% F (Fluor Protector) and 1.0% chlorhexidine (Cervitec). A reference group of 104 children received fluoride varnish treatment (Fluor Protector) semi-annually. Approximal caries was recorded from bitewing radiographs at baseline and after 3 yr. At baseline, total decayed and filled surfaces (DFS) including enamel caries were 1.79+/-2.36 in the reference group and 2.0+/-2.77 in the test group. After 3 yr, the mean approximal caries incidence including enamel caries was 3.01+/-3.74 and 3.78+/-4.32, respectively. The differences at baseline as well as after 3 yr were not statistically significant. The results showed that both groups had a comparatively low incidence of approximal caries during the experimental period, and suggest that a mixture of fluoride and antibacterial varnish had no additional preventive effect on approximal caries incidence compared with fluoride varnish treatments alone.

  8. Stellar evolution at high mass including the effect of a stellar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.-W.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of a stellar wind on the evolution of stars in the mass range from 15 to 120 solar masses is investigated. All the stellar models are constructed with the use of Cox-Stewart opacities. Four possible cases of mass loss are considered: (1) no mass loss at all; (2) substantial mass loss from stars in all stages of evolution; (3) heavy mass loss from red supergiants only; and (4) sudden and very heavy mass loss from luminous yellow supergiants. The assumption of mass loss during the main-sequence phase of evolution is found to lead to a lowering of the luminosity and, unless the mass loss is extremely heavy, of the effective temperature as well. A comparison of the adopted mass-loss rates with observed rates suggests that stellar winds are probably not an important factor in the evolution of main-sequence stars and supergiants unless the initial masses are greater than about 30 solar masses.

  9. The Effects of Partial Ionization on Prominence Mass Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, J. T.; Olson, K.; DeVore, C. R.; Martinez Gomez, D.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-12-01

    The origin of the prominence mass has been an open question since this cool plasma suspended in the hot corona was first discovered. We have known for a long time that the mass must come from the chromosphere, but it is unclear whether this mass is lifted bodily through magnetic levitation, injected by reconnection-driven upflows, or driven from the chromosphere by evaporation and then condensed. One evaporation-condensation scenario, the thermal nonequilibrium (TNE) model, is the most fully developed, quantitative model for the prominence plasma to date. In the TNE scenario, localized heating concentrated at the coronal loop footpoints produces chromospheric evaporation, filling the flux tube with hot, dense plasma that subsequently collapses radiatively to form cool condensations. Thus far this model has been successful in explaining the key properties of the long, persistent threads and small, highly dynamic, transient blobs in prominences, the damping of large-amplitude field-aligned prominence oscillations, the appearance of horn-shaped features above the cool prominence in EUV images of coronal cavities, and coronal rain in the ambient corona. To date, all studies of TNE have assumed that the plasma is fully ionized, which is appropriate for the hot coronal gas but unrealistic for the cool plasma below ~30,000 K. The energetics, dynamics, and evolutionary time scales of the TNE process are expected to be altered when the effects of ionization and recombination are considered. We have modified ARGOS, our 1D hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement, to include an equation of state that accounts for the effects of partial ionization of the plasma over a wide range of temperatures and densities. We will discuss the results of these simulations and their comparison with our previous studies of TNE in typical filament-supporting flux tubes. This work was partially supported by NASA's LWS Strategic Capability program.

  10. Approximate symmetries of Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Christopher T.; Flammia, Steven T.

    2017-08-01

    We explore the relationship between approximate symmetries of a gapped Hamiltonian and the structure of its ground space. We start by considering approximate symmetry operators, defined as unitary operators whose commutators with the Hamiltonian have norms that are sufficiently small. We show that when approximate symmetry operators can be restricted to the ground space while approximately preserving certain mutual commutation relations. We generalize the Stone-von Neumann theorem to matrices that approximately satisfy the canonical (Heisenberg-Weyl-type) commutation relations and use this to show that approximate symmetry operators can certify the degeneracy of the ground space even though they only approximately form a group. Importantly, the notions of "approximate" and "small" are all independent of the dimension of the ambient Hilbert space and depend only on the degeneracy in the ground space. Our analysis additionally holds for any gapped band of sufficiently small width in the excited spectrum of the Hamiltonian, and we discuss applications of these ideas to topological quantum phases of matter and topological quantum error correcting codes. Finally, in our analysis, we also provide an exponential improvement upon bounds concerning the existence of shared approximate eigenvectors of approximately commuting operators under an added normality constraint, which may be of independent interest.

  11. Strain effects on the optical conductivity of gapped graphene in the presence of Holstein phonons beyond the Dirac cone approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2016-08-15

    In this paper we study the optical conductivity and density of states (DOS) of doped gapped graphene beyond the Dirac cone approximation in the presence of electron-phonon (e-ph) interaction under strain, i.e., within the framework of a full π-band Holstein model, by using the Kubo linear response formalism that is established upon the retarded self-energy. A new peak in the optical conductivity for a large enough e-ph interaction strength is found which is associated to transitions between the midgap states and the Van Hove singularities of the main π-band. Optical conductivity decreases with strain and at large strains, the system has a zero optical conductivity at low energies due to optically inter-band excitations through the limit of zero doping. As a result, the Drude weight changes with e-ph interaction, temperature and strain. Consequently, DOS and optical conductivity remains stable with temperature at low e-ph coupling strengths.

  12. Tunable band structure and effective mass of disordered chalcopyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze-Lian; Xie, Wen-Hui; Zhao, Yong-Hong

    2017-02-01

    The band structure and effective mass of disordered chalcopyrite photovoltaic materials Cu1- x Ag x Ga X 2 ( X = S, Se) are investigated by density functional theory. Special quasirandom structures are used to mimic local atomic disorders at Cu/Ag sites. A local density plus correction method is adopted to obtain correct semiconductor band gaps for all compounds. The bandgap anomaly can be seen for both sulfides and selenides, where the gap values of Ag compounds are larger than those of Cu compounds. Band gaps can be modulated from 1.63 to 1.78 eV for Cu1- x Ag x Ga Se 2, and from 2.33 to 2.64 eV for Cu1- x Ag x Ga S 2. The band gap minima and maxima occur at around x = 0:5 and x = 1, respectively, for both sulfides and selenides. In order to show the transport properties of Cu1- x Ag x Ga X 2, the effective mass is shown as a function of disordered Ag concentration. Finally, detailed band structures are shown to clarify the phonon momentum needed by the fundamental indirect-gap transitions. These results should be helpful in designing high-efficiency photovoltaic devices, with both better absorption and high mobility, by Ag-doping in CuGa X 2.

  13. The Effect of QBO on the Total Mass Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saǧır, Selçuk; Atıcı, Ramazan

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) measured at 10 hPa altitude and total mass density (TMD) values obtained from NRLMSIS-00 model for 90 km altitude of ionosphere known as Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region is statistically investigated. For this study, multiple-regression model is used. To see the effect on TMD of QBO directions, Dummy variables are also added to model. In the result of calculations, it is observed that QBO is effected on TMD. It is determined that 69% of variations at TMD can be explainable by QBO. It is determined that the explainable ratio is at the rate of 5%. Also, it is seen that an increase/a decrease of 1 meter per second at QBO give rise to an increase/a decrease of 7,2x10-4 g/cm3 at TMD.

  14. Hydromagnetic free convection flow with Hall effect and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Prasan Kumar

    2016-02-01

    The study of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) deals with the flow of an electrically conducting fluid in the presence of an electromagnetic field, which has many applications in astrophysics, geophysics and engineering. Objective of the present study in this paper is to consider the effect of dissipation and Hall current on the MHD free convection flow with mass transfer in a porous vertical channel. An exact solution of the governing equations is obtained by solving the complex variables. The effect of Hall parameter (m), Hartmann number (M), and Concentration parameter (Sc) on the velocity and temperature of the fluid is studied. Simulation results show that the shear stress of primary and secondary velocity for the lower plate increases with increase in the strength of Hall parameter (m) and decreases with increase in Hartmann number (M) and concentration parameter (Sc).

  15. Professional sport activity and micronutrients: effects on bone mass.

    PubMed

    Nuti, R; Martini, G; Merlotti, D; Valleggi, F; De Paola, V; Gennari, L

    2005-01-01

    Osteoporosis is the most prevalent metabolic bone disease among developed countries. Although bone mass and density are certainly determined by various concurrent factors such as genetics, hormones, life-style and the environment, and although the genetic program has a critical role in growth and in bone peak development, for their realization an adequate nutritional intake of nutrients and regular exercise are always necessary and may represent a way to prevent osteoporosis and fractures. Exercise and especially high-impact sport activity during growth and adolescence increases bone mineral density (BMD) in weight-loaded skeletal regions. Aerobics, weight bearing and resistance exercises may also be effective in increasing BMD in post-menopausal women. Even though most of the research on nutritional components has focused almost exclusively on calcium and vitamin D, there is now considerable interest in the effects of a variety of other nutrients on bone status.

  16. The effect of geographic range on extinction risk during background and mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Payne, Jonathan L; Finnegan, Seth

    2007-06-19

    Wide geographic range is generally thought to buffer taxa against extinction, but the strength of this effect has not been investigated for the great majority of the fossil record. Although the majority of genus extinctions have occurred between major mass extinctions, little is known about extinction selectivity regimes during these "background" intervals. Consequently, the question of whether selectivity regimes differ between background and mass extinctions is largely unresolved. Using logistic regression, we evaluated the selectivity of genus survivorship with respect to geographic range by using a global database of fossil benthic marine invertebrates spanning the Cambrian through the Neogene periods, an interval of approximately 500 My. Our results show that wide geographic range has been significantly and positively associated with survivorship for the great majority of Phanerozoic time. Moreover, the significant association between geographic range and survivorship remains after controlling for differences in species richness and abundance among genera. However, mass extinctions and several second-order extinction events exhibit less geographic range selectivity than predicted by range alone. Widespread environmental disturbance can explain the reduced association between geographic range and extinction risk by simultaneously affecting genera with similar ecological and physiological characteristics on global scales. Although factors other than geographic range have certainly affected extinction risk during many intervals, geographic range is likely the most consistently significant predictor of extinction risk in the marine fossil record.

  17. The effect of measurement errors and computational approximations on a perspective ILM radar image. [airport runways and the microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundick, W. T.

    1975-01-01

    The effect was examined of aircraft position and attitude, of measurement errors, and of computational approximations on the size, shape, and position of a perspective radar image of an airport runway as might be displayed by an independent landing monitor in transport aircraft. The effect on runway image geometry was examined for different aircraft attitudes and different aircraft positions relative to a standard three degree glide slope. Measurement errors investigated were errors in radar azimuth angle and range, and errors in those aircraft parameters supplied to the radar for use in converting the radar image into a perspective format (namely pitch, roll, and altitude). Also investigated were the effects of using certain mathematical approximations, such as small angle, in the coordinate transformation which converts the image to a perspective format.

  18. Multivariate causal attribution and cost-effectiveness of a national mass media campaign in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Kincaid, D Lawrence; Do, Mai Phuong

    2006-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis is based on a simple formula. A dollar estimate of the total cost to conduct a program is divided by the number of people estimated to have been affected by it in terms of some intended outcome. The direct, total costs of most communication campaigns are usually available. Estimating the amount of effect that can be attributed to the communication alone, however is problematical in full-coverage, mass media campaigns where the randomized control group design is not feasible. Single-equation, multiple regression analysis controls for confounding variables but does not adequately address the issue of causal attribution. In this article, multivariate causal attribution (MCA) methods are applied to data from a sample survey of 1,516 married women in the Philippines to obtain a valid measure of the number of new adopters of modern contraceptives that can be causally attributed to a national mass media campaign and to calculate its cost-effectiveness. The MCA analysis uses structural equation modeling to test the causal pathways and to test for endogeneity, biprobit analysis to test for direct effects of the campaign and endogeneity, and propensity score matching to create a statistically equivalent, matched control group that approximates the results that would have been obtained from a randomized control group design. The MCA results support the conclusion that the observed, 6.4 percentage point increase in modern contraceptive use can be attributed to the national mass media campaign and to its indirect effects on attitudes toward contraceptives. This net increase represented 348,695 new adopters in the population of married women at a cost of U.S. $1.57 per new adopter.

  19. Approximate Confidence Intervals for Standardized Effect Sizes in the Two-Independent and Two-Dependent Samples Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viechtbauer, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Standardized effect sizes and confidence intervals thereof are extremely useful devices for comparing results across different studies using scales with incommensurable units. However, exact confidence intervals for standardized effect sizes can usually be obtained only via iterative estimation procedures. The present article summarizes several…

  20. The effective medium and the average field approximations vis-à-vis the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. I. The self-consistent scheme in matrix-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, Y.; Milton, G. W.

    2010-07-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) and the average field approximation (AFA) are two classical micromechanics models for the determination of effective properties of heterogeneous media. They are also known in the literature as 'self-consistent' approximations. In the AFA, the basic idea is to estimate the actual average field existing in a phase through a configuration in which a typical particle of that phase is embedded in the homogenized medium. In the EMA, on the other hand, one or more representative microstructural elements of the composite is embedded in the homogenized effective medium subjected to a uniform field, and the demand is made that the dominant part of the far-field disturbance vanishes. Both parts of this study are concerned with two-phase, matrix-based, effectively isotropic composites with an inclusion phase consisting of randomly oriented particles of arbitrary shape in general, and ellipsoidal shape in particular. The constituent phases are assumed to be isotropic. It is shown that in those systems the AFA and EMA give different predictions, with the distinction between them becoming especially striking regarding their standing vis-à-vis the Hashin-Shtrikman (HS-bounds). While due to its realizability property the EMA will always obey the bounds, we show that there are circumstances in which the AFA may violate the bounds. In the AFA for two-phase matrix-based composites, the embedded inclusion is a particle of the inclusion phase. If the particle is directly embedded in the effective medium, the method is called here the self-consistent scheme-average field approximation (SCS-AFA), and will obey the HS-bounds for an inclusion shape that is simply connected. If the embedded entity is a matrix-coated particle, then the method is called the generalized self-consistent scheme-average field approximation (GSCS-AFA), and may violate the HS-bounds. On the other hand, in the EMA for matrix-based composites with well-separated inclusions, we

  1. Drying temperature effects on fish dry mass measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; O'Gorman, R.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of tissue composition in fish often requires dry samples. Time needed to dry fish decreases as temperature is increased, but additional volatile material may be lost. Effects of 10??C temperature increases on percentage dry mass (%DM) were tested against 60??C controls for groups of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus, and alewife Alosa pseudoharengus. Lake trout %DMs were lower at greater temperatures, but not significantly different from 60??C controls. Rainbow smelt and slimy sculpin %DMs were lower at greater temperatures and differences were significant when test temperatures reached 90??C. Significant differences were not found in tests using alewives because variability in %DM was high between fish. To avoid inter-fish variability, 30 alewives were each dried successively at 60, 70, 80, and then 90??C and for all fish %DM declined at each higher temperature. In general, %DMs were lower at greater temperatures and after reaching a stable dry weight, fish did not lose additional mass if temperature remained constant. Results indicate that caution should be used when comparing dry mass related indices from fish dried at different temperatures because %DM was negatively related to temperature. The differences in %DM observed with rising temperature could account for substantial portions of the variability in reported energy values for the species tested. Differences in %DM means for the 60 vs. 80??C and 60 vs. 90??C tests for rainbow smelt and alewife could represent of from 8 to 38% of observed annual energy cycles for Lakes Ontario and Michigan.

  2. Does body mass index effect the success of percutaneous nephrolithotomy?

    PubMed Central

    Şimşek, Abdülmuttalip; Özgör, Faruk; Akbulut, Mehmet Fatih; Küçüktopçu, Onur; Berberoğlu, Ahmet Yalçın; Sarılar, Ömer; Binbay, Murat; Müslümanoğlu, Ahmet Yaser

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In obese patients, the management of renal calculi presents a number of challenges for urologists. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) procedure in obese and morbidly obese patients. Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical files of 2360 patients treated with PNL between March 2002 and April 2013. The patients were stratified into four groups according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of body mass index (BMI): <25 kg/m2 (average), 25–29.9 kg/m2 (overweight), 30–39.9 kg/m2 (obese), and >40 kg/m2 (morbidly obese). Patients under 18 years of age and those with a body mass index under 18 kg/m2 were excluded from the study. Intra-, and postoperative outcomes of PNL were compared between groups. Results: A total of 2102 patients with a mean age of 43±13.62 years were enrolled in the study. The mean stone size, mean number of stones, staghorn stone rate and history of previous shock wave lithotripsy were similar in all groups. The overall stone-free rate was 82 percent. The mean operation time was longer in the morbidly obese group but it was not significantly different from that in the other groups. No differences were observed in hospital stay, complication or stone-free rate among four study groups. Conclusion: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a safe and effective treatment for renal stone disease. Body mass index does not affect the success or complication rate in PNL. PMID:26328160

  3. Diffuse supernova neutrinos: oscillation effects, stellar cooling and progenitor mass dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Tamborra, Irene E-mail: tamborra@mpp.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    We estimate the diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB) using the recent progenitor-dependent, long-term supernova simulations from the Basel group and including neutrino oscillations at several post-bounce times. Assuming multi-angle matter suppression of collective effects during the accretion phase, we find that oscillation effects are dominated by the matter-driven MSW resonances, while neutrino-neutrino collective effects contribute at the 5–10% level. The impact of the neutrino mass hierarchy, of the time-dependent neutrino spectra and of the diverse progenitor star population is 10% or less, small compared to the uncertainty of at least 25% of the normalization of the supernova rate. Therefore, assuming that the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy will be determined within the next decade, the future detection of the DSNB will deliver approximate information on the MSW-oscillated neutrino spectra. With a reliable model for neutrino emission, its detection will be a powerful instrument to provide complementary information on the star formation rate and for learning about stellar physics.

  4. Effects of wheelchair mass on the physiologic responses, perception of exertion, and performance during various simulated daily tasks.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Yoshimasa; Watelain, Eric; Lepoutre, François-Xavier; Thevenon, Andre

    2010-08-01

    To verify whether additional manual wheelchair mass above a critical level would produce, during many daily tasks, an increase in physiologic parameters, an increase in the perceived exertion, and a decrease in performance. A repeated-measurement design. Six standardized tests thought to mimic daily activities. Volunteers (N=21), 8 men with spinal cord injuries (SCIs; mean age, 34+/-12y; range, 19-56y) and 13 able-bodied persons (11 men and 2 women; mean, 24+/-5y; range, 18-37y). Random additional masses ("0", 1, 2, 5kg) were placed under the seat of a multisport manual wheelchair (mass approximately 10kg) out of the subject's field of vision. Energy expenditure (EE; total o(2) consumed), heart rate (total number of beats), perceived exertion (visual analog scale), and performance (seconds to execute a sprint test) were measured. For all tests, there was no significant effect of mass found for either group for the EE, heart rate, and performance. In addition, for all tests, no significant effect of mass was found for the SCI group for the visual analog perceived exertion. However, for the able-bodied group, the added mass had a significant effect for the visual analog perceived exertion (F=6.11; P=.02) in the Stop-and-Go test. A post hoc Tukey test showed a significant difference between the 0kg and 5kg mass conditions (P<.01; d=.8), between 1kg and 5kg (P=.02; d=.6), and between 2kg and 5kg (P=.01; d=.6). Based on these findings, it can be concluded that, under the conditions of this study, additional mass (up to 5kg) loaded on a multisport manual wheelchair does not seem have any effect on EE, heart rate, or performance and has a minor effect on the visual analog perceived exertion evaluated in many activities of daily living.

  5. Protein solution structure determination using distances from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect experiments: Effect of approximations on the accuracy of derived structures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, P.D.; Basus, V.J.; James, T.L. )

    1991-02-15

    Solution structures for many proteins have been determined to date utilizing interproton distance constraints estimated from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect (2D NOE) spectra. Although the simple isolated spin pair approximation (ISPA) generally used can result in systematic errors in distances, the large number of constraints enables proteins structure to be defined with reasonably high resolution. Effects of these systematic errors on the resulting protein structure are examined. Iterative relaxation matrix calculations, which account for dipolar interactions between all protons in a molecule, can accurately determine internuclear distances with little or no a priori knowledge of the molecular structure. The value of this additional complexity is also addressed. To assess these distance determination methods, hypothetical experimental data, including random noise and peak overlap, are calculated for an arbitrary true protein structure. Three methods of obtaining distance constraints from 2D NOE peak intensities are examined: one entails a conservative use of ISPA, one assumes the ISPA to be fairly accurate, and on utilizes an iterative relaxation matrix method called MARDIGRAS (matrix analysis of relaxation for discerning the geometry of an aqueous structure), developed in this laboratory. An R factor for evaluating fit between experimental and calculated 2D NOE intensities is proposed.

  6. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Thomas, K.B.

