Science.gov

Sample records for effective near-net shape

  1. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) for Cost Effective Near-Net Shape Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Manufacturing of structural metal parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data has been investigated by numerous researchers over the past decade. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a new solid freeform fabrication process, electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3), as a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. EBF3 deposits of 2219 aluminium and Ti-6Al-4V have exhibited a range of grain morphologies depending upon the deposition parameters. These materials have exhibited excellent tensile properties comparable to typical handbook data for wrought plate product after post-processing heat treatments. The EBF3 process is capable of bulk metal deposition at deposition rates in excess of 2500 cubic centimeters per hour (150 in3/hr) or finer detail at lower deposition rates, depending upon the desired application. This process offers the potential for rapidly adding structural details to simpler cast or forged structures rather than the conventional approach of machining large volumes of chips to produce a monolithic metallic structure. Selective addition of metal onto simpler blanks of material can have a significant effect on lead time reduction and lower material and machining costs.

  2. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication for Cost Effective Near-Net Shape Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Manufacturing of structural metal parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data has been investigated by numerous researchers over the past decade. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a new solid freeform fabrication process, electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3), as a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. EBF3 deposits of 2219 aluminium and Ti-6Al-4V have exhibited a range of grain morphologies depending upon the deposition parameters. These materials have exhibited excellent tensile properties comparable to typical handbook data for wrought plate product after post-processing heat treatments. The EBF3 process is capable of bulk metal deposition at deposition rates in excess of 2500 cm3/hr (150 in3/hr) or finer detail at lower deposition rates, depending upon the desired application. This process offers the potential for rapidly adding structural details to simpler cast or forged structures rather than the conventional approach of machining large volumes of chips to produce a monolithic metallic structure. Selective addition of metal onto simpler blanks of material can have a significant effect on lead time reduction and lower material and machining costs.

  3. Additive Manufacturing of Near-net Shaped Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, M. Parans; Sridharan, Niyanth; List, Fred A.; Babu, S. S.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Constantinides, Steve

    2016-07-26

    The technical objective of this technical collaboration phase I proposal is to fabricate near net-shaped permanent magnets using alloy powders utilizing direct metal deposition technologies at the ORNL MDF. Direct Manufacturing using the POM laser system was used to consolidate Nd2Fe14B (NdFeB) magnet powders into near net-shape parts efficiently and with virtually no wasted material as part of the feasibility study. We fabricated builds based on spherical NdFeB magnet particles. The results show that despite the ability to fabricate highly reactive materials in the laser deposition process, the magnetic coercivity and remanence of the NdFeB hard magnets is significantly reduced. X-ray powder diffraction in conjunction with electron microscopy showed that the material experienced a primary Nd2Fe17Bx solidification due to the undercooling effect (>60K). Consequently the presence of alpha iron phase resulted in deterioration of the build properties. Further optimization of the processing parameters is needed to maintain the Nd2Fe14B phase during fabrication.

  4. Production of aluminum-lithium near net shape extruded cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Paula J.

    1995-01-01

    In the late 1980's, under funding from the Advanced Launch System Program, numerous near net shape technologies were investigated as a means for producing high quality, low cost Aluminum-Lithium (Al-Li) hardware. Once such option was to extrude near net shape barrel panels instead of producing panels by machining thick plate into a final tee-stiffened configuration (which produced up to 90% scrap). This method offers a reduction in the volume of scrap and consequently reduces the buy-to-fly cost. Investigation into this technology continued under Shuttle-C funding where four Al alloys 2219, 2195, 2096, and RX 818 were extruded. Presented herein are the results of that program. Each alloy was successfully extruded at Wyman Gordon, opened and flattened at Ticorm, and solution heat treated and stretched at Reynolds Metals Company. The first two processes were quite successful while the stretching process did offer some challenges. Due to the configuration of the panels and the stretch press set-up, it was difficult to induce a consistent percentage of cold work throughout the length and width of each panel. The effects of this variation will be assessed in the test program to be conducted at a future date.

  5. Electrohydraulic Forming of Near Net Shape Automotive Panels

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop the electrohydraulic forming (EHF) process as a near net shape automotive panel manufacturing technology that simultaneously reduces the energy embedded in vehicles and the energy consumed while producing automotive structures.

  6. Near Net Shape Manufacturing of New Titanium Powders for Industry

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop a manufacturing technology to process new titanium powders into fully consolidated near net shape components for industrial applications. This will be achieved using various technologies, including press and sinter, pneumatic isostatic forging (PIF), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and adiabatic compaction.

  7. Near net shape processing: A necessity for advanced materials applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Howard A.

    1993-01-01

    High quality discrete parts are the backbones for successful operation of equipment used in transportation, communication, construction, manufacturing, and appliances. Traditional shapemaking for discrete parts is carried out predominantly by machining, or removing unwanted material to produce the desired shape. As the cost and complexity of modern materials escalates, coupled with the expense and environmental hazards associated with handling of scrap, it is increasingly important to develop near net shape processes for these materials. Such processes involve casting of liquid materials, consolidation of powder materials, or deformation processing of simple solid shapes into the desired shape. Frequently, several of these operations may be used in sequence to produce a finished part. The processes for near net shape forming may be applied to any type of material, including metals, polymers, ceramics, and their composites. The ability to produce shapes is the key to implementation of laboratory developments in materials science into real world applications. This seminar presents an overview of near net shapemaking processes, some application examples, current developments, and future research opportunities.

  8. Near-Net Shape Powder Metallurgy Rhenium Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhardt, Todd; Hamister, Mark; Carlen, Jan C.; Biaglow, James; Reed, Brian

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a method to produce a near-net shape (NNS) powder metallurgy (PM) rhenium combustion chamber of the size 445 N (100 lbf) used in a high performance liquid apogee engine. These engines are used in low earth Orbit and geostationary orbit for satellite positioning systems. The developments in near-net shape powder metallurgy rhenium combustion chambers reported in this paper will reduce manufacturing cost of the rhenium chambers by 25 percent, and reduce the manufacturing time by 30 to 40 percent. The quantity of rhenium metal powder used to produce a rhenium chamber is reduced by approximately 70 percent and the subsequent reduction in machining schedule and costs is nearly 50 percent.

  9. Near Net Shape production of metal components using LENS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlienger, E.; Dimos, D.; Griffith, M.; Michael, J.; Oliver, M.; Romero, T.; Smugeresky, J.

    1998-03-01

    Rapid Prototyping and Near Net Shape manufacturing technologies are the subject of considerable attention and development efforts. At Sandia National Laboratories, one such effort is LENS (Laser Engineered Net Shaping). The LENS process utilizes a stream of powder and a focused Nd YAG laser to build near net shape fully dense metal parts. In this process, a 3-D solid model is sliced, then an X-Y table is rastered under the beam to build each slice. The laser 1 powder head is incremented upward with each slice and the deposition process is controlled via shuttering of the laser. At present, this process is capable of producing fully dense metal parts of iron, nickel and titanium alloys including tool steels and aluminides. Tungsten components have also been produced. A unique aspect of this process is the ability to produce components wherein the composition varies at differing locations in the part. Such compositional variations may be accomplished in either a stepped or graded fashion. In this paper, the details of the process will be described. The deposition mechanism will be characterized and microstructures and their associated properties will be discussed. Examples of parts which have been produced will be shown and issues regarding dimensional control and surface finish will be addressed.

  10. Electrohydraulic Forming of Near-Net Shape Automotive Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Golovaschenko, Sergey F.

    2013-09-26

    The objective of this project was to develop the electrohydraulic forming (EHF) process as a near-net shape automotive panel manufacturing technology that simultaneously reduces the energy embedded in vehicles and the energy consumed while producing automotive structures. Pulsed pressure is created via a shockwave generated by the discharge of high voltage capacitors through a pair of electrodes in a liquid-filled chamber. The shockwave in the liquid initiated by the expansion of the plasma channel formed between two electrodes propagates towards the blank and causes the blank to be deformed into a one-sided die cavity. The numerical model of the EHF process was validated experimentally and was successfully applied to the design of the electrode system and to a multi-electrode EHF chamber for full scale validation of the process. The numerical model was able to predict stresses in the dies during pulsed forming and was validated by the experimental study of the die insert failure mode for corner filling operations. The electrohydraulic forming process and its major subsystems, including durable electrodes, an EHF chamber, a water/air management system, a pulse generator and integrated process controls, were validated to be capable to operate in a fully automated, computer controlled mode for forming of a portion of a full-scale sheet metal component in laboratory conditions. Additionally, the novel processes of electrohydraulic trimming and electrohydraulic calibration were demonstrated at a reduced-scale component level. Furthermore, a hybrid process combining conventional stamping with EHF was demonstrated as a laboratory process for a full-scale automotive panel formed out of AHSS material. The economic feasibility of the developed EHF processes was defined by developing a cost model of the EHF process in comparison to the conventional stamping process.

  11. Near net shape processing for solar thermal propulsion hardware using directed light fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J.O.; Fonseca, J.C.; Lewis, G.K.

    1998-12-01

    Directed light fabrication (DLF) is a direct metal deposition process that fuses gas delivered powder, in the focal zone of a high powered laser beam to form fully fused near net shaped components. The near net shape processing of rhenium, tungsten, iridium and other high temperature materials may offer significant cost savings compared with conventional processing. This paper describes a 3D parametric solid model, integrated with a manufacturing model, and creating a control field which runs on the DLF machine directly depositing a fully dense, solid metal, near net shaped, nozzle component. Examples of DLF deposited rhenium, iridium and tantalum, from previous work, show a continuously solidified microstructure in rod and tube shapes. Entrapped porosity indicates the required direction for continued process development. These combined results demonstrate the potential for a new method to fabricate complex near net shaped components using materials of interest to the space and aerospace industries.

  12. Near net shape forming of advanced structural ceramic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Chih

    This research applied a combination of rapid prototyping techniques and ceramic gelcasting processes in the design and manufacturing of advanced structural ceramic components that cannot be fabricated by other shape-forming processes. An Assembly Mold SDM process, a derivative process of Shape Deposition Manufacturing, was adopted along with modified gelcasting with great success. The fabricated gas turbine rotors, inlet nozzles, and mesoscale burner arrays have demonstrated superior shape accuracy, mechanical strength, and surface smoothness with a feature size of 200 mum. The design concepts and functionalities of the ceramic devices were verified with performance tests. The shape complexity and surface quality of ceramic parts have been further improved by the use of a mold assembly made of a low melting temperature metal alloy. The introduction of metal alloy required modifications in the mold design, machining procedure, and ceramic processing. A complete shape forming process (from slurry to final parts) was developed for the low melting temperature metal alloy. In addition, the choice of ceramic material now includes SiC, which is critical to the development of micro heat exchangers. Forty-channel, high-aspect-ratio structured SiC heat exchangers were fabricated, and the thermal conductivity value of SiC was found to be comparable to that of steel. The catalyst deposition and ceramic precursor impregnation processes were proposed to enable use of the SiC heat exchangers as micro reactors. Micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS)-related techniques such as SU-8 deep photolithography and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography were combined with gelcasting to make micro patterns on structural ceramics. A feature size of 125 mum and aspect ratio of 8 have been achieved in the preliminary experiments. Based on the fabricated ceramic devices, a graphical method to characterize the shape attributes of complex-shaped components was proposed and used to compare

  13. The potential of centrifugal casting for the production of near net shape uranium parts

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, E.

    1993-09-01

    This report was written to provide a detailed summary of a literature survey on the near net shape casting process of centrifugal casting. Centrifugal casting is one potential casting method which could satisfy the requirements of the LANL program titled Near Net Shape Casting of Uranium for Reduced Environmental, Safety and Health Impact. In this report, centrifugal casting techniques are reviewed and an assessment of the ability to achieve the near net shape and waste minimization goals of the LANL program by using these techniques is made. Based upon the literature reviewed, it is concluded that if properly modified for operation within a vacuum, vertical or horizontal centrifugation could be used to safely cast uranium for the production of hollow, cylindrical parts. However, for the production of components of geometries other than hollow tubes, vertical centrifugation could be combined with other casting methods such as semi-permanent mold or investment casting.

  14. Near net shape forming processes for chemically prepared zinc oxide varistors.

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, Steven John; Voigt, James A.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2005-01-01

    Chemically prepared zinc oxide powders are fabricated for the production of high aspect ratio varistor components. Colloidal processing in water was performed to reduce agglomerates to primary particles, form a high solids loading slurry, and prevent dopant migration. The milled and dispersed powder exhibited a viscoelastic to elastic behavioral transition at a volume loading of 43-46%. The origin of this transition was studied using acoustic spectroscopy, zeta potential measurements and oscillatory rheology. The phenomenon occurs due to a volume fraction solids dependent reduction in the zeta potential of the solid phase. It is postulated to result from divalent ion binding within the polyelectrolyte dispersant chain, and was mitigated using a polyethylene glycol plasticizing additive. Chemically prepared zinc oxide powders were processed for the production of high aspect ratio varistor components. Near net shape casting methods including slip casting and agarose gelcasting were evaluated for effectiveness in achieving a uniform green microstructure achieving density values near the theoretical maximum during sintering. The structure of the green parts was examined by mercury porisimetry. Agarose gelcasting produced green parts with low solids loading values and did not achieve high fired density. Isopressing the agarose cast parts after drying raised the fired density to greater than 95%, but the parts exhibited catastrophic shorting during electrical testing. Slip casting produced high green density parts, which exhibited high fired density values. The electrical characteristics of slip cast parts are comparable with dry pressed powder compacts. Alternative methods for near net shape forming of ceramic dispersions were investigated for use with the chemically prepared ZnO material. Recommendations for further investigation to achieve a viable production process are presented.

  15. Recent Advances in Near-Net-Shape Fabrication of Al-Li Alloy 2195 for Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John; Domack, Marcia; Hoffman, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Recent applications in launch vehicles use 2195 processed to Super Lightweight Tank specifications. Potential benefits exist by tailoring heat treatment and other processing parameters to the application. Assess the potential benefits and advocate application of Al-Li near-net-shape technologies for other launch vehicle structural components. Work with manufacturing and material producers to optimize Al-Li ingot shape and size for enhanced near-net-shape processing. Examine time dependent properties of 2195 critical for reusable applications.

  16. Near-net-shape manufacturing: Spray-formed metal matrix composites and tooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, Kevin M.

    1994-01-01

    Spray forming is a materials processing technology in which a bulk liquid metal is converted to a spray of fine droplets and deposited onto a substrate or pattern to form a near-net-shape solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing without sacrificing, and oftentimes substantially improving, product quality. Spray forming can be performed with a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offers property improvements resulting from rapid solidification (e.g. refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is developing a unique spray-forming method, the Controlled Aspiration Process (CAP), to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Results from two spray-accompanying technical and economic benefits. These programs involved spray forming aluminum strip reinforced with SiC particulate, and the production of tooling, such as injection molds and dies, using low-melting-point metals.

  17. Near-net shape processing of spherical high Nb-TiAl alloy powder by gelcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hui-ping; Liu, Xiao-ting; Ji, Ye; Guo, Zhi-meng

    2013-11-01

    Spherical Ti-45Al-8.5Nb-(W,B,Y) alloy powder prepared by an argon plasma process was near-net shape by gelcasting. In the non-aqueous system, methaerylate-2-hydroxy ethyl, toluene, benzoyl peroxide, and N, N-dimethylaniline were used as the monomer, solvent, initiator, and catalyst, respectively. To improve sintering and forming behaviors, many additives were included in the suspension. The concentrated suspension with a solid loading of 70vol% was prepared. The high Nb-TiAl powder was analyzed by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was found that the green bodies had a smooth surface and homogeneous microstructure, exhibiting a bending strength as high as 50 MPa. After sintering at 1480°C for 2 h in vacuum, uniform complex-shaped high Nb-TiAl parts were successfully produced.

  18. Powder-Coated Towpreg: Avenues to Near Net Shape Fabrication of High Performance Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, N. J.; Cano, R. J.; Marchello, J. M.; Sandusky, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Near net shape parts were fabricated from powder-coated preforms. Key issues including powder loss during weaving and tow/tow friction during braiding were addressed, respectively, by fusing the powder to the fiber prior to weaving and applying a water-based gel to the towpreg prior to braiding. A 4:1 debulking of a complex 3-D woven powder-coated preform was achieved in a single step utilizing expansion rubber molding. Also, a process was developed for using powder-coated towpreg to fabricate consolidated ribbon having good dimensional integrity and low voids. Such ribbon will be required for in situ fabrication of structural components via heated head advanced tow placement. To implement process control and ensure high quality ribbon, the ribbonizer heat transfer and pulling force were modeled from fundamental principles. Most of the new ribbons were fabricated from dry polyarylene ether and polymide powders.

  19. Near-Net Shape Fabrication Using Low-Cost Titanium Alloy Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David M. Bowden; Dr. William H. Peter

    2012-03-31

    The use of titanium in commercial aircraft production has risen steadily over the last half century. The aerospace industry currently accounts for 58% of the domestic titanium market. The Kroll process, which has been used for over 50 years to produce titanium metal from its mineral form, consumes large quantities of energy. And, methods used to convert the titanium sponge output of the Kroll process into useful mill products also require significant energy resources. These traditional approaches result in product forms that are very expensive, have long lead times of up to a year or more, and require costly operations to fabricate finished parts. Given the increasing role of titanium in commercial aircraft, new titanium technologies are needed to create a more sustainable manufacturing strategy that consumes less energy, requires less material, and significantly reduces material and fabrication costs. A number of emerging processes are under development which could lead to a breakthrough in extraction technology. Several of these processes produce titanium alloy powder as a product. The availability of low-cost titanium powders may in turn enable a more efficient approach to the manufacture of titanium components using powder metallurgical processing. The objective of this project was to define energy-efficient strategies for manufacturing large-scale titanium structures using these low-cost powders as the starting material. Strategies include approaches to powder consolidation to achieve fully dense mill products, and joining technologies such as friction and laser welding to combine those mill products into near net shape (NNS) preforms for machining. The near net shape approach reduces material and machining requirements providing for improved affordability of titanium structures. Energy and cost modeling was used to define those approaches that offer the largest energy savings together with the economic benefits needed to drive implementation. Technical

  20. Novel processes for near net-shaped fabrication of monolithic and reinforced oxide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pragati

    Mg reinforced Alsb2Osb3 composites were fabricated by pressureless infiltration of molten Mg into porous Alsb2Osb3 preforms. Such pressureless infiltration is thought to be driven by a displacement reaction that was observed to occur at interfaces between liquid Mg and solid Alsb2Osb3. The feasibility of fabricating near net-shaped, monolithic, MgAlsb2Osb4 spinel bodies by the oxidation of the solid Mg-Alsb2Osb3-bearing composites was demonstrated. By controlling the preform porosity and the infiltration conditions, Mg-Alsb2Osb3-bearing composite bodies could be produced with the proper overall stoichiometry for spinel. The Mg/Alsb2Osb3 composites could be machined into complex shapes. Oxidation of the Mg in the shaped composite was conducted in pure, flowing oxygen at 430{-}700sp°C. Post-oxidation annealing at 1200sp°C then allowed for complete conversion of MgO-Alsb2Osb3 bearing body into MgAlsb2Osb4 spinel. A final sintering treatment in flowing Ar at 1700sp°C yielded spinel specimens with densities ≥92%. The sintered spinel bodies retained the Mg-Alsb2Osb3-bearing precursor shape and dimensions (to within 0.63%). The fabrication of spinel-matrix composites is also discussed. In addition, a novel approach is presented for the fabrication of dense, shaped ceramic/metal composites by a novel class of displacement reactions. This approach differs from other oxidation-based processes for fabricating near net-shaped oxide/metal composites (e.g. DIMOX, Csp4) in that a reaction-induced volume expansion is used to compensate for the porosity within a preform, so as to yield a dense composite with a high ceramic content. In the present case, a displacement reaction between liquid Mg and solid Alsb2Osb3 was used to produce composites of MgO and Mg-bearing metal. Porous, shaped Alsb2Osb3 preforms were placed in contact with a Mg(l) bath at 1000sp°C. The liquid Mg completely infiltrated and consumed the Alsb2Osb3 preform by the following net reaction:$3Mg(l) + Alsb2

  1. Characterization of Al-Cu-Li Alloy 2090 Near Net Shape Extrusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birt, M. J.; Domack, M. S.; Hafley, R. A.; Pollock, W. D.

    1998-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys near net shape extrusions are being evaluated for potential application in launch vehicle structures. The objective of this study was to determine tensile and fracture properties, corrosion resistance, and weldability of integrally stiffened panels of Al-Cu-Li alloy 2090 in the T8 temper. The microstructure was pre-dominantly unrecrystallized. Texture analyses revealed the presence of fiber components in the stiffeners and a combination of fiber and rolling components in the skin. Variations in grain morphology and texture through the extruded cross section were correlated with the tensile, fracture, and corrosion behavior. Tensile strengths at room and cryogenic temperatures of the 2090 extrusions were similar to other 2090 product forms and were higher than 2219-T87, the primary structural material in the Space Shuttle external tank; however, ductilities were lower. The fracture resistance of the 2090 extrusion was lower than 2219-T87 plate at room temperature. At cryogenic temperatures, tensile ductility and fracture behavior of the 2090 extrusion were similar to other 2090 product forms but were lower than 2219-T87 plate. The exfoliation and stress corrosion resistance of the 2090 extrusion compared favorably with the characteristics of other 2090 product forms. The weldability and weldment properties of the extrusions were similar to 2090 and 2219 plates.

  2. Colloidal processing of chemically prepared zinc oxide varistors. Part 2, near net shape forming and fired electrical properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, James A.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Dimos, Duane Brian

    2003-07-01

    Chemically prepared zinc oxide powders were processed for the production of high aspect ratio varistor components (length/diameter >5). Near-net-shape casting methods including slip casting and agarose gelcasting were evaluated for effectiveness in achieving a uniform green microstructure that densifies to near theoretical values during sintering. The structure of the green parts was examined by mercury porisimetry. Agarose gelcasting produced green parts having low solids loading values and did not achieve high fired density. Isopressing the agarose cast parts after drying raised the fired density to greater than 95%, but the parts exhibited catastrophic shorting during electrical testing. Slip casting produced high green density parts, which exhibit high fired density values. The electrical characteristics of slip-cast parts are comparable with dry-pressed powder compacts.

  3. Near-Net-Shape Production of Hollow Titanium Alloy Components via Electrochemical Reduction of Metal Oxide Precursors in Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Di; Xiao, Wei; Chen, George Z.

    2013-04-01

    Metal oxide precursors (ca. 90 wt pct Ti, 6 wt pct Al, and 4 wt pct V) were prepared with a hollow structure in various shapes such as a sphere, miniature golf club head, and cup using a one-step solid slip-casting process. The precursors were then electro-deoxidized in molten calcium chloride [3.2 V, 1173 K (900 °C)] against a graphite anode. After 24 hours of electrolysis, the near-net-shape Ti-6Al-4V product maintained its original shape with controlled shrinkage. Oxygen contents in the Ti-6Al-4V components were typically below 2000 ppm. The maximum compressive stress and modulus of electrolytic products obtained in this work were approximately 243 MPa and 14 GPa, respectively, matching with the requirement for medical implants. Further research directions are discussed for mechanical improvement of the products via densification during or after electrolysis. This simple, fast, and energy-efficient near-net-shape manufacturing method could allow titanium alloy components with desired geometries to be prepared directly from a mixture of metal oxides, promising an innovative technology for the low-cost production of titanium alloy components.

  4. Superplastic deformation in carbonate apatite ceramics under constant compressive loading for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Masanori; Wakamatsu, Nobukazu; Doi, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    To produce carbonate apatite (CAP) ceramics with the desired complex shapes using superplastic deformation, deformation behavior of CAP ceramics under constant loading as well as physical properties after deformation were evaluated. Sintered CAP ceramics were plastically deformed in an electric furnace attached to a universal hydraulic testing machine under a constant load. CAP ceramics subjected to an initial compressive pressure of 10 MPa showed an appreciable amount of plastic deformation at temperatures ranging from 720 to 800 degrees C. Plastic deformation increased with increasing temperature from about 10% to 70% after two hours of loading. X-ray diffraction analysis and SEM observation further revealed that some CAP crystals were elongated and aligned with the c-axis normal to the loading direction during superplastic deformation. It was thus concluded that a marked plastic deformation of about 70% at 800 degrees C would be sufficient for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable CAP bone substitutes with complex shapes.

  5. Catalogue of X-Ray Texture Data for Al-Cu-Li Alloy 1460, 2090, 2096 and 2195 Near-Net-Shape Extrusions, Sheet and Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J.; Hafley, Robert A.; Alexa, Joel A.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of crystallographic texture on the mechanical properties of near-net-shape extrusions is of major interest ff these products are to find application in launch vehicle or aircraft structures. The objective of this research was to produce a catalogue containing quantitative texture information for extruded product, sheet and plate. The material characterized was extracted from wide, integrally stiffened panels fabricated from the Al-Cu-Li alloys 1460, 2090, 2096 and 2195. The textural characteristics of sheet and plate products of the same alloys were determined for comparison purposes. The approach involved using X-ray diffraction to generate pole figures in combination with orientation distribution function analysis. The data were compiled as a function of location in the extruded cross-sections and the variation in the major deformation- and recrystallization-related texture components was identified.

  6. Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Advanced Near Net Shape Technology (ANNST) Method for Fabricating Stiffened Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, Mary Cecilia; Hehir, Austin R.; Ivanco, Marie L.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2016-01-01

    This cost-benefit analysis assesses the benefits of the Advanced Near Net Shape Technology (ANNST) manufacturing process for fabricating integrally stiffened cylinders. These preliminary, rough order-of-magnitude results report a 46 to 58 percent reduction in production costs and a 7-percent reduction in weight over the conventional metallic manufacturing technique used in this study for comparison. Production cost savings of 35 to 58 percent were reported over the composite manufacturing technique used in this study for comparison; however, the ANNST concept was heavier. In this study, the predicted return on investment of equipment required for the ANNST method was ten cryogenic tank barrels when compared with conventional metallic manufacturing. The ANNST method was compared with the conventional multi-piece metallic construction and composite processes for fabricating integrally stiffened cylinders. A case study compared these three alternatives for manufacturing a cylinder of specified geometry, with particular focus placed on production costs and process complexity, with cost analyses performed by the analogy and parametric methods. Furthermore, a scalability study was conducted for three tank diameters to assess the highest potential payoff of the ANNST process for manufacture of large-diameter cryogenic tanks. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was subsequently used with a group of selected subject matter experts to assess the value of the various benefits achieved by the ANNST method for potential stakeholders. The AHP study results revealed that decreased final cylinder mass and quality assurance were the most valued benefits of cylinder manufacturing methods, therefore emphasizing the relevance of the benefits achieved with the ANNST process for future projects.

  7. Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Advanced Near Net Shape Technology (ANNST) Method for Fabricating Stiffened Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Marie L.; Domack, Marcia S.; Stoner, Mary Cecilia; Hehir, Austin R.

    2016-01-01

    Low Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and high levels of uncertainty make it challenging to develop cost estimates of new technologies in the R&D phase. It is however essential for NASA to understand the costs and benefits associated with novel concepts, in order to prioritize research investments and evaluate the potential for technology transfer and commercialization. This paper proposes a framework to perform a cost-benefit analysis of a technology in the R&D phase. This framework was developed and used to assess the Advanced Near Net Shape Technology (ANNST) manufacturing process for fabricating integrally stiffened cylinders. The ANNST method was compared with the conventional multi-piece metallic construction and composite processes for fabricating integrally stiffened cylinders. Following the definition of a case study for a cryogenic tank cylinder of specified geometry, data was gathered through interviews with Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), with particular focus placed on production costs and process complexity. This data served as the basis to produce process flowcharts and timelines, mass estimates, and rough order-of-magnitude cost and schedule estimates. The scalability of the results was subsequently investigated to understand the variability of the results based on tank size. Lastly, once costs and benefits were identified, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) was used to assess the relative value of these achieved benefits for potential stakeholders. These preliminary, rough order-of-magnitude results predict a 46 to 58 percent reduction in production costs and a 7-percent reduction in weight over the conventional metallic manufacturing technique used in this study for comparison. Compared to the composite manufacturing technique, these results predict cost savings of 35 to 58 percent; however, the ANNST concept was heavier. In this study, the predicted return on investment of equipment required for the ANNST method was ten cryogenic tank barrels

  8. A novel one-pot process for near-net-shape fabrication of open-porous resorbable hydroxyapatite/protein composites and in vivo assessment.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Berit; Koch, Dietmar; Lutz, Rainer; Schlegel, Karl A; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2014-09-01

    We present a mild one-pot freeze gelation process for fabricating near-net, complex-shaped hydroxyapatite scaffolds and to directly incorporate active proteins during scaffold processing. In particular, the direct protein incorporation enables a simultaneous adjustment and control of scaffold microstructure, porosity, resorbability and enhancement of initial mechanical and handling stability. Two proteins, serum albumin and lysozyme, are selected and their effect on scaffold stability and microstructure investigated by biaxial strength tests, electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The resulting hydroxyapatite/protein composites feature adjustable porosities from 50% to 70% and a mechanical strength ranging from 2 to 6 MPa comparable to that of human spongiosa without any sintering step. Scaffold degradation behaviour and protein release are assessed by in vitro studies. A preliminary in vivo assessment of scaffold biocompatibility and resorption behaviour in adult domestic pigs is discussed. After implantation, composites were resorbed up to 50% after only 4 weeks and up to 65% after 8 weeks. In addition, 14% new bone formation after 4 weeks and 37% after 8 weeks were detected. All these investigations demonstrate the outstanding suitability of the one-pot-process to create, in a customisable and reliable way, biocompatible scaffolds with sufficient mechanical strength for handling and surgical insertion, and for potential use as biodegradable bone substitutes and versatile platform for local drug delivery.

  9. Development of a near-net-shape casting technology for the U-6Nb alloy. Part 1: Materials characterization, experiment design, and model construction

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M.J.; Keeney, J.A.; Wendel, M.W.; Demint, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12) is conducting highly coupled experimental and numerical studies to develop the technology needed to produce near-net-shape (NNS)-cast uranium-6 wt% niobium (U-6Nb) components which have a controlled carbon content. Current activities are focused on defining mechanical and metallurgical properties of cast material; experimental studies to define NNS casting, carbide particle flotation, and immersion-quench physics; and developing the numerical models needed to support the optimized design of NNS components. This paper summarizes the material characterization, experiment design, and model development activities.

  10. Producing Zirconium Diboride Components with Complex, Near-Net Shape Geometries by Aqueous Room-Temperature Injection Molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Youngblood, Jeffrey; Trice, Rodney

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature injection molding is proposed as a novel, low-cost and more energy efficient manufacturing process capable of forming complex-shaped zirconium diboride (ZrB2) parts. This innovative processing method utilized aqueous suspensions with high powder loading and a minimal amount (5 vol.) of water-soluble polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was used as a viscosity modifier. Rheological characterization was performed to evaluate the room-temperature flow properties of ZrB2-PVP suspensions. ZrB2 specimens were fabricated with high green body strength and were machinable prior to binder removal despite their low polymer content. After binder burnout and pressureless sintering, the bulk density and microstructure of specimens were characterized using Archimedes technique and scanning electron microscopy. X-Ray Diffraction was used to determine the phase compositions present in sintered specimens. Ultimate strength of sintered specimens will be determined using ASTM C1323-10 compressive C-ring test.

  11. Final report to the strategic environmental research and development program on near-net shape casting of uranium-6% niobium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fabrication methods traditionally used in the fabrication of depleted uranium parts within the Department of Energy (DOE) are extremely wasteful, with only 3% of the starting material actually appearing as finished product. The current effort, funded by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), was conceived as a means to drastically reduce this inefficiency and the accompanying waste by demonstrating the technology to cast simple parts close to their final shape in molds made from a variety of materials. As a part of this coordinated study, LLNL was given, and has achieved, two primary objectives: (1) to demonstrate the feasibility of using refractory metal for reusable molds in the production of castings of uranium-6 wt% niobium alloy (U-6Nb); and (2) to demonstrate the utility of detailed simulations of thermal and fluid flow characteristics in the understanding and improvement of the near-net shape casting process. In both cases, our efforts were focused on a flat plate castings, which serve as simple prototypical parts. This report summarizes the results of LLNL work in each area.

  12. Near-Net Forging Technology Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, I. Keith

    1996-01-01

    Significant advantages in specific mechanical properties, when compared to conventional aluminum (Al) alloys, make aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys attractive candidate materials for use in cryogenic propellant tanks and dry bay structures. However, the cost of Al-Li alloys is typically five times that of 2219 aluminum. If conventional fabrication processes are employed to fabricate launch vehicle structure, the material costs will restrict their utilization. In order to fully exploit the potential cost and performance benefits of Al-Li alloys, it is necessary that near-net manufacturing methods be developed to off-set or reduce raw material costs. Near-net forging is an advanced manufacturing method that uses elevated temperature metal movement (forging) to fabricate a single piece, near-net shape, structure. This process is termed 'near-net' because only a minimal amount of post-forge machining is required. The near-net forging process was developed to reduce the material scrap rate (buy-to-fly ratio) and fabrication costs associated with conventional manufacturing methods. The goal for the near-net forging process, when mature, is to achieve an overall cost reduction of approximately 50 percent compared with conventional manufacturing options for producing structures fabricated from Al-Li alloys. This NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) sponsored program has been a part of a unique government / industry partnership, coordinated to develop and demonstrate near-net forging technology. The objective of this program was to demonstrate scale-up of the near-net forging process. This objective was successfully achieved by fabricating four integrally stiffened, 170- inch diameter by 20-inch tall, Al-Li alloy 2195, Y-ring adapters. Initially, two 2195 Al-Li ingots were converted and back extruded to produce four cylindrical blockers. Conventional ring rolling of the blockers was performed to produce ring preforms, which were then contour ring rolled to produce

  13. Some Metallurgical Issues Concerning Austenite Conditioning in Nb-Ti and Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels Processed by Near-Net-Shape Casting and Direct Rolling Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Beatriz; Rodriguez-Ibabe, Jose M.

    2016-08-01

    As thin slab direct rolling technologies are moving to the production of higher quality steel grades, chemical compositions based on Nb-Ti and Nb-Mo become a good option. However, with the use of multiple microalloying additions, the as-cast austenite conditioning becomes more complex. This paper analyzes some of the microstructural features that should be taken into account during the as-cast austenite conditioning in Nb-Ti and Nb-Mo microalloyed steel grades. In the case of Nb-Ti grades, it has been observed that the process parameters during solidification and post-solidification steps affect the austenite evolution during hot rolling. This is due to the differences in the size and volume fraction of TiN particles that can be formed. Fine TiN precipitates have been shown to be able to delay recrystallization kinetics. Moreover, the solute drag effect of Ti cannot be ignored in the case of hyperstoichiometric Ti/N ratios. It is observed that Nb-Ti grades tend to have lower non-recrystallization temperatures compared to Nb grades, which means that pancaking of the austenite is more difficult for these steels. The opposite is observed for the Nb-Mo grades, although in both cases the behavior is affected by the nominal content of Nb.

  14. Near Net Manufacturing Using Thin Gage Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeshita, Jennifer; Potter, David; Holquin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) and near net spin forming of FSW aluminumn blanks were investigated for large-scale pressure vessel applications. With a specific focus on very thin gage 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys, the program concentrated on the following: the criteria used for material selection, a potential manufacturing flow, and the effectiveness and associated risks of near net spin forming. Discussion will include the mechanical properties of the friction stir welds and the parent material from before and after the spin forming process. This effort was performed under a NASA Space Exploration initiative focused on increasing the affordability, reliability and performance of pressure vessels larger than 10 ft. diameter.

  15. Near net shape processing of continuous lengths of superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Danyluk, Steven; McNallan, Michael; Troendly, Robert; Poeppel, Roger; Goretta, Kenneth; Lanagan, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A system and method for mechanically forming a ceramic superconductor product. A system for making the ceramic superconductor includes a metallic channel portion having a cross section for receiving a ceramic superconductor powder, a roll to mechanically reduce the channel cross section and included superconductor powder and a cap portion welded to the channel portion using a localized high energy source. The assembled bar is then mechanically reduced to form a tape or wire end product.

  16. Near net shape processing of continuous lengths of superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Danyluk, S.; McNallan, M.; Troendly, R.; Poeppel, R.; Goretta, K.; Lanagan, M.

    1997-08-26

    A system and method for mechanically forming a ceramic superconductor product are disclosed. A system for making the ceramic superconductor includes a metallic channel portion having a cross section for receiving a ceramic superconductor powder, a roll to mechanically reduce the channel cross section and included superconductor powder and a cap portion welded to the channel portion using a localized high energy source. The assembled bar is then mechanically reduced to form a tape or wire end product. 9 figs.

  17. Heavy metals processing near-net-forming summary progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, L.D.; Thompson, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    This study utilized a converging-diverging nozzle to spray-form an alloy having a weight percent composition of 49.6% iron, 49.6% tungsten, and 0.8% carbon into samples for analysis. The alloy was a surrogate that displayed metallurgical characteristics similar to the alloys used in the heavy metals processing industry. US DOE facilities are evaluating advanced technologies which can simplify component fabrication, reduce handling steps, and minimize final machining. The goal of producing net-shaped components can be approached from several directions. In spray forming, molten metal is converted by a nozzle into a plume of fine droplets which quickly cool in flight and solidify against a substrate. The near-final dimension product that is formed receives additional benefits from rapid solidification. This single-step processing approach would aid the heavy metals industry by streamlining fabrication, improving production yields, and minimizing the generation of processing wastes. This Program effort provided a large selection of as-sprayed specimens. These samples were sprayed with gas-to-metal mass ratios ranging from 0.8:1 to 4:1. Samples targeted for analysis were produced from different spray conditions. Metallography on some samples revealed areas that were fully dense and homogeneous at 5,000X. These areas averaged grain sizes of 1 micron diameter. Other samples when viewed at 2,000X were highly segregated in the 10 micron diameter range. Deposit efficiencies of greater than 90% were demonstrated using the untailored spray system. Discharge gases were analyzed and two categories of particles were identified. One category of particle had a chemical composition characteristic of the alloy being sprayed and the second type of particle had a chemical composition characteristic of the ceramics used in the spray system component fabrication. Particles ranged in size from 0.07 to 3 microns in diameter. 8 refs., 67 figs., 20 tabs.

  18. Near Net Shape Rapid Manufacture & Repair by LENS(registered trademark)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Steels 304, 316, 420 Nickel Based Hastelloy X Aluminium 4047 Cobalt Base CoCr ( Stellite ) Copper Cu-Ni LENS Developmental Alloys Alloy Class Alloy...Alloy Class Alloy Ti 48-2-2 A2 Titanium Ti 22Al-23Nb 15-5PH 600 & 690 309, 410 , 416 Haynes 188 & 230 MM 10 MarM 247 CPM 10V CMSX-3 Steels

  19. Chemically Induced Solidification: A New Way to Produce Thin Solid-Near-Net Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Carl; Spooner, Stephen; Davis, Claire; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-12-01

    In situ observation of the solidification of high-carbon steel (4 wt pct C) through decarburization has been carried out as a feasibility study into reducing high-power usage and high CO2 production involved in steel making. Decarburization has been carried out under both air and pure N2 atmospheres at temperatures of 1573 K and 1673 K (1300 °C and 1400 °C). A solidified shell of around 500 μm was formed with carbon concentrations reduced down to 1 pct in as short as 18 seconds.

  20. Reaction-Forming Method for Producing Near Net-Shape Refractory Metal Carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Palmisiano, Marc N.; Jakubenas, Kevin J.; Baranwal, Rita

    2004-07-20

    A method for reaction forming refractory metal carbides. The method involves the fabrication of a glassy carbon preform by casting an organic, resin-based liquid mixture into a mold and subsequently heat treating it in two steps, which cures and pyrolizes the resin resulting in a porous carbon preform. By varying the amounts of the constituents in the organic, resin-based liquid mixture, control over the density of the carbon preform is obtained. Control of the density and microstructure of the carbon preform allows for determination of the microstructure and properties of the refractory metal carbide material produced. The glassy carbon preform is placed on a bed of refractory metal or refractory metal--silicon alloy. The pieces are heated above the melting point of the metal or alloy. The molten metal wicks inside the porous carbon preform and reacts, forming the refractory metal carbide or refractory metal carbide plus a minor secondary phase.

  1. Metal Injection Moulding: A Near Net Shape Fabrication Method for the Manufacture of Turbine Engine Component

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Mechanical Properties of Inconel 625 and 718 Alloys Processed by Powder Injection Molding, Superalloys 718 , 625, 706 and Various Derivatives, ed...on the processing and characterization of Inconel 625 LPIM material are presented. In depth microstructural characterization was performed on the... dissolution of second phase particles in the microstructure can be achieved and needs to be optimized with secondary heat treatment such as solution

  2. Finite element simulation of HIP-process to produce 3d near net shape parts

    SciTech Connect

    Zadeh, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    One of the major problems when producing powder metallurgy parts through hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is the non homogeneous shrinkage of HIP-capsule during the process. This leads to time and cost consuming machining of the HIP parts. In order to reduce the machining to a minimum, one can try to simulate the HIP-process by means of numerical methods. Hereby, the part distortion can be predicted, and hence a new HIP-capsule can be designed in such a way to prevent the distortion partly or even completely. In the following, a finite element method is used, on one hand, to simulate part shrinkage during HIP process; on the other hand a method is integrated in this simulation to optimize the HIP-capsule geometry. For the determination of material dependent parameters, a mixture of theoretical and experimental methods is used. Results of simulation are verified for a complex 3d HIP part out of TiAl6V4.

  3. Shape-assimilation effect: retrospective distortion of visual shapes.

    PubMed

    Ono, Fuminori; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    A brief visual stimulus distorts the perceived shape of a subsequent visual stimulus as being dissimilar to the shape of a previous stimulus (shape-contrast effect). In this study, we presented a visual stimulus after a to-be-estimated target stimulus and found that the perceived shape of the target stimulus appeared to be similar to the shape of the following stimulus (shape-assimilation effect). The assimilation effect occurred even when the following stimulus was presented at positions different from that of the target stimulus, indicating that the shape-assimilation effect is a nonretinotopic distortion. The results suggest that the preceding and succeeding stimuli differentially modulate the perceived shape of a briefly presented stimulus.

  4. Shape effects on asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davalos, J.; Carvano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to probe how the shape of a body like an asteroid could be modifying its observed spectra and the derived mineralogical interfaces based on spectral modeling. To model this effect, we construct an oblate ellipsoid with triangular facets, where each facet contributes to the overall reflectance. The synthetic spectra is generated by the isotropic multiple-scattering approximation (IMSA) reflectance model of Hapke (1993). First, we obtained optical constants by inverting the spectra of meteorites, obtained from the RELAB spectral database. These optical constants were found inverting the reflectance bidirectional equation of Hapke; this is made in two steps: (i) The first inversion is to find the single-scattering albedo π (ii) in the model of Hapke, this albedo is found under the regime of the geometric optics, where the particle size is much larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Here we assumed a constant value for the real part of the optical constant n=1.5. With these optical constants, we can construct synthetic spectra for any particle size. The phase function used is the double Henyey-Greenstein phase function and an accurate expression for the H-functions. We started with the ellipsoidal shape a=1.0, b=c=0.5 for two particle size 50 and 250 μ m, in this part, we found good differences in the BAR parameter between the two geometric models, this was done for 100 Eucrite meteorites spectra. In this first study, we found that the BAR parameter between the two models is bigger when the particle size increases. In the second part, we started with different ellipsoidal shapes and produced synthetic spectra for material with eucrite and diogenite composition with a phase angle of 20 degrees, incidence and emission angles of 10 degrees, and particle size at 250 μ m. All spectra was generated for four parameters of phase angle b=[0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8] taking the empirical relation between the phase constants of Hapke (2012

  5. Triple shape memory effect of star-shaped polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xifeng; Wang, Lin; Wang, Wenxi; Chen, Hongmei; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-05-14

    In this study, we synthesized one type of star-shaped polyurethane (SPU) with star-shaped poly(ε-caprolactone) (SPCL) containing different arm numbers as soft segment and 4,4'-diphenyl methane diisocyanate (MDI) as well as chain extender 1,4-butylene glycol (BDO) as hard segment. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) confirmed the chemical structure of the material. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results indicated that both the melting temperature (Tm) and transition temperature (Ttrans) of SPU decreased with the hard segment composition increase. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrated that the increase of the crystallinity of SPU following the raised arm numbers endowed a high shape fixity of six-arm star-shaped polyurethane (6S-PU) and a wide melting temperature range, which resulted in an excellent triple-shape memory effect of 6S-PU. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay evaluated with osteoblasts through Alamar blue assay demonstrates that this copolymer possessed good cytocompatibility. This material can be potentially used as a new smart material in the field of biomaterials.

  6. Energy performance of net-zero and near net-zero energy homes in New England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Walter D.

    Net-Zero Energy Homes (NZEHs) are homes that consume no more energy than they produce on site during the course of a year. They are well insulated and sealed, use energy efficient appliances, lighting, and mechanical equipment, are designed to maximize the benefits from day lighting, and most often use a combination of solar hot water, passive solar and photovoltaic (PV) panels to produce their on-site energy. To date, NZEHs make up a miniscule percentage of homes in the United States, and of those, few have had their actual performance measured and analyzed once built and occupied. This research focused on 19 NZEHs and near net-zero energy homes (NNZEHs) built in New England. This set of homes had varying designs, numbers of occupants, and installed technologies for energy production, space heating and cooling, and domestic hot water systems. The author worked with participating homeowners to collect construction and systems specifications, occupancy information, and twelve months of energy consumption, production and cost measurements, in order to determine whether the homes reached their respective energy performance design goals. The author found that six out of ten NZEHs achieved net-zero energy or better, while all nine of the NNZEHs achieved an energy density (kWh/ft 2/person) at least half as low as the control house, also built in New England. The median construction cost for the 19 homes was 155/ft 2 vs. 110/ft2 for the US average, their average monthly energy cost was 84% below the average for homes in New England, and their estimated CO2 emissions averaged 90% below estimated CO2 emissions from the control house. Measured energy consumption averaged 14% below predictions for the NZEHs and 38% above predictions for the NNZEHs, while generated energy was within +/- 10% of predicted for 17 out of 18 on-site PV systems. Based on these results, the author concludes that these types of homes can meet or exceed their designed energy performance (depending on

  7. Influence of Handling Parameters on Coating Characteristics in Order to Produce Near-Net-Shape Wear Resistant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Krebs, B.

    2012-06-01

    The present study investigates the influence of spray torch handling parameters such as the spray angle, spray distance, track pitch, and gun velocity on the deposition rate and the microstructure of atmospheric plasma sprayed WC-12Co coatings as well as twin wire arc sprayed WSC-Fe coatings. Similarities as well as fundamental differences in the sensitivity of the two spray processes, regarding changes in handling parameters are discussed, using results of light microscopic analyses. Both coating systems show distinct changes of the deposition rate when varying the handling parameters. An empirical model could be determined to describe the coating deposition. This model enables an optimization of path planning processes by reducing the number of optimization loops. However, the coatings show visible changes in the microstructure, which have to be taken into consideration in order to guarantee the production of high quality coatings.

  8. Magnetic shape memory effect in thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heczko, Oleg; Soroka, Aleksandr; Hannula, Simo-Pekka

    2008-07-01

    The magnetic shape memory (MSM) effect was observed in Ni-Mn-Ga freestanding thin foils down to 90μm in thickness using top-down approach. The foils were prepared by thinning the bulk crystals exhibiting MSM effect. The effect was evaluated from the magnetization curves. The significant decrease in magnetic field needed to initiate the MSM effect (magnetic field induced strain or martensite structure reorientation) was observed for the studied foils down to μ0H=0.088T or H =70kA/m. Observation suggests that the pinning of twin boundaries on the internal obstacles rather than pinning on surface lowers twin boundaries' mobility.

  9. Mechanocaloric effects in shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Mañosa, Lluís; Planes, Antoni

    2016-08-13

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) are a class of ferroic materials which undergo a structural (martensitic) transition where the associated ferroic property is a lattice distortion (strain). The sensitiveness of the transition to the conjugated external field (stress), together with the latent heat of the transition, gives rise to giant mechanocaloric effects. In non-magnetic SMA, the lattice distortion is mostly described by a pure shear and the martensitic transition in this family of alloys is strongly affected by uniaxial stress, whereas it is basically insensitive to hydrostatic pressure. As a result, non-magnetic alloys exhibit giant elastocaloric effects but negligible barocaloric effects. By contrast, in a number of magnetic SMA, the lattice distortion at the martensitic transition involves a volume change in addition to the shear strain. Those alloys are affected by both uniaxial stress and hydrostatic pressure and they exhibit giant elastocaloric and barocaloric effects. The paper aims at providing a critical survey of available experimental data on elastocaloric and barocaloric effects in magnetic and non-magnetic SMA.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'.

  10. Effects of sinker shapes on dissolution profiles.

    PubMed

    Soltero, R A; Hoover, J M; Jones, T F; Standish, M

    1989-01-01

    In dissolution testing, according to the U.S. Pharmacopeia, a nonreactive stainless steel wire helix is typically used to sink dosage forms that would otherwise float. The objective of this investigation was to determine if other sinker shapes will influence the rate, extent, or variability of dissolution. Criteria for the optimal sinker were defined. Various new sinker designs were fabricated, tested, and classified. Four classes of sinker shapes were defined: longitudinal, lateral, screen enclosures, and internal weights. Longitudinal sinkers contact the dosage forms on the long axis. Lateral sinkers either wrap around or contact capsule dosage forms in the middle, such as the line where the top and bottom halves of a capsule shell come together. Screen enclosures are of two types: either a wire cage, which holds the entire capsule, or a circular piece of wire screen placed on top of the capsule. Internal weights consist of two steel ball bearings, one inserted into each end of the capsule. The investigation consisted of four studies: (1) visual observation of the dissolution performance using 12 different sinkers; (2) the effect on drug release from nine classified sinkers on two different capsule formulations; (3) side-by-side comparison between the selected optimal longitudinal U clip and the wire helix lateral type sinkers; and (4) hydrodynamic effects caused by the use of the longitudinal U clip and the wire helix lateral type sinkers in the absence of capsule shells. We concluded that capsules sunk with either of the two longitudinal sinkers, the U clip or the paper clip, have faster, more complete dissolution and less variable results than did lateral type sinkers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Shape effect of carbon nanovectors on angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Padmaparna; Harfouche, Rania; Soni, Shivani; Hentschel, Dirk M; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2010-01-26

    Physically diverse carbon nanostructures are increasingly being studied for potential applications in cancer chemotherapy. However, limited knowledge exists on the effect of their shape in tuning the biological outcomes when used as nanovectors for drug delivery. In this study, we evaluated the effect of doxorubicin-conjugated single walled carbon nanotubes (CNT-Dox) and doxorubicin-conjugated spherical polyhydroxylated fullerenes or fullerenols (Ful-Dox) on angiogenesis. We report that CNTs exert a pro-angiogenic effect in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, the fullerenols or doxorubicin-conjugated fullerenols exerted a dramatically opposite antiangiogenic activity in zebrafish and murine tumor angiogenesis models. Dissecting the angiogenic phenotype into discrete cellular steps revealed that fullerenols inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, while CNTs attenuated the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin on the endothelial cells. Interestingly, CNT promoted endothelial tubulogenesis, a late step during angiogenesis. Further, mechanistic studies revealed that CNTs, but not fullerenols, induced integrin clustering and activated focal adhesion kinase and downstream phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in endothelial cells, which can explain the distinct angiogenic outcomes. The results of the study highlight the function of physical parameters of nanoparticles in determining their activity in biological settings.

  12. Effect of reflux time on nanoparticle shape.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Chandan; Sushma, K V L

    2014-06-01

    In the present work, Pt nanoparticles were produced from a reaction mixture containing a trace amount of cobalt carbonyl salt acting as a shape inducer. Nanoparticle shape evolution during reaction mixture reflux was monitored by characterizing particles extracted from the reaction mixture at different times. It was observed that 5 min of reflux produced spherical nanoparticles, 30 min of reflux produced cube shaped nanoparticles, and 60 min of reflux produced truncated octahedron morphology nanoparticles. It is illustrated that during nanoparticle synthesis the reflux process can provide energy needed for shape transformation from a metastable cube morphology to a truncated octahedron morphology which is thermodynamically the most stable geometry for fcc crystals. An optimization of the reaction reflux is thus needed for isolating metastable shapes.

  13. Method for fabricating uranium alloy articles without shape memory effects

    DOEpatents

    Banker, John G.

    1985-01-01

    Uranium-rich niobium and niobium-zirconium alloys possess a characteristic known as shape memory effect wherein shaped articles of these alloys recover their original shape when heated. The present invention circumvents this memory behavior by forming the alloys into the desired configuration at elevated temperatures with "cold" matched dies and maintaining the shaped articles between the dies until the articles cool to ambient temperature.

  14. Method for fabricating uranium alloy articles without shape memory effects

    DOEpatents

    Banker, J.G.

    1980-05-21

    Uranium-rich niobium and niobium-zirconium alloys possess a characteristic known as shape memory effect wherein shaped articles of these alloys recover their original shape when heated. The present invention circumvents this memory behavior by forming the alloys into the desired configuration at elevated temperatures with cold matched dies and maintaining the shaped articles between the dies until the articles cool to ambient temperature.

  15. Whole-Word Shape Effect in Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavidor, Michal

    2011-01-01

    The research question here was whether whole-word shape cues might facilitate reading in dyslexia following reports of how normal-reading children benefit from using this cue when learning to read. We predicted that adults with dyslexia would tend to rely more on orthographic rather than other cues when reading, and therefore would be more…

  16. Shape memory effect of laser welded NiTi plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. P.; Fernandes, F. M. Braz; Schell, N.; Miranda, R. M.

    2015-07-01

    Laser welding is a suitable joining technique for shape memory alloys (SMAs). This paper reports the existence of shape memory effect (SME) on laser welded NiTi joints, subjected to bending tests, and correlates this effect with the microstructural analysis performed with X-ray diffraction (XRD). All welded samples were able to recover their initial shape after bending to 180°, which is a remarkable result for industrial applications of NiTi involving laser welding.

  17. Shape Effects on Jamming of Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Somayeh

    In this work, we have focused on the jamming properties of systems composed of semi-2D elliptical shaped particles. In order to study these systems, we have performed three types of experiments: Couette shear, biaxial isotropic compression, and biaxial pure shear. In each experimental scheme, we take data for both systems of ellipses an bi-disperse disks, in order to probe the effect of broken spherical symmetry at the particle scale, on the global behavior. We use two synchronized cameras to capture the flow of particles and the local stress at the same time. In Couette experiments, we study the rheological properties, as well as the stress fluctuations for very large strains (up to 20 revolutions of the inner wheel). The system is sheared for densities below the isotropic jamming point (point J). From these studies we learn that over a small range of packing fractions, (0.85 ≤ φ ≤ 0.86), systems of ellipses demonstrate exceptionally slow dynamical evolution when they are sheared. For fixed density, and starting from an essentially unstressed state, the application of shear strain leads to first a growth of average particle displacements in the system through a Reynolds dilatancy effect, and then for very large strains, a steady decrease in particle displacements. In an intermediate range of shear strains, the system exists in effectively meta-stable states for a very long time before relaxing to an unjammed state, in which the flow of particles stops completely, and the stress fluctuations drop to zero. The strain scale for this relaxation depends on the global packing fraction. We characterize this slow dynamics by measuring the evolution of mean velocity, density, and orientational order throughout the experiments. In a similar set of experiments performed on disks, slow relaxation was observed as well. However, the increasing average displacement build-up before relaxation, which was observed in ellipses, did not occur for disks. This suggests that the

  18. Effectiveness and Efficiency of Different Shapes of Food Guides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Rebecca; Visschers, Vivianne H. M.; Siegrist, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the influence of a food guide's shape on its effectiveness and efficiency to convey nutritional information. Methods: A between-subjects experiment was conducted by manipulating the graph's shape (circle, pyramid, or rainbow). Nutrition tasks were used to assess the effectiveness and eye-movement data (number/duration of…

  19. Fiber shape effects on metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H. C.; Lee, H.-J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of different fiber shapes on the behavior of a SiC/Ti-15 metal matrix composite is computationally simulated. A three-dimensional finite element model consisting of a group of nine unidirectional fibers is used in the analysis. The model is employed to represent five different fiber shapes: a circle, an ellipse, a kidney, and two different cross shapes. The distribution of microstresses and the composite material properties, such as moduli, coefficients of thermal expansion, and Poisson's ratios, are obtained from the finite element analysis for the various fiber shapes. Comparisons of these results are used to determine the sensitivity of the composite behavior to the different fiber shapes and assess their potential benefits. No clear benefits result from different fiber shapes though there are some increases/decreases in isolated properties.

  20. The quintuple-shape memory effect in electrospun nanofiber membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Lu, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-08-01

    Shape memory fibrous membranes (SMFMs) are an emerging class of active polymers, which are capable of switching from a temporary shape to their permanent shape upon appropriate stimulation. Quintuple-shape memory membranes based on the thermoplastic polymer Nafion, with a stable fibrous structure, are achieved via electrospinning technology, and possess a broad transition temperature. The recovery of multiple temporary shapes of electrospun membranes can be triggered by heat in a single triple-, quadruple-, quintuple-shape memory cycle, respectively. The fiber morphology and nanometer size provide unprecedented design flexibility for the adjustable morphing effect. SMFMs enable complex deformations at need, having a wide potential application field including smart textiles, artificial intelligence robots, bio-medical engineering, aerospace technologies, etc in the future.

  1. Effect of laser irradiation of donor blood on erythrocyte shape.

    PubMed

    Baibekov, I M; Ibragimov, A F; Baibekov, A I

    2012-04-01

    Changes in erythrocyte shape in donor blood during storage and after irradiation with He-Ne laser and infrared laser were studied by scanning electron microscopy, thick drop express-method, and morphometry. It was found that laser irradiation delayed the appearance of erythrocytes of pathological shapes (echinocytes, stomatocytes, etc.) in the blood; He-Ne laser produced a more pronounced effect.