    1994-09-01

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane ({approx}Ph(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Ph, or {approx}DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 {degrees}C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  7. Effect of Body Mass Index on Left Ventricular Mass in Career Male Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Korre, Maria; Porto, Luiz Guilherme G.; Farioli, Andrea; Yang, Justin; Christiani, David C.; Christophi, Costas A.; Lombardi, David A.; Kovacs, Richard J.; Mastouri, Ronald; Abbasi, Siddique; Steigner, Michael; Moffatt, Steven; Smith, Denise; Kales, Stefanos N.

    2017-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) mass is a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events; increased LV mass is common among US firefighters and plays a major role in firefighter sudden cardiac death. We aim to identify significant predictors of LV mass among firefighters. Cross-sectional study of 400 career male firefighters selected by an enriched randomization strategy. Weighted analyses were performed based on the total number of risk factors per subject with inverse probability weighting. LV mass was assessed by echocardiography (ECHO) and cardiac magnetic resonance, and normalized (indexed) for height. CVD risk parameters included vital signs at rest, body mass index (BMI)–defined obesity, obstructive sleep apnea risk, low cardiorespiratory fitness, and physical activity. Linear regression models were performed. In multivariate analyses, BMI was the only consistent significant independent predictor of LV mass indexes (all, p <0.001). A 1-unit decrease in BMI was associated with 1-unit (g/m1.7) reduction of LV mass/height1.7 after adjustment for age, obstructive sleep apnea risk, and cardiorespiratory fitness. In conclusion, after height-indexing ECHO-measured and cardiac magnetic resonance–measured LV mass, BMI was found to be a major driver of LV mass among firefighters. Our findings taken together with previous research suggest that reducing obesity will improve CVD risk profiles and decrease on-duty CVD and sudden cardiac death events in the fire service. Our results may also support targeted noninvasive screening for LV hypertrophy with ECHO among obese firefighters. PMID:27687051

  8. Mass Loss: Its Effect on the Evolution and Fate of High-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2014-08-01

    Our understanding of massive star evolution is in flux due to recent upheavals in our view of mass loss and observations of a high binary fraction among O-type stars. Mass-loss rates for standard metallicity-dependent winds of hot stars are lower by a factor of 2-3 compared with rates adopted in modern stellar evolution codes, due to the influence of clumping on observed diagnostics. Weaker hot star winds shift the burden of H-envelope removal to the winds, pulsations, and eruptions of evolved supergiants, as well as binary mass transfer. Studies of stripped-envelope supernovae, in particular, require binary mass transfer. Dramatic examples of eruptive mass loss are seen in Type IIn supernovae, which have massive shells ejected just a few years earlier. These eruptions are a prelude to core collapse, and may signify severe instabilities in the latest nuclear burning phases. We encounter the predicament that the most important modes of mass loss are also the most uncertain, undermining the predictive power of single-star evolution models. Moreover, the influence of winds and rotation has been evaluated by testing single-star models against observed statistics that, it turns out, are heavily influenced by binary evolution. Altogether, this may alter our view about the most basic outcomes of massive-star mass loss—are Wolf-Rayet stars and Type Ibc supernovae the products of winds, or are they mostly the result of binary evolution and eruptive mass loss? This is not fully settled, but mounting evidence points toward the latter. This paradigm shift impacts other areas of astronomy, because it changes predictions for ionizing radiation and wind feedback from stellar populations, it may alter conclusions about star-formation rates and initial mass functions, it affects the origin of compact stellar remnants, and it influences how we use supernovae as probes of stellar evolution across cosmic time.

  9. Effective photon mass by Super and Lorentz symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Luca; dos Santos Filho, Luís R.; Helayël-Neto, José A.; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of Standard Model Extensions (SMEs), we analyse four general classes of Super Symmetry (SuSy) and Lorentz Symmetry (LoSy) breaking, leading to observable imprints at our energy scales. The photon dispersion relations show a non-Maxwellian behaviour for the CPT (Charge-Parity-Time reversal symmetry) odd and even sectors. The group velocities exhibit also a directional dependence with respect to the breaking background vector (odd CPT) or tensor (even CPT). In the former sector, the group velocity may decay following an inverse squared frequency behaviour. Thus, we extract a massive Carroll-Field-Jackiw photon term in the Lagrangian and show that the effective mass is proportional to the breaking vector and moderately dependent on the direction of observation. The breaking vector absolute value is estimated by ground measurements and leads to a photon mass upper limit of 10-19 eV or 2 ×10-55 kg, and thereby to a potentially measurable delay at low radio frequencies.

  10. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    A model for approximate spatial reasoning using fuzzy logic to represent the uncertainty in the environment is presented. Algorithms are developed which can be used to reason about spatial information expressed in the form of approximate linguistic descriptions similar to the kind of spatial information processed by humans. Particular attention is given to static spatial reasoning.

  11. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    A model for approximate spatial reasoning using fuzzy logic to represent the uncertainty in the environment is presented. Algorithms are developed which can be used to reason about spatial information expressed in the form of approximate linguistic descriptions similar to the kind of spatial information processed by humans. Particular attention is given to static spatial reasoning.

  12. Exponential approximations in optimal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belegundu, A. D.; Rajan, S. D.; Rajgopal, J.

    1990-01-01

    One-point and two-point exponential functions have been developed and proved to be very effective approximations of structural response. The exponential has been compared to the linear, reciprocal and quadratic fit methods. Four test problems in structural analysis have been selected. The use of such approximations is attractive in structural optimization to reduce the numbers of exact analyses which involve computationally expensive finite element analysis.

  13. Green Ampt approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Parlange, J.-Y.; Li, L.; Jeng, D.-S.; Crapper, M.

    2005-10-01

    The solution to the Green and Ampt infiltration equation is expressible in terms of the Lambert W-1 function. Approximations for Green and Ampt infiltration are thus derivable from approximations for the W-1 function and vice versa. An infinite family of asymptotic expansions to W-1 is presented. Although these expansions do not converge near the branch point of the W function (corresponds to Green-Ampt infiltration with immediate ponding), a method is presented for approximating W-1 that is exact at the branch point and asymptotically, with interpolation between these limits. Some existing and several new simple and compact yet robust approximations applicable to Green-Ampt infiltration and flux are presented, the most accurate of which has a maximum relative error of 5 × 10 -5%. This error is orders of magnitude lower than any existing analytical approximations.

  14. Mass-dependent and non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone photolysis: Resolving theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Amanda S.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2006-11-14

    In addition to the anomalous {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O isotope effects in the three-body ozone formation reaction O+O{sub 2}+M, isotope effects in the destruction of ozone by photolysis may also play a role in determining the isotopic composition of ozone and other trace gases in the atmosphere. While previous experiments on ozone photolysis at 254 nm were interpreted as evidence for preferential loss of light ozone that is anomalous (or 'non-mass-dependent'), recent semiempirical theoretical calculations predicted a preferential loss of heavy ozone at that wavelength that is mass dependent. Through photochemical modeling results presented here, we resolve this apparent contradiction between experiment and theory. Specifically, we show that the formation of ozone during the UV photolysis experiments is not negligible, as had been assumed, and that the well-known non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone formation can account for the non-mass-dependent enrichment of the heavy isotopologs of ozone observed in the experiment. Thus, no unusual non-mass-dependent fractionation in ozone photolysis must be invoked to explain the experimental results. Furthermore, we show that theoretical predictions of a mass-dependent preferential loss of the heavy isotopologs of ozone during UV photolysis are not inconsistent with the experimental data, particularly if mass-dependent isotope effects in the chemical loss reactions of ozone during the photolysis experiments or experimental artifacts enrich the remaining ozone in {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O. Before the calculated fractionation factors can be quantitatively evaluated, however, further investigation of possible mass-dependent isotope effects in the reactions of ozone with O({sup 1}D), O({sup 3}P), O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}), and O{sub 2}({sup 1}{sigma}) is needed through experiments we suggest here.

  15. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response. The key to this new method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in msot cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacement are used to approximate bending stresses.

  16. Differential equation based method for accurate approximations in optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method to efficiently and accurately approximate the effect of design changes on structural response. The key to this new method is to interpret sensitivity equations as differential equations that may be solved explicitly for closed form approximations, hence, the method is denoted the Differential Equation Based (DEB) method. Approximations were developed for vibration frequencies, mode shapes and static displacements. The DEB approximation method was applied to a cantilever beam and results compared with the commonly-used linear Taylor series approximations and exact solutions. The test calculations involved perturbing the height, width, cross-sectional area, tip mass, and bending inertia of the beam. The DEB method proved to be very accurate, and in msot cases, was more accurate than the linear Taylor series approximation. The method is applicable to simultaneous perturbation of several design variables. Also, the approximations may be used to calculate other system response quantities. For example, the approximations for displacement are used to approximate bending stresses.

  17. Massive outflows driven by magnetic effects in star-forming clouds with high mass accretion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Yuko; Machida, Masahiro N.; Sakurai, Yuya; Hosokawa, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    The relation between the mass accretion rate on to the circumstellar disc and the rate of mass ejection by magnetically driven winds is investigated using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations. Using a spherical cloud core with a varying ratio of thermal to gravitational energy, which determines the mass accretion rate on to the disc, to define the initial conditions, the outflow propagation for approximately 104 yr after protostar formation is then calculated for several cloud cores. The mass ejection rate and accretion rate are comparable only when the magnetic energy of the initial cloud core is comparable to the gravitational energy. Consequently, in strongly magnetized clouds a higher mass accretion rate naturally produces both massive protostars and massive outflows. The simulated outflow mass, momentum, kinetic energy and momentum flux agree well with observations, indicating that massive stars form through the same mechanism as low-mass stars but require a significantly strong magnetic field to launch massive outflows.

  18. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  19. Approximate Confidence Intervals for Moment-Based Estimators of the Between-Study Variance in Random Effects Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Dan; Bowden, Jack; Baker, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Moment-based estimators of the between-study variance are very popular when performing random effects meta-analyses. This type of estimation has many advantages including computational and conceptual simplicity. Furthermore, by using these estimators in large samples, valid meta-analyses can be performed without the assumption that the treatment…

  20. Approximate Confidence Intervals for Moment-Based Estimators of the Between-Study Variance in Random Effects Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Dan; Bowden, Jack; Baker, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Moment-based estimators of the between-study variance are very popular when performing random effects meta-analyses. This type of estimation has many advantages including computational and conceptual simplicity. Furthermore, by using these estimators in large samples, valid meta-analyses can be performed without the assumption that the treatment…

  1. A Rough Approximation of the Relative Labor Effectiveness of the Book Acquisition and Cataloging Process at Three Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, H. C.

    To gain some insight into the effectiveness of the Glendale Public Library Processing Section, it was decided to compare, with some very crude measures, the performance in the acquisition and cataloging areas of that library with that of the neighboring libraries of Pasadena and Burbank. A management consultant on the Glendale City Manager's staff…

  2. The Effective Mass of a Ball in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messer, J.; Pantaleone, J.

    2010-01-01

    The air surrounding a projectile affects the projectile's motion in three very different ways: the drag force, the buoyant force, and the added mass. The added mass is an increase in the projectile's inertia from the motion of the air around it. Here we experimentally measure the added mass of a spherical projectile in air. The results agree well…

  3. The Effective Mass of a Ball in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messer, J.; Pantaleone, J.

    2010-01-01

    The air surrounding a projectile affects the projectile's motion in three very different ways: the drag force, the buoyant force, and the added mass. The added mass is an increase in the projectile's inertia from the motion of the air around it. Here we experimentally measure the added mass of a spherical projectile in air. The results agree well…

  4. Modeling multi-layer effects in passive microwave remote sensing of dry snow using Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory (DMRT) based on quasicrystalline approximation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liang, D.; Xu, X.; Tsang, L.; Andreadis, K.M.; Josberger, E.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Dense Media Radiative Transfer theory (DMRT) of Quasicrystalline Approximation of Mie scattering by sticky particles is used to study the multiple scattering effects in layered snow in microwave remote sensing. Results are illustrated for various snow profile characteristics. Polarization differences and frequency dependences of multilayer snow model are significantly different from that of the single-layer snow model. Comparisons are also made with CLPX data using snow parameters as given by the VIC model. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  5. Effectiveness of a mass hepatitis A vaccination program in preadolescents.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Angela; Salleras, Lluís; Carmona, Glòria; Batalla, Juan

    2003-01-30

    A program of mass hepatitis A+B vaccination in preadolescents in schools was begun in the Catalonia in the last quarter of 1998. This study investigated the impact of the program by comparing the incidence of hepatitis A in vaccinated and unvaccinated cohort. The greatest reduction of the incidence rate of hepatitis A was observed in the 10-14 years age group, from 10.3 per 100000 persons-year in the period 1996-1998 to 1.8 per 100000 persons-year in the period 1999-2001. The global incidence decreased from 6.2 to 2.6 per 100000 persons-year. After analysis of cases occurring in the vaccinated and non vaccinated cohort, the effectiveness of the vaccination program was estimated at 97.0% (95% CI: 78.6-99.6).

  6. Mass transfer effects on the transmission of bubble screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, Daniel; Bergamasco, Luca

    2016-11-01

    In this work we investigate, theoretically and numerically, the reflection and transmission properties of bubble screens excited by pressure wave pulses. We use modified expressions for the bubble resonance frequency and the damping factor in order to capture the influence of mass transfer on the reflection-transmission coefficients. In addition to the influence of variables such as the bubble radius and the averaged inter-bubble distance, the analysis reveals that in conditions close to the saturation line there exists a regime where the heat transport surrounding the bubble plays an important role on the bubble's response also influencing the reflection properties of the bubble screen. The linear analysis allows us to predict the critical vapor content beyond which liquid heat's transport controls the dynamic response of the bubbles. Numerical simulations show that these effects become especially relevant in the nonlinear regime. ANR Cachmap.

  7. Strong washout approximation to resonant leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Garbrecht, Björn; Gautier, Florian; Klaric, Juraj E-mail: florian.gautier@tum.de

    2014-09-01

    We show that the effective decay asymmetry for resonant Leptogenesis in the strong washout regime with two sterile neutrinos and a single active flavour can in wide regions of parameter space be approximated by its late-time limit ε=Xsin(2φ)/(X{sup 2}+sin{sup 2}φ), where X=8πΔ/(|Y{sub 1}|{sup 2}+|Y{sub 2}|{sup 2}), Δ=4(M{sub 1}-M{sub 2})/(M{sub 1}+M{sub 2}), φ=arg(Y{sub 2}/Y{sub 1}), and M{sub 1,2}, Y{sub 1,2} are the masses and Yukawa couplings of the sterile neutrinos. This approximation in particular extends to parametric regions where |Y{sub 1,2}|{sup 2}>> Δ, i.e. where the width dominates the mass splitting. We generalise the formula for the effective decay asymmetry to the case of several flavours of active leptons and demonstrate how this quantity can be used to calculate the lepton asymmetry for phenomenological scenarios that are in agreement with the observed neutrino oscillations. We establish analytic criteria for the validity of the late-time approximation for the decay asymmetry and compare these with numerical results that are obtained by solving for the mixing and the oscillations of the sterile neutrinos. For phenomenologically viable models with two sterile neutrinos, we find that the flavoured effective late-time decay asymmetry can be applied throughout parameter space.

  8. NIMROD: a program for inference via a normal approximation of the posterior in models with random effects based on ordinary differential equations.

    PubMed

    Prague, Mélanie; Commenges, Daniel; Guedj, Jérémie; Drylewicz, Julia; Thiébaut, Rodolphe

    2013-08-01

    Models based on ordinary differential equations (ODE) are widespread tools for describing dynamical systems. In biomedical sciences, data from each subject can be sparse making difficult to precisely estimate individual parameters by standard non-linear regression but information can often be gained from between-subjects variability. This makes natural the use of mixed-effects models to estimate population parameters. Although the maximum likelihood approach is a valuable option, identifiability issues favour Bayesian approaches which can incorporate prior knowledge in a flexible way. However, the combination of difficulties coming from the ODE system and from the presence of random effects raises a major numerical challenge. Computations can be simplified by making a normal approximation of the posterior to find the maximum of the posterior distribution (MAP). Here we present the NIMROD program (normal approximation inference in models with random effects based on ordinary differential equations) devoted to the MAP estimation in ODE models. We describe the specific implemented features such as convergence criteria and an approximation of the leave-one-out cross-validation to assess the model quality of fit. In pharmacokinetics models, first, we evaluate the properties of this algorithm and compare it with FOCE and MCMC algorithms in simulations. Then, we illustrate NIMROD use on Amprenavir pharmacokinetics data from the PUZZLE clinical trial in HIV infected patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic effective mass of granular media and the attenuation of structure-borne sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, John; Hsu, Chaur-Jian; Ingale, Rohit; Gland, Nicolas; Makse, Hernán A.; Johnson, David Linton

    2009-11-01

    We report a theoretical and experimental investigation into the fundamental physics of why loose granular media are effective deadeners of structure-borne sound. Here, we demonstrate that a measurement of the effective mass, M˜(ω) , of the granular medium is a sensitive and direct way to answer the question: what is the specific mechanism whereby acoustic energy is transformed into heat? Specifically, we apply this understanding to the case of the flexural resonances of a rectangular bar with a grain-filled cavity within it. The pore space in the granular medium is air of varying humidity. The dominant features of M˜(ω) are a sharp resonance and a broad background, which we analyze within the context of simple models. We find that: (a) on a fundamental level, dampening of acoustic modes is dominated by adsorbed films of water at grain-grain contacts, not by global viscous dampening or by attenuation within the grains. (b) These systems may be understood, qualitatively, in terms of a height-dependent and diameter-dependent effective sound speed [˜100-300(mṡs-1)] and an effective viscosity [˜5×104Poise] . (c) There is an acoustic Janssen effect in the sense that, at any frequency, and depending on the method of sample preparation, approximately one-half of the effective mass is borne by the side walls of the cavity and one-half by the bottom. (d) There is a monotonically increasing effect of humidity on the dampening of the fundamental resonance within the granular medium which translates to a nonmonotonic, but predictable, variation in dampening within the grain-loaded bar.

  10. Hybrid Approximate Message Passing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangan, Sundeep; Fletcher, Alyson K.; Goyal, Vivek K.; Byrne, Evan; Schniter, Philip

    2017-09-01

    The standard linear regression (SLR) problem is to recover a vector $\\mathbf{x}^0$ from noisy linear observations $\\mathbf{y}=\\mathbf{Ax}^0+\\mathbf{w}$. The approximate message passing (AMP) algorithm recently proposed by Donoho, Maleki, and Montanari is a computationally efficient iterative approach to SLR that has a remarkable property: for large i.i.d.\\ sub-Gaussian matrices $\\mathbf{A}$, its per-iteration behavior is rigorously characterized by a scalar state-evolution whose fixed points, when unique, are Bayes optimal. AMP, however, is fragile in that even small deviations from the i.i.d.\\ sub-Gaussian model can cause the algorithm to diverge. This paper considers a "vector AMP" (VAMP) algorithm and shows that VAMP has a rigorous scalar state-evolution that holds under a much broader class of large random matrices $\\mathbf{A}$: those that are right-rotationally invariant. After performing an initial singular value decomposition (SVD) of $\\mathbf{A}$, the per-iteration complexity of VAMP can be made similar to that of AMP. In addition, the fixed points of VAMP's state evolution are consistent with the replica prediction of the minimum mean-squared error recently derived by Tulino, Caire, Verd\\'u, and Shamai. The effectiveness and state evolution predictions of VAMP are confirmed in numerical experiments.

  11. Mass transfer effects on the unsteady mhd radiative- convective flow of a micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate with variable heat and mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. Gnaneswara

    2013-03-01

    The problem of unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow of a viscous incompressible micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate in the presence of a transverse magnetic field and thermal radiation with variable heat and mass fluxes is considered. The free stream velocity is subjected to exponentially increasing or decreasing small perturbations. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to a porous surface where a micropolar fluid is absorbed with a suction velocity varying with time. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe radiative heat transfer in the limit of optically thick fluids. The effects of the flow parameters and thermophysical properties on the velocity and temperature fields across the boundary layer are investigated. The effects of various parameters on the velocity, microrotation velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are given graphically, and the values of the skin friction and couple stress coefficients are presented.

  12. Elucidating Potential Energy Surfaces for Singlet O2 Reactions with Protonated, Deprotonated, and Di-Deprotonated Cystine Using a Combination of Approximately Spin-Projected Density Functional Theory and Guided-Ion-Beam Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenchao; Tsai, I-Hsien Midas; Sun, Yan; Zhou, Wenjing; Liu, Jianbo

    2017-08-24

    The reactivity of cystine toward electronically excited singlet O2 (a(1)Δg) has been long debated, despite the fact that most organic disulfides are susceptible to oxidation by singlet O2. We report a combined experimental and computational study on reactions of singlet O2 with gas-phase cystine at different ionization and hydration states, aimed to determine reaction outcomes, mechanisms, and potential energy surfaces (PESs). Ion-molecule collisions of protonated and di-deprotonated cystine ions with singlet O2, in both the absence and the presence of a water ligand, were measured over a center-of-mass collision energy (Ecol) range from 0.1 to 1.0 eV, using a guided-ion-beam scattering tandem mass spectrometer. No oxidation was observed for these reactant ions except collision-induced dissociation at high energies. Guided by density functional theory (DFT)-calculated PESs, reaction coordinates were established to unravel the origin of the nonreactivity of cystine ions toward singlet O2. To account for mixed open- and closed-shell characters, singlet O2 and critical structures along reaction coordinates were evaluated using broken-symmetry, open-shell DFT with spin contamination errors removed by an approximate spin-projection method. It was found that collision of protonated cystine with singlet O2 follows a repulsive potential surface and possesses no chemically significant interaction and that collision-induced dissociation of protonated cystine is dominated by loss of water and CO. Collision of di-deprotonated cystine with singlet O2, on the other hand, forms a short-lived electrostatically bonded precursor complex at low Ecol. The latter may evolve to a covalently bonded persulfoxide, but the conversion is blocked by an activation barrier lying 0.39 eV above reactants. At high Ecol, C-S bond cleavage dominates the collision-induced dissociation of di-deprotonated cystine, leading to charge-separated fragmentation. Cross section for the ensuing fragment ion H2

  13. Tunneling effects in electromagnetic wave scattering by nonspherical particles: A comparison of the Debye series and physical-geometric optics approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping

    2016-07-01

    The accuracy of the physical-geometric optics (PG-O) approximation is examined for the simulation of electromagnetic scattering by nonspherical dielectric particles. This study seeks a better understanding of the tunneling effect on the phase matrix by employing the invariant imbedding method to rigorously compute the zeroth-order Debye series, from which the tunneling efficiency and the phase matrix corresponding to the diffraction and external reflection are obtained. The tunneling efficiency is shown to be a factor quantifying the relative importance of the tunneling effect over the Fraunhofer diffraction near the forward scattering direction. Due to the tunneling effect, different geometries with the same projected cross section might have different diffraction patterns, which are traditionally assumed to be identical according to the Babinet principle. For particles with a fixed orientation, the PG-O approximation yields the external reflection pattern with reasonable accuracy, but ordinarily fails to predict the locations of peaks and minima in the diffraction pattern. The larger the tunneling efficiency, the worse the PG-O accuracy is at scattering angles less than 90°. If the particles are assumed to be randomly oriented, the PG-O approximation yields the phase matrix close to the rigorous counterpart, primarily due to error cancellations in the orientation-average process. Furthermore, the PG-O approximation based on an electric field volume-integral equation is shown to usually be much more accurate than the Kirchhoff surface integral equation at side-scattering angles, particularly when the modulus of the complex refractive index is close to unity. Finally, tunneling efficiencies are tabulated for representative faceted particles.

  14. Effect of a 3-year professional flossing program with chlorhexidine gel on approximal caries and cost of treatment in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Gisselsson, H; Birkhed, D; Björn, A L

    1994-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of chlorhexidine gel treatment on the incidence of approximal caries in preschool children. One hundred and seventeen 4-year-olds, divided into two groups, participated: (1) chlorhexidine gel group (n = 59), and (2) placebo gel group (n = 58). Group 1 was treated 4 times a year with a 1% chlorhexdine gel and group 2 with a placebo gel. Approximately 0.7 ml of gel was applied interdentally by means of a flat dental floss. A control group (group 3), which did not receive any flossing or gel treatment, was also included in the study (n = 116). After 3 years, i.e. when the children were 7 years old, the mean incidence of caries on approximal surfaces (defs), including both enamel and dentin lesions, was 2.59 in the chlorhexidine gel, 4.53 in the placebo gel and 4.20 in the control group (group 1 vs. 2 and group 1 vs. 3: p < 0.01). Mean number of approximal fillings at the end of the study, i.e. when the children were 7 years old, was 0.33 in the chlorhexidine gel, 1.04 in the placebo gel and 0.80 in the control group (group 1 vs. 2: p < 0.01; group 1 vs. 3: p < 0.05). The progression of approximal caries lesions, diagnosed on bitewing radiographs from the age of 5 to 7, was slower in the chlorhexidine than in the placebo gel group (the control group was not evaluated in this respect). A cost analysis, based on the total treatment time in minutes, showed a small gain for the flossing program.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Rytov approximation in electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehl, Jonas; Lubk, Axel

    2017-06-01

    In this work we introduce the Rytov approximation in the scope of high-energy electron scattering with the motivation of developing better linear models for electron scattering. Such linear models play an important role in tomography and similar reconstruction techniques. Conventional linear models, such as the phase grating approximation, have reached their limits in current and foreseeable applications, most importantly in achieving three-dimensional atomic resolution using electron holographic tomography. The Rytov approximation incorporates propagation effects which are the most pressing limitation of conventional models. While predominately used in the weak-scattering regime of light microscopy, we show that the Rytov approximation can give reasonable results in the inherently strong-scattering regime of transmission electron microscopy.

  16. Simulating the ballistic effects of ion irradiation in the binary collision approximation: A first step toward the ion mixing framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demange, G.; Antoshchenkova, E.; Hayoun, M.; Lunéville, L.; Simeone, D.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding ballistic effects induced by ion beam irradiation can be a key point for controlling and predicting the microstructure of irradiated materials. Meanwhile, the ion mixing framework suggests an average description of displacement cascades may be sufficient to estimate the influence of ballistic relocations on the microstructure. In this work, the BCA code MARLOWE was chosen for its ability to account for the crystal structure of irradiated materials. A first set of simulations was performed on pure copper for energies ranging from 0.5 keV to 20 keV. These simulations were validated using molecular dynamics (MD). A second set of simulations on AgCu irradiated by 1 MeV krypton ions was then carried out using MARLOWE only, as such energy is beyond reach for molecular dynamics. MARLOWE simulations are found to be in good agreement with experimental results, which suggests the predictive potential of the method.

  17. The effects of damping on the approximate teleportation and nonclassical properties in the atom-field interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshmand, R.; Tavassoly, M. K.

    2016-04-01

    Based on the Jaynes-Cummings interaction model of a Ξ-type three-level atom with a single-mode quantized field, the effect of damping on teleportation is studied. To achieve this purpose, we have taken into account the decay rates of the two upper atomic levels. The influences of such atomic damping on the teleportation of atomic as well as field states are evaluated. It is shown that, by increasing the damping parameter the fidelity and success probability is decreased. Finally, beside our main motivation of the paper, we end it with some marginal, however, of interest purposes like the analyzing the dynamics of a few interesting physical properties such as entanglement, Mandel parameter and quadrature squeezing in the presence of damping.

  18. A self-consistent, microenvironment modulated screened coulomb potential approximation to calculate pH-dependent electrostatic effects in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Mehler, E L; Guarnieri, F

    1999-01-01

    An improved approach is presented for calculating pH-dependent electrostatic effects in proteins using sigmoidally screened Coulomb potentials (SCP). It is hypothesized that a key determinant of seemingly aberrant behavior in pKa shifts is due to the properties of the unique microenvironment around each residue. To help demonstrate this proposal, an approach is developed to characterize the microenvironments using the local hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity around each residue of the protein. The quantitative characterization of the microenvironments shows that the protein is a complex mosaic of differing dielectric regions that provides a physical basis for modifying the dielectric screening functions: in more hydrophobic microenvironments the screening decreases whereas the converse applies to more hydrophilic regions. The approach was applied to seven proteins providing more than 100 measured pKa values and yielded a root mean square deviation of 0.5 between calculated and experimental values. The incorporation of the local hydrophobicity characteristics into the algorithm allowed the resolution of some of the more intractable problems in the calculation of pKa. Thus, the divergent shifts of the pKa of Glu-35 and Asp-66 in hen egg white lysozyme, which are both about 90% buried, was correctly predicted. Mechanistically, the divergence occurs because Glu-35 is in a hydrophobic microenvironment, while Asp-66 is in a hydrophilic microenvironment. Furthermore, because the calculation of the microenvironmental effects takes very little CPU time, the computational speed of the SCP formulation is conserved. Finally, results from different crystal structures of a given protein were compared, and it is shown that the reliability of the calculated pKa values is sufficient to allow identification of conformations that may be more relevant for the solution structure. PMID:10388736

  19. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because “each-atom-counts” toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted that may be compared with the results of high-level theoretical calculations. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well

  20. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Grant E; Laskin, Julia

    2016-06-21

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because "each-atom-counts" toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well-defined surfaces may be explored using ion soft landing (SL) in a custom

  1. Intrinsic Nilpotent Approximation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    RD-A1II58 265 INTRINSIC NILPOTENT APPROXIMATION(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST 1/2 OF TECH CAMBRIDGE LAB FOR INFORMATION AND, DECISION UMCLRSSI SYSTEMS C...TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Intrinsic Nilpotent Approximation Technical Report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER LIDS-R-1482 7. AUTHOR(.) S...certain infinite-dimensional filtered Lie algebras L by (finite-dimensional) graded nilpotent Lie algebras or g . where x E M, (x,,Z) E T*M/O. It

  2. Anomalous diffraction approximation limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videen, Gorden; Chýlek, Petr

    It has been reported in a recent article [Liu, C., Jonas, P.R., Saunders, C.P.R., 1996. Accuracy of the anomalous diffraction approximation to light scattering by column-like ice crystals. Atmos. Res., 41, pp. 63-69] that the anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) accuracy does not depend on particle refractive index, but instead is dependent on the particle size parameter. Since this is at odds with previous research, we thought these results warranted further discussion.

  3. Negative muon chemistry: the quantum muon effect and the finite nuclear mass effect.

    PubMed

    Posada, Edwin; Moncada, Félix; Reyes, Andrés

    2014-10-09

    The any-particle molecular orbital method at the full configuration interaction level has been employed to study atoms in which one electron has been replaced by a negative muon. In this approach electrons and muons are described as quantum waves. A scheme has been proposed to discriminate nuclear mass and quantum muon effects on chemical properties of muonic and regular atoms. This study reveals that the differences in the ionization potentials of isoelectronic muonic atoms and regular atoms are of the order of millielectronvolts. For the valence ionizations of muonic helium and muonic lithium the nuclear mass effects are more important. On the other hand, for 1s ionizations of muonic atoms heavier than beryllium, the quantum muon effects are more important. In addition, this study presents an assessment of the nuclear mass and quantum muon effects on the barrier of Heμ + H2 reaction.

  4. Correlation effects of π electrons on the band structures of conjugated polymers using the self-consistent GW approximation with vertex corrections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2012-01-14

    Many-body perturbation theory is used to investigate the effect of π-electron correlations on the quasi-particle band structures of conjugated polymers at the level of the Pariser-Parr-Pople model. The self-consistent GW approximation with vertex corrections to both the self-energy and the polarization in Hedin's equations is employed in order to eliminate self-interaction errors and include the effects of electron-hole attraction in screening processes. The dynamic inverse dielectric function is constructed from the generalized plasmon-pole approximation with the static dressed polarization given by the coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock equation. The bandgaps of trans-polyacetylene, trans-polyphenylenevinylene and poly(para)phenylene are calculated by both the Hartree-Fock and GW approximation, and a lowering of bandgaps due to electron correlations is found. We conclude that both dielectric screening and vertex corrections are important for calculating the quasi-particle bandgaps of conjugated polymers.

  5. THE EFFECT OF RADIATION PRESSURE ON EMISSION-LINE PROFILES AND BLACK HOLE MASS DETERMINATION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Netzer, Hagai; Marziani, Paola

    2010-11-20

    We present a new analysis of the motion of pressure-confined, broad-line region (BLR) clouds in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taking into account the combined influence of gravity and radiation pressure. We calculate cloud orbits under a large range of conditions and include the effect of column density variation as a function of location. The dependence of radiation pressure force on the level of ionization and the column density are accurately computed. The main results are as follows. (1) The mean cloud locations (r{sub BLR}) and line widths (FWHMs) are combined in such a way that the simple virial mass estimate, r{sub BLR}, FWHM{sup 2}/G, gives a reasonable approximation to M{sub BH} even when radiation pressure force is important. The reason is that L/M rather than L is the main parameter affecting the planar cloud motion. (2) Reproducing the mean observed r{sub BLR}, FWHM, and line intensity of H{beta} and C IV {lambda}1549 requires at least two different populations of clouds. (3) The cloud location is a function of both L {sup 1/2} and L/M. Given this, we suggest a new approximation for r{sub BLR} which, when inserted into the BH mass equation, results in a new approximation for M{sub BH}. The new expression involves L {sup 1/2}, FWHM, and two constants that are obtained from a comparison with available M-{sigma}* mass estimates. It deviates only slightly from the old mass estimate at all luminosities. (4) The quality of the present black hole mass estimators depends, critically, on the way the present M-{sigma}* AGN sample (29 objects) represents the overall population, in particular the distribution of L/L{sub Edd}.

  6. The mass media alone are not effective change agents.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, J M

    1991-01-01

    Social mobilization programs for immunization have been used by African leaders, however, coverage from 20% to 70% in capitals like Mogadishu, Maputo, and Dakar were the result of short campaigns rather than the consequence of knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) improvement. One-party states relied on their network of cadres issuing decrees from the top down to enforce completion of these immunization campaigns. Sometimes resistance developed against these programs, as the military mobilized people (e.g., Somalia). These efforts became rather superficial once the temporary pressure evaporated. In Mogadishu coverage increased from 22% to 70% in 1985, and within a year it dropped back to 8% above the original level. Nigeria, Senegal, and Togo where they used regular mini campaigns had better results. Research data from Botswana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, and Zambia were analyzed. In 1983 in Kenya 73% of health workers never advised their clients, and 82% were incompetent to do so. Data also showed that clinics provided the bulk of information to women aged 15-45 in lower income groups, but they rarely consulted village health workers. Radio and TV programs were not reaching people because radio ownership was not universal (47% in Zambia and 30% in Zimbabwe), and batteries were often not available. In addition, most people turned to the radio for entertainment. In 1989, vaccination coverage was 19% in Luanda, Angola, but only 5% of 232 respondents to an evaluation could name the immunizable diseases. An identical percentage was familiar with these diseases in a Zambian study in 1986. Media experts proposed dramas to raise interest, but innovative mass media programs of dissemination of the message advocated in the 1960s did not prove effective to bring about KAP changes. Training of health and paramedical personnel by mass organizations as initiated in Ethiopia may prove to be worthwhile.

  7. Approximate spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Soumitra

    1988-01-01

    Much of human reasoning is approximate in nature. Formal models of reasoning traditionally try to be precise and reject the fuzziness of concepts in natural use and replace them with non-fuzzy scientific explicata by a process of precisiation. As an alternate to this approach, it has been suggested that rather than regard human reasoning processes as themselves approximating to some more refined and exact logical process that can be carried out with mathematical precision, the essence and power of human reasoning is in its capability to grasp and use inexact concepts directly. This view is supported by the widespread fuzziness of simple everyday terms (e.g., near tall) and the complexity of ordinary tasks (e.g., cleaning a room). Spatial reasoning is an area where humans consistently reason approximately with demonstrably good results. Consider the case of crossing a traffic intersection. We have only an approximate idea of the locations and speeds of various obstacles (e.g., persons and vehicles), but we nevertheless manage to cross such traffic intersections without any harm. The details of our mental processes which enable us to carry out such intricate tasks in such apparently simple manner are not well understood. However, it is that we try to incorporate such approximate reasoning techniques in our computer systems. Approximate spatial reasoning is very important for intelligent mobile agents (e.g., robots), specially for those operating in uncertain or unknown or dynamic domains.

  8. Effect of the Pauli principle on the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculations and its consequence for β -decay calculations of deformed even-even nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Dong-Liang

    2016-03-01

    In this work, I take into consideration the Pauli exclusion principle (PEP) in the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) calculations for the deformed systems by replacing the traditional quasiboson approximation (QBA) with the renormalized one. With this new formalism, the parametrization of QRPA calculations has been changed and the collapse of QRPA solutions could be avoid for realistic gp p values. I further find that the necessity of the renormalization parameter of particle-particle residual interaction gp p in QRPA calculations is due to the exclusion of PEP. So with the inclusion of PEP, I could easily extend the deformed QRPA calculations to the less-explored region where lack of experimental data prevent effective parametrization of gp p for QRPA methods. With this theoretical improvement, I give predictions of weak decay rates for even-even isotopes in the rare-earth region and compare the results with existing calculations.

  9. Vibrational quenching of excitonic splittings in H-bonded molecular dimers: adiabatic description and effective mode approximation.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Sabine; Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel; Köppel, Horst

    2012-11-14

    The quenching of the excitonic splitting in hydrogen-bonded molecular dimers has been explained recently in terms of exciton coupling theory, involving Förster's degenerate perturbation theoretical approach [P. Ottiger, S. Leutwyler, and H. Köppel, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 174308 (2012)]. Here we provide an alternative explanation based on the properties of the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. In the proper limit, the lower of these surfaces exhibits a double-minimum shape, with an asymmetric distortion that destroys the geometric equivalence of the excitonically coupled monomers. An effective mode is introduced that exactly reproduces the energy gain and amount of distortion that occurs in a multi-dimensional normal coordinate space. This allows to describe the quenched exciton splitting as the energy difference of the two (S(1) and S(2)) vibronic band origins in a one-dimensional (rather than multi-dimensional) vibronic calculation. The agreement with the earlier result (based on Förster theory) is excellent for all five relevant cases studied. A simple rationale for the quenched exciton splitting as nonadiabatic tunneling splitting on the lower double-minimum potential energy surface is given.

  10. Testing the frozen flow approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Melott, Adrian L.; Moscardini, Lauro

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the frozen-flow approximation (FFA), recently proposed by Matarrese, et al. (1992), for following the nonlinear evolution of cosmological density fluctuations under gravitational instability. We compare a number of statistics between results of the FFA and n-body simulations, including those used by Melott, Pellman & Shandarin (1993) to test the Zel'dovich approximation. The FFA performs reasonably well in a statistical sense, e.g. in reproducing the counts-in-cell distribution, at small scales, but it does poorly in the crosscorrelation with n-body which means it is generally not moving mass to the right place, especially in models with high small-scale power.

  11. Changes in Kicking Pattern: Effect of Experience, Speed, Accuracy, and Effective Striking Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to: (a) examine the effect of experience and goal constraints (speed, accuracy) on kicking patterns; (b) determine if effective striking mass was independent of ankle velocity at impact; and (c) determine the accuracy of kicks relative to independent factors. Method: Twenty participants were recruited to…

  12. Changes in Kicking Pattern: Effect of Experience, Speed, Accuracy, and Effective Striking Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to: (a) examine the effect of experience and goal constraints (speed, accuracy) on kicking patterns; (b) determine if effective striking mass was independent of ankle velocity at impact; and (c) determine the accuracy of kicks relative to independent factors. Method: Twenty participants were recruited to…

  13. The effects of analyte mass and collision gases on ion beam formation in an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jessica J.; Edmund, Alisa J.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-11-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to evaluate the effect of matrix components on the formation and focusing of a Ba ion beam in a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Cross sections of the ion beams were taken in the second vacuum stage, in front of the entrance to the mass analyzer. Under normal operating conditions, the addition of Pb shifted the position of the Ba ion beam to the right. PLIF was also used to evaluate the effect of a collision reaction interface (CRI) on Ca and Ba ion beams. A wider velocity distribution of ions and a decrease in overall intensity were observed for the CRI images. The fluorescence and mass spectrometer signals decreased with increased CRI flow rates. These effects were most obvious for Ca ions with He gas.

  14. Diffusion approximation with polarization and resonance effects for the modelling of seismic waves in strongly scattering small-scale media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margerin, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the multiple scattering of seismic waves by a collection of randomly distributed point scatterers. The theory assumes that the energy envelopes are smooth, but does not require perturbations to be small, thereby allowing the modelling of strong, resonant scattering. The correlation tensor of seismic coda waves recorded at a three-component sensor is decomposed into a sum of eigenmodes of the elastodynamic multiple scattering (Bethe-Salpeter) equation. For a general moment tensor excitation, a total number of four modes is necessary to describe the transport of seismic waves polarization. Their spatio-temporal dependence is given in closed analytical form. Two additional modes transporting exclusively shear polarizations may be excited by antisymmetric moment tensor sources only. The general solution converges towards an equipartition mixture of diffusing P and S waves which allows the retrieval of the local Green's function from coda waves. The equipartition time is obtained analytically and the impact of absorption on Green's function reconstruction is discussed. The process of depolarization of multiply scattered waves and the resulting loss of information is illustrated for various seismic sources. It is shown that coda waves may be used to characterize the source mechanism up to lapse times of the order of a few mean free times only. In the case of resonant scatterers, a formula for the diffusivity of seismic waves incorporating the effect of energy entrapment inside the scatterers is obtained. Application of the theory to high-contrast media demonstrates that coda waves are more sensitive to slow rather than fast velocity anomalies by several orders of magnitude. Resonant scattering appears as an attractive physical phenomenon to explain the small values of the diffusion constant of seismic waves reported in volcanic areas.

  15. Schottky effect in the i -Zn-Ag-Sc-Tm icosahedral quasicrystal and its 1/1 Zn-Sc-Tm approximant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazbec, S.; Kashimoto, S.; Koželj, P.; Vrtnik, S.; Jagodič, M.; Jagličić, Z.; Dolinšek, J.