  2. The effect of object shape and laser beam shape on lidar system resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-06-01

    In a LIDAR system, a pulsed laser beam is propagated to a scene, and then reflected back by objects. Ideally if the beam diameter and the pulse width are close to zero, then the reflected beam in time domain is similar to a delta function, which can accurately locate an object's position. However, in a practical system, the beam has finite size. Therefore, even if the pulse width is small, an object shape will make the reflected beam stretched along the time axis, then affect system resolution. In this paper, we assume the beam with Gaussian shape. The beam can be formulated as a delta function convolved with a shape function, such as a rectangular function, in time domain. Then the reflected beam can be defined as a system response function convolved with the shape function. We use symmetric objects to analyze the reflected beam. Corn, sphere, and cylinder objects are used to find a LIDAR system's response function. The case for large beam size is discussed. We assume the beam shape is similar to a plane wave. With this assumption, we get the simplified LIDAR system response functions for the three kinds of objects. Then we use tiny spheres to emulate an arbitrary object, and study its effect to the returned beam.

  3. Crack-shape effects for indentation fracture toughness measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.M.; Scattergood, R.O. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-02-01

    Various methods to measure fracture toughness using indentation precracks were compared using soda-lime glass as a test material. In situ measurements of crack size as a function of applied stress allow both the toughness K[sub c] and the residual-stress factor [chi] to be independently determined. Analysis of the data showed that stress intensity factors based on classical half-penny crack shapes overestimate toughness values and produce an apparent R-curve effect. This is due to a constraint on crack shape imposed by primary lateral cracks in soda-lime glass. Models based on elliptical cracks were developed to account for the crack-shape effects.

  4. Near Net-Shape, Ultra-High Melting, Recession-Resistant ZrC/W-Based Rocket Nozzle Liners via the Displacive Compensation of Porosity (DCP) Method (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    LASSNER and W. D. SCHUBERT , “Tungsten: Properties , Chemistry, and Technology of the Element, Alloys , and Chemical Compounds” (Plenum Publishers, New York... TOULOUKIAN , R . K. K IRBY, R . E . TAYLOR and P . D . DESAI , “Thermophysical Properties of Matter, Vol. 12: Thermal Expansion of Metallic Elements and... Alloys ” (Plenum Press, New York, NY, 1975) p. 354. 21. Y . S . TOULOUKIAN , R . K. K IRBY, R . E . TAYLOR and T . Y. R . LEE , “Thermophysical

  5. Near Net-Shape, Ultra High Melting, Erosion Resistant Carbide/Metal Composites with Tailored Fibrillar Microstructures via the Displacive Compensation of Porosity Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-26

    in the system Zr-W-C," Porosh. Met., 2 (26) 22-25 (1965). 22. Touloukian , Y.S., Kirby, R.K., Taylor, R.E. and Desai, P.D. Thermophysical Properties ...of Matter. Vol. 12: Thermal Expansion of Metallic Elements and Alloys " New York: Plenum Press, (1975). 23. Touloukian , Y.S., Kirby, R.K., Taylor...Lassner, E. and Schubert, W.D. Tungsten: Properties , Chemistry, and Technology of the Element, Alloys , and Chemical Compounds. New York: Plenum Publishers

  6. Effects of velocity averaging on the shapes of absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    The velocity averaging of collision cross sections produces non-Lorentz line shapes, even at densities where Doppler broadening is not apparent. The magnitude of the effects will be described using a model in which the collision broadening depends on a simple velocity power law. The effect of the modified profile on experimental measures of linewidth, shift and amplitude will be examined and an improved approximate line shape will be derived.

  7. Fiber shape effects on metal matrix composite behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H. C.; Lee, H.-J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of different fiber shapes on the behavior of metal matrix composites is computationally simulated. A three-dimensional finite element model consisting of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in a three by three unit cell array of a SiC/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite is used in the analysis. The model is employed to represent five fiber shapes that include a circle, an ellipse, a kidney, and two different cross shapes. The distribution of stresses and the composite material properties, such as moduli, coefficients of thermal expansion, and Poisson's ratios, are obtained from the finite element analysis using the various fiber shapes. Comparisons of these results are used to determine the sensitivity of the composite behavior to the different fiber shapes. In general, fiber dominated properties are not affected by fiber geometry and matrix dominated properties are only moderately affected.

  8. Martensitic transformation, shape memory effects, and other curious mechanical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Vandermeer, R.A.

    1982-01-08

    The objective of this paper is to review tutorially the subject of martensitic transformations in uranium alloys emphasizing their role in the shape memory effect (SME). We examine first what a martensitic transformation is, illustrating some of its characteristics with specific examples. As well as being athermal in nature, as expected, data are presented indicating that martensitic transformations in some uranium alloys also have a strong isothermal component. In addition, a few alloys are known to exhibit thermoelastic martensitic reactions. The SME, which is associated with these, is defined and demonstrated graphically with data from a uranium-6 wt % niobium alloy. Some of the important variables influencing SME behavior are described. Specifically, these are reheat temperature, amount of deformation, crystal structure, and composition. A mechanism for SME is postulated and the association with martensitic transformation is detailed. A self-induced shape instability in the uranium-7.5 wt % niobium-2.5 wt % zirconium alloy with a rationalization of the behavior in terms of texture and lattice parameter change during aging is reviewed and discussed. 24 figures.

  9. Effects of shape anisotropy on microstructural evolution of diblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, Ashoutosh

    This dissertation discusses the effects of shape anisotropy on the evolved microstructure of diblock copolymers at various levels. Due to chain connectivity and microphase separation, the diblock copolymers self-assemble into ellipsoidal grains of lamellar and cylindrical morphologies. A grain-structure related phenomenon, Excluded Volume Epitaxy (E.V.E.) is explored in Chapter 2. E.V.E. is a local, inter-grain azimuthal orientational correlations effect, which results from a combination of sporadic nucleation and impingement of growing anisotropic shaped grains. Due to E.V.E., the ellipsoidal grains have a propensity for similar orientations in a local neighborhood, despite complete absence of global orientation in the sample. Simulations and experiments have verified this effect. The Avrami kinetics of anisotropic shaped grains is discussed in Chapter 3. Traditionally Avrami equation is used to model the growth kinetics of volume filling isotropic shaped grains. The probabilistic nature of Avrami kinetics produces a coupling between the grain shape and Poisson distribution. The Poisson-shape coupling remains latent for isotropic grains but becomes operative for anisotropic grains in random orientations scheme leading to inhibited growth kinetics. For unidirectional orientation of anisotropic grains, the growth kinetics remains uninhibited due to absence of Poisson-shape coupling. For two-dimensional case in simultaneous and continuous nucleation regimes, the inhibited kinetics scales as L1/2 where L is the shape anisotropy. The blends of highly shape anisotropic nanoclay, montmorillonite (MMT) and lamellar poly(styrene-b-isoprene), PS-PI are discussed in Appendix A. Annealing and cooling is sufficient to produce long-range lamellar order at 1 wt % clay loading. However at 5 wt % clay loading, shear force is additionally required. This system reveals the effect of shape anisotropy on evolution of long-range order in clay-block copolymer blends. The effect of shape

  10. Wake shape and its effects on aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emdad, H.; Lan, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    The wake shape under symmetrical flight conditions and its effects on aerodynamic characteristics are examined. In addition, the effect of wake shape in sideslip and discrete vortices such as strake or forebody vortex on lateral characteristics is presented. The present numerical method for airplane configurations, which is based on discretization of the vortex sheet into vortex segments, verified the symmetrical and asymmetrical roll-up process of the trailing vortices. Also, the effect of wing wake on tail planes is calculated. It is concluded that at high lift the assumption of flat wake for longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics should be reexamined.

  11. Swimming motion of rod-shaped magnetotactic bacteria: the effects of shape and growing magnetic moment

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Dali; Lin, Wei; Pan, Yongxin; Zhang, Keke

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the swimming motion of rod-shaped magnetotactic bacteria affiliated with the Nitrospirae phylum in a viscous liquid under the influence of an externally imposed, time-dependent magnetic field. By assuming that fluid motion driven by the translation and rotation of a swimming bacterium is of the Stokes type and that inertial effects of the motion are negligible, we derive a new system of the twelve coupled equations that govern both the motion and orientation of a swimming rod-shaped magnetotactic bacterium with a growing magnetic moment in the laboratory frame of reference. It is revealed that the initial pattern of swimming motion can be strongly affected by the rate of the growing magnetic moment. It is also revealed, through comparing mathematical solutions of the twelve coupled equations to the swimming motion observed in our laboratory experiments with rod-shaped magnetotactic bacteria, that the laboratory trajectories of the swimming motion can be approximately reproduced using an appropriate set of the parameters in our theoretical model. PMID:24523716

  12. Blocked Shape Memory Effect in Negative Poisson's Ratio Polymer Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Boba, Katarzyna; Bianchi, Matteo; McCombe, Greg; Gatt, Ruben; Griffin, Anselm C; Richardson, Robert M; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Hamerton, Ian; Grima, Joseph N

    2016-08-10

    We describe a new class of negative Poisson's ratio (NPR) open cell PU-PE foams produced by blocking the shape memory effect in the polymer. Contrary to classical NPR open cell thermoset and thermoplastic foams that return to their auxetic phase after reheating (and therefore limit their use in technological applications), this new class of cellular solids has a permanent negative Poisson's ratio behavior, generated through multiple shape memory (mSM) treatments that lead to a fixity of the topology of the cell foam. The mSM-NPR foams have Poisson's ratio values similar to the auxetic foams prior their return to the conventional phase, but compressive stress-strain curves similar to the ones of conventional foams. The results show that by manipulating the shape memory effect in polymer microstructures it is possible to obtain new classes of materials with unusual deformation mechanisms.

  13. Brain potentials associated with the shape Stroop effect.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Xie, Peng; Zhang, Qinglin

    2016-03-23

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded to explore, for the first time, the electrophysiological correlates of the shape Stroop effect. Fifteen healthy individuals were presented with a frame and a name of an object with a typical shape in life and asked to categorize the object's typical shape in life as a 'circle', a 'square,' or a 'triangle' by pressing the relevant button as quickly as possible. Accurate categorization of the name of an object was faster when it was presented with a congruent shape frame (e.g. name of a tyre/circle frame) than with an incongruent one (e.g. name of a tyre/square frame). Scalp ERPs analysis showed that the incongruent condition elicited a more negative component N430 and a more late positive component LPC than the congruent condition. N430 is a critical sign of conflict detection in the early stage, whereas late positive component reflects the response conflict in the late stage. The results provided evidence for the dissociation between conflict detection and conflict resolution in the shape Stroop effect.

  14. Effects of supersaturation on pore shape in solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. S.; Hsiao, S. Y.

    2017-02-01

    The shape of a pore resulting from a bubble entrapped by a solidification front with different supersaturation ratios is predicted in this work. Supersaturation ratio, representing the ratio between solute concentration and saturation solute concentration, determines nucleation of a bubble and development of the pore shape in the early stage. Pore formation and its shape in solid influence contemporary issues of biology, engineering, foods, geophysics and climate change, etc. This work extends and combines previous models accounting for realistic mass and momentum transport, and physico-chemical equilibrium of solute gas across the bubble cap to self-consistently determine shape of the bubble cap beyond the solidification front and the pore shape in solid. The study also deal with that pore formation can be resulted from three different mechanisms, depending on the directions and magnitude of solute gas transport across the bubble cap. Case 1 is subject to solute transport from the pore across the cap into the surrounding liquid in the early stage. Cases 2a and 2b indicate opposite direction of solute transport. In contrast to Case 2b, the effect of solute transport on solute gas pressure in the pore in Case 2a is stronger than that of pore volume expansionin the last stage. The results find that an increase in supersaturation ratio decreases pore radius and time for bubble entrapment in Case 1. The bubble cannot be entrapped in Case 2. The predicted pore shape in solid agrees with experimental data. Understanding, prediction and control of the growth of the pore shape have therefore been obtained.

  15. Effects of magnetic field on the shape memory behavior of single and polycrystalline magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turabi, Ali Sadi

    Shape memory alloys and polymers have been extensively researched recently because of their unique ability to recover large deformations. Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are able to recover large deformations compared to shape memory alloys (SMAs), although SMAs have higher strength and are able to generate more stress during recovery. This project focuses on procedure for fabrication and Finite Element Modeling (FEM) of a shape memory composite actuator. First, SMP was characterized to reveal its mechanical properties. Specifically, glass transition temperature, the effects of temperature and strain rate on compressive response and recovery properties of shape memory polymer were studied. Then, shape memory properties of a NiTi wire, including transformation temperatures and stress generation, were investigated. SMC actuator was fabricated by using epoxy based SMP and NiTi SMA wire. Experimental tests confirmed the reversible behavior of fabricated shape memory composites. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  16. Shape effects on nanoparticle engulfment for metal matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozsoy, Istemi Baris; Li, Gang; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Obtaining a uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles and their structural integrity in metal matrix is a prominent obstacle to use the intrinsic properties of metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) to the full extent. In this study, a potential way to overcome the scientific and technical barrier of nanoparticle dispersion in high performance lightweight MMNCs is presented. The goal is to identify the shape and size of Al2O3 nanoparticle for its optimal dispersion in Al matrix. Critical velocity of solidification is calculated numerically for spherical, cylindrical and disk-shaped nanoparticles using an analytical model which incorporates drag force, intermolecular force and inertia effect. The results show that it is possible to reduce the critical solidification velocity for nanoparticle capture by 6 times with proper shape modification.

  17. The effect of diet on bone shape in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D R; O'Higgins, P; McAndrew, T J

    1990-01-01

    The effects of four deficient diets (oats, barley, wheat, buckwheat) on the shape of first and second cervical vertebrae and scapulae in C57BL mice have been measured using Fourier analysis. Bone shape was found to be robust, and only minimally affected by dietary change. The significance of this lack of change is discussed in the light of changes induced by diet in non-metrical variants in the skeleton. The study further emphasises the dangers of using certain non-metrical characters in taxonomic studies and indicates that the shapes of mouse bones are affected to a lesser degree by dietary influences than are the incidences of certain non-metrical character states. PMID:2272903

  18. Effects of Plasma Shaping on Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Belli; Hammett, G. W.; Dorland, W.

    2008-08-01

    The effects of flux surface shape on the gyrokinetic stability and transport of tokamak plasmas are studied using the GS2 code [M. Kotschenreuther, G. Rewoldt, and W.M. Tang, Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995); W. Dorland, F. Jenko, M. Kotschenreuther, and B.N. Rogers, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)]. Studies of the scaling of nonlinear turbulence with shaping parameters are performed using analytic equilibria based on interpolations of representative shapes of the Joint European Torus (JET) [P.H. Rebut and B.E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)]. High shaping is found to be a stabilizing influence on both the linear ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instability and the nonlinear ITG turbulence. For the parameter regime studied here, a scaling of the heat flux with elongation of χ ~ κ-1.5 or κ-2.0, depending on the triangularity, is observed at fixed average temperature gradient. While this is not as strong as empirical elongation scalings, it is also found that high shaping results in a larger Dimits upshift of the nonlinear critical temperature gradient due to an enhancement of the Rosenbluth-Hinton residual zonal flows.

  19. Effects of memory on the shapes of simple outbreak trees.

    PubMed

    Plazzotta, Giacomo; Kwan, Christopher; Boyd, Michael; Colijn, Caroline

    2016-02-18

    Genomic tools, including phylogenetic trees derived from sequence data, are increasingly used to understand outbreaks of infectious diseases. One challenge is to link phylogenetic trees to patterns of transmission. Particularly in bacteria that cause chronic infections, this inference is affected by variable infectious periods and infectivity over time. It is known that non-exponential infectious periods can have substantial effects on pathogens' transmission dynamics. Here we ask how this non-Markovian nature of an outbreak process affects the branching trees describing that process, with particular focus on tree shapes. We simulate Crump-Mode-Jagers branching processes and compare different patterns of infectivity over time. We find that memory (non-Markovian-ness) in the process can have a pronounced effect on the shapes of the outbreak's branching pattern. However, memory also has a pronounced effect on the sizes of the trees, even when the duration of the simulation is fixed. When the sizes of the trees are constrained to a constant value, memory in our processes has little direct effect on tree shapes, but can bias inference of the birth rate from trees. We compare simulated branching trees to phylogenetic trees from an outbreak of tuberculosis in Canada, and discuss the relevance of memory to this dataset.

  20. Acoustic emission and shape memory effect in the martensitic transformation.

    PubMed

    Sreekala, S; Ananthakrishna, G

    2003-04-04

    Acoustic emission signals are known to exhibit a high degree of reproducibility in time and show correlations with the growth and shrinkage of martensite domains when athermal martensites are subjected to repeated thermal cycling in a restricted temperature range. We show that a recently introduced two dimensional model for the martensitic transformation mimics these features. We also show that these features are related to the shape memory effect where near full reversal of morphological features are seen under these thermal cycling conditions.

  1. Plot shape effects on plant species diversity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.; Fotheringham, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract. Question: Do rectangular sample plots record more plant species than square plots as suggested by both empirical and theoretical studies?Location: Grasslands, shrublands and forests in the Mediterranean-climate region of California, USA.Methods: We compared three 0.1-ha sampling designs that differed in the shape and dispersion of 1-m2 and 100-m2 nested subplots. We duplicated an earlier study that compared the Whittaker sample design, which had square clustered subplots, with the modified Whittaker design, which had dispersed rectangular subplots. To sort out effects of dispersion from shape we used a third design that overlaid square subplots on the modified Whittaker design. Also, using data from published studies we extracted species richness values for 400-m2 subplots that were either square or 1:4 rectangles partially overlaid on each other from desert scrub in high and low rainfall years, chaparral, sage scrub, oak savanna and coniferous forests with and without fire.Results: We found that earlier empirical reports of more than 30% greater richness with rectangles were due to the confusion of shape effects with spatial effects, coupled with the use of cumulative number of species as the metric for comparison. Average species richness was not significantly different between square and 1:4 rectangular sample plots at either 1- or 100-m2. Pairwise comparisons showed no significant difference between square and rectangular samples in all but one vegetation type, and that one exhibited significantly greater richness with squares. Our three intensive study sites appear to exhibit some level of self-similarity at the scale of 400 m2, but, contrary to theoretical expectations, we could not detect plot shape effects on species richness at this scale.Conclusions: At the 0.1-ha scale or lower there is no evidence that plot shape has predictable effects on number of species recorded from sample plots. We hypothesize that for the mediterranean

  2. Pulsed laser interactions with space debris: Target shape effects

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D. A.; Rubenchik, A.; Libby, S. B.; Nikolaev, S.; Phipps, C. R.

    2013-05-24

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes. We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon pressure is the dominant momentum transfer mechanism, showing that shape and orientation effects influence the target response in a similar, but not identical, manner. As a result, we address the related problem of target spin and, by way of a few simple examples, show how ablation can alter the spin state of a target, which often has a pronounced effect on the recoil dynamics.

  3. Pulsed laser interactions with space debris: Target shape effects

    DOE PAGES

    Liedahl, D. A.; Rubenchik, A.; Libby, S. B.; ...

    2013-05-24

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes.more » We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon pressure is the dominant momentum transfer mechanism, showing that shape and orientation effects influence the target response in a similar, but not identical, manner. As a result, we address the related problem of target spin and, by way of a few simple examples, show how ablation can alter the spin state of a target, which often has a pronounced effect on the recoil dynamics.« less

  4. Plasma shaping effects on tokamak scrape-off layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Fabio; Lanti, Emmanuel; Jolliet, Sébastien; Ricci, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    The impact of plasma shaping on tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) turbulence is investigated. The drift-reduced Braginskii equations are written for arbitrary magnetic geometries, and an analytical equilibrium model is used to introduce the dependence of turbulence equations on tokamak inverse aspect ratio (ε ), Shafranov’s shift (Δ), elongation (κ), and triangularity (δ). A linear study of plasma shaping effects on the growth rate of resistive ballooning modes (RBMs) and resistive drift waves (RDWs) reveals that RBMs are strongly stabilized by elongation and negative triangularity, while RDWs are only slightly stabilized in non-circular magnetic geometries. Assuming that the linear instabilities saturate due to nonlinear local flattening of the plasma gradient, the equilibrium gradient pressure length {L}p=-{p}e/{{\

  5. Effect of Physical Parameters on Shape Instability of Sonoluminescing Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; An, Yu

    2006-04-01

    Considering the vapour effects, we calculate the shape instability of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in the phase diagram of the amplitude of driving pressure versus ambient radius, i.e. the pa-R0 diagram. The numerical calculation shows that the results calculated by the present model are reliable, even some parameters, such as the binary diffusion constant and the thermal conductivity of the mixture of argon and water vapour inside the bubble, are roughly evaluated. It is found by numerical calculation that the shape stable area of a single argon bubble in those viscous liquids with low vapour pressure, such as oil of vitriol, glycerol and 1,2-propanediol, can be extended to a wider region. Combining with the calculation of the maximum temperature inside the bubble, we may predict that these areas are probably the stable region of SBSL.

  6. The effect of boundary shape to acoustic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prawirasasra, M. S.; Sampurna, R.; Suwandi

    2016-11-01

    To design a room in term of acoustic, many variables need to be considered such as volume, acoustic characteristics & surface area of material and also boundary shape. Modifying each variable possibly change the sound field character. To find impact of boundary shape, every needed properties is simulated through acoustic prediction software. The simulation is using three models with different geometry (asymmetry and symmetry) to produce certain objective parameters. By applying just noticeable difference (JND), the effect is considered known. Furthermore, individual perception is needed to gain subjective parameter. The test is using recorded speech that is convoluted with room impulse of each model. The result indicates that 84% of participants could not recognize the speech which is emit from different geometry properties. In contrast, JND value of T30 is exceed 5%. But for D50, every model has JND below 5%.

  7. Going back to Donald: how comparisons shape judgmental priming effects.

    PubMed

    Mussweiler, Thomas; Damisch, Lysann

    2008-12-01

    The authors examine how judgmental priming effects are shaped by comparisons. Specifically, they suggest that concept priming involves spontaneous activation of concept-consistent standards, which are then spontaneously compared to the judgmental target. In 6 studies, they used a variety of priming methods (contextual cue, subliminal priming, indirect priming) to test these notions of spontaneous standard activation and spontaneous comparison. Study 1 demonstrates that priming a trait concept activates concept-consistent standards. Study 2 suggests that these activated standards contribute to priming effects. If alternative standards that are not particularly consistent with the primed concept are activated, priming effects diminish. Studies 3-6 show that the magnitude and direction of priming effects depend on the intensity and the type of the engaged comparison. Specifically, Study 3 demonstrates that the magnitude of a priming effect depends on the intensity of comparative processing. Studies 4 through 6 show that the direction of a priming effect (assimilation vs. contrast) depends on whether judges engage in a similarity or dissimilarity testing comparison mechanism--a factor which has been found to shape comparison consequences in other domains. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Magnetic shape memory effect at 1.7 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heczko, Oleg; Kopecký, Vít; Sozinov, Alexei; Straka, Ladislav

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic shape memory effect or magnetically induced structure reorientation (MIR) occurred down to 1.7 K in 10 M martensite with composition of Ni50.0Mn27.5Ga22.5 exhibiting no intermartensite transformation. The reorientation of the martensite microstructure was mediated by the motion of single Type II twin boundary. In contrast with weak thermal dependence of Type II boundary, MIR with Type I boundary in the same alloy showed strong thermal dependence resembling normal thermal activation process and the effect disappeared below 220 K. Thus the type of the boundary is decisive for MIR at low temperatures.

  9. Studies of Standard Heat Treatment Effects on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser Net Shape Manufactured INCONEL 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, H.; Azer, M.; Ritter, A.

    2009-10-01

    Laser net shape manufacturing (LNSM) is a laser cladding/deposition based technology, which can fabricate and repair near-net-shape high-performance components directly from metal powders. Characterizing mechanical properties of the laser net shape manufactured components is prerequisite to the applications of LNSM in aircraft engine industrial productions. Nickel-based superalloys such as INCONEL 718 are the most commonly used metal materials in aircraft engine high-performance components. In this study, the laser deposition process is optimized through a set of designed experiments to reduce the porosity to less than 0.03 pct. It is found that the use of plasma rotating electrode processed (PREP) powder and a high energy input level greater than 80 J/mm are necessary conditions to minimize the porosity. Material microstructure and tensile properties of laser-deposited INCONEL 718 are studied and compared under heat treatment conditions of as deposited, direct aged, solution treatment and aging (STA), and full homogenization followed by STA. Tensile test results showed that the direct age heat treatment produces the highest tensile strength equivalent to the wrought material, which is followed by the STA-treated and the homogenization-treated tensile strengths, while the ductility exhibits the reverse trend. Finally, failure modes of the tensile specimens were analyzed with fractography.

  10. The effect of jet shape on jet injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Geehoon; Modak, Ashin; Hogan, N Catherine; Hunter, Ian W

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the dispersion pattern of a needle-free jet injector are explored. The shape of the jets were compared using a high-speed video camera and jet injections of collimated and dispersed fluid jets with a Lorentz-force actuated jet injector were made into acrylamide gel and post-mortem porcine tissue. A custom-built high-speed X-ray imaging system was used in order to observe the dynamics of the dispersion mechanism for each injection in real time. We show that a collimated jet stream results in greater tissue penetration than a dispersed jet stream.

  11. Effects of Setup Errors and Shape Changes on Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mourik, Anke van; Kranen, Simon van; Hollander, Suzanne den; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Herk, Marcel van; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to quantify the robustness of the dose distributions from three whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) techniques involving different levels of intensity modulation against whole patient setup inaccuracies and breast shape changes. Methods and Materials: For 19 patients (one computed tomography scan and five cone beam computed tomography scans each), three treatment plans were made (wedge, simple intensity-modulated RT [IMRT], and full IMRT). For each treatment plan, four dose distributions were calculated. The first dose distribution was the original plan. The other three included the effects of patient setup errors (rigid displacement of the bony anatomy) or breast errors (e.g., rotations and shape changes of the breast with respect to the bony anatomy), or both, and were obtained through deformable image registration and dose accumulation. Subsequently, the effects of the plan type and error sources on target volume coverage, mean lung dose, and excess dose were determined. Results: Systematic errors of 1-2 mm and random errors of 2-3 mm (standard deviation) were observed for both patient- and breast-related errors. Planning techniques involving glancing fields (wedge and simple IMRT) were primarily affected by patient errors ({approx}6% loss of coverage near the dorsal field edge and {approx}2% near the skin). In contrast, plan deterioration due to breast errors was primarily observed in planning techniques without glancing fields (full IMRT, {approx}2% loss of coverage near the dorsal field edge and {approx}4% near the skin). Conclusion: The influences of patient and breast errors on the dose distributions are comparable in magnitude for whole breast RT plans, including glancing open fields, rendering simple IMRT the preferred technique. Dose distributions from planning techniques without glancing open fields were more seriously affected by shape changes of the breast, demanding specific attention in partial breast

  12. Thermal energy conversion by coupled shape memory and piezoelectric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Dmitry; Lebedev, Gor; Cugat, Orphee; Delamare, Jerome; Viala, Bernard; Lafont, Thomas; Gimeno, Leticia; Shelyakov, Alexander

    2012-09-01

    This work gives experimental evidence of a promising method of thermal-to-electric energy conversion by coupling shape memory effect (SME) and direct piezoelectric effect (DPE) for harvesting quasi-static ambient temperature variations. Two original prototypes of thermal energy harvesters have been fabricated and tested experimentally. The first is a hybrid laminated composite consisting of TiNiCu shape memory alloy (SMA) and macro fiber composite piezoelectric. This composite comprises 0.1 cm3 of active materials and harvests 75 µJ of energy for each temperature variation of 60 °C. The second prototype is a SME/DPE ‘machine’ which uses the thermally induced linear strains of the SMA to bend a bulk PZT ceramic plate through a specially designed mechanical structure. The SME/DPE ‘machine’ with 0.2 cm3 of active material harvests 90 µJ over a temperature increase of 35 °C (60 µJ when cooling). In contrast to pyroelectric materials, such harvesters are also compatible with both small and slow temperature variations.

  13. Shaping cancer nanomedicine: The effect of particle shape on the in vivo journey of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Toy, Randall; Peiris, Pubudu M.; Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2014-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in nanoparticle technology have enabled the fabrication of nanoparticle classes with unique size, shape, and materials, which in turn has facilitated major advancements in the field of nanomedicine. More specifically, in the last decade, nanoscientists have recognized that nanomedicine exhibits a highly engineerable nature that makes it a mainstream scientific discipline, which is governed by its own distinctive principles in terms of interactions with cells and intravascular, transvascular and interstitial transport. This review focuses on recent developments and understanding of the relation between the shape of a nanoparticle and its navigation through different biological processes. Importantly, we seek to illustrate that the shape of a nanoparticle can govern its in vivo journey and destination dictating its biodistribution, intravascular and transvascular transport, and ultimately targeting of difficult-to-reach cancer sites. PMID:24354814

  14. Enhanced nonlinear optical effects in organic frustum-shaped microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamonov, Evgeniy A.; Novikov, Vladimir B.; Zhdanova, Karina D.; Mitetelo, Nikolai V.; Kolmychek, Irina A.; Venkatakrishnarao, Dasari; Narayana, Yemineni S. L. V.; Mohiddon, Mahamad A.; Chandrasekar, Rajadurai; Murzina, Tatyana V.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss photonic effects in arrays of frustum-shaped organic microstructures prepared from organic orange dye composed on a solid substrate by self-assembling technique. We demonstrate that such structures reveal strong amplification of second-order nonlinear optical response, including optical second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF), as compared to that of a continuous film. This is associated with a strong light localization in microstructures composed of high refractive index material. The TPF and SHG power dependencies show that the observed effects are governed by high second-order nonlinearity of the dye damped by a strong absorption. FDTD calculations confirm that the mechanism of the light localization inside organic frustums can be in the form of whispering gallery modes excitation.

  15. Fast-Response-Time Shape-Memory-Effect Foam Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bulk shape memory alloys, such as Nitinol or CuAlZn, display strong recovery forces undergoing a phase transformation after being strained in their martensitic state. These recovery forces are used for actuation. As the phase transformation is thermally driven, the response time of the actuation can be slow, as the heat must be passively inserted or removed from the alloy. Shape memory alloy TiNi torque tubes have been investigated for at least 20 years and have demonstrated high actuation forces [3,000 in.-lb (approximately equal to 340 N-m) torques] and are very lightweight. However, they are not easy to attach to existing structures. Adhesives will fail in shear at low-torque loads and the TiNi is not weldable, so that mechanical crimp fits have been generally used. These are not reliable, especially in vibratory environments. The TiNi is also slow to heat up, as it can only be heated indirectly using heater and cooling must be done passively. This has restricted their use to on-off actuators where cycle times of approximately one minute is acceptable. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) has been used in the past to make porous TiNi metal foams. Shape Change Technologies has been able to train SHS derived TiNi to exhibit the shape memory effect. As it is an open-celled material, fast response times were observed when the material was heated using hot and cold fluids. A methodology was developed to make the open-celled porous TiNi foams as a tube with integrated hexagonal ends, which then becomes a torsional actuator with fast response times. Under processing developed independently, researchers were able to verify torques of 84 in.-lb (approximately equal to 9.5 Nm) using an actuator weighing 1.3 oz (approximately equal to 37 g) with very fast (less than 1/16th of a second) initial response times when hot and cold fluids were used to facilitate heat transfer. Integrated structural connections were added as part of the net shape process, eliminating

  16. Effects of wave shape on sheet flow sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsu, T.-J.; Hanes, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    A two-phase model is implemented to study the effects of wave shape on the transport of coarse-grained sediment in the sheet flow regime. The model is based on balance equations for the average mass, momentum, and fluctuation energy for both the fluid and sediment phases. Model simulations indicate that the responses of the sheet flow, such as the velocity profiles, the instantaneous bed shear stress, the sediment flux, and the total amount of the mobilized sediment, cannot be fully parameterized by quasi-steady free-stream velocity and may be correlated with the magnitude of local horizontal pressure gradient (or free-stream acceleration). A net sediment flux in the direction of wave advance is obtained for both skewed and saw-tooth wave shapes typical of shoaled and breaking waves. The model further suggests that at critical values of the horizontal pressure gradient, there is a failure event within the bed that mobilizes more sediment into the mobile sheet and enhances the sediment flux. Preliminary attempts to parameterize the total bed shear stress and the total sediment flux appear promising. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Effect of centrifugal forces on dimensional error of bored shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsuaga, M.; de Lacalle, L. N. López; Lobato, R.; Urbikain, G.; Campa, F.

    2012-04-01

    Boring operations of deep holes with a slender boring bar are often hindered by the precision because of their low static stiffness and high deformations. Because of that, it is not possible to remove much larger depths of cuts than the nose radius of the tool, unlike the case of turning and face milling operations, and consequently, the relationship between the cutting force distribution, tool geometry, feed rate and depth of cut becomes non-linear and complex. This problem gets worse when working with a rotating boring head where apart from the cutting forces and the variation of the inclination angle because of shape boring, the bar and head are affected by de centrifugal forces. The centrifugal forces, and therefore the centrifugal deflection, will vary as a function of the rotating speed, boring bar mass distribution and variable radial position of the bar in shape boring. Taking in to account all this effects, a load and deformation model was created. This model has been experimentally validated to use as a corrector factor of the radial position of the U axis in the boring head.

  18. The Effect of Pulse Shaping QPSK on Bandwidth Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purba, Josua Bisuk Mubyarto; Horan, Shelia

    1997-01-01

    This research investigates the effect of pulse shaping QPSK on bandwidth efficiency over a non-linear channel. This investigation will include software simulations and the hardware implementation. Three kinds of filters: the 5th order Butterworth filter, the 3rd order Bessel filter and the Square Root Raised Cosine filter with a roll off factor (alpha) of 0.25,0.5 and 1, have been investigated as pulse shaping filters. Two different high power amplifiers, one a Traveling Wave Tube Amplifier (TWTA) and the other a Solid State Power Amplifier (SSPA) have been investigated in the hardware implementation. A significant improvement in the bandwidth utilization (rho) for the filtered data compared to unfiltered data through the non-linear channel is shown in the results. This method promises strong performance gains in a bandlimited channel when compared to unfiltered systems. This work was conducted at NMSU in the Center for Space Telemetering, and Telecommunications Systems in the Klipsch School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and is supported by a grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NAG5-1491.

  19. The effect of contour closure on shape recognition.

    PubMed

    Garrigan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Recent research on the Gestalt principle of closure has focused on how the presence of closure affects the ability to detect contours hidden in cluttered visual arrays. Some of the earliest research on closure, however, dealt with encoding and recognizing closed and open shapes, rather than detection. This research re-addresses the relation between closure and shape memory, focusing on how contour closure affects the ability to learn to recognize novel contour shapes. Of particular interest is whether closed contour shapes are easier to learn to recognize and, if so, whether this benefit is due to better encoding of closed contour shapes or easier comparison of closed contour shapes to already learned shapes. The results show that closed contours are indeed easier to recognize and, further, that this advantage appears to be related to better encoding.

  20. Reverse Shape Memory Effect Related to α → γ Transformation in a Fe-Mn-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Huabei; Huang, Pan; Zhou, Tiannan; Wang, Shanling; Wen, Yuhua

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the shape memory behavior and phase transformations of solution-treated Fe43.61Mn34.74Al13.38Ni8.27 alloy between room temperature and 1173 K (900 °C). This alloy exhibits the reverse shape memory effect resulting from the phase transformation of α (bcc) → γ (fcc) between 673 K and 1073 K (400 °C and 800 °C) in addition to the shape memory effect resulting from the martensitic reverse transformation of γ' (fcc) → α (bcc) below 673 K (400 °C). There is a high density of hairpin-shaped dislocations in the α phase undergoing the martensitic reverse transformation of γ' → α. The lath γ phase, which preferentially nucleates and grows in the reversed α phase, has the same crystal orientation with the reverse-transformed γ' martensite. However, the vermiculate γ phase, which is precipitated in the α phase between lath γ phase, has different crystal orientations. The lath γ phase is beneficial to attaining better reverse shape memory effect than the vermiculate γ phase.

  1. Shape function effects in B→Xcℓν¯ℓ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannel, Thomas; Tackmann, Frank J.

    2005-02-01

    Owing to the fact that m2c˜mbΛQCD, the end point region of the charged lepton energy spectrum in the inclusive decay B→Xcℓν¯ℓ is affected by the Fermi motion of the initial-state b quark bound in the B meson. This effect is described in QCD by shape functions. Including the mass of the final-state quark, we find that a different set of operators as employed in previous work is needed for a consistent matching, when incorporating the subleading contributions in B→Xqℓν¯ℓ for both q=u and q=c. In addition, we modify the usual twist expansion in such a way that it yields a description of the lepton energy spectrum which is not just valid in the end point region, but over the entire phase space.

  2. Simulation of grain size effects in nanocrystalline shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Rajeev; Quek, Siu Sin; Wu, David T.

    2015-06-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that martensitic transformation in nanocrystalline shape memory alloys can be suppressed for small grain sizes. Motivated by these results, we study the grain size dependence of martensitic transformations and stress-strain response of nanocrystalline shape memory alloys within the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory. A GL model for a square to rectangle transformation in polycrystals is extended to account for grain boundary effects. We propose that an inhibition of the transformation in grain boundary regions can occur, if the grain boundary energy of the martensite is higher than that of the austenite phase. We show that this inhibition of transformation in grain boundary regions has a strong influence on domain patterns inside grains. Although the transformation is inhibited only at the grain boundaries, it leads to a suppression of the transformation even inside the grains as grain size is decreased. In fact, below a critical grain size, the transformation can be completely suppressed. We explain these results in terms of the extra strain gradient cost associated with grain boundaries, when the transformation is inhibited at grain boundaries. On the other hand, no significant size effects are observed when transformation is not inhibited at grain boundaries. We also study the grain size dependence of the stress strain curve. It is found that when the transformation is inhibited at grain boundaries, a significant reduction in the hysteresis associated with stress-strain curves during the loading-unloading cycles is observed. The hysteresis for this situation reduces even further as the grain size is reduced, which is consistent with recent experiments. The simulations also demonstrate that the mechanical behavior is influenced by inter-granular interactions and the local microstructural neighbourhood of a grain has a stronger influence than the orientation of the grain itself.

  3. The effects of polymeric nanostructure shape on drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Shrinivas; Hedrick, James L; Ong, Zhan Yuin; Yang, Chuan; Ee, Pui Lai Rachel; Hammond, Paula T; Yang, Yi Yan

    2011-11-01

    Amphiphilic polymeric nanostructures have long been well-recognized as an excellent candidate for drug delivery applications. With the recent advances in the "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches, development of well-defined polymeric nanostructures of different shapes has been possible. Such a possibility of tailoring the shape of the nanostructures has allowed for the fabrication of model systems with chemically equivalent but topologically different carriers. With these model nanostructures, evaluation of the importance of particle shape in the context of biodistribution, cellular uptake and toxicity has become a major thrust area. Since most of the current polymeric delivery systems are based upon spherical nanostructures, understanding the implications of other shapes will allow for the development of next generation drug delivery vehicles. Herein we will review different approaches to fabricate polymeric nanostructures of various shapes, provide a comprehensive summary on the current understandings of the influence of nanostructures with different shapes on important biological processes in drug delivery, and discuss future perspectives for the development of nanostructures with well-defined shapes for drug delivery.

  4. Underwater Sliding Properties: Effect of Slider Shape and Surface Wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirveslahti, A.; Mielonen, K.; Ikonen, K.; Cui, W.; Suvanto, M.; Pakkanen, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    A dynamic test method for the measurement of the underwater sliding properties of model boats has been developed. Surface-modified model boats were examined to assess how the surface wettability properties affect sliding. Along with the surface properties, the influence of the boat shape was considered. We studied various coatings in the contact angle range of 3-162∘ with two model boat shapes. The hydrophobicity of the surfaces influenced the sliding speed of the model boat depending on the boat shape. The method is applicable to study sliding properties of model boats with different surfaces in variable flow conditions.

  5. Measurement and Perturbation of Morphogen Lifetime: Effects on Gradient Shape

    PubMed Central

    Drocco, Jeffrey A.; Grimm, Oliver; Tank, David W.; Wieschaus, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Protein lifetime is of critical importance for most biological processes and plays a central role in cell signaling and embryonic development, where it impacts the absolute concentration of signaling molecules and, potentially, the shape of morphogen gradients. Early conceptual and mathematical models of gradient formation proposed that steady-state gradients are established by an equilibration between the lifetime of a morphogen and its rates of synthesis and diffusion, though whether gradients in fact reach steady state before being read out is a matter of controversy. In any case, this class of models predicts that protein lifetime is a key determinant of both the time to steady state and the spatial extent of a gradient. Using a method that employs repeated photoswitching of a fusion of the morphogen Bicoid (Bcd) and the photoconvertible fluorescent protein Dronpa, we measure and modify the lifetime of Dronpa-Bcd in living Drosophila embryos. We find that the lifetime of Bcd is dynamic, changing from 50 min before mitotic cycle 14 to 15 min during cellularization. Moreover, by measuring total quantities of Bcd over time, we find that the gradient does not reach steady state. Finally, using a nearly continuous low-level conversion to the dark state of Dronpa-Bcd to mimic the effect of increased degradation, we demonstrate that perturbation of protein lifetime changes the characteristic length of the gradient, providing direct support for a mechanism based on synthesis, diffusion, and degradation. PMID:22004733

  6. Shared learning shapes human performance: Transfer effects in task sharing.

    PubMed

    Milanese, Nadia; Iani, Cristina; Rubichi, Sandro

    2010-07-01

    We investigated whether performing a task with a co-actor shapes the way a subsequent task is performed. In four experiments participants were administered a Simon task after practicing a spatial compatibility task with an incompatible S-R mapping. In Experiment 1 they performed both tasks alongside another person; in Experiment 2 they performed the spatial compatibility task alone, responding to only one stimulus position, and the Simon task with another person; in Experiment 3, they performed the spatial compatibility task with another person and the Simon task alone; finally, in Experiment 4, they performed the spatial compatibility task alone and the Simon task with another person. The incompatible practice eliminated the Simon effect in Experiments 1 and 4. These results indicate that when a task is distributed between two participants with each one performing a different part of it, they tend to represent the whole task rather than their own part of it. This experience can influence the way a subsequent task is performed, as long as this latter occurs in a social context.

  7. Nanostructure shape effects on response of plasmonic aptamer sensors.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Subramanian; Mayer, Kathryn M; Lee, Seunghyun; Soper, Steven A; Hafner, Jason H; Spivak, David A

    2013-09-01

    A localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor surface was fabricated by the deposition of gold nanorods on a glass substrate and subsequent immobilization of the DNA aptamer, which specifically bind to thrombin. This LSPR aptamer sensor showed a response of 6-nm λ(max) shift for protein binding with the detection limit of at least 10 pM, indicating one of the highest sensitivities achieved for thrombin detection by optical extinction LSPR. We also tested the LSPR sensor fabricated using gold bipyramid, which showed higher refractive index sensitivity than the gold nanorods, but the overall response of gold bipyramid sensor appears to be 25% less than that of the gold nanorod substrate, despite the approximately twofold higher refractive index sensitivity. XPS analysis showed that this is due to the low surface density of aptamers on the gold bipyramid compared with gold nanorods. The low surface density of the aptamers on the gold bipyramid surface may be due to the effect of shape of the nanostructure on the kinetics of aptamer monolayer formation. The small size of aptamers relative to other bioreceptors is the key to achieving high sensitivity by biosensors on the basis of LSPR, demonstrated here for protein binding. The generality of aptamer sensors for protein detection using gold nanorod and gold nanobipyramid substrates is anticipated to have a large impact in the important development of sensors toward biomarkers, environmental toxins, and warfare agents.

  8. Effect of droplet shape on ring stains from dried liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Melvin; Brown, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh

    A landmark experimental paper on coffee stains by Deegan et al included a simple theoretical analysis of circular droplets. The analysis was based on a model informally called the Maxwell House equations. It describes the evolving height profile of the droplet, the evaporation of the solvent and the outflow of solute to the rim of the droplet. Since typical droplets are not circles, here we extend the analysis to more general shapes. We find that for thin droplets the height profile may be determined by solving Poisson's equation in a domain corresponding to the footprint of the droplet. Evaporation is treated in a simple approximation via an electrostatic analogy and is dominated by the sharp edges of the droplet. Assuming zero vorticity allows us to analyze the solvent flow in droplets of arbitrary shape. We compare circular droplets to other shapes including long linear droplets, ring shaped droplets and droplets with an elliptical footprint

  9. EFFECTS OF FORSTERITE GRAIN SHAPE ON INFRARED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, C.; Imai, Y.; Chihara, H.; Murata, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Suto, H.; Tachibana, S.; Ohara, S.

    2010-02-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) detected several sharp infrared features around young stars, comets, and evolved stars. These sharp features were identified as Mg-rich crystalline silicates of forsterite and enstatite by comparison with spectra from laboratory data. However, certain infrared emission bands in the observed spectra cannot be identified because they appear at slightly shorter wavelengths than the peaks in forsterite laboratory spectra, where the shapes of forsterite particles are irregular. To solve this problem, we measured infrared spectra of forsterite grains of various shapes (irregular, plate-like with no sharp edges, elliptical, cauliflower, and spherical) in the infrared spectral region between 5 and 100 mum. The spectra depend on particle shape. The spectra of the 11, 19, 23, and 33 mum bands, in particular, are extremely sensitive to particle shape, whereas some peaks such as the 11.9, 49, and 69 mum bands remained almost unchanged despite different particle shapes. This becomes most evident from the spectra of near-spherical particles produced by annealing an originally amorphous silicate sample at temperature from 600 to 1150 deg. C. The spectra of these samples differ strongly from those of other ones, showing peaks at much shorter wavelengths. At a higher annealing temperature of 1200 deg. C, the particle shapes changed drastically from spherical to irregular and the spectra became similar to those of forsterite particles with irregular shapes. Based on ISO data and other observational data, the spectra of outflow sources and disk sources may correspond to differences in forsterite shape, and further some unidentified peaks, such as those at 32.8 or 32.5 mum, may be due to spherical or spherical-like forsterite.

  10. Effect of enclosure shape on natural convection velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.; Nicholson, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical analysis was performed to compare natural convection velocities in two dimensional enclosures of various shape. The following shapes were investigated: circle, square, horizontal and upright 2 x 1 aspect ratio rectangles, horizontal and upright half circles, diamond. In all cases, the length scale in the various dimensionless parameters, such as Rayleigh number, is defined as the diameter of the equal area circle. Natural convection velocities were calculated for Rayleigh numbers of 1000 and 5000 with the temperature difference taken to be across (1) the maximum horizontal dimension, (2) the median horizontal line (line through centroid) and (3) the horizontal distance such that the temperature gradient is the same for shapes of equal area. For the class of shapes including the square, upright half circle and upright rectangle, the computed velocities were found to agree very closely with that of the equal area circle when the temperature difference is taken to be across the maximum horizontal dimension (condition (a)). The velocities for the horizontal rectangle and half circle were found to be approximately one half that of the equal area circle for the same condition. Better overall agreement among all shapes was obtained by setting the temperature difference across a distance such that the temperature gradients were equal for shapes of equal area.

  11. Effect of body shape on vibration of electric guitars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Daniel A.; Haveman, Wesley S.; Broden, Willis; Weibull, N. Pontus

    2003-04-01

    The body vibrations of an electric guitar are typically ignored since the string vibrations are converted to sound through the use of a magnetic pickup. However, vibrations in the neck have been shown to cause dead spots at certain fret positions [H. Fleischer, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 105, 1330 (1999)]. In this paper we compare the vibrational mode shapes and frequencies of three electric guitars with different body shapes. Two guitars are solid-body electrics: one with a body shape which is symmetric about the neck axis (Epiphone Coronet) and the other which is not (Gibson Explorer). Mode shapes and frequencies are considerably different for the body, though neck vibrations are more closely related. The third guitar is an arched top hollow-body electric (Gibson ES-335). For this guitar, the top and back plates and the air cavities may also contribute to the guitar sound quality. Mode shapes and frequencies are determined from experimental modal analysis using an impact hammer and accelerometer.

  12. The effects of 3-D shaping on ITG stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorvig, Mordechai; Hegna, Chris

    2012-03-01

    In this work we seek to understand how 3-D shaping can be used to improve ion temperature gradient stability. Part of the difficulty in deducing the role of 3-D shaping is the generation of 3-D MHD equilibria necessary for the calculations. In this work, MHD equilibrium surfaces are generated using local 3-D magnetostatic equilibrium theory [1]. We distinguish three different types of toroidal magnetic surface shaping: axisymmetric shaping, toroidal rotation of the cross section, and toroidal translation of the magnetic axis. We study these types of shaping independently and in combination to look for improvements. Linear growth rates for ITG modes are calculated using the gyrokinetics code GENE [2]. The geometric interface package GIST [3] accepts the equilibrium input data from the local equilibrium calculation. Growth rates for both axisymmetric and 3-D equilibrium calculations are presented. [4pt] [1] C. C. Hegna, Physics of Plasmas 7, 3921 (2000).[0pt] [2] F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M. Kotschenreuther, and B. N. Rogers, Physical Review Letters 7, 1904 (2000).[0pt] [3] P. Xanthopoulos, W. A. Cooper, F. Jenko, Yu. Turkin, A. Runov, and J. Geiger, Physics of Plasmas 16, 082303 (2009).

  13. Shape Effect Analysis of Aluminum Projectile Impact on Whipple Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquilla, Maria J.; Miller, Joshua E.

    2017-01-01

    The informed design with respect to hypervelocity collisions involving micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) is influential to the success of space missions. For an orbit comparable to that of the International Space Station, velocities for MMOD can range from 1 to 15 km/s, with an average velocity around 10 km/cu s. The high energy released during collisions at these speeds can result in damage to a spacecraft, or worst-case, loss of the spacecraft, thus outlining the importance of methods to predict the likelihood and extent of damage due to an impact. Through experimental testing and numerical simulations, substantial work has been conducted to better understand the effects of hypervelocity impacts (HVI) on spacecraft systems and shields; however, much of the work has been focused on spherical impacting particles. To improve environment models for the analysis of MMOD, a large-scale satellite break-up test was performed at the Arnold Engineering and Development Complex to better understand the varied impactor geometries that could be generated from a large impact. As a part of the post-experiment analysis, an undertaking to characterize the irregular fragments generated is currently being performed by the University of Florida under the management of NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC). DebriSat was a representative, modern LEO satellite that was catastrophically broken up in a HVI test. The test chamber was lined with a soft-catch system of foam panels that captured the fragments after impact. Initial predictions put the number of fragments larger than 2mm generated from the HVI at roughly 85,000. The number of fragments thus far extracted from the foam panels has exceeded 100,000, with that number continuously increasing. The shapes of the fragments vary dependent upon the material. Carbon-fiber reinforced polymer pieces, for instance, are abundantly found as thin, flat slivers. The characterization of these fragments with

  14. The ferromagnetic shape-memory effect in Ni Mn Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marioni, M. A.; O'Handley, R. C.; Allen, S. M.; Hall, S. R.; Paul, D. I.; Richard, M. L.; Feuchtwanger, J.; Peterson, B. W.; Chambers, J. M.; Techapiesancharoenkij, R.

    2005-04-01

    Active materials have long been used in the construction of sensors and devices. Examples are piezo-electric ceramics and shape memory alloys. The more recently developed ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys (FSMAs) have received considerable attention due to their large magnetic field-induced, reversible strains (up to 10%). In this article, we review the basic physical characteristics of the FSMA Ni-Mn-Ga (crystallography, thermal, mechanical and magnetic behavior). Also, we present some of the works currently under way in the areas of pulse-field and acoustic-assisted actuation, and vibration energy absorption.

  15. Different shapes of constructions and their effects on permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaganova, Nataliia; Filimonov, M. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    A heat transfer model of thermal fields in permafrost soil as a result of operation of different constructions is considered. Some positions(shapes) of engineering objects are compared in view to estimate its reliability and decrease the thermal influence on permafrost.

  16. Shared Learning Shapes Human Performance: Transfer Effects in Task Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milanese, Nadia; Iani, Cristina; Rubichi, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether performing a task with a co-actor shapes the way a subsequent task is performed. In four experiments participants were administered a Simon task after practicing a spatial compatibility task with an incompatible S-R mapping. In Experiment 1 they performed both tasks alongside another person; in Experiment 2 they performed…

  17. Parametric analysis and temperature effect of deployable hinged shells using shape memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ran; Yang, Qing-Sheng; He, Xiao-Qiao; Liew, Kim-Meow

    2016-11-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a class of intelligent materials, which are defined by their capacity to store a temporary shape and recover an original shape. In this work, the shape memory effect of SMP deployable hinged shell is simulated by using compiled user defined material subroutine (UMAT) subroutine of ABAQUS. Variations of bending moment and strain energy of the hinged shells with different temperatures and structural parameters in the loading process are given. The effects of the parameters and temperature on the nonlinear deformation process are emphasized. The entire thermodynamic cycle of SMP deployable hinged shell includes loading at high temperature, load carrying with cooling, unloading at low temperature and recovering the original shape with heating. The results show that the complicated thermo-mechanical deformation and shape memory effect of SMP deployable hinge are influenced by the structural parameters and temperature. The design ability of SMP smart hinged structures in practical application is prospected.

  18. The effect of shaping on Reversed Field Pinch dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahine, Robert; Morales, Jorge A.; Schneider, Kai; Bos, Wouter J. T.

    2016-10-01

    Reversed Field Pinch fusion devices (RFPs) are inevitably plagued by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. High resolution numerical simulations of fully nonlinear visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamics using a Fourier pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization [Morales et al. JCP, 2014] are performed. Results of RFP simulations in toroidal geometry were reported in [Morales et al. PPCF, 2014]. Here we consider a cylindrical domain with elliptical cross-section for different aspect ratios. The results illustrate a notable influence of the shape of the cross-section on the nonlinear dynamics of RFPs. The axial mode-spectrum is qualitatively changed in cylinders with elliptic cross-section. The results suggest that shaping could change, and possibly improve the confinement of RFPs. It is certainly possible that specific helical modes can be promoted, approaching thereby a QSH state. Support by the French Research Federation for Fusion Studies within the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) is thankfully acknowledged.

  19. Unambiguous observation of shape effects on cellular fate of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chu, Zhiqin; Zhang, Silu; Zhang, Bokai; Zhang, Chunyuan; Fang, Chia-Yi; Rehor, Ivan; Cigler, Petr; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Lin, Ge; Liu, Renbao; Li, Quan

    2014-03-28

    Cellular fate of nanoparticles is vital to application of nanoparticles to cell imaging, bio-sensing, drug delivery, suppression of drug resistance, gene delivery, and cytotoxicity analysis. However, the current studies on cellular fate of nanoparticles have been controversial due to complications of interplay between many possible factors. By well-controlled experiments, we demonstrated unambiguously that the morphology of nanoparticles independently determined their cellular fate. We found that nanoparticles with sharp shapes, regardless of their surface chemistry, size, or composition, could pierce the membranes of endosomes that carried them into the cells and escape to the cytoplasm, which in turn significantly reduced the cellular excretion rate of the nanoparticles. Such features of sharp-shaped nanoparticles are essential for drug delivery, gene delivery, subcellular targeting, and long-term tracking. This work opens up a controllable, purely geometrical and hence safe, degree of freedom for manipulating nanoparticle-cell interaction, with numerous applications in medicine, bio-imaging, and bio-sensing.

  20. Effect of Pre-straining on the Shape Recovery of Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Bikas C.; Krishnan, Madangopal; Verma, Amit; Basu, R.; Samajdar, I.; Ray, Ranjit K.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of pre-straining on the shape recovery behavior of Fe-14Mn-6Si-9Cr-5Ni (wt pct) shape memory alloy (SMA) has been studied. The shape recovery associated with the reverse ɛ martensitic transformation, i.e., ɛ → γ, was characterized by dilatometry using specimens which were pre-strained to different extent (0 to 14 pct). Dilatometric studies revealed that in Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni SMA, the shape recovery takes place in two stages: (i) in the first stage, the unpinned fraction of stress-induced ɛ martensite reverts back to parent phase γ in the temperature regime of 353 K to 653 K (80 °C to 380 °C) and (ii) in the second stage the remaining "pinned" ɛ martensite is unpinned by the decomposition of deformation-induced α' martensite in the temperature range of 743 K to 893 K (470 °C to 620 °C). The amount of recovery in the first stage decreases with pre-strain, whereas it increases in the second stage. The ɛ → γ transformation finish temperature, A f, increases with increase in pre-strain amount, though the reverse transformation start temperature, A S, remains unaffected. Microstructural characterization revealed that the amount of deformation-induced α' martensite depends on the mode of straining and the crystallographic texture of the starting material. The reversion of α' martensite is seen to occur by the precipitation of Fe5Ni3Si2-type intermetallic π-phase within these plates.

  1. Effects of organelle shape on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching.

    PubMed

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Mezzacasa, Anna; Helenius, Ari; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-09-01

    The determination of diffusion coefficients from fluorescence recovery data is often complicated by geometric constraints imposed by the complex shapes of intracellular compartments. To address this issue, diffusion of proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is studied using cell biological and computational methods. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments are performed in tissue culture cells expressing GFP-KDEL, a soluble, fluorescent protein, in the ER lumen. The three-dimensional (3D) shape of the ER is determined by confocal microscopy and computationally reconstructed. Within these ER geometries diffusion of solutes is simulated using the method of particle strength exchange. The simulations are compared to experimental FRAP curves of GFP-KDEL in the same ER region. Comparisons of simulations in the 3D ER shapes to simulations in open 3D space show that the constraints imposed by the spatial confinement result in two- to fourfold underestimation of the molecular diffusion constant in the ER if the geometry is not taken into account. Using the same molecular diffusion constant in different simulations, the observed speed of fluorescence recovery varies by a factor of 2.5, depending on the particular ER geometry and the location of the bleached area. Organelle shape considerably influences diffusive transport and must be taken into account when relating experimental photobleaching data to molecular diffusion coefficients. This novel methodology combines experimental FRAP curves with high accuracy computer simulations of diffusion in the same ER geometry to determine the molecular diffusion constant of the solute in the particular ER lumen.

  2. Effects of Organelle Shape on Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Mezzacasa, Anna; Helenius, Ari; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-01-01

    The determination of diffusion coefficients from fluorescence recovery data is often complicated by geometric constraints imposed by the complex shapes of intracellular compartments. To address this issue, diffusion of proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is studied using cell biological and computational methods. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments are performed in tissue culture cells expressing GFP–KDEL, a soluble, fluorescent protein, in the ER lumen. The three-dimensional (3D) shape of the ER is determined by confocal microscopy and computationally reconstructed. Within these ER geometries diffusion of solutes is simulated using the method of particle strength exchange. The simulations are compared to experimental FRAP curves of GFP–KDEL in the same ER region. Comparisons of simulations in the 3D ER shapes to simulations in open 3D space show that the constraints imposed by the spatial confinement result in two- to fourfold underestimation of the molecular diffusion constant in the ER if the geometry is not taken into account. Using the same molecular diffusion constant in different simulations, the observed speed of fluorescence recovery varies by a factor of 2.5, depending on the particular ER geometry and the location of the bleached area. Organelle shape considerably influences diffusive transport and must be taken into account when relating experimental photobleaching data to molecular diffusion coefficients. This novel methodology combines experimental FRAP curves with high accuracy computer simulations of diffusion in the same ER geometry to determine the molecular diffusion constant of the solute in the particular ER lumen. PMID:15951382

  3. Effect of illite particle shape on cesium sorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rajec, P.; Sucha, V.; Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.; Elsass, F.

    1999-01-01

    Samples containing illite and illite-smectite, having different crystal shapes (plates, "barrels", and filaments), were selected for sorption experiments with cesium. There is a positive correlation between total surface area and Cs-sorption capacity, but no correlation between total surface area and the distribution coefficient, Kd. Generally Kd increases with the edge surface area, although "hairy" (filamentous) illite does not fit this pattern, possibly because elongation of crystals along one axis reduces the number of specific sorption sites.

  4. Effects of Shape on Diffusion and Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Robert; Packard, Norman

    2010-03-01

    Diffusion of point particles is well-understood, likewise the motion of simple particles under shear flow. However if the particles are extended objects with shape, more complicated behavior can occur. For example, objects might enter a shaped channel in a configuration that requires them to back up a finite distance in order to proceed further. A configuration that blocks flow through the channel might be statistically preferred, an attracting metastable state of the system. In the bulk, the configuration space of a set of closely packed rigid objects can become convoluted, with many dead-end alleys. If such a system is subjected to a shear, it may naturally tend to settle in such a dead-end, and have to retrace its path in order to continue further, a configuration can become locally locked. The requirement that the system backtrack to unlock distinguishes this process from ordinary jamming, there need be no dissipation or friction per se. We have a number of computer simulations of the motions of closely packed shaped objects, under both Hamiltonian and Monte Carlo dynamics. In addition we will present a simple analytic model, describing the entry and escape of the system from the attracting locked metastable states.

  5. The effects of aging on haptic 2D shape recognition.

    PubMed

    Overvliet, Krista E; Wagemans, J; Krampe, Ralf T

    2013-12-01

    We use the image-mediation model (Klatzky & Lederman, 1987) as a framework to investigate potential sources of adult age differences in the haptic recognition of two-dimensional (2D) shapes. This model states that the low-resolution, temporally sequential, haptic input is translated into a visual image, which is then reperceived through the visual processors, before it is matched against a long-term memory representation and named. In three experiments we tested groups of 12 older (mean age 73.11) and three groups of 12 young adults (mean age 22.80) each. In Experiment 1 we confirm age-related differences in haptic 2D shape recognition, and we show the typical age × complexity interaction. In Experiment 2 we show that if we facilitate the visual translation process, age differences become smaller, but only with simple shapes and not with the more complex everyday objects. In Experiment 3 we target the last step in the model (matching and naming) for complex stimuli. We found that age differences in exploration time were considerably reduced when this component process was facilitated by providing a category name. We conclude that the image-mediation model can explain adult-age differences in haptic recognition, particularly if the role of working memory in forming the transient visual image is considered. Our findings suggest that sensorimotor skills thought to rely on peripheral processes for the most part are critically constrained by age-related changes in central processing capacity in later adulthood.

  6. [Effects of canopy shapes of grape on canopy microenvironment, leaf and fruit quality in greenhouse].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang-bin; Liu, Feng-zhi; Cheng, Cun-gang; Wang, Xiao-di; Wang, Bao-liang; Zheng, Xiao-cui; Wang, Hai-bo

    2015-12-01

    The effects of three canopy shapes, i.e., vertical canopy, V-shaped canopy and horizontal canopy, on canopy microenvironment, quality of leaves and fruits were studied in the 3-year-old grape 'Jingmi' grafted on ' Beta' in greenhouse. The results showed that gap fraction and openness of vertical canopy were significantly higher than that of V-shaped canopy and horizontal canopy, and leaf area index, light interception rate and canopy temperature difference between day and night were significantly lower than those of V-shaped canopy and horizontal canopy. There was no significant difference between the latter two treatments. The palisade thickness of V-shaped canopy was significantly greater than that of vertical canopy, and horizontal canopy was in the middle. The chlorophyll and carotenoid contents of V-shaped canopy were significantly higher than those of vertical canopy and horizontal canopy, and those in the latter two treatments had no significant difference. The fruit quality of V-shaped canopy was the best, and that of horizontal canopy was the worst. The results of GC-MS analysis showed that 29 types of volatile aroma compounds were detected in V-shaped canopy, but just 17 and 16 in vertical canopy and horizontal canopy, respectively. In V-shaped canopy, the characteristic aroma in grape 'Jingmi' was higher, except ethanol, trans-2- hexene-1-alcohol, 2-octyl ketone and formic acid ester. The linalool content in vertical canopy and V-shaped canopy was higher than that in horizontal canopy. The nerol content in V-shaped canopy was higher than that in vertical canopy and horizontal canopy, and the leaf alcohol content in V-shaped canopy and horizontal canopy was higher than that in vertical canopy. The citronellol was de-tected only in V-shaped canopy. In greenhouse, the fruit aroma of V-shaped canopy grape was stronger, and well reflected the variety characteristics.

  7. Size effects on pull-out of bone shaped fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tippetts, T. B.; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Zhu, Y. T.

    2001-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that ductile bone shaped short (BSS) fibers, i.e. fibers with enlarged ends, can significantly increase toughness of brittle materials over that of conventional short fibers (CSS) [1]. In this work, we apply a recently developed micromechanical model for the pull-out force vs. displacement response of a ductile BSS fiber as it pulls completely out of a brittle matrix material. The pull-out process of BSS fibers absorbs more energy than that of CSS fibers, largely due to nonlinear deformation of the fiber end and surrounding matrix.

  8. Effect of particle shape on the mixing of powders.

    PubMed

    Wong, L W; Pilpel, N

    1990-01-01

    Mixtures were prepared containing 200 g of 600 microns lactose and 0.5 g of 3 microns calcium carbonate of different particle shapes using a Y cone mixer. Measurements were made of the time required to achieve the acceptable standard deviation of mixing sigma A and of the segregation that occurred on subsequently vibrating the mixtures. The time taken to achieve sigma A increased with the irregularity of the particles of both components and the mixtures containing irregular particles segregated less on vibration.

  9. Cruising the rain forest floor: butterfly wing shape evolution and gliding in ground effect.

    PubMed

    Cespedes, Ann; Penz, Carla M; DeVries, Philip J

    2015-05-01

    Flight is a key innovation in the evolutionary success of insects and essential to dispersal, territoriality, courtship and oviposition. Wing shape influences flight performance and selection likely acts to maximize performance for conducting essential behaviours that in turn results in the evolution of wing shape. As wing shape also contributes to fitness, optimal shapes for particular flight behaviours can be assessed with aerodynamic predictions and placed in an ecomorphological context. Butterflies in the tribe Haeterini (Nymphalidae) are conspicuous members of understorey faunas in lowland Neotropical forests. Field observations indicate that the five genera in this clade differ in flight height and behaviour: four use gliding flight at the forest floor level, and one utilizes flapping flight above the forest floor. Nonetheless, the association of ground level gliding flight behaviour and wing shape has never been investigated in this or any other butterfly group. We used landmark-based geometric morphometrics to test whether wing shapes in Haeterini and their close relatives reflected observed flight behaviours. Four genera of Haeterini and some distantly related Satyrinae showed significant correspondence between wing shape and theoretical expectations in performance trade-offs that we attribute to selection for gliding in ground effect. Forewing shape differed between sexes for all taxa, and male wing shapes were aerodynamically more efficient for gliding flight than corresponding females. This suggests selection acts differentially on male and female wing shapes, reinforcing the idea that sex-specific flight behaviours contribute to the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Our study indicates that wing shapes in Haeterini butterflies evolved in response to habitat-specific flight behaviours, namely gliding in ground effect along the forest floor, resulting in ecomorphological partitions of taxa in morphospace. The convergent flight behaviour and wing morphology

  10. Shape memory effect and superelasticity of titanium nickelide alloys implanted with high ion doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnjak, A. D.; Bratushka, S. N.; Beresnev, V. M.; Levintant-Zayonts, N.

    2013-12-01

    The state of the art in ion implantation of superelastic NiTi shape memory alloys is analyzed. Various technological applications of the shape memory effect are outlined. The principles and techiques of ion implantation are described. Specific features of its application for modification of surface layers in surface engineering are considered. Key properties of shape memory alloys and problems in utilization of ion implantation to improve the surface properties of shape memory alloys, such as corrosion resistance, friction coefficient, wear resistance, etc. are discussed. The bibliography includes 162 references.

  11. Fast Response, Open-Celled Porous, Shape Memory Effect Actuators with Integrated Attachments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Andrew Peter (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates to the exploitation of porous foam articles exhibiting the Shape Memory Effect as actuators. Each foam article is composed of a plurality of geometric shapes, such that some geometric shapes can fit snugly into or around rigid mating connectors that attach the Shape Memory foam article intimately into the load path between a static structure and a moveable structure. The foam is open-celled, composed of a plurality of interconnected struts whose mean diameter can vary from approximately 50 to 500 microns. Gases and fluids flowing through the foam transfer heat rapidly with the struts, providing rapid Shape Memory Effect transformations. Embodiments of porous foam articles as torsional actuators and approximately planar structures are disposed. Simple, integral connection systems exploiting the ability to supply large loads to a structure, and that can also supply hot and cold gases and fluids to effect rapid actuation are also disposed.

  12. Effects of Caricaturing in Shape or Color on Familiarity Decisions for Familiar and Unfamiliar Faces

    PubMed Central

    Itz, Marlena L.; Schweinberger, Stefan R.; Kaufmann, Jürgen M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that while reflectance information (including color) may be more diagnostic for familiar face recognition, shape may be more diagnostic for unfamiliar face identity processing. Moreover, event-related potential (ERP) findings suggest an earlier onset for neural processing of facial shape compared to reflectance. In the current study, we aimed to explore specifically the roles of facial shape and color in a familiarity decision task using pre-experimentally familiar (famous) and unfamiliar faces that were caricatured either in shape-only, color-only, or both (full; shape + color) by 15%, 30%, or 45%. We recorded accuracies, mean reaction times, and face-sensitive ERPs. Performance data revealed that shape caricaturing facilitated identity processing for unfamiliar faces only. In the ERP data, such effects of shape caricaturing emerged earlier than those of color caricaturing. Unsurprisingly, ERP effects were accentuated for larger levels of caricaturing. Overall, our findings corroborate the importance of shape for identity processing of unfamiliar faces and demonstrate an earlier onset of neural processing for facial shape compared to color. PMID:26900690

  13. Joint effects of illumination geometry and object shape in the perception of surface reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Maria; Brainard, David H

    2011-01-01

    Surface properties provide useful information for identifying objects and interacting with them. Effective utilization of this information, however, requires that the perception of object surface properties be relatively constant across changes in illumination and changes in object shape. Such constancy has been studied separately for changes in these factors. Here we ask whether the separate study of the illumination and shape effects is sufficient, by testing whether joint effects of illumination and shape changes can be predicted from the individual effects in a straightforward manner. We found large interactions between illumination and object shape in their effects on perceived glossiness. In addition, analysis of luminance histogram statistics could not account for the interactions. PMID:23145259

  14. Bayesian Covariate Selection in Mixed-Effects Models For Longitudinal Shape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Prasanna; Fishbaugh, James; Kim, Eun Young; Johnson, Hans J.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Gerig, Guido; Fletcher, P. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The goal of longitudinal shape analysis is to understand how anatomical shape changes over time, in response to biological processes, including growth, aging, or disease. In many imaging studies, it is also critical to understand how these shape changes are affected by other factors, such as sex, disease diagnosis, IQ, etc. Current approaches to longitudinal shape analysis have focused on modeling age-related shape changes, but have not included the ability to handle covariates. In this paper, we present a novel Bayesian mixed-effects shape model that incorporates simultaneous relationships between longitudinal shape data and multiple predictors or covariates to the model. Moreover, we place an Automatic Relevance Determination (ARD) prior on the parameters, that lets us automatically select which covariates are most relevant to the model based on observed data. We evaluate our proposed model and inference procedure on a longitudinal study of Huntington's disease from PREDICT-HD. We first show the utility of the ARD prior for model selection in a univariate modeling of striatal volume, and next we apply the full high-dimensional longitudinal shape model to putamen shapes. PMID:28090246

  15. An Effective 3D Shape Descriptor for Object Recognition with RGB-D Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong; Zhao, Changchen; Wu, Xingming; Chen, Weihai

    2017-01-01

    RGB-D sensors have been widely used in various areas of computer vision and graphics. A good descriptor will effectively improve the performance of operation. This article further analyzes the recognition performance of shape features extracted from multi-modality source data using RGB-D sensors. A hybrid shape descriptor is proposed as a representation of objects for recognition. We first extracted five 2D shape features from contour-based images and five 3D shape features over point cloud data to capture the global and local shape characteristics of an object. The recognition performance was tested for category recognition and instance recognition. Experimental results show that the proposed shape descriptor outperforms several common global-to-global shape descriptors and is comparable to some partial-to-global shape descriptors that achieved the best accuracies in category and instance recognition. Contribution of partial features and computational complexity were also analyzed. The results indicate that the proposed shape features are strong cues for object recognition and can be combined with other features to boost accuracy. PMID:28245553

  16. Effect of wind-induced drag on leaf shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louf, Jean-Francois; Ntoh Song, Pierre; Zehnbauer, Tim; Jung, Sunghwan

    2016-11-01

    Under windy conditions everyone can see leaves bending and twisting. From a geometrical point of view, a leaf is composed of two parts: a large flat plate called the lamina, and a small beam called the petiole, connecting the lamina to the branch/stem. While the wind is exerting forces (e.g. drag) on the lamina, the petiole undergoes twisting and bending stresses. To survive in harsh abiotic conditions, leaves might have evolved to form in many different shapes, resulting from a coupling between the lamina and the petiole. In this study we measure the twisting modulus (G) of the petiole using a twisting setup, and its Young modulus (E) by performing tensile tests. Micro-CT scan is used to precisely measure the cross section of the petiole allowing us to calculate the second moment of inertia (I) and the second moment of area (J). We then use the non-dimensional number EI/GJ and compare it to a geometrical non-dimensional number (Lpetiole +Llamina/2)/W, where Lpetiole is the length of the petiole, Llamina the length of the lamina, and W the width of the lamina. We found a linear relation between the ratio of the bending to twisting rigidity and the leaf geometry.

  17. Effect of diffuser vane shape on the performance of a centrifugal compressor stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, T. Ch Siva; Ramana Murty, G. V.; Prasad, M. V. S. S. S. M.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper reports the results of experimental investigations on the effect of diffuser vane shape on the performance of a centrifugal compressor stage. These studies were conducted on the chosen stage having a backward curved impeller of 500 mm tip diameter and 24.5 mm width and its design flow coefficient is ϕd=0.0535. Three different low solidity diffuser vane shapes namely uncambered aerofoil, constant thickness flat plate and circular arc cambered constant thickness plate were chosen as the variants for diffuser vane shape and all the three shapes have the same thickness to chord ratio (t/c=0.1). Flow coefficient, polytropic efficiency, total head coefficient, power coefficient and static pressure recovery coefficient were chosen as the parameters for evaluating the effect of diffuser vane shape on the stage performance. The results show that there is reasonable improvement in stage efficiency and total head coefficient with the use of the chosen diffuser vane shapes as compared to conventional vaneless diffuser. It is also noticed that the aero foil shaped LSD has shown better performance when compared to flat plate and circular arc profiles. The aerofoil vane shape of the diffuser blade is seen to be tolerant over a considerable range of incidence.

  18. Two-way Shape Memory Effect of NiTi under Compressive Loading Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Young Ik; Lee, Jung Ju

    In this study, the two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) of a Ni-54.5 at.% Ti alloy was investigated experimentally to develop a NiTi linear actuator. The two-way shape memory effect was induced through a compressive shape memory cycle composed of four steps: (1) loading to maximum deformation; (2) unloading; (3) heating; (4) and cooling. Six types of specimens (one solid cylindrical and five tubular) were used to obtain the twoway shape memory strain and two-way recovery stress and to evaluate the actuating capacity. The two-way actuating strain showed a convergent tendency after several training cycles for the same maximum deformation. A maximum value of the two-way strain was obtained for 7% of maximum deformation, independently of the geometry of the tubular specimens. The two-way strains obtained by the shape memory cycles and two-way recovery stress linearly increase as a function of the maximum deformation and the two-way strain, respectively, and the geometry of specimen affects the two-way recovery stress. Although the results show that sufficient recovery stress can be generated by either the two-way shape memory process or by the one-way shape memory process, the two-way shape memory process can be applied more conveniently to actuating applications.

  19. Effect of the shape of quantum dots on the third-harmonic generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Keyin; Guo, Kangxian; Liang, Litao

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the shape of quantum dots on the third-harmonic generations is theoretically investigated. Using the effective-mass approximation, calculations are performed employing methods of both the compact-density-matrix and the matrix diagonalization. We discuss the properties of the third-harmonic generations (THG) coefficients as a function of the incident photon frequency in elliptic and triangular shaped quantum dots. The results reveal that the shape of quantum dots has a great influence on the third-harmonic generations.

  20. Competing Classical and Quantum Effects in Shape Relaxation of a Metallic Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Rowland H.; Chen, D.; Yamada, T.

    2002-01-01

    Pb islands grown on a silicon substrate transform at room temperature from the initially flattop facet geometry into an unusual ring, shape with a volume-preserving mass transport process catalysed by the tip electrical field of a scanning tunnelling microscope. The formation of such ring shape morphology results from the competing classical and quantum effects in the shape relaxation. The latter also leads to a sequential regrowth on alternating, strips of the same facet defined by the underlying substrate steps, showing for the first time the dynamical impact of the quantum size effect on the stability of a nanostructure.

  1. Effect of axial load on mode shapes and frequencies of beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of axial load on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of uniform beams and of a cantilevered beam with a concentrated mass at the tip is presented. Characteristic equations which yield the frequencies and mode shape functions for the various cases are given. The solutions to these equations are presented by a series of graphs so that frequency as a function of axial load can readily be determined. The effect of axial load on the mode shapes are also depicted by another series of graphs.

  2. Tubular Scaffold with Shape Recovery Effect for Cell Guide Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Kazi M. Zakir; Zhu, Chenkai; Felfel, Reda M.; Sharmin, Nusrat; Ahmed, Ifty

    2015-01-01

    Tubular scaffolds with aligned polylactic acid (PLA) fibres were fabricated for cell guide applications by immersing rolled PLA fibre mats into a polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) solution to bind the mats. The PVAc solution was also mixed with up to 30 wt % β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) content. Cross-sectional images of the scaffold materials obtained via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the aligned fibre morphology along with a significant number of voids in between the bundles of fibres. The addition of β-TCP into the scaffolds played an important role in increasing the void content from 17.1% to 25.3% for the 30 wt % β-TCP loading, which was measured via micro-CT (µCT) analysis. Furthermore, µCT analyses revealed the distribution of aggregated β-TCP particles in between the various PLA fibre layers of the scaffold. The compressive modulus properties of the scaffolds increased from 66 MPa to 83 MPa and the compressive strength properties decreased from 67 MPa to 41 MPa for the 30 wt % β-TCP content scaffold. The scaffolds produced were observed to change into a soft and flexible form which demonstrated shape recovery properties after immersion in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) media at 37 °C for 24 h. The cytocompatibility studies (using MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line) revealed preferential cell proliferation along the longitudinal direction of the fibres as compared to the control tissue culture plastic. The manufacturing process highlighted above reveals a simple process for inducing controlled cell alignment and varying porosity features within tubular scaffolds for potential tissue engineering applications. PMID:26184328

  3. Effect of I-shaped metamaterial on microstrip antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, JiJun; Gong, LeiLei; Zhang, YanRong

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a near-zero-index metamaterial is proposed by the composite I-shaped unit cell and the refraction index of this metamaterial is close to zero from 6.12GHz to 6.19 GHz. To study the characteristics and application of this near-zero-index metamaterial, especially the ability of focusing energy, a microstrip antenna is designed. According to the formulations for designing microstrip patch antenna, the conventional microstrip antenna, which resonance at 6.19GHz, is designed and optimized. This metamaterial is placed right above the conventional microstrip antenna and this system is tested by the finite element method (FEM). Simulation results show that the maximum radiation gain in H-plane of the microstrip antenna with this near-zero-index metamaterial is 9.24dB, while the maximum radiation gain in H-plane of the conventional microstrip antenna is 2.63dB, improving about 6.61dB than conventional microstrip antenna; the maximum radiation gain in E-plane of the microstrip antenna with this near-zero-index metamaterial is 9.24dB, while the maximum radiation gain in E-plane of the conventional microstrip antenna is 5.12dB, improving about 4.12dB than conventional microstrip antenna. Simulation results also show that the directivity of the microstrip antenna with this near-zero-index metamaterial is much higher, compared with the conventional microstrip antenna. Radiation gain at other frequencies, from 6.12GHz to 6.19GHz, is also obtained, the value is much higher than the conventional microstrip antenna at the corresponding frequency. The results indicate that near-zero-index metamaterials can improve the radiation gain and the directivity of the conventional microstrip antenna.

  4. Tubular Scaffold with Shape Recovery Effect for Cell Guide Applications.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Kazi M Zakir; Zhu, Chenkai; Felfel, Reda M; Sharmin, Nusrat; Ahmed, Ifty

    2015-07-10

    Tubular scaffolds with aligned polylactic acid (PLA) fibres were fabricated for cell guide applications by immersing rolled PLA fibre mats into a polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) solution to bind the mats. The PVAc solution was also mixed with up to 30 wt % β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) content. Cross-sectional images of the scaffold materials obtained via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the aligned fibre morphology along with a significant number of voids in between the bundles of fibres. The addition of β-TCP into the scaffolds played an important role in increasing the void content from 17.1% to 25.3% for the 30 wt % β-TCP loading, which was measured via micro-CT (µCT) analysis. Furthermore, µCT analyses revealed the distribution of aggregated β-TCP particles in between the various PLA fibre layers of the scaffold. The compressive modulus properties of the scaffolds increased from 66 MPa to 83 MPa and the compressive strength properties decreased from 67 MPa to 41 MPa for the 30 wt % β-TCP content scaffold. The scaffolds produced were observed to change into a soft and flexible form which demonstrated shape recovery properties after immersion in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) media at 37 °C for 24 h. The cytocompatibility studies (using MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line) revealed preferential cell proliferation along the longitudinal direction of the fibres as compared to the control tissue culture plastic. The manufacturing process highlighted above reveals a simple process for inducing controlled cell alignment and varying porosity features within tubular scaffolds for potential tissue engineering applications.

  5. Interface shape in Czochralski grown crystals - Effect of conduction and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R. K.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Dudukovic, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    A sequential modular computational scheme has been proposed for the calculation of temperature profiles in the melt and crystal including the melt-crystal interface shape and the crystal pulling rate for a fixed crystal radius. The heat transfer in the melt is assumed to occur by conduction only. The shape of melt-gas meniscus, described by Laplace-Young equation, is incorporated in the model and its effects on interface shape and pulling rate are examined. Further, the model incorporates the detailed radiation interaction among the various surfaces in the puller using the Gebhart enclosure theory which accounts for both direct and reflected radiation. The effects of various process parameters on the interface shape and the pulling rate have been investigated. The results of this study indicate that the shape of the melt-gas meniscus has a significant effect on the pulling rate and the interface shape in conformity with earlier studies. Further, it is shown that a simple radiation model (Stefan's model) is inadequate to model the radiation heat exchange in the Czochralski puller apparatus and the detailed Gebhart analysis is necessary for accurate calculation of both the temperature profile in the crystal as well as the interface shape.

  6. Projectile Shape Effects Analysis for Space Debris Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, Kuniaki; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kamiya, Takeshi

    2002-01-01

    (JEM IST), has a manned pressurized module used as a research laboratory on orbit and planned to be attached to the International Space Station (ISS). Protection system from Micrometeoroids and orbital debris (MM/OD) is very important for crew safety aboard the ISS. We have to design a module with shields attached to the outside of the pressurized wall so that JEM can be protected when debris of diameter less than 20mm impact on the JEM wall. In this case, the ISS design requirement for space debris protection system is specified as the Probability of No Penetration (PNP). The PNP allocation for the JEM is 0.9738 for ten years, which is reallocated as 0.9814 for the Pressurized Module (PM) and 0.9922 for the Experiment Logistics Module-Pressurized Section (ELM-PS). The PNP is calculated with Bumper code provided by NASA with the following data inputs to the calculation. (1) JEM structural model (2) Ballistic Limit Curve (BLC) of shields pressure wall (3) Environmental conditions: Analysis type, debris distribution, debris model, debris density, Solar single aluminum plate bumper (1.27mm thickness). The other is a Stuffed Whipple shield with its second bumper composed of an aluminum mesh, three layers of Nextel AF62 ceramic fabric, and four layers of Kevlar 710 fabric with thermal isolation material Multilayer Insulation (MLI) in the bottom. The second bumper of Stuffed Whipple shields is located at the middle between the first bumper and the 4.8 mm-thick pressurized wall. with Two-Stage Light Gas Gun (TSLGG) tests and hydro code simulation already. The remaining subject is the verification of JEM debris protection shields for velocities ranging from 7 to 15 km/sec. We conducted Conical Shaped Charge (CSC) tests that enable hypervelocity impact tests for the debris velocity range above 10 km/sec as well as hydro code simulation. because of the jet generation mechanism. It is therefore necessary to analyze and compensate the results for a solid aluminum sphere, which

  7. Turbulent momentum transport due to the beating between different tokamak flux surface shaping effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin; Parra, Felix I.

    2017-02-01

    Introducing up-down asymmetry into the tokamak magnetic equilibria appears to be a feasible method to drive fast intrinsic toroidal rotation in future large devices. In this paper we investigate how the intrinsic momentum transport generated by up-down asymmetric shaping scales with the mode number of the shaping effects. Making use the gyrokinetic tilting symmetry (Ball et al 2016 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 58 045023), we study the effect of envelopes created by the beating of different high-order shaping effects. This reveals that the presence of an envelope can change the scaling of the momentum flux from exponentially small in the limit of large shaping mode number to just polynomially small. This enhancement of the momentum transport requires the envelope to be both up-down asymmetric and have a spatial scale on the order of the minor radius.

  8. Surface effects on shape and topology optimization of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanthakumar, S. S.; Valizadeh, Navid; Park, Harold S.; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-07-01

    We present a computational method for the optimization of nanostructures, where our specific interest is in capturing and elucidating surface stress and surface elastic effects on the optimal nanodesign. XFEM is used to solve the nanomechanical boundary value problem, which involves a discontinuity in the strain field and the presence of surface effects along the interface. The boundary of the nano-structure is implicitly represented by a level set function, which is considered as the design variable in the optimization process. Two objective functions, minimizing the total potential energy of a nanostructure subjected to a material volume constraint and minimizing the least square error compared to a target displacement, are chosen for the numerical examples. We present results of optimal topologies of a nanobeam subject to cantilever and fixed boundary conditions. The numerical examples demonstrate the importance of size and aspect ratio in determining how surface effects impact the optimized topology of nanobeams.

  9. Experimental comparison of ring and diamond shaped planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-09-01

    Planar Hall effect magnetic field sensors with ring and diamond shaped geometries are experimentally compared with respect to their magnetic field sensitivity and total signal variation. Theoretically, diamond shaped sensors are predicted to be 41% more sensitive than corresponding ring shaped sensors for negligible shape anisotropy. To experimentally validate this, we have fabricated both sensor geometries in the exchange-biased stack Ni80Fe20(tFM)/Cu(tCu)/Mn80Ir20(10 nm) with tFM=10 , 20, and 30 nm and tCu=0 , 0.3, and 0.6 nm. Sensors from each stack were characterized by external magnetic field sweeps, which were analyzed in terms of a single domain model. The total signal variation of the diamond sensors was generally found to be about 40% higher than that for the ring sensors in agreement with theoretical predictions. However, for the low-field sensitivity, the corresponding improvement varied from 0% to 35% where the largest improvement was observed for sensor stacks with comparatively strong exchange bias. This is explained by the ring sensors being less affected by shape anisotropy than the diamond sensors. To study the effect of shape anisotropy, we also characterized sensors that were surrounded by the magnetic stack with a small gap of 3 μm. These sensors were found to be less affected by shape anisotropy and thus showed higher low-field sensitivities.

  10. Thermal analysis and evolution of shape loss phenomena during polymer burnout in powder metal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enneti, Ravi Kumar

    2005-07-01

    Powder metallurgy technology involves manufacturing of net shape or near net shape components starting from metal powders. Polymers are used to provide lubrication during shaping and handling strength to the shaped component. After shaping, the polymers are removed from the shaped components by providing thermal energy to burnout the polymers. Polymer burnout is one of the most critical step in powder metal processing. Improper design of the polymer burnout cycle will result in formation of defects, shape loss, or carbon contamination of the components. The effect of metal particles on polymer burnout and shape loss were addressed in the present research. The study addressing the effect of metal powders on polymer burnout was based on the hypothesis that metal powders act to catalyze polymer burnout. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) on pure polymer, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), and on admixed powders of 316L stainless steel and 1 wt. % EVA were carried out to verify the hypothesis. The effect of metal powders additions was studied by monitoring the onset temperature for polymer degradation and the temperature at which maximum rate of weight loss occurred from the TGA data. The catalytic behavior of the powders was verified by varying the particle size and shape of the 316L stainless powder. The addition of metal particles lowered the polymer burnout temperatures. The onset temperature for burnout was found to be sensitive to the surface area of the metal particle as well as the polymer distribution. Powders with low surface area and uniform distribution of polymer showed a lower burnout temperature. The evolution of shape loss during polymer burnout was based on the hypothesis that shape loss occurs during the softening of the polymer and depends on the sequence of chemical bonding in the polymer during burnout. In situ observation of shape loss was carried out on thin beams compacted from admixed powders of 316L stainless steel and 1 wt. % ethylene vinyl acetate

  11. Fast Response Shape Memory Effect Titanium Nickel (TiNi) Foam Torque Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Shape Change Technologies has developed a process to manufacture net-shaped TiNi foam torque tubes that demonstrate the shape memory effect. The torque tubes dramatically reduce response time by a factor of 10. This Phase II project matured the actuator technology by rigorously characterizing the process to optimize the quality of the TiNi and developing a set of metrics to provide ISO 9002 quality assurance. A laboratory virtual instrument engineering workbench (LabVIEW'TM')-based, real-time control of the torsional actuators was developed. These actuators were developed with The Boeing Company for aerospace applications.

  12. Effect of shape and size of lung and chest wall on stresses in the lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vawter, D. L.; Matthews, F. L.; West, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    To understand better the effect of shape and size of lung and chest wall on the distribution of stresses, strains, and surface pressures, we analyzed a theoretical model using the technique of finite elements. First we investigated the effects of changing the chest wall shape during expansion, and second we studied lungs of a variety of inherent shapes and sizes. We found that, in general, the distributions of alveolar size, mechanical stresses, and surface pressures in the lungs were dominated by the weight of the lung and that changing the shape of the lung or chest wall had relatively little effect. Only at high states of expansion where the lung was very stiff did changing the shape of the chest wall cause substantial changes. Altering the inherent shape of the lung generally had little effect but the topographical differences in stresses and surface pressures were approximately proportional to lung height. The results are generally consistent with those found in the dog by Hoppin et al (1969).

  13. History of the Shaped Charge Effect: The First 100 Years

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-22

    transferred, inasmuch as 10 Part 1 both originators of the effect were in proximiy - southern Gernmany and Switzerland border each other. Dr. Mohaupt’s...Mistel ( Mistletoe ) referred to the parasitic mounting of the top aircraft on the host aircraft. In the tactical version, the bomber’s nose was replaced...16) in the patents (Ref. 32) issued in France in 1940 and in Australia in 1941, wherein the inventors (Mohaupt and his two associates) had claimed the

  14. Poly(glycerol sebacate urethane)-cellulose nanocomposites with water-active shape-memory effects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tongfei; Frydrych, Martin; O'Kelly, Kevin; Chen, Biqiong

    2014-07-14

    Biodegradable and biocompatible materials with shape-memory effects (SMEs) are attractive for use as minimally invasive medical devices. Nanocomposites with SMEs were prepared from biodegradable poly(glycerol sebacate urethane) (PGSU) and renewable cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). The effects of CNC content on the structure, water absorption, and mechanical properties of the PGSU were studied. The water-responsive mechanically adaptive properties and shape-memory performance of PGSU-CNC nanocomposites were observed, which are dependent on the content of CNCs. The PGSU-CNC nanocomposite containing 23.2 vol % CNCs exhibited the best SMEs among the nanocomposites investigated, with the stable shape fixing and shape recovery ratios being 98 and 99%, respectively, attributable to the formation of a hydrophilic, yet strong, CNC network in the elastomeric matrix. In vitro degradation profiles of the nanocomposites were assessed with and without the presence of an enzyme.

  15. Equivalent circuit method for resonant magnetoelectric effect in disk-shaped laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ru; Wu, Gaojian; Zhang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model based on equivalent circuit analytical method has been presented for the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in disk-shaped laminated composites. The derived expressions for the ME voltage coefficient can be used to describe the frequency response of ME effect under both open circuit and finite electrical resistance load conditions. It was shown that the resonance frequency and resonant ME voltage coefficient increase with the increase in electrical resistance load in disk-shaped ME laminated composite, which is consistent with the observations for plate-shaped one. The theoretical results show good agreement with the experimental results in Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.92 (Terfenol-D)/Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT)/Terfenol-D disk-shaped sandwich laminated composite. This work is significant for designing ME devices and their signal-processing and electronic circuits.

  16. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects—surface charge convection and shape deformation—towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  17. Effects of damping on mode shapes, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Displacement, velocity, and acceleration admittances were calculated for a realistic NASTRAN structural model of space shuttle for three conditions: liftoff, maximum dynamic pressure and end of solid rocket booster burn. The realistic model of the orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket motors included the representation of structural joint transmissibilities by finite stiffness and damping elements. Methods developed to incorporate structural joints and their damping characteristics into a finite element model of the space shuttle, to determine the point damping parameters required to produce realistic damping in the primary modes, and to calculate the effect of distributed damping on structural resonances through the calculation of admittances.

  18. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  19. Effects of habitat light intensity on mammalian eye shape.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Carrie C; Lewis, Rebecca J

    2011-05-01

    Many aspects of mammalian visual anatomy vary with activity pattern, reflecting the divergent selective pressures imposed by low light and high light visual environments. However, ambient light intensity can also differ substantially between and within habitats due to differences in foliage density. We explored the effects of interhabitat and intrahabitat variation in light intensity on mammalian visual anatomy. Data on relative cornea size, activity pattern, and habitat type were collected from the literature for 209 terrestrial mammal species. In general, mammalian relative cornea size significantly varied by habitat type. In within-order and across-mammal analyses, diurnal and cathemeral mammals from forested habitats exhibited relatively larger corneas than species from more open habitats, reflecting an adaptation to increase visual sensitivity in forest species. However, in all analyses, we found no habitat-type effect in nocturnal species, suggesting that nocturnal mammals may experience selection to maximize visual sensitivity across all habitats. We also examined whether vertical strata usage affected relative cornea size in anthropoid primates. In most analyses, species occupying lower levels of forests and woodlands did not exhibit relatively larger corneas than species utilizing higher levels. Thus, unlike differences in intensity between habitat types, differences in light intensity between vertical forest strata do not appear to exert a strong selective pressure on visual morphology. These results suggest that terrestrial mammal visual systems reflect specializations for habitat variation in light intensity, and that habitat type as well as activity pattern have influenced mammalian visual evolution.

  20. Effect of Graphene Addition on Shape Memory Behavior of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Tiffany; Meador, Michael; Miller, Sandi; Scheiman, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) and composites are a special class of smart materials known for their ability to change size and shape upon exposure to an external stimulus (e.g. light, heat, pH, or magnetic field). These materials are commonly used for biomedical applications; however, recent attempts have been made towards developing SMPs and composites for use in aircraft and space applications. Implementing SMPs and composites to create a shape change effect in some aircraft structures could potentially reduce drag, decrease fuel consumption, and improve engine performance. This paper discusses the development of suitable materials to use in morphing aircraft structures. Thermally responsive epoxy SMPs and nanocomposites were developed and the shape memory behavior and thermo-mechanical properties were studied. Overall, preliminary results from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed that thermally actuated shape memory epoxies and nanocomposites possessed Tgs near approximately 168 C. When graphene nanofiller was added, the storage modulus and crosslinking density decreased. On the other hand, the addition of graphene enhanced the recovery behavior of the shape memory nanocomposites. It was assumed that the addition of graphene improved shape memory recovery by reducing the crosslinking density and increasing the elasticity of the nanocomposites.

  1. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, Thomas Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Palczynski, Karol Dzubiella, Joachim

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  2. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  3. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  4. Gravity effect on lymphocyte deformation through cell shape change.

    PubMed

    Hung, R J; Tsao, Y D; Spauling, G F

    1995-01-01

    The effects on human cells (lymphocyte) immersed in a culture liquid under microgravity environment has been investigated. The study was based on the numerical simulation of the Morphology of human cells affected by the time dependent variation of gravity acceleration ranging from 10(-3) to 2 g(o) (g(o) = 9.81 m/s2) in 15 s. Both the free floating cells and the cells which came into contact with the upper and lower inclined walls imposed by the time-dependent reduced gravity acceleration were considered in this study. The results show that, when the gravity acceleration increased, the cell morphology changed from spherical to horizontally elongated ellipsoid for both the free floating cells and the stationary cells on the lower inclined wall while the cell morphology varied from spherical to vertically-elongated ellipsoid for the cells hanging on the upper inclined wall. A test of the deformation of human cells exposed to the variation of gravity levels, carried out in the KC-135 free fall aircraft, show that the results of experimental observations agree exactly with the theoretical model computation described in this paper. These results will be useful for study of the behavior and morphology of cells in space.

  5. Spin Rate Distribution of Small Asteroids Shaped by YORP Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr

    2008-09-01

    We studied a distribution of spin rates of main belt/Mars crossing (MB/MC) asteroids with diameters 3-15 km using data obtained within the Photometric Survey of Asynchronous Binary Asteroids (Pravec et al. 2008). We found that the spin distribution of the small asteroids is uniform in the range from f = 1 to 9.5 d-1, and there is an excess of slow rotators with f < 1 d-1. The observed distribution appears to be controlled by the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect. The magnitude of the excess of slow rotators is related to the residence time of slowed down asteroids in the excess and the rate of spin rate change outside the excess. We estimated a median YORP spin rate change of 0.022 d-1/Myr for asteroids in our sample (i.e., a median time in which the spin rate changes by 1 d-1 is 45 Myr), thus the residence time of slowed down asteroids in the excess is 110 Myr. The spin rate distribution of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) with sizes in the range 0.2-3 km ( 5-times smaller in median diameter than the MB/MC asteroids sample) shows a similar excess of slow rotators, but there is also a concentration of NEAs at fast spin rates with f = 9-10 d-1. The concentration at fast spin rates is correlated with a narrower distribution of spin rates of primaries of binary systems among NEAs; the difference may be due to the apparently more evolved population of binaries among MB/MC asteroids. Reference: Pravec, P., and 30 colleagues, 2008. Spin rate distribution of small asteroids. Icarus, in press. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2008.05.012

  6. Shape and solar phase angle effects on the taxonomic classification of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvano, J. M.; Davalos, J. A. G.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The taxonomic classification of SDSS observations of asteroids show a dependency on the phase angle of the observations. Aims: We aim to quantify this dependence and use Hapke models to investigate its cause. Methods: Statistical methods were used to characterize the taxonomic variation with phase angle. The effect of several Hapke parameters on the spectral slope and band depth of synthetic spectra for a slab and for ellipsoids with different oblatenesses were then analyzed. Results: Effects linked to body shape and the solar phase function and macroscopic roughness can alter key spectral parameters that are related to the taxonomic classification depending on the solar phase angle, rotational phase of the observation, and shape of the asteroid. Depending on the oblateness of the body, shape effects are similar to phase effects.

  7. Degradation of the shape memory effect in copper-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stalmans, R.; Van Humbeeck, J.; Delaey, L. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science)

    1994-12-01

    The reversible transformation of the parent phase (austenite) to the product phase (martensite) is the basis of several shape memory properties in specific Cu-base alloys. In this respect, the two-way memory effect (TWME) refers the reversible, spontaneous shape change from a hot austenitic shape to a cold martensitic shape during cooling and heating without the application of external stresses. It is known that the magnitude of the TWME decrease during thermal or thermomechanical cycling, in particular in Cu-base shape memory alloys. It is however important to remark that this decrease, indicated as degradation of the TWME, can be caused as well by a decrease of the spontaneous martensitic strain, i.e. a degradation of the cold shape, as by an increase of the residual austenitic strain, i.e. a degradation of the hot shape, or by a combination of both. The degradation of the TWME, and of the hot and cold shape is influenced by a number of factors including the alloy composition, the processing, the heat treatment, the training procedure and the parameters of the thermal or thermomechanical cycling. The knowledge of the degradation phenomena is still limited. In a subsequent study of the relationships between training and the two-way memory behavior, the authors have shown that the degradation of the hot shape already starts during training. It was found that the residual austenitic strain [gamma][sub a] increases gradually during training cycling; [gamma][sub a] is also in the case of training composed of a recoverable residual strain [gamma][sub ar] and a non-recoverable residual strain [gamma][sub anr]. The present paper reports the results of the specific experiments which were designed based upon the results described above. The evolutions during thermal cycling of the TWME, of the martensitic strain and austenitic strain, and of the recoverable and non-recoverable austenitic strain are presented and discussed.

  8. Additional Study of Water Droplet Median Volume Diameter (MVD) Effects on Ice Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Anderson, David N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the result of an experimental study in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) to evaluate how well the MVD-independent effect identified previously might apply to SLD conditions in rime icing situations. Models were NACA 0012 wing sections with chords of 53.3 and 91.4 cm. Tests were conducted with a nominal airspeed of 77 m/s (150 kt) and a number of MVD's ranging from 15 to 100 m with LWC of 0.5 to 1 g/cu m. In the present study, ice shapes recorded from past studies and recent results at SLD and Appendix-C conditions are reviewed to show that droplet diameter is not important to rime ice shape for MVD of 30 microns or larger, but for less than 30 m drop sizes a rime ice shape transition from convex to wedge to spearhead type ice shape is observed.

  9. Effect of the influence function of deformable mirrors on laser beam shaping.

    PubMed

    González-Núñez, Héctor; Béchet, Clémentine; Ayancán, Boris; Neichel, Benoit; Guesalaga, Andrés

    2017-02-20

    The continuous membrane stiffness of a deformable mirror propagates the deformation of the actuators beyond their neighbors. When phase-retrieval algorithms are used to determine the desired shape of these mirrors, this cross-coupling-also known as influence function (IF)-is generally disregarded. We study this problem via simulations and bench tests for different target shapes to gain further insight into the phenomenon. Sound modeling of the IF effect is achieved as highlighted by the concurrence between the modeled and experimental results. In addition, we observe that the actuators IF is a key parameter that determines the accuracy of the output light pattern. Finally, it is shown that in some cases it is possible to achieve better shaping by modifying the input irradiance of the phase-retrieval algorithm. The results obtained from this analysis open the door to further improvements in this type of beam-shaping systems.

  10. High performance shape memory effect in nitinol wire for actuators with increased operating temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Riccardo; Biffi, Carlo Alberto; Vedani, Maurizio; Tuissi, Ausonio

    2014-07-01

    In this research, the high performance shape memory effect (HP-SME) is experimented on a shape memory NiTi wire, with austenite finish temperature higher than room temperature. The HP-SME consists in the thermal cycling of stress induced martensite and it allows achieving mechanical work higher than that produced by conventional shape memory actuators based on the heating/cooling of detwinned martensite. The Nitinol wire was able to recover about 5.5% of deformation under a stress of 600 MPa and to withstand about 5000 cycles before failure. HP-SME path increased the operating temperature of the shape memory actuator wire. Functioning temperatures higher than 100°C was reached.

  11. Micromagnetic simulations on the grain shape effect in Nd-Fe-B magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Min; Gutfleisch, Oliver; Xu, Bai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Micromagnetic simulations were performed to study the effect of grain shape and defect layer in Nd-Fe-B magnets. It was found that the coercivity can be increased by a factor of ˜2 by changing the grain shape from the triangular prism to the spheroid. Both the anisotropy field contribution and the shape contribution to the coercivity, and thus also the final coercivity, were found to decrease in the order: spheroid > circular prism > hexagonal prism > square prism > triangular prism. Sputtered columnar grains and hot-deformed platelet grains with a constant volume were also considered. Results show that the coercivity initially increases with the aspect ratio and then nearly saturates above the ratio of ˜4. Simulations of multigrain ensembles showed that depending on the grain shape, compared to the case of single grain, a further decrease of ˜10%-45% in the coercivity is induced by magnetostatic coupling.

  12. Quantifying the effect of rheology on plan-view shapes of lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, B. C.; Taylor, G. J.; Lopes-Gautier, R. M. C.

    1993-01-01

    This study aims at quantifying the effect of rheology on the plan-view shapes of lava flows. Plan-view shapes of lava flows are important because they reflect the processes governing flow emplacement and may provide insight into lava flow rheology and dynamics. In our earlier investigation, it was reported that plan-view shapes of tholeite basalts are fractal, having a characteristic shape regardless of scale. It was also found one could use the fractal dimension (a parameter which quantifies flow margin convolution) to distinguish between the two major types of basalts: a'a and pahoehoe. Encouraged by these earlier results, a similar method for use on silicic flows are being developed and our preliminary work is presented.

  13. Large-scale experimental landscapes reveal distinctive effects of patch shape and connectivity on arthropod communities.

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John, L.; Curler, Gregory, R.; Danielson, Brent, J.; Coyle, David. R.

    2011-09-14

    The size, shape, and isolation of habitat patches can affect organism behavior and population dynamics, but little is known about the relative role of shape and connectivity in affecting ecological communities at large spatial scales. Using six sampling sessions from July 2001 until August 2002, we collected 33,685 arthropods throughout seven 12-ha experimental landscapes consisting of clear-cut patches surrounded by a matrix of mature pine forest. Patches were explicitly designed to manipulate connectivity (via habitat corridors) independently of area and edge effects. We found that patch shape, rather than connectivity, affected ground-dwelling arthropod richness and beta diversity (i.e. turnover of genera among patches). Arthropod communities contained fewer genera and exhibited less turnover in high-edge connected and high-edge unconnected patches relative to low-edge unconnected patches of similar area. Connectivity, rather than patch shape, affected the evenness of ground-dwelling arthropod communities; regardless of patch shape, high-edge connected patches had lower evenness than low- or high-edge unconnected patches. Among the most abundant arthropod orders, increased richness in low-edge unconnected patches was largely due to increased richness of Coleoptera, whereas Hymenoptera played an important role in the lower evenness in connected patches and patterns of turnover. These findings suggest that anthropogenic habitat alteration can have distinct effects on ground-dwelling arthropod communities that arise due to changes in shape and connectivity. Moreover, this work suggests that corridors, which are common conservation tools that change both patch shape and connectivity, can have multiple effects on arthropod communities via different mechanisms, and each effect may alter components of community structure.

  14. Coherent Backscattering Effect in Saturnian vs. Uranian Satellites: Effects on Band Depths and Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, Karly M.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Gulotta, Charles; Joseph, Emily C. S.; Mackowski, Daniel W.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Momary, Thomas W.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we examine the changes in depth and shape of individual absorption bands as a function of solar phase angle that are caused by the coherent backscattering effect (CBE) in near-IR spectra of saturnian and uranian satellites. We have quantified band depths and shapes for real-world data (from Cassini Visual & Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and TripleSpec at Apache Point Observatory) and also modeled spectra of densely packed icy particulate surfaces with the MSTM (multisphere T-matrix) version 4.0 code specifically developed to model light scattering in regolith layers. MSTM4 allows us to calculate the brightness for thick fluffy layers on order of 20,000 particles (compared to 1000 with previous code versions). We have now obtained good matches between model and real-world data at specific bands for several higher albedo moons. We are finding that the normalized depth of the absorption band can increase or decrease with solar phase angle depending on the albedo at the wavelength of normalization; this is seen in all the data (VIMS, ground-based, and model spectra). We model the change in the phase-angle-dependent band depth in response to varying the size and packing of the constituent icy particles. Indeed, the coherent backscattering effect can be observed at some wavelengths and entirely disappear at others because CBE requires a specific range of size and packing (cf. Muinonen et al. 2014); we see this effect as well.This work is supported by NASA’s Outer Planets Research program (NNX12AM76G; PI Pitman), Planetary Astronomy program (NNX09AD06G; PI Verbiscer), and NASA’s Advanced Supercomputing Division. Calibrated Cassini VIMS data cubes appear courtesy of the Cassini VIMS team and the PDS.

  15. The Effect of Shape Model Uncertainty on the Geophysical Predictions of Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jay W.; Scheeres, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Recent work by Jacobson and Scheeres (ApJ Vol. 736, L19) have shown that for a binary asteroid system in and equilibrium between tides and the binary YORP effect, the ratio Q/k can be determined, where Q is the tidal dissipation number and k is the tidal Love number. In their work, the value for B (the binary YORP coefficient) was that computed by McMahon and Scheeres (Icarus Vol. 209, pp 494-509, 2010) for binary asteroid 1999 KW4. Using this value, it was shown that the geophysical parameters Q/k can be estimated. Furthermore, we can similarly compute μQ based on the relationship between μ and k (where μ is the rigidity parameter), as discussed by Scheirich et al (ACM, Niigata, Japan, 2012, No. 1667, id.6123). These geophysical predictions, however, depend directly on the value of the binary YORP coefficient used, which is uncertain due to the limited shape model accuracy.In this study, we analyze the effect of shape model uncertainty on the predictions of Q/k and μQ. The 1999 KW4 secondary shape model is stochastically perturbed based on the radar observation accuracy (Ostro et al, Science Vol. 314, pp 1276-1280, 2006). Furthermore the detail of the topography is varied by adding more vertices to create a higher resolution shape model. For each newly perturbed shape model, the binary YORP coefficient is computed using our most advanced modeling software, and is used to derive new values for the geophysical parameter relationships. Furthermore we compute the B for a variety of known asteroid shape models as investigated by McMahon and Scheeres (44th AAS DPS, Reno, NV, 2012. Abstract No. 105.08). The results give effective error bounds on the Q/k (and derived μQ) predictions based on the shape model uncertainties.

  16. Effect on measurement accuracy of transillumination using sawtooth-shaped-function optical signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Hu, Yajia; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-11-01

    There exist lots of difficulties in optical transillumination of biological tissues, especially, low-level-light detection and low gray-scale resolution could reduce recognition accuracy of differences in tissue. Aiming at the problems, this paper proposes a method for optical transillumination using sawtooth-shaped-function optical signal and frame accumulation technology to explore the spatial information of heterogeneity in the tissue. Sawtooth-shaped-function optical signal combined with frame accumulation technology is applied to realize the low-level-light image detection, where frame accumulation technology improves the signal-to-noise ratio and detection sensitivity, and sawtooth-shaped-function signal improves gray-scale resolution. The results of the experiment applied on the flat-shaped phantom demonstrated that, compared with the constant intensity optical signal, the application of the sawtooth-shaped-function optical signal effectively improved the gray-scale resolution, thus improved the extraction accuracy on positional feature pixels of heterogeneity. In addition, the sawtooth-shaped-function optical signal reduces the light radiation per unit time and per unit area. Therefore, the proposed illuminated way is more suitable for the imaging of biological tissue.

  17. Effects of electrode bevel angle on argon arc properties and weld shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W. C.; Lu, S. P.; Li, D. Z.; Y Li, Y.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical modeling of coupled welding arc with weld pool is established using FLUENT software for moving shielded GTA welding to systematically investigate the effects of electrode bevel angle on the argon arc properties as well as the weld shape on SUS304 stainless steel. The calculated results show that the argon arc is constricted and the peak values of heat flux and shear stress on the weld pool decrease with increasing electrode bevel angle, while the radial distribution of heat flux and shear stress varying slightly. The weld shape is controlled by the pool flow patterns driving by the surface tension, gas shear stress, electromagnetic force and buoyancy. The Marangoni convection induced by surface tension plays an important role on weld shapes. All the weld shapes are wide and shallow with low weld metal oxygen content, while the narrow and deep weld shapes form under high weld metal oxygen content, which is related with the oxygen concentration in the shielding gas. The weld depth/width (D/W) ratio increases with increasing electrode bevel angle for high weld metal oxygen content and is not sensitive to the electrode bevel angle under low weld metal oxygen content. The calculated results for the weld shape, weld size and weld D/W ratio agree well with the experimental ones.

  18. Effect of gravity and electric field on shape and surface tension of drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateni, A.; Ababneh, A.; Elliott, J. A. W.; Neumann, A. W.; Amirfazli, A.

    Experimental work was performed in reduced gravity conditions using a novel methodology to investigate the effect of external forces, i.e., gravity and electric field, on shape and surface tension of drops. The new methodology, called axisymmetric drop-shape analysis - electric fields (ADSA-EF), can generate numerical drop profiles as a function of surface tension, at any given gravity and/or electric field. When an image of an experimental drop is available, ADSA-EF can calculate the true value of the surface tension by matching the numerical profiles with the shape of the experimental drop, taking the surface tension as an adjustable parameter. ADSA-EF is a novel technique, which can be employed to predict and simulate drop shapes in the electric field, determine the effect of external fields on surface tensions, or measure surface tensions in reduced gravity conditions, where other drop-shape techniques are not applicable. The results of the reduced gravity experiment suggested that the electric field significantly increases the surface tension of water. No significant effect of gravity on surface tension was detected.

  19. Effects of Angular Shapes on Optical properties of Martian Dust and Ice grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarnato, B. V.; Colaprete, A.; Iraci, L. T.

    2012-12-01

    Dust, ice clouds and their interaction are now recognized as playing important roles in atmospheric thermal heating, in driving atmospheric dynamics and therefore in affecting martian climate and weather. However, simulation results depend strongly on dust and cloud optical properties, which depend on assumptions made on particle size, shape, number and composition (e.g. ice impurities). In radiative transfer calculations which are used to interpret space or ground-based observations of Mars, various assumptions are made regarding the aerosol optical properties; it is common to approximate aerosol shape to homogeneous spherical particles. The optical properties of spherical particles can, however, differ significantly from those of irregularly shaped particles, even if their composition and/or size distribution is the same. Therefore, assuming spherical instead of irregularly shaped angular particles in radiative transfer calculations can lead to significant errors in climate modeling and in retrieved atmospheric parameters, such as the aerosol type, optical thickness and particle size distributions. For irregularly shaped particles, which are very common in nature, the optical properties can be calculated with numerical methods such as the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) method. We present a sensitivity study of the effect of angular shapes on optical properties of suspended dust aerosol and water ice particles (type 1 and 2) with and without a dust inclusion. We assess a plausible range of variability of the optical properties (e.g., mass extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, phase function and polarization) over an extended spectral range, between 200 nm and 50 microns. Optical properties of dust and water ice grains with different angular shapes are also compared with more commonly used shapes like spheres, spheres with a concentric spherical inclusion (core-shell) and spheroids.

  20. Effect of plasma shaping on performance in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, D. A.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.; Kaye, S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Bernabei, S.; Bialek, J.; Biewer, T.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bush, C.; Carter, M. D.; Choe, W.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Davis, W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diem, S.; Ferron, J.; Field, A.; Foley, J.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Harvey, R.; Hatcher, R. E.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Johnson, D. W.; Kaita, R.; Kessel, C.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H. W.; Lawson, J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lee, K. C.; Levinton, F.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Marsala, R.; Mastrovito, D.; Mau, T. K.; Medley, S. S.; Meyer, H.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mueller, D.; Munsat, T.; Nelson, B. A.; Neumeyer, C.; Nishino, N.; Ono, M.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Phillips, C.; Pigarov, A.; Pinsker, R.; Ram, A.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Rasmussen, D.; Redi, M.; Rensink, M.; Rewoldt, G.; Robinson, J.; Roney, P.; Roquemore, L.; Ruskov, E.; Ryan, P.; Schneider, H.; Skinner, C. H.; Smith, D. R.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stevenson, T.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.; Synakowski, E.; Takase, Y.; Tritz, K.; Halle, A. von; Wade, M.; White, R.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Zhu, W.; Zweben, S. J.; Akers, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Betti, R.; Bigelow, T.

    2006-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has explored the effects of shaping on plasma performance as determined by many diverse topics including the stability of global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes (e.g., ideal external kinks and resistive wall modes), edge localized modes (ELMs), bootstrap current drive, divertor flux expansion, and heat transport. Improved shaping capability has been crucial to achieving βt ~ 40%. Precise plasma shape control has been achieved on NSTX using real-time equilibrium reconstruction. NSTX has simultaneously achieved elongation κ ~ 2.8 and triangularity delta ~ 0.8. Ideal MHD theory predicts increased stability at high values of shaping factor S equivalent to q95Ip/(aBt), which has been observed at large values of the S ~ 37[MA/(m • T)] on NSTX. The behavior of ELMs is observed to depend on plasma shape. A description of the ELM regimes attained as shape is varied will be presented. Increased shaping is predicted to increase the bootstrap fraction at fixed Ip. The achievement of strong shaping has enabled operation with 1 s pulses with Ip=1 MA, and for 1.6 s for Ip=700 kA. Analysis of the noninductive current fraction as well as empirical analysis of the achievable plasma pulse length as elongation is varied will be presented. Data are presented showing a reduction in peak divertor heat load due to increasing in flux expansion.