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of low-temperature specific heat of rare-earth (RE)-containing quasicrystals and periodic approximants and consequent interpretation of their electronic properties in the T →0 limit is frequently hampered by the Schottky effect, where crystalline electric fields lift the degeneracy of the RE-ion Hund's rule ground state and introduce additional contribution to the specific heat. In this paper we study the low-temperature specific heat of a thulium-containing i -Zn-Ag-Sc-Tm icosahedral quasicrystal and its 1/1 Zn-Sc-Tm approximant, both being classified as "Schottky" systems. We have derived the crystal-field Hamiltonian for pentagonal symmetry of the crystalline electric field, pertinent to the class of Tsai-type icosahedral quasicrystals and their approximants, where the RE ions are located on fivefold axes of the icosahedral atomic cluster. Using the leading term of this Hamiltonian, we have calculated analytically the Schottky specific heat in the presence of an external magnetic field and made comparison to the experimental specific heat of the investigated quasicrystal and approximant. When the low-temperature specific heat C is analyzed in a C /T versus T2 scale (as it is customarily done for metallic specimens), the Schottky specific heat yields an upturn in the T →0 limit that cannot be easily distinguished from a similar upturn produced by the electron-electron interactions in exchange-enhanced systems and strongly correlated systems. Our results show that extraction of the electronic properties of RE-containing quasicrystals from their low-temperature specific heat may be uncertain in the presence of the Schottky effect.

  16. Effects of mass on aircraft sidearm controller characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    When designing a flight simulator, providing a set of low mass variable-characteristic pilot controls can be very difficult. Thus, a strong incentive exists to identify the highest possible mass that will not degrade the validity of a simulation. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has conducted a brief flight program to determine the maximum acceptable mass (system inertia) of an aircraft sidearm controller as a function of force gradient. This information is useful for control system design in aircraft as well as development of suitable flight simulator controls. A modified Learjet with a variable-characteristic sidearm controller was used to obtain data. A boundary was defined between mass considered acceptable and mass considered unacceptable to the pilot. This boundary is defined as a function of force gradient over a range of natural frequencies. This investigation is limited to a study of mass-frequency characteristics only. Results of this investigation are presented in this paper.

  17. Effects from fast dynamics: the crux for assessing Greenland's centennial mass loss ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, J. J.; Goelzer, H.; Huybrechts, P.

    2011-12-01

    Observations have revealed quick and asynchronous fluctuations in outlet glacier discharge around the marine margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). It has been estimated that the net effect of these fluctuations may have contributed up to half of the increased mass loss of the GrIS during the last decade. If such marginal accelerations are to have an appreciable effect on total mass loss on a century time scale, a fast mechanism to transmit such perturbations inland is required. Almost instantaneous stress transmission of marginal perturbations is effectuated by gradients in longitudinal stresses and facilitated by high basal sliding. Implications of these mechanisms on the transient response of the GrIS however remain controversial because of potentially strong feedbacks from basal sliding and surface mass balance. Here we use a three-dimensional, thermo-mechanically coupled model on the GrIS to assess the effects of marginal perturbations on volume changes on centennial time scales. The model is designed to allow for two different icedynamic cores using different approximations to the force balance. The reference model is based on the shallow ice approximation (SIA) for both ice deformation and basal sliding. The second model version relies on a higherorder (HO) Blatter/Pattyn type of core that includes longitudinal stress gradients and lateral drag throughout the entire ice column. While inland signal transmission in the SIA is restricted by diffusive changes in the driving stress, the HO model allows an immediate, horizontal coupling via longitudinal stresses. Idealised experiments were conducted to compare the time-dependent response of the two model versions forced by imposed accelerations at the marine calving front. Allowing for longitudinal stress transmission, we observe an instantaneous speedup of upstream ice some distance inland. However the total ice volume loss after hundred years differs only slightly from the SIA model as most of the response is

  18. The Effects of Mass Transfer and Angle of Attack on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    temperature was measured with a singly shielded thermocouple (tip height approximately 0.050"). This probe was calibrated in the free stream for several...thickness, (P u 9/ ) e e e r - radius measured from axis of symmetry; recovery factor s - wetted length along surface of body St - Stanton number, w /(Pu) e...experiment considered mass addition rates which cover the ablation gas range for current heat shield materials (simulated ablation via gaseous mass

  19. An approximate analytical methodology for the concentration CDF and corresponding adverse health effects in 3D heterogeneous aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarlenga, Antonio; de Barros, Felipe; Fiori, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    series of problems of practical relevance. The basic scenario is constituted by a steady state plume in a 3D heterogeneous formation. In this case the non-reactive transport is ruled by interplay of the spreading (lateral and vertical) and dilution. The second scenario considers two different dynamics of degradation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions which allows the contaminant abatement. The final example links the environmental concentration with adverse health effects. For this case, additional information on toxicological and behavioral parameters are required. Despite the simplifying assumptions adopted, the proposed solutions are appealing in applications due to their simplicity and the fact that they allow to easily propagate the uncertainty from different sources in the final risk endpoint. de Barros, F.P., Fiori, A., 2014. First-order based cumulative distribution function for solute concentration in heterogeneous aquifers: theoretical analysis and implications for human health risk assessment. Water Resour. Res. 50, 4018-4037. Zarlenga, A., Fiori, A., 2013. Steady plumes in heterogeneous porous formations: a stochastic lagrangian approach. Water Resour. Res. 49, 864-873. Zarlenga, A., Fiori, A., 2014. Stochastic analytical modeling of the biodegradation of steady plumes. J. Contam. Hydrol. 157, 106-116.

  20. Binding Energies, Effective Masses and Screenings Effects of Fröhlich Bipolarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataudella, V.; Iadonisi, G.; Ninno, D.

    1991-01-01

    The bipolaron ground state binding energy and the effective masses are calculated self-consistently in a scheme where the electron-phonon interaction is described by the Fröhlich interaction. We explicitly use the total linear momentum conservation and both two-and three-dimensional systems are considered. We review results for binding energies and show that the bipolaron effective mass increases with the electron-phonon coupling constant α more rapidly than two free polaron masses. As expected, the increase is greater in two than in three dimensions. We estimate the screening effects due to an electronic or hole density n in a range of values such that nR2b ll 1 (here Rb is the bipolaron radius). We find that the bipolaron binding energy decreases with n and eventually becomes positive indicating the existence of a metastable bipolaron state. Finally we discuss the possible connections between our results and high Tc superconductivity.

  1. Effective mass of a charged carrier in a nonpolar liquid: Snowball effect in superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Chikina, I.; Varlamov, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    The problem of a correct definition of the charged carrier effective mass in superfluid helium is revised. It is shown that the effective mass of such a quasiparticle can be introduced without Atkins's idea about the solidification of liquid He{sup 4} in the close vicinity of an ion (the so-called ''snowball'' model). Moreover, in addition to the generalization of Atkins's model, the charged carrier effective mass formation is considered within the framework of the two-fluid scenario. The physical reasons of the normal-fluid contribution divergency and the way of the corresponding regularization procedure are discussed. Agreement between the theory and the available experimental data is found in a wide range of temperatures.

  2. Effective mass of a charged carrier in a nonpolar liquid: Snowball effect in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikina, I.; Shikin, V.; Varlamov, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    The problem of a correct definition of the charged carrier effective mass in superfluid helium is revised. It is shown that the effective mass of such a quasiparticle can be introduced without Atkins’s idea about the solidification of liquid He4 in the close vicinity of an ion (the so-called “snowball” model). Moreover, in addition to the generalization of Atkins’s model, the charged carrier effective mass formation is considered within the framework of the two-fluid scenario. The physical reasons of the normal-fluid contribution divergency and the way of the corresponding regularization procedure are discussed. Agreement between the theory and the available experimental data is found in a wide range of temperatures.

  3. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoshan

    1995-07-07

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the "Fassel" TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

  4. Effect of professional flossing with NaF or SnF2 gel on approximal caries in 13-16-year-old schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Gisselsson, H; Birkhed, D; Emilson, C G

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of professional flossing with NaF and SnF2 gels on caries development on approximal tooth surfaces. Two-hundred-and-eighty 13-year-old schoolchildren were divided into 3 groups: (1) NaF (n = 97), (2) SnF2 (n = 85), and (3) placebo gel group (n = 98). The investigation was carried out double-blind. The children were treated 4 times a year for 3 years with 1% NaF gel, 1% SnF2 gel, or placebo gel. The treatment was carried out by dental nurses and the time required per visit was approximately 10 min. After 3 years, the mean approximal caries increment, including initial caries lesions, was 2.8 in the NaF, 2.4 in the SnF2, and 4.0 in the placebo gel group (P< 0.05 for SnF2 vs placebo); a reduction compared to the placebo of 30% and 39% in the NaF and SnF2 groups, respectively. Thus, professional flossing with NaF or SnF2 gel carried out 4 times a year may be considered as an interesting caries-preventing method for large-scale application in schoolchildren.

  5. Effects of Spaced versus Massed Training in Function Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Mark A.; Fadler, Cynthia L.; Pashler, Harold

    2013-01-01

    A robust finding in the literature is that spacing material leads to better retention than massing; however, the benefit of spacing for concept learning is less clear. When items are massed, it may help the learner to discover the relationship between instances, leading to better abstraction of the underlying concept. Two experiments addressed…

  6. Self-force on extreme mass ratio inspirals via curved spacetime effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Galley, Chad R.; Hu, B. L.

    2009-03-15

    In this series we construct an effective field theory (EFT) in curved spacetime to study gravitational radiation and backreaction effects. We begin in this paper with a derivation of the self-force on a compact object moving in the background spacetime of a supermassive black hole. The EFT approach utilizes the disparity between two length scales, which in this problem are the size of the compact object r{sub m} and the radius of curvature of the background spacetime R such that {epsilon}{identical_to}r{sub m}/R<<1, to treat the orbital dynamics of the compact object, described as an effective point particle, separately from its tidal deformations. The equation of motion of an effective relativistic point particle coupled to the gravitational waves generated by its motion in a curved background spacetime can be derived without making a slow motion or weak field approximation, as was assumed in earlier EFT treatment of post-Newtonian binaries. Ultraviolet divergences are regularized using Hadamard's partie finie to isolate the nonlocal finite part from the quasilocal divergent part. The latter is constructed from a momentum space representation for the graviton retarded propagator and is evaluated using dimensional regularization in which only logarithmic divergences are relevant for renormalizing the parameters of the theory. As a first important application of this framework we explicitly derive the first-order self-force given by Mino, Sasaki, Tanaka, Quinn, and Wald. Going beyond the point particle approximation, to account for the finite size of the object, we demonstrate that for extreme mass ratio inspirals the motion of a compact object is affected by tidally induced moments at O({epsilon}{sup 4}), in the form of an effacement principle. The relatively large radius-to-mass ratio of a white dwarf star allows for these effects to be enhanced until the white dwarf becomes tidally disrupted, a potentially O({epsilon}{sup 2}) process, or plunges into the

  7. Wavelet Sparse Approximate Inverse Preconditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Tang, W.-P.; Wan, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using sparse approximate inverses as preconditioners for Krylov subspace iterative methods. Recent studies of Grote and Huckle and Chow and Saad also show that sparse approximate inverse preconditioner can be effective for a variety of matrices, e.g. Harwell-Boeing collections. Nonetheless a drawback is that it requires rapid decay of the inverse entries so that sparse approximate inverse is possible. However, for the class of matrices that, come from elliptic PDE problems, this assumption may not necessarily hold. Our main idea is to look for a basis, other than the standard one, such that a sparse representation of the inverse is feasible. A crucial observation is that the kind of matrices we are interested in typically have a piecewise smooth inverse. We exploit this fact, by applying wavelet techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse in the wavelet basis. We shall justify theoretically and numerically that our approach is effective for matrices with smooth inverse. We emphasize that in this paper we have only presented the idea of wavelet approximate inverses and demonstrated its potential but have not yet developed a highly refined and efficient algorithm.

  8. Effects of intermediate mass black holes on nuclear star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Perets, Hagai B.; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-11-20

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are dense stellar clusters observed in galactic nuclei, typically hosting a central massive black hole. Here we study the possible formation and evolution of NSCs through the inspiral of multiple star clusters hosting intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs). Using an N-body code, we examine the dynamics of the IMBHs and their effects on the NSC. We find that IMBHs inspiral to the core of the newly formed NSC and segregate there. Although the IMBHs scatter each other and the stars, none of them is ejected from the NSC. The IMBHs are excited to high eccentricities and their radial density profile develops a steep power-law cusp. The stars also develop a power-law cusp (instead of the central core that forms in their absence), but with a shallower slope. The relaxation rate of the NSC is accelerated due to the presence of IMBHs, which act as massive perturbers. This in turn fills the loss cone and boosts the tidal disruption rate of stars both by the MBH and the IMBHs to a value excluded by rate estimates based on current observations. Rate estimates of tidal disruptions can therefore provide a cumulative constraint on the existence of IMBHs in NSCs.

  9. Device-Level Models Using Multi-Valley Effective Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczewski, Andrew D.; Frees, Adam; Gamble, John King; Gao, Xujiao; Jacobson, N. Tobias; Mitchell, John A.; Montaño, Inès; Muller, Richard P.; Nielsen, Erik

    2015-03-01

    Continued progress in quantum electronics depends critically on the availability of robust device-level modeling tools that capture a wide range of physics and effective mass theory (EMT) is one means of building such models. Recent developments in multi-valley EMT show quantitative agreement with more detailed atomistic tight-binding calculations of phosphorus donors in silicon (Gamble, et. al., arXiv:1408.3159). Leveraging existing PDE solvers, we are developing a framework in which this multi-valley EMT is coupled to an integrated device-level description of several experimentally active qubit technologies. Device-level simulations of quantum operations will be discussed, as well as the extraction of process matrices at this level of theory. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the Sandia National Laboratories Truman Fellowship Program, which is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Does Taste Perception Effect Body Mass Index in Preschool Children?

    PubMed Central

    Markam, Vandana; Singh, Garima; Chakravarthy, Kalyan; Gupta, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Eating trends established early in life leads to chronic life style disorders such as obesity, which is hard to overcome as child comes of age. Energy expenditure is less but caloric intake is high leading to disparity of energy balance in turn leading to obesity. Obesity is the outcome of a disparity between energy expenditure and caloric intake. Genes play a role in establishing eating habits, which is termed as genetic sensitivity to taste. Aim To determine taste perception effect on body mass index (BMI) in preschool central Indian urban children. Materials and Methods A total of 500 children of 3-6 years were selected and genetic taste perception was assessed using PROP sensitivity test. Anthropometric measurements were recorded to obtain BMI value. Categorical variables were analysed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results Non tasters were mostly in overweight category i.e. 73.30% where as more number of tasters i.e. 59.70% were in underweight category. A significant correlation is seen between BMI and taste perception. No statistically significant correlation was seen between oral hygiene and taste perception. Females were predominant in both the tasters and non tasters categories. Conclusion Taste perception showed significant relationship with BMI of children between 3-6-year-old children. PMID:26816983

  11. Effect of vapor-phase mass transfer on aquifer restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.T.; Staes, E.G.

    1992-02-01

    Volatile organic chemicals (VOC) are a frequent source of groundwater contamination in North Carolina and throughout the United States and other developed countries. The work is considered a subset of the general multiphase flow and transport problem: fluid flow and contaminant transport in the gas phase of the unsaturated zone. The specific purpose of the work was to investigate gas-phase (VOC) transport phenomena at the field scale to assess the relative importance of operative transport phenomena. A field research site was established at an active fire training area on Pope Air Force Base. Monitoring of groundwater flow and gas-phase contaminant distributions was accomplished as a function of three spatial dimensions and time. These distributions are reported and interpreted with respect to the current level of understanding of gas-phase transport phenomena. Consideration is given to advective transport, diffusive transport, interphase mass transfer, and multicomponent effects. Numerical modeling is used to evaluate expected steady-state contaminant distributions in the unsaturated zone and to assess relative time scales of operative transport processes. Reasonable agreement is achieved between model simulations and observed concentration distributions in the field, with a dominant vertical transport component shown in both predicted and observed contaminant distributions.

  12. Approximate Bayesian Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisewski, Jessi

    2015-08-01

    Explicitly specifying a likelihood function is becoming increasingly difficult for many problems in astronomy. Astronomers often specify a simpler approximate likelihood - leaving out important aspects of a more realistic model. Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) provides a framework for performing inference in cases where the likelihood is not available or intractable. I will introduce ABC and explain how it can be a useful tool for astronomers. In particular, I will focus on the eccentricity distribution for a sample of exoplanets with multiple sub-populations.

  13. Estimate the effective connectivity in multi-coupled neural mass model using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Bonan; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Zhang, Zhen; Wei, Xile

    2017-03-01

    Assessment of the effective connectivity among different brain regions during seizure is a crucial problem in neuroscience today. As a consequence, a new model inversion framework of brain function imaging is introduced in this manuscript. This framework is based on approximating brain networks using a multi-coupled neural mass model (NMM). NMM describes the excitatory and inhibitory neural interactions, capturing the mechanisms involved in seizure initiation, evolution and termination. Particle swarm optimization method is used to estimate the effective connectivity variation (the parameters of NMM) and the epileptiform dynamics (the states of NMM) that cannot be directly measured using electrophysiological measurement alone. The estimated effective connectivity includes both the local connectivity parameters within a single region NMM and the remote connectivity parameters between multi-coupled NMMs. When the epileptiform activities are estimated, a proportional-integral controller outputs control signal so that the epileptiform spikes can be inhibited immediately. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework. The framework and the results have a profound impact on the way we detect and treat epilepsy.

  14. Thermodynamic constraints on effective energy and mass transfer and catchment function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, C.

    2012-03-01

    Understanding how water, energy and carbon are partitioned to primary production and effective precipitation is central to quantifying the limits on critical zone evolution. Recent work suggests quantifying energetic transfers to the critical zone in the form of effective precipitation and primary production provides a first order approximation of critical zone process and structural organization. However, explicit linkage of this effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT; W m-2) to critical zone state variables and well defined physical limits remains to be developed. The objective of this work was to place EEMT in the context of thermodynamic state variables of temperature and vapor pressure deficit, with explicit definition of EEMT physical limits using a global climate dataset. The relation of EEMT to empirical measures of catchment function was also examined using a subset of the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) catchments. The data demonstrated three physical limits for EEMT: (i) an absolute vapor pressure deficit threshold of 1200 Pa above which EEMT is zero; (ii) a temperature dependent vapor pressure deficit limit following the saturated vapor pressure function up to a temperature of 292 K; and (iii) a minimum precipitation threshold required from EEMT production at temperatures greater than 292 K. Within these limits, EEMT scales directly with precipitation, with increasing conversion of the precipitation to EEMT with increasing temperature. The state-space framework derived here presents a simplified framework with well-defined physical limits that has the potential for directly integrating regional to pedon scale heterogeneity in effective energy and mass transfer relative to critical zone structure and function within a common thermodynamic framework.

  15. Thermodynamic constraints on effective energy and mass transfer and catchment function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, C.

    2011-07-01

    Understanding how water, energy and carbon are partitioned to primary production and effective precipitation is central to quantifying the limits on critical zone evolution. Recent work suggests quantifying energetic transfers to the critical zone in the form of effective precipitation and primary production provides a first order approximation of critical zone process and structural organization. However, explicit linkage of this effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT; W m-2) to critical zone state variables and well defined physical limits remains to be developed. The objective of this work was to place EEMT in the context of thermodynamic state variables of temperature and vapor pressure deficit, with explicit definition of EEMT physical limits using a global climate dataset. The relation of EEMT to empirical measures of catchment function was also examined using a subset of the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) catchments. The data demonstrated three physical limits for EEMT: (i) an absolute vapor pressure deficit threshold of 1200 Pa above which EEMT is zero; (ii) a temperature dependent vapor pressure deficit limit following the saturated vapor pressure function up to a temperature of 292 K; and (iii) a minimum precipitation threshold required from EEMT production at temperatures greater than 292 K. Within these limits, EEMT scales directly with precipitation, with increasing conversion of the precipitation to EEMT with increasing temperature. The state-space framework derived here presents a simplified framework with well-defined physical limits that has the potential for directly integrating regional to pedon scale heterogeneity in effective energy and mass transfer relative to critical zone structure and function within a common thermodynamic framework.

  16. Mass fluctuation kinetics: Capturing stochastic effects in systems of chemical reactions through coupled mean-variance computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Uribe, Carlos A.; Verghese, George C.