  1. Human vision model in relation to characteristics of shapes for the Mach band effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo-Wen; Fang, Yi-Chin

    2015-10-01

    For human vision to recognize the contours of objects means that, as the contrast variation at the object's edges increases, so will the Mach band effect of human vision. This paper more deeply investigates the relationship between changes in the contours of an object and the Mach band effect of human vision. Based on lateral inhibition and the Mach band effect, we studied subjects' eyes as they watched images of different shapes under a fixed brightness at 34  cd/m2, with changes of contrast and spatial frequency. Three types of display were used: a television, a computer monitor, and a projector. For each display used, we conducted a separate experiment for each shape. Although the maximum values for the contrast sensitivity function curves of the displays were different, their variations were minimal. As the spatial frequency changed, the diminishing effect of the different lines also was minimal. However, as the shapes at the contour intersections were modified by the Mach band effect, a greater degree of variation occurred. In addition, as the spatial frequency at a contour intersection increased, the Mach band effect became lower, along with changes in the corresponding contrast sensitivity function curve. Our experimental results on the characteristics of human vision have led to what we believe is a new vision model based on tests with different shapes. This new model may be used for future development and implementation of an artificial vision system.

  2. Quantitative separation of the influence of copper (II) chloride mass migration on the chemo-responsive shape memory effect in polyurethane shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Lu, Chunrui; Huang, Wei Min; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-10-01

    Chemo-responsive shape memory effect in polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) composite triggered by mass migration of copper (II) chloride (CuCl2) has been experimentally demonstrated. In this study, we present a comprehensive study on quantitative separation of the effect of CuCl2 particle mass migration on the chemo-responsive shape recovery behavior of polyurethane SMP composites with different concentrations of CuCl2 particles. It is found that the SMP is featured with a critical release rate of the mechanical energy storage associated with the shape recovery behavior due to mass migration of the CuCl2 particle. A sequence of molecular interactions among CuCl2 particles, polyurethane macromolecules and water molecules, i.e., assembly of the CuCl2 particle with polyurethane macromolecules, and then disassembly and dissolution of the CuCl2 particle in water, results in an acceleration of water-induced shape recovery of polyurethane SMP. This study focuses on the quantitative separation of the influence of mass migration on the chemo-responsive shape recovery behavior of polyurethane SMP in response to water. It is expected to promote and achieve the actuation of chemo-responsive SMPs in a fully controllable manner.

  3. A review of modeling techniques for advanced effects in shape memory alloy behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisse, Cheikh; Zaki, Wael; Ben Zineb, Tarak

    2016-10-01

    micro, micro-macro and macro scales focusing pseudoelastic and shape memory effects. The paper reviews and discusses various techniques used in the literature for modeling complex behaviors observed in shape memory alloys (SMAs) that go beyond the core pseudoelastic and shape memory effects. These behaviors, which will be collectively referred to herein as ‘secondary effects’, include mismatch between austenite and martensite moduli, martensite reorientation under nonproportional multiaxial loading, slip and transformation-induced plasticity and their influence on martensite transformation, strong thermomechanical coupling and the influence of loading rate, tensile-compressive asymmetry, and the formation of internal loops due to incomplete phase transformation. In addition, because of their importance for practical design considerations, the paper discusses functional and structural fatigue, and fracture mechanics of SMAs.

  4. Tumbling in Turbulence: How much does particle shape effect particle motion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variano, E. A.; Andersson, H. I.; Zhao, L.; Byron, M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural particles suspended in surface water are often non-spherical. We explore the ways in which particle shape effects particle motion, focusing specifically on how particle rotation is divided into spinning and tumbling components. This, in turn, will effect particle collision, clustering, and settling rates. We focus on idealized axisymmetric particles shaped as rods, discs, and spheroids. They are chosen so as to explain the physics of aspherical-particle motion that will be relevant for natural particles such as plankton, sediment, or aggregates (e.g. oil-mineral aggregates, clay flocs, or bio-sediment aggregates held together by TEP). Our work begins with laboratory measurements of particle motion in a turbulence tank built to mimic the flow found in rivers, estuaries, and the ocean surface mixed layer. We then proceed to direct numerical simulation of particle-flow interactions in sheared turbulence similar to that which is found in the surface water of creeks and rivers. We find that shape has only a very weak effect on particle angular velocity, which is a quantity calculated with respect the global reference frame (i.e. east/north/up). If we analyze rotation in a particle's local frame (i.e. the particle's principle axes of rotation), then particle shape has a strong effect on rotation. In the local frame, rotation is described by two components: tumbling and spinning. We find that rod-shaped particles spin more than they tumble, and we find that disc-shaped particles tumble more than they spin. Such behavior is indicative of how particles respond the the directional influence of vortex tubes in turbulence, and such response has implications for particle motion other than rotation. Understanding particle alignment is relevant for predicting particle-particle collision rates, particle-wall collision rates, and the shear-driven breakup of aggregates. We discuss these briefly in the context of what can be concluded from the rotation data discussed above.

  5. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Wu, A. T.; Lu, X. Y.; Rimmer, R. A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I-V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson-Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  6. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, S.; Wu, A. T.; Lu, X. Y.; Rimmer, R. A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I–V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson–Superfish and Solidworks respectively. Finally, with the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ~2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  7. Crystallinity as a tunable switch of poly(L-lactide) shape memory effects.

    PubMed

    Sobota, Michał; Jurczyk, Sebastian; Kwiecień, Michał; Smola-Dmochowska, Anna; Musioł, Marta; Domański, Marian; Janeczek, Henryk; Kawalec, Michał; Kurcok, Piotr

    2017-02-01

    Materials with shape memory effect (SME) have already been widely used in the medical field. The interesting part of this group is represented by double function materials. The bioresorption and SME ability are common in polyesters implants. The first information about vascular stent made of bioresorbable polyester with SME was published in 2000. However, there are not many investigations about SME control of elements in the aspect of material processing. In the present work, the ability to control the shape memory (SM) of bioresorbable and semicrystalline poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) is investigated. The studies are based on the unexpected effect of material orientation which was demonstrated even at low percentage deformation in crystallized mould injected material. The presented studies revealed that the different degrees of crystallinity obtained during processing might be a useful switch to create a tailored SME for a specific application. The prepared samples of variable morphology revealed a possibility to control the value of material stress during permanent shape recovery. The degree of shape recovery of the prepared samples was also controlable. The highest stress value observed during permanent shape recovery reached 10MPa for the sample annealed 60min at 115°C even when the sample was only deformed in 8%. The other significant aspect of this work is to present the problem of slow crystallization of the material during and after processing (cooling rate) as well as the possibility of negative SME change during the shelf life of the fabric.

  8. A macroscopic multi-mechanism based constitutive model for the thermo-mechanical cyclic degeneration of shape memory effect of NiTi shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao; Kang, Guozheng; Kan, Qianhua

    2017-01-01

    A macroscopic based multi-mechanism constitutive model is constructed in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics to describe the degeneration of shape memory effect occurring in the thermo-mechanical cyclic deformation of NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs). Three phases, austenite A, twinned martensite Mt and detwinned martensite Md , as well as the phase transitions occurring between each pair of phases (A→ M t , Mt→ A , A→ M d , Md→ A , and Mt→ M d) are considered in the proposed model. Meanwhile, two kinds of inelastic deformation mechanisms, martensite transformation-induced plasticity and reorientation-induced plasticity, are used to explain the degeneration of shape memory effects of NiTi SMAs. The evolution equations of internal variables are proposed by attributing the degeneration of shape memory effect to the interaction between the three phases (A, Mt , and Md) and plastic deformation. Finally, the capability of the proposed model is verified by comparing the predictions with the experimental results of NiTi SMAs. It is shown that the degeneration of shape memory effect and its dependence on the loading level can be reasonably described by the proposed model.

  9. Confinement effects on the shape and composition of bimetallic nano-objects in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Hungria, T; Garcia Marcelot, C; Axet, M R; Fazzini, P-F; Tan, R P; Serp, P; Soulantica, K

    2016-02-07

    CoPt and FePt nanostructures have been efficiently confined in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A marked confinement effect has been evidenced, both on bimetallic nano-object shape and composition. In large diameter CNTs small Co- and Fe-rich nanoparticles are formed, while in small diameter CNTs Pt-rich nanowires are selectively produced.

  10. Shape effects on the random-packing density of tetrahedral particles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Li, Shuixiang; Jin, Weiwei; Zhou, Xuan

    2012-09-01

    Regular tetrahedra have been demonstrated recently giving high packing density in random configurations. However, it is unknown whether the random-packing density of tetrahedral particles with other shapes can reach an even higher value. A numerical investigation on the random packing of regular and irregular tetrahedral particles is carried out. Shape effects of rounded corner, eccentricity, and height on the packing density of tetrahedral particles are studied. Results show that altering the shape of tetrahedral particles by rounding corners and edges, by altering the height of one vertex, or by lateral displacement of one vertex above its opposite face, all individually have the effect of reducing the random-packing density. In general, the random-packing densities of irregular tetrahedral particles are lower than that of regular tetrahedra. The ideal regular tetrahedron should be the shape which has the highest random-packing density in the family of tetrahedra, or even among convex bodies. An empirical formula is proposed to describe the rounded corner effect on the packing density, and well explains the density deviation of tetrahedral particles with different roundness ratios. The particles in the simulations are verified to be randomly packed by studying the pair correlation functions, which are consistent with previous results. The spherotetrahedral particle model with the relaxation algorithm is effectively applied in the simulations.

  11. Effect of Using Logo on Pupils' Learning in Two-Dimensional Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yi, Boo Jia; Eu, Leong Kwan

    2016-01-01

    The integration of technology in mathematics instruction is an important step in the 21st century learning style. At the primary level, some studies have explored how technology could help in mathematics learning. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of using Logo on pupils' learning of the properties of two-dimensional shapes. A…

  12. Effect of head shape variations among individuals on the EEG/MEG forward and inverse problems.

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Muravchik, Carlos H; Wagner, Michael; Nehorai, Arye

    2009-03-01

    We study the effect of the head shape variations on the EEG/magnetoencephalography (MEG) forward and inverse problems. We build a random head model such that each sample represents the head shape of a different individual and solve the forward problem assuming this random head model, using a polynomial chaos expansion. The random solution of the forward problem is then used to quantify the effect of the geometry when the inverse problem is solved with a standard head model. The results derived with this approach are valid for a continuous family of head models, rather than just for a set of cases. The random model consists of three random surfaces that define layers of different electric conductivity, and we built an example based on a set of 30 deterministic models from adults. Our results show that for a dipolar source model, the effect of the head shape variations on the EEG/MEG inverse problem due to the random head model is slightly larger than the effect of the electronic noise present in the sensors. The variations in the EEG inverse problem solutions are due to the variations in the shape of the volume conductor, while the variations in the MEG inverse problem solutions, larger than the EEG ones, are caused mainly by the variations of the absolute position of the sources in a coordinate system based on anatomical landmarks, in which the magnetometers have a fixed position.

  13. Effects of grain size and shape in modeling reflectance spectra of mineral mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, T.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of grain size and shape on the reflectance spectra of mineral mixtures are investigated to improve a reflectance model called the isograin model, whose prototype was proposed by M. Kinoshita in 1985. The sample powder was assumed to consist of an infinite number of layers, each of which has the same thickness with the grain size d.

  14. Effect of fiber shape on mechanical behavior of composite with elastoplastic matrix and SMA reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuping; Dui, Guansuo

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, an equivalent three-phase micromechanical model of composite with an elasto- plastic matrix and shape memory alloy (SMA) reinforcement is developed. Compared with the traditional two-phase method, the interaction among the austenitic phase, the martensite phase and the matrix phase is considered. During applications of the model, the predicted curve shows good agreement with the experimental result. Most attention is given to the effect of fiber shape on the overall response of the composite and the residual stress. It is helpful to design an intelligent composite.

  15. Effect of trailing edge shape on the wake and propulsive performance of pitching panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buren, Tyler; Floryan, Daniel; Brunner, Daniel; Senturk, Utku; Smits, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    We present the effects of the trailing edge shape on the wake and propulsive performance of a pitching panel with an aspect ratio of 1. The trailing edges are symmetric chevron shapes with convex and concave orientations of varying degree. Concave trailing edges delay the natural vortex bending and compression of the wake, and the streamwise velocity field contains a single jet-like structure. Conversely, convex trailing edges promote wake compression and produce a wake split into four jets. Deviation from the square trailing edge mostly reduces the thrust and efficiency. Supported by the Office of Naval Research under MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  16. Effect of crash pulse shape on seat stroke requirements for limiting loads on occupants of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical study was made to provide comparative information on various crash pulse shapes that potentially could be used to test seats under conditions included in Federal Regulations Part 23 Paragraph 23.562(b)(1) for dynamic testing of general aviation seats, show the effects that crash pulse shape can have on the seat stroke requirements necessary to maintain a specified limit loading on the seat/occupant during crash pulse loadings, compare results from certain analytical model pulses with approximations of actual crash pulses, and compare analytical seat results with experimental airplace crash data. Structural and seat/occupant displacement equations in terms of the maximum deceleration, velocity change, limit seat pan load, and pulse time for five potentially useful pulse shapes were derived; from these, analytical seat stroke data were obtained for conditions as specified in Federal Regulations Part 23 Paragraph 23.562(b)(1) for dynamic testing of general aviation seats.

  17. Shape and 'gap' effects on the behavior of variably confined concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Harries, Kent A.; Carey, Shawn A

    2003-06-01

    Factors affecting the behavior of variably confined concrete are presented. The effect of debonding the fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) jacket to the concrete substrate and providing a gap between the concrete and confining jacket is investigated. A second parameter--the shape of the cross section--is also investigated. An experimental program involving the compression testing of standard cylinders and similarly sized square specimens having external FRP jackets providing passive confinement is presented. Factors affecting jacket efficiency and the appropriateness of factors accounting for specimen shape are determined experimentally and discussed. The provision of a gap affected the axial stress at which the confining jacket was engaged, resulting in a reduced maximum attainable concrete strength. The jacket efficiency was not affected by the provision of the gap. The shape of the specimens was observed to affect the level of confinement generated. Square specimens exhibit lower confinement levels than circular specimens having the same jacket.

  18. Disruption shape effects on the performance of enhanced tubes with the separation and reattachment mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Arman, B.; Rabas, T.J.

    1992-08-01

    A non-orthogonal, body-fitted numerical code is used to determine the thermo-hydraulic performance of enhanced tubes with transverse periodic sine-, semicircle-, arc-, and trapezoid-shaped disruptions. The turbulence closure was achieved with a two-layer turbulence model. It is shown that there is a tradeoff of the heat-transfer and pressure-drop performances when the disruption shape becomes more contoured; that is, both the heat transfer and the pressure drop increase. The local heat transfer is strongly dependent on the shape in the vicinity of the disruption but it is less dependent in the downstream recirculation region and in the boundary layer development zone. With increasing pitch, effect of the shape on the heat-transfer performance becomes less important. The pressure drop is more dependent on the disruption shape and it continues to decrease when the disruptions become less contoured because of the reduced form drag which is by far the major contribution to the total pressure drop. 27 refs.

  19. Disruption shape effects on the performance of enhanced tubes with the separation and reattachment mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Arman, B.; Rabas, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    A non-orthogonal, body-fitted numerical code is used to determine the thermo-hydraulic performance of enhanced tubes with transverse periodic sine-, semicircle-, arc-, and trapezoid-shaped disruptions. The turbulence closure was achieved with a two-layer turbulence model. It is shown that there is a tradeoff of the heat-transfer and pressure-drop performances when the disruption shape becomes more contoured; that is, both the heat transfer and the pressure drop increase. The local heat transfer is strongly dependent on the shape in the vicinity of the disruption but it is less dependent in the downstream recirculation region and in the boundary layer development zone. With increasing pitch, effect of the shape on the heat-transfer performance becomes less important. The pressure drop is more dependent on the disruption shape and it continues to decrease when the disruptions become less contoured because of the reduced form drag which is by far the major contribution to the total pressure drop. 27 refs.

  20. Effect of angle of attack on the flow past a harbor seal vibrissa shaped cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo Ju; Yoon, Hyun Sik

    2016-11-01

    The present study considered the geometric disturbance inspired by a harbor seal vibrissa of which undulated surface structures are known as a detecting device to capture the water movement induced by prey fish. In addition, this vibrissa plays an important role to suppress vortex-induced vibration, which has been reported by the previous researches. The present study aims at finding the effect of the angle of attack (AOA) on flow characteristics around the harbor seal vibrissa shaped cylinder, since the flow direction facing the harbor seal vibrissa with the elliptic shape can be changed during the harbor seal's movements and surrounding conditions. Therefore, we considered a wide range of AOA varying from 0 to 90 degree. We carried out large eddy simulation (LES) to investigate the flow around inclined vibrissa shaped cylinder for the Reynolds number (Re) of 500 based hydraulic diameter of a harbor seal vibrissa shape. For comparison, the flow over the elliptic cylinder was also simulated according to AOA at the same Re. The vortical structures of both vibrissa shaped and elliptic cylinders have been compared to identify the fundamental mechanism making the difference flow quantities. This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment (MOE) as "the Chemical Accident Prevention Technology Development Project.", National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant through GCRCSOP (No.20110030013) and (NRF-2015R1D1A3A01020867).

  1. Periodic Cellular Structure Technology for Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Edward Y.

    2015-01-01

    Shape memory alloys are being considered for a wide variety of adaptive components for engine and airframe applications because they can undergo large amounts of strain and then revert to their original shape upon heating or unloading. Transition45 Technologies, Inc., has developed an innovative periodic cellular structure (PCS) technology for shape memory alloys that enables fabrication of complex bulk configurations, such as lattice block structures. These innovative structures are manufactured using an advanced reactive metal casting technology that offers a relatively low cost and established approach for constructing near-net shape aerospace components. Transition45 is continuing to characterize these structures to determine how best to design a PCS to better exploit the use of shape memory alloys in aerospace applications.

  2. Effect of osmolarity on shape retention following laser-mediated cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Gray, Darren S.; Kimball, Joey A.; Wong, Brian J.

    2001-07-01

    Laser reshaping of mechanically deformed cartilage specimens accelerates stress relaxation and results in permanent shape change. The mechanism of laser-mediated cartilage reshaping is still unknown, but clearly depends upon the complex molecular interactions between the physio-chemical environment and matrix proteins (collagen, and proteoglycans). It is well known in articular tissues that the mechanical properties of cartilage are sensitive to changes in tissue pH and osmolarity. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of osmolarity on shape change during laser reshaping in morphologic cartilage tissues. Porcine nasal septal cartilage specimens were cut (20 x 5 x 1.5 mm) and immersed in osmotically graded NaCl (0.2NS, 0.8NS, 1.0NS, 1.2 NS and 5 NS) or Phosphate buffered (0.2NS, 0.9NS, 1.0NS, 1.1NS, and 5NS) solutions for 12 hours to establish equilibrium. Then, specimens were bent into semicircular shapes, secured with clamps, and irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser (λ= 1320nm, 5W, 15 secs, 5 mm spot size) along the region of maximum curvature. Resultant bend angle was measured. Shape retention was calculated by comparing resultant curvature with pre-irradiation measurements. Non-irradiated, untreated (negative controls) cartilage retained less than 46% of the original bend. There was no difference in shape retention with respect to varying osmolarity (changed tissue water content) in either group. Resultant bend angles varied from 84 degree(s) to 194 degree(s) corresponding to shape retention varying from 42% to 72% in specimens which were immersed in either NaCl of Phosphate buffered solutions. While laser heating of deformed specimens does result in significant reshaping, the alterations in osmolarity do not seem to effect this process significantly over the range of values evaluated in this study.

  3. Competing Classical and Quantum Effects in Shape Relaxation of a Metallic Nanostructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dongmin; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Toshishi; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that the quantum size effect (QSE) plays a competing role along side the classical thermodynamic effect in the shape relaxation of a small metallic island. Together, these effects transforms a lead(Pb) island grown on Si(111) substrate from its initially flattop faceted morphology to a peculiar ring-shape island, a process catalysed by the tip electric field of a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). We shall show for the first time how QSE affects the relaxation process dynamically. In particular, it leads to a novel strip-flow growth and double-step growth on selective strips of a plateau inside the ring, defined by the substrate steps more than 60?0?3 below. It appears that atoms diffusing on the plateau can clearly (sub i)(deg)sense(sub i)+/- the quantized energy states inside the island and have preferentially attached to regions that further reduces the surface energy as a result of the QSE, limiting its own growth and stabilizing the ring shape. The mechanism proposed here offers a sound explanation for ring shape metal and semiconductor islands observed in other systems as well.

  4. Swelling effect actuation of shape-memory polymer: mechanism and demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong; Liu, Yanju; Du, Shanyi

    2009-03-01

    Recently, there is increasing interest in triggering shape recovery of shape-memory polymers (SMPs) by novel inductive effect. In this paper, many hard works have been carried out to make SMP induced while along with swelling effect. Based on the Free-volume theory, Rubber Elasticity Theory and Mooney-Rivlin Equation, it is theoretically and experimentally demonstrated the feasibility of SMP activated by swelling effect. The mechanism behind it is solvent acting as plasticizer, to reduce the glass transition temperature (Tg) and melting temperature (Tm) of polymers, make them softer and more flexible, facilitating the diffusion of the molecules to polymer chains, and then separating them. In addition to this physical action, the intermolecular interactions among the chains are weakened, because interactions are hindered at the points where the plasticizer is located. Finally, the Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), FTIR study and glass transition temperature measurement tests were used to exemplify the feasibility of SMP driven by swelling effect. And it is qualitatively identified the role of swelling effect playing in influencing the transition temperature. Swelling effect occurs due to the interaction between macromolecules and solvent molecules, leading to free volume of polymeric chains increasing (namely the flexibility of polymer chains increasing), resulting in the Tg decreasing. All above mentioned investigation can be used to confirm that the shape recovery is induced by swelling effect. This actuation almost is applicable for all the SMP and SMP composite, as the swelling theory is almost applicable for all the polymeric materials.

  5. Effects of Shapes of Solute Molecules on Diffusion: A Study of Dependences on Solute Size, Solvent, and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Chan, T C; Li, H T; Li, K Y

    2015-12-24

    Diffusivities of basically linear, planar, and spherical solutes at infinite dilution in various solvents are studied to unravel the effects of solute shapes on diffusion. On the basis of the relationship between the reciprocal of diffusivity and the molecular volume of solute molecules with similar shape in a given solvent at constant temperature, the diffusivities of solutes of equal molecular volume but different shapes are evaluated and the effects due to different shapes of two equal-sized solute molecules on diffusion are determined. It is found that the effects are dependent on the size of the solute pairs studied. Evidence of the dependence of the solute-shape effects on solvent properties is also demonstrated and discussed. Here, some new diffusion data of aromatic compounds in methanol at different temperatures are reported. The result for methanol in this study indicates that the effects of solute shape on diffusivity are only weakly dependent on temperature.

  6. Clarification of effects of DDE on shell thickness, size, mass, and shape of avian eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Bunck, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    Moriarty et al. (1986) used field data to conclude that DDE decreased the size or altered the shape of avian eggs; therefore, they postulated that decreased eggshell thickness was a secondary effect because, as a general rule, thickness and egg size are positively correlated. To further test this relationship, the present authors analyzed data from eggs of captive American kestrels. Falco sparverius given DDT- or DDE-contaminated or clean diets and from wild brown pelicans Pelecanus occidentalis collected both before (pre-1946) and after (post-1945) DDT was introduced into the environment. Pertinent data from other field and laboratory studies were also summarized. DDE was not related to and did not affect size, mass, or shape of eggs of the brown pelican or American kestrel; but the relationship of DDE to eggshell thinning held true. Size and shape of eggs of brown pelicans from the post-1945 era and those of kestrels, on DDT-contaminated diets showed some significant, but inconsistent, changes compared to brown pelican data from the pre-1946 era or kestrels on clean diets. In contrast, nearly all samples of eggs of experimental kestrels given DDT-contaminated diets and those of wild brown pelicans from the post-1945 era exhibited significant eggshell thinning. Pertinent experimental studies with other sensitive avian species indicated no effects of DDE on the size or shape of eggs, even though the high dietary concentrations caused extreme eggshell thinning and mortality of some adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in one study. These findings essentially controvert the argument that decreased eggshell thickness is a secondary effect resulting from the primary effect of DDE-induced changes in the size or shape of eggs.

  7. Clarification of effects of DDE on shell thickness, size, mass, and shape of avian eggs.

    PubMed

    Blus, L J; Wiemeyer, S N; Bunck, C M

    1997-01-01

    Moriarty et al. (1986) used field data to conclude that DDE decreased the size or altered the shape of avian eggs; therefore, they postulated that decreased eggshell thickness was a secondary effect because, as a general rule, thickness and egg size are positively correlated. To further test this relationship, the present authors analyzed data from eggs of captive American kestrels. Falco sparverius given DDT- or DDE-contaminated or clean diets and from wild brown pelicans Pelecanus occidentalis collected both before (pre-1946) and after (post-1945) DDT was introduced into the environment. Pertinent data from other field and laboratory studies were also summarized. DDE was not related to and did not affect size, mass, or shape of eggs of the brown pelican or American kestrel; but the relationship of DDE to eggshell thinning held true. Size and shape of eggs of brown pelicans from the post-1945 era and those of kestrels, on DDT-contaminated diets showed some significant, but inconsistent, changes compared to brown pelican data from the pre-1946 era or kestrels on clean diets. In contrast, nearly all samples of eggs of experimental kestrels given DDT-contaminated diets and those of wild brown pelicans from the post-1945 era exhibited significant eggshell thinning. Pertinent experimental studies with other sensitive avian species indicated no effects of DDE on the size or shape of eggs, even though the high dietary concentrations caused extreme eggshell thinning and mortality of some adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in one study. These findings essentially controvert the argument that decreased eggshell thickness is a secondary effect resulting from the primary effect of DDE-induced changes in the size or shape of eggs.

  8. Shape effect in cellular uptake of PEGylated nanoparticles: comparison between sphere, rod, cube and disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Kröger, Martin; Liu, Wing Kam

    2015-10-01

    The size, shape, surface property and material composition of polymer-coated nanoparticles (NPs) are four important parameters in designing efficient NP-based carriers for targeted drug delivery. However, due to the complex interplay between size, shape and surface property, most studies lead to ambiguous descriptions of the relevance of shape. To clarify its influence on the cellular uptake of PEGylated NPs, large scale molecular simulations have been performed to study differently shaped convex NPs, such as sphere, rod, cube and disk. Comparing systems with identical NP surface area, ligand-receptor interaction strength, and grafting density of the polyethylene glycol, we find that the spherical NPs exhibit the fastest internalization rate, followed by the cubic NPs, then rod- and disk-like NPs. The spherical NPs thus demonstrate the highest uptake among these differently shaped NPs. Based on a detailed free energy analysis, the NP shape effect is found to be mainly induced by the different membrane bending energies during endocytosis. The spherical NPs need to overcome a minimal membrane bending energy barrier, compared with the non-spherical counterparts, while the internalization of disk-like NPs involves a strong membrane deformation, responsible for a large free energy barrier. Besides, the free energy change per tethered chain is about a single kBT regardless of NP shape, as revealed by our self-consistent field theory calculations, where kB and T denote Boltzmann constant and temperature, respectively. Thus, the NP shape only plays the secondary role in the free energy change of grafted PEG polymers during internalization. We also find that star-shaped NPs can be quickly wrapped by the cell membrane, similar to their spherical counterparts, indicating star-shaped NPs can be used for drug delivery with high efficacy. Our findings seem to provide useful guidance in the molecular design of PEGylated NPs for controllable cellular uptake and help establish

  9. Effects of star-shape poly(alkyl methacrylate) arm uniformity on lubricant properties

    DOE PAGES

    Robinson, Joshua W.; Qu, Jun; Erck, Robert; ...

    2016-03-29

    Star-shaped poly(alkyl methacrylate)s (PAMAs) were prepared and blended into an additive-free engine oil to assess the structure property relationship between macromolecular structure and lubricant performance. These additives were designed with a comparable number of repeating units per arm and the number of arms was varied between 3 and 6. Well-defined star-shaped PAMAs were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) via a core-first strategy from multi-functional headgroups. Observations of the polymer-oil blends suggest that stars with less than four arms are favorable as a viscosity index improver (VII), and molecular weight dominates viscosity-related effects over other structural features. Star-shaped PAMAs,more » as oil additives, effectively reduce the friction coefficient in both mixed and boundary lubrication regime. Several analogs outperformed commercial VIIs in both viscosity and friction performance. Furthermore, increased wear rates were observed for these star-shaped PAMAs in the boundary lubrication regime suggesting pressure-sensitive conformations may exist.« less

  10. Effects of star-shape poly(alkyl methacrylate) arm uniformity on lubricant properties

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Joshua W.; Qu, Jun; Erck, Robert; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Zhou, Yan

    2016-03-29

    Star-shaped poly(alkyl methacrylate)s (PAMAs) were prepared and blended into an additive-free engine oil to assess the structure property relationship between macromolecular structure and lubricant performance. These additives were designed with a comparable number of repeating units per arm and the number of arms was varied between 3 and 6. Well-defined star-shaped PAMAs were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) via a core-first strategy from multi-functional headgroups. Observations of the polymer-oil blends suggest that stars with less than four arms are favorable as a viscosity index improver (VII), and molecular weight dominates viscosity-related effects over other structural features. Star-shaped PAMAs, as oil additives, effectively reduce the friction coefficient in both mixed and boundary lubrication regime. Several analogs outperformed commercial VIIs in both viscosity and friction performance. Furthermore, increased wear rates were observed for these star-shaped PAMAs in the boundary lubrication regime suggesting pressure-sensitive conformations may exist.

  11. Plaque removing effect of a convex-shaped brush compared with a conventional flat brush.

    PubMed

    Thevissen, E; Quirynen, M; van Steenberghe, D

    1987-12-01

    The plaque-removing effect of a convex-shaped multitufted brush was compared with that of a conventional flat multitufted brush. Two group (five and seven dental students, respectively), well instructed in the modified Bass technique, participated in a blind, splitmouth, crossover study during two consecutive experimental periods of 96 hours of undisturbed plaque growth. After each of these periods, a supervised brushing session was performed, followed by toothpick utilization. Plaque removal was evaluated using the modified Navy Plaque Index (MNPI) and planimetry. A 4% erythrosin solution was used as a disclosing agent. Planimetrically, the flat Oral B brush appeared significantly more effective than the convex shaped Ph brush (P less than 0.001). This superiority was even enhanced after the use of toothpicks (P less than 0.0005). The differences between the brushes, however, were too small to be detected by the less discriminating MNPI. Although it has been claimed that the convex brush could assure approximal plaque control, the results indicate that for the convex-shaped, as well as for the flat brush, an approximal aid is essential for good plaque control. The hypothesis that the design of the convex-shaped brush could facilitate the modified Bass technique for the average patient could not be proven in this study.

  12. Effect of chondral defect size, shape, and location on MRI diagnostic performance in the porcine knee.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, David C; Harris, Joshua D; Jia, Guang; Choi, Seongjin; Siston, Robert A; Randazzo, John L; Knopp, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and positive predictive value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the identification of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in the porcine knee. Seventy-two full-thickness chondral defects (small or large; circular, oval, or triangular) were created in 12 porcine knees. The authors used 3.0-T MRI with 3-dimensional gradient echo water-selective/fluid (WATSf) sequences acquired in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. Sensitivity and positive predictive value parameters were calculated for 2 readers. Magnetic resonance imaging was highly sensitive for detection of full-thickness defects in the knee (85%). The highest sensitivity was observed at the medial femoral condyle (93%), while the lowest was observed at the medial patella (71%). The sensitivities for detecting different shapes were unique to each shape, with oval lesions identified with greatest sensitivity (93%). Small lesions (86%) were detected at a similar sensitivity as large lesions (83%). The positive predictive values for accurate true-positive reads were low for all lesion shapes (18%-57%) and moderate for small (69%) and large (59%) sizes, with significant differences observed between the 2 readers. Magnetic resonance imaging has a high sensitivity in the detection of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in the porcine knee. Variability in defect shape and intra-articular location affects MRI sensitivity, while size does not. Magnetic resonance imaging was not effective in describing lesion shape or size. Further, there was subjectivity in reading defect shape and size between 2 radiologists.

  13. Shape effects of filaments versus spherical particles in flow and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yan; Dalhaimer, Paul; Cai, Shenshen; Tsai, Richard; Tewari, Manorama; Minko, Tamara; Discher, Dennis E.

    2007-04-01

    Interaction of spherical particles with cells and within animals has been studied extensively, but the effects of shape have received little attention. Here we use highly stable, polymer micelle assemblies known as filomicelles to compare the transport and trafficking of flexible filaments with spheres of similar chemistry. In rodents, filomicelles persisted in the circulation up to one week after intravenous injection. This is about ten times longer than their spherical counterparts and is more persistent than any known synthetic nanoparticle. Under fluid flow conditions, spheres and short filomicelles are taken up by cells more readily than longer filaments because the latter are extended by the flow. Preliminary results further demonstrate that filomicelles can effectively deliver the anticancer drug paclitaxel and shrink human-derived tumours in mice. Although these findings show that long-circulating vehicles need not be nanospheres, they also lend insight into possible shape effects of natural filamentous viruses.

  14. Temperature dependence and shape effect in high-temperature microwave heating of nickel oxide powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, H.; Kashimura, K.; Hayashi, M.; Matsumuro, T.; Watanabe, T.; Mitani, T.; Shinohara, N.

    2015-02-01

    The temperature dependence of microwave absorption was investigated for Ni1-yO particles over the frequency range 2.0-13.5 GHz and temperature range 25-1000 °C. Using a coaxial transmission line method with a network analyzer, both the real and imaginary parts of the relative permittivity (ε‧r and ε″r, respectively) and permeability (μ‧r and μ″r, respectively) were measured; finding that both are largely dependent on the temperature at all frequencies. Furthermore, permeability loss factors related to shape effects were observed at high frequencies, indicating an increase in the microwave-absorption properties. A modified form of Mie's theory was applied to discuss these effects, wherein a spherical model demonstrating a close fit to the shape effect data suggests a more complex microwave-absorption behavior at increased temperature.

  15. Theoretical description of magnetocaloric effect in the shape memory alloy exhibiting metamagnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    L'vov, Victor A.; Kosogor, Anna; Barandiaran, Jose M.

    2016-01-07

    A simple thermodynamic theory is proposed for the quantitative description of giant magnetocaloric effect observed in metamagnetic shape memory alloys. Both the conventional magnetocaloric effect at the Curie temperature and the inverse magnetocaloric effect at the transition from the ferromagnetic austenite to a weakly magnetic martensite are considered. These effects are evaluated from the Landau-type free energy expression involving exchange interactions in a system of a two magnetic sublattices. The findings of the thermodynamic theory agree with first-principles calculations and experimental results from Ni-Mn-In-Co and Ni-Mn-Sn alloys, respectively.

  16. Hydrodynamic drag of diving birds: effects of body size, body shape and feathers at steady speeds.

    PubMed

    Lovvorn, J; Liggins, G A; Borstad, M H; Calisal, S M; Mikkelsen, J

    2001-05-01

    For birds diving to depths where pressure has mostly reduced the buoyancy of air spaces, hydrodynamic drag is the main mechanical cost of steady swimming. Drag is strongly affected by body size and shape, so such differences among species should affect energy costs. Because flow around the body is complicated by the roughness and vibration of feathers, feathers must be considered in evaluating the effects of size and shape on drag. We investigated the effects of size, shape and feathers on the drag of avian divers ranging from wing-propelled auklets weighing 75 g to foot-propelled eiders weighing up to 2060 g. Laser scanning of body surfaces yielded digitized shapes that were averaged over several specimens per species and then used by a milling machine to cut foam models. These models were fitted with casts of the bill area, and their drag was compared with that of frozen specimens. Because of the roughness and vibration of the feathers, the drag of the frozen birds was 2-6 times that of the models. Plots of drag coefficient (C(D)) versus Reynolds number (Re) differed between the model and the frozen birds, with the pattern of difference varying with body shape. Thus, the drag of cast models or similar featherless shapes can differ both quantitatively and qualitatively from that of real birds. On the basis of a new towing method with no posts or stings that alter flow or angles of attack, the dimensionless C(D)/Re curves differed among a size gradient of five auklet species (75-100g) with similar shapes. Thus, extrapolation of C(D)/Re curves among related species must be performed with caution. At lower speeds, the C(D) at a given Re was generally higher for long-necked birds that swim with their neck extended (cormorants, grebes, some ducks) than for birds that swim with their head retracted (penguins, alcids), but this trend was reversed at high speeds. Because swimming birds actually travel at a range of instantaneous speeds during oscillatory strokes, species

  17. Mechanical properties and shape memory effect of 3D-printed PLA-based porous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Senatov, F S; Niaza, K V; Zadorozhnyy, M Yu; Maksimkin, A V; Kaloshkin, S D; Estrin, Y Z

    2016-04-01

    In the present work polylactide (PLA)/15wt% hydroxyapatite (HA) porous scaffolds with pre-modeled structure were obtained by 3D-printing by fused filament fabrication. Composite filament was obtained by extrusion. Mechanical properties, structural characteristics and shape memory effect (SME) were studied. Direct heating was used for activation of SME. The average pore size and porosity of the scaffolds were 700μm and 30vol%, respectively. Dispersed particles of HA acted as nucleation centers during the ordering of PLA molecular chains and formed an additional rigid fixed phase that reduced molecular mobility, which led to a shift of the onset of recovery stress growth from 53 to 57°C. A more rapid development of stresses was observed for PLA/HA composites with the maximum recovery stress of 3.0MPa at 70°C. Ceramic particles inhibited the growth of cracks during compression-heating-compression cycles when porous PLA/HA 3D-scaffolds recovered their initial shape. Shape recovery at the last cycle was about 96%. SME during heating may have resulted in "self-healing" of scaffold by narrowing the cracks. PLA/HA 3D-scaffolds were found to withstand up to three compression-heating-compression cycles without delamination. It was shown that PLA/15%HA porous scaffolds obtained by 3D-printing with shape recovery of 98% may be used as self-fitting implant for small bone defect replacement owing to SME.

  18. The Effect of Caudal Fin Shape on the Hydrodynamics of Swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghooghi, Mohsen; Borazjani, Iman

    2011-11-01

    The caudal fin is thought to be the main thrust generator in body/caudal fin swimmers because the largest undulations occur at the caudal fin. The shape of the fin could possibly be one of the most important factors in thrust generation for such swimmers. However, investigating this experimentally is quite challenging due to the issues in controlling and measuring forces on different appendages of live fish. We can investigate the effect of caudal fin shape through controlled numerical simulations. We construct virtual swimmers with different caudal fin shapes but with the same projected area. We attach trapezoidal and heterocercal shapes of caudal fins (e.g. observed in trouts and sharks, respectively) to a mackerel body and test these swimmers beside the original mackerel with a hemocercal tail. We prescribe the same carangiform kinematics to all virtual swimmers and carry out self-propelled simulations under similar conditions, i.e., the undulations are prescribed while motion of the center of mass is calculated. The simulations are continued until the quasi-steady state is reached, in which the swimmers are compared in terms of different performance measures. This work was partly supported by the Center for Computational Research at the University at Buffalo.

  19. Effect of Marangoni Flows on the Shape of Thin Sessile Droplets Evaporating into Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumpas, Yannis; Dehaeck, Sam; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    With the help of Mach-Zehnder interferometry, we study the (largely) axisymmetric shapes of freely receding evaporating sessile droplets of various HFE liquids. The droplets evaporate into ambient air and, although the liquids are perfectly wetting, possess small finite contact angles reckoned to be evaporation-induced. The experimentally determined droplet profiles are shown here to deviate, under some conditions, from the classical macroscopic static profile of a sessile droplet, as this is determined by gravity and capillarity. These deviations are attributed to a Marangoni flow, due to evaporation-induced thermal gradients along the liquid-air interface, and are mostly observed in conditions of high evaporation. Unlike the classical static shapes, the distorted experimental profiles exhibit an inflection point at the contact line area. When a poorly volatile liquid is considered, however, the temperature differences and the Marangoni stresses are weak, and the measurements are found to be in a good agreement with the classical static shape. Overall, the experimental findings are quantitatively confirmed by the predictions of a lubrication model accounting for the impact of the Marangoni effect on the droplet shape. Financial support of FP7 Marie Curie MULTIFLOW Network (PITNGA-2008-214919), ESA/BELSPO-PRODEX, BELSPO- μMAST (IAP 7/38) & FRS-FNRS is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Finite element analysis of the effect of loading curve shape on brain injury predictors.

    PubMed

    Post, Andrew; Hoshizaki, Blaine; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2012-02-23

    Prediction of traumatic and mild traumatic brain injury is an important factor in managing their prevention. Currently, the prediction of these injuries is limited to peak linear and angular acceleration loading curves derived from laboratory reconstructions. However it remains unclear as to what aspect of these loading curves contributes to brain tissue damage. This research uses the University College Dublin Brain Trauma Model (UCDBTM) to analyse three distinct loading curve shapes meant to represent different helmet loading scenarios. The loading curves were applied independently in each axis of linear and angular acceleration and their effect on currently used predictors of TBI and mTBI was examined. Loading curve shape A had a late time to peak, B an early time to peak and C had a consistent plateau. The areas under the curve for all three loading curve shapes were identical. The results indicate that loading curve A produced consistently higher maximum principal strains and Von Mises stress than the other two loading curve types. Loading curve C consistently produced the lowest values of maximum principal strain and Von Mises stress, with loading curve B being lowest in only 2 cases. The areas of peak Von Mises stress and Principal strain also varied depending on loading curve shape and acceleration input.

  1. Signalling product healthiness through symbolic package cues: Effects of package shape and goal congruence on consumer behaviour.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Iris; Fransen, Marieke L; Verlegh, Peeter W J; Smit, Edith G

    2017-02-01

    Three studies show that product packaging shape serves as a cue that communicates healthiness of food products. Inspired by embodiment accounts, we show that packaging that simulates a slim body shape acts as a symbolic cue for product healthiness (e.g., low in calories), as opposed to packaging that simulates a wide body shape. Furthermore, we show that the effect of slim package shape on consumer behaviour is goal dependent. Whereas simulation of a slim (vs. wide) body shape increases choice likelihood and product attitude when consumers have a health-relevant shopping goal, packaging shape does not affect these outcomes when consumers have a hedonic shopping goal. In Study 3, we adopt a realistic shopping paradigm using a shelf with authentic products, and find that a slim (as opposed to wide) package shape increases on-shelf product recognition and increases product attitude for healthy products. We discuss results and implications regarding product positioning and the packaging design process.

  2. Gold nanoparticle shape effects on human serum albumin corona interface: a molecular dynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Fatemeh; Amanlou, Massoud; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable progress in the design and study of gold nanoparticles that geared toward biomedical applications. In most imaging and therapeutic applications, gold nanoparticles enter the bloodstream directly by intravenous administration forming molecular complexes with encountered proteins termed as the protein corona. Since albumin is the most abundant protein in human blood plasma, in this study, gold nanoparticle interactions and its shape effects on human serum albumin were studied by molecular dynamic simulation. These results revealed that in the interaction of albumin with any shapes of gold nanoparticle, human serum albumin unfolds and helix amount decreases. Cubic gold nanoparticles showed stronger unfolding effects on the albumin than the spherical gold nanoparticles.

  3. Effect of Marangoni Flows on the Shape of Thin Sessile Droplets Evaporating into Air.

    PubMed

    Tsoumpas, Yannis; Dehaeck, Sam; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre

    2015-12-15

    Freely receding evaporating sessile droplets of perfectly wetting liquids, for which the observed finite contact angles are attributed to evaporation, are studied with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The experimentally obtained droplet shapes are found to depart, under some conditions, from the classical macroscopic static profile of a sessile droplet. The observed deviations (or the absence thereof) are explained in terms of a Marangoni flow due to evaporation-induced thermal gradients along the liquid-air interface. When such a Marangoni effect is strong, the experimental profiles exhibit a maximum of the slope at a certain distance from the contact line. In this case, the axisymmetric flow is directed from the contact line to the apex (along the liquid-air interface), hence delivering more liquid to the center of the droplet and making it appear inflated. These findings are quantitatively confirmed by predictions of a lubrication model accounting for the impact of the Marangoni effect on the droplet shape.

  4. The shape effect of space debris on recoil impulse by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenglin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Kunpeng

    2016-10-01

    Removing space debris by high-energy pulsed laser may be the most effective way to mitigate the threat posed by the increasing space debris. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes recoil impulse, which will lower the orbit perigee of space debris and accelerate the atmospheric capture. When the laser beam vertically irradiates a flat debris, it requires a certain laser fluence to reach the optimal impulse coupling, and the recoil impulse is parallel to the laser beam. However, the incident laser fluence varies in different parts of a non-flat surface. We have taken the shape effect into account to propose a numerical method of calculating the recoil impulse. Taking cylinder debris as the target, we have compared the recoil impulse in different laser fluences through simulation experiments, which implies that a higher laser fluence than the optimal one is needed to obtain a larger recoil impulse for irregularly shaped space debris.

  5. Singular observation of the polarization-conversion effect for a gammadion-shaped metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chu-En; Yen, Ta-Jen; Yu, Chih-Jen; Hsieh, Cheng-Min; Lee, Min-Han; Chen, Chii-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the polarization-conversion effects of a gammadion-shaped metasurface in transmission and reflection modes are discussed. In our experiment, the polarization-conversion effect of a gammadion-shaped metasurface is investigated because of the contribution of the phase and amplitude anisotropies. According to our experimental and simulated results, the polarization property of the first-order transmitted diffraction is dominated by linear anisotropy and has weak depolarization; the first-order reflected diffraction exhibits both linear and circular anisotropies and has stronger depolarization than the transmission mode. These results are different from previously published research. The Mueller matrix ellipsometer and polar decomposition method will aid in the investigation of the polarization properties of other nanostructures. PMID:26915332

  6. Singular observation of the polarization-conversion effect for a gammadion-shaped metasurface.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chu-En; Yen, Ta-Jen; Yu, Chih-Jen; Hsieh, Cheng-Min; Lee, Min-Han; Chen, Chii-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Wei

    2016-02-26

    In this article, the polarization-conversion effects of a gammadion-shaped metasurface in transmission and reflection modes are discussed. In our experiment, the polarization-conversion effect of a gammadion-shaped metasurface is investigated because of the contribution of the phase and amplitude anisotropies. According to our experimental and simulated results, the polarization property of the first-order transmitted diffraction is dominated by linear anisotropy and has weak depolarization; the first-order reflected diffraction exhibits both linear and circular anisotropies and has stronger depolarization than the transmission mode. These results are different from previously published research. The Mueller matrix ellipsometer and polar decomposition method will aid in the investigation of the polarization properties of other nanostructures.

  7. Synergic effect of carbon black and short carbon fiber on shape memory polymer actuation by electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinsong; Lv, Haibao; Liu, Yanju; Du, Shanyi

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents a study on the effect of carbon black (CB) and short carbon fibers (SCFs) on shape memory polymer (SMP) actuation by applying electric current. The coexistence of CB and SCF electrically conductive networks, supporting each other, resulting in significant improvement of electrical properties, was supported by optical microscopy, while the roles of particulate and fibrous fillers were distinguished by scanning electron microscopy. In sequence, the volume resistivity curves of one filler systems and two fillers systems were figured out and compared. Moreover, experimental results substantiated that the actuation voltage of two-filler SMP composites' shape recovery was prominently lower in comparison with that of one-filler systems at the same filler content. Additional, the response of glass transition temperature (Tg) and thermomechanical properties to filler content and two fillers' synergic effect were characterized and illuminated experimentally.

  8. Surface-active element effects on the shape of GTA, laser, and electron-beam welds

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Roper, J.R.; Stagner, R.T.; Aden, R.J.

    1983-03-01

    Laser and electron-beam welds were passed across selenium-doped zones in 21-6-9 stainless steel. The depth/width (d/w) ratio of a defocused laser weld with a weld pool shape similar to a GTA weld increased by over 200% in a zone where 66 ppm selenium had been added. Smaller increases were observed in selenium-doped zones for a moderately defocused electron beam weld with a higher d/w ratio in undoped base metal. When laser or electron beam weld penetration was by a keyhole mechanism, no change in d/w ratio occurred in selenium-doped zones. The results confirm the surface-tension-driven fluid-flow model for the effect of minor elements on GTA weld pool shape. Other experimental evidence bearing on the effect of minor elements on GTA weld penetration is summarized.

  9. Precipitation-hardening stainless steels with a shape-memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaradze, V. V.; Afanasiev, S. V.; Volkova, E. G.; Zavalishin, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of obtaining the shape-memory effect as a result of the γ → ɛ → γ transformations in aging stainless steels strengthened by VC carbides has been investigated. Regimes are given for strengthening aging (at 650 and 720°C) for stainless steels that predominantly contain (in wt %) 0.06-0.45C, 1-2V, 2-5Si, 9 and 13-14Cr. The values of reversible deformation e (amount of shape-memory effect) determined after heating to 400°C in samples preliminarily deformed to 3.5-4% vary from 0.15 to 2.7%, depending on the composition of the steels and regimes of stabilizing and destabilizing aging.

  10. The Haptic Recognition of Geometrical Shapes in Congenitally Blind and Blindfolded Adolescents: Is There a Haptic Prototype Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Theurel, Anne; Frileux, Stéphanie; Hatwell, Yvette; Gentaz, Edouard

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been shown that visual geometrical shape categories (rectangle and triangle) are graded structures organized around a prototype as demonstrated by perception and production tasks in adults as well as in children. The visual prototypical shapes are better recognized than other exemplars of the categories. Their existence could emerge from early exposure to these prototypical shapes that are present in our visual environment. The present study examined the role of visual experience in the existence of prototypical shapes by comparing the haptic recognition of geometrical shapes in congenitally blind and blindfolded adolescents. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine whether the existence of a prototype effect (higher recognition of prototypical shapes than non prototypical shapes) depended on visual experience, congenitally blind and blindfolded sighted adolescents were asked to recognize in the haptic modality three categories of correct shapes (square, rectangle, triangle) varying in orientation (prototypical/canonical orientation vs. non prototypical/canonical orientation rotated by 45°) among a set of other shapes. A haptic prototype effect was found in the blindfolded sighted whereas no difference between prototypical and non prototypical correct shapes was observed in the congenitally blind. A control experiment using a similar visual recognition task confirmed the existence of a visual prototype effect in a group of sighted adolescents. Conclusion/Significance These findings show that the prototype effect is not intrinsic to the haptic modality but depends on visual experience. This suggests that the occurrence of visual and haptic prototypical shapes in the recognition of geometrical shape seems to depend on visual exposure to these prototypical shapes existing in our environment. PMID:22761961

  11. Effect of Dummy Block Shape on Deformation of Oxide Film of Billet in Copper Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Y.; Hoshino, M.

    2010-06-01

    There are some problems in the copper hot extrusion. One is the mixture of impurities in the product, for example, the oxide film in the side of billet comes to the outer of product and the oxide film in the back-end of billet is inserted in the material and extruded into the center of product, which is called as "piping". Then, it has been investigated that dummy block shape effects on deformation of oxide film by experiment and numerical simulation.

  12. Shaping effective communication skills and therapeutic relationships at work: the foundation of collaboration.

    PubMed

    Grover, Susan M

    2005-04-01

    Effective communication is essential to practice and can result in improved interpersonal relationships at the workplace. Effective communication is shaped by basic techniques such as open-ended questions, listening, empathy, and assertiveness. However, the relationship between effective communication and successful interpersonal relationships is affected by intervening variables. The variables of gender, generation, context, collegiality, cooperation, self-disclosure, and reciprocity can impede or enhance the outcome of quality communication. It is essential for occupational health nurses to qualitatively assess the degree to which each of these concepts affects communication and, in turn, relationships at work.

  13. Precipitation Effects on the Martensitic Transformation in a Cu-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suru, Marius-Gabriel; Lohan, Nicoleta-Monica; Pricop, Bogdan; Mihalache, Elena; Mocanu, Mihai; Bujoreanu, Leandru-Gheorghe

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the effects of precipitation of α-phase on a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy (SMA) with chemical composition bordering on β region. By differential scanning calorimetry, a series of reproducible heat flow fluctuations was determined on heating a hot-rolled martensitic Cu-Al-Ni SMA, which was associated with the precipitation of α-phase. Two heat treatments were given to the SMA so as to "freeze" its states before and after the thermal range for precipitation, respectively. The corresponding microstructures of the two heat-treated states were observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy and were compared with the initial martensitic state. Energy dispersive spectroscopy experiments were carried out to determine the chemical compositions of the different phases formed in heat-treated specimens. The initial as well as the heat-treated specimens with a lamellar shape were further comparatively investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis and two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) tests comprising heating-cooling cycles under a bending load. Temperature scans were applied to the three types of specimens (initial and heat-treated states), so as to bring out the effects of heat treatment. The storage modulus increased, corresponding to the reversion of thermoelastic martensite and disappeared with the formation of precipitates. These features are finally discussed in association with TWSME under bending.

  14. Effect of Protuberance Shape and Orientation on Space Shuttle Orbiter Boundary-Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, RUdolph A.; Berry, Scott A.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This document describes an experimental study conducted to examine the effects of protuberances on hypersonic boundary-layer transition. The experiment was conducted in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel on a series of 0.9%-scale Shuttle Orbiter models. The data were acquired to complement the existing ground-based boundary-layer transition database that was used to develop Version 1.0 of the boundary-layer transition RTF (return-to-flight) tool. The existing ground-based data were all acquired on 0.75%-scale Orbiter models using diamond-shaped ( pizza-box ) trips. The larger model scale facilitated in manufacturing higher fidelity protuberances. The end use of this experimental database will be to develop a technical basis (in the form of a boundary-layer transition correlation) to assess representative protrusion shapes, e.g., gap fillers and protrusions resulting from possible tile repair concepts. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effects of protuberance-trip location and geometry on Shuttle Orbiter boundary-layer transition. Secondary goals are to assess the effects of gap-filler orientation and other protrusion shapes on boundary-layer transition. Global heat-transfer images using phosphor thermography of the Orbiter windward surface and the corresponding streamwise and spanwise heating distributions were used to infer the state of the boundary layer, i.e., laminar, transitional, or turbulent.

  15. Measured Effects of Turbulence on the Loudness and Waveforms of Conventional and Shaped Minimized Sonic Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, Kenneth J.; Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2005-01-01

    Turbulence has two distinctive effects on sonic booms: there is distortion in the form of random perturbations that appear behind the shock waves, and shock rise times are increased randomly. A first scattering theory by S.C. Crow in the late 1960s quantified the random distortions, and Crow's theory was shown to agree with available flight test data. A variety of theories for the shock thickness have been presented, all supporting the role of turbulence in increasing rise time above that of a basic molecular-relaxation structure. The net effect of these phenomena on the loudness of shaped minimized booms is of significant interest. Initial analysis suggests that there would be no change to average loudness, but this had not been experimentally investigated. The January 2004 flight test of the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstrator (SSBD), together with a reference unmodified F-5E, included a 12500- foot linear ground sensor array with 28 digitally recorded sensor sites. This data set provides an opportunity to re-test Crow's theory for the post-shock perturbations, and to examine the net effect of turbulence on the loudness of shaped sonic booms.

  16. The variation of heat transfer coefficient, adiabatic effectiveness and aerodynamic loss with film cooling hole shape.

    PubMed

    Sargison, J E; Guo, S M; Oldfield, M L; Rawlinson, A J

    2001-05-01

    The heat transfer coefficient and adiabatic effectiveness of cylindrical, fan shaped holes and a slot are presented for the region zero to 50 diameters downstream of the holes. Narrow-band liquid crystals were used on a heated flat plate with heated air coolant. These parameters have been measured in a steady state, low speed facility at engine representative Reynolds number based on hole diameter and pressure difference ratio (ideal momentum flux ratio). The aerodynamic loss due to each of the film cooling geometries has been measured using a traverse of the boundary layer far downstream of the film cooling holes. Compared to the cylindrical holes, the fan shaped hole case showed an improvement in the uniformity of cooling downstream of the holes and in the level of laterally averaged film cooling effectiveness. The fan effectiveness approached the slot level and both the fan and cylindrical hole cases show lower heat transfer coefficients than the slot and non film cooled cases based on the laterally averaged results. The drawback to the fan shaped hole was that the aerodynamic loss was significantly higher than both the slot and cylindrical hole values due to inefficient diffusion in the hole exit expansion.

  17. Shape-dependent antibacterial effects of non-cytotoxic gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Penders, Jelle; Stolzoff, Michelle; Hickey, Daniel J; Andersson, Martin; Webster, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of various shapes (including spheres, stars and flowers), with similar dimensions, were synthesized and evaluated for their antibacterial effects toward Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium responsible for numerous life-threatening infections worldwide. Optical growth curve measurements and Gompertz modeling showed significant AuNP shape- and concentration-dependent decreases in bacterial growth with increases in bacterial growth lag time. To evaluate prospective use in in vivo systems, the cytotoxicity of the same AuNPs was evaluated toward human dermal fibroblasts in vitro by 3-(4,5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) viability assays and confocal microscopy. No indication of any mammalian cell toxicity or morphological effects was found. Additionally, it was observed that the AuNPs were readily internalized in fibroblasts after 4 days of incubation. Most importantly, the results of the present study showed that gold nanoflowers in particular possessed the most promising non-cytotoxic mammalian cell behavior with the greatest shape-dependent antibacterial activity-promising properties for their future investigation in a wide range of anti-infection applications.

  18. Effects of chitosan fiber addition on the properties of polyurethane with thermo-responsive shape memory.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kyotaro; Iijima, Masahiro; Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Ohta, Mitsuru; Muguruma, Takeshi; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nakazawa, Futoshi; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2016-03-30

    We investigated the effects of the addition of chitosan fiber (biomass nanofiber made by Sugino (BiNFi-s)) to polyether-based thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) on material properties. BiNFi-s (2 and 5 wt %)/TPU composite materials were prepared via compression molding, and glass fiber (2 and 5 wt %)/TPU composite materials and plain TPU were also prepared for comparison. The glass transition temperature was analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry, and the crystal structure was investigated using X-ray diffraction. 20-mm-long test specimens with cross-sectional dimensions of 1 mm × 1 mm were cut from sheets of the composite materials, and three-point bending tests were carried out using a universal testing machine to investigate their mechanical properties and shape memory. The addition of BiNFi-s or glass fiber to TPU did not influence the glass transition temperature, although the crystal structure changed from semi-crystalline to amorphous. The elastic modulus increased 40% by the addition of 5 wt % BiNFi-s (2.31 MPa) compared with plain TPU (1.65 MPa), and these composites exhibited shape recovery with clinically relevant changes in temperature. The addition of 5 wt % BiNFi-s into TPU resulted in an improvement in the elastic modulus without any decrease in the shape memory effect. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  19. Marangoni Effect on the Shape of Freely Receding Evaporating Sessile Droplets of Perfectly Wetting Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumpas, Yannis; Dehaeck, Sam; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    Freely receding evaporating sessile droplets of perfectly wetting liquids (HFE-7100, 7200 and 7500), with small finite contact angles induced by evaporation, are studied with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Surprisingly, the experimentally obtained profiles turn out to deviate from the classical macroscopic static shape of a sessile droplet (as determined by gravity and capillarity), often used when modeling evaporating droplets. These deviations can be seen in two ways. Namely, either the droplet appears to be inflated as compared to the classical static shape assuming the same contact angle and contact radius, or the apparent contact angle appears lower than the classical static one assuming the same volume and contact radius. In reality, the experimental profiles exhibit a local decrease of the slope near the contact line, which we attribute to the Marangoni effect in an evaporating sessile droplet. In this case, the radially inward (along the liquid-air interface) direction of the flow delivers more liquid to the center of the droplet making it appear inflated. When the Marangoni effect is weak, as in the case of the poorly volatile HFE-7500, no significant influence is noticed on the drop shape. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of a lubrication-type theoretical model that incorporates the evaporation-induced Marangoni flow. Financial support of FP7 Marie Curie MULTIFLOW Network (PITN-GA-2008-214919), ESA/BELSPO-PRODEX, BELSPO- μMAST (IAP 7/38) & FRS-FNRS is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Inlet Shape Effects on the Far-Field Sound of a Model Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. R.; Thomas, R. H.; Dougherty, R. P.; Farassat, F.; Gerhold, C. H.

    1997-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to determine the effects of inlet shape on fan radiated noise. Four inlet geometries, which included a long standard flight type inlet, a short, aggressive flight inlet a scarf inlet, and an elliptical inlet were investigated in the study. The fan model used in the study was a 0.1 scale of the Pratt and Whitney Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP), an ultra high bypass ratio turbofan engine. Acoustic data are presented for a fan speed of 70% (12,000 rpm) and a tunnel speed of 0.10 Mach number, The fan was configured with a 16-bladed rotor and a 40 stator vane set that were separated by 2.0 chord lengths. The radiated noise was measured with 15 microphones on a boom that traversed the length of the tunnel test section. Data from these microphones are presented in the form of sideline angle directivity plots. Noise associated with the test inlets was also predicted using a ray acoustics code. Inlet shape has been found to have a significant effect on both tone and broadband noise, and the non-axisymmetric inlet shape can be used for a noise reduction method.

  1. Effect of canopy shape on physical load when holding an umbrella.

    PubMed

    Kuijt-Evers, Lottie F M; Könemann, Reinier; Hallbeck, M Susan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of the canopy shape of an umbrella on physical load when holding the umbrella in different circumstances. For this purpose, thirteen subjects participated in this study and muscle activity of seven muscles of the upper limb (including the forearm) was measured for 5 wind speeds (4, 5, 6, 7, 8 Bft) and two wind directions (front and side). From the results, it was seen that for the p50 value of the muscle activity, the umbrella with the asymmetric canopy required 62% and for the p90 value of the muscle activity 74% of the muscle activity, on average, over all wind speeds - compared to the traditional umbrella. Based on these results, we can conclude that the physical load of holding the traditional umbrella is significantly higher than holding the umbrella with the asymmetric canopy shape in windy conditions.

  2. Effect of counterface roughness on adhesion of mushroom-shaped microstructure.

    PubMed

    Kasem, Haytam; Varenberg, Michael

    2013-10-06

    In this study, the effect of the substrate roughness on adhesion of mushroom-shaped microstructure was experimentally investigated. To do so, 12 substrates having different isotropic roughness were prepared from the same material by replicating topography of different surfaces. The pull-off forces generated by mushroom-shaped microstructure in contact with the tested substrates were measured and compared with the pull-off forces generated by a smooth reference. It was found that classical roughness parameters, such as average roughness (Ra) and others, cannot be used to explain topography-related variation in pull-off force. This has led us to the development of an integrated roughness parameter capable of explaining results of pull-off measurements. Using this parameter, we have also found that there is a critical roughness, above which neither smooth nor microstructured surface could generate any attachment force, which may have important implications on design of both adhesive and anti-adhesive surfaces.

  3. Effects of contact cap dimension on dry adhesion of bioinspired mushroom-shaped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Hu, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Dry adhesion observed in small creatures, such as spiders, insects, and geckos, has many great advantages such as repeatability and strong adhesiveness. In order to mimic these unique performances, fibrillar surface with a mushroom shaped end has drawn lots of attentions because of its advantage in efficiently enhancing adhesion compared with other sphere or simple flat ends. Here, in order to study the effects of contact cap dimension on adhesion strength, patterned surfaces of mushroom-shaped micropillars with differing cap diameters are fabricated based on the conventional photolithography and molding. The normal adhesion strength of these dry adhesives with varying cap diameters is measured with home-built equipment. The strength increases with the rise of cap diameter, and interestingly it becomes strongest when the mushroom caps join together.

  4. Investigation of pulse voltage shape effects on electrohydrodynamic jets using a vision measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Lee, Dae-Yong

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a vision measurement technique to evaluate electrohydrodynamic (EHD) inkjet behavior, and discuss the effects of the pulse voltage shape on the EHD jets for drop-on-demand printing, including the falling and rising time in the pulse voltage. Sequential images acquired by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with a strobe light-emitting diode (LED) were used to visualize EHD jet behavior with respect to time. A vision algorithm was implemented in an EHD jet system to enable in situ measurement and analysis of EHD jets. A guideline for selecting pulse shape parameters is also presented, to enable the achievement of high-frequency reliable jets for drop-on-demand printing. Printing results are presented to demonstrate the drop consistency of jets.

  5. Shape memory alloy actuation effect on subsonic static aeroelastic deformation of composite cantilever plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, A. M. H.; Majid, D. L. Abdul; Abdullah, E. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) is one of the smart materials that have unique properties and used recently in several aerospace applications. SMAs are metallic alloys that can recover permanent strains when they are heated above a certain temperature. In this study, the effects of SMA actuation on the composite plate under subsonic aeroelastic conditions are examined. The wind tunnel test is carried out for two configurations of a cantilever shape memory alloy composite plate with a single SMA wire fixed eccentrically. Strain gage data for both bending and torsional strain are recorded and demonstrated during the aeroelastic test for active and non-active SMA wire in two locations. The cyclic actuation of the SMA wire embedded inside the composite plate is also investigated during the aeroelastic test. The results show reduction in both bending and torsional strain of the composite plate after activation of the SMA wire during the wind tunnel test.

  6. Effects of laser beam propagation and saturation on the spatial shape of sodium laser guide stars.

    PubMed

    Marc, Fabien; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2009-03-30

    The possibility to produce diffraction-limited images by large telescopes through Adaptive Optics is closely linked to the precision of measurement of the position of the guide star on the wavefront sensor. In the case of laser guide stars, many parameters can lead to a strong distortion on the shape of the LGS spot. Here we study the influence of both the saturation of the sodium layer excited by different types of lasers, the spatial quality of the laser mode at the ground and the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the upward propagation of the laser beam. Both shape and intensity of the LGS spot are found to depend strongly on these three effects with important consequences on the precision on the wavefront analysis.

  7. Effect of Local Junction Losses in the Optimization of T-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    T-shaped channels are extensively used in flow distribution applications such as irrigation, chemical dispersion, gas pipelines and space heating and cooling. The geometry of T-shaped channels can be optimized to reduce the overall pressure drop in stem and branch sections. Results of such optimizations are in the form of geometric parameters such as the length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. The traditional approach of this optimization accounts for the pressure drop across the stem and branch sections, however, ignores the pressure drop in the T-junction. In this paper, we conduct geometry optimization while including the effect of local junction losses in laminar flows. From the results, we are able to identify a non-dimensional parameter that can be used to predict the optimal geometric configurations. This parameter can also be used to identify the conditions in which the local junction losses can be ignored during the optimization.

  8. Converse magnetoelectric effect in ferromagnetic shape memory alloy/piezoelectric laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. Y.; Wang, D. H.; Han, Z. D.; Zhang, C. L.; Du, Y. W.; Huang, Z. G.

    2009-07-01

    In laminates, the converse magnetoelectric (CME) effect is often achieved by an elastic coupling between magnetostrictive and piezoelectric layers. Here the authors report on an alternative mechanism for obtaining CME. In a transition-metals-based ferromagnetic shape memory alloy/piezoelectric ceramic laminated composite, the stress-induced martensitic transformation is utilized to gain the magnetic changes, which gives rise to a giant CME effect consequently. The strong CME is observed at room temperature over a broad bandwidth, under weak magnetic bias and electric field.

  9. An improved quasistatic line-shape theory: The effects of molecular motion on the line wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A theory is presented for the modification of the line-shape functions and absorption coefficient due to the breakdown of the quasistatic approximation. This breakdown arises from the effects of molecular motion and increases the absorption in the near wings. Numerical calculations for the high-frequency wing of the nu(sub 3) band of CO2 broadened by Ar are reported and it is shown that these effects are significant near the bandhead. The importance of such corrections in other spectral regions and for other systems is discussed briefly.

  10. Galilean symmetry in the effective theory of inflation: new shapes of non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Musso, Marcello; D'Amico, Guido; Noreña, Jorge; Trincherini, Enrico E-mail: gda2@nyu.edu E-mail: jorge.norena@gmail.com

    2011-02-01

    We study the consequences of imposing an approximate Galilean symmetry on the Effective Theory of Inflation, the theory of small perturbations around the inflationary background. This approach allows us to study the effect of operators with two derivatives on each field, which can be the leading interactions due to non-renormalization properties of the Galilean Lagrangian. In this case cubic non-Gaussianities are given by three independent operators, containing up to six derivatives, two with a shape close to equilateral and one peaking on flattened isosceles triangles. The four-point function is larger than in models with small speed of sound and potentially observable with the Planck satellite.

  11. Shape effect on the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized via a microwave-assisted method.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xuesen; Wen, Junjie; Xiong, Xuhua; Hu, Yongyou

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used as sustained-release bactericidal agents for water treatment. Among the physicochemical characteristics of AgNPs, shape is an important parameter relevant to the antibacterial activity. Three typically shaped AgNPs, nanocubes, nanospheres, and nanowires, were prepared via a microwave-assisted method and characterized by TEM, UV-vis, and XRD. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was determined by OD growth curves tests, MIC tests, and cell viability assay against Escherichia coli. The interaction between AgNPs and bacterial cells was observed by TEM. The results showed that the three differently shaped AgNPs were nanoscale, 55 ± 10 nm in edge length for nanocubes, 60 ± 15 nm in diameter for nanospheres, 60 ± 10 nm in diameter and 2-4 μm in length for nanowires. At the bacterial concentration of 10(4) CFU/mL, the MIC of nanocubes, nanospheres, and nanowires were 37.5, 75, and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Due to the worst contact with bacteria, silver nanowires exhibited the weakest antibacterial activity compared with silver nanocubes and silver nanospheres. Besides, silver nanocubes mainly covered by {100} facets showed stronger antibacterial activity than silver nanospheres covered by {111} facets. It suggests that the shape effect on the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is attributed to the specific surface areas and facets reactivity; AgNPs with larger effective contact areas and higher reactive facets exhibit stronger antibacterial activity.

  12. Suppression of the coffee-ring effect by shape-dependent capillary interactions.

    PubMed

    Yunker, Peter J; Still, Tim; Lohr, Matthew A; Yodh, A G

    2011-08-17

    When a drop of liquid dries on a solid surface, its suspended particulate matter is deposited in ring-like fashion. This phenomenon, known as the coffee-ring effect, is familiar to anyone who has observed a drop of coffee dry. During the drying process, drop edges become pinned to the substrate, and capillary flow outward from the centre of the drop brings suspended particles to the edge as evaporation proceeds. After evaporation, suspended particles are left highly concentrated along the original drop edge. The coffee-ring effect is manifested in systems with diverse constituents, ranging from large colloids to nanoparticles and individual molecules. In fact--despite the many practical applications for uniform coatings in printing, biology and complex assembly-the ubiquitous nature of the effect has made it difficult to avoid. Here we show experimentally that the shape of the suspended particles is important and can be used to eliminate the coffee-ring effect: ellipsoidal particles are deposited uniformly during evaporation. The anisotropic shape of the particles significantly deforms interfaces, producing strong interparticle capillary interactions. Thus, after the ellipsoids are carried to the air-water interface by the same outward flow that causes the coffee-ring effect for spheres, strong long-ranged interparticle attractions between ellipsoids lead to the formation of loosely packed or arrested structures on the air-water interface. These structures prevent the suspended particles from reaching the drop edge and ensure uniform deposition. Interestingly, under appropriate conditions, suspensions of spheres mixed with a small number of ellipsoids also produce uniform deposition. Thus, particle shape provides a convenient parameter to control the deposition of particles, without modification of particle or solvent chemistry.

  13. Antibacterial effect of various shapes of silver nanoparticles monitored by SERS.

    PubMed

    El-Zahry, Marwa R; Mahmoud, Amer; Refaat, Ibrahim H; Mohamed, Horria A; Bohlmann, Holger; Lendl, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    A comparative evaluation of antimicrobial effect of synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of different shapes using different methods was performed. Spherical, triangular and hexagonal AgNPs with an average size of 40 nm were chemically prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy. The antimicrobial effect of these different AgNPs against the gram negative bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli) was studied by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), the evaluation of growth curves and inhibition zones. SERS proved to be sensitive to monitor the changes that occurred in the bacterial cells upon interaction with AgNPs, which qualitatively compared well with the data provided by the reference methods. However, as SERS is already sensitive to initial changes in the chemistry of bacteria due to the antibacterial effect of the AgNPs, fast and detailed information is provided by SERS as opposed to the classical reference methods based on the evaluation of growth curves and inhibition zones. The results of this work also demonstrate that hexagonal AgNPs display the highest antibacterial effect when compared to other NPs shapes, with triangular AgNPs exhibiting no antibacterial effect under the adopted conditions.

  14. Thermodynamics of multicaloric effects in multiferroic materials: application to metamagnetic shape-memory alloys and ferrotoroidics

    SciTech Connect

    Planes, Antoni; Castán, Teresa; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-07-11

    In this paper, we develop a general thermodynamic framework to investigate multicaloric effects in multiferroic materials. This is applied to the study of both magnetostructural and magnetoelectric multiferroics. Landau models with appropriate interplay between the corresponding ferroic properties (order parameters) are proposed for metamagnetic shape-memory and ferrotoroidic materials, which, respectively, belong to the two classes of multiferroics. For each ferroic property, caloric effects are quantified by the isothermal entropy change induced by the application of the corresponding thermodynamically conjugated field. The multicaloric effect is obtained as a function of the two relevant applied fields in each class of multiferroics. It is further shown that multicaloric effects comprise the corresponding contributions from caloric effects associated with each ferroic property and the cross-contribution arising from the interplay between these ferroic properties. Finally, this article is part of the themed issue ‘Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials’.

  15. Thermodynamics of multicaloric effects in multiferroic materials: application to metamagnetic shape-memory alloys and ferrotoroidics

    DOE PAGES

    Planes, Antoni; Castán, Teresa; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-07-11

    In this paper, we develop a general thermodynamic framework to investigate multicaloric effects in multiferroic materials. This is applied to the study of both magnetostructural and magnetoelectric multiferroics. Landau models with appropriate interplay between the corresponding ferroic properties (order parameters) are proposed for metamagnetic shape-memory and ferrotoroidic materials, which, respectively, belong to the two classes of multiferroics. For each ferroic property, caloric effects are quantified by the isothermal entropy change induced by the application of the corresponding thermodynamically conjugated field. The multicaloric effect is obtained as a function of the two relevant applied fields in each class of multiferroics. Itmore » is further shown that multicaloric effects comprise the corresponding contributions from caloric effects associated with each ferroic property and the cross-contribution arising from the interplay between these ferroic properties. Finally, this article is part of the themed issue ‘Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials’.« less

  16. Thermodynamics of multicaloric effects in multiferroic materials: application to metamagnetic shape-memory alloys and ferrotoroidics.

    PubMed

    Planes, Antoni; Castán, Teresa; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-08-13

    We develop a general thermodynamic framework to investigate multicaloric effects in multiferroic materials. This is applied to the study of both magnetostructural and magnetoelectric multiferroics. Landau models with appropriate interplay between the corresponding ferroic properties (order parameters) are proposed for metamagnetic shape-memory and ferrotoroidic materials, which, respectively, belong to the two classes of multiferroics. For each ferroic property, caloric effects are quantified by the isothermal entropy change induced by the application of the corresponding thermodynamically conjugated field. The multicaloric effect is obtained as a function of the two relevant applied fields in each class of multiferroics. It is further shown that multicaloric effects comprise the corresponding contributions from caloric effects associated with each ferroic property and the cross-contribution arising from the interplay between these ferroic properties.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'.

  17. Appearance of the two-way shape-memory effect in a nitinol spring subjected to temperature and deformation cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjavidze, A. G.; Barnov, V. A.; Jorjishvili, L. I.; Sobolevskaya, S. V.

    2008-03-01

    The properties of a cylindrical spiral spring of nitinol (shape-memory alloy) are studied. When this spring is used as a working element in a rotary martensitic engine, the appearance of the two-way shape-memory effect in it is shown to decrease the engine operation efficiency.

  18. Effect of Particle Shape on Mechanical Behaviors of Rocks: A Numerical Study Using Clumped Particle Model

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Guan; Liu, Guang; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2013-01-01

    Since rocks are aggregates of mineral particles, the effect of mineral microstructure on macroscopic mechanical behaviors of rocks is inneglectable. Rock samples of four different particle shapes are established in this study based on clumped particle model, and a sphericity index is used to quantify particle shape. Model parameters for simulation in PFC are obtained by triaxial compression test of quartz sandstone, and simulation of triaxial compression test is then conducted on four rock samples with different particle shapes. It is seen from the results that stress thresholds of rock samples such as crack initiation stress, crack damage stress, and peak stress decrease with the increasing of the sphericity index. The increase of sphericity leads to a drop of elastic modulus and a rise in Poisson ratio, while the decreasing sphericity usually results in the increase of cohesion and internal friction angle. Based on volume change of rock samples during simulation of triaxial compression test, variation of dilation angle with plastic strain is also studied. PMID:23997677

  19. Effect of Gravity Level on the Particle Shape and Size During Zeolite Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Hong-Wei; Ilebusi, Olusegun J.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A microscopic diffusion model is developed to represent solute transport in the boundary layer of a growing zeolite crystal. This model is used to describe the effect of gravity on particle shape and solute distribution. Particle dynamics and crystal growth kinetics serve as the boundary conditions of flow and convection-diffusion equations. A statistical rate theory is used to obtain the rate of solute transport across the growing interface, which is expressed in terms of concentration and velocity of solute species. Microgravity can significantly decrease the solute velocity across the growing interface compared to its earth-based counterpart. The extent of this reduction highly depends on solute diffusion constant in solution. Under gravity, the flow towards the crystal enhances solute transport rate across the growing interface while the flow away from crystals reduces this rate, suggesting a non-uniform growth rate and thus an elliptic final shape. However, microgravity can significantly reduce the influence of flow and obtain a final product with perfect spherical shape. The model predictions compare favorably with the data of space experiment of zeolites grown in space.

  20. Phase Diagram of Continuous Binary Nanoalloys: Size, Shape, and Segregation Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Mingjin; Lu, Haiming; Jiang, Haiping; Cao, Zhenhua; Meng, Xiangkang

    2017-02-01

    The phase diagrams of continuous binary nanoalloys are important in providing guidance for material designs and industrial applications. However, experimental determination of the nano-phase diagram is scarce since calorimetric measurements remain quite challenging at the nanoscale. Based on the size-dependent cohesive energy model, we developed a unified nano-thermodynamic model to investigate the effects of the size, shape, and segregation on the phase diagrams of continuous binary nanoalloys. The liquidus/solidus dropped in temperature, two-phase zone was narrowed, and the degree of surface segregation decreased with decrease in the size or increase in the shape factor. The congruent melting point of Cu-Au nanoalloys with and without segregation is linearly shifted to higher Au component and lower temperature with decreasing size or increasing shape factor. By reviewing surface segregated element of different binary nanoalloys, two segregation rules based on the solid surface energy and atomic size have been identified. Moreover, the established model can be employed to describe other physicochemical properties of nanoalloys, e.g. the cohesive energy, catalytic activation energy, and order-disorder transition temperature, and the validity is supported by available other theoretical prediction, experimental data and molecular dynamic simulations results. This will help the experimentalists by guiding them in their attempts to design bimetallic nanocrystals with the desired properties.

  1. Phase Diagram of Continuous Binary Nanoalloys: Size, Shape, and Segregation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Mingjin; Lu, Haiming; Jiang, Haiping; Cao, Zhenhua; Meng, Xiangkang

    2017-01-01

    The phase diagrams of continuous binary nanoalloys are important in providing guidance for material designs and industrial applications. However, experimental determination of the nano-phase diagram is scarce since calorimetric measurements remain quite challenging at the nanoscale. Based on the size-dependent cohesive energy model, we developed a unified nano-thermodynamic model to investigate the effects of the size, shape, and segregation on the phase diagrams of continuous binary nanoalloys. The liquidus/solidus dropped in temperature, two-phase zone was narrowed, and the degree of surface segregation decreased with decrease in the size or increase in the shape factor. The congruent melting point of Cu-Au nanoalloys with and without segregation is linearly shifted to higher Au component and lower temperature with decreasing size or increasing shape factor. By reviewing surface segregated element of different binary nanoalloys, two segregation rules based on the solid surface energy and atomic size have been identified. Moreover, the established model can be employed to describe other physicochemical properties of nanoalloys, e.g. the cohesive energy, catalytic activation energy, and order-disorder transition temperature, and the validity is supported by available other theoretical prediction, experimental data and molecular dynamic simulations results. This will help the experimentalists by guiding them in their attempts to design bimetallic nanocrystals with the desired properties. PMID:28169320

  2. Effects of plasma shape and profiles on edge stability in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Chan, V.S.; Chen, L.

    1998-12-01

    The results of recent experimental and theoretical studies concerning the effects of plasma shape and current and pressure profiles on edge instabilities in DIII-D are presented. Magnetic oscillations with toroidal mode number n {approx} 2--9 and a fast growth time {gamma}{sup {minus}1} = 20--150 {micro}s are often observed prior to the first giant type 1 ELM in discharges with moderate squareness. High n ideal ballooning second stability access encourages edge instabilities by facilitating the buildup of the edge pressure gradient and bootstrap current density which destabilize the intermediate to low n modes. Analysis suggests that discharges with large edge pressure gradient and bootstrap current density are more unstable to n > 1 modes. Calculations and experimental results show that ELM amplitude and frequency can be varied by controlling access to the second ballooning stability regime at the edge through variation of the squareness of the discharge shape. A new method is proposed to control edge instabilities by reducing access to the second ballooning stability regime at the edge using high order local perturbation of the plasma shape in the outboard bad curvature region.

  3. Principal shapes and squeezed limits in the effective field theory of large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Solon, Mikhail P.

    2016-11-01

    We apply an orthogonalization procedure on the effective field theory of large scale structure (EFT of LSS) shapes, relevant for the angle-averaged bispectrum and non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum at one loop. Assuming natural-sized EFT parameters, this identifies a linear combination of EFT shapes—referred to as the principal shape—that gives the dominant contribution for the whole kinematic plane, with subdominant combinations suppressed by a few orders of magnitude. For the covariance, our orthogonal transformation is in excellent agreement with a principal component analysis applied to available data. Additionally we find that, for both observables, the coefficients of the principal shapes are well approximated by the EFT coefficients appearing in the squeezed limit, and are thus measurable from power spectrum response functions. Employing data from N-body simulations for the growth-only response, we measure the single EFT coefficient describing the angle-averaged bispectrum with 𝒪(10%) precision. These methods of shape orthogonalization and measurement of coefficients from response functions are valuable tools for developing the EFT of LSS framework, and can be applied to more general observables.

  4. Effects of electrons on the shape of nanopores prepared by focused electron beam induced etching.

    PubMed

    Liebes, Yael; Hadad, Binyamin; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2011-07-15

    The fabrication of nanometric pores with controlled size is important for applications such as single molecule detection. We have recently suggested the use of focused electron beam induced etching (FEBIE) for the preparation of such nanopores in silicon nitride membranes. The use of a scanning probe microscope as the electron beam source makes this technique comparably accessible, opening the way to widespread fabrication of nanopores. Since the shape of the nanopores is critically important for their performance, in this work we focus on its analysis and study the dependence of the nanopore shape on the electron beam acceleration voltage. We show that the nanopore adopts a funnel-like shape, with a central pore penetrating the entire membrane, surrounded by an extended shallow-etched region at the top of the membrane. While the internal nanopore size was found to depend on the electron acceleration voltage, the nanopore edges extended beyond the primary electron beam spot size due to long-range effects, such as radiolysis and diffusion. Moreover, the size of the peripheral-etched region was found to be less dependent on the acceleration voltage. We also found that chemical etching is the rate-limiting step of the process and is only slightly dependent on the acceleration voltage. Furthermore, due to the chemical etch process the chemical composition of the nanopore rims was found to maintain the bulk membrane composition.

  5. Effects of electrons on the shape of nanopores prepared by focused electron beam induced etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebes, Yael; Hadad, Binyamin; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2011-07-01

    The fabrication of nanometric pores with controlled size is important for applications such as single molecule detection. We have recently suggested the use of focused electron beam induced etching (FEBIE) for the preparation of such nanopores in silicon nitride membranes. The use of a scanning probe microscope as the electron beam source makes this technique comparably accessible, opening the way to widespread fabrication of nanopores. Since the shape of the nanopores is critically important for their performance, in this work we focus on its analysis and study the dependence of the nanopore shape on the electron beam acceleration voltage. We show that the nanopore adopts a funnel-like shape, with a central pore penetrating the entire membrane, surrounded by an extended shallow-etched region at the top of the membrane. While the internal nanopore size was found to depend on the electron acceleration voltage, the nanopore edges extended beyond the primary electron beam spot size due to long-range effects, such as radiolysis and diffusion. Moreover, the size of the peripheral-etched region was found to be less dependent on the acceleration voltage. We also found that chemical etching is the rate-limiting step of the process and is only slightly dependent on the acceleration voltage. Furthermore, due to the chemical etch process the chemical composition of the nanopore rims was found to maintain the bulk membrane composition.

  6. Laboratory study of effects of sonic boom shaping on subjective loudness and acceptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine the effects of sonic boom signature shaping on subjective loudness and acceptability. The study utilized the sonic boom simulator at the Langley Research Center. A wide range of symmetrical, front-shock-minimized signature shapes were investigated together with a limited number of asymmetrical signatures. Subjective loudness judgments were obtained from 60 test subjects by using an 11-point numerical category scale. Acceptability judgments were obtained using the method of constant stimuli. Results were used to assess the relative predictive ability of several noise metrics, determine the loudness benefits of detailed boom shaping, and derive laboratory sonic boom acceptability criteria. These results indicated that the A-weighted sound exposure level, the Stevens Mark 7 Perceived Level, and the Zwicker Loudness Level metrics all performed well. Significant reductions in loudness were obtained by increasing front-shock rise time and/or decreasing front-shock overpressure of the front-shock minimized signatures. In addition, the asymmetrical signatures were rated to be slightly quieter than the symmetrical front-shock-minimized signatures of equal A-weighted sound exposure level. However, this result was based on a limited number of asymmetric signatures. The comparison of laboratory acceptability results with acceptability data obtained in more realistic situations also indicated good agreement.

  7. Effects of shape and stroke parameters on the propulsion performance of an axisymmetric swimmer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jifeng; Alben, Silas

    2012-03-01

    In nature, there exists a special group of aquatic animals which have an axisymmetric body and whose primary swimming mechanism is to use periodic body contractions to generate vortex rings in the surrounding fluid. Using jellyfish medusae as an example, this study develops a mathematical model of body kinematics of an axisymmetric swimmer and uses a computational approach to investigate the induced vortex wakes. Wake characteristics are identified for swimmers using jet propulsion and rowing, two mechanisms identified in previous studies of medusan propulsion. The parameter space of body kinematics is explored through four quantities: a measure of body shape, stroke amplitude, the ratio between body contraction duration and extension duration, and the pulsing frequency. The effects of these parameters on thrust, input power requirement and circulation production are quantified. Two metrics, cruising speed and energy cost of locomotion, are used to evaluate the propulsion performance. The study finds that a more prolate-shaped swimmer with larger stroke amplitudes is able to swim faster, but its cost of locomotion is also higher. In contrast, a more oblate-shaped swimmer with smaller stroke amplitudes uses less energy for its locomotion, but swims more slowly. Compared with symmetric strokes with equal durations of contraction and extension, faster bell contractions increase the swimming speed whereas faster bell extensions decrease it, but both require a larger energy input. This study shows that besides the well-studied correlations between medusan body shape and locomotion, stroke variables also affect the propulsion performance. It provides a framework for comparing the propulsion performance of axisymmetric swimmers based on their body kinematics when it is difficult to measure and analyze their wakes empirically. The knowledge from this study is also useful for the design of robotic swimmers that use axisymmetric body contractions for propulsion.

  8. The effect of nozzle-exit-channel shape on resultant fiber diameter in melt-electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilirad, Ahmad; Ko, Junghyuk; Rukosuyev, Maxym V.; Lee, Jason K.; Lee, Patrick C.; Jun, Martin B. G.

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, electrospinning using a molten poly (ε-caprolactone) resin has gained attention for creating fibrous tissue scaffolds. The topography and diameter control of such electrospun microfibers is an important issue for their different applications in tissue engineering. Charge density, initial nozzle-exit-channel cross-sectional area, nozzle to collector distance, viscosity, and processing temperature are the most important input parameters that affect the final electrospun fiber diameters. In this paper we will show that the effect of nozzle-exit-channel shape is as important as the other effective parameters in a resultant fiber diameter. However, to the best of our knowledge, the effect of nozzle-exit-channel shapes on a resultant fiber diameter have not been studied before. Comparing rectangular and circular nozzles with almost the same exit-channel cross-sectional areas in a similar processing condition showed that using a rectangular nozzle resulted in decreasing final fiber diameter up to 50%. Furthermore, the effect of processing temperature on the final fiber topography was investigated.

  9. Mitigation of Adverse Effects Caused by Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions Through Optimal Wall Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, May-Fun; Lee, Byung Joon

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the adverse effects of shock wave boundary layer interactions in high speed inlets include reduced total pressure recovery and highly distorted flow at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP). This paper presents a design method for flow control which creates perturbations in geometry. These perturbations are tailored to change the flow structures in order to minimize shock wave boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) inside supersonic inlets. Optimizing the shape of two dimensional micro-size bumps is shown to be a very effective flow control method for two-dimensional SWBLI. In investigating the three dimensional SWBLI, a square duct is employed as a baseline. To investigate the mechanism whereby the geometric elements of the baseline, i.e. the bottom wall, the sidewall and the corner, exert influence on the flow's aerodynamic characteristics, each element is studied and optimized separately. It is found that arrays of micro-size bumps on the bottom wall of the duct have little effect in improving total pressure recovery though they are useful in suppressing the incipient separation in three-dimensional problems. Shaping sidewall geometry is effective in re-distributing flow on the side wall and results in a less distorted flow at the exit. Subsequently, a near 50% reduction in distortion is achieved. A simple change in corner geometry resulted in a 2.4% improvement in total pressure recovery.

  10. Numerical Analysis of the Rarefied Plume from an Arcjet Thruster: Effect of the Nozzle Exit Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Michio

    The plume flow field of an arcjet thruster with hydrazine decomposed gas as the propellant has been numerically analyzed to reveal a backflow field, using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). Hydrazine decomposed gas is approximated by a mixture of gas composed of N2, H2, and H. Four different nozzle lip shapes have been prepared to investigate their effects on the backflow, and species existing in the backflow have also been examined. The present results of mass flux at various angles measured from the plume axis have been compared with experiments, and a qualitatively fairly good agreement has been obtained.

  11. Martensitic transformation and shape memory effect in ferromagnetic Heusler alloy Ni2FeGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, M.; Cui, Y. T.; Zhou, Y. Q.; Wang, W. H.; Wu, G. H.; Zhang, X. X.; Xiao, Gang

    2003-01-01

    We have synthesized ferromagnetic Heusler alloy Ni2FeGa using the melt-spinning technique. The Ni2FeGa ribbon, having a high chemical ordering L21 structure, exhibits a thermoelastic martensitic transformation from cubic to orthorhombic structure at 142 K and a premartensitic transformation. The alloy has a relatively high Curie temperature of 430 K, a magnetization of 73 Am2/kg, and a low saturated field of 0.6 T. The textured samples with preferentially oriented grains show a completely recoverable two-way shape memory effect with a strain of 0.3% upon the thermoelastic martensitic transformation.

  12. The effect of particle aggregate shape on ultrasonic anisotropy in concentrated magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornowski, T.; Józefczak, A.; Kołodziejczyk, B.; Timko, M.; Skumiel, A.; Rajnak, M.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of aggregate shape on the ultrasonic anisotropy in magnetic fluid was studied. Experimental results were compared with the theory of Ahuja and Hendee. Analysis of experimental results in terms of the theoretical model show the formation of ellipsoidal aggregates composed of several particles. The chain-like aggregates (h = b/a >> 1 a and b being minor and major axis lengths, respectively) are most conspicuous in diluted ferrofluids while dense ferrofluids are characterized by a more homogeneous drop-like (h = b/a > 1) structure. This finding is supported by some theoretical simulations.

  13. The effect of the shape function on small-angle scattering analysis by the maximum entropy method

    SciTech Connect

    Jemian, P.R.; Allen, A.J. |

    1992-09-15

    Analysis of small-angle scattering data to obtain a particle size distribution is dependent upon the shape function used to model the scattering. Using a maximum entropy analysis of small-angle scattering data, the effect of shape function selection on obtained size distribution is demonstrated using three different shape functions to describe the same scattering data from each of two steels. The alloys have been revealed by electron microscopy to contain a distribution of randomly oriented and mainly non-interacting, irregular, ellipsoidal precipitates. Comparison is made between the different forms of the shape function. Effect of an incident wavelength distribution is also shown. The importance of testing appropriate shape functions and validating these against other microstructural studies is discussed.

  14. Effect of window shape on the detection of hyperuniformity via the local number variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeuk; Torquato, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Hyperuniform many-particle systems in d-dimensional space {{{R}}d} , which includes crystals, quasicrystals, and some exotic disordered systems, are characterized by an anomalous suppression of density fluctuations at large length scales such that the local number variance within a ‘spherical’ observation window grows slower than the window volume. In usual circumstances, this direct-space condition is equivalent to the Fourier-space hyperuniformity condition that the structure factor vanishes as the wavenumber goes to zero. In this paper, we comprehensively study the effect of aspherical window shapes with characteristic size L on the direct-space condition for hyperuniform systems. For lattices, we demonstrate that the variance growth rate can depend on the shape as well as the orientation of the windows, and in some cases, the growth rate can be faster than the window volume (i.e. L d ), which may lead one to falsely conclude that the system is non-hyperuniform solely according to the direct-space condition. We begin by numerically investigating the variance of two-dimensional lattices using ‘superdisk’ windows, whose convex shapes continuously interpolate between circles (p  =  1) and squares (p\\to ∞ ), as prescribed by a deformation parameter p, when the superdisk symmetry axis is aligned with the lattice. Subsequently, we analyze the variance for lattices as a function of the window orientation, especially for two-dimensional lattices using square windows (superdisk when p\\to ∞ ). Based on this analysis, we explain the reason why the variance for d  =  2 can grow faster than the window area or even slower than the window perimeter (e.g. like \\ln (L) ). We then study the generalized condition of the window orientation, under which the variance can grow as fast as or faster than L d (window volume), to the case of Bravais lattices and parallelepiped windows in {{{R}}d} . In the case of isotropic disordered hyperuniform systems, we

  15. On the effect of considering more realistic particle shape and mass parameters in MMOD risk assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamsen, Joel E.; Schonberg, William P.; Jenkin, Alan B.

    2011-03-01

    One of the primary mission risks tracked in the development of all spacecraft is that due to micro-meteoroids and orbital debris (MMOD). Both types of particles, especially those larger than 0.1 mm in diameter, contain sufficient kinetic energy due to their combined mass and velocities to cause serious damage to crew members and spacecraft. The process used to assess MMOD risk consists of three elements: environment, damage prediction, and damage tolerance. Orbital debris risk assessments for the Orion vehicle, as well as the Shuttle, Space Station and other satellites use ballistic limit equations (BLEs) that have been developed using high speed impact test data and results from numerical simulations that have used spherical projectiles. However, spheres are not expected to be a common shape for orbital debris; rather, orbital debris fragments might be better represented by other regular or irregular solids. In this paper we examine the general construction of NASA’s current orbital debris (OD) model, explore the potential variations in orbital debris mass and shape that are possible when using particle characteristic length to define particle size (instead of assuming spherical particles), and, considering specifically the Orion vehicle, perform an orbital debris risk sensitivity study taking into account variations in particle mass and shape as noted above. While the results of the work performed for this study are preliminary, they do show that continuing to use aluminum spheres in spacecraft risk assessments could result in an over-design of its MMOD protection systems. In such a case, the spacecraft could be heavier than needed, could cost more than needed, and could cost more to put into orbit than needed. The results obtained in this study also show the need to incorporate effects of mass and shape in mission risk assessment prior to first flight of any spacecraft as well as the need to continue to develop/refine BLEs so that they more accurately reflect

  16. Shape distortions induced by convective effect on hot object in visible, near infrared and infrared bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, Anthony; Maoult, Yannick Le; Buchlin, Jean-Marie; Sentenac, Thierry; Orteu, Jean-José

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the perturbation induced by the convective effect (or mirage effect) on shape measurement and to give an estimation of the error induced. This work explores the mirage effect in different spectral bands and single wavelengths. A numerical approach is adopted and an original setup has been developed in order to investigate easily all the spectral bands of interest with the help of a CCD camera (Si, 0.35-1.1 μm), a near infrared camera (VisGaAs, 0.8-1.7 μm) or infrared cameras (8-12 μm). Displacements due to the perturbation for each spectral band are measured and finally some hints about how to correct them are given.

  17. Elastocaloric and magnetocaloric effects in Ni-Mn-Sn(Cu) shape-memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Villa, Pedro O.; Mañosa, Lluís; Planes, Antoni; Soto-Parra, Daniel E.; Sánchez-Llamazares, J. L.; Flores-Zúñiga, H.; Frontera, Carlos

    2013-02-01

    We have studied magnetocaloric and elastocaloric properties of a Ni-Mn-Sn(Cu) metamagnetic shape-memory alloy undergoing a magneto-structural transition (martensitic type) close to room temperature. Changes of entropy have been induced by isothermally applying both mechanical (uniaxial stress) and magnetic fields. These entropy changes have been, respectively, estimated from dilatometric measurements giving the length of the sample as a function of temperature at selected applied forces and magnetic fields and from magnetization measurements as a function of temperature at selected applied magnetic fields. Our results indicate that the elastocaloric effect is conventional and occurs in two steps which reflect the interplay between the martensitic and the incipient magnetic transitions. By contrast, the magnetocaloric effect is inverse and occurs in a single step that encompasses the effect arising from both transitions.

  18. U-shaped, double-tapered, fiber-optic sensor for effective biofilm growth monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nianbing; Zhao, Mingfu; Li, Yishan

    2016-01-01

    To monitor biofilm growth on polydimethylsiloxane in a photobioreactor effectively, the biofilm cells and liquids were separated and measured using a sensor with two U-shaped, double-tapered, fiber-optic probes (Sen. and Ref. probes). The probes’ Au-coated hemispherical tips enabled double-pass evanescent field absorption. The Sen. probe sensed the cells and liquids inside the biofilm. The polyimide–silica hybrid-film-coated Ref. probe separated the liquids from the biofilm cells and analyzed the liquid concentration. The biofilm structure and active biomass were also examined to confirm the effectiveness of the measurement using a simulation model. The sensor was found to effectively respond to the biofilm growth in the adsorption through exponential phases at thicknesses of 0–536 μm. PMID:26977344

  19. An experimental study of the two-way shape memory effect in a NiTi tubular actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Young Ik; Lee, Jung Ju; Lee, Chang Ho; Lim, Jae Hyuk

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) in a Ti-54.5 Ni(wt%) alloy was investigated experimentally to develop a NiTi linear actuator. The two-way shape memory effect was induced through a compressive shape memory cycle comprising four steps: (1) loading to maximum deformation; (2) unloading (3) heating and (4) cooling. Six types of specimen (one solid cylindrical and five tubular) were used to obtain the two-way shape memory strain and two-way recovery stress and to evaluate the actuating capacity. The two-way actuating strain showed a saturated tendency after several training cycles for the same maximum deformation. A maximum value of the two-way strain was obtained for 7% of maximum deformation, independently of the geometry of the tubular specimens. The two-way strains obtained by the shape memory cycles and two-way recovery stress linearly increase as a function of the maximum deformation and the two-way strain, respectively, and the geometry of specimen affects the two-way recovery stress. Although the results show that sufficient recovery stress can be generated by either the two-way shape memory process or by the one-way shape memory process, the two-way shape memory process can be applied more conveniently to actuating applications.

  20. Effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tumor shape and size effect on drug delivery to solid tumors are studied, based on the application of the governing equations for fluid flow, i.e., the conservation laws for mass and momentum, to physiological systems containing solid tumors. The discretized form of the governing equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, is developed for predefined tumor geometries. The governing equations are solved using a numerical method, the element-based finite volume method. Interstitial fluid pressure and velocity are used to show the details of drug delivery in a solid tumor, under an assumption that drug particles flow with the interstitial fluid. Drug delivery problems have been most extensively researched in spherical tumors, which have been the simplest to examine with the analytical methods. With our numerical method, however, more complex shapes of the tumor can be studied. The numerical model of fluid flow in solid tumors previously introduced by our group is further developed to incorporate and investigate non-spherical tumors such as prolate and oblate ones. Also the effects of the surface area per unit volume of the tissue, vascular and interstitial hydraulic conductivity on drug delivery are investigated. PMID:22534172

  1. Effect of diffuse layer and pore shapes in mesoporous carbon supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Qiao, Rui

    2010-01-01

    In the spirit of the theoretical evolution from the Helmholtz model to the Gouy Chapman Stern model for electric double-layer capacitors, we explored the effect of a diffuse layer on the capacitance of mesoporous carbon supercapacitors by solving the Poisson Boltzmann (PB) equation in mesopores of diameters from 2 to 20 nm. To evaluate the effect of pore shape, both slit and cylindrical pores were considered. We found that the diffuse layer does not affect the capacitance significantly. For slit pores, the area-normalized capacitance is nearly independent of pore size, which is not experimentally observed for template carbons. In comparison, for cylindrical pores, PB simulations produce a trend of slightly increasing area-normalized capacitance with pore size, similar to that depicted by the electric double-cylinder capacitor model proposed earlier. These results indicate that it is appropriate to approximate the pore shape of mesoporous carbons as being cylindrical and the electric double-cylinder capacitor model should be used for mesoporous carbons as a replacement of the traditional Helmholtz model.

  2. Homogeneity of ball milled ceramic powders: Effect of jar shape and milling conditions.

    PubMed

    Broseghini, M; D'Incau, M; Gelisio, L; Pugno, N M; Scardi, P

    2017-02-01

    This paper contains data and supporting information of and complementary to the research article entitled "Effect of jar shape on high-energy planetary ball milling efficiency: simulations and experiments" (Broseghini et al.,) [1]. Calcium fluoride (CaF2) was ground using two jars of different shape (cylindrical and half-moon) installed on a planetary ball-mill, exploring different operating conditions (jar-to-plate angular velocity ratio and milling time). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images and X-Ray Powder Diffraction data (XRPD) were collected to assess the effect of milling conditions on the end-product crystallite size. Due to the inhomogeneity of the end product, the Whole Powder Pattern Model (WPPM, (Scardi, 2008) [2]) analysis of XRPD data required the hypothesis of a bimodal distribution of sizes - respectively ground (fine fraction) and less-to-not ground (coarse fraction) - confirmed by SEM images and suggested by the previous literature (Abdellatief et al., 2013) [3,4]. Predominance of fine fraction clearly indicates optimal milling conditions.

  3. Effect of transformation volume contraction on the toughness of superelastic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wenyi; Wang, Chun Hui; Zhang, Xin Ping; Mai, Yiu-Wing

    2002-12-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit two very important properties: shape memory phenomenon and superelastic deformation due to intrinsic thermoelastic martensitic transformation. To fully exploit the potential of SMAs in developing functional structures or smart structures in mechanical and biomechanical engineering, it is important to understand and quantify the failure mechanisms of SMAs. This paper presents a theoretical study of the effect of phase-transformation-induced volume contraction on the fracture properties of superelastic SMAs. A simple model is employed to account for the forward and reverse phase transformation with pure volume change, which is then applied to numerically study the transformation field near the tip of a tensile crack. The results reveal that during steady-state crack propagation, the transformation zone extends ahead of the crack tip due to forward transformation while partial reverse transformation occurs in the wake. Furthermore, as a result of the volume contraction associated with the austenite-to-martensite transformation, the induced stress-intensity factor is positive. This is in stark contrast with the negative stress-intensity factor achieved in zirconia ceramics, which undergoes volume expansion during phase transformation. The reverse transformation has been found to have a negligible effect on the induced stress-intensity factor. An important implication of the present results is that the phase transformation with volume contraction in SMAs tends to reduce their fracture resistance and increase the brittleness.

  4. Improved self-healing of polyethylene/carbon black nanocomposites by their shape memory effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Min; Ma, Lan; Zhao, Xiaodong; Dang, Zhi-Min; Wang, Zhenwen

    2013-02-07

    In this work, the improved self-healing of cross-linked polyethylene (PE) (cPE)/carbon black (CB) nanocomposites by their shape memory effect (SME) is investigated. CB nanoparticles are found to be homogeneously dispersed in the PE matrix and significantly increase the strength of the materials. Compared with the breaking of linear PE (lPE) at the melting temperature (T(m)), the cPE and cPE/CB nanocomposites still have high strength above T(m) due to the formation of networks. The cPE and cPE/CB nanocomposites show both high strain fixity ratio (R(f)) and high strain recovery ratio (R(r)). Crystallization-induced elongation is observed for all the prepared shape memory polymer (SMP) materials and the effect becomes less remarkable with increasing volume fraction of CB nanoparticles (v(CB)). The scratch self-healing tests show that the cross-linking of PE matrix, the addition of CB nanoparticles, and the previous stretching in the direction perpendicular to the scratch favor the closure of the scratch and its complete healing. This SME-aided self-healing could have potential applications in diverse fields such as coating and structure materials.

  5. Trapezoidal-shaped detector to reduce edge effects in small gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yong Hyun; Hwang, Ji Yeon; Baek, Cheol-Ha; An, Su Jung; Kim, Hyun-Il; Kim, Kwang Hyun

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in compact and high resolution small gamma cameras for the early detection of breast cancer and thyroid diseases. We proposed a new detector consisting of a trapezoidal-shaped crystal and a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) to reduce the edge effect. In this study, the imaging performance of the proposed detector was evaluated by DETECT2000 simulation. Trapezoidal-shaped NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) crystals were modeled and the 2-dimensional event positions were calculated using Anger-logic. 99mTc (140 keV) and 131I (364 keV) gamma rays were generated on evenly spaced points with 3.0 mm spacing in the X-Y plane starting 1.0 mm away from the corner surface and 10,000 gamma events were simulated at each location. The simulated results demonstrated that all the 99mTc and 131I point sources were clearly identified in the NaI(Tl) crystal. CsI(Tl) crystal could image 131I sources without edge effect but did not distinguish 99mTc points at the periphery region due to low light yield. In conclusion, our new detector with an enlarged FOV without increasing crystal size could be a useful tool in breast as well as thyroid imaging.

  6. Subsonic Maneuvering Effectiveness of High Performance Aircraft Which Employ Quasi-Static Shape Change Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Scott, Michael A.; Weston, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper represents an initial study on the use of quasi-static shape change devices in aircraft maneuvering. The macroscopic effects and requirements for these devices in flight control are the focus of this study. Groups of devices are postulated to replace the conventional leading-edge flap (LEF) and the all-moving wing tip (AMT) on the tailless LMTAS-ICE (Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems - Innovative Control Effectors) configuration. The maximum quasi-static shape changes are 13.8% and 7.7% of the wing section thickness for the LEF and AMT replacement devices, respectively. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) panel code is used to determine the control effectiveness of groups of these devices. A preliminary design of a wings-leveler autopilot is presented. Initial evaluation at 0.6 Mach at 15,000 ft. altitude is made through batch simulation. Results show small disturbance stability is achieved, however, an increase in maximum distortion is needed to statically offset five degrees of sideslip. This only applies to the specific device groups studied, encouraging future research on optimal device placement.

  7. Effect of Interface Shape and Magnetic Field on the Microstructure of Bulk Ge:Ga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal and compositional gradients induced during the growth process contribute significantly to the development of defects in the solidified boule. Thermal gradients and the solid-liquid interface shape can be greatly effected by ampoule material. Compositional gradients are strongly influenced by interface curvature and convective flow in the liquid. Results of this investigation illustrate the combined influences of interface shape and convective fluid flow. An applied magnetic field was used to reduce the effects of convective fluid flow in the electrically conductive melt during directional solidification. Several 8 mm diameter boules of Ga-doped Ge were grown at different field strengths, up to 5 Tesla, in four different ampoule materials. Compositional profiles indicate mass transfer conditions ranged from completely mixed to diffusion controlled. The influence of convection in the melt on the developing crystal microstructure and defect density was investigated as a function of field strength and ampoule material. Chemical etching and electron backscattered electron diffraction were used to map the crystal structure of each boule along the center plane. Dislocation etch pit densities were measured for each boule. Results show the influence of magnetic field strength and ampoule material on overall crystal quality.

  8. Pulse shape effects on the measurement of temperature using a Brillouin-based optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindez, Carlos; Madruga, Francisco-Javier; Cobo, Adolfo; Conde, Olga; Lopez-Higuera, Jose-Miguel

    2007-04-01

    Distributed fiber sensing based on Brillouin gain scattering (BGS) principle is a useful way to develop devices capable to measure temperature or/and strain in optical fibers. New effects or technologies that could achieve a larger distance and/or a better spatial resolution are a topic of special interest in this fiber sensing area. The influence of the probe-pulse shape in the interaction between the pulsed light and the continuous wave laser in a pump-probe system is presented. The purpose of this study is to improve the spatial resolution of the measurement without losing stability in the BGS. Also it is showed how the backscattering Brillouin gain is affected by inducing variations on the final value of the BGS intensity; this effect is illustrated by using an experimental set up based on the Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA). Theoretical analysis of the probe pulse in the Brillouin shift and intensity value using triangular, sinc and saw tooth shapes around the medium phonon life time (~10ns) are presented; as well as the experimental results and possible applications are explained.

  9. Effects of target shape and impact speed on the outcome of catastrophic disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo~Bagatin, A.; Durda, D.; Alemañ, R.; Flynn, G.; Strait, M.; Clayton, A.; Patmore, E.

    2014-07-01

    Because of the propensity of previous laboratory investigations to focus on idealized spherical targets, there is a bit of ambiguity in decoupling the relative importance/influence of low speed or spherical shape in producing the 'onion shell' fragment shape outcomes found in impacts into spherical targets [1,2]. If due primarily to impact speed/energy density as suggested by [3], this could play an important role in main-belt impacts due to the presence of non-spherical targets and non-negligible probability of low-speed (i.e., below about 3-4 km/s, subsonic in rock) impacts [4]. Also, [5] and [6] suggested that the shape of targets may affect the outcome of shattering processes, both in terms of fragment shape and mass distribution. To examine explicitly the effects of target shape in impact outcomes, we chose to conduct impact experiments on both spherical and naturally-occurring irregularly-shaped basalt targets. We impacted a total of six targets (two spheres and four irregular targets). We focused on shots with impact speeds in the ˜4 to 6 km/s range by 3/16th-inch diameter Al-sphere projectiles fired at the NASA AVGR. Following each shot, the debris were recovered (>95 %) and large fragments (>0.20 g) were individually weighed, allowing us to carefully measure the mass-frequency distribution from each impact experiment. The 36 largest fragments of each shot were photographed and their largest axes accurately measured by the program ''ImageJ''. Their shortest axes were measured by means of a digital caliber. High-speed video of each impact was obtained to aid interpretation of the fragmentation mode of the targets. Images clearly show that shell-like fragments can be produced in shattering events not in the target's surface. Instead, those fragments may form around the core, well inside the target structure, independently on the target shape itself. This is a feature not reported to date. In order to understand what the bulk macro-porosity of a non

  10. Effects of Gear-Shape Fibre on the Transverse Mechanical Properties of Unidirectional Composites: Virtual Material Design by Computational Micromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Li, Zhiwei; Sun, Tao; Wu, Zhanjun

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to study the effect of fibre cross-section shape on the mechanical properties of unidirectional fibre reinforced composites. First, the specific surface area of different cross-section shape is compared, and the gear-shape fibre is selected for further study, which has the largest specific surface area. The effect of gear-shape fibre with various tooth number on the transverse mechanical properties of unidirectional composites is investigated by computational micromechanics, comparing with the traditional round fibre. It is found that all the gear-shape fibre reinforced composites have higher transverse stiffness and strength than the round fibre reinforced composite, and the gear-shape fibre with fewer tooth number has greater reinforcing effect on the mechanical properties of the composite. The mechanism of this phenomenon is revealed by examine the damage initiation and evolution process of the composite, and suggestion is made on the optimal cross-section shape of the reinforcing fibre for the composites.

  11. Novel thermal effect at nanoshell heating by pulsed laser irradiation: hoop-shaped hot zone formation.

    PubMed

    Avetisyan, Yuri A; Yakunin, Alexander N; Tuchin, Valery V

    2012-10-01

    Photonic nanotechnologies have good perspectives to be widely used in biophotonics. In this study we have developed an approach for calculation of nanoparticle temperature field accounting for absorbed local intensity at pulse laser radiation of composite spherical nanoparticles (nanoshells). This approach allowed us to analyze spatial inhomogeneities of light field diffracted into a nanoshell and corresponding distribution of the absorption energy and to provide numerical solution of time-dependent heat conduction equation accounting for corresponding spatially inhomogeneous distribution of heating sources. We were able to predict the appearance of a novel thermal effect - hoop-shaped hot zone on the nanoshell surface. The observed effect has potential applications in cell biology and medicine for controlled cell optoporation and nanosurgery, as well as cancer cell killing.

  12. Effects of erodant particle shape and various heat treatments on erosion resistance of plain carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Erosion tests were conducted on 1045 steel samples which had been subjected to different heat treatments. The weight of material removed upon erosion with glass beads and crushed glass was measured. The data show that there is no correlation between hardness and erosion resistance. The erosion rate was strongly dependent on the shape of erodant particles, being an order of magnitude higher for erosion with crushed glass than with glass beads. Heat treatment had a profound effect on the erosion resistance when the erodant particles were glass beads but little or no effect when the particles were crushed glass. It is thus concluded that different mechanisms of material removal are involved with these two erodants. This conclusion is supported by the surface morphology of annealed 1045 steel samples which had been eroded by these two types of erodant particles. SEM micrographs of the eroded surfaces show that for erosion with glass beads it is deformation induced fracture of surface layers.

  13. The effect of contact angle on triangular shape interrupted microchannel heat sinks performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Azmi, Mohd Irwan; Chuan, Yeoh Chit; Tokit, Ernie Mat; Razali, Nadlene; Munir, Fudhail Abd; Azmi Nordin, Mohd Nur; Mat Nuri, Nur Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The effect of different contact angle on triangular shaped interrupted microchannel performance was studied by simulation using FLUENT software. The investigated effects were pressure drop and platinum film temperature. The flow in microchannel is laminar and single phase. Water was used as the working fluid and the interrupted microchannel is made of silicon. A thin platinum film plate was deposited to provide uniform heat flux. The geometry dimension of the heat sink is 30 mm in length, width of 7 mm and the thickness of 0.525 mm. The chosen contact angles that were investigated are 48.13°, 51.27° and 58.48°. From the simulation result, pressure drop and thermal dissipation is the highest for contact angle 58.48° and 48.13° respectively. Reducing the contact angle reduces the pressure drop and increases the thermal dissipation.

  14. Absolute standardization of 241Pu by the TDCR technique and effect of the beta spectral shape.

    PubMed

    van Wyngaardt, W M; Simpson, B R S; van Staden, M J; Lubbe, J

    2012-09-01

    The NMISA participated in the 2010 international key comparison of (241)Pu, standardizing the inter-comparison solution by the TDCR efficiency calculation technique. Special attention was paid to ensure accurate efficiency calculation for this low-energy, pure beta-emitter: in particular the effect of low-energy stopping powers on the calculation of ionization quenching was assessed and an optimal value for the quench parameter, kB, was determined. In addition, phototube efficiency mismatch was accounted for by a software minimization technique. The effect of the beta spectral shape on the activity extracted from data analysis was assessed and found to be significant. Based on the results of this work we propose a new value for the average beta-particle energy.

  15. Fano–Andreev effect in a T-shape double quantum dot in the Kondo regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle, A. M.; Pacheco, M.; Martins, G. B.; Apel, V. M.; Lara, G. A.; Orellana, P. A.