    2007-01-01

    The intrinsic stochastic effects in chemical reactions, and particularly in biochemical networks, may result in behaviors significantly different from those predicted by deterministic mass action kinetics (MAK). Analyzing stochastic effects, however, is often computationally taxing and complex. The authors describe here the derivation and application of what they term the mass fluctuation kinetics (MFK), a set of deterministic equations to track the means, variances, and covariances of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. These equations are obtained by approximating the dynamics of the first and second moments of the chemical master equation. Apart from needing knowledge of the system volume, the MFK description requires only the same information used to specify the MAK model, and is not significantly harder to write down or apply. When the effects of fluctuations are negligible, the MFK description typically reduces to MAK. The MFK equations are capable of describing the average behavior of the network substantially better than MAK, because they incorporate the effects of fluctuations on the evolution of the means. They also account for the effects of the means on the evolution of the variances and covariances, to produce quite accurate uncertainty bands around the average behavior. The MFK computations, although approximate, are significantly faster than Monte Carlo methods for computing first and second moments in systems of chemical reactions. They may therefore be used, perhaps along with a few Monte Carlo simulations of sample state trajectories, to efficiently provide a detailed picture of the behavior of a chemical system.

  17. An approximate projection method for incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, David E.; Chan, Stevens T.; Gresho, Phil

    2002-12-01

    This paper presents an approximate projection method for incompressible flows. This method is derived from Galerkin orthogonality conditions using equal-order piecewise linear elements for both velocity and pressure, hereafter Q1Q1. By combining an approximate projection for the velocities with a variational discretization of the continuum pressure Poisson equation, one eliminates the need to filter either the velocity or pressure fields as is often needed with equal-order element formulations. This variational approach extends to multiple types of elements; examples and results for triangular and quadrilateral elements are provided. This method is related to the method of Almgren et al. (SIAM J. Sci. Comput. 2000; 22: 1139-1159) and the PISO method of Issa (J. Comput. Phys. 1985; 62: 40-65). These methods use a combination of two elliptic solves, one to reduce the divergence of the velocities and another to approximate the pressure Poisson equation. Both Q1Q1 and the method of Almgren et al. solve the second Poisson equation with a weak error tolerance to achieve more computational efficiency.A Fourier analysis of Q1Q1 shows that a consistent mass matrix has a positive effect on both accuracy and mass conservation. A numerical comparison with the widely used Q1Q0 (piecewise linear velocities, piecewise constant pressures) on a periodic test case with an analytic solution verifies this analysis. Q1Q1 is shown to have comparable accuracy as Q1Q0 and good agreement with experiment for flow over an isolated cubic obstacle and dispersion of a point source in its wake.

  18. The effect of body mass index on perioperative thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Özer, Ayşe Belin; Yildiz Altun, Aysun; Erhan, Ömer Lütfi; Çatak, Tuba; Karatepe, Ümit; Demirel, İsmail; Çağlar Toprak, Gonca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the effects of body mass index (BMI) on thermoregulation in obese patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Methods Sixty patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic abdominal surgery with no pre-medication were included in the study. The patients were classified into 4 groups according to BMI <24.9, 25–39.9, 40–49.9, and >50. Anesthesia was provided with routine techniques. Tympanic and peripheral temperatures were recorded every 5 minutes starting with the induction of anesthesia. The mean skin temperature (MST), mean body temperature (MBT), vasoconstriction time, and vasoconstriction threshold that triggers core warming were calculated with the following formulas: MST = 0.3 (Tchest + Tarm) + 0.2 (Tthigh + Tcalf). MBT was calculated using the equation 0.64Tcore+0.36Tskin, and vasoconstriction was determined by calculating Tforearm−Tfinger. Results There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age, gender, duration of operation, and room temperature. Compared to those with BMI <24.9, the tympanic temperature was significantly higher in those with BMI =25–39.9 in the 10th, 15th, 20th, and 50th minutes. In addition, BMI =40–49.9 in the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 40th, 45th, 50th, and 55th minutes and BMI >50 in the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 50th, and 55th minutes were less than those with BMI <24.9 (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in terms of MST and MBT. Vasoconstriction occurred later, and that vasoconstriction threshold was significantly higher in patients with higher BMIs. Conclusion Under anesthesia, the core temperature was protected more easily in obese patients as compared to nonobese patients. Therefore, obesity decreases the negative effects of anesthesia on thermoregulation. PMID:27920541

  19. Real-time optical monitoring of thin film growth by in situ pyrometry through multiple layers and effective media approximation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Benedic, F.; Bruno, P.; Pigeat, Ph.

    2007-03-26

    A model combining multiple layer description and effective media approximation is developed for pyrometry in the case of thin film synthesis, in order to estimate the film property evolution along its thickness during the growth process in real time. The model is used to investigate optical properties of polycrystalline diamond film prepared by H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} microwave plasma. It is shown that in the presence of nitrogen, the growth is strongly nonhomogeneous. The deposit, initially composed of large amounts of void and nondiamond phases, evolves rapidly towards highest quality dense film where the diamond phase is predominant.

  20. Review of rigorous coupled-wave analysis and of homogeneous effective medium approximations for high spatial-frequency surface-relief gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glytsis, Elias N.; Brundrett, David L.; Gaylord, Thomas K.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the rigorous coupled-wave analysis as applied to the diffraction of electro-magnetic waves by gratings is presented. The analysis is valid for any polarization, angle of incidence, and conical diffraction. Cascaded and/or multiplexed gratings as well as material anisotropy can be incorporated under the same formalism. Small period rectangular groove gratings can also be modeled using approximately equivalent uniaxial homogeneous layers (effective media). The ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices of these layers depend on the gratings filling factor, the refractive indices of the substrate and superstrate, and the ratio of the freespace wavelength to grating period. Comparisons of the homogeneous effective medium approximations with the rigorous coupled-wave analysis are presented. Antireflection designs (single-layer or multilayer) using the effective medium models are presented and compared. These ultra-short period antireflection gratings can also be used to produce soft x-rays. Comparisons of the rigorous coupled-wave analysis with experimental results on soft x-ray generation by gratings are also included.

  1. Effects of particle shape on volume and mass estimates of interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, J. M.; Hong, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    Mass estimates of interstellar grain materials based on visual extinction characteristics are shown to be insensitive to shape and, so long as the wavelength dependence of extinction is defined well into the infrared, they are also insensitive to size distribution. Spheroidal particles are treated by an approximate analytical method. Spheres and cylinders (core mantle as well as homogeneous) are treated by exact methods.

  2. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C.; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E.

    1998-06-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of their technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. Their method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) the authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing; (2) they also show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  3. Multicriteria approximation through decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, C. |; Krumke, S.; Marathe, M.; Phillips, C.; Sundberg, E. |

    1997-12-01

    The authors propose a general technique called solution decomposition to devise approximation algorithms with provable performance guarantees. The technique is applicable to a large class of combinatorial optimization problems that can be formulated as integer linear programs. Two key ingredients of the technique involve finding a decomposition of a fractional solution into a convex combination of feasible integral solutions and devising generic approximation algorithms based on calls to such decompositions as oracles. The technique is closely related to randomized rounding. The method yields as corollaries unified solutions to a number of well studied problems and it provides the first approximation algorithms with provable guarantees for a number of new problems. The particular results obtained in this paper include the following: (1) The authors demonstrate how the technique can be used to provide more understanding of previous results and new algorithms for classical problems such as Multicriteria Spanning Trees, and Suitcase Packing. (2) They show how the ideas can be extended to apply to multicriteria optimization problems, in which they wish to minimize a certain objective function subject to one or more budget constraints. As corollaries they obtain first non-trivial multicriteria approximation algorithms for problems including the k-Hurdle and the Network Inhibition problems.

  4. On Stochastic Approximation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Hans

    This paper deals with a stochastic process for the approximation of the root of a regression equation. This process was first suggested by Robbins and Monro. The main result here is a necessary and sufficient condition on the iteration coefficients for convergence of the process (convergence with probability one and convergence in the quadratic…

  5. Approximating Integrals Using Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.; Caudle, Kyle A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a discussion on Monte Carlo methods, which outlines how to use probability expectations to approximate the value of a definite integral. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on this technique and then to show several examples using visual basic as a programming tool. It is an interesting method because it combines two branches of…

  6. Approximating Integrals Using Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.; Caudle, Kyle A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a discussion on Monte Carlo methods, which outlines how to use probability expectations to approximate the value of a definite integral. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on this technique and then to show several examples using visual basic as a programming tool. It is an interesting method because it combines two branches of…

  7. Fast approximate stochastic tractography.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Thompson, Paul M; Liu, Cheng-Yi; Tu, Zhuowen

    2012-01-01

    Many different probabilistic tractography methods have been proposed in the literature to overcome the limitations of classical deterministic tractography: (i) lack of quantitative connectivity information; and (ii) robustness to noise, partial volume effects and selection of seed region. However, these methods rely on Monte Carlo sampling techniques that are computationally very demanding. This study presents an approximate stochastic tractography algorithm (FAST) that can be used interactively, as opposed to having to wait several minutes to obtain the output after marking a seed region. In FAST, tractography is formulated as a Markov chain that relies on a transition tensor. The tensor is designed to mimic the features of a well-known probabilistic tractography method based on a random walk model and Monte-Carlo sampling, but can also accommodate other propagation rules. Compared to the baseline algorithm, our method circumvents the sampling process and provides a deterministic solution at the expense of partially sacrificing sub-voxel accuracy. Therefore, the method is strictly speaking not stochastic, but provides a probabilistic output in the spirit of stochastic tractography methods. FAST was compared with the random walk model using real data from 10 patients in two different ways: 1. the probability maps produced by the two methods on five well-known fiber tracts were directly compared using metrics from the image registration literature; and 2. the connectivity measurements between different regions of the brain given by the two methods were compared using the correlation coefficient ρ. The results show that the connectivity measures provided by the two algorithms are well-correlated (ρ = 0.83), and so are the probability maps (normalized cross correlation 0.818 ± 0.081). The maps are also qualitatively (i.e., visually) very similar. The proposed method achieves a 60x speed-up (7 s vs. 7 min) over the Monte Carlo sampling scheme, therefore

  8. Mass drivers. 3: Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, W.; Bowen, S.; Cohen, S.; Fine, K.; Kaplan, D.; Kolm, M.; Kolm, H.; Newman, J.; Oneill, G. K.; Snow, W.

    1979-01-01

    The last of a series of three papers by the Mass-Driver Group of the 1977 Ames Summer Study is presented. It develops the engineering principles required to implement the basic mass-driver. Optimum component mass trade-offs are derived from a set of four input parameters, and the program used to design a lunar launcher. The mass optimization procedures is then incorporated into a more comprehensive mission optimization program called OPT-4, which evaluates an optimized mass-driver reaction engine and its performance in a range of specified missions. Finally, this paper discusses, to the extent that time permitted, certain peripheral problems: heating effects in buckets due to magnetic field ripple; an approximate derivation of guide force profiles; the mechanics of inserting and releasing payloads; the reaction mass orbits; and a proposed research and development plan for implementing mass drivers.

  9. Bose polaron problem: Effect of mass imbalance on binding energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardila, L. A. Peña; Giorgini, S.

    2016-12-01

    By means of quantum Monte Carlo methods we calculate the binding energy of an impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate at T =0 . The focus is on the attractive branch of the Bose polaron and on the role played by the mass imbalance between the impurity and the surrounding particles. For an impurity resonantly coupled to the bath, we investigate the dependence of the binding energy on the mass ratio and on the interaction strength within the medium. In particular, we determine the equation of state in the case of a static (infinite mass) impurity, where three-body correlations are irrelevant and the result is expected to be a universal function of the gas parameter. For the mass ratio corresponding to 40K impurities in a gas of 87Rb atoms, we provide an explicit comparison with the experimental findings of a recent study carried out at JILA.

  10. Extended-Source Effect and Chromaticity in Two-Point-Mass Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Heyrovský, David

    2009-01-01

    We explore the sensitivity of two-point-mass gravitational microlensing to the extended nature of the source star, as well as the related sensitivity to its limb darkening. We demonstrate that the sensitive region, usually considered to be limited to a source-diameter-wide band along the caustic, is strongly expanded near cusps, most prominently along their outer axis. In the case of multicomponent caustics, facing cusps may form a region with a non-negligible extended-source effect spanning the gap between them. We demonstrate that for smaller sources the size of the sensitive region extending from a cusp measured in units of source radii increases, scaling as the inverse cube root of the radius. We study the extent of different sensitivity contours and show that for a microlensed Galactic bulge giant the probability of encountering at least a 1% extended-source effect is higher than the probability of caustic crossing by 40-60% when averaged over a typical range of lens-component separations, with the actual value depending on the mass ratio of the components. We derive analytical expressions for the extended-source effect and chromaticity for a source positioned off the caustic. These formulae are more generally applicable to any gravitational lens with a sufficiently small source. Using exactly computed amplifications we test the often used linear-fold caustic approximation and show that it may lead to errors on the level of a few percent even in near-ideal caustic-crossing events. Finally, we discuss several interesting cases of observed binary and planetary microlensing events and point out the importance of our results for the measurement of stellar limb darkening from microlensing light curves.

  11. Combined effect of couple stresses and heat and mass transfer on peristaltic flow with slip conditions in a tube.

    PubMed

    Sobh, Ayman M

    2013-10-01

    In this article, the influence of heat and mass transfer on peristaltic transport of a couple stress fluid in a uniform tube with slip conditions on the wall is studied. The problem can model the blood flow in living creatures. Under long wavelength approximation and zero Reynolds number, exact solutions for the axial velocity component, pressure gradient, and both temperature and concentration fields are derived. The pressure rise is computed numerically and explained graphically. Moreover, effects of various physical parameters of the problem on temperature distribution, concentration field, and trapping are studied and discussed graphically.

  12. Optimizing the Zeldovich approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Pellman, Todd F.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1994-01-01

    We have recently learned that the Zeldovich approximation can be successfully used for a far wider range of gravitational instability scenarios than formerly proposed; we study here how to extend this range. In previous work (Coles, Melott and Shandarin 1993, hereafter CMS) we studied the accuracy of several analytic approximations to gravitational clustering in the mildly nonlinear regime. We found that what we called the 'truncated Zeldovich approximation' (TZA) was better than any other (except in one case the ordinary Zeldovich approximation) over a wide range from linear to mildly nonlinear (sigma approximately 3) regimes. TZA was specified by setting Fourier amplitudes equal to zero for all wavenumbers greater than k(sub nl), where k(sub nl) marks the transition to the nonlinear regime. Here, we study the cross correlation of generalized TZA with a group of n-body simulations for three shapes of window function: sharp k-truncation (as in CMS), a tophat in coordinate space, or a Gaussian. We also study the variation in the crosscorrelation as a function of initial truncation scale within each type. We find that k-truncation, which was so much better than other things tried in CMS, is the worst of these three window shapes. We find that a Gaussian window e(exp(-k(exp 2)/2k(exp 2, sub G))) applied to the initial Fourier amplitudes is the best choice. It produces a greatly improved crosscorrelation in those cases which most needed improvement, e.g. those with more small-scale power in the initial conditions. The optimum choice of kG for the Gaussian window is (a somewhat spectrum-dependent) 1 to 1.5 times k(sub nl). Although all three windows produce similar power spectra and density distribution functions after application of the Zeldovich approximation, the agreement of the phases of the Fourier components with the n-body simulation is better for the Gaussian window. We therefore ascribe the success of the best-choice Gaussian window to its superior treatment

  13. Producing approximate answers to database queries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrbsky, Susan V.; Liu, Jane W. S.

    1993-01-01

    We have designed and implemented a query processor, called APPROXIMATE, that makes approximate answers available if part of the database is unavailable or if there is not enough time to produce an exact answer. The accuracy of the approximate answers produced improves monotonically with the amount of data retrieved to produce the result. The exact answer is produced if all of the needed data are available and query processing is allowed to continue until completion. The monotone query processing algorithm of APPROXIMATE works within the standard relational algebra framework and can be implemented on a relational database system with little change to the relational architecture. We describe here the approximation semantics of APPROXIMATE that serves as the basis for meaningful approximations of both set-valued and single-valued queries. We show how APPROXIMATE is implemented to make effective use of semantic information, provided by an object-oriented view of the database, and describe the additional overhead required by APPROXIMATE.

  14. Applied Routh approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The Routh approximation technique for reducing the complexity of system models was applied in the frequency domain to a 16th order, state variable model of the F100 engine and to a 43d order, transfer function model of a launch vehicle boost pump pressure regulator. The results motivate extending the frequency domain formulation of the Routh method to the time domain in order to handle the state variable formulation directly. The time domain formulation was derived and a characterization that specifies all possible Routh similarity transformations was given. The characterization was computed by solving two eigenvalue-eigenvector problems. The application of the time domain Routh technique to the state variable engine model is described, and some results are given. Additional computational problems are discussed, including an optimization procedure that can improve the approximation accuracy by taking advantage of the transformation characterization.

  15. The Effects of Post-Main-Sequence Solar Mass Loss on the Stability of Our Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Martin J.; Lissauer, Jack J.

    1998-08-01

    We present the results of extensive long-term integrations of systems of planets with orbits initially identical to subsets of the planets within our Solar System, but with the Sun's mass decreased relative to the masses of the planets. For systems based on the giant planets, we find an approximate power-law correlation between the time elapsed until a pair of planetary orbits cross and the solar-to-planetary-mass ratio, provided that this ratio is ≲0.4 times its current value. However, deviations from this relationship at larger ratios suggest that this correlation may not be useful in predicting the lifetime of the current system. Detailed simulations of the evolution of planetary orbits through the solar mass loss phase at the end of the Sun's main-sequence lifetime suggest that the orbits of those terrestrial planets that survive the Sun's red giant phase are likely to remain stable for (possibly much) longer than a billion years and those of the giant planets are likely to remain stable for (possibly much) more than ten billion years. Pluto is likely to escape from its current 2:3 mean-motion resonance with Neptune within a few billion years beyond the Sun's main sequence lifetime if subject only to gravitational forces; its prognosis is likely to be even poorer when nongravitational forces are included. Implications for the effects of stellar mass loss on the stability of other planetary systems are discussed.

  16. Cost-effective binomial sequential sampling of western bean cutworm, Striacosta albicosta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), egg masses in corn.

    PubMed

    Paula-Moraes, S; Burkness, E C; Hunt, T E; Wright, R J; Hein, G L; Hutchison, W D

    2011-12-01

    Striacosta albicosta (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a native pest of dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and corn (Zea mays L.). As a result of larval feeding damage on corn ears, S. albicosta has a narrow treatment window; thus, early detection of the pest in the field is essential, and egg mass sampling has become a popular monitoring tool. Three action thresholds for field and sweet corn currently are used by crop consultants, including 4% of plants infested with egg masses on sweet corn in the silking-tasseling stage, 8% of plants infested with egg masses on field corn with approximately 95% tasseled, and 20% of plants infested with egg masses on field corn during mid-milk-stage corn. The current monitoring recommendation is to sample 20 plants at each of five locations per field (100 plants total). In an effort to develop a more cost-effective sampling plan for S. albicosta egg masses, several alternative binomial sampling plans were developed using Wald's sequential probability ratio test, and validated using Resampling for Validation of Sampling Plans (RVSP) software. The benefit-cost ratio also was calculated and used to determine the final selection of sampling plans. Based on final sampling plans selected for each action threshold, the average sample number required to reach a treat or no-treat decision ranged from 38 to 41 plants per field. This represents a significant savings in sampling cost over the current recommendation of 100 plants.

  17. Short-range ordering effects on the electronic Bloch spectral function of real materials in the nonlocal coherent-potential approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmodoro, Alberto; Ernst, Arthur; Ostanin, Sergei; Sandratskii, Leonid; Trevisanutto, Paolo E.; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N.; Staunton, Julie B.

    2016-12-01

    The nonlocal coherent-potential approximation provides a systematic technique for the study of short-range ordering effects in a variety of disordered systems. In its original formulation the technique, however, shows an unwanted dependence on details in the coarse-grained effective medium construction. This is particularly evident in the study of k ⃗-resolved quantities, such as the Bloch spectral function and other non-site-diagonal observables. We remove the issue and recover fully physical results in first principles studies of real materials, by means of a resampling procedure first proposed for model tight-binding Hamiltonians. The prescription is further generalized to the case of complex unit cell compounds, with more than a single sublattice, and illustrated through examples from metallic alloys and disordered local moment simulations of paramagnetism in the prototype iron-based superconductor FeSe.

  18. Kaluza's kinetic theory description of the classical Hall effect in a single component dilute gas within the Chapman-Enskog approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A.; Garcia-Perciante, A. L.; Sagaceta-Mejia, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic theory is used to establish the explicit form of the particle flux associated to the Hall effect for the case of a dilute single component charged gas, using the Chapman-Enskog method and the BGK approximation for the collision Kernel. It is shown that when the system evolves towards mechanical equilibrium, the standard treatment using the concept of external force fails to describe the Hall effect. It is also shown that the use of a five-dimensional curved space-time in the description of the dynamics of the charged particle in the kinetic treatment (Kaluza's theory) formally solves the problem. The implications of this result are briefly discussed. The authors acknowledge support from CONACyT (Mexico) through grant CB2011/167563.