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, we investigate the electronic transport through a T-shape double quantum dot system coupled to two normal leads and to one superconducting lead. We explore the interplay between Kondo and Andreev states due to proximity effects. We find that Kondo resonance is modified by the Andreev bound states, which manifest through Fano antiresonances in the local density of states of the embedded quantum dot and normal transmission. This means that there is a correlation between Andreev bound states and Fano resonances that is robust under the influence of high electronic correlation. We have also found that the dominant couplings at the quantum dots are characterized by a crossover region that defines the range where the Fano–Kondo and the Andreev–Kondo effect prevail in each quantum dot. Likewise, we find that the interaction between Kondo and Andreev bound states has a notable influence on the Andreev transport.

  16. An investigation into particle shape effects on the light scattering properties of mineral dust aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meland, Brian Steven

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. The radiative balance of the Earth's atmosphere can be affected by mineral dust through both direct and indirect means. Mineral dust can directly scatter or absorb incoming visible solar radiation and outgoing terrestrial IR radiation. Dust particles can also serve as cloud condensation nuclei, thereby increasing albedo, or provide sites for heterogeneous reactions with trace gas species, which are indirect effects. Unfortunately, many of these processes are poorly understood due to incomplete knowledge of the physical and chemical characteristics of the particles including dust concentration and global distribution, as well as aerosol composition, mixing state, and size and shape distributions. Much of the information about mineral dust aerosol loading and spatial distribution is obtained from remote sensing measurements which often rely on measuring the scattering or absorption of light from these particles and are thus subject to errors arising from an incomplete understanding of the scattering processes. The light scattering properties of several key mineral components of atmospheric dust have been measured at three different wavelengths in the visible. In addition, measurements of the scattering were performed for several authentic mineral dust aerosols, including Saharan sand, diatomaceous earth, Iowa loess soil, and palagonite. These samples include particles that are highly irregular in shape. Using known optical constants along with measured size distributions, simulations of the light scattering process were performed using both Mie and T-Matrix theories. Particle shapes were approximated as a distribution of spheroids for the T-Matrix calculations. It was found that the theoretical model simulations differed markedly from experimental measurements of the light scattering, particularly near the mid-range and near backscattering angles. In

  17. Triple shape memory effects of cross-linked polyethylene/polypropylene blends with cocontinuous architecture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Chen, Min; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Xiaodong; Wang, Zhenwen; Dang, Zhi-Min; Ma, Lan; Hu, Guo-Hua; Chen, Fenghua

    2013-06-26

    In this paper, the triple shape memory effects (SMEs) observed in chemically cross-linked polyethylene (PE)/polypropylene (PP) blends with cocontinuous architecture are systematically investigated. The cocontinuous window of typical immiscible PE/PP blends is the volume fraction of PE (v(PE)) of ca. 30-70 vol %. This architecture can be stabilized by chemical cross-linking. Different initiators, 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-di(tert-butylperoxy)-hexane (DHBP), dicumylperoxide (DCP) coupled with divinylbenzene (DVB) (DCP-DVB), and their mixture (DHBP/DCP-DVB), are used for the cross-linking. According to the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements and gel fraction calculations, DHBP produces the best cross-linking and DCP-DVB the worst, and the mixture, DHBP/DCP-DVB, is in between. The chemical cross-linking causes lower melting temperature (Tm) and smaller melting enthalpy (ΔHm). The prepared triple shape memory polymers (SMPs) by cocontinuous immiscible PE/PP blends with v(PE) of 50 vol % show pronounced triple SMEs in the dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and visual observation. This new strategy of chemically cross-linked immiscible blends with cocontinuous architecture can be used to design and prepare new SMPs with triple SMEs.

  18. Effect of additives on size and shape of lithium carbonate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborga, P.; Brito, I.; Graber, T. A.

    2017-02-01

    Generally, properties such internal structure, shape, and size distribution influence the reactivity, fluidity and wettability of the crystals, and may be modified by the use of additives such as polyelectrolytes or surfactants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different additives on the size and morphology of lithium carbonate crystals obtained by reactive crystallization from solutions of LiCl and Na2CO3. The additives used were: polyethylenimine (PEI), polyethylene glycol (PEG), poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid), (P4SA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS). Obtained crystals were observed using scanning electron microscopy, the crystal size distribution was determined by a size image analyzer, and the crystal structure were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the presence of PEI, PEG and P4SA, increased the length of the lithium carbonate particles. The presence of SDS decreases the crystals size. Using SDBS as additive, the crystals had a needle-like shape, Finally PAA allowed the production of Li2CO3 spherulites. Crystal structure of lithium carbonate did not change in the presence of the tested additives.

  19. Phase effects in masking by harmonic complexes: detection of bands of speech-shaped noise.

    PubMed

    Deroche, Mickael L D; Culling, John F; Chatterjee, Monita

    2014-11-01

    When phase relationships between partials of a complex masker produce highly modulated temporal envelopes on the basilar membrane, listeners may detect speech information from temporal dips in the within-channel masker envelopes. This source of masking release (MR) is however located in regions of unresolved masker partials and it is unclear how much of the speech information in these regions is really needed for intelligibility. Also, other sources of MR such as glimpsing in between resolved masker partials may provide sufficient information from regions that disregard phase relationships. This study simplified the problem of speech recognition to a masked detection task. Target bands of speech-shaped noise were restricted to frequency regions containing either only resolved or only unresolved masker partials, as a function of masker phase relationships (sine or random), masker fundamental frequency (F0) (50, 100, or 200 Hz), and masker spectral profile (flat-spectrum or speech-shaped). Although masker phase effects could be observed in unresolved regions at F0s of 50 and 100 Hz, it was only at 50-Hz F0 that detection thresholds were ever lower in unresolved than in resolved regions, suggesting little role of envelope modulations for harmonic complexes with F0s in the human voice range and at moderate level.

  20. The Impact of Martensite Deformation on Shape Memory Effect Recovery Strain Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanba, Asheesh; Hamilton, Reginald F.

    2015-08-01

    The one-way shape memory effect of polycrystalline NiTi is investigated after differential levels of martensite deformation. Martensite naturally forms an energy-minimizing configuration, referred to as self-accommodated, of differently oriented martensite variants, which are internally twinned. Stress preferentially orients a select variant that eventually detwins and plastically deforms at the highest stress levels. In this work, the underlying morphology is ascertained based on the evolution of micro-scale deformation measurements using digital image correlation analysis of three characteristic material responses. An initial martensitic structure is deformed at constant temperature. The forward austenite-to-martensite and reverse martensite-to-austenite phase transformations take place during temperature cycling under a constant stress. The austenite-to-martensite transformation is tensile stress induced at a constant temperature and initiates via a localized strain band. For the conversion of self-accommodated martensite to orientated morphology and further deformation, spatially heterogeneous strains accrue over the entire specimen surface. Shape memory recovery during heating, on the other hand, culminates with a centralized strain localization that persists as recovery approaches completion. The recovery temperature differential ( A f - A s) depends on the extent of deformation. This work characterizes the influence of stress on phase transformation and martensite deformation morphology for deformation in the martensitic state compared to the stress-induced phase transformation.

  1. Hydrodynamics of diamond-shaped gradient nanopillar arrays for effective DNA translocation into nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Bruce, Robert L; Duch, Elizabeth A; Patel, Jyotica V; Smith, Joshua T; Astier, Yann; Wunsch, Benjamin H; Meshram, Siddharth; Galan, Armand; Scerbo, Chris; Pereira, Michael A; Wang, Deqiang; Colgan, Evan G; Lin, Qinghuang; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2015-02-24

    Effective DNA translocation into nanochannels is critical for advancing genome mapping and future single-molecule DNA sequencing technologies. We present the design and hydrodynamic study of a diamond-shaped gradient pillar array connected to nanochannels for enhancing the success of DNA translocation events. Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is utilized to interrogate the hydrodynamic interactions of the DNA with this unique structure, evaluate key DNA translocation parameters, including speed, extension, and translocation time, and provide a detailed mapping of the translocation events in nanopillar arrays coupled with 10 and 50 μm long channels. Our analysis reveals the important roles of diamond-shaped nanopillars in guiding DNA into as small as 30 nm channels with minimized clogging, stretching DNA to nearly 100% of their dyed contour length, inducing location-specific straddling of DNA at nanopillar interfaces, and modulating DNA speeds by pillar geometries. Importantly, all critical features down to 30 nm wide nanochannels are defined using standard photolithography and fabrication processes, a feat aligned with the requirement of high-volume, low-cost production.

  2. Effect of temper rolling on final shape defects in a V-section roll forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abvabi, Akbar; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter D.; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Roll forming is a continuous process in which a flat strip is shaped to the desired profile by sequential bending in a series of roll stands. Because of the large variety of applications of roll forming in the industry, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is increasingly utilized for roll forming process design. Bending is the dominant deformation mode in roll forming. Sheet materials used in this process are generally temper rolled, roller- or tension- leveled. These processes introduce residual stresses into the material, and recent studies have shown that those affect the material behavior in bending. In this study a numerical model of the temper rolling (skin passing) process was used to determine a residual stress distribution in a dual phase, DP780, steel strip. A 5-stand roll forming process for the forming of a V-section was modeled, and the effect of various thickness reduction levels in the temper rolling process on the final shape defects was analyzed. The results show that a small thickness reduction in the temper rolling process decreases the maximum bow height but the final springback angle increases. It is also shown that reasonable model accuracy can be achieved by including the residual stress information due to temper rolling as initial condition in the numerical modeling of a roll forming process.

  3. Nanoparticle shape evolution and proximity effects during tip-induced electrochemical processes

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Sangmo; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Noh, Tae Won; ...

    2016-01-08

    The voltage spectroscopies in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques are widely used to investigate the electrochemical processes in nanoscale volumes, which are important for current key applications, such as batteries, fuel cells, catalysts, and memristors. The spectroscopic measurements are commonly performed on a grid of multiple points to yield spatially resolved maps of reversible and irreversible electrochemical functionalities. Hence, the spacing between measurement points is an important parameter to be considered, especially for irreversible electrochemical processes. Here, we report nonlocal electrochemical dynamics in chains of Ag particles fabricated by the SPM tip on a silver ion solid electrolyte. When themore » grid spacing is small compared with the size of the formed Ag particles, anomalous chains of unequally sized particles with double periodicity evolve. This behavior is ascribed to a proximity effect during the tip-induced electrochemical process, specifically, size-dependent silver particle growth following the contact between the particles. In addition, fractal shape evolution of the formed Ag structures indicates that the growth-limiting process changes from Ag+/Ag redox reaction to Ag+-ion diffusion with the increase in the applied voltage and pulse duration. Our study shows that characteristic shapes of the electrochemical products are good indicators for determining the underlying growth-limiting process, and emergence of complex phenomena during spectroscopic mapping of electrochemical functionalities.« less

  4. How to best smash a snail: the effect of tooth shape on crushing load

    PubMed Central

    Crofts, S. B.; Summers, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Organisms that are durophagous, hard prey consumers, have a diversity of tooth forms. To determine why we see this variation, we tested whether some tooth forms break shells better than others. We measured the force needed with three series of aluminium tooth models, which varied in concavity and the morphology of a stress concentrating cusp, to break a shell. We created functionally identical copies of two intertidal snail shells: the thicker shelled Nucella ostrina and the more ornamented Nucella lamellosa using a three-dimensional printer. In this way, we reduced variation in material properties between test shells, allowing us to test only the interaction of the experimental teeth with the two shell morphologies. We found that for all tooth shapes, thicker shells are harder to break than the thinner shells and that increased ornamentation has no discernible effect. Our results show that for both shell morphologies, domed and flat teeth break shells better than cupped teeth, and teeth with tall or skinny cusps break shells best. While our results indicate that there is an ideal tooth form for shell breaking, we do not see this shape in nature. This suggests a probable trade-off between tooth function and the structural integrity of the tooth. PMID:24430124

  5. Effect of EDTA solution on corrosion fatigue of Ni-Ti files with different shapes.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yuki; Goto, Shin-ichi; Ogura, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of EDTA solutions (3% and 10% EDTA•2Na) on corrosion fatigue of three Ni-Ti files with different shapes, in comparison with other solutions (6% NaClO, 3% H2O2, 0.9% NaCl and distilled water). Ni-Ti files were subjected to rotational bending in a bent glass tube (30° and 60° angles) filled with the solutions, and the number of rotations to failure was counted. At 30° bent angle, files in the two EDTA solutions showed significantly lower resistance than those in distilled water, but no significant difference was found between the two EDTA solutions. Fatigue resistance of two tested files in the two EDTA solutions was not significantly different from those in the other three solutions, whereas one file in EDTA solutions showed significantly lower resistance than that in 3% H2O2. At 60° bent angle, early failure within 1-2.5 min was observed for all tested files, and no significant difference was found among the six solutions. At both angles, significant differences in fatigue resistance were observed among the three tested files, which could be related to the difference in the cross-sectional shapes of the files.

  6. Shape-Memory Effect and Pseudoelasticity in Fe-Mn-Based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Roca, P.; Baruj, A.; Sade, M.

    2017-03-01

    Several Fe-based alloys are being considered as potential candidates for applications which require shape-memory behavior or superelastic properties. The possibility of using fabrication methods which are well known in the steel industry is very attractive and encourages a large amount of research in the field. In the present article, Fe-Mn-based alloys are mainly addressed. On the one hand, attention is paid to the shape-memory effect where the alloys contain (a) a maximum amount of Mn up to around 30 wt%, (b) several possible substitutional elements like Si, Cr, Ni, Co, and Nb and (c) some possible interstitial elements like C. On the other hand, superelastic alloys are analyzed, mainly the Fe-Mn-Al-Ni system discovered a few years ago. The most noticeable properties resulting from the martensitic transformations which are responsible for the mentioned properties, i.e., the fcc-hcp in the first case and the bcc-fcc in the latter are discussed. Selected potential applications are also analyzed.

  7. Shape-dependent exchange bias effect in magnetic nanoparticles with core-shell morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, V.; Kechrakos, D.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.; Tsiantos, V.

    2015-08-01

    We study the low-temperature isothermal magnetic hysteresis of cubical and spherical nanoparticles with ferromagnetic-core/antiferromagnetic-shell morphology, in order to elucidate the sensitivity of the exchange bias effect to the shape of the particles and the structural imperfections at the core-shell interface. We model the magnetic structure using a classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian with uniaxial anisotropy and simulate the hysteresis loop using the metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm. For nanoparticles with geometrically sharp interfaces, we find that cubes exhibit a higher coercivity and lower exchange bias field than spheres of the same size. With increasing interface roughness, the shape dependence of the characteristic fields gradually decays, and eventually, the distinction between cubical and spherical particles is lost for moderately rough interfaces. The sensitivity of the exchange bias field to the microstructural details of the interface is quantified by a scaling factor (b ) relating the bias field to the net moment of the antiferromagnetic shell (Heb=b MAF+Ho) . Cubical particles exhibit a lower sensitivity to the dispersed values of the net interfacial moment.

  8. Shape-Memory Effect and Pseudoelasticity in Fe-Mn-Based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Roca, P.; Baruj, A.; Sade, M.

    2016-12-01

    Several Fe-based alloys are being considered as potential candidates for applications which require shape-memory behavior or superelastic properties. The possibility of using fabrication methods which are well known in the steel industry is very attractive and encourages a large amount of research in the field. In the present article, Fe-Mn-based alloys are mainly addressed. On the one hand, attention is paid to the shape-memory effect where the alloys contain (a) a maximum amount of Mn up to around 30 wt%, (b) several possible substitutional elements like Si, Cr, Ni, Co, and Nb and (c) some possible interstitial elements like C. On the other hand, superelastic alloys are analyzed, mainly the Fe-Mn-Al-Ni system discovered a few years ago. The most noticeable properties resulting from the martensitic transformations which are responsible for the mentioned properties, i.e., the fcc-hcp in the first case and the bcc-fcc in the latter are discussed. Selected potential applications are also analyzed.

  9. Particle-based modeling effect of shape transform of single sickle red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Karniadakis, George; Dao, Ming

    2016-11-01

    Sickle red blood cells often exhibit various sickled shapes as well as higher shear and bending stiffness. To study the membrane biomechanical properties related to cell morphology, we employed multiscale coarse grain models based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Through the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) we analyst the membrane fluctuation of a single cell which probe the membrane mechanical properties. In this work, the membrane mechanics alteration caused by cell volume and surface area variation are tested. We verified that with same ratio of surface area and volume, volume differences will not affect the membrane fluctuation. We also found that by expanding the whole cell the membrane fluctuation performance does not change. To further quantify the pure shape effects, we generate cells with different aspect ratio of major axis and minor axis at which membrane exhibit different fluctuation indicating the mechanical properties divergence. Through the spatial-temporal autocorrelation of membrane fluctuations characteristics, the membrane bending stiffness and shear modulus are carefully calibrated against QPI experimental data.

  10. Dilution rates for tailpipe emissions: effects of vehicle shape, tailpipe position, and exhaust velocity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor W C; Hildemann, Lynn M; Chang, Cheng-hisn

    2009-06-01

    The rate at which motor vehicle exhaust undergoes dilution with ambient air will greatly affect the size distribution characteristics of the particulate emissions. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted to investigate the impacts of vehicle shape, tailpipe orientation, and exhaust exit velocity on the dilution profiles under steady driving conditions for three model vehicles: a light-duty truck, a passenger car, and a heavy-duty tractor head. A three dimensional array of 60 sensors provided simultaneous measurements of dilution ratios for the emissions in the near- and far-wake regions downstream of the vehicle. The processes underlying the observations were investigated via nondimensionalization. Many of the trends seen substantially downstream can be well generalized using a simple nondimensionalization technique; however, this is not true in the near-wake region (within a downstream distance equivalent to a few vehicle heights). In the near-wake region, using the vehicle width and length to normalize for the vehicle shape is not enough to fully account for the variations seen. Including the exhaust flow rate in the nondimensionalization process is effective further downwind but does not adequately capture the complexity in the near-wake region. Tailpipe orientation and location are also shown to be influential factors affecting the near-wake dilution characteristics.

  11. The effects of patch shape on indigo buntings. Evidence for an ecological trap

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, Aimee J.; Haddad, Nick M.

    2005-01-01

    Weldon, Aimee, J., and Nick M. Haddad. 2005. The effect of patch shape on indigo buntings: Evidence for an ecological trap. Ecology 86(6):1422-1431. Abstract. Habitat loss and fragmentation have led to a widespread increase in the proportion of edge habitat in the landscape. Disturbance-dependent bird species are widely assumed to benefit from these edges. However, anthropogenic edges may concentrate nest predators while retaining habitat cues that birds use to select breeding habitat. This may lead birds to mistakenly select dangerous habitat a phenomenon known as an ecological trap. We experimentally demonstrated how habitat shape, and thus amount of edge, can adversely affect nest site selection and reproductive success of a disturbance-dependent bird species, the Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea). We did so within a landscape-scale experiment composed of equal-area habitat patches that differed in their amount of edge. Indigo Buntings preferentially selected edgy patches, which contained 50% more edge than more compact rectangular patches. Further, buntings fledged significantly fewer young per pair in edgy patches than in rectangular patches. These results provide the first experimental evidence that edges can function as ecological traps.

  12. How to best smash a snail: the effect of tooth shape on crushing load.

    PubMed

    Crofts, S B; Summers, A P

    2014-03-06

    Organisms that are durophagous, hard prey consumers, have a diversity of tooth forms. To determine why we see this variation, we tested whether some tooth forms break shells better than others. We measured the force needed with three series of aluminium tooth models, which varied in concavity and the morphology of a stress concentrating cusp, to break a shell. We created functionally identical copies of two intertidal snail shells: the thicker shelled Nucella ostrina and the more ornamented Nucella lamellosa using a three-dimensional printer. In this way, we reduced variation in material properties between test shells, allowing us to test only the interaction of the experimental teeth with the two shell morphologies. We found that for all tooth shapes, thicker shells are harder to break than the thinner shells and that increased ornamentation has no discernible effect. Our results show that for both shell morphologies, domed and flat teeth break shells better than cupped teeth, and teeth with tall or skinny cusps break shells best. While our results indicate that there is an ideal tooth form for shell breaking, we do not see this shape in nature. This suggests a probable trade-off between tooth function and the structural integrity of the tooth.

  13. Nanoparticle shape evolution and proximity effects during tip-induced electrochemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Sangmo; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Noh, Tae Won; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Strelcov, Evgheni

    2016-01-08

    The voltage spectroscopies in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques are widely used to investigate the electrochemical processes in nanoscale volumes, which are important for current key applications, such as batteries, fuel cells, catalysts, and memristors. The spectroscopic measurements are commonly performed on a grid of multiple points to yield spatially resolved maps of reversible and irreversible electrochemical functionalities. Hence, the spacing between measurement points is an important parameter to be considered, especially for irreversible electrochemical processes. Here, we report nonlocal electrochemical dynamics in chains of Ag particles fabricated by the SPM tip on a silver ion solid electrolyte. When the grid spacing is small compared with the size of the formed Ag particles, anomalous chains of unequally sized particles with double periodicity evolve. This behavior is ascribed to a proximity effect during the tip-induced electrochemical process, specifically, size-dependent silver particle growth following the contact between the particles. In addition, fractal shape evolution of the formed Ag structures indicates that the growth-limiting process changes from Ag+/Ag redox reaction to Ag+-ion diffusion with the increase in the applied voltage and pulse duration. Our study shows that characteristic shapes of the electrochemical products are good indicators for determining the underlying growth-limiting process, and emergence of complex phenomena during spectroscopic mapping of electrochemical functionalities.

  14. Biomedical engineering in design and application of nitinol stents with shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryklina, E. P.; Khmelevskaya, I. Y.; Morozova, Tamara V.; Prokoshkin, S. D.

    1996-04-01

    Our studies in the field of endosurgery in collaboration with the physicians of the National Research Center of Surgery of the Academy of Medical Sciences are carried out beginning in 1983. These studies laid the foundation for the new direction of X-ray surgery--X-ray Nitinol stenting of vessels and tubular structures. X-ray nitinol stents are unique self-fixing shells based on the shape memory effect and superelasticity of nickel-titanium alloys self- reconstructed under human body temperature. Applied for stenting of arteries in cases of stenosis etc., bile ducts in cases of benign and malignant stenoses, digestive tract in cases of oesophageal cancer and cervical canal uterus in cases of postsurgical atresiss and strictures of uterine. The purpose of stenting is restoration of the shape of artery or tubular structure by a cylinder frame formation. The especially elaborated original method of stenting allows to avoid the traditional surgical operation, i.e. the stenting is performed without blood, narcosis and surgical knife. The stent to be implanted is transported into the affected zone through the puncture under the X-ray control. Clinical applications of X-ray endovascular stenting has been started in March 1984. During this period nearly 400 operations on stenting have been performed on femoral, iliac, brachio-cephalic, subclavian arteries, bile ducts, tracheas, digestive tract and cervical canal uterus.

  15. Density and Shape Effects in the Acoustic Propulsion of Bimetallic Nanorod Motors.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Suzanne; Wang, Wei; Bai, Lanjun; Gentekos, Dillon T; Hoyos, Mauricio; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2016-04-26

    Bimetallic nanorods are propelled without chemical fuels in megahertz (MHz) acoustic fields, and exhibit similar behaviors to single-metal rods, including autonomous axial propulsion and organization into spinning chains. Shape asymmetry determines the direction of axial movement of bimetallic rods when there is a small difference in density between the two metals. Movement toward the concave end of these rods is inconsistent with a scattering mechanism that we proposed earlier for acoustic propulsion, but is consistent with an acoustic streaming model developed more recently by Nadal and Lauga ( Phys. Fluids 2014 , 26 , 082001 ). Longer rods were slower at constant power, and their speed was proportional to the square of the power density, in agreement with the acoustic streaming model. The streaming model was further supported by a correlation between the disassembly of spinning chains of rods and a sharp decrease in the axial speed of autonomously moving motors within the levitation plane of the cylindrical acoustic cell. However, with bimetallic rods containing metals of different densities, a consistent polarity of motion was observed with the lighter metal end leading. Speed comparisons between single-metal rods of different densities showed that those of lower density are propelled faster. So far, these density effects are not explained in the streaming model. The directionality of bimetallic rods in acoustic fields is intriguing and offers some new possibilities for designing motors in which shape, material, and chemical asymmetry might be combined for enhanced functionality.

  16. Surface preparation effects on GTA weld shape in JBK-75 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.D.; Robertson, A.M. ); Heiple, C.R. ); Sturgill, P.L.; Jamsay, R.

    1993-02-01

    The results of a study are reported here on the effects of surface preparation on the shape of autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in JBK-75, an austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel similar to A286. Minor changes in surface preparation produced substantial changes in the fusion zone shape and welding behavior of this alloy. Increased and more consistent depth of fusion (higher d/w ratios) along with improved arc stability and less arc wander resulted from wire brushing and other abrasive surface preparations, although chemical and machining methods did not produce any increase in depth of fusion. Abrasive treatments roughen the surface, increase the surface area, increase the surface oxide thickness, and entrap oxide. The increased weld d/w ratio is attributed to oxygen added to the weld pool from the surface oxide on the base metal. The added oxygen alters the surface-tension-driven fluid flow pattern in the weld pool. Increased depth of fusion in wire-fed U-groove weld joints also resulted when welding wire with a greater surface oxide thickness was used. Increasing the amount of wire brushing produced even deeper welds. However, a maximum in depth of fusion was observed with further wire brushing, beyond which weld fusion depth decreased.

  17. Effect of mitral orifice shape on intra-ventricular filling fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, Ikechukwu; Angirish, Yagna; Yoganathan, Ajit; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2013-11-01

    The natural geometry of the mitral orifice is D-shaped. However, most current designs of prosthetic valves employ O-shaped orifice geometry. The goal of this study was to compare the effect of geometrical modification between the D and O orifice on the intra-ventricular fluid dynamics during diastolic filling. The different mitral orifice geometries were incorporated into an in vitro left heart simulator consisting of a flexible-walled anatomical left ventricle (LV) physical model enclosed in an acrylic housing. Physiological flow rates and pressures were obtained via tuning systemic resistance and compliance elements in the flow loop. A programmable piston pump was used to generate the LV model wall motion. 2D Particle image velocimetry measurements were conducted along multiple longitudinal planes perpendicular to the annulus plane. During peak diastole, the incoming jet width at the LV central plane was smaller for the D-orifice than that of the O-orifice. Further, the core of the vortex ring in the D-orifice was reduced in size compared to that of the O-orifice. The spatiotemporal spreading of the inflow jet as well as the propagation of the vortex ring will be discussed. This study was funded by a grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (RO1HL70262).

  18. Engineering an Effective Immune Adjuvant by Designed Control of Shape and Crystallinity of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingbing; Ji, Zhaoxia; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Wang, Xiang; Dong, Juyao; Chang, Chong Hyun; Li, Ruibin; Zhang, Haiyuan; Nel, André E.; Xia, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants based on aluminum salts (Alum) are commonly used in vaccines to boost the immune response against infectious agents. However, the detailed mechanism of how Alum enhances adaptive immunity and exerts its adjuvant immune effect remains unclear. Other than being comprised of micron-sized aggregates that include nanoscale particulates, Alum lacks specific physicochemical properties to explain activation of the innate immune system, including the mechanism by which aluminum-based adjuvants engage the NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β production. This is putatively one of the major mechanisms required for an adjuvant effect. Because we know that long aspect ratio nanomaterials trigger the NLRP3 inflammasome, we synthesized a library of aluminum oxyhydroxide (AlOOH) nanorods to determine whether control of the material shape and crystalline properties could be used to quantitatively assess NLRP3 inflammasome activation and linkage of the cellular response to the material’s adjuvant activities in vivo. Using comparison to commercial Alum, we demonstrate that the crystallinity and surface hydroxyl group display of AlOOH nanoparticles quantitatively impact the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human THP-1 myeloid cells or murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Moreover, these in vitro effects were correlated with the immunopotentiation capabilities of the AlOOH nanorods in a murine OVA immunization model. These results demonstrate that shape, crystallinity and hydroxyl content play an important role in NLRP3 inflammasome activation and are therefore useful for quantitative boosting of antigen-specific immune responses. These results show that the engineered design of aluminum-based adjuvants in combination with dendritic cell property-activity analysis can be used to design more potent aluminum-based adjuvants. PMID:24261790

  19. Effect of surfactant shape on solvophobicity and surface activity in alcohol-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Phwey S.; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2016-11-01

    Here we study the relationship between a surfactant's molecular shape and its tendency to partition to the interface in ethanol-water mixtures. In general, finding surfactants that are effective in alcohol-water mixtures is more challenging than finding ones that are effective in pure water. This is because the solvophobic effect that partitions surfactants from bulk solution to the interface becomes weaker as ethanol concentration increases. We use experiments and molecular dynamics to observe the effects of increasing surfactant tail length or width. The results show that increasing surfactant tail length causes the surfactant to partition to the surface better in low ethanol concentrations, but not at high ethanol concentrations. In comparison, increasing surfactant tail width causes the surfactant to partition to the surface better at higher concentrations of ethanol. We examine the liquid structure to elucidate the mechanisms that weaken the partitioning effect as ethanol concentration increases. Ethanol-water mixtures are nanoscopically heterogeneous with protic and aprotic regions in the bulk solution. We see that the surfactant tail is most likely to be solvated in the aprotic regions where it perturbs fewer hydrogen bonds.

  20. Calorimetric study of the effect of linear strain on the shape memory properties of Nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchil, J.; Mahesh, K. K.; Ganesh Kumara, K.

    2001-10-01

    The effect of linear strain on the transformation behaviour of 40% cold worked Nitinol wire has been studied using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), for two heat-treat temperatures, one in which there exists a fully developed martensitic phase (M) at room temperature and another in which there exists a mixture of M-phase and intermediate R-phase at room temperature. Samples have been subjected to a linear strain in the range 0-30% at room temperature by applying tensile stress. The effect of linear strain on the transformation temperatures, the energy of transformation and the thermal width of the transformation is discussed on the basis of the orientation effect which facilitates the growth of a single variant of the martensitic phase, the internal stress effect which opposes the growth of the martensitic phase and the conversion effect which increases the size of the martensitic phase. An attempt is made to correlate the shape of the endotherm peaks with the recovery of the applied linear strain. The DSC results are compared with the observations obtained through the tensile stress-strain curves.

  1. The effects of prosthetic foot roll-over shape arc length on the gait of trans-tibial prosthesis users.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Andrew H; Meier, Margrit R; Sessoms, Pinata H; Childress, Dudley S

    2006-12-01

    The Shape&Roll prosthetic foot was used to examine the effect of roll-over shape arc length on the gait of 14 unilateral trans-tibial prosthesis users. Simple modifications to the prosthetic foot were used to alter the effective forefoot rocker length, leaving factors such as alignment, limb length, and heel and mid-foot characteristics unchanged. Shortening the roll-over shape arc length caused a significant reduction in the maximum external dorsiflexion moment on the prosthetic side at all walking speeds (p < 0.001 for main effect of arc length), due to a reduction in forefoot leverage (moment arm) about the ankle. Roll-over shape arc length significantly affected the initial loading on the sound limb at normal and fast speeds (p = 0.001 for the main effect of arc length), with participants experiencing larger first peaks of vertical ground reaction forces on their sound limbs when using the foot with the shortest effective forefoot rocker arc length. Additionally, the difference between step lengths on the sound and prosthetic limbs was larger with the shortest arc length condition, although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.06 for main effect). It appears that prosthesis users may experience a drop-off effect at the end of single limb stance on prosthetic feet with short roll-over shape arc lengths, leading to increased loading and/or a shortened step on the contralateral limb.

  2. Arterial pulse shape measurement using self-mixing effect in a diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, J; Myllylae, Risto; Sorvoja, H; Miettinen, J

    2002-11-30

    The self-mixing effect in a diode laser and the Doppler technique are used for quantitative measurements of the cardiovascular pulses from radial arteries of human individuals. 738 cardiovascular pulses from 10 healthy volunteers were studied. The Doppler spectrograms reconstructed from the Doppler signal, which is measured from the radial displacement of the radial artery, are compared to the first derivative of the blood pressure signals measured from the middle finger by the Penaz technique. The mean correlation coefficient between the Doppler spectrograms and the first derivative of the blood pressure signals was 0.84, with a standard deviation of 0.05. Pulses with the correlation coefficient less than 0.7 were neglected in the study. Percentage of successfully detected pulses was 95.7%. It is shown that cardiovascular pulse shape from the radial artery can be measured noninvasively by using the self-mixing interferometry. (laser biology and medicine)

  3. Effect of the nozzle tip’s geometrical shape on electrospray deposition of organic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Keita; Kikuchi, Akihiko

    2017-04-01

    Electrospray deposition (ESD) is a favorable wet fabrication technique for organic thin films. We investigated the effects of the nozzle tip’s geometrical shape on the spraying properties of an organic solution used for ESD. Five types of cylindrical metal nozzles with zero (flat end) to four protrusions at the tips were prepared for depositing a solution of a small-molecule compound, tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3) solution. We confirmed that the diameter of the deposited droplets and their size dispersion decreased with an increase in the number of protrusions. The area occupation ratio of small droplets with a diameter smaller than 2 µm increased from 21 to 83% as the number of protrusions was increased from zero to four. The surface roughness root mean square of 60-nm-thick Alq3 films substantially improved from 32.5 to 6.8 nm with increasing number of protrusions.

  4. Simulation of three-phase flow and lance height effect on the cavity shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kai; Zhu, Rong; Gao, Wei; Liu, Fu-hai

    2014-06-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate a 150-t top-blown converter. The effect of different lance heights on the cavity shape was investigated using the volume of fluid (VOF) method. Numerical simulation results can reflect the actual molten bath surface waves impinged by the supersonic oxygen jets. With increasing lance height, the cavity depth decreases, and the cavity area, varying like a parabola, increases and then decreases. The cavity area maximizes at the lance height of 1.3 m. Under the three different lance heights simulated in this study, all of the largest impact velocities at the molten bath surface are between 50 m/s and 100 m/s.

  5. Shape memory alloy nanostructures with coupled dynamic thermo-mechanical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhote, R. P.; Gomez, H.; Melnik, R. N. V.; Zu, J.

    2015-07-01

    Employing the Ginzburg-Landau phase-field theory, a new coupled dynamic thermo-mechanical 3D model has been proposed for modeling the cubic-to-tetragonal martensitic transformations in shape memory alloy (SMA) nanostructures. The stress-induced phase transformations and thermo-mechanical behavior of nanostructured SMAs have been investigated. The mechanical and thermal hysteresis phenomena, local non-uniform phase transformations and corresponding non-uniform temperatures and deformations' distributions are captured successfully using the developed model. The predicted microstructure evolution qualitatively matches with the experimental observations. The developed coupled dynamic model has provided a better understanding of underlying martensitic transformation mechanisms in SMAs, as well as their effect on the thermo-mechanical behavior of nanostructures.

  6. Effective dynamics of cold atoms flowing in two ring-shaped optical potentials with tunable tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghamalyan, Davit; Amico, Luigi; Kwek, L. C.

    2013-12-01

    We study the current dynamics of coupled atomic condensates flowing in two ring-shaped optical potentials. We provide a specific setup where the ring-ring coupling can be tuned in an experimentally feasible way. It is demonstrated that the imaginary time effective action of the system in a weak coupling regime provides a two-level-system dynamics for the phase slip across the two rings. Through two-mode Gross- Pitaevskii mean-field equations, the real-time dynamics of the population imbalance and the phase difference between the two condensates is thoroughly analyzed analytically, as a function of the relevant physical parameters of the system. In particular, we find that the macroscopic quantum self-trapping phenomenon is induced in the system if the flowing currents assume a nonvanishing difference.

  7. Effect of thermal convection on the shape of a solid-liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennetrier, C.; Chopra, M. A.; De Groh, H. C., III

    1991-01-01

    The effect of thermal convection on the shape of solid-liquid interface was investigated in experiments conducted in a transparent Bridgman-type directional solidification furnace. The relationship was numerically modeled using a standard 2D finite-difference approach, with the solid-liquid deformable interface approximated by a blocking-off technique. The directional solidification furnace was used with pure succinonitrile (which is also transparent) contained in a long square ampoule made of borosilicate glass. With the furnace in the vertical configuration, a flat interface was observed, in agreement with the model. On the other hand, a highly distorted interface was obtained in the horizontal configuration; the numerical results showed a strong recirculating cell in front of the interface due to natural thermal convection. The results indicate that thermal convection is responsible for the interface distortion.

  8. Biophysical feedback mediates effects of invasive grasses on coastal dune shape.

    PubMed

    Zarnetske, Phoebe L; Hacker, Sally D; Seabloom, Eric W; Ruggiero, Peter; Killian, Jason R; Maddux, Timothy B; Cox, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Vegetation at the aquatic-terrestrial interface can alter landscape features through its growth and interactions with sediment and fluids. Even similar species may impart different effects due to variation in their interactions and feedbacks with the environment. Consequently, replacement of one engineering species by another can cause significant change in the physical environment. Here we investigate the species-specific ecological mechanisms influencing the geomorphology of U.S. Pacific Northwest coastal dunes. Over the last century, this system changed from open, shifting sand dunes with sparse vegetation (including native beach grass, Elymus mollis), to densely vegetated continuous foredune ridges resulting from the introduction and subsequent invasions of two nonnative grass species (Ammophila arenaria and Ammophila breviligulata), each of which is associated with different dune shapes and sediment supply rates along the coast. Here we propose a biophysical feedback responsible for differences in dune shape, and we investigate two, non-mutually exclusive ecological mechanisms for these differences: (1) species differ in their ability to capture sand and (2) species differ in their growth habit in response to sand deposition. To investigate sand capture, we used a moveable bed wind tunnel experiment and found that increasing tiller density increased sand capture efficiency and that, under different experimental densities, the native grass had higher sand capture efficiency compared to the Ammophila congeners. However, the greater densities of nonnative grasses under field conditions suggest that they have greater potential to capture more sand overall. We used a mesocosm experiment to look at plant growth responses to sand deposition and found that, in response to increasing sand supply rates, A. arenaria produced higher-density vertical tillers (characteristic of higher sand capture efficiency), while A. breviligulata and E. mollis responded with lower

  9. Effect of irregularity in shape and boundary of a macro-texture region in titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Blackshire, James L.; Freed, Shaun L.

    2016-02-01

    Peak amplitudes of mode converted shear wave signals back scattered from macro-texture regions (MTRs) in an aerospace grade titanium alloy material are measured to be about the same level as corner trapped shear wave signals. In addition to the abnormally high shear wave responses, the time of flight data indicates that the MTR signals are back scattered from a location deep in the sample so that the round trip travel time is close to that of corner trapped signals. In this work, these two ultrasonic properties of an MTR in a test specimen cut from a titanium jet engine disk are closely studied to understand the root cause of abnormally high shear wave responses. Based on the amplitude and time of flight data collected in a laboratory condition, a decision has been made to investigate further experimentally and computationally how surface irregularity of an acoustically reflective surface affects incoming shear waves upon reflection. Attempts are made to correlate the localized back scattered signal response of the MTR in the test specimen to the beam focusing effect of a non-planar surface of an acoustically impedance mismatched boundary layer such as a fatigue crack face. From the current experimental and computational results on the reflection of corner trapped shear waves from a concave shaped section of a non-planar crack face and the time of flight data, it is speculated that the root cause of the abnormally high peak amplitude MTR signal is possibly due to the beam focusing effect caused by the shape of the MTR.

  10. Size and shape effects on the thermodynamic properties of nanoscale volumes of water.

    PubMed

    Strøm, Bjørn A; Simon, Jean-Marc; Schnell, Sondre K; Kjelstrup, Signe; He, Jianying; Bedeaux, Dick

    2017-03-17

    Small systems are known to deviate from the classical thermodynamic description, among other things due to their large surface area to volume ratio compared to corresponding big systems. As a consequence, extensive thermodynamic properties are no longer proportional to the volume, but are instead higher order functions of size and shape. We investigate such functions for second moments of probability distributions of fluctuating properties in the grand-canonical ensemble, focusing specifically on the volume and surface terms of Hadwiger's theorem, explained in Klain, Mathematika, 1995, 42, 329-339. We resolve the shape dependence of the surface term and show, using Hill's nanothermodynamics [Hill, J. Chem. Phys., 1962, 36, 3182], that the surface satisfies the thermodynamics of a flat surface as described by Gibbs [Gibbs, The Scientific Papers of J. Willard Gibbs, Volume 1, Thermodynamics, Ox Bow Press, Woodbridge, Connecticut, 1993]. The Small System Method (SSM), first derived by Schnell et al. [Schnell et al., J. Phys. Chem. B, 2011, 115, 10911], is extended and used to analyze simulation data on small systems of water. We simulate water as an example to illustrate the method, using TIP4P/2005 and other models, and compute the isothermal compressibility and thermodynamic factor. We are able to retrieve the experimental value of the bulk phase compressibility within 2%, and show that the compressibility of nanosized volumes increases by up to a factor of two as the number of molecules in the volume decreases. The value for a tetrahedron, cube, sphere, polygon, etc. can be predicted from the same scaling law, as long as second order effects (nook and corner effects) are negligible. Lastly, we propose a general formula for finite reservoir correction to fluctuations in subvolumes.

  11. The effects of pattern shape, subliminal stimulation, and voluntary control on multistable visual perception.

    PubMed

    Taddei-Ferretti, C; Radilova, J; Musio, C; Santillo, S; Cibelli, E; Cotugno, A; Radil, T

    2008-08-15

    Spontaneous figure reversal of ambiguous patterns was analyzed in humans. A) With Necker-"cube"-like, or "drum"-like figures, having square or round shaped "front" and "rear" surfaces, and either large or small "depth", the perceptual intervals corresponding to both interpretations of "drum" were longer than those of "cube"; the perceived "depth" of the figures was less relevant for reversal timing (inter-reversal intervals were only slightly longer for the "deeper" figures). Although the shape of "front" and "rear" surfaces is not a crucial geometrical feature for figure reversal, it did influence its timing. More, or longer information-processing steps should probably be needed for perceptual representations of curvilinear patterns in comparison with rectangular ones. The underlying neural mechanisms are probably located at a relatively peripheral level in the visual system. B) With a modified Necker "cube"-like figure, having the two internal vertices coincident, and the long axis of the figure aligned horizontally, the effect of voluntary control on perception-reversal timing overcomes opposite effects due to either fixation-attention to pattern's focal zones, or subliminal stimulation by the pattern's biased versions, suggesting one or the other perception's possibility, while it is enhanced by concordant imagery. Voluntary control should intervene downward at a high-level processing, and should probably affect both a decision-making and a perception-stabilizing mechanism in the process of the pattern's unconscious interpretation. Results A and B are confronted with other results on both perceptual and binocular rivalry of up-to-date literature, in the frame of discussions on low-level bottom-up automatic stimulus-driven processing vs high-level top-down covert attention-driven processing.

  12. Strong spin Seebeck effect in Kondo T-shaped double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, K P; Weymann, I

    2017-02-08

    We investigate, taking a theoretical approach, the thermoelectric and spin thermoelectric properties of a T-shaped double quantum dot strongly coupled to two ferromagnetic leads, focusing on the transport regime in which the system exhibits the two-stage Kondo effect. We study the dependence of the (spin) Seebeck coefficient, the corresponding power factor and the figure of merit on temperature, leads' spin polarization and dot level position. We show that the thermal conductance fulfills a modified Wiedemann-Franz law, also in the regime of suppression of subsequent stages of the Kondo effect by the exchange field resulting from the presence of ferromagnets. Moreover, we demonstrate that the spin thermopower is enhanced at temperatures corresponding to the second stage of Kondo screening. Very interestingly, the spin-thermoelectric response of the system is found to be highly sensitive to the spin polarization of the leads. In some cases spin polarization of the order of 1% is sufficient for a strong spin Seebeck effect to occur. This is explained as a consequence of the interplay between the two-stage Kondo effect and the exchange field induced in the double quantum dot. Due to the possibility of tuning the exchange field by the choice of gate voltage, the spin thermopower may also be tuned to be maximal for desired spin polarization of the leads. All calculations are performed with the aid of the numerical renormalization group technique.

  13. Strong spin Seebeck effect in Kondo T-shaped double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, K. P.; Weymann, I.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate, taking a theoretical approach, the thermoelectric and spin thermoelectric properties of a T-shaped double quantum dot strongly coupled to two ferromagnetic leads, focusing on the transport regime in which the system exhibits the two-stage Kondo effect. We study the dependence of the (spin) Seebeck coefficient, the corresponding power factor and the figure of merit on temperature, leads’ spin polarization and dot level position. We show that the thermal conductance fulfills a modified Wiedemann-Franz law, also in the regime of suppression of subsequent stages of the Kondo effect by the exchange field resulting from the presence of ferromagnets. Moreover, we demonstrate that the spin thermopower is enhanced at temperatures corresponding to the second stage of Kondo screening. Very interestingly, the spin-thermoelectric response of the system is found to be highly sensitive to the spin polarization of the leads. In some cases spin polarization of the order of 1% is sufficient for a strong spin Seebeck effect to occur. This is explained as a consequence of the interplay between the two-stage Kondo effect and the exchange field induced in the double quantum dot. Due to the possibility of tuning the exchange field by the choice of gate voltage, the spin thermopower may also be tuned to be maximal for desired spin polarization of the leads. All calculations are performed with the aid of the numerical renormalization group technique.

  14. Large reversible magnetocaloric effect in a Ni-Co-Mn-In magnetic shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Cong, D. Y.; Ma, L.; Nie, Z. H.; Wang, Z. L.; Suo, H. L.; Ren, Y.; Wang, Y. D.

    2016-01-18

    Reversibility of the magnetocaloric effect in materials with first-order magnetostructural transformation is of vital significance for practical magnetic refrigeration applications. Here, we report a large reversible magnetocaloric effect in a Ni49.8Co1.2Mn33.5In15.5 magnetic shape memory alloy. A large reversible magnetic entropy change of 14.6 J/(kg K) and a broad operating temperature window of 18 K under 5 T were simultaneously achieved, correlated with the low thermal hysteresis (-8 K) and large magnetic-field-induced shift of transformation temperatures (4.9 K/T) that lead to a narrow magnetic hysteresis (1.1 T) and small average magnetic hysteresis loss (48.4 J/kg under 5 T) as well. Furthermore, a large reversible effective refrigeration capacity (76.6 J/kg under 5 T) was obtained, as a result of the large reversible magnetic entropy change, broad operating temperature window, and small magnetic hysteresis loss. The large reversible magnetic entropy change and large reversible effective refrigeration capacity are important for improving the magnetocaloric performance, and the small magnetic hysteresis loss is beneficial to reducing energy dissipation during magnetic field cycle in potential applications.

  15. Large reversible magnetocaloric effect in a Ni-Co-Mn-In magnetic shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Cong, D. Y.; Ma, L.; Nie, Z. H.; Wang, Z. L.; Suo, H. L.; Ren, Y.; Wang, Y. D.

    2016-01-01

    Reversibility of the magnetocaloric effect in materials with first-order magnetostructural transformation is of vital significance for practical magnetic refrigeration applications. Here, we report a large reversible magnetocaloric effect in a Ni49.8Co1.2Mn33.5In15.5 magnetic shape memory alloy. A large reversible magnetic entropy change of 14.6 J/(kg K) and a broad operating temperature window of 18 K under 5 T were simultaneously achieved, correlated with the low thermal hysteresis (˜8 K) and large magnetic-field-induced shift of transformation temperatures (4.9 K/T) that lead to a narrow magnetic hysteresis (1.1 T) and small average magnetic hysteresis loss (48.4 J/kg under 5 T) as well. Furthermore, a large reversible effective refrigeration capacity (76.6 J/kg under 5 T) was obtained, as a result of the large reversible magnetic entropy change, broad operating temperature window, and small magnetic hysteresis loss. The large reversible magnetic entropy change and large reversible effective refrigeration capacity are important for improving the magnetocaloric performance, and the small magnetic hysteresis loss is beneficial to reducing energy dissipation during magnetic field cycle in potential applications.

  16. Effects of shape parameters on the attractiveness of a female body.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Dai, W; Qian, X; Chau, K P; Liu, Q

    2007-08-01

    Various researchers have suggested that certain anthropometric ratios can be used to measure female body attractiveness, including the waist to hip ratio, Body Mass Index (BMI), and the body volume divided by the square of the height (Volume-Height Index). Based on a wide range of female subjects and virtual images of bodies with different ratios, Volume-Height Index was found to provide the best fit with female body attractiveness, and the effect of Volume-Height Index can be fitted with two half bell-shaped exponential curves with an optimal Volume-Height Index at 14.2 liter/m2. It is suggested that the general trend of the effect of Volume-Height Index may be culturally invariant, but the optimal value of Volume-Height Index may vary from culture to culture. In addition to Volume-Height Index, other body parameters or ratios which reflect body proportions and the traits of feminine characteristics had smaller but significant effects on female body attractiveness, and such effects were stronger at optimum Volume-Height Index.

  17. Effect of cold rolling on fatigue crack propagation of TiNi/Al6061 shape memory composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Chul; Kang, Jung Ho; Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Gyu Chang; Furuya, Yasybumi

    2007-08-01

    A TiNi alloy fiber was used to recover the original shape of materials using its shape memory effect. The shape memory alloy plays an important role within the metal matrix composite. The shape memory alloy can control the crack propagation in the metal matrix composite, and improve the tensile strength of the composite. In this study, TiNi/Al6061 shape memory alloy (SMA) composite was fabricated by the hot press method, and pressed by a roller for its strength improvement. The four kinds of specimens were fabricated with 0%, 3.2%, 5.2% and 7% volume fraction of TiNi alloy fiber, respectively. A fatigue test has been performed to evaluate the crack initiation and propagation for the TiNi/Al6061 SMA composite fabricated by this method. In order to study the shape memory effect of the TiNi alloy fiber, the test has also been done under both room temperature and high temperature conditions. The relationship between the crack growth rate and the stress intensity factor was clarified for the composite, and the cold rolling effect was also studied.

  18. The shape effects of nanoparticles suspended in HFE-7100 over wedge with entropy generation and mixed convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellahi, R.; Hassan, M.; Zeeshan, A.; Khan, Ambreen A.

    2016-06-01

    The flow of mixed convection nanofluid over wedge under the effects of porous medium is investigated. The HFE-7100 Engineered Fluid having Nimonic 80a metal nanoparticles of spherical and non-spherical shapes with different sizes is used. The particle shape effects on Bejan number and entropy generation are taken into account. The system of partial differential equations is first written in terms of ordinary differential equations using adequate similarity transformations and then solved analytically. Analytical solutions of the resulting equations are obtained for the velocity and temperature profiles. Simultaneous effects of porous medium, particle volume friction, mixed convection parameter, and angle of wedge in the presence of different shapes nanoparticles are demonstrated graphically. Effects of particle concentrations, sizes on wall stress, heat transfer coefficient of Skin friction, and Nusselt are discussed in the form of tables.

  19. Correction of resist heating effect on variable shaped beam mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayamada, Noriaki; Suganuma, Mizuna; Nomura, Haruyuki; Kato, Yasuo; Kamikubo, Takashi; Ogasawara, Munehiro; Zable, Harold; Masuda, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Aki

    2016-04-01

    The specifications for critical dimension (CD) accuracy and line edge roughness are getting tighter to promote every photomask manufacturer to choose electron beam resists of lower sensitivity. When the resist is exposed by too many electrons, it is excessively heated up to have higher sensitivity at a higher temperature, which results in degraded CD uniformity. This effect is called "resist heating effect" and is now the most critical error source in CD control on a variable shaped beam (VSB) mask writer. We have developed an on-tool, real-time correction system for the resist heating effect. The system is composed of correction software based on a simple thermal diffusion model and computational hardware equipped with more than 100 graphical processing unit chips. We have demonstrated that the designed correction accuracy was obtained and the runtime of correction was sufficiently shorter than the writing time. The system is ready to be deployed for our VSB mask writers to retain the writing time as short as possible for lower sensitivity resists by removing the need for increased pass count.

  20. Extraction of biologic particles by pumping effect in a pi-shaped ultrasonic actuator.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junhui; Yang, Jianbo; Xu, Jun; Du, Jinlong

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a new method of extracting biologic particles from a mixture of particles. The method is based on the pumping effect in a pi-shaped ultrasonic actuator, which has a gap between its two vibrating metal plates. An adhesive tape is placed at a proper position in the gap. Due to the pumping effect which is induced by the sound field in the gap, the particles with smaller mass and radius in the mixture can be pumped up to reach the adhesive tape; while the ones with larger mass cannot. Therefore, the particles with smaller mass and radius can be extracted from the mixture. A theoretical model which can well explain the operation principle and experimental phenomena is developed. By the experimental results and the theoretical analyses based on the model, the validity of the method in extracting small particles from a mixture of solid particles in air is confirmed, and the effects of the actuator's vibration, adhesive tape height, contents of the mixture and viscosity of fluid on the extraction are clarified. Also, it is theoretically predicted that the method will work under the microgravity condition in air.

  1. Theoretical study on substituent and solvent effects for nanocubes formed with gear-shaped amphiphile molecules.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, T; Hiraoka, S; Nagashima, U; Tachikawa, M

    2017-01-04

    Gear-shaped amphiphile molecules (1) recently synthesized by Hiraoka et al. self-assemble into a hexameric structure, nanocubes (16), in 25% aqueous methanol due to a solvophobic effect. Here we have carried out molecular dynamic simulations to elucidate the stability of these hexameric capsules (16 and 26) in water, 25% aqueous methanol, and methanol. In all solvents, the 16 nanocubes are maintained for all trajectories. On the other hand, 26 was found to collapse for one trajectory in water and seven trajectories in 25% aqueous methanol. In a pure methanol solvent, 26 was found to collapse for all trajectories. The number of collapsed trajectories of 26 increased with the amount of methanol in the solvent. We therefore focused on the structure of the π-π stacking between pyridyl groups and the CH-π interactions between the methyl and pyridyl groups within the nanocube. Our study clearly shows the role played by the methanol solvent molecules in the assembly of the nanocube in terms of the substituent and solvent effects at the molecular level, and that these substituent and solvent effects are important for the self-assembly of the nanocubes.

  2. Melt-spun shaped fibers with enhanced surface effects: fiber fabrication, characterization and application to woven scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Park, S J; Lee, B-K; Na, M H; Kim, D S

    2013-08-01

    Scaffolds with a high surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA:V) are advantageous with regard to the attachment and proliferation of cells in the field of tissue engineering. This paper reports on the development of novel melt-spun fibers with a high SA:V, which enhanced the surface effects of a fiber-based scaffold while maintaining its mechanical strength. The cross-section of the fibers was altered to a non-circular shape, producing a higher SA:V for a similar cross-sectional area. To obtain fibers with non-circular cross-sectional shape, or shaped fibers, three different types of metal spinnerets were fabricated for the melt-spinning process, each with circular, triangular or cruciform capillaries, using deep X-ray lithography followed by nickel electroforming. Using these spinnerets, circular and shaped fibers were manufactured with biodegradable polyester, polycaprolactone. The SA:V increase in the shaped fibers was experimentally investigated under different processing conditions. Tensile tests on the fibers and indentation tests on the woven fiber scaffolds were performed. The tested fibers and scaffolds exhibited similar mechanical characteristics, due to the similar cross-sectional area of the fibers. The degradation of the shaped fibers was notably faster than that of circular fibers, because of the enlarged surface area of the shaped fibers. The woven scaffolds composed of the shaped fibers significantly increased the proliferation of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells. This approach to increase the SA:V in shaped fibers could be useful for the fabrication of programmable, biodegradable fiber-based scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  3. TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF ABLATING AXISYMMETRIC BODIES INCLUDING THE EFFECTS OF SHAPE CHANGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howser, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to analyze the transient response of an ablating axisymmetric body, including the effect of shape change. The governing differential equation, the boundary conditions for the analysis on which the computer program is based, and the method of solution of the resulting finite-difference equations are discussed in the documentation. Some of the features of the analysis and the associated program are (1) the ablation material is considered to be orthotropic with temperature-dependent thermal properties; (2) the thermal response of the entire body is considered simultaneously; (3) the heat transfer and pressure distribution over the body are adjusted to the new geometry as ablation occurs; (4) the governing equations and several boundary-condition options are formulated in terms of generalized orthogonal coordinates for fixed points in a moving coordinate system; (5) the finite-difference equations are solved implicitly; and (6) other instantaneous body shapes can be displayed with a user-supplied plotting routine. The physical problem to be modeled with the analysis is described by FORTRAN input variables. For example, the external body geometry is described in the W, Z coordinates; material density is given; and the stagnation cold-wall heating rate is given in a time-dependent array. Other input variables are required which control the solution, specify boundary conditions, and determine output from the program. The equations have been programmed so that either the International System of Units or the U. S. Customary Units may be used. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 Series computer. This program was developed in 1972.

  4. Quantifying the effects of hydrograph shape and flow transience on coarse sediment bed load transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Colin; Hill, Kimberly; Paola, Chris

    2016-04-01

    The rate of bed load transport under steady flow is known to vary both spatially and temporally due to various hydrologic and granular phenomena. Grain size distributions and riverbed properties (packing, armoring, imbrication, etc.) have been observed to affect flux for a particular value of applied flow stress while hydrology is mainly assumed to control the magnitude of the applied bed stress above the threshold for bed material entrainment. The prediction and measurement of bed load sediment transport in field settings are further complicated by the inherent transience in the flood hydrograph, but relatively little is known about how flood transience differs from a steady flow. Here we investigate the role of flood transience for gravel bed load transport through controlled laboratory experiments in a 28 m long 0.5-meter wide flume. We explore transient flow through the use of short duration hydrographs as the combination of unsteady and intermittent flow, where unsteady flow varies in magnitude over a given duration, and intermittent flow is characterized by turning the flow on and off. Experimental runs consist of sequences of steady and unsteady flood hydrographs of various shapes, but equivalent integrated excess transport capacity. These flood sequences are run for a variety of competent flow durations and peak stress magnitudes. We find that even for a narrow unimodal grain size distribution and constant sediment supply we observe clockwise hysteresis in bed load flux, different thresholds for entrainment and distrainment for the rising and falling limbs of a flood, and a threshold of entrainment that can vary from one flood hydrograph to the next. Despite complex transport phenomena at the particle scale, we find that the total bed load transported for each flood plots along a linear trend with the integrated excess transport capacity, in agreement with prior field results. These experiments indicate that while the effects of transient flow and

  5. The effect of vesicle shape, line tension, and lateral tension on membrane-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Jaime B.