  19. Effects of mass density enhancements on VLF transmitter signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Al-Haddad, Eimad; Leitzinger, Martin; Krauss, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    We study the variation of the electric field measurements recorded by DEMETER micro-satellite above specific very low frequency (VLF) transmitters. The investigated period starts from August 2004 to December 2010. The VLF signals are combined with the mass density measurements recorded, in the same time interval, by GRACE and CHAMP satellites. Particular enhancements of the mass densities were observed at polar and sub-polar regions by both satellites. Those mass density enhancements are found to propagate from the northern or southern hemisphere to the equator region. We attempt in this study to analyse the VLF signal variations in the time interval where the mass density enhancements are recorded. Such disturbances of the atmosphere can probably affect the Earth's ionosphere. The VLF signal may be attenuated and then not detected by DEMETER. We find that it is the case at some specific occasions. Nevertheless we show that several parameters have to be taken into consideration: (a) the origin of the mass density enhancement in the polar region (e.g. solar particles), (b) its phase speed from the pole to the equator and (c) the satellite (CHAMP, DEMETER, GRACE) local time.

  20. Effects of deformation and neutron-proton pairing on the Gamow-Teller transitions for Mg,2624 in a deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Eunja; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2016-11-01

    We investigate effects of neutron-proton (n p ) pairing correlations on the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition of Mg,2624 by explicitly taking into account deformation effects. Our calculation is performed by a deformed quasiparticle random phase approximation (DQRPA) which includes the deformation at the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer and RPA stage. In this paper, we include the n p pairing as well as neutron-neutron (n n ) and proton-proton (p p ) paring correlations to the DQRPA. Our new formalism is applied to the GT transition of well-known deformed Mg isotopes. The n p pairing effect is found to affect more or less the GT distribution of 24Mg and 26Mg. But the deformation effect turns out to be much larger than the n p paring effect because the Fermi surfaces smear more widely by the deformation rather than the n p pairing correlations. Correlations between the deformation and the n p pairing effects and their ambiguities are also discussed with the comparison to experimental GT strength data by triton and 3He beams.

  1. Co-Seismic Mass Dislocation and its Effect on Earth's Rotation and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Gross, R. S.

    2002-01-01

    Mantle processes often involve large-scale mass transport, ranging from mantle convection, tectonic motions, glacial isostatic adjustment, to tides, atmospheric and oceanic loadings, volcanism and seismicity. On very short time scale of less than an hour, co-seismic event, apart from the shaking that is the earthquake, leaves behind permanent (step-function-like) dislocations in the crust and mantle. This redistribution of mass changes the Earth's inertia tensor (and hence Earth's rotation in both length-of-day and polar motion), and the gravity field (in terms of spherical harmonic Stokes coefficients). The question is whether these effects are large enough to be of any significance. In this paper we report updated calculation results based on Chao & Gross (1987). The calculation uses the normal mode summation scheme, applied to nearly twenty thousand major earthquakes that occurred during 1976-2002, according to source mechanism solutions given by the Harvard Central Moment Tensor catalog. Compared to the truly large ones earlier in the century, the earthquakes we study are individually all too small to have left any discernible signature in geodetic records of Earth rotation or global gravity field. However, their collective effects continue to exhibit an extremely strong statistical tendencies. For example, earthquakes conspire to decrease J2 and J22 while shortening LOD, resulting in a rounder and more compact Earth. Strong tendency is also seen in the earthquakes trying to nudge the Earth rotation pole towards approximately 140 degrees E, roughly opposite to the observed polar drift direction. The geophysical significance and implications will be further studied.

  2. Effect of wall mass on the peak sensible heating and cooling loads of a single-family residence

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, D.M.; Walton, G.N.; Licitra, B.A.; Cavanaugh, K.; Klein, M.D.

    1986-10-01

    The effect of wall mass on the peak sensible heating and cooling loads of a single-family residence was investigated using a sophisticated computer program called the Thermal Analysis Research Program (TARP). The computer simulation accuracy was verified by comparing its predicted sensible heating and cooling loads to measured values for six test buildings each having different wall constructions at the National Bureau of Standards. Good agreement was obtained for the load comparisons. The computer program subsequently was used to simulate the performance of identical houses each having the following three insulated-wall constructions: wood frame, conventional masonry (outside wall mass), and innovative masonry (inside wall mass). When the house was operated with fixed thermostat settings, the effect of wall mass on the peak sensible heating and cooling loads was found to be less than 11% for the climatic regions analyzed. Operating the typical house with a 10/sup 0/F (5.6/sup 0/C) night temperature setback during an 8-hour night period caused the daily peak sensible heating loads to be approximately twice those without setback.

  3. Approximate option pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Chalasani, P.; Saias, I.; Jha, S.

    1996-04-08

    As increasingly large volumes of sophisticated options (called derivative securities) are traded in world financial markets, determining a fair price for these options has become an important and difficult computational problem. Many valuation codes use the binomial pricing model, in which the stock price is driven by a random walk. In this model, the value of an n-period option on a stock is the expected time-discounted value of the future cash flow on an n-period stock price path. Path-dependent options are particularly difficult to value since the future cash flow depends on the entire stock price path rather than on just the final stock price. Currently such options are approximately priced by Monte carlo methods with error bounds that hold only with high probability and which are reduced by increasing the number of simulation runs. In this paper the authors show that pricing an arbitrary path-dependent option is {number_sign}-P hard. They show that certain types f path-dependent options can be valued exactly in polynomial time. Asian options are path-dependent options that are particularly hard to price, and for these they design deterministic polynomial-time approximate algorithms. They show that the value of a perpetual American put option (which can be computed in constant time) is in many cases a good approximation to the value of an otherwise identical n-period American put option. In contrast to Monte Carlo methods, the algorithms have guaranteed error bounds that are polynormally small (and in some cases exponentially small) in the maturity n. For the error analysis they derive large-deviation results for random walks that may be of independent interest.

  4. Neutron-proton effective mass splitting in terms of symmetry energy and its density slope

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, S.; Sahoo, B.; Sahoo, S.

    2015-01-15

    Using a simple density-dependent finite-range effective interaction having Yukawa form, the density dependence of isoscalar and isovector effective masses is studied. The isovector effective mass is found to be different for different pairs of like and unlike nucleons. Using HVH theorem, the neutron-proton effective mass splitting is represented in terms of symmetry energy and its density slope. It is again observed that the neutron-proton effective mass splitting has got a positive value when isoscalar effective mass is greater than the isovector effective mass and has a negative value for the opposite case. Furthermore, the neutron-proton effective mass splitting is found to have a linear dependence on asymmetry β. The second-order symmetry potential has a vital role in the determination of density slope of symmetry energy but it does not have any contribution on neutron-proton effective mass splitting. The finite-range effective interaction is compared with the SLy2, SKM, f{sub −}, f{sub 0}, and f{sub +} forms of interactions.

  5. Beyond the Kirchhoff approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Ernesto

    1989-01-01

    The three most successful models for describing scattering from random rough surfaces are the Kirchhoff approximation (KA), the small-perturbation method (SPM), and the two-scale-roughness (or composite roughness) surface-scattering (TSR) models. In this paper it is shown how these three models can be derived rigorously from one perturbation expansion based on the extinction theorem for scalar waves scattering from perfectly rigid surface. It is also shown how corrections to the KA proportional to the surface curvature and higher-order derivatives may be obtained. Using these results, the scattering cross section is derived for various surface models.

  6. The effectiveness of mass communication to change public behavior.

    PubMed

    Abroms, Lorien C; Maibach, Edward W

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the ways in which mass communication has been used -- or can be used -- to promote beneficial changes in behavior among members of populations. We use an ecological perspective to examine the ways in which mass media interventions can be used to influence public behavior both directly and indirectly. Mass media interventions that seek to influence people directly -- by directly targeting the people burdened by the public health problem of concern and/or the people who influence them -- have a long basis in public health history, and recent reviews have clarified our expectations about what can be expected from such approaches. Mass media interventions that seek to influence people indirectly -- by creating beneficial changes in the places (or environments) in which people live and work -- have equal if not greater potential to promote beneficial changes in population health behaviors, but these are currently less explored options. To have the greatest possible beneficial influence on public behavior with the public health resources available, we recommend that public health program planners assess their opportunities to use media to target both people and places in a manner that complements and extends other investments being made in population health enhancement.

  7. Intergenerational Educational Effects of Mass Imprisonment in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, John; Foster, Holly

    2012-01-01

    In some American schools, about a fifth of the fathers have spent time in prison during their child's primary education. We examine how variation across schools in the aggregation and concentration of the mass imprisonment of fathers is associated with their own children's intergenerational educational outcomes and "spills over" into the…

  8. Finite volume effects in the chiral extrapolation of baryon masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M. F. M.; Bavontaweepanya, R.; Kobdaj, C.; Schwarz, K.

    2014-09-01

    We perform an analysis of the QCD lattice data on the baryon octet and decuplet masses based on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian. The baryon self-energies are computed in a finite volume at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO), where the dependence on the physical meson and baryon masses is kept. The number of free parameters is reduced significantly down to 12 by relying on large-Nc sum rules. Altogether we describe accurately more than 220 data points from six different lattice groups, BMW, PACS-CS, HSC, LHPC, QCDSF-UKQCD and NPLQCD. Values for all counterterms relevant at N3LO are predicted. In particular we extract a pion-nucleon sigma term of 39-1+2 MeV and a strangeness sigma term of the nucleon of σsN=84-4+28 MeV. The flavor SU(3) chiral limit of the baryon octet and decuplet masses is determined with (802±4) and (1103±6) MeV. Detailed predictions for the baryon masses as currently evaluated by the ETM lattice QCD group are made.

  9. Effects of mass fires on personnel in shelters

    Treesearch

    A. Broido; A.W. McMasters

    1960-01-01

    In the mass fires resulting from air attack during World War II, many people lost their lives in shelters in fire areas. The greatest number of deaths occurred in basements or makeshift shelters. In many cases, positions of the corpses indicated that death came peacefully and unexpectedly. A frequent assumption is that death was due to carbon monoxide poisoning....

  10. Numerical modelling of the effect of changing surface geometry on mountain glacier mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Chris; Carrivick, Jonathan; Evans, Andrew; Carver, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Mountain glaciers and ice caps are extremely useful indicators of environmental change. Due to their small size, they have much faster response times to climate changes than the large ice masses of Greenland and Antarctica. Mountain glaciers are important for society as sources of water for energy production and irrigation and the meltwater cycles significantly impact local ecology. We have applied a spatially distributed surface energy balance model to a glacier record spanning 100 years. Our study encompasses (i) the creation of a GIS enabling quantitative analysis of changing glacier geometry; absolute length, area, surface lowering and volume change, over the 20th and early 21st Centuries and (ii) the development and testing of a novel user-friendly distributed-surface energy balance model that is designed specifically to consider the effect that these geometrical changes have on mountain glacier mass balance. Our study site is Kårsaglaciären in Arctic Sweden for which there is a variety of data for the past 100 years, sourced from historical surveys, satellite imagery and recent field work. This contrasts with other Arctic mountain glaciers where long-term records are rare, making model development and evaluation very difficult. Kårsaglaciären has been in a state of negative balance throughout the 20th century. Disintegration of the glacier occurred during the 1920s, breaking the glacier into two separate bodies. Between 1926 and 2008, the glacier retreated 1.3 km and reduced in area by 3.41km2. In 2008 the glacier had an estimated surface area of 0.89km2 and a length of approximately 1.0km. Firstly, we present the GIS based construction of robust three-dimensional glacier surface reconstructions for Kårsaglaciären from 1926 to 2010 using a decadal interval. We highlight the kriging interpolation methods used for surface development and the importance of inter-model sensitivity analyses as well as the use of Monte Carlo simulations used to assess the

  11. Effects of mass transfer between Martian satellites on surface geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Michael; Nimmo, Francis; Udrea, Bogdan

    2016-03-01

    Impacts on planetary bodies can lead to both prompt secondary craters and projectiles that reimpact the target body or nearby companions after an extended period, producing so-called "sesquinary" craters. Here we examine sesquinary cratering on the moons of Mars. We model the impact that formed Voltaire, the largest crater on the surface of Deimos, and explore the orbital evolution of resulting high-velocity ejecta across 500 years using four-body physics and particle tracking. The bulk of mass transfer to Phobos occurs in the first 102 years after impact, while reaccretion of ejecta to Deimos is predicted to continue out to a 104 year timescale (cf. Soter, S. [1971]. Studies of the Terrestrial Planets. Cornell University). Relative orbital geometry between Phobos and Deimos plays a significant role; depending on the relative true longitude, mass transfer between the moons can change by a factor of five. Of the ejecta with a velocity range capable of reaching Phobos, 25-42% by mass reaccretes to Deimos and 12-21% impacts Phobos. Ejecta mass transferred to Mars is <10%. We find that the characteristic impact velocity of sesquinaries on Deimos is an order of magnitude smaller than those of background (heliocentric) hypervelocity impactors and will likely result in different crater morphologies. The time-averaged flux of Deimos material to Phobos can be as high as 11% of the background (heliocentric) direct-to-Phobos impactor flux. This relatively minor contribution suggests that spectrally red terrain on Phobos (Murchie, S., Erard, S. [1996]. Icarus 123, 63-86) is not caused by Deimos material. However the high-velocity ejecta mass reaccreted to Deimos from a Voltaire-sized impact is comparable to the expected background mass accumulated on Deimos between Voltaire-size events. Considering that the high-velocity ejecta contains only 0.5% of the total mass sent into orbit, sesquinary ejecta from a Voltaire-sized impact could feasibly resurface large parts of the Moon

  12. Galaxy Cluster Gas Mass Fractions From Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Measurement: Constraints on Omega_M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Holzapfel, William L.; Joy, Marshall K.; Mohr, Joseph J.; Patel, Sandeep; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using sensitive centimeter-wave receivers mounted on the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association millimeter arrays, we have obtained interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zei'dovich (SZ) effect toward massive galaxy clusters. We use the SZ data to determine the pressure distribution of the cluster gas and, in combination with published X-ray temperatures, to infer the gas mass and total gravitational mass of 18 clusters. The gas mass fraction, fg, is calculated for each cluster, and is extrapolated to the fiducial radius r_{500} using the results of numerical simulations. The mean f_g within r_{500} is 0.081 + 0.009 - 0.011/(h_{100} (statistical uncertainty at 68% confidence level, assuming OmegaM=0.3, OmegaL=0.7). We discuss possible sources of systematic errors in the mean f 9 measurement. We derive an upper limit for OmegaM from this sample under the assumption that the mass composition of clusters within r_{500} reflects the universal mass composition: Omega_M h mass f on cosmology through the angular diameter distance and the r_{500} correction factors. For a flat universe (Omegal, = 1 - OmegaM) and h=0.7, we find the measured gas mass fractions are consistent with OmegaM less than 0.40, at 68% confidence. Including estimates of the baryons contained in galaxies and the baryons which failed to become bound during the cluster formation process, we find OmegaM\\approximately 0.25.

  13. Galaxy Cluster Gas Mass Fractions From Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Measurement: Constraints on Omega_M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grego, Laura; Carlstrom, John E.; Reese, Erik D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Holzapfel, William L.; Joy, Marshall K.; Mohr, Joseph J.; Patel, Sandeep; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using sensitive centimeter-wave receivers mounted on the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland-Association millimeter arrays, we have obtained interferometric measurements of the Sunyaev-Zei'dovich (SZ) effect toward massive galaxy clusters. We use the SZ data to determine the pressure distribution of the cluster gas and, in combination with published X-ray temperatures, to infer the gas mass and total gravitational mass of 18 clusters. The gas mass fraction, fg, is calculated for each cluster, and is extrapolated to the fiducial radius r_{500} using the results of numerical simulations. The mean f_g within r_{500} is 0.081 + 0.009 - 0.011/(h_{100} (statistical uncertainty at 68% confidence level, assuming OmegaM=0.3, OmegaL=0.7). We discuss possible sources of systematic errors in the mean f 9 measurement. We derive an upper limit for OmegaM from this sample under the assumption that the mass composition of clusters within r_{500} reflects the universal mass composition: Omega_M h mass f on cosmology through the angular diameter distance and the r_{500} correction factors. For a flat universe (Omegal, = 1 - OmegaM) and h=0.7, we find the measured gas mass fractions are consistent with OmegaM less than 0.40, at 68% confidence. Including estimates of the baryons contained in galaxies and the baryons which failed to become bound during the cluster formation process, we find OmegaM\\approximately 0.25.

  14. Uncertainties and Systematic Effects on the estimate of stellar masses in high z galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, S.; Fontana, A.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Menci, N.; Pentericci, L.; Santini, P.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the uncertainties and the systematic effects that exist in the estimates of the stellar masses of high redshift galaxies, using broad band photometry, and how they affect the deduced galaxy stellar mass function. We use at this purpose the latest version of the GOODS-MUSIC catalog. In particular, we discuss the impact of different synthetic models, of the assumed initial mass function and of the selection band. Using Chariot & Bruzual 2007 and Maraston 2005 models we find masses lower than those obtained from Bruzual & Chariot 2003 models. In addition, we find a slight trend as a function of the mass itself comparing these two mass determinations with that from Bruzual & Chariot 2003 models. As consequence, the derived galaxy stellar mass functions show diverse shapes, and their slope depends on the assumed models. Despite these differences, the overall results and scenario is observed in all these cases. The masses obtained with the assumption of the Chabrier initial mass function are in average 0.24 dex lower than those from the Salpeter assumption, at all redshifts, causing a shift of galaxy stellar mass function of the same amount. Finally, using a 4.5 μm-selected sample instead of a Ks-selected one, we add a new population of highly absorbed, dusty galaxies at z~=2-3 of relatively low masses, yielding stronger constraints on the slope of the galaxy stellar mass function at lower masses.

  15. The Joint Effects of Body Mass Index and MAOA Gene Polymorphism on Depressive Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the joint effects of the body mass index and the MAOA gene polymorphism on depressive symptoms. In two independent Chinese samples, we measured adolescents' depressive symptoms and body mass index and collected their DNA. The results indicated that the main effects of the MAOA gene polymorphism on depressive symptoms were significant. However, the main effects of body mass index and the interaction of the MAOA gene polymorphism and body mass index on depressive symptoms were not significant. By using Chinese adolescents, this study confirmed that the MAOA gene polymorphism directly influenced adolescents' depressive symptoms.

  16. Quantum systems with effective and time-dependent masses: form-preserving transformations and reality conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel

    2005-12-01

    We study the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) with an effective (position-dependent) mass, relevant in the context of transport phenomena in semiconductors. The most general form-preserving transformation between two TDSEs with different effective masses is derived. A condition guaranteeing the reality of the potential in the transformed TDSE is obtained. To ensure maximal generality, the mass in the TDSE is allowed to depend on time also.

  17. Fitting Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equation Models with Random Effects and Unknown Initial Conditions Using the Stochastic Approximation Expectation-Maximization (SAEM) Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Lu, Zhaohua; Sherwood, Andrew; Zhu, Hongtu

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has evidenced the increased prevalence of irregularly spaced longitudinal data in social sciences. Clearly lacking, however, are modeling tools that allow researchers to fit dynamic models to irregularly spaced data, particularly data that show nonlinearity and heterogeneity in dynamical structures. We consider the issue of fitting multivariate nonlinear differential equation models with random effects and unknown initial conditions to irregularly spaced data. A stochastic approximation expectation-maximization algorithm is proposed and its performance is evaluated using a benchmark nonlinear dynamical systems model, namely, the Van der Pol oscillator equations. The empirical utility of the proposed technique is illustrated using a set of 24-h ambulatory cardiovascular data from 168 men and women. Pertinent methodological challenges and unresolved issues are discussed.

  18. FITTING NONLINEAR ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION MODELS WITH RANDOM EFFECTS AND UNKNOWN INITIAL CONDITIONS USING THE STOCHASTIC APPROXIMATION EXPECTATION–MAXIMIZATION (SAEM) ALGORITHM

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Sy- Miin; Lu, Zhaohua; Zhu, Hongtu; Sherwood, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The past decade has evidenced the increased prevalence of irregularly spaced longitudinal data in social sciences. Clearly lacking, however, are modeling tools that allow researchers to fit dynamic models to irregularly spaced data, particularly data that show nonlinearity and heterogeneity in dynamical structures. We consider the issue of fitting multivariate nonlinear differential equation models with random effects and unknown initial conditions to irregularly spaced data. A stochastic approximation expectation–maximization algorithm is proposed and its performance is evaluated using a benchmark nonlinear dynamical systems model, namely, the Van der Pol oscillator equations. The empirical utility of the proposed technique is illustrated using a set of 24-h ambulatory cardiovascular data from 168 men and women. Pertinent methodological challenges and unresolved issues are discussed. PMID:25416456

  19. Increasing the Thermal Conductivity of Graphene-Polyamide-6,6 Nanocomposites by Surface-Grafted Polymer Chains: Calculation with Molecular Dynamics and Effective-Medium Approximation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yangyang; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2016-02-25

    By employing reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in a full atomistic resolution, the effect of surface-grafted chains on the thermal conductivity of graphene-polyamide-6.6 (PA) nanocomposites has been investigated. The interfacial thermal conductivity perpendicular to the graphene plane is proportional to the grafting density, while it first increases and then saturates with the grafting length. Meanwhile, the intrinsic in-plane thermal conductivity of graphene drops sharply as the grafting density increases. The maximum overall thermal conductivity of nanocomposites appears at an intermediate grafting density because of these two competing effects. The thermal conductivity of the composite parallel to the graphene plane increases with the grafting density and grafting length which is attributed to better interfacial coupling between graphene and PA. There exists an optimal balance between grafting density and grafting length to obtain the highest interfacial and parallel thermal conductivity. Two empirical formulas are suggested, which quantitatively account for the effects of grafting length and density on the interfacial and parallel thermal conductivity. Combined with effective medium approximation, for ungrafted graphene in random orientation, the model overestimates the thermal conductivity at low graphene volume fraction (f < 10%) compared with experiments, while it underestimates it at high graphene volume fraction (f > 10%). For unoriented grafted graphene, the model matches the experimental results well. In short, this work provides some valuable guides to obtain the nanocomposites with high thermal conductivity by grafting chain on the surface of graphene.

  20. Intergenerational influences on childhood body mass index: the effect of parental body mass index trajectories.

    PubMed

    Li, Leah; Law, Catherine; Lo Conte, Rossella; Power, Chris

    2009-02-01

    Parental obesity in adulthood is a strong determinant of offspring obesity. Whether parental body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) at earlier life stages is associated with offspring BMI is unknown. The main objective was to assess whether recent BMI of parents in adulthood and their recent BMI gain are more strongly associated with offspring BMI than are BMI or changes in parental BMI in childhood. Two generations in the 1958 British birth cohort were studied, including cohort members (parents' generation) with BMI at 7, 11, 16, 23, and 33 y (n = 16,794) and a one-third sample of their offspring selected in 1991 aged 4-18 y (n = 2908). We applied multilevel models to allow for within-family correlations. Childhood BMI increased on average by 0.25-1.10 between the 2 generations, depending on sex and age group, and overweight/obesity increased from 10% to 16%. Parents' BMI in childhood and adulthood independently influenced offspring BMI, but no significant difference in the strength of influence was observed. For example, adjusted increase in BMI for offspring aged 4-8 y was equivalent to 0.37 and 0.23 for a 1-SD increase in maternal BMI at 7 and 33 y, respectively. Similar patterns were observed for risk of overweight/obesity and for paternal BMI at most ages. Excessive BMI gains of parents during childhood and adulthood were associated with a higher BMI and risk of obesity in the offspring. Reductions in the incidence of child obesity in the current population may reduce obesity in future generations.

  1. Effective-mass analysis of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices: Stabilization and levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, H.; Zhang, W.; Meystre, P.; Baksmaty, L.O.; Bigelow, N.P.

    2003-04-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a periodic optical potential. Using an effective mass formalism, we study the equation of motion for the envelope function modulating the Bloch states of the lattice potential. In particular, we show how the negative effective-mass affects the dynamics of the condensate.

  2. Magnetic Field Modulated Photoreflectance Study of the Electron Effective Mass in Dilute Nitride Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, N.; Hiejima, K.; Kubo, H.; Patane, A.; Eaves, L.

    2011-12-23

    Magnetic field modulated photoreflectance measurements are performed on the dilute nitride semiconductor Ga(AsN) in quantizing magnetic fields. From the measured cyclotron energies, the conduction band effective mass and its dependence on the nitrogen content are determined. The effective mass is found to become significantly heavier in samples with high nitrogen composition (>0.1%).

  3. A highly cost effective method of mass screening for thalassaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Silvestroni, E; Bianco, I

    1983-01-01

    A simple, fast, and reliable two step procedure for the detection of non-alpha-thalassaemias in mass screening programmes is presented. Step 1 consists of a study of red cell morphology and a one tube red cell osmotic fragility tests. This step eliminates the non-thalassaemic samples; the rest are processed through step 2, consisting of determination of red cell indices and haemoglobin studies. Over the past seven years this procedure has been used at this centre in mass screening secondary school students in Latium. Blood samples from 289 763 students were examined, and 6838 cases of thalassaemia detected. It is estimated that 0.35 +/- 0.25% of subjects with thalassaemia escaped detection by this procedure. PMID:6403170

  4. Effective Planck mass and the scale of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, Matthew; Porrati, Massimo; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad E-mail: mehrdadm@ias.edu

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper argued that it is not possible to infer the energy scale of inflation from the amplitude of tensor fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background, because the usual connection is substantially altered if there are a large number of universally coupled fields present during inflation, with mass less than the inflationary Hubble scale. We give a simple argument demonstrating that this is incorrect.

  5. Estimated effects of the vertical structure of atmospheric mass on the time-variable geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Sean; Wahr, John

    2002-09-01

    The GRACE satellite mission is designed to map the Earth's gravity field at a resolution of a few hundred kilometers every 30 days beginning in 2002. At these timescales, much of the change in the gravity field may be attributed to processes involving the redistribution of water on the surface of the Earth. Contributions from continental water storage, the oceans, and the atmosphere will all be present in the time-varying gravity solutions. Isolating the hydrological and oceanographic signals will first require the removal of the atmospheric component of the gravity field estimates provided by GRACE. The vertical distribution of mass in the atmosphere is typically neglected when calculating the atmospheric gravity signal. We examine the accuracy of this approximation, as well as the accuracies of models which determine idealized atmospheric vertical structure from surface values of temperature and pressure. Using isobaric geopotential height data from a global forecast center to characterize the true atmospheric density distribution, we compute an exact atmospheric gravity signal with which to compare the gravity signal of each of these models. In addition, we examine the effects of including the aspherical component of the Earth's shape when calculating the atmospheric component of the gravity field. Because gravity estimates from GRACE will have limited spatial resolution, we average our results over regions of 200 to 500 km. At these length scales, our results show that using models based solely on surface data can introduce errors in the time variable surface mass signal inferred from GRACE as large as a few millimeters equivalent water thickness, with a global RMS of about 1 mm.

  6. The Relative Effectiveness of Massed Versus Spaced Film Presentation. Rapid Mass Learning. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Philip

    In presenting material to be learned in a film, is a single, long session, dealing with the subject in depth, as effective as the same content divided into several short sessions? In other words, is a long presentation more tiring than a short one? Groups of psychology students and Navy recruits were given equivalent amounts of instruction time,…

  7. Concentrated mass effects on the flutter of a composite advanced turboprop model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, J. K.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1986-01-01

    The effects on bending-torsion flutter due to the addition of a concentrated mass to an advanced turboprop model blade with rigid hub are studied. Specifically the effects of the magnitude and location of added mass on the natural frequencies, mode shapes, critical interblade phase angle, and flutter Mach number are analytically investigated. The flutter of a propfan model is shown to be sensitive to the change in mass distribution. Static unbalance effects, like those for fixed wings, were shown to occur as the concentrated mass was moved from the leading edge to the trailing edge with the exception of one mass location. Mass balancing is also inferred to be a feasible method for increasing the flutter speed.

  8. Hierarchical Approximate Bayesian Computation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Brandon M.; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2013-01-01

    Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) is a powerful technique for estimating the posterior distribution of a model’s parameters. It is especially important when the model to be fit has no explicit likelihood function, which happens for computational (or simulation-based) models such as those that are popular in cognitive neuroscience and other areas in psychology. However, ABC is usually applied only to models with few parameters. Extending ABC to hierarchical models has been difficult because high-dimensional hierarchical models add computational complexity that conventional ABC cannot accommodate. In this paper we summarize some current approaches for performing hierarchical ABC and introduce a new algorithm called Gibbs ABC. This new algorithm incorporates well-known Bayesian techniques to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the ABC approach for estimation of hierarchical models. We then use the Gibbs ABC algorithm to estimate the parameters of two models of signal detection, one with and one without a tractable likelihood function. PMID:24297436

  9. Approximate strip exchanging.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swapnoneel; Thakur, Ashok Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Genome rearrangements have been modelled by a variety of primitives such as reversals, transpositions, block moves and block interchanges. We consider such a genome rearrangement primitive Strip Exchanges. Given a permutation, the challenge is to sort it by using minimum number of strip exchanges. A strip exchanging move interchanges the positions of two chosen strips so that they merge with other strips. The strip exchange problem is to sort a permutation using minimum number of strip exchanges. We present here the first non-trivial 2-approximation algorithm to this problem. We also observe that sorting by strip-exchanges is fixed-parameter-tractable. Lastly we discuss the application of strip exchanges in a different area Optical Character Recognition (OCR) with an example.

  10. An Approximate Approach to Automatic Kernel Selection.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lizhong; Liao, Shizhong

    2016-02-02

    Kernel selection is a fundamental problem of kernel-based learning algorithms. In this paper, we propose an approximate approach to automatic kernel selection for regression from the perspective of kernel matrix approximation. We first introduce multilevel circulant matrices into automatic kernel selection, and develop two approximate kernel selection algorithms by exploiting the computational virtues of multilevel circulant matrices. The complexity of the proposed algorithms is quasi-linear in the number of data points. Then, we prove an approximation error bound to measure the effect of the approximation in kernel matrices by multilevel circulant matrices on the hypothesis and further show that the approximate hypothesis produced with multilevel circulant matrices converges to the accurate hypothesis produced with kernel matrices. Experimental evaluations on benchmark datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of approximate kernel selection.

  11. OMI tropospheric NO2 air mass factors over South America: effects of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; Torres, O.; de Haan, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Biomass burning is an important and uncertain source of aerosols and NOx (NO + NO2) to the atmosphere. OMI observations of tropospheric NO2 are essential for characterizing this emissions source, but inaccuracies in the retrieval of NO2 tropospheric columns due to the radiative effects of aerosols, especially light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, are not well understood. It has been shown that the O2-O2 effective cloud fraction and pressure retrieval is sensitive to aerosol optical and physical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD). Aerosols implicitly influence the tropospheric air mass factor (AMF) calculations used in the NO2 retrieval through the effective cloud parameters used in the independent pixel approximation. In this work, we explicitly account for the effects of biomass burning aerosols in the tropospheric NO2 AMF calculation by including collocated aerosol extinction vertical profile observations from the CALIOP instrument, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the OMI near-UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) in the DISAMAR radiative transfer model for cloud-free scenes. Tropospheric AMFs calculated with DISAMAR were benchmarked against AMFs reported in the Dutch OMI NO2 (DOMINO) retrieval; the mean and standard deviation (SD) of the difference was 0.6 ± 8%. Averaged over three successive South American biomass burning seasons (2006-2008), the spatial correlation in the 500 nm AOD retrieved by OMI and the 532 nm AOD retrieved by CALIOP was 0.6, and 72% of the daily OMAERUV AOD observations were within 0.3 of the CALIOP observations. Overall, tropospheric AMFs calculated with observed aerosol parameters were on average 10% higher than AMFs calculated with effective cloud parameters. For effective cloud radiance fractions less than 30%, or effective cloud pressures greater than 800 hPa, the difference between tropospheric AMFs based on implicit and explicit aerosol parameters is on average 6 and 3

  12. THE EFFECTS OF VIEWING ANGLE ON THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, S.; Jenkins, J. S.

    2012-09-10

    We present a mathematical method to statistically decouple the effects of unknown inclination angles on the mass distribution of exoplanets that have been discovered using radial-velocity (RV) techniques. The method is based on the distribution of the product of two random variables. Thus, if one assumes a true mass distribution, the method makes it possible to recover the observed distribution. We compare our prediction with available RV data. Assuming that the true mass function is described by a power law, the minimum mass function that we recover proves a good fit to the observed distribution at both mass ends. In particular, it provides an alternative explanation for the observed low-mass decline, usually explained as sample incompleteness. In addition, the peak observed near the low-mass end arises naturally in the predicted distribution as a consequence of imposing a low-mass cutoff in the true distribution. If the low-mass bins below 0.02 M{sub J} are complete, then the mass distribution in this regime is heavily affected by the small fraction of lowly inclined interlopers that are actually more massive companions. Finally, we also present evidence that the exoplanet mass distribution changes form toward low mass, implying that a single power law may not adequately describe the sample population.

  13. Scale effects and morphological diversification in hindlimb segment mass proportions in neognath birds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In spite of considerable work on the linear proportions of limbs in amniotes, it remains unknown whether differences in scale effects between proximal and distal limb segments has the potential to influence locomotor costs in amniote lineages and how changes in the mass proportions of limbs have factored into amniote diversification. To broaden our understanding of how the mass proportions of limbs vary within amniote lineages, I collected data on hindlimb segment masses – thigh, shank, pes, tarsometatarsal segment, and digits – from 38 species of neognath birds, one of the most speciose amniote clades. I scaled each of these traits against measures of body size (body mass) and hindlimb size (hindlimb length) to test for departures from isometry. Additionally, I applied two parameters of trait evolution (Pagel’s λ and δ) to understand patterns of diversification in hindlimb segment mass in neognaths. Results All segment masses are positively allometric with body mass. Segment masses are isometric with hindlimb length. When examining scale effects in the neognath subclade Land Birds, segment masses were again positively allometric with body mass; however, shank, pedal, and tarsometatarsal segment masses were also positively allometric with hindlimb length. Methods of branch length scaling to detect phylogenetic signal (i.e., Pagel’s λ) and increasing or decreasing rates of trait change over time (i.e., Pagel’s δ) suffer from wide confidence intervals, likely due to small sample size and deep divergence times. Conclusions The scaling of segment masses appears to be more strongly related to the scaling of limb bone mass as opposed to length, and the scaling of hindlimb mass distribution is more a function of scale effects in limb posture than proximo-distal differences in the scaling of limb segment mass. Though negative allometry of segment masses appears to be precluded by the need for mechanically sound limbs, the positive allometry of

  14. Scale effects and morphological diversification in hindlimb segment mass proportions in neognath birds.

    PubMed

    Kilbourne, Brandon M

    2014-01-01

    In spite of considerable work on the linear proportions of limbs in amniotes, it remains unknown whether differences in scale effects between proximal and distal limb segments has the potential to influence locomotor costs in amniote lineages and how changes in the mass proportions of limbs have factored into amniote diversification. To broaden our understanding of how the mass proportions of limbs vary within amniote lineages, I collected data on hindlimb segment masses - thigh, shank, pes, tarsometatarsal segment, and digits - from 38 species of neognath birds, one of the most speciose amniote clades. I scaled each of these traits against measures of body size (body mass) and hindlimb size (hindlimb length) to test for departures from isometry. Additionally, I applied two parameters of trait evolution (Pagel's λ and δ) to understand patterns of diversification in hindlimb segment mass in neognaths. All segment masses are positively allometric with body mass. Segment masses are isometric with hindlimb length. When examining scale effects in the neognath subclade Land Birds, segment masses were again positively allometric with body mass; however, shank, pedal, and tarsometatarsal segment masses were also positively allometric with hindlimb length. Methods of branch length scaling to detect phylogenetic signal (i.e., Pagel's λ) and increasing or decreasing rates of trait change over time (i.e., Pagel's δ) suffer from wide confidence intervals, likely due to small sample size and deep divergence times. The scaling of segment masses appears to be more strongly related to the scaling of limb bone mass as opposed to length, and the scaling of hindlimb mass distribution is more a function of scale effects in limb posture than proximo-distal differences in the scaling of limb segment mass. Though negative allometry of segment masses appears to be precluded by the need for mechanically sound limbs, the positive allometry of segment masses relative to body mass may

  15. Well Ordered Melts from Low Molar Mass Pluronic Copolymers Blended with Poly (acrylic acid): Effect of Homopolymer Molar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daga, Vikram; Tirumala, Vijay; Romang, Alvin; Lin, Eric; Watkins, James

    2008-03-01

    The use of short chain block copolymer melts as nanostructured templates is often limited by their low segregation strength (χN). Since increasing molar mass to strengthen segregation also increases the interdomain spacing, it is more desirable to increase the segment-segment interaction parameter, χ to produce strong segregation. We have recently shown that block copolymer melts with a molar mass less than 15 kg/mol undergo disorder-to-order transition without a significant increase in interdomain spacing when blended with a selectively associating homopolymer, due to an apparent increase in effective χ. Here, we study the effect of homopolymer molar mass on the segregation of a disordered poly (oxyethylene-oxypropylene-oxyethylene) copolymer melt that forms lamellar microstructure in the ordered phase. Based on small-angle scattering measurements, we find that the melts remain ordered over a broad range of homopolymer chain lengths, ranging up to ten times that of the copolymer. This approach has many implications for the use of commodity block copolymer surfactants as inexpensive nanostructured templates for commercial applications.

  16. Effect of higher-order stress gradients on the centennial mass evolution of the Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, J. J.; Goelzer, H.; Huybrechts, P.

    2013-02-01

    We use a three-dimensional thermo-mechanically coupled model of the Greenland ice sheet to assess the effects of marginal perturbations on volume changes on centennial timescales. The model is designed to allow for five ice dynamic formulations using different approximations to the force balance. The standard model is based on the shallow ice approximation for both ice deformation and basal sliding. A second model version relies on a higher-order Blatter/Pattyn type of core that resolves effects from gradients in longitudinal stresses and transverse horizontal shearing, i.e. membrane-like stresses. Together with three intermediate model versions, these five versions allow for gradually more dynamic feedbacks from membrane stresses. Idealised experiments are conducted on various resolutions to compare the time-dependent response to imposed accelerations at the marine ice front. If such marginal accelerations are to have an appreciable effect on total mass loss on a century timescale, a fast mechanism to transmit such perturbations inland is required. While the forcing is independent of the model version, inclusion of direct horizontal coupling allows the initial speed-up to reach several tens of kilometres inland. Within one century, effects from gradients in membrane stress alter the inland signal propagation and transmit additional dynamic thinning to the ice sheet interior. But the centennial overall volume loss differs only by some percents from the standard model, as the dominant response is a diffusive inland propagation of geometric changes. For the experiments considered, this volume response is even attenuated by direct horizontal coupling. The reason is a faster adjustment of the sliding regime by instant stress transmission in models that account for the effect of membrane stresses. Ultimately, horizontal coupling decreases the reaction time to perturbations at the ice sheet margin. These findings suggest that for modelling the mass evolution of a large

  17. Age-related effects of body mass on fertility and litter size in roe deer

    PubMed Central

    Jerina, Klemen; Pokorny, Boštjan

    2017-01-01

    We analysed effects of females’ body mass and age on reproductive capacity of European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in a large sample set of 1312 females (305 yearlings and 1007 adults), hunted throughout Slovenia, central Europe, in the period 2013–2015. Body mass positively affected probability of ovulation and potential litter size (number of corpora lutea), although its effect was more pronounced in yearlings than in adults. Between age groups, we found clear differences in responses of both reproductive parameters to body mass which influences primarily reproductive performance of younger, and in particular, lighter individuals: at the same body mass yearlings would at average have smaller litters than adults, and at lower body mass also young to middle-aged adults would have smaller litters than old ones. In addition, while yearlings have to reach a critical threshold body mass to attain reproductive maturity, adult females are fertile (produce ova) even at low body mass. However, at higher body mass also younger individuals shift their efforts into the reproduction, and after reaching an age-specific threshold the body mass does not have any further effects on the reproductive output of roe deer females. Increased reproductive capacity at more advanced age, combined with declining body mass suggests that old does allocate more of their resources in reproduction than in body condition. PMID:28403161

  18. Age-related effects of body mass on fertility and litter size in roe deer.

    PubMed

    Flajšman, Katarina; Jerina, Klemen; Pokorny, Boštjan

    2017-01-01

    We analysed effects of females' body mass and age on reproductive capacity of European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in a large sample set of 1312 females (305 yearlings and 1007 adults), hunted throughout Slovenia, central Europe, in the period 2013-2015. Body mass positively affected probability of ovulation and potential litter size (number of corpora lutea), although its effect was more pronounced in yearlings than in adults. Between age groups, we found clear differences in responses of both reproductive parameters to body mass which influences primarily reproductive performance of younger, and in particular, lighter individuals: at the same body mass yearlings would at average have smaller litters than adults, and at lower body mass also young to middle-aged adults would have smaller litters than old ones. In addition, while yearlings have to reach a critical threshold body mass to attain reproductive maturity, adult females are fertile (produce ova) even at low body mass. However, at higher body mass also younger individuals shift their efforts into the reproduction, and after reaching an age-specific threshold the body mass does not have any further effects on the reproductive output of roe deer females. Increased reproductive capacity at more advanced age, combined with declining body mass suggests that old does allocate more of their resources in reproduction than in body condition.