    Model membranes allow for the exploration of complex biological phenomena with simple, controllable components. In this thesis we employ model membranes to determine the effect of vesicle properties such as line tension, lateral tension, and shape on membrane-binding proteins. We find that line tension at the boundary between domains in a phase separated vesicle can accumulate model membrane-binding proteins (green fluorescent protein with a histidine tag), and that those proteins can, in turn, alter vesicle shape. These results suggest that domains in biological membranes may enhance the local concentration of membrane-bound proteins and thus alter protein function. We also explore how membrane mechanical and chemical properties alter the function of the N-BAR domain of amphiphysin, a membrane-binding protein implicated in endocytosis. We find that negatively charged lipids are necessary for N-BAR binding to membranes at detectable levels, and that, at least for some lipid species, binding may be cooperative. Measurements of N-BAR binding as a function of vesicle tension reveal that modest membrane tension of around 2 mN/m, corresponding to a strain of around 1%, strongly increases N-BAR binding. We attribute this increase in binding with tension to the insertion of N-BAR's N-terminal amphipathic helix into the membrane which increases the membrane area. We propose that N-BAR, which was previously described as being able to sense membrane curvature, may be sensing strain instead. Measurements of membrane deformation by N-BAR as a function of membrane tension reveal that tension can hinder membrane deformation. Thus, tension may favor N-BAR binding yet suppress membrane deformation/tubulation, which requires work against tension. These results suggest that membrane tension, a parameter that is often not controlled in model membranes but is tightly controlled in biological cells, may be important in regulating protein binding and assembly and, hence, protein

  6. Shape and surface effects on the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles: Gold nanospheres versus gold nanostars.

    PubMed

    Favi, Pelagie Marlene; Gao, Ming; Johana Sepúlveda Arango, Liuda; Ospina, Sandra Patricia; Morales, Mariana; Pavon, Juan Jose; Webster, Thomas Jay

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles are materials with unique optical properties that have made them very attractive for numerous biomedical applications. With the increasing discovery of techniques to synthesize novel nanoparticles such as star-shaped gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications, the safety and performance of these new nanomaterials must be systematically assessed before use. In this study, gold nanostars (AuNSTs) with multibranched surface structures were synthesized, and their influence on the cytotoxicity of human skin fibroblasts and rat fat pad endothelial cells (RFPECs) were assessed and compared with that of gold nanospheres (AuNSPs) with unbranched surfaces. Results showed that the AuNSPs with diameters of approximately 61.46 nm showed greater toxicity with fibroblast cells and RFPECs compared with the synthesized AuNSTs with diameters of approximately 33.69 nm. The AuNSPs were lethal at concentrations of 40 μg/mL for both cell lines, whereas the AuNSTs were less toxic at higher concentrations (400 μg/mL). The calculated IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values of the AuNSPs exposed to fibroblast cells were greater at 1 and 4 days of culture (26.4 and 27.7 μg/mL, respectively) compared with the RFPECs (13.6 and 13.8 μg/mL, respectively), indicating that the AuNSPs have a greater toxicity to endothelial cells. It was proposed that possible factors that could be promoting the reduced toxicity effects of the AuNSTs to fibroblast cells and RFPECs, compared with the AuNSPs may be size, surface chemistry, and shape of the gold nanoparticles. The reduced cell toxicity observed with the AuNSTs suggests that AuNSTs may be a promising material for use in biomedical applications.

  7. Effect of the surface state of the Ti-Ni alloy products on the shape memory effect parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokoshkin, S. D.; Ryklina, E. P.; Chernavina, A. A.; Abramov, V. Ya.; Krestnikov, N. S.

    2009-12-01

    The depth profiles of the structure, composition, and properties of the oxide layer that forms on the surface of Ti-Ni alloy products during postdeformation annealing (PDA) are studied. These parameters depend substantially on the holding temperature and time during PDA. The application of low-temperature thermomechanical treatment improves the state of surface as compared to quenching due to a decrease in the oxide-layer depth by more than an order of magnitude. The state of the surface of Ti-Ni alloy products significantly affects the characteristic martensite transformation temperatures and the shape memory effect parameters. This effect is more pronounced as the sample thickness (diameter) decreases. It is impossible to predict this effect on the entire set of the functional properties of the alloy products because of its ambiguity. Therefore, the oxide layer should be removed by etching to obtain reliable and reproducible results.

  8. Effect of Individual Layer Shape on the Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Al Alloys Laminated Metal Composite Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zejun; Wu, Xia; Hu, Hongbo; Chen, Quanzhong; Liu, Qing

    2014-03-01

    For the dissimilar laminated metal composite sheets (LMCS) fabricated by roll bonding technology, the great differences of mechanical properties between the constituent metals lead to the non-uniform deformation and individual layer necking. The individual layer shape affects the mechanical properties and microstructure of dissimilar LMCS. The Al/Al alloy (1100/7075) LMCS with the same thickness and ratio of dissimilar metals, but different individual layer shapes, have been successfully fabricated by hot accumulative roll bonding in conjunction with cold rolling technology. Some effective methods (such as sheet crown, warp degree, and slant angle) were presented to quantitatively evaluate the individual layer shape and necking of constituent metals. The microstructure and mechanical properties of 1100/7075 LMCS with different individual layer shapes were investigated. The effects of bonding interface on the mechanical properties were obtained based on the assessment of individual layer shapes and necking. The strength and elongation of LMCS decrease with the increase of variation of individual layer shapes and necking when the number of layers keeps constant. The research results offer some theoretical guides and references for adjusting the control measures of compatibility deformation, optimizing the hot roll bonding technologies, and designing the novel high-performance dissimilar LMCS.

  9. Masking Jupiter's Ammonia-Ice Spectral Signatures - The Effects of Size, Shape, and Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M. H.; Kalogerakis, K. S.; Marschall, J.; Oza, A. U.; Engel, P. A.; Meharchand, R. T.

    Infrared spectral signatures of NH3 ice have been reported only twice for the absorption feature near 3 micron [1,2] and once for the feature near 9 micron [3]. Photochemical residue may fall from above to coat the ice particles, masking these spectral signatures [4,5]. We present laboratory measurements of hydrocarbon coatings on NH3 ice films, validating this coating hypothesis. The masking effect is largely due to optical interference and works for a number of different coating compositions. To extend these thin-film results to Jupiter's atmosphere, we calculate scattering properties of aerosols and compare the relative importance of size, shape, and coatings. For small particles, these three effects have a comparable influence on the 9-micron NH3 ice feature. All three effects are significant for small particles at 3 micron, but particle size exerts the dominant influence at this wavelength. For larger particles (~10 micron), the masking effect of coatings is weak. Coating of NH3 ice may explain the weak and spatially inhomogeneous 9-micron detection by Cassini CIRS [3], while the infrequent occurrence of 3-micron NH3 ice signatures in Galileo NIMS data [2] may instead be due to size effects. [1] Brooke T.Y. et al. (1998) Icarus 136, 1-13. [2] Baines K.H. et al. (2002) Icarus 59, 74-94. [3] Wong M.H. et al. (2004) Planet. Space Sci. 52, 385-395. [4] Smith P.H. and Tomasko M.G. (1984) Icarus 58, 35-73. [5] Atreya S.K. et al. (2005) Planet. Space Sci. 53, 498-507.Infrared spectral signatures of NH3 ice have been reported only twice for the absorption feature near 3 micron [1,2] and once for the feature near 9 micron [3]. Photochemical residue may fall from above to coat the ice particles, masking these spectral signatures [4,5]. We present laboratory measurements of hydrocarbon coatings on NH3 ice films, validating this coating hypothesis. The masking effect is largely due to optical interference and works for a number of different coating compositions. To extend

  10. The effect of ethnicity and age on palatal size and shape: a study in a northern Chilean healthy population.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Colombo, A; Tartaglia, G M; Carvajal, R; Palomino, H

    2000-01-01

    Race and ethnicity influence the form of the human craniofacial complex in varying ways. The aim of the present investigation was to quantify the effects of ethnicity (mestizos, Aymara, non-Aymara), age (adolescents and adults), and sex on the form (size and shape) of the hard palate in normal Native American individuals. From the dental casts of 51 individuals with a complete permanent dentition, the x, y, and z coordinates of several standardized palatal landmarks were obtained with a computerized 3-dimensional digitizer. Palatal landmarks were used to derive a mathematical equation for palatal shape in the frontal and sagittal planes. Palatal width and length, frontal and sagittal heights, sagittal slope, and deviation of the raphe from the midline were also calculated. In the Aymara subjects, there was no effect of sex on palatal size, but there was an effect on palatal shape independent of size, especially with respect to male growth. Indeed, female palates apparently did not change their shape between adolescence and adulthood, while male palates increased their posterior "height." Overall, the 3 ethnic groups appeared to possess similar palatal size, with small significant differences. In the adult individuals, ethnicity did not seem to influence palatal shape. In contrast, adolescent males showed differences: non-Aymara subjects had the "highest" palatal shape, Aymara the "lowest," and mestizos an intermediate position. In conclusion, ethnicity does not seem to be a factor of major variability of human hard palate morphology, at least in the present 3 northern Chilean groups, as already found for dental arch shape. Age probably has a larger effect, particularly in the posterior part of the palate, where the eruption of the second and third molars between adolescence and young adulthood may play a role. A further development of the present investigation may involve larger samples of individuals from different ethnic groups.

  11. The Effects of Verbal Instruction and Shaping to Improve Tackling by High School Football Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Antonio M.; Pyles, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated verbal instruction and shaping using TAG (teaching with acoustical guidance) to improve tackling by 3 high school football players. Verbal instruction and shaping improved tackling for all 3 participants. In addition, performance was maintained as participants moved more quickly through the tackling procedure.

  12. Shaping Effects on Resistive-Plasma Resistive-Wall Mode Stability in a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Dov; Cole, A. J.; Navratil, G. A.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    2016-10-01

    A sharp-boundary MHD model is used to explore the effects of toroidal curvature and cross-sectional shaping on resistive-plasma resistive-wall modes in a tokamak. Building on the work of Fitzpatrick, we investigate mode stability with fixed toroidal number n =1 and a broad spectrum of poloidal m-numbers, given varying aspect-ratio, elongation, triangularity and up-down asymmetry. The speed and versatility of the sharp-boundary model facilitate exploration of a large parameter space, revealing qualitative trends to be further investigated by larger codes. In addition, the study addresses the effect of geometric mode-coupling on higher beta stability limits associated with an ideal-plasma or ideal-wall. These beta limits were used by Brennan and Finn to identify plasma response domains for feedback control. Present results show how geometric mode-coupling affects the stability limits and plasma response domains. The results are explained by an analytic reduced-MHD model with two coupled modes having different m-numbers. The next phase of this work will explore feedback control in different tokamak geometries. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  13. How Online Peer-to-Peer Conversation Shapes the Effects of a Message About Healthy Sleep.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Rebecca; Niederdeppe, Jeff

    2017-02-01

    Conversation about health messages and campaigns is common, and message-related conversations are increasingly recognized as a consequential factor in shaping message effects. The evidence base is limited, however, about the conditions under which conversation may help or hinder health communication efforts. In this study, college students (N = 301) first watched a short sleep video and were randomly assigned to either talk with a partner in an online chat conversation or proceed directly to a short survey. Unknown to participants, the chat partner was a confederate coached to say positive things about sleep and the message ('positive' chat condition), negative things ('negative' chat condition), or unrelated things ('natural' chat condition). All respondents completed a short survey on beliefs about sleep, reactions to the message, and intentions to get adequate sleep. Respondents had greater intentions to engage in healthy sleep when they engaged in positive conversation following message exposure than when they engaged in negative conversation after the message (p < 0.001). Positive emotion experienced in response to the message and positive chat perceptions were significant predictors (p < 0.05) of intentions to achieve healthy sleep. Health message designers may benefit from understanding how messages are exchanged in peer-to-peer conversation to better predict and explain their effects.

  14. Effect of Deformation Mode on the Wear Behavior of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lina; Liu, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Owing to good biocompatibility, good fatigue resistance, and excellent superelasticity, various types of bio-medical devices based on NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) have been developed. Due to the complexity in deformation mode in service, for example NiTi implants, accurate assessment/prediction of the surface wear process is difficult. This study aims at providing a further insight into the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA. In the present study, two types of wear testing modes were used, namely sliding wear mode and reciprocating wear mode, to investigate the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA in both martensitic and austenitic states. It was found that, when in martensitic state and under high applied loads, sliding wear mode resulted in more surface damage as compared to that under reciprocating wear mode. When in austenitic state, although similar trends in the coefficient of friction were observed, the coefficient of friction and surface damage in general is less under reciprocating mode than under sliding mode. These observations were further discussed in terms of different deformation mechanisms involved in the wear tests, in particular, the reversibility of martensite variant reorientation and stress-induced phase transformation, respectively.

  15. Size and shape effects on the order-disorder phase transition in CoPt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloyeau, D.; Ricolleau, C.; Mottet, C.; Oikawa, T.; Langlois, C.; Le Bouar, Y.; Braidy, N.; Loiseau, A.

    2009-12-01

    Chemically ordered bimetallic nanoparticles are promising candidates for magnetic-storage applications. However, the use of sub-10nm nanomagnets requires further study of possible size effects on their physical properties. Here, the effects of size and morphology on the order-disorder phase transition temperature of CoPt nanoparticles (TCNP) have been investigated experimentally, using transmission electron microscopy, and theoretically, with canonical Monte Carlo simulations. For 2.4-3-nm particles, TCNP is found to be 325-175∘C lower than the bulk material transition temperature, consistent with our Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, we establish that TCNP is also sensitive to the shape of the nanoparticles, because only one dimension of the particle (that is, in-plane size or thickness) smaller than 3nm is sufficient to induce a considerable depression of TCNP. This work emphasizes the necessity of taking into account the three-dimensional morphology of nano-objects to understand and control their structural properties.

  16. Effects of thermal shape fluctuations and pairing fluctuations on the giant dipole resonance in warm nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhine Kumar, A. K.; Arumugam, P.; Dang, N. Dinh

    2015-04-01

    Apart from the higher limits of isospin and temperature, the properties of atomic nuclei are intriguing and less explored at the limits of lowest but finite temperatures. At very low temperatures there is a strong interplay between the shell (quantal fluctuations), statistical (thermal fluctuations), and residual pairing effects as evidenced from the studies on giant dipole resonance (GDR). In our recent work [Phys. Rev. C 90, 044308 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevC.90.044308], we have outlined some of our results from a theoretical approach for such warm nuclei where all these effects are incorporated along within the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) extended to include the fluctuations in the pairing field. In this article, we present the complete formalism based on the microscopic-macroscopic approach for determining the deformation energies and a macroscopic approach which links the deformation to GDR observables. We discuss our results for the nuclei 97Tc,120Sn,179Au, and 208Pb, and corroborate with the experimental data available. The TSFM could explain the data successfully at low temperature only with a proper treatment of pairing and its fluctuations. More measurements with better precision could yield rich information about several phase transitions that can happen in warm nuclei.

  17. Cluster Plasmonics: Dielectric and Shape Effects on DNA-Stabilized Silver Clusters.

    PubMed

    Copp, Stacy M; Schultz, Danielle; Swasey, Steven M; Faris, Alexis; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2016-06-08

    This work investigates the effects of dielectric environment and cluster shape on electronic excitations of fluorescent DNA-stabilized silver clusters, AgN-DNA. We first establish that the longitudinal plasmon wavelengths predicted by classical Mie-Gans (MG) theory agree with previous quantum calculations for excitation wavelengths of linear silver atom chains, even for clusters of just a few atoms. Application of MG theory to AgN-DNA with 400-850 nm cluster excitation wavelengths indicates that these clusters are characterized by a collective excitation process and suggests effective cluster thicknesses of ∼2 silver atoms and aspect ratios of 1.5 to 5. To investigate sensitivity to the surrounding medium, we measure the wavelength shifts produced by addition of glycerol. These are smaller than reported for much larger gold nanoparticles but easily detectable due to narrower line widths, suggesting that AgN-DNA may have potential for fluorescence-reported changes in dielectric environment at length scales of ∼1 nm.

  18. NDE to assess the effectiveness of boron-epoxy repairs to complex-shaped aircraft components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, C. M.; Burke, S. K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper presents the results of recent DSTO research to develop NDE for crack monitoring under boron reinforcement/repairs adhesively bonded to curved surfaces. Experimental results are given for the application of a range of innovative eddy-current and ultrasonic techniques to reinforced curved surfaces in both F-18 aileron hinges and bulkheads. The presence of curved surfaces made the application of conventional ultrasonics techniques difficult, due to the resulting complex wave propagation paths in the composite/substrate combination and the difficulty of maintaining probe coupling. However, a novel ultrasonic technique was developed which successfully detected very small cracks. The curved surfaces also complicated the application of eddy-current testing, particularly in terms of controlling probe lift-off. The paper addresses the effect of variations in lift-off in detail, particularly in relation to their effect on the sensitivity of eddy-current techniques as applied to bonded repairs on curved surfaces. Possible solutions to this lift-off problem are discussed. Finally, the paper discusses directions for future research on NDE for bonded repairs to complex-shaped components.

  19. Effect of antimony incorporation on the density, shape, and luminescence of InAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. F.; Chiang, C. H.; Wu, Y. H.; Chang, L.; Chi, J. Y.

    2008-07-01

    This work investigates the surfactant effect on exposed and buried InAs quantum dots (QDs) by incorporating Sb into the QD layers with various Sb beam equivalent pressures (BEPs). Secondary ion mass spectroscopy shows the presence of Sb in the exposed and buried QD layers with the Sb intensity in the exposed layer substantially exceeding that in the buried layer. Incorporating Sb can reduce the density of the exposed QDs by more than two orders of magnitude. However, a high Sb BEP yields a surface morphology with a regular periodic structure of ellipsoid terraces. A good room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) at ˜1600 nm from the exposed QDs is observed, suggesting that the Sb incorporation probably improves the emission efficiency by reducing the surface recombination velocity at the surface of the exposed QDs. Increasing Sb BEP causes a blueshift of the emission from the exposed QDs due to a reduction in the dot height as suggested by atomic force microscopy. Increasing Sb BEP can also blueshift the ˜1300 nm emission from the buried QDs by decreasing the dot height. However, a high Sb BEP yields a quantum well-like PL feature formed by the clustering of the buried QDs into an undulated planar layer. These results indicate a marked Sb surfactant effect that can be used to control the density, shape, and luminescence of the exposed and buried QDs.

  20. Room temperature magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Mn-In-Cr ferromagnetic shape memory alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkera, Harish Sharma; Singh, Inderdeep; Kaur, Davinder

    2017-02-01

    The influence of Cr substitution for In on the martensitic phase transformation and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) has been investigated in Ni-Mn-Cr-In ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) thin films fabricated by magnetron sputtering. Temperature dependent magnetization (M-T) measurements demonstrated that the martensitic transformation temperatures (TM) monotonously increase with the increase of Cr content due to change in valence electron concentration (e/a) and cell volume. From the study of isothermal magnetization curves (M-H), magnetocaloric effect around the martensitic transformation has been investigated in these FSMA thin films. The magnetic entropy change ∆SM of 7.0 mJ/cm3-K was observed in Ni51.1Mn34.9In9.5Cr4.5 film at 302 K in an applied field of 2 T. Further, the refrigerant capacity (RC) was also calculated for all the films in an applied field of 2 T. These findings indicate that the Cr doped Ni-Mn-In FSMA thin films are potential candidates for room temperature micro-length-scale magnetic refrigeration applications.

  1. Effect of Film-Hole Shape on Turbine Blade Film Cooling Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Teng, S.

    2000-01-01

    The detailed heat transfer coefficient and film cooling effectiveness distributions as well as tile detailed coolant jet temperature profiles on the suction side of a gas turbine blade A,ere measured using a transient liquid crystal image method and a traversing cold wire and a traversing thermocouple probe, respectively. The blade has only one row of film holes near the gill hole portion on the suction side of the blade. The hole geometries studied include standard cylindrical holes and holes with diffuser shaped exit portion (i.e. fanshaped holes and laidback fanshaped holes). Tests were performed on a five-blade linear cascade in a low-speed wind tunnel. The mainstream Reynolds number based on cascade exit velocity was 5.3 x 10(exp 5). Upstream unsteady wakes were simulated using a spoke-wheel type wake generator. The wake Strouhal number was kept at 0 or 0.1. Coolant blowing ratio was varied from 0.4 to 1.2. Results show that both expanded holes have significantly improved thermal protection over the surface downstream of the ejection location, particularly at high blowing ratios. However, the expanded hole injections induce earlier boundary layer transition to turbulence and enhance heat transfer coefficients at the latter part of the blade suction surface. In general, the unsteady wake tends to reduce film cooling effectiveness.

  2. Building academic health centers' capacity to shape and respond to comparative effectiveness research policy.

    PubMed

    VanLare, Jordan M; Conway, Patrick H; Rowe, John W

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, the focus on comparative effectiveness research (CER), the funding available to support it, and the range of possible effects of CER policy on academic health centers (AHCs) have increased substantially. CER has implications for the research, education, and clinical care components of AHCs' missions. The current funding and policy environment have created specific opportunities for AHCs to shape and respond to CER policies across the four dimensions of the CER enterprise: research, human and scientific capital, data infrastructure, and translation and dissemination. Characteristics such as the degree of physician-hospital integration, the status of a health information technology infrastructure, and the presence of a well-developed cross-functional health services research capacity linked to the care delivery enterprise could help AHCs respond to these opportunities and influence future policies. AHCs are also essential to the development of methodologies and the training of the next cadre of researchers. Further, a focus on understanding what works in health care and increasing adoption of evidence-based practice must become embedded in the fabric of AHCs. Those AHCs most successful in responding to the CER challenge may leverage it as a point of differentiation in the marketplace for health care and lead transformational improvements in health.

  3. Effect of Electrode Shape on Impedance of Single HeLa Cell: A COMSOL Simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min-Haw; Chang, Wen-Hao

    2015-01-01

    In disease prophylaxis, single cell inspection provides more detailed data compared to conventional examinations. At the individual cell level, the electrical properties of the cell are helpful for understanding the effects of cellular behavior. The electric field distribution affects the results of single cell impedance measurements whereas the electrode geometry affects the electric field distributions. Therefore, this study obtained numerical solutions by using the COMSOL multiphysics package to perform FEM simulations of the effects of electrode geometry on microfluidic devices. An equivalent circuit model incorporating the PBS solution, a pair of electrodes, and a cell is used to obtain the impedance of a single HeLa cell. Simulations indicated that the circle and parallel electrodes provide higher electric field strength compared to cross and standard electrodes at the same operating voltage. Additionally, increasing the operating voltage reduces the impedance magnitude of a single HeLa cell in all electrode shapes. Decreasing impedance magnitude of the single HeLa cell increases measurement sensitivity, but higher operational voltage will damage single HeLa cell.

  4. The effects of rotational flow, viscosity, thickness, and shape on transonic flutter dip phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Kaza, Krishna Rao V.

    1988-01-01

    The transonic flutter dip phenomena on thin airfoils, which are employed for propfan blades, is investigated using an integrated Euler/Navier-Stokes code and a two degrees of freedom typical section structural model. As a part of the code validation, the flutter characteristics of the NACA 64A010 airfoil are also investigated. In addition, the effects of artificial dissipation models, rotational flow, initial conditions, mean angle of attack, viscosity, airfoil thickness and shape on flutter are investigated. The results obtained with a Euler code for the NACA 64A010 airfoil are in reasonable agreement with published results obtained by using transonic small disturbance and Euler codes. The two artificial dissipation models, one based on the local pressure gradient scaled by a common factor and the other based on the local pressure gradient scaled by a spectral radius, predicted the same flutter speeds except in the recovery region for the case studied. The effects of rotational flow, initial conditions, mean angle of attack, and viscosity for the Reynold's number studied seem to be negligible or small on the minima of the flutter dip.

  5. On the mechanism of two way shape memory effect obtained by stabilized stress induced martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Guilemany, J.M.; Fernandez, J. . Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Metalurgia)

    1994-02-01

    Two way shape memory effect (TWME) can be obtained by suitable thermomechanical processing which involve repetitive training routines. J. Perkins found that TWME take place as a result of a macroscopic non-uniform residual stress field, concluding that plastic deformation was necessary to get TWME. K. Enami et al found that complex dislocations arrays are generated by thermomechanical cycling during the training procedure. TWME results obtained by the above training methods are not as good as would be expected, because during the thermal cycles, above and below A[sub f] and M[sub f] respectively, new dislocations are generated which interact with the dislocations that control TWME so giving a loss of TWME. A different training method has been developed by J.M. Guilemany et al based on the stabilization of stress induced martensite variants (SSIM). This method has been derived from the observation made by J. Perkins and R.O. Sponholz who found that retained (not stabilized) martensite acts as a nucleation site of thermal martensite. Thus, during cooling the stabilized martensite would grow or influence the nucleation and growth of the thermal martensite giving TWME. The effect of training temperature, time and stress on TWME obtained by SSIM has been studied.

  6. Effects of substrate preheating on the thin-wall part built by laser metal deposition shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Shijie; Liu, Weijun; Long, Risheng

    2014-10-01

    Laser metal deposition shaping (LMDS) is a state-of-the-art technology that combines rapid prototyping and laser processing. There are many factors affecting the quality, precision, microstructure and performance of the LMDS-deposited parts. Among these factors, substrate preheating is a significant one because it can change the heat history of the LMDS process. Preheating is generally adopted to reduce the residual stresses and the risk of thermal distortion and cracking. However, it changes the heat transfer conditions and affects the final microstructure and properties. In this work a numerical simulation model was established to analyze the heat transfer characteristics between deposited material and substrate, the influence rules of substrate preheating on the thermal behavior during LMDS, and the distribution characters of temperature and stress field. And then, the experimental methods were used to evaluate the effects of substrate preheating on the surface quality, microstructure, composition, hardness distribution, and mechanical properties of as-built thin-wall parts. The experimental results primarily agree with the theoretical analysis and numerical model, which indicates that in terms of the varied thermo-mechanical coupled field, the investigated microstructure and properties of formed components depend considerably on the initial temperature of the substrate, so the LMDS process can be effectively adjusted and controlled by means of substrate preheating.

  7. Similarities Among the Shapes of Writing and Their Effects on Learning.

    PubMed

    Treiman, Rebecca; Kessler, Brett

    2011-01-01

    Writing systems are usually studied in terms of the level of language that they represent, with little attention to the shapes that are used to do so. Those shapes are not random or accidental, however. They tend to be similar to one another within a script. Many of the Latin letters have a roughly vertical stem or hasta with an appendage or coda to the right. This arrangement is more common than one with the coda on the left of the hasta. We present data to show that young children are generally better at copying and writing from memory shapes such as and , which have the typical arrangement with the coda on the right, than those such as and , which do not. The results suggest that children start to learn about the statistics of the letter shapes before they know how or that these shapes represent language.

  8. Inactivation of Pmel alters melanosome shape but has only a subtle effect on visible pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Anders R; Watt, Brenda; Fard, Shahrzad Shirazi; Tenza, Danièle; Mannström, Paula; Narfström, Kristina; Ekesten, Björn; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Larsson, Jimmy; Ulfendahl, Mats; Kullander, Klas; Raposo, Graça; Kerje, Susanne; Hallböök, Finn; Marks, Michael S; Andersson, Leif

    2011-09-01

    PMEL is an amyloidogenic protein that appears to be exclusively expressed in pigment cells and forms intralumenal fibrils within early stage melanosomes upon which eumelanins deposit in later stages. PMEL is well conserved among vertebrates, and allelic variants in several species are associated with reduced levels of eumelanin in epidermal tissues. However, in most of these cases it is not clear whether the allelic variants reflect gain-of-function or loss-of-function, and no complete PMEL loss-of-function has been reported in a mammal. Here, we have created a mouse line in which the Pmel gene has been inactivated (Pmel⁻/⁻). These mice are fully viable, fertile, and display no obvious developmental defects. Melanosomes within Pmel⁻/⁻ melanocytes are spherical in contrast to the oblong shape present in wild-type animals. This feature was documented in primary cultures of skin-derived melanocytes as well as in retinal pigment epithelium cells and in uveal melanocytes. Inactivation of Pmel has only a mild effect on the coat color phenotype in four different genetic backgrounds, with the clearest effect in mice also carrying the brown/Tyrp1 mutation. This phenotype, which is similar to that observed with the spontaneous silver mutation in mice, strongly suggests that other previously described alleles in vertebrates with more striking effects on pigmentation are dominant-negative mutations. Despite a mild effect on visible pigmentation, inactivation of Pmel led to a substantial reduction in eumelanin content in hair, which demonstrates that PMEL has a critical role for maintaining efficient epidermal pigmentation.

  9. Inactivation of Pmel Alters Melanosome Shape But Has Only a Subtle Effect on Visible Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Hellström, Anders R.; Watt, Brenda; Fard, Shahrzad Shirazi; Tenza, Danièle; Mannström, Paula; Narfström, Kristina; Ekesten, Björn; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Larsson, Jimmy; Ulfendahl, Mats; Kullander, Klas; Raposo, Graça; Kerje, Susanne; Hallböök, Finn; Marks, Michael S.; Andersson, Leif

    2011-01-01

    PMEL is an amyloidogenic protein that appears to be exclusively expressed in pigment cells and forms intralumenal fibrils within early stage melanosomes upon which eumelanins deposit in later stages. PMEL is well conserved among vertebrates, and allelic variants in several species are associated with reduced levels of eumelanin in epidermal tissues. However, in most of these cases it is not clear whether the allelic variants reflect gain-of-function or loss-of-function, and no complete PMEL loss-of-function has been reported in a mammal. Here, we have created a mouse line in which the Pmel gene has been inactivated (Pmel −/−). These mice are fully viable, fertile, and display no obvious developmental defects. Melanosomes within Pmel −/− melanocytes are spherical in contrast to the oblong shape present in wild-type animals. This feature was documented in primary cultures of skin-derived melanocytes as well as in retinal pigment epithelium cells and in uveal melanocytes. Inactivation of Pmel has only a mild effect on the coat color phenotype in four different genetic backgrounds, with the clearest effect in mice also carrying the brown/Tyrp1 mutation. This phenotype, which is similar to that observed with the spontaneous silver mutation in mice, strongly suggests that other previously described alleles in vertebrates with more striking effects on pigmentation are dominant-negative mutations. Despite a mild effect on visible pigmentation, inactivation of Pmel led to a substantial reduction in eumelanin content in hair, which demonstrates that PMEL has a critical role for maintaining efficient epidermal pigmentation. PMID:21949658

  10. Early discrimination of Atlantic salmon smolt age: Time course of the relative effectiveness of body size and shape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearlstein, J.H.; Letcher, B.H.; Obedzinski, M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to test the relative effectiveness of morphological measurements and body size in predicting the smolt age of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and to determine the time course of body size and shape differences between smolt ages. Analyses were conducted on age-0 to age-2 fish that were stocked as fry in the West Brook, Massachusetts and on laboratory-raised age-0 to age-1 fish. Using both body size and shape, we could partition the age-0 fish collected during fall into future early or late smolts, although the predictive ability of body shape was somewhat weaker than that of body size, especially in the laboratory. Classification success averaged 81% (size) and 79% (shape) in the field and 85% (size) and 73% (shape) in the laboratory. Despite differences in smolt age between the field and the laboratory, the relative timing of growth rate differences between future early and late smolts was similar in the field and the laboratory and peaked at 50-60% of development from fry to smolt. While body shape differed between early and late smolts well before smoltification, it did not improve classification based on size alone.

  11. Effect of in vitro degradation of poly(D,L-lactide)/beta-tricalcium composite on its shape-memory properties.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Shaobing; Yu, Xiongjun; Li, Xiaohong; Feng, Bo; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie

    2008-07-01

    The in vitro degradation characteristic and shape-memory properties of poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA)/beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) composites were investigated because of their wide application in biomedical fields. In this article, PDLLA and crystalline beta-TCP were compounded and interesting shape-memory behaviors of the composite were first investigated. Then, in vitro degradation of the PDLLA/beta-TCP composites with weight ratios of 1:1, 2:1, and 3:1 was performed in phosphate buffer saline solution (PBS) (154 mM, pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C. The effect of in vitro degradation time for PDLLA/beta-TCP composites on shape-memory properties was studied by scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, gel permeation chromatography, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The changes of structural morphology, glass transition temperature (T(g)), molecular weight, and weight loss of composites matrix and pH change of degradation medium indicated that shape-memory effects at different degradation time were nonlinearly influenced because of the breaking down of polymer chain and the formation of degradation products. Furthermore, the results from XRD and FTIR implied that the degradation products, for example, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium hydrogen phosphate (CaHPO(4)), and calcium pyrophosphate (Ca(2)P(2)O(7)) phases also had some effects on shape-memory properties during the degradation.

  12. Deformation induced martensite in NiTi and its shape memory effects generated by low temperature laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yiliang; Ye, Chang; Lin, Dong; Suslov, Sergey; Cheng, Gary J.

    2012-08-01

    In this study, laser shock peening (LSP) was utilized to generate localized deformation induced martensite (DIM) in NiTi shape memory alloy. The DIM was investigated by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The effects of temperature and laser intensity on DIM transformation were investigated. It has been found that higher laser intensity and lower processing temperature leads to higher volume fraction of DIM. This is attributed to the increase of the chemical driving force and the increase in the density of potential martensite variant for martensite nucleation at low temperatures. The localized shape memory effect in micrometer scale after low temperature LSP has been evaluated.

  13. Shape-memory effect by specific biodegradable polymer blending for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Cha, Kook Jin; Lih, Eugene; Choi, Jiyeon; Joung, Yoon Ki; Ahn, Dong Jun; Han, Dong Keun

    2014-05-01

    Specific biodegradable polymers having shape-memory properties through "polymer-blend" method are investigated and their shape-switching in body temperature (37 °C) is characterized. Poly(L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) and poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) are dissolved in chloroform and the films of several blending ratios of PLCL/PLGA are prepared by solvent casting. The shape-memory properties of films are also examined using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Among the blending ratios, the PLCL50/PLGA50 film shows good performance of shape-fixity and shape-recovery based on glass transition temperature. It displays that the degree of shape recovery is 100% at 37 °C and the shape recovery proceeds within only 15 s. In vitro biocompatibility studies are shown to have good blood compatibility and cytocompatibility for the PLCL50/PLGA50 films. It is expected that this blended biodegradable polymer can be potentially used as a material for blood-contacting medical devices such as a self-expended vascular polymer stents and vascular closure devices in biomedical applications.

  14. Classification of particle effective shape ratios in cirrus clouds based on the lidar depolarization ratio.

    PubMed

    Noel, Vincent; Chepfer, Helene; Ledanois, Guy; Delaval, Arnaud; Flamant, Pierre H

    2002-07-20

    A shape classification technique for cirrus clouds that could be applied to future spaceborne lidars is presented. A ray-tracing code has been developed to simulate backscattered and depolarized lidar signals from cirrus clouds made of hexagonal-based crystals with various compositions and optical depth, taking into account multiple scattering. This code was used first to study the sensitivity of the linear depolarization rate to cloud optical and microphysical properties, then to classify particle shapes in cirrus clouds based on depolarization ratio measurements. As an example this technique has been applied to lidar measurements from 15 mid-latitude cirrus cloud cases taken in Palaiseau, France. Results show a majority of near-unity shape ratios as well as a strong correlation between shape ratios and temperature: The lowest temperatures lead to high shape ratios. The application of this technique to space-borne measurements would allow a large-scale classification of shape ratios in cirrus clouds, leading to better knowledge of the vertical variability of shapes, their dependence on temperature, and the formation processes of clouds.

  15. Collaborative effects of wavefront shaping and optical clearing agent in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonseung; Lee, Peter; Jo, YoungJu; Lee, KyeoReh; Tuchin, Valery V.; Jeong, Yong; Park, YongKeun

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that simultaneous application of optical clearing agents (OCAs) and complex wavefront shaping in optical coherence tomography (OCT) can provide significant enhancement of penetration depth and imaging quality. OCA reduces optical inhomogeneity of a highly scattering sample, and the wavefront shaping of illumination light controls multiple scattering, resulting in an enhancement of the penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio. A tissue phantom study shows that concurrent applications of OCA and wavefront shaping successfully operate in OCT imaging. The penetration depth enhancement is further demonstrated for ex vivo mouse ears, revealing hidden structures inaccessible with conventional OCT imaging.

  16. The effects of workforce-shaping tools on retirement: the case of the Department of Defense civil service.

    PubMed

    Asch, Beth J; Haider, Steven J; Zissimopoulos, Julie M

    2009-11-01

    Apriority area for the public health workforce research agenda is the study of the public health labor market and how wages and benefits affect workforce outcomes, including recruiting, retention, and retirement. This study provides an example of such a study for the Department of Defense civil service workforce. We analyze the financial incentives to retire that are specifically embedded in the retirement system and how different workforce-shaping policies would affect these incentives. The study then uses a recently estimated model of the effects of financial incentives on retirement behavior among defense civilians to predict how these workforce-shaping tools would affect retirement behavior. We find that buyouts, retention incentives, and other workforce-shaping tools have a sizable effect on predicted retirement behavior and therefore, could be useful policies to help manage retirement outflows.

  17. Analysis of the wobbling effect in a lens-shaped body rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minho

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the wobbling motion in a lens-shaped body rotation, focusing on the frequencies and the amplitude of nutation by filming the rotational motion and wobbling of the body. The friction coefficient of the surface is altered to examine its influence for two lenses with different curvature radii. MATLAB programs are developed to retrieve the Euler angles, which are graphed according to time. It is shown that the lens with a smaller curvature radius exhibits the wobbling effect in all cases, whereas the lens with a larger curvature radius shows such behaviour in limited circumstances. The study confirms that the friction coefficient has a negative linear correlation with the vertical axis declination amplitude with the R-squared value 0.878, showing that friction gives damping and causes smaller axis declination amplitudes. Negative linear correlation also exists with relation to the number of wobbles before the motion stops, where the R-squared value is 0.938, providing further evidence that friction and wobbling cause higher energy dissipation rates. The frequency of the wobbling motion only has a correlation with the curvature radius of the lens, showing no explicit correlation with the friction coefficient, with its R-squared value being 0.077. No losses of contact were observable in this motion. The overall process does not utilize particularly expensive apparatus and will be applicable for senior undergraduate students to experiment on and analyze the motion of a special situation regarding a rigid body that is both spinning and nutating.

  18. On the stability of satellite planes - I. Effects of mass, velocity, halo shape and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Nuwanthika; Arias, Veronica; Guglielmo, Magda; Lewis, Geraint F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Power, Chris

    2017-02-01

    The recently discovered vast thin plane of dwarf satellites orbiting the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) adds to the mystery of the small-scale distribution of the Local Group's galaxy population. Such well-defined planar structures are apparently rare occurrences in cold dark matter cosmological simulations, and we lack a coherent explanation of their formation and existence. In this paper, we explore the long-term survivability of thin planes of dwarfs in galactic haloes, focusing, in particular, on systems mimicking the observed Andromeda distribution. The key results show that, in general, planes of dwarf galaxies are fragile, sensitive to the shape of the dark matter halo and other perturbing effects. In fact, long-lived planes of satellites only exist in polar orbits in spherical dark matter haloes, presenting a challenge to the observed Andromeda plane that is significantly tilted with respect to the optical disc. Our conclusion is that, in the standard cosmological models, planes of satellites are generally short lived, and hence we must be located at a relatively special time in the evolution of the Andromeda Plane, lucky enough to see its coherent pattern.

  19. Hearing mouth shapes: Sound symbolism and the reverse McGurk effect.

    PubMed

    Spence, Charles; Deroy, Ophelia

    2012-01-01

    In their recent article, Sweeny, Guzman-Martinez, Ortega, Grabowecky, and Suzuki (2012) demonstrate that heard speech sounds modulate the perceived shape of briefly presented visual stimuli. Ovals, whose aspect ratio (relating width to height) varied on a trial-by-trial basis, were rated as looking wider when a /woo/ sound was presented, and as taller when a /wee/ sound was presented instead. On the one hand, these findings add to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that audiovisual correspondences can have perceptual (as well as decisional) effects. On the other hand, they prompt a question concerning their origin. Although the currently popular view is that crossmodal correspondences are based on the internalization of the natural multisensory statistics of the environment (see Spence, 2011), these new results suggest instead that certain correspondences may actually be based on the sensorimotor responses associated with human vocalizations. As such, the findings of Sweeny et al. help to breathe new life into Sapir's (1929) once-popular "embodied" explanation of sound symbolism. Furthermore, they pose a challenge for those psychologists wanting to determine which among a number of plausible accounts best explains the available data on crossmodal correspondences.

  20. A field study investigating effects of landmarks on territory size and shape

    PubMed Central

    Suriyampola, Piyumika S.; Eason, Perri K.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined how landmarks affect territories' fundamental characteristics. In this field study, we investigated effects of landmarks on territory size, shape and location in a cichlid fish (Amatitlania siquia). We provided cans as breeding sites and used plastic plants as landmarks. During 10 min trials, we recorded locations where residents chased intruders and used those locations to outline and measure the territory. In two experiments, we observed pairs without landmarks and with either a point landmark (one plant) or linear landmark (four plants) placed near the nest can. We alternated which trial occurred first and performed the second trial 24 h after the first. Territories were approximately round without landmarks or with a point landmark but were significantly more elongated when we added a linear landmark. Without landmarks, nests were centrally located; however, with any landmark, pairs set territory boundaries closer to the landmark and thus the nest. Territory size was significantly reduced in the presence of any landmark. This reduction suggests that a smaller territory with well-defined boundaries has greater benefits than a larger territory with less well-defined borders. PMID:24759367

  1. A field study investigating effects of landmarks on territory size and shape.

    PubMed

    Suriyampola, Piyumika S; Eason, Perri K

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined how landmarks affect territories' fundamental characteristics. In this field study, we investigated effects of landmarks on territory size, shape and location in a cichlid fish (Amatitlania siquia). We provided cans as breeding sites and used plastic plants as landmarks. During 10 min trials, we recorded locations where residents chased intruders and used those locations to outline and measure the territory. In two experiments, we observed pairs without landmarks and with either a point landmark (one plant) or linear landmark (four plants) placed near the nest can. We alternated which trial occurred first and performed the second trial 24 h after the first. Territories were approximately round without landmarks or with a point landmark but were significantly more elongated when we added a linear landmark. Without landmarks, nests were centrally located; however, with any landmark, pairs set territory boundaries closer to the landmark and thus the nest. Territory size was significantly reduced in the presence of any landmark. This reduction suggests that a smaller territory with well-defined boundaries has greater benefits than a larger territory with less well-defined borders.

  2. Effects of laser parameters on the geometrical characteristics of peg-shaped bionic coupling unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baoyu; Zhang, Zhihui; Liang, Yunhong; Yan, Qiongqiong; Ren, Luquan

    2014-12-01

    Peg-shaped bionic coupling unit (PBCU) processed by pulse laser is effective in anti-adhesion, anti-drag, anti-wear and anti-fatigue application. To obtain desired structural and morphological characteristics of the PBCU for industrial manufacturing, selection of proper processing parameters gradually becomes a growing important problem. Traditionally, the procedure of parameter selecting is often cost-plus and time-consuming. In this work, a statistical analysis of fabricating PBCU on the surface of medium carbon steel was conducted. The laser processing parameters utilized in the experiment and analysis are peak power 4-8 kW, pulse duration 6-16 ms and defocusing amount 6-10 mm. A series of mathematical models regarding the relationship between geometrical characteristics of PBCU and laser processing parameters were developed and checked. The results indicate that the developed models can be adequately used to control the structural and morphological characteristics of PBCU within the scope of analysis. Based on the models, the formation mechanism of the structural and morphological characteristics under different laser parameters were analyzed and discussed.

  3. Effect of Precipitate Shape and Habit on Mechanical Asymmetry in Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Joseph D.; Stanford, Nicole; Barnett, Matthew R.

    2013-07-01

    Asymmetric yield behavior in tension and compression is a common and usually undesirable feature of wrought magnesium alloys. To prevent yield asymmetry, it is necessary to favor slip over twinning, as it is the unidirectional nature of twinning combined with the strong textures produced in wrought magnesium alloys that produce yield asymmetry. In this article, the potential to use precipitates to strengthen selectively against twin growth is discussed. The effect of precipitate's shape and habit on strengthening of slip and twinning is calculated using simple Orowan-based models. It is shown that basal plate precipitates, although being poor strengtheners against basal slip, are good strengtheners against twin growth. This is because they produce the maximum unrelaxed back-stress when they remain unsheared inside the twin. The predictions of the model have been validated against experiments for two alloys that form different precipitate types: AZ91 (basal plates). and Z5 (c-axis rods). Crystal plasticity modeling has been used to predict that an optimized distribution of basal plate precipitates is expected to strongly reduce yield asymmetry, even in strongly textured magnesium alloy.

  4. Effects of nacelle position and shape on performance of subsonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, L. H.; Krivec, D. K.; Segall, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The reduction of installed-propulsion-system drag by installing circular and D-shaped-cross-section nacelles in an underwing-aft position is investigated experimentally in the NASA-Langley 16-foot transonic wind tunnel. Measurements were made at Mach 0.70 to 0.85, -2.5 to 4.1-deg angle of attack, and 3.4 to 4.0 million/ft Reynolds numbers using the NASA USB full-span transonic transport model; and results were compared with those for the wing-body and underwing-forward/pylon-mounted-nacelle (UTW) configurations. While all nacelle configurations are found to have interference drag, which can probably be reduced by eliminating supersonic flows, both aft configurations are shown to reduce drag relative to UTW and increase lift coefficients. The aft D-nacelle had the lowest drag, 6.8 percent of airplane drag lower than UTW at Mach 8.0 and lift coefficient 0.45. Wing pressure distributions and the effects of deflectors are discussed.

  5. Numerical study of mixing viscous fluids in T-shaped micro-channels with compressibility effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar; Harrison, Christopher; Sullivan, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    We study numerically the mixing processes of two miscible fluids in T-shaped micro-channels in the presence of compressibility effects. Three mixing modes are considered: `passive' mixing, which relies on the molecular diffusion and chaotic advection; `active' mixing relies on external disturbances, e.g. due to periodic compression; and a combination of these modes. In all cases considered, one of the fluids, fluid `A', is initially present in the dead-end region of the micro-channel. In the `passive' mixing case, the other fluid, fluid `B', flows through the open part of the channel at a constant flow rate. In the `active' case, this fluid is initially at rest but is then set in motion through pressure cycling. The combined case, involves the flow of fluid `B' in the presence of compression-decompression cycles. Numerical simulations are carried out for three different fluids, accounting for their compressibility, and their pressure-dependent e.g. density, viscosity, and diffusivity; a simple mixing rule is used to model the properties of the mixed fluids. Our results indicate that the vortices in the dead-end zone, engendered by the relative motion of the fluids leads to their mixing; the combination of mixing modes is shown to promote mixing efficiency significantly. Schlumberger-Doll Research.

  6. Effect of non-ideal clamping shape on the resonance frequencies of silicon nanocantilevers.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Samuel; Saya, Daisuke; Mazenq, Laurent; Perisanu, Sorin; Vincent, Pascal; Lazarus, Arnaud; Thomas, Olivier; Nicu, Liviu

    2011-06-17

    In this paper, we investigate the effects of non-ideal clamping shapes on the dynamic behavior of silicon nanocantilevers. We fabricated silicon nanocantilevers using silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers by employing stepper ultraviolet (UV) lithography, which permits a resolution of under 100 nm. The nanocantilevers were driven by electrostatic force inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Both lateral and out-of-plane resonance frequencies were visually detected with the SEM. Next, we discuss overhanging of the cantilever support and curvature at the clamping point in the silicon nanocantilevers, which generally arises in the fabrication process. We found that the fundamental out-of-plane frequency of a realistically clamped cantilever is always lower than that for a perfectly clamped cantilever, and depends on the cantilever width and the geometry of the clamping point structure. Using simulation with the finite-elements method, we demonstrate that this discrepancy is attributed to the particular geometry of the clamping point (non-zero joining curvatures and a flexible overhanging) that is obtained in the fabrication process. The influence of the material orthotropy is also investigated and is shown to be negligible.

  7. Effect of sulfur on the ductility of copper shaped-charge jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Chan, D.K.; King, W.E.; Schwartz, A.J.; Baker, E.L.

    1996-07-01

    We have observed that a change in bulk sulfur (S) content imposed by doping has a marked effect on ductility of copper shaped-charge jets as measured by breakup times and length-to-diameter ratios of the particulated jet. Baseline material was Oxygen-Free-Electronic (ofe) copper with a S concentration of 3-4 ppM. Several liners were doped using a Cu sulfide powder pack method to increase the S level up to 9 ppM, while keeping other impurities and microstructure unchanged. Using flash x-ray radiographs to record the formation of jets, both the length-to-diameter ratios of the jet particles and breakup times were measured. Increasing the bulk S content of ofe Cu to 9 ppM, the breakup times decreased from 186 to 147 {mu}s, while the length-to- diameter ratios observed at 260 {mu}s decreased from 8:1 to 5:1. Since the solubility of S in Cu at the processing temperatures is extremely low, we conclude that the bulk rise in S content is due to S segregating to the grain boundaries. Thus, the decrease in ductility of liners doped with S appears directly related to the S content at the grain boundaries.

  8. Subjective Significance Shapes Arousal Effects on Modified Stroop Task Performance: A Duality of Activation Mechanisms Account

    PubMed Central

    Imbir, Kamil K.

    2016-01-01

    Activation mechanisms such as arousal are known to be responsible for slowdown observed in the Emotional Stroop and modified Stroop tasks. Using the duality of mind perspective, we may conclude that both ways of processing information (automatic or controlled) should have their own mechanisms of activation, namely, arousal for an experiential mind, and subjective significance for a rational mind. To investigate the consequences of both, factorial manipulation was prepared. Other factors that influence Stroop task processing such as valence, concreteness, frequency, and word length were controlled. Subjective significance was expected to influence arousal effects. In the first study, the task was to name the color of font for activation charged words. In the second study, activation charged words were, at the same time, combined with an incongruent condition of the classical Stroop task around a fixation point. The task was to indicate the font color for color-meaning words. In both studies, subjective significance was found to shape the arousal impact on performance in terms of the slowdown reduction for words charged with subjective significance. PMID:26869974

  9. Recent Evolution in Rattus norvegicus Is Shaped by Declining Effective Population Size.

    PubMed

    Deinum, Eva E; Halligan, Daniel L; Ness, Rob W; Zhang, Yao-Hua; Cong, Lin; Zhang, Jian-Xu; Keightley, Peter D

    2015-10-01

    The brown rat, Rattus norvegicus, is both a notorious pest and a frequently used model in biomedical research. By analyzing genome sequences of 12 wild-caught brown rats from their presumed ancestral range in NE China, along with the sequence of a black rat, Rattus rattus, we investigate the selective and demographic forces shaping variation in the genome. We estimate that the recent effective population size (Ne) of this species = [Formula: see text], based on silent site diversity. We compare patterns of diversity in these genomes with patterns in multiple genome sequences of the house mouse (Mus musculus castaneus), which has a much larger Ne. This reveals an important role for variation in the strength of genetic drift in mammalian genome evolution. By a Pairwise Sequentially Markovian Coalescent analysis of demographic history, we infer that there has been a recent population size bottleneck in wild rats, which we date to approximately 20,000 years ago. Consistent with this, wild rat populations have experienced an increased flux of mildly deleterious mutations, which segregate at higher frequencies in protein-coding genes and conserved noncoding elements. This leads to negative estimates of the rate of adaptive evolution (α) in proteins and conserved noncoding elements, a result which we discuss in relation to the strongly positive estimates observed in wild house mice. As a consequence of the population bottleneck, wild rats also show a markedly slower decay of linkage disequilibrium with physical distance than wild house mice.

  10. Understanding the effect of size and shape of gold nanomaterials on nanometal surface energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Soumyadipta; Moulik, Satya Priya; Bhattacharya, Subhash Chandra

    2017-04-01

    Gold Nanomaterials (GNMs) interact with fluorophores via electromagnetic coupling under excitation. In this particular work we carried out (to the best of our knowledge for the first time) a comprehensive study of systematic quenching of a blue emitter 2-Anthracene Sulfonate (2-AS) in the presence of gold nanoparticles of different size and shape. We synthesized gold nanomaterials of four different dimensions [nanoparticle (0D), nanorod (1D), nanotriangle (2D) and nanobipyramids (3D)] and realized the underlying effect on the emitting dipole in terms of steady and time resolved fluorescence. Nanometal Surface Energy Transfer (NSET) has already been proved to be the best long range spectroscopic ruler so far. Many attempts have been made to understand the interaction between a fluorescent molecule and gold nanomaterials. But not a single model can interpret alone the interaction phenomena. We have opted three different models to compare the experimental and theoretical data. Due to the presence of size dependent absorptivity and dielectric function, modified CPS-Kuhn model was proved to be the worthiest to comprehend variance of behavior of an emitting dipole in close proximity to nanometal surface by coupling with the image dipole of gold nanomaterials.

  11. Dual effects of phytoestrogens result in u-shaped dose-response curves.

    PubMed Central

    Almstrup, Kristian; Fernández, Mariana F; Petersen, Jørgen H; Olea, Nicolas; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Leffers, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors can affect the endocrine system without directly interacting with receptors, for example, by interfering with the synthesis or metabolism of steroid hormones. The aromatase that converts testosterone to 17beta-estradiol is a possible target. In this paper we describe an assay that simultaneously detects aromatase inhibition and estrogenicity. The principle is similar to that of other MCF-7 estrogenicity assays, but with a fixed amount of testosterone added. The endogenous aromatase activity in MCF-7 cells converts some of the testosterone to 17beta-estradiol, which is assayed by quantifying differences in the expression level of the estrogen-induced pS2 mRNA. Potential aromatase inhibitors can be identified by a dose-dependent reduction in the pS2 mRNA expression level after exposure to testosterone and the test compound. Using this assay, we have investigated several compounds, including synthetic chemicals and phytoestrogens, for aromatase inhibition. The phytoestrogens, except genistein, were aromatase inhibitors at low concentrations (< 1 micro M) but estrogenic at higher concentrations (greater than or equal to 1 micro M), resulting in U-shaped dose-response curves. None of the tested synthetic chemicals were aromatase inhibitors. The low-dose aromatase inhibition distinguished phytoestrogens from other estrogenic compounds and may partly explain reports about antiestrogenic properties of phytoestrogens. Aromatase inhibition may play an important role in the protective effects of phytoestrogens against breast cancer. PMID:12153753

  12. Effect of Size, Content and Shape of Reinforcements on the Behavior of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) Under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknia, A.; Pramanik, A.; Dixit, A. R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites (MMCs) 6061 aluminum, reinforced with silicon carbide particles, under unidirectional tensile loading by finite element analysis. The effects of particle's shape, size and content on the tensile properties of the composites were studied and compared with each other. In addition, stress and strain distributions and possible particle fracture or debonding were investigated. It was found that, among different shapes, a certain shape of reinforcement particle provided better tensile properties for MMCs and, within each shape category, composites with smaller particle size and higher particle content (20%) also showed better properties. It was also found that when the reinforcement content was 10%, the effects of shape and size of the particles were negligible. Not only interfacial length between the reinforcement and matrix materials, but also state of matrix material, due to the presence of the reinforcement particles, affected the stiffness of the MMCs. In almost all of the cases, except for MMCs with triangular particles, when the stress increased, with the increase in the applied positive displacement, the stress distributions remained unchanged.

  13. Redundant Coding in Visual Search Displays: Effects of Shape and Colour.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-02-01

    results for refining color selection algorithms and for color coding in situations where the gamut of available colors is limited. In a secondary set of analyses, we note large performance differences as a function of target shape.

  14. Origin of shape anisotropy effects in solution-phase synthesized FePt nanomagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, D. A.; Guchhait, S.; Liu, H.; Ferdousi, F.; Corbet, C.; Xu, H.; Saha, S.; Ramon, M.; Banerjee, S. K.; Doczy, M.; Bourianoff, G.; Mathew, L.; Rao, R.; Ganguly, S.; Markert, J. T.

    2011-07-01

    Controlling the morphology of inorganic nanocrystals is important because many of their electronic attributes are highly sensitive to shape and aspect ratio. FePt nanocrystals have potential as advanced magnetic materials for ultrahigh-density memory. This is due to their high shape and/or magnetocrystalline anisotropy, which allows bits as small as 3 nm to be thermally stable over typical data storage periods of 10 years. Herein, nanocrystals were simply fabricated by simultaneous reduction of platinum acetylacetonate and thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl in properly chosen conditions of solvent/surfactant proportions and temperature for rational design of their shape and magnetic properties. This work has combined magnetometry measurements and micromagnetic simulations to illustrate the role of the external shape on the rotation of the magnetization vector for colloidal assemblies.

  15. Analytical models for GaN-based heterostructure-free normally off fin-shaped field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guangxi; Qiang, Haisheng; Hu, Shuyan; Liu, Ran; Zheng, Lirong; Zhou, Xing

    2017-02-01

    Analytical models for threshold voltage and subthreshold swing of GaN-based fin-shaped field-effect transistors (FinFETs) are obtained. Analytical expressions for the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and threshold voltage roll-off effect are presented. The explicit expressions for threshold voltage and subthreshold swing make the model suitable for being embedded in circuit simulations and design tools.

  16. Effect of growth and development on cephalometric shapes in orthodontic patients: a Fourier analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Poggio, C E; Colombo, A; Cova, M

    1997-12-01

    The age- and gender-related shape variations of the craniofacial skeleton in skeletal Class I children were quantified using a Fourier analysis on the pre-treatment lateral head films of 122 orthodontic patients (age range 7-15 years), who were subdivided into six groups for sex and age (2-year intervals). Seven landmarks representative of the maxillo-mandibular sagittal and vertical relationship were identified and digitized. The contiguous landmarks were connected by segments, the form was normalized with respect to its orientation and size, and a Fourier analysis of the contour was performed. Mean values of the cosine and sine coefficients of the first six harmonics in the sex and age classes were computed. The size-standardized outlines of the oldest boys were narrower and longer than the outlines of the youngest boys (differences at gonion, menton, sella and nasion). Shape differences between mean plots in girls were negligible. In the youngest patients, girls had a larger size-independent shape in the mandibular region; their shape was narrower (anterior-posterior direction) and longer (vertical direction) than male shape. In the oldest patients, boys had a larger size-independent shape at gonion, and a narrower shape at articulare and pogonion than girls. Size increased from the youngest to the oldest boys; size differences were not conspicuous in girls. Within an age class, male size was always larger than female. Fourier analysis allowed a global evaluation of the cephalometric forms, with separate quantifications of the age- and gender-related differences in size and shape.