  19. Multi-valley effective mass treatment of donor-dot tunneling in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frees, Adam; Baczewski, Andrew D.; Gamble, John King; Jacobson, N. Tobias; Muller, Richard P.; Nielsen, Erik

    2015-03-01

    Many cutting-edge experiments in silicon-based devices for quantum information processing involve the tunneling of an individual electron from a donor atom within the material to the interface of the heterostructure. Understanding how this tunneling process varies among different realistic devices is therefore of great interest. Using a multi-valley effective mass approximation method, we find the tunnel coupling, adiabatic min-gap, and ionizing electric field strength between a phosphorous donor in silicon and a nearby quantum dot at a Si/SiO2 interface. Additionally, we calculate these quantities for a phosphorous donor in strained silicon and a Si/SiGe interface. We consider how these properties change as a function of relative position between the donor and the dot. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the Sandia National Laboratories Truman Fellowship Program, which is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Massive nitrogen loss in critical surgical illness: effect on cardiac mass and function.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, A A; Plank, L D; Finn, P J; Whalley, G A; Sharpe, N; Clark, M A; Hill, G L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors measured cardiac mass and function to determine whether these changed in patients who were critically ill who were losing large amounts of nitrogen from the body. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The large losses of body nitrogen that occur in patients with protein-energy malnutrition are associated with a loss of cardiac mass and function. It is not known if this also occurs in patients who were critically ill who are losing massive amounts of nitrogen. METHODS: Once hemodynamically stable, 13 patients who were critically ill underwent sequential measurements of left ventricular mass (LVM) and function, total body nitrogen (TBN), total body potassium, body weight, fat-free mass, and limb muscle mass. RESULTS: Over a 21-day study period, there was no change in LVM or function despite falls of 14% and 21% in TBN and total body potassium, respectively, a 21% fall in limb muscle mass, and a deterioration in skeletal muscle function by approximately 40%. CONCLUSIONS: In patients who were critically ill, cardiac mass does not decrease and function does not deteriorate after hemodynamic stability has been achieved despite massive losses of protein from the body. PMID:9296513

  1. Effects of main-sequence mass loss on the turnoff ages of globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Willson, Bowen, and Struck-Marcell have proposed that globular cluster main-sequence turnoff ages can be reconciled with the lower ages of the Galaxy and universe deduced from other methods by incorporating an epoch of early main-sequence mass-loss by stars of spectral types A through early-F. The proposed mass loss is pulsation-driven, and facilitated by rapid rotation. This paper presents stellar evolution calculations of Pop. II (Z = 0.001) mass-losing stars of initial mass 0.8 to 1.6 M/sub /circle dot//, with exponentially-decreasing mass loss rates of e-folding times 0.5 to 2.0 Gyr, evolving to a final mass of 0.7 M/sub /circle dot//. The calculations indicate that a globular cluster with apparent turnoff age 18 Gyr could have an actual age as low as /approximately/12 Gyr. Observational implications that may help to verify the hypothesis, e.g. low C/N abundance ratios among red giants following first dredge-up, blue stragglers, red giant deficiencies, and signatures in cluster mass/luminosity functions, are also discussed.25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Effect of 120 keV proton irradiation on mass loss and chemical structure of AG-80 epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yu; Jiang, Sheng-Ling; Dong, Shang-Li; Yang, De-Zhuang

    2010-11-01

    The AG-80 resin is a new type of thermosetting matrix for advanced carbon/epoxy composites. Mass loss effect and the related outgassing are major concerns for its application in space. The changes in mass loss, outgassing and chemical structure under 120 keV proton exposure were investigated for the AG-80 epoxy resin. The variation in chemistry was characterised by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Experimental results show that by increasing the proton fluence, the surface colour of specimens becomes darker. Mass loss ratios ascend remarkably until the fluence of approximately 6.3×1015 cm-2 and then tend to level off. The surface roughness of specimens exhibits an increasing trend followed by a decreasing trend as a function of proton fluence. Under the exposure, the C‒C, C‒H, C‒N and C‒O bonds are broken, a variety of molecule ions with smaller molecular weight are formed and carbon is enriched in the surface layer of the specimens. The changes in mass loss and surface roughness of the AG-80 epoxy resin could be attributed to the formation of the molecule ions and the enrichment of carbon content in the surface layer due to proton radiation.

  3. Effect of chlorhexidine gel on approximal caries increment in adolescents with high caries risk using professional flossing compared to individual trays.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Birgitta; Gisselsson, Hans; Wennerholm, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorhexidine gel treatment on approximal caries development during a three year-study in children with expected high risk of caries. New caries of this group was compared to the caries development in two groups with assumed moderate or low caries risk. One hundred and sixty-nine of 201 twelve-year-old children fulfilled the trial. A group of 77 children showed no caries experience and was expected to be a low caries risk group (R1). Ninety-two children had at least one approximal lesion and their salivary numbers of mutans streptococci (ms) were quantified. Forty-six of those showed less than 3 x 10(5) ms per ml saliva and were supposed to have a moderate caries risk (R2). Forty-six children, with high levels of ms, were expected to have a high caries risk (R3). Both R1 and R3 were treated with fluoride varnish every 18th month and R2 every 6th month. The R3 group was supplementary treated with 1% chlorhexidine gel (Corsodyl) by using either flossing combined with polishing (Flossing group), or gel in individual trays (Tray group) every third month, in two subsequent days. The mean caries development during three years was for R1 and R2, 1.5 and 3.0, respectively. For R3, the corresponding caries incidence was 2.9 in the Tray group and 2.8 in the Flossing group. Significantly less new caries was found in the R1 compared to R2 and R3, but no significant difference was found between R2 and R3 or between the two groups of R3. In conclusion both methods of professional chlorhexidine gel treatments showed a caries development corresponding to the group with moderate caries risk and could both be used for caries prevention.

  4. Effect of neutrino rest mass on ionization equilibrium freeze-out

    DOE PAGES

    Grohs, Evan Bradley; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; ...

    2015-12-23

    We show how small neutrino rest masses can increase the expansion rate near the photon decoupling epoch in the early Universe, causing an earlier, higher temperature freeze-out for ionization equilibrium compared to the massless neutrino case. This yields a larger free-electron fraction, thereby affecting the photon diffusion length differently than the sound horizon at photon decoupling. This neutrino-mass and recombination effect depends strongly on the neutrino rest masses. Ultimately, though below current sensitivity, this effect could be probed by next-generation cosmic microwave background experiments, giving another observational handle on neutrino rest mass.

  5. The measurement and evaluation of the effect of fuse materials and masses on railgun performance

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.C.; Tanner, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    The HERA railgun device at Texas Tech University has been used to investigate the effects of armature fuses on plasma armature railguns. The fuse mass (thickness) was varied for both copper and aluminum fuses over a range of 0.1 mm to 1.5 mm in a 1 cm round bore geometry. Armature velocity and velocity saturation effects were observed. While holding railgun current and total projectile mass constant the fuse mass and material were varied. This paper will present the current findings from the research, including representative data on velocity vs. fuse material and mass, and velocity saturation. The experimental setup and methods will also be described.

  6. Effect of neutrino rest mass on ionization equilibrium freeze-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohs, E.; Fuller, G. M.; Kishimoto, C. T.; Paris, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    We show how small neutrino rest masses can increase the expansion rate near the photon decoupling epoch in the early Universe, causing an earlier, higher temperature freeze-out for ionization equilibrium compared to the massless neutrino case. This yields a larger free-electron fraction, thereby affecting the photon diffusion length differently than the sound horizon at photon decoupling. This neutrino-mass and recombination effect depends strongly on the neutrino rest masses. Though below current sensitivity, this effect could be probed by next-generation cosmic microwave background experiments, giving another observational handle on neutrino rest mass.

  7. Effect of neutrino rest mass on ionization equilibrium freeze-out

    SciTech Connect

    Grohs, Evan Bradley; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; Paris, Mark W.

    2015-12-23

    We show how small neutrino rest masses can increase the expansion rate near the photon decoupling epoch in the early Universe, causing an earlier, higher temperature freeze-out for ionization equilibrium compared to the massless neutrino case. This yields a larger free-electron fraction, thereby affecting the photon diffusion length differently than the sound horizon at photon decoupling. This neutrino-mass and recombination effect depends strongly on the neutrino rest masses. Ultimately, though below current sensitivity, this effect could be probed by next-generation cosmic microwave background experiments, giving another observational handle on neutrino rest mass.

  8. Dirac particles interacting with the improved Frost-Musulin potential within the effective mass formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, Ahmet; Aydogdu, Oktay; Salti, Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    We mainly investigate the dynamics of spin-1/2 particles with position-dependent mass for the improved Frost-Musulin potential under spin-pseudospin symmetry. First, we find an approximate analytical solution of the Dirac equation both for bound and scattering states under spin-pseudospin symmetry and then we see that the normalized solutions are given in terms of the Gauss hypergeometric functions. In further steps, we analyze our results numerically.

  9. Random-Phase Approximation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guo P.; Voora, Vamsee K.; Agee, Matthew M.; Balasubramani, Sree Ganesh; Furche, Filipp

    2017-05-01

    Random-phase approximation (RPA) methods are rapidly emerging as cost-effective validation tools for semilocal density functional computations. We present the theoretical background of RPA in an intuitive rather than formal fashion, focusing on the physical picture of screening and simple diagrammatic analysis. A new decomposition of the RPA correlation energy into plasmonic modes leads to an appealing visualization of electron correlation in terms of charge density fluctuations. Recent developments in the areas of beyond-RPA methods, RPA correlation potentials, and efficient algorithms for RPA energy and property calculations are reviewed. The ability of RPA to approximately capture static correlation in molecules is quantified by an analysis of RPA natural occupation numbers. We illustrate the use of RPA methods in applications to small-gap systems such as open-shell d- and f-element compounds, radicals, and weakly bound complexes, where semilocal density functional results exhibit strong functional dependence.

  10. Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM): Study of Backscatter Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. J.; Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Seo, E. S.; Wang, J. Z.; Wu, J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. K.; Park, I. H.; Beach, S.; Beatty, J. J.; Coutu, S.; Nutter, S.; Minnick, S.; Duvernois, M. A.; Swordy, S.

    2001-08-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) ultra long duration balloon-borne instrument is configured with an ionization calorimeter, a transition ra-diation detector (TRD), and a charge identification module. This mission will provide the first inight calibration of a TRD and a calorimeter. We will present results of simulations of this hybrid instrument based on GEANT4. In particular, we will address the impact of splash back from albedo particles generated in the calorimeter on charge measurements with the timingbased charge detector and velocity measurements with the TRD.

  11. Effect of interfaces and the spin-orbit band on the band gaps of InAs/GaSb superlattices beyond the standard envelope-function approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmulowicz, Frank; Haugan, Heather; Brown, Gail; Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy

    2004-03-01

    We develop a modified 8x8 envelope-function approximation (EFA) formalism for the noncommon-atom (NCA) superlattices (SLs), incorporating the effect of anisotropic and other interface (IF) interactions that go beyond the standard EFA. The boundary conditions in the presence of IF interactions are used to set up a novel secular equation (including a transfer matrix derivation) whose physical transparency makes possible a number of valuable insights (possibility of IF bound states, analytic solutions, indirect gaps, etc.). We show that the heavy hole - spin-orbit IF coupling is very important due to the IF localization of the SO wave function components and the ability of the IF potential to potentially bind a hole at the IFs. With two adjustable parameter for the two possible IFs, we find a very good agreement between experiment and theory for the band gaps of several sets of very long- and mid-infrared InAs/GaSb SLs grown at several laboratories and by us. The band gaps as a function of GaSb and InAs widths are explained in terms of variations of the HH and conduction (C) band bandwidths. We show that the cut-off wavelengths can be reduced by increasing the GaSb layer width. Thus, a consistent application of the EFA method with the inclusion of well established IF effects can provide useful physical insights and possesses good predictive capacity in the design of NCA SLs.

  12. Countably QC-Approximating Posets

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuxin; Xu, Luoshan

    2014-01-01

    As a generalization of countably C-approximating posets, the concept of countably QC-approximating posets is introduced. With the countably QC-approximating property, some characterizations of generalized completely distributive lattices and generalized countably approximating posets are given. The main results are as follows: (1) a complete lattice is generalized completely distributive if and only if it is countably QC-approximating and weakly generalized countably approximating; (2) a poset L having countably directed joins is generalized countably approximating if and only if the lattice σc(L)op of all σ-Scott-closed subsets of L is weakly generalized countably approximating. PMID:25165730

  13. Charged Kaon Mass Measurement using the Cherenkov Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.; Lebedev, A.; Abrams, R.J.; Akgun, U.; Aydin, G.; Baker, W.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Bergfeld, T.; Beverly, L.; Bujak, A.; Carey, D.; /Fermilab /Virginia U. /Iowa U.

    2009-09-01

    The two most recent and precise measurements of the charged kaon mass use X-rays from kaonic atoms and report uncertainties of 14 ppm and 22 ppm yet differ from each other by 122 ppm. We describe the possibility of an independent mass measurement using the measurement of Cherenkov light from a narrow-band beam of kaons, pions, and protons. This technique was demonstrated using data taken opportunistically by the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory which recorded beams of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from +37 GeV/c to +63 GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3 {+-} 1.7 MeV/c{sup 2}, which is within 1.4{sigma} of the world average. An improvement of two orders of magnitude in precision would make this technique useful for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data and may be achievable in a dedicated experiment.

  14. Low thermal-mass LEDs: size effect and limits.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shunpeng; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ju, Zhengang; Ji, Yun; Zhang, Xueliang; Zhang, Yiping; Zhu, Binbin; Kyaw, Zabu; Hasanov, Namig; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2014-12-29

    In this work, low thermal-mass LEDs (LTM-LEDs) were developed and demonstrated in flip-chip configuration, studying both experimentally and theoretically the enhanced electrical and optical characteristics and the limits. LTM-LED chips in 25 × 25 μm2, 50 × 50 μm2, 100 × 100 μm2 and 200 × 200 μm2 mesa sizes were fabricated and comparatively investigated. Here it was revealed that both the electrical and optical properties are improved by the decreasing chip size due to the reduced thermal mass. With a smaller chip size (from 200 μm to 50 μm), the device generally presents higher current density against the bias and higher power density against the current density. However, the 25 × 25 μm2 device behaves differently, limited by the fabrication margin limit of 10 μm. The underneath mechanisms of these observations are uncovered, and furthermore, based on the device model, it is proven that for a specific flip-chip fabrication process, the ideal size for LTM-LEDs with optimal power density performance can be identified.

  15. EFFECTS OF ROTATION ON THE MINIMUM MASS OF PRIMORDIAL PROGENITORS OF PAIR-INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Craig Wheeler, J.

    2012-03-20

    The issue of which stars may reach the conditions of electron/positron pair-formation instability is of importance to understand the final evolution both of the first stars and of contemporary stars. The criterion to enter the pair-instability regime in density and temperature is basically controlled by the mass of the oxygen core. The main-sequence masses that produce a given oxygen core mass are, in turn, dependent on metallicity, mass loss, and convective and rotationally induced mixing. We examine the evolution of massive stars to determine the minimum main-sequence mass that can encounter pair-instability effects, either a pulsational pair-instability supernova (PPISN) or a full-fledged pair-instability supernova (PISN). We concentrate on zero-metallicity stars with no mass-loss subject to the Schwarzschild criterion for convective instability, but also explore solar metallicity and mass loss and the Ledoux criterion. As expected, for sufficiently strong rotationally induced mixing, the minimum main-sequence mass is encountered for conditions that induce effectively homogeneous evolution such that the original mass is converted almost entirely to helium and then to oxygen. For this case, we find that the minimum main-sequence mass is about 40 M{sub Sun} to encounter PPISN and about 65 M{sub Sun} to encounter a PISN. The implications of these results for the first stars and for contemporary supernovae are discussed.

  16. A unified approach to the Darwin approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Todd B.; Apte, A.; Morrison, P. J.

    2007-10-15

    There are two basic approaches to the Darwin approximation. The first involves solving the Maxwell equations in Coulomb gauge and then approximating the vector potential to remove retardation effects. The second approach approximates the Coulomb gauge equations themselves, then solves these exactly for the vector potential. There is no a priori reason that these should result in the same approximation. Here, the equivalence of these two approaches is investigated and a unified framework is provided in which to view the Darwin approximation. Darwin's original treatment is variational in nature, but subsequent applications of his ideas in the context of Vlasov's theory are not. We present here action principles for the Darwin approximation in the Vlasov context, and this serves as a consistency check on the use of the approximation in this setting.

  17. Coupled effects of temperature and mass transport on the isotope fractionation of zinc during electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; John, Seth G.; Kavner, Abby

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic composition of zinc metal electrodeposited on a rotating disc electrode from a Zn-citrate aqueous solution was investigated as a function of overpotential (electrochemical driving force), temperature, and rotation rate. Zn metal was measured to be isotopically light with respect to Zn+2 in solution, with observed fractionations varying from Δ66/64Znmetal-aqueous = -1.0‰ to -3.9‰. Fractionation varies continuously as a function of a dimensionless parameter described by the ratio of observed deposition rate to calculated mass-transport limiting rate, where larger fractionations are observed at lower deposition rates, lower temperature, and at faster electrode rotation rates. Thus, the large fractionation and its rate dependence is interpreted as a competition between the two kinetic processes with different effective activation energies: mass-transport-limited (diffusion limited) kinetics with a large activation energy, which creates small fractionations close to the predicted diffusive fractionation; and electrochemical deposition kinetics, with a smaller effective activation energy, which creates large fractionations at low deposition rates and high hydrodynamic fluxes of solute to the electrode. The results provide a framework for predicting isotope fractionation in processes controlled by two competing reactions with different kinetic isotope effects. Light isotopes are electroplated. In all cases light stable isotopes of the metals are preferentially electroplated, with mass-dependent behavior evident where three or more isotopes are measured. Fractionation is time-independent, meaning that the fractionation factor does not vary with the extent of reaction. In most of our experiments, we have controlled the extent of reaction such that only a small amount of metal is deposited from the stock solution, thus avoiding significant evolution of the reservoir composition. In such experiments, the observed isotope fractionation is constant as a

  18. Ultrafast approximation for phylogenetic bootstrap.

    PubMed

    Minh, Bui Quang; Nguyen, Minh Anh Thi; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2013-05-01

    Nonparametric bootstrap has been a widely used tool in phylogenetic analysis to assess the clade support of phylogenetic trees. However, with the rapidly growing amount of data, this task remains a computational bottleneck. Recently, approximation methods such as the RAxML rapid bootstrap (RBS) and the Shimodaira-Hasegawa-like approximate likelihood ratio test have been introduced to speed up the bootstrap. Here, we suggest an ultrafast bootstrap approximation approach (UFBoot) to compute the support of phylogenetic groups in maximum likelihood (ML) based trees. To achieve this, we combine the resampling estimated log-likelihood method with a simple but effective collection scheme of candidate trees. We also propose a stopping rule that assesses the convergence of branch support values to automatically determine when to stop collecting candidate trees. UFBoot achieves a median speed up of 3.1 (range: 0.66-33.3) to 10.2 (range: 1.32-41.4) compared with RAxML RBS for real DNA and amino acid alignments, respectively. Moreover, our extensive simulations show that UFBoot is robust against moderate model violations and the support values obtained appear to be relatively unbiased compared with the conservative standard bootstrap. This provides a more direct interpretation of the bootstrap support. We offer an efficient and easy-to-use software (available at http://www.cibiv.at/software/iqtree) to perform the UFBoot analysis with ML tree inference.

  19. Computer Experiments for Function Approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A; Izmailov, I; Rizzo, S; Wynter, S; Alexandrov, O; Tong, C

    2007-10-15

    This research project falls in the domain of response surface methodology, which seeks cost-effective ways to accurately fit an approximate function to experimental data. Modeling and computer simulation are essential tools in modern science and engineering. A computer simulation can be viewed as a function that receives input from a given parameter space and produces an output. Running the simulation repeatedly amounts to an equivalent number of function evaluations, and for complex models, such function evaluations can be very time-consuming. It is then of paramount importance to intelligently choose a relatively small set of sample points in the parameter space at which to evaluate the given function, and then use this information to construct a surrogate function that is close to the original function and takes little time to evaluate. This study was divided into two parts. The first part consisted of comparing four sampling methods and two function approximation methods in terms of efficiency and accuracy for simple test functions. The sampling methods used were Monte Carlo, Quasi-Random LP{sub {tau}}, Maximin Latin Hypercubes, and Orthogonal-Array-Based Latin Hypercubes. The function approximation methods utilized were Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). The second part of the study concerned adaptive sampling methods with a focus on creating useful sets of sample points specifically for monotonic functions, functions with a single minimum and functions with a bounded first derivative.

  20. Rack Distribution Effects on MPLM Center of Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tester, John T.

    2005-01-01

    This research was in support of exploring the need for more flexible "center of gravity (CG) specifications than those currently established by NASA for the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The MPLM is the cargo carrier for International Space Station (ISS) missions. The MPLM provides locations for 16 standard racks, as shown in Figure 1; not all positions need to be filled in any given flight. The MPLM coordinate system (X(sub M), Y(sub M), Z(sub M)) is illustrated as well. For this project, the primary missions of interest were those which supply the ISS and remove excess materials on the return flights. These flights use a predominate number of "Resupply Stowage Racks" (RSR) and "Resupply Stowage Platforms" (RSP). In these two types of racks, various smaller items are stowed. Hence, these racks will exhibit a considerable range of mass values as well as a range as to where their individual CG are located.