  17. Passive mechanical models of fish caudal fins: effects of shape and stiffness on self-propulsion.

    PubMed

    Feilich, Kara L; Lauder, George V

    2015-04-16

    Fishes are found in a great variety of body forms with tail shapes that vary from forked tuna-like tails to the square-shaped tails found in some deep-bodied species. Hydrodynamic theory suggests that a fish's body and tail shape affects undulatory swimming performance. For example, a narrow caudal peduncle is believed to reduce drag, and a tuna-like tail to increase thrust. Despite the prevalence of these assertions, there is no experimental verification of the hydrodynamic mechanisms that may confer advantages on specific forms. Here, we use a mechanically-actuated flapping foil model to study how two aspects of shape, caudal peduncle depth and presence or absence of a forked caudal fin, may affect different aspects of swimming performance. Four different foil shapes were each made of plastics of three different flexural stiffnesses, permitting us to study how shape might interact with stiffness to produce swimming performance. For each foil, we measured the self-propelling swimming speed. In addition, we measured the forces, torques, cost of transport and power coefficient of each foil swimming at its self-propelling speed. There was no single 'optimal' foil exhibiting the highest performance in all metrics, and for almost all measures of swimming performance, foil shape and flexural stiffness interacted in complicated ways. Particle image velocimetry of several foils suggested that stiffness might affect the relative phasing of the body trailing edge and the caudal fin leading edge, changing the flow incident to the tail, and affecting hydrodynamics of the entire foil. The results of this study of a simplified model of fish body and tail morphology suggest that considerable caution should be used when inferring a swimming performance advantage from body and tail shape alone.

  18. Effects of shielding coatings on the anode shaping process during counter-rotating electrochemical machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dengyong; Zhu, Zengwei; Wang, Ningfeng; Zhu, Di

    2016-09-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) has been widely used in the aerospace, automotive, defense and medical industries for its many advantages over traditional machining methods. However, the machining accuracy in ECM is to a great extent limited by the stray corrosion of the unwanted material removal. Many attempts have been made to improve the ECM accuracy, such as the use of a pulse power, passivating electrolytes and auxiliary electrodes. However, they are sometimes insufficient for the reduction of the stray removal and have their limitations in many cases. To solve the stray corrosion problem in CRECM, insulating and conductive coatings are respectively used. The different implement processes of the two kinds of coatings are introduced. The effects of the two kinds of shielding coatings on the anode shaping process are investigated. Numerical simulations and experiments are conducted for the comparison of the two coatings. The simulation and experimental results show that both the two kinds of coatings are valid for the reduction of stray corrosion on the top surface of the convex structure. However, for insulating coating, the convex sidewall becomes concave when the height of the convex structure is over 1.26 mm. In addition, it is easy to peel off by the high-speed electrolyte. In contrast, the conductive coating has a strong adhesion, and can be well reserved during the whole machining process. The convex structure fabricated by using a conductive iron coating layer presents a favorable sidewall profile. It is concluded that the conductive coating is more effective for the improvement of the machining quality in CRECM. The proposed shielding coatings can also be employed to reduce the stray corrosion in other schemes of ECM.

  19. Vibration shape effects on the power output in piezoelectric vibro-impact energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twiefel, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Vibro-Impcact harvesting devices are one concept to increase the bandwidth of resonant operated piezoelectric vibration generators. The fundamental setup is a piezoelectric bending element, where the deflection is limited by two stoppers. After starting the system in resonance operation the bandwidth increases towards higher frequencies as soon the deflection reach the stopper. If the stoppers are rigid, the frequency response gives constant amplitude for increasing frequencies, as long the system is treated as ideal one-DOF system with symmetric stoppers. In consequence, the bandwidth is theoretically unlimited large. However, such a system also has two major drawbacks, firstly the complicated startup mechanism and secondly the tendency to drop from the high constant branch in the frequency response on the much smaller linear branch if the system is disturbed. Nevertheless, the system has its application wherever the startup problem can be solved. Most modeling approaches utilize modal one-DOF models to describe the systems behavior and do not tread the higher harmonics of the beam. This work investigates the effects of the stoppers on the vibration shape of the piezoelectric beam, wherefore a finite element model is used. The used elements are one-dimensional two node elements based on the Timoshenko-beam theory. The finite element code is implemented in Matlab. The model is calculated utilizing time step integration for simulation, to reduce the computation time an auto-resonant calculation method is implemented. A control loop including positive feedback and saturation is used to create a self-excited system. Therefore, the system is always operated in resonance (on the backbone curve) and the frequency is a direct result of the computation. In this case tip velocity is used as feedback. This technique allows effective parametric studies. Investigated parameters include gap, excitation amplitude, tip mass as well as the stiffness of the stopper. The stress and

  20. Shape Beyond Recognition: Form-derived Directionality and its Effects on Visual Attention and Motion Perception

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdardottir, Heida M.; Michalak, Suzanne M.; Sheinberg, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The shape of an object restricts its movements and therefore its future location. The rules governing selective sampling of the environment likely incorporate any available data, including shape, that provide information about where important things are going to be in the near future so that the object can be located, tracked, and sampled for information. We asked people to assess in which direction several novel objects pointed or directed them. With independent groups of people, we investigated whether their attention and sense of motion were systematically biased in this direction. Our work shows that nearly any novel object has intrinsic directionality derived from its shape. This shape information is swiftly and automatically incorporated into the allocation of overt and covert visual orienting and the detection of motion, processes which themselves are inherently directional. The observed connection between form and space suggests that shape processing goes beyond recognition alone and may help explain why shape is a relevant dimension throughout the visual brain. PMID:23565670

  1. Unusual shapes for a catenary under the effects of surface tension and gravity: A variational treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Behroozi, F. ); Mohazzabi, P.; McCrickard, J. )

    1995-02-01

    The familiar catenary is the shape assumed by a chain or string as it hangs from two points. The mathematical equation of the catenary was first published more than three hundred years ago by Leibnitz and Huygen, among others. Here we consider the shapes assumed by a hanging string in the presence of gravity and surface tension. The surface tension is introduced by suspending the string from a thin horizontal rod while the area bounded by the string and the rod is covered with a soap film. The string then assumes new and wonderful shapes depending on the relative strength of the surface tension and the weight per unit length of the string. When surface tension dominates, the string is pulled inward, assuming a convex shape similar to the Greek letter [gamma]. On the other hand, when gravity is dominant the string is pulled outward and assumes a concave shape best described as a distorted catenary. However, when the gravitational force normal to the string matches the surface tension, the string takes a linear configuration similar to the letter [ital V]. Under suitable conditions, the string can be made to assume any of the three configurations by adjusting the separation of its end points. The equations that describe the shape of the string are derived by minimizing the total energy of the system and are presented for the three principal configurations.

  2. Elastic poly(ε-caprolactone)-polydimethylsiloxane copolymer fibers with shape memory effect for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kai, Dan; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Chan, Benjamin Qi Yu; Liow, Sing Shy; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Xu, Fujian; Loh, Xian Jun

    2016-02-02

    A porous shape memory scaffold with biomimetic architecture is highly promising for bone tissue engineering applications. In this study, a series of new shape memory polyurethanes consisting of organic poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) segments and inorganic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) segments in different ratios (9 : 1, 8 : 2 and 7 : 3) was synthesised. These PCL-PDMS copolymers were further engineered into porous fibrous scaffolds by electrospinning. With different ratios of PCL: PDMS, the fibers showed various fiber diameters, thermal behaviour and mechanical properties. Even after being processed into fibrous structures, these PCL-PDMS copolymers maintained their shape memory properties, and all the fibers exhibited excellent shape recovery ratios of  >90% and shape fixity ratios of  >92% after 7 thermo-mechanical cycles. Biological assay results corroborated that the fibrous PCL-PDMS scaffolds were biocompatible by promoting osteoblast proliferation, functionally enhanced biomineralization-relevant alkaline phosphatase expression and mineral deposition. Our study demonstrated that the PCL-PDMS fibers with excellent shape memory properties are promising substrates as bioengineered grafts for bone regeneration.

  3. Effects of parallelogram-shaped pavement markings on vehicle speed and safety of pedestrian crosswalks on urban roads in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanyong; Liu, Pan; Liang, Qiyu; Wang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of parallelogram-shaped pavement markings on vehicle speed and crashes in the vicinity of urban pedestrian crosswalks. The research team measured speed data at twelve sites, and crash data at eleven sites. Observational cross-sectional studies were conducted to identify if the effects of parallelogram-shaped pavement markings on vehicle speeds and speed violations were statistically significant. The results showed that parallelogram-shaped pavement markings significantly reduced vehicle speeds and speed violations in the vicinity of pedestrian crosswalks. More specifically, the speed reduction effects varied from 1.89km/h to 4.41km/h with an average of 3.79km/h. The reduction in the 85th percentile speed varied from 0.81km/h to 5.34km/h with an average of 4.19km/h. Odds ratios (OR) showed that the parallelogram-shaped pavement markings had effects of a 7.1% reduction in the mean speed and a 6.9% reduction in the 85th percentile speed at the pedestrian crosswalks. The reduction of proportion of drivers exceeding the speed limit varied from 8.64% to 14.15% with an average of 11.03%. The results of the crash data analysis suggested that the use of parallelogram-shaped pavement markings reduced both the frequency and severity of crashes at pedestrian crosswalks. The parallelogram-shaped pavement markings had a significant effect on reducing the vehicle-pedestrian crashes. Two crash prediction models were developed for vehicle-pedestrian crashes and rear-end crashes. According to the crash models, the presence of parallelogram-shaped pavement markings reduced vehicle-pedestrian crashes at pedestrian crosswalks by 24.87% with a 95% confidence interval of [10.06-30.78%]. However, the model results also showed that the presence of parallelogram-shaped pavement markings increased rear-end crashes at pedestrian crosswalks by 5.4% with a 95% confidence interval of [0-11.2%].

  4. Characterization of Stoichiometric and Aging Effects on NiTiHf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Daniel Robert

    NiTiHf ternary alloys exhibit attractive high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) properties. Material properties include moderate transformation strain, relatively high transformation temperature, stable pseudoelastic (PE) behavior, and very small irrecoverable strain during load biased tests. The addition of Hf is more attractive than Pt and Pd due to the fact that Hf has a lower cost. Four NiTiHf alloys with different chemical compositions spanning stoichiometry were used to analyze microstructure and mechanical behavior. Research will mainly be focused on the Ni-rich alloys based on that the Ni-lean alloys do not exhibit the previously mentioned HTSMA material properties. The alloys analyzed all had 20(at.)% Hf with varying Ti concentrations (29(at.)%, 29.7(at.)%, 30(at.)%, and 30.5(at.)%). All of the alloys were formed by induction melting, homogenized at 1050C for 72hrs, and then hot extruded with a diameter reduction of 7:1 at a temperature of 900C. In addition to the homogenized and extruded condition, several short-term aging cycles above 400C were completed on each of the alloys. Certain microstructure and mechanical properties are obtained when Hf is added to NiTi and a proper aging cycle is used. Results from isothermal compression tests that were executed above the austenite finish temperature determined that the Ni-rich NiTiHf alloys exhibited all the necessary properties to be considered for HTSMA applications. The test temperature range of the isothermal compression tests were chosen to characterize the transition from PE behavior to austenite plasticity and to examine the deformation behavior of the B2 phase at high temperatures. Results from compression tests showed a strengthening effect when the test temperature was increased through the PE test region. The strengthening effect is due to the yield stress and plasticity being related to the stress induced martensite that is created during the compression test executed above the austenite

  5. Effects of Anticaricaturing vs. Caricaturing and Their Neural Correlates Elucidate a Role of Shape for Face Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Claudia; Kaufmann, Jurgen M.; Walther, Lydia; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the role of shape information for unfamiliar face learning, we investigated effects of photorealistic spatial anticaricaturing and caricaturing on later face recognition. We assessed behavioural performance and event-related brain potential (ERP) correlates of recognition, using different images of anticaricatures, veridical faces, or…

  6. NEUTRON-PROTON EFFECTIVE RANGE PARAMETERS AND ZERO-ENERGY SHAPE DEPENDENCE.

    SciTech Connect

    HACKENBURG, R.W.

    2005-06-01

    A completely model-independent effective range theory fit to available, unpolarized, np scattering data below 3 MeV determines the zero-energy free proton cross section {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.4287 {+-} 0.0078 b, the singlet apparent effective range r{sub s} = 2.754 {+-} 0.018{sub stat} {+-} 0.056{sub syst} fm, and improves the error slightly on the parahydrogen coherent scattering length, a{sub c} = -3.7406 {+-} 0.0010 fm. The triplet and singlet scattering lengths and the triplet mixed effective range are calculated to be a{sub t} = 5.4114 {+-} 0.0015 fm, a{sub s} = -23.7153 {+-} 0.0043 fm, and {rho}{sub t}(0,-{epsilon}{sub t}) = 1.7468 {+-} 0.0019 fm. The model-independent analysis also determines the zero-energy effective ranges by treating them as separate fit parameters without the constraint from the deuteron binding energy {epsilon}{sub t}. These are determined to be {rho}{sub t}(0,0) = 1.705 {+-} 0.023 fm and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) = 2.665 {+-} 0.056 fm. This determination of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is most sensitive to the sparse data between about 20 and 600 keV, where the correlation between the determined values of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is at a minimum. This correlation is responsible for the large systematic error in r{sub s}. More precise data in this range are needed. The present data do not event determine (with confidence) that {rho}{sub t}(0,0) {ne} {rho}{sub t}(0, -{epsilon}{sub t}), referred to here as ''zero-energy shape dependence''. The widely used measurement of {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.491 {+-} 0.014 b from W. Dilg, Phys. Rev. C 11, 103 (1975), is argued to be in error.

  7. Beyond-mean-field study of the hyperon impurity effect in hypernuclei with shape coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. Y.; Mei, H.; Yao, J. M.; Zhou, Xian-Rong

    2017-03-01

    Background: The hyperon impurity effect in nuclei has been extensively studied in different mean-field models. Recently, there is a controversy about whether the Λ hyperon is more tightly bound in the normal deformed (ND) states than that in the superdeformed (SD) states. Purpose: This article is aimed to provide a beyond-mean-field study of the low-lying states of hypernuclei with shape coexistence and to shed some light on the controversy. Method: The models of relativistic mean field and beyond based on a relativistic point-coupling energy functional are adopted to study the low-lying states of both Ar37Lambda; and 36Ar. The wave functions of low-lying states are constructed as a superposition of a set of relativistic mean-field states with different values of quadrupole deformation parameter. The projections onto both particle number and angular momentum are considered. Results: The Λ binding energies in both ND and SD states of Ar37Lambda; are studied in the case of the Λ hyperon occupying the s ,p , or d state in the spherical limit, respectively. For comparison, four sets of nucleon-hyperon point-coupling interactions are used, respectively. Moreover, the spectra of low-lying states in 36Ar and Ar Lambda;s37 are calculated based on the same nuclear energy density functional. The results indicate that the SD states exist in Ar37Lambda; for all four effective interactions. Furthermore, the Λs reduces the quadrupole collectivity of ND states to a greater extent than that of SD states. For Ar37Lambda;, the beyond-mean field decreases the Λs binding energy of the SD state by 0.17 MeV, but it almost has no effect on that of the ND state. Conclusions: In Ar Lambda;s37 , the Λp and Λd binding energies of the SD states are always larger than those of the ND states. For Λs, the conclusion depends on the effective nucleon-hyperon interaction. Moreover, the beyond-mean-field model

  8. New system for manipulation of nanoobjects based on composite Ti2NiCu/Pt nanotweezers with shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhikharev, A. M.; Irzhak, A. V.; Beresin, M. Y.; Lega, P. V.; Koledov, V. V.; Kasyanov, N. N.; Martynov, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    We report the new system for manipulation of nanoobjects based on composite Ti2NiCu/Pt nanotweezers with shape memory effect. The design consists of the bimetallic Ti2NiCu/Pt shape memory nanotweezers placed on a tip of electrochemically etched tungsten needle. The semiconductor diode placed on the tip of the needle plays both role of resistive element of the heater and temperature sensor for feedback control loop closing. The device is compatible with existing positioning systems like OmniProbe®, Kleindiek®, etc. and may find numerous practical applications in various tasks of nanotechnology connected with 3D manipulation.

  9. Effect of cross-sectional shape on the propagation characteristics of fundamental plasmon mode guided along Au and Ag nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitender; Kumar, Arun

    2017-01-01

    We numerically examine the effect of the cross-sectional shape on the propagation characteristics of the fundamental surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode guided along Au and Ag nanowires. It is observed that as the cross-sectional symmetry decreases from circular to triangular via pentagonal and square, the modal confinement, loss and dispersion increases. Further the difference in propagation characteristics between circular and other cross-sections increases rapidly as the wavelength of operation decreases. The study should be useful for selecting the cross-sectional shape of the nanowire for a particular application.

  10. Exploiting object constancy: effects of active exploration and shape morphing on similarity judgments of novel objects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haemy; Wallraven, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Humans are experts at shape processing. This expertise has been learned and fine tuned by actively manipulating and perceiving thousands of objects during development. Therefore, shape processing possesses an active component and a perceptual component. Here, we investigate both components in six experiments in which participants view and/or interact with novel, parametrically defined 3D objects using a touch-screen interface. For probing shape processing, we use a similarity rating task. In Experiments 1-3, we show that active manipulation leads to a better perceptual reconstruction of the physical parameter space than judging rotating objects, or passively viewing someone else's exploration pattern. In Experiment 4, we exploit object constancy-the fact that the visual system assumes that objects do not change their identity during manipulation. We show that slow morphing of an object during active manipulation systematically biases similarity ratings-despite the participants being unaware of the morphing. Experiments 5 and 6 investigate the time course of integrating shape information by restricting the morphing to the first and second half of the trial only. Interestingly, the results indicate that participants do not seem to integrate shape information beyond 5 s of exploration time. Finally, Experiment 7 uses a secondary task that suggests that the previous results are not simply due to lack of attention during the later parts of the trial. In summary, our results demonstrate the advantage of active manipulation for shape processing and indicate a continued, perceptual integration of complex shape information within a time window of a few seconds during object interactions.

  11. Effects of heat treatment on shape-setting and non-linearmechanical properties of Nitinol stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Yinong; Qi, Min; Yang, Dazhi

    2007-07-01

    NiTi shape memory alloy is a temperature sensitive material with non-linear mechanical properties and good biocompatibility, which can be used for medical devices such as stent, catheter guide wire and orthodontic wire. The majority of nitinol stents are of the self-expanding type basing on the superelasticity. Nitinol stents are shape set into the open condition and compressed and inserted into the delivery catheter. Additional the shape-setting treatment can be used as a tool to accurately tune the transformation temperatures and mechanical properties. In this study, different heat treatments have been performed on the Ti-50.7at%Ni alloy wires. And results of shape-setting, austenite transformation finish temperature and non-linear mechanical property of NiTi shape memory alloy at body temperature have been investigated. The experimental results show that the proper shape-setting temperature should be chosen between 450-550 °C. And the shape-setting results were stabilization when the NiTi wires were constrain-treated at 500 and 550°C and ageing time longer than 10 minutes. The austenite finish temperatures increased with ageing time and increased first and then decreased with ageing temperature. The peak values were obtained at 400°C. When the heat treatments was performed at the same temperature, both the upper plateau stresses and lower plateau stresses decreased with the ageing time. Most of treated nitinol wires owned good recovery ability at body temperature and the permanent sets were less than 0.05% when short time ageing treatment was performed at 500°C.

  12. Metamagnetic shape memory effect in a Heusler-type Ni43Co7Mn39Sn11 polycrystalline alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainuma, R.; Imano, Y.; Ito, W.; Morito, H.; Sutou, Y.; Oikawa, K.; Fujita, A.; Ishida, K.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.; Kanomata, T.

    2006-05-01

    Shape memory and magnetic properties of a Ni43Co7Mn39Sn11 Heusler polycrystalline alloy were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, the sample extraction method, and the three-terminal capacitance method. A unique martensitic transformation from the ferromagnetic parent phase to the antiferromagneticlike martensite phase was detected and magnetic-field-induced "reverse" transition was confirmed in a high magnetic field. In addition, a large magnetic-field-induced shape recovery strain of about 1.0% was observed to accompany reverse martensitic transformation, and the metamagnetic shape memory effect, which was firstly reported in a Ni45Co5Mn36.7In13.3 Heusler single crystal, was confirmed in a polycrystalline specimen.

  13. Effect of external tank nose shape on the Rockwell International space shuttle vehicle 3, integrated configuration (IA37B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    Tests of several tank nose shapes were conducted as a part of the investigation of configuration changes to reduce drag for the integrated vehicle. The effect on the integrated vehicle aerodynamic characteristics of several tank nose shapes was investigated. The tank nose shapes investigated were the 600 inch (baseline) and 1204 inch radius ogives, and the 600 inch ogive plus a spike 360 inches long and 12.0 inches in diameter. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.6 through 4.96 and for angles-of-attack and sideslip from -10 through +10 degrees. The model used was the 0.004-scale integrated vehicle model number 34-OTS.

  14. Shape memory effect of thermoplastic segmented polyurethanes with self-complementary quadruple hydrogen bonding in soft segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong; Hu, Jinlian; Liu, Yijun

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the fact that a kind of thermoplastic shape memory polyurethane with self-complementary quadruple hydrogen bonding units in soft segments can present a significant shape memory effect under the usually used thermodynamic programming condition. Compared with the control sample, it was observed that the introduction of self-complementary quadruple hydrogen bonding into soft segments increases the glass transition temperature from 28.3 ° C to 73.3 ° C. Therefore, the temporary deformation can be fixed well after cooling at room temperature; subsequently thermal responsive shape memory recovery can be triggered by heating up to 86 ° C. The immediate shape recovery ratio and shape fixity ratio can be 95.8% and 95.9%. Even after 24 hours relaxation for the stretched films, the corresponding Rr and Rf can be 94% and 60%. In contrast, the sample without quadruple hydrogen bonding shows that the elasticity and the deformation cannot be fixed after 24 hours relaxation. Supplementary material in the form of a doc file available from the journal web page at 10.1140/epje/i2008-10395-2 and are accessible for authorised users.

  15. Variation in the cranium shape of wall lizards (Podarcis spp.): effects of phylogenetic constraints, allometric constraints and ecology.

    PubMed

    Urošević, Aleksandar; Ljubisavljević, Katarina; Jelić, Dušan; Ivanović, Ana

    2012-08-01

    We used geometric morphometrics to explore the influence of phylogenetic and allometric constraints as well as ecology on variation in cranium shape in five species of monophyletic, morphologically similar Podarcis lizards (Podarcis erhardii, Podarcis melisellensis, Podarcis muralis, Podarcis sicula and Podarcis taurica). These species belong to different clades, they differ in their habitat preferences and can be classified into two distinct morphotypes: saxicolous and terrestrial. We found (i) no phylogenetic signal in cranium shape, (ii) diverging allometric slopes among species, and (iii) a significant effect of habitat on cranium shape. The saxicolous species (P. erhardii and P. muralis) had crania with elongated parietals, elongated cranium bases, shortened anterior parts of the dorsal cranium, reduced chambers of the jaw adductor muscles and larger subocular foramina. These cranial features are adaptations that compensate for a flattened cranium, dwelling on vertical surfaces and seeking refuge in crevices. The crania of the terrestrial species (P. melisellensis, P. sicula and P. taurica) tended to be more elongate and robust, with enlarged chambers of the jaw adductor muscle, reduced skull bases and shortened parietals. Terrestrial species exhibited more variation in cranium shape than saxicolous species. Our study suggests that shape variation in Podarcis sp. lizards is largely influenced by ecology, which likely affects species-specific patterns of static allometry.

  16. A Combinational Effect of "Bulk" and "Surface" Shape-Memory Transitions on the Regulation of Cell Alignment.

    PubMed

    Uto, Koichiro; Aoyagi, Takao; DeForest, Cole A; Hoffman, Allan S; Ebara, Mitsuhiro

    2017-02-07

    A novel shape-memory cell culture platform has been designed that is capable of simultaneously tuning surface topography and dimensionality to manipulate cell alignment. By crosslinking poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) macromonomers of precisely designed nanoarchitectures, a shape-memory PCL with switching temperature near body temperature is successfully prepared. The temporary strain-fixed PCLs are prepared by processing through heating, stretching, and cooling about the switching temperature. Temporary nanowrinkles are also formed spontaneously during the strain-fixing process with magnitudes that are dependent on the applied strain. The surface features completely transform from wrinkled to smooth upon shape-memory activation over a narrow temperature range. Shape-memory activation also triggers dimensional deformation in an initial fixed strain-dependent manner. A dynamic cell-orienting study demonstrates that surface topographical changes play a dominant role in cell alignment for samples with lower fixed strain, while dimensional changes play a dominant role in cell alignment for samples with higher fixed strain. The proposed shape-memory cell culture platform will become a powerful tool to investigate the effects of spatiotemporally presented mechanostructural stimuli on cell fate.

  17. Size effects on magnetic actuation in Ni-Mn-Ga shape-memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Dunand, David C; Müllner, Peter

    2011-01-11

    The off-stoichiometric Ni(2)MnGa Heusler alloy is a magnetic shape-memory alloy capable of reversible magnetic-field-induced strains (MFIS). These are generated by twin boundaries moving under the influence of an internal stress produced by a magnetic field through the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. While MFIS are very large (up to 10%) for monocrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga, they are near zero (<0.01%) in fine-grained polycrystals due to incompatibilities during twinning of neighboring grains and the resulting internal geometrical constraints. By growing the grains and/or shrinking the sample, the grain size becomes comparable to one or more characteristic sample sizes (film thickness, wire or strut diameter, ribbon width, particle diameter, etc), and the grains become surrounded by free space. This reduces the incompatibilities between neighboring grains and can favor twinning and thus increase the MFIS. This approach was validated recently with very large MFIS (0.2-8%) measured in Ni-Mn-Ga fibers and foams with bamboo grains with dimensions similar to the fiber or strut diameters and in thin plates where grain diameters are comparable to plate thickness. Here, we review processing, micro- and macrostructure, and magneto-mechanical properties of (i) Ni-Mn-Ga powders, fibers, ribbons and films with one or more small dimension, which are amenable to the growth of bamboo grains leading to large MFIS, and (ii) "constructs" from these structural elements (e.g., mats, laminates, textiles, foams and composites). Various strategies are proposed to accentuate this geometric effect which enables large MFIS in polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga by matching grain and sample sizes.

  18. Implications of particle composition and shape to dust radiative effect: A case study from the Great Indian Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Dey, Sagnik; Tripathi, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    The assessment of direct radiative forcing (DRF) of aerosol is uncertain, particularly where the natural dust particles mix with the anthropogenic components. One of the sources of such uncertainty is the assumption of morphology (size and shape) and composition of pure dust particles. Recently Mishra and Tripathi [2008] have computationally assessed the effect of particle morphology on optical properties over the Great Indian Desert. As a continuation of the previous study, in this paper, we have further examined the effects on dust radiative properties. Non-spherical pure dust particles show large variations in the optical and radiative properties from spherical pure dust particles, however, particle composition is found to have greater influence than particle shape on the radiative properties. Among the various shapes, sharp-edged particles show larger difference than smooth-shaped particles. Although the overall atmospheric absorption monotonically increases with increase in hematite content, maximum effect of particle non-sphericity at 4% hematite content implies that non-sphericity should be considered to minimize the uncertainty of regional estimates of aerosol DRF, as most of the global dusts contain that much hematite. However the difference in radiative properties for two different background dust cases due to particle morphology is low. Our results show that ignoring non-sphericity will lead to under-estimation of the regional warming and dust-absorption efficiency.

  19. Infrared light actuated shape memory effects in crystalline polyurethane/graphene chemical hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Kim, B. K.

    2014-02-01

    A series of crystalline shape memory polyurethanes (SMPUs) were synthesized from polycaprolactone diols and 4,4‧-methylenedicyclohexyl diisocyanate (H12MDI) with chemical incorporation of allyl isocyanate modified graphene oxide (iGO) into the PU. Actuation of hybrid SMPUs by infrared (IR) absorption of iGO as well as the direct heat actuated SMPUs has been studied in terms of the isothermal crystallization rate, near-IR absorption, and thermal, mechanical, and shape memory properties. It was found that iGO functions as a multifunctional cross-linker at low contents and a nucleating agent at high contents, and as a reinforcing filler, while light absorption by the iGO induced melting of the PU soft segment, giving rise to a shape recovery of over 90% at 1% iGO (G10).

  20. Effect of panel shape of soccer ball on its flight characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sungchan; Asai, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Soccer balls are typically constructed from 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, however, newer balls named Cafusa, Teamgeist 2, and Jabulani were respectively produced from 32, 14, and 8 panels with shapes and designs dramatically different from those of conventional balls. The newest type of ball, named Brazuca, was produced from six panels and will be used in the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil. There have, however, been few studies on the aerodynamic properties of balls constructed from different numbers and shapes of panels. Hence, we used wind tunnel tests and a kick-robot to examine the relationship between the panel shape and orientation of modern soccer balls and their aerodynamic and flight characteristics. We observed a correlation between the wind tunnel test results and the actual ball trajectories, and also clarified how the panel characteristics affected the flight of the ball, which enabled prediction of the trajectory. PMID:24875291

  1. Study of temporal pulse shape effects on W using simulations and laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Doerner, R. P.; van den Berg, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Transient heat pulses with triangular, square, and ELM-like temporal shapes are investigated in order to further understand how transient plasma instabilities will affect plasma facing components in tokamaks. A solution to the 1D heat equation for triangular pulses allows the peak surface temperature to be written analytically for arbitrary rise times. The solution as well as ANSYS simulations reveal that a positive ramp (maximum rise time) triangular pulse has a higher peak surface temperature by a factor of \\sqrt{2} compared to that from a negative ramp (rise time = 0) pulse shape with equal energy density, peak power, and pulse width. Translating the results to ITER, an ELM or disruption pulse with the shortest rise time is the most benign compared to other pulse shapes with the same peak heat flux and same energy density.

  2. A Numerical Method for Modeling the Effects of Irregular Shape on Interconnect Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bao-Jun; Tang, Zhen-An; Ju, Yan-Jie

    2014-05-01

    When clock frequencies exceed gigahertz, the skin depth in analog and digital circuits greatly decreases. The irregular shape of the cross section of the interconnect plays an increasingly important role in interconnect parasitic extraction. However, existing methods only focus on the rough surface of the interconnect, while ignoring other irregular shapes, such as the trapezoidal cross section. In this work, a new simulation method is proposed for irregular interconnects, which is applicable to arbitrary irregular shapes and to a wide range of frequencies. The method involves generating a mesh information file firstly and then extracting the frequency-dependent resistance based on a numerical solution of scalar wave modeling by using the method of moments. The singularity extraction method is used to calculate the self-inductors. The data from experiments verify the accuracy of our proposed method.

  3. Dark-field spectroscopy of plasmon resonance in metal nanoislands: effect of shape and light polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, E. S.; Scherbak, S. A.; Heisler, F.; Chervinskii, S. D.; Samusev, A. K.; Lipovskii, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    We present the experimental dark-field scattering studies and the simulation of plasmonic properties of isolated silver nanoislands. The nanoislands were fabricated on a soda- lime glass substrate using silver-sodium ion exchange, subsequent thermal poling and annealing of the processed glass substrate in hydrogen. The morphology of the nanoislands was characterized with atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy; the dimensions were 100-180 nm in base and 80-160 nm in height. We measured and modeled dark-field scattering spectra of the silver hemiellipsoidal nanoparticles differing in size and shape. The SPR position varied from 450 nm to 730 nm depending on the particle shape and dimensions. Both experiments and simulation showed a red shift of the SPR for bigger nanoislands of the same shape. Losing the axial symmetry in nanoislands resulted in the resonance splitting, while their elongation led to an increase in the scattering of p-polarized light.

  4. Effect of panel shape of soccer ball on its flight characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungchan; Asai, Takeshi

    2014-05-01

    Soccer balls are typically constructed from 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, however, newer balls named Cafusa, Teamgeist 2, and Jabulani were respectively produced from 32, 14, and 8 panels with shapes and designs dramatically different from those of conventional balls. The newest type of ball, named Brazuca, was produced from six panels and will be used in the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil. There have, however, been few studies on the aerodynamic properties of balls constructed from different numbers and shapes of panels. Hence, we used wind tunnel tests and a kick-robot to examine the relationship between the panel shape and orientation of modern soccer balls and their aerodynamic and flight characteristics. We observed a correlation between the wind tunnel test results and the actual ball trajectories, and also clarified how the panel characteristics affected the flight of the ball, which enabled prediction of the trajectory.

  5. Monte Carlo - Metropolis Investigations of Shape and Matrix Effects in 2D and 3D Spin-Crossover Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerroudj, Salim; Caballero, Rafael; De Zela, Francisco; Jureschi, Catalin; Linares, Jorge; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2016-08-01

    The Ising like model, taking into account short-, long-range interaction as well as surface effects is used to investigate size and shape effects on the thermal behaviour of 2D and 3D spin crossover (SCO) nanoparticles embedded in a matrix. We analyze the role of the parametert, representing the ratio between the number of surface and volume molecules, on the unusual thermal hysteresis behaviour (appearance of the hysteresis and a re-entrance phase transition) at small scales.

  6. Effect of ocular shape and vascular geometry on retinal hemodynamics: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Dziubek, Andrea; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Harris, Alon; Hirani, Anil N; Rusjan, Edmond; Thistleton, William

    2016-08-01

    A computational model for retinal hemodynamics accounting for ocular curvature is presented. The model combines (i) a hierarchical Darcy model for the flow through small arterioles, capillaries and small venules in the retinal tissue, where blood vessels of different size are comprised in different hierarchical levels of a porous medium; and (ii) a one-dimensional network model for the blood flow through retinal arterioles and venules of larger size. The non-planar ocular shape is included by (i) defining the hierarchical Darcy flow model on a two-dimensional curved surface embedded in the three-dimensional space; and (ii) mapping the simplified one-dimensional network model onto the curved surface. The model is solved numerically using a finite element method in which spatial domain and hierarchical levels are discretized separately. For the finite element method, we use an exterior calculus-based implementation which permits an easier treatment of non-planar domains. Numerical solutions are verified against suitably constructed analytical solutions. Numerical experiments are performed to investigate how retinal hemodynamics is influenced by the ocular shape (sphere, oblate spheroid, prolate spheroid and barrel are compared) and vascular architecture (four vascular arcs and a branching vascular tree are compared). The model predictions show that changes in ocular shape induce non-uniform alterations of blood pressure and velocity in the retina. In particular, we found that (i) the temporal region is affected the least by changes in ocular shape, and (ii) the barrel shape departs the most from the hemispherical reference geometry in terms of associated pressure and velocity distributions in the retinal microvasculature. These results support the clinical hypothesis that alterations in ocular shape, such as those occurring in myopic eyes, might be associated with pathological alterations in retinal hemodynamics.

  7. Effect of higher-order multipole moments on the Stark line shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, T. A.; Nagayama, T.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.

    2016-08-01

    Spectral line shapes are sensitive to plasma conditions and are often used to diagnose electron density of laboratory plasmas as well as astrophysical plasmas. Stark line-shape models take into account the perturbation of the radiator's energy structure due to the Coulomb interaction with the surrounding charged particles. Solving this Coulomb interaction is challenging and is commonly approximated via a multipole expansion. However, most models include only up to the second term of the expansion (the dipole term). While there have been studies on the higher-order terms due to one of the species (i.e., either ions or electrons), there is no model that includes the terms beyond dipole from both species. Here, we investigate the importance of the higher-order multipole terms from both species on the Hβ line shape. First, we find that it is important to include higher-order terms consistently from both ions and electrons to reproduce measured line-shape asymmetry. Next, we find that the line shape calculated with the dipole-only approximation becomes inaccurate as density increases. It is necessary to include up to the third (quadrupole) term to compute the line shape accurately within 2%. Since most existing models include only up to the dipole terms, the densities inferred with such models are in question. We find that the model without the quadrupole term slightly underestimates the density, and the discrepancy becomes as large as 12% at high densities. While the case of study is limited to Hβ, we expect similar impact on other lines.

  8. Endwall shape modification using vortex generators and fences to improve gas turbine cooling and effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokce, Zeki Ozgur

    The gas turbine is one of the most important parts of the air-breathing jet engine. Hence, improving its efficiency and rendering it operable under high temperatures are constant goals for the aerospace industry. Two types of flow within the gas turbine are of critical relevance: The flow around the first row of stator blades (also known as the nozzle guide vane blade - NGV) and the cooling flow inside the turbine blade cooling channel. The subject of this thesis work was to search for methods that could improve the characteristics of these two types of flows, thus enabling superior engine performance. The innovative aspect of our work was to apply an endwall shape modification previously employed by non-aerospace industries for cooling applications, to the gas turbine cooling flow which is vital to aerospace propulsion. Since the costs of investigating the possible benefits of any idea via extensive experiments could be quite high, we decided to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) followed by experimentation as our methodology. We decided to analyze the potential benefits of using vortex generators (VGs) as well as the rectangular endwall fence. Since the pin-fins used in cooling flow are circular cylinders, and since the boundary layer flow is mainly characterized by the leading edge diameter of the NGV blade, we modeled both the pin-fins and the NGV blade as vertical circular cylinders. The baseline case consisted of the cylinder(s) being subjected to cross flow and a certain amount of freestream turbulence. The modifications we made on the endwall consisted of rectangular fences. In the case of the cooling flow, we used triangular shaped, common flow up oriented, delta winglet type vortex generators as well as rectangular endwall fences. The channel contained singular cylinders as well as staggered rows of multiple cylinders. For the NGV flow, a rectangular endwall fence and a singular cylinder were utilized. Using extensive CFD modeling and analysis, we

  9. Software development for Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Ensz, M.T.; Griffith, M.L.; Harwell, L.D.

    1998-08-01

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping, also known as LENS{trademark}, is an advanced manufacturing technique used to fabricate near-net shaped, fully dense metal components directly from computer solid models without the use of traditional machining processes. The LENS{trademark} process uses a high powered laser to create a molten pool into which powdered metal is injected and solidified. Like many SFF techniques, LENS{trademark} parts are made through a layer additive process. In the current system, for any given layer, the laser is held stationary, while the part and its associated substrate is moved, allowing for the each layer`s geometry to be formed. Individual layers are generated by tracing out the desired border, followed by filling in the remaining volume. Recent research into LENS{trademark} has highlighted the sensitivity of the processes to multiple software controllable parameters such as substrate travel velocity, border representation, and fill patterns. This research is aimed at determining optimal border outlines and fill patterns for LENS{trademark} and at developing the associated software necessary for automating the creation of the desired motion control.

  10. Effect of the defect initial shape on the fatigue lifetime of a continuous casting machine roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasniy, Oleh P.; Lapusta, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with the influence of the defect initial shape on the residual lifetime of a continuous casting machine roll made of 25Cr1MoV steel. Based on this approach, previously proposed by some authors, the growth of the surface fatigue crack was modeled in a roll under loading and temperature conditions that are close to operational ones, taking into account the statistical distribution of the C parameter of Paris' equation. Dependencies of the continuous casting machines roll fatigue lifetime on the initial defect shape and critical defect sizes are obtained.

  11. Salting-out in the aqueous single-protein solution: the effect of shape factor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bong Ho; Bae, Young Chan

    2003-06-01

    A molecular-thermodynamic model is developed to describe salt-induced protein precipitation. The protein-protein interaction goes through the potential of mean force. An equation of state is derived based on the generalized van der Waals partition function. The attractive term including the potential of mean force is perturbed by the statistical mechanical perturbation theory. The precipitation behaviors are studied by calculating the partition coefficient with various conditions such as the ionic strength and the shape of protein. Our results show that the protein shape plays a significant role in the protein precipitation behavior.

  12. Genetic basis of wing morphogenesis in Drosophila: sexual dimorphism and non-allometric effects of shape variation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Drosophila wing represents a particularly appropriate model to investigate the developmental control of phenotypic variation. Previous studies which aimed to identify candidate genes for wing morphology demonstrated that the genetic basis of wing shape variation in D. melanogaster is composed of numerous genetic factors causing small, additive effects. In this study, we analyzed wing shape in males and females from 191 lines of D. melanogaster, homozygous for a single P-element insertion, using geometric morphometrics techniques. The analysis allowed us to identify known and novel candidate genes that may contribute to the expression of wing shape in each sex separately and to compare them to candidate genes affecting wing size which have been identified previously using the same lines. Results Our results indicate that more than 63% of induced mutations affected wing shape in one or both sexes, although only 33% showed significant differences in both males and females. The joint analysis of wing size and shape revealed that only 19% of the P-element insertions caused coincident effects on both components of wing form in one or both sexes. Further morphometrical analyses revealed that the intersection between veins showed the smallest displacements in the proximal region of the wing. Finally, we observed that mutations causing general deformations were more common than expected in both sexes whereas the opposite occurred with those generating local changes. For most of the 94 candidate genes identified, this seems to be the first record relating them with wing shape variation. Conclusions Our results support the idea that the genetic architecture of wing shape is complex with many different genes contributing to the trait in a sexually dimorphic manner. This polygenic basis, which is relatively independent from that of wing size, is composed of genes generally involved in development and/or metabolic functions, especially related to the regulation of

  13. Effect of shape and thickness of asbestos bundles and fibres on EDS microanalysis: A Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, D.; Valdre, G.

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative microanalysis of tiny asbestos mineral fibres by scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) still represents a complex analytical issue. This complexity arises from the variable fibre shape and small thickness (< 5 μm) compared with the penetration of the incident electron beam. Here, we present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of chrysotile, crocidolite and amosite fibres (and bundles of fibres) of circular and square section and thicknesses from 0.1 μm to 10 μm, to investigate the effect of shape and thickness on SEM-EDS microanalysis. The influence of shape and thickness on the simulated spectrum was investigated for electron beam energies of 5, 15 and 25 keV, respectively. A strong influence of the asbestos bundles and fibres shape and thickness on the detected EDS X-ray intensity was observed. The X-ray intensity trends as a function of fibre thickness showed a non-linear dependence for all the elements and minerals. In general, the X-ray intensities showed a considerable reduction for thicknesses below about 5 μm at 5 keV, 2 μm at 15 keV, and 5 μm at 25 keV. Correction parameters, k-ratios, for the asbestos fibre thickness effect, are reported.

  14. Calculation of the electrode shape for suppression of the standing wave effect in large area rectangular capacitively coupled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonnens, L.

    2005-03-15

    The electromagnetic standing wave becomes one of the main sources of plasma nonuniformity in large area capacitively coupled rf reactors. In cylindrical reactors with a central rf connection or one-dimensional linear reactors with rf connections at both extremities, Gaussian shaped electrodes can be used to suppress this standing wave. In this work, we present a two-dimensional quasiplanar circuit model and a numerical method for calculation of the electrode shape that can suppress the standing wave effect in large area rectangular reactors. It is shown that the calculated shapes are not Gaussian, and are not only a function of the reactor dimensions and excitation frequency, but are also strongly influenced by the position and number of rf connections, as will also be the case for a cylindrical reactor with a noncentral rf connection. However, when a shape has been determined for a given reactor geometry and rf excitation frequency, then it is shown that it remains independent of the plasma provided that the electromagnetic skin depth in the plasma remains large enough such that skin effects remain negligible.

  15. A novel methodology to study effects of the electric field on shape and surface tension of drops in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateni, A.; Susnar, S. S.; Amirfazli, A.; Neumann, A. W.

    The behavior of liquid drops and bubbles in an electric field is of importance both for improving existing and developing new technologies on the ground and in space. Examples are electrostatic spraying, ink jet printing, electro wetting, physical and chemical separations and alloy research in space. Of particular interest is the effect of electric fields on shape and surface tension of drops and bubbles. Because of mathematical limitations as well as for practical reasons we have been developing a tool for studying these two quantities under microgravity conditions. The new methodology, called Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis - Electric Field (ADSA- EF), generates numerical drop profiles in the electric field, for a given surface tension. Then, it calculates the surface tension by matching the theoretical profiles with the shape of the experimental drops. The new methodology predicts the shape of conducting drops in the electric field with high accuracy. Preliminary ground-based experiments suggest that the surface tension of liquids is changed by one or two percent in the electric field. The magnitude of this change depends on the polarity of the liquid. More definitive results for drops as well as the effect of the polarity of the electric field will be presented at the conference. However, ultimate validation requires experimental work under reduced and/or microgravity conditions. Finally, under such conditions, because of the absence of convection, the developed methodology can be a valuable tool to study electric field driven adsorption and diffusion in two component liquids.

  16. Effects of Processing Parameters on the Forming Quality of C-Shaped Thermosetting Composite Laminates in Hot Diaphragm Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, X. X.; Gu, Y. Z.; Sun, J.; Li, M.; Liu, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the effects of processing temperature and vacuum applying rate on the forming quality of C-shaped carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite laminates during hot diaphragm forming process were investigated. C-shaped prepreg preforms were produced using a home-made hot diaphragm forming equipment. The thickness variations of the preforms and the manufacturing defects after diaphragm forming process, including fiber wrinkling and voids, were evaluated to understand the forming mechanism. Furthermore, both interlaminar slipping friction and compaction behavior of the prepreg stacks were experimentally analyzed for showing the importance of the processing parameters. In addition, autoclave processing was used to cure the C-shaped preforms to investigate the changes of the defects before and after cure process. The results show that the C-shaped prepreg preforms with good forming quality can be achieved through increasing processing temperature and reducing vacuum applying rate, which obviously promote prepreg interlaminar slipping process. The process temperature and forming rate in hot diaphragm forming process strongly influence prepreg interply frictional force, and the maximum interlaminar frictional force can be taken as a key parameter for processing parameter optimization. Autoclave process is effective in eliminating voids in the preforms and can alleviate fiber wrinkles to a certain extent.

  17. Flexoelectrically Driven Electroclinic Effect in the Twist-Bend Nematic Phase of Achiral Molecules with Bent Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, C.; Luckhurst, G. R.; Dozov, I.

    2013-08-01

    We extend the twist-bend nematic (NTB) model to describe the electro-optics of this novel phase. We predict an electroclinic effect (ECE) subject to a dc electric field E applied perpendicular to the helix axis or wave vector q, with rotation of the NTB optic axis around E. This linear effect, with its flexoelectric origin, is a close analog to the electro-optic effects observed for chiral liquid crystals. However, in nematics composed of achiral molecules having a bent shape, it is the electro-optic signature of the NTB phase. We test our model experimentally in the low-temperature nematic phase of the odd liquid crystal dimer, CB7CB, with its molecules having, on average, a bent shape. The ECE measurements confirm the previously proposed twist-bend nematic structure of this phase, with its broken chiral symmetry, extremely short (<10nm) doubly degenerate pitch and ultrafast, submicrosecond response times.

  18. On the Takayanagi principle for the shape memory effect and thermomechanical behaviors in polymers with multi-phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Yu, Kai; Huang, Wei Min; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-12-01

    We present an explicit model to study the mechanics and physics of the shape memory effect (SME) in polymers based on the Takayanagi principle. The molecular structural characteristics and elastic behavior of shape memory polymers (SMPs) with multi-phases are investigated in terms of the thermomechanical properties of the individual components, of which the contributions are combined by using Takayanagi’s series-parallel model and parallel-series model, respectively. After that, Boltzmann superposition principle is employed to couple the multi-SME, elastic modulus parameter (E) and temperature parameter (T) in SMPs. Furthermore, the extended Takayanagi model is proposed to separate the plasticizing effect and physical swelling effect on the thermo-/chemo-responsive SME in polymers and then compared with the available experimental data reported in the literature. This study is expected to provide a powerful simulation tool for modeling and experimental substantiation of the mechanics and working mechanism of SME in polymers.

  19. Ultrafast transient absorption studies of hematite nanoparticles: the effect of particle shape on exciton dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fitzmorris, Bob C; Patete, Jonathan M; Smith, Jacqueline; Mascorro, Xiomara; Adams, Staci; Wong, Stanislaus S; Zhang, Jin Z

    2013-10-01

    Much progress has been made in using hematite (α-Fe2 O3 ) as a potentially practical and sustainable material for applications such as solar-energy conversion and photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting; however, recent studies have shown that the performance can be limited by a very short charge-carrier diffusion length or exciton lifetime. In this study, we performed ultrafast studies on hematite nanoparticles of different shapes to determine the possible influence of particle shape on the exciton dynamics. Nanorice, multifaceted spheroidal nanoparticles, faceted nanocubes, and faceted nanorhombohedra were synthesized and characterized by using SEM and XRD techniques. Their exciton dynamics were investigated by using femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. Although the TA spectral features differ for the four samples studied, their decay profiles are similar, which can be fitted with time constants of 1-3 ps, approximately 25 ps, and a slow nanosecond component extending beyond the experimental time window that was measured (2 ns). The results indicate that the overall exciton lifetime is weakly dependent on the shape of the hematite nanoparticles, even though the overall optical absorption and scattering are influenced by the particle shape. This study suggests that other strategies need to be developed to increase the exciton lifetime or to lengthen the exciton diffusion length in hematite nanostructures.

  20. Effects of sensitizer length on radiation crosslinked shape-memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Taylor; Voit, Walter; Gall, Ken

    2010-04-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can be designed to retain a metastable state and upon activation, recover a preprogrammed shape. In this study, poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) is blended with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) of various molecular weights in various concentrations and subsequently exposed to ionizing radiation. PEGDA sensitizes the radiation crosslinking of PMA, lowering the minimum absorbed dose for gelation and increasing the rubbery modulus, after crosslinking. Minimum dose for gelation, as determined by the Charlesby-Pinner equation, decreases from 25.57 kGy for unblended PMA to 2.06 kGy for PMA blended with 10.00 mole% PEGDA. Moreover, increase in the blend concentration of PEGDA increases the crosslinking density of the resulting networks. Sensitizer length, namely Mn of PEGDA, also affects crosslinking and final mechanical properties. Increase in the length of the PEGDA molecule at a constant molar ratio increases the efficacy of the molecule as a radiation sensitizer as determined by the increase in gel fraction and rubbery modulus across doses. However, at a constant weight ratio of PEGDA to PMA, shorter PEGDA chains sensitize more crosslinking because they have more reactive ends per weight fraction. Sensitized samples of PMA with PEGDA were tested for shape-memory properties and showed shape fixity of greater than 99%. Samples had a glass transition temperature near 28 °C and recovered between 97% and 99% of the induced strain when strained to 50%.

  1. A Study of the Effects of Blade Shape on Rotor Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Burley, Casey L.

    1997-01-01

    A new rotor noise prediction system called the Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Code (TRAC) has been developed under the Short Haul (Civil Tiltrotor) program between NASA, the Army, and the U.S. helicopter industry. This system couples the comprehensive rotorcraft code CAMRAD.Mod1 with either the high resolution sectional loads code HIRES or the full potential CFD code FPRBVI to predict unsteady blade loads, which are then input to the noise prediction program WOPWOP. In this paper, HIRES will be used to predict the blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise trends associated with blade shape. The baseline shape selected was a 17% scale model of a contemporary design 4 bladed rotor. Measurements for this rotor were acquired in the Duits-Nederslandse Windtunnel (DNW). The code is used to predict noise for the base configuration and the results are compared to the measured data. This provides a firm foundation for investigating the BVI noise trends associated with blade shape. The shapes selected for study are based on variation of sweep and taper which reflect plausible "passive" design concepts. Comparisons of power required, integrated noise, and aerodynamics are made and important trends are noted.

  2. Temporal Intraspeech Masking of Plosive Bursts: Effects of Hearing Loss and Frequency Shaping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackersie, Carol L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes were (a) to compare masking of consonant bursts by adjacent vowels for listeners with and without hearing loss and (b) to determine the extent to which the temporal intraspeech masking can be reduced by a simulated hearing-aid frequency-response shaping. Method: Fourteen adults with sensorineural hearing loss and 10 with…

  3. Size and shape effects in β-NaGdF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Noculak, Agnieszka; Podhorodecki, Artur

    2017-04-28

    Three sets of β-NaGdF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanocrystals (NCs) with different shapes (spherical and more complex flower shapes), different sizes (6-17 nm) and Yb(3+) concentrations (2%-15%) were synthesized by a co-precipitation method using oleic acid as a stabilizing agent. The uncommon, single-crystalline flower-shaped NCs were obtained by simply adjusting the fluorine-to-lanthanides molar ratio. Additionally, some of the NCs with different sizes have been covered by the un-doped shell. The crystal phase, shapes and sizes of all NCs were examined using transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction methods. Simultaneously, upconversion luminescence and lifetimes, under 980 nm excitation, were measured and the changes in green to red (G/R) emission ratios as well as emission decay times were correlated with the evolution of nanocrystal sizes and surface to volume ratios. Three different mechanisms responsible for the changes in G/R ratios were presented and discussed.

  4. Effect of interior surface finish on the break-up of commercial shaped charge liners

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E L; Schwartz, A J

    1999-08-11

    A series of experiments aimed at understanding the influence of the liner interior surface finish on the break-up of shaped charge jets has been completed. The experiments used a standard 81-mm shaped charge design, loaded with LX-14 high explosive; incorporating high-precision copper shaped charged liners. The results indicate that a significant reduction of jet break-up time occurs between a surface finish of 99.30 microinches and 375.65 microinches. Surface finishes of 4.78, 44.54 and 99.30 microinches produced significantly better ductility and associated break-up times than the 375.65-microinch finish. The baseline production process high-precision liners were measured to have an average surface finish of 44.54 microinches. The results show that for the shaped charge warhead geometry and explosive combination investigated, some care must be taken in respect to surface finish, but that very fine surface finishes do not significantly improve the jet ductility and associated break-up times.

  5. The Effect of Aerodynamic Heating on Air Penetration by Shaped Charge Jets and Their Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backofen, Joseph

    2009-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present recent work modeling thermal coupling between shaped charge jets and their particles with air while it is being penetrated to form a crater that subsequently collapses back onto the jet. This work complements research published at International Symposia on Ballistics: 1) 1987 - Shaped Charge Jet Aerodynamics, Particulation and Blast Field Modeling; and 2) 2007 - Air Cratering by Eroding Shaped Charge Jets. The current work shows how and when a shaped charge jet's tip and jet particles are softened enough that they can erode in a hydrodynamic manner as modeled in these papers. This paper and its presentation includes models for heat transfer from shocked air as a function of jet velocity as well as heat flow within the jet or particle. The work is supported by an extensive bibliographic search including publications on meteors and ballistic missile re-entry vehicles. The modeling shows that a jet loses its strength to the depth required to justify hydrodynamic erosion when its velocity is above a specific velocity related to the shock properties of air and the jet material's properties. As a result, the portion of a jet's kinetic energy converted at the aerodynamic shock into heating transferred back onto the jet affects the energy deposited into the air through drag and ablation which in turn affect air crater expansion and subsequent collapse back onto the jet and its particles as shown in high-speed photography.

  6. Multi-Shape and Temperature Memory Effects via Strong Physical Confinement in Poly(Propylene Carbonate)/Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaodong; Guo, Yilan; Wei, Yuan; Dong, Peng; Fu, Qiang

    2016-10-04

    The importance of filler-matrix interactions is generally recognized for mechanical property enhancement, their direct impact via physical confinement on diverse functional properties has remained poorly explored. We report here our effort in achieving versatile shape memory performances for a biodegradable poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) matrix containing high contents of graphene oxide (GO). The excellent dispersion in the entire filler range (up to 20 wt%) allows precise morphological tuning, along with the physical filler-matrix interactions, contributing overall to a strong nano-confinement effect that positively affects the thermo-mechanical properties of nanocomposites. Only one glass transition temperature (Tg) of PPC is detected as GO content is below 10 wt%, corresponding to a slightly confined system, whereas two distinct Tgs are observed with GO content over 10 wt%, corresponding to a highly confined system. As such, tunable multi-shape memory effect can be achieved simply by tuning the filler contents. Dual shape memory effect (SME) is observed for slightly confined system, while a triple SME can be achieved via deformation at two distinct Tgs for highly confined system. More importantly, it is interesting to find that the switch temperature (Tsw) evolves linearly with the programing temperature (Tprog) for both slightly and highly confined system, with Tsw ≈ Tprog for highly confined system, but Tsw < Tprog for slightly confined system. Our work suggests a highly flexible approach to take advantage of strong nano-confinement effect via tuning the content of GO within a single polymer to access versatile SME, such as dual, triple shape memory and temperature memory effect.

  7. Effects of laser sintering processing time and temperature on changes in polyamide 12 powder particle size, shape and distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielicki, C.; Gronhoff, B.; Wortberg, J.

    2014-05-01

    In laser sintering (LS) un-molten Polyamide 12 (PA12) powder is usually re-used (recycled) in further processes. However, LS processing time at powder bed temperature leads to material property changes. As a consequence, un-molten PA12 powder that is re-used or recycled in further processes leads to process and part properties deviations. In this context, powder particle size, shape and distribution is assumed to affect surface roughness and porosity of LS parts. In order to investigate this process effect on changes in powder size, shape and distribution, PA12 powder was systematically aged in a vacuum oven at conditions close to the LS process. According to this procedure, polymeric powder was obtained with aging times up to 120 hours and analyzed by dynamic image analysis. At first, fresh powder was investigated as a reference. The effect of LS processing time and temperature, i.e. powder bed temperature of approx. 174°C was measured with respect to changes in size distribution and shape whereas particles were considered of size up to 500μm. The influence of LS processing time at powder bed temperature was found to be neither significant on changes in particle size nor distribution. With respect to particle shape, a higher deviation to the reference was observed for particle size bigger than 100 μm and longer aging times. Consequently, influences on particle shape changes on surface roughness are assumed to be more likely than influences on part porosity due to LS processing conditions.

  8. Cryogenic Tank Technology Program (CTTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, T. P.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the Cryogenic Tank Technology Program were to: (1) determine the feasibility and cost effectiveness of near net shape hardware; (2) demonstrate near net shape processes by fabricating large scale-flight quality hardware; and (3) advance state of current weld processing technologies for aluminum lithium alloys.

  9. Do studies reporting ‘U’-shaped serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D–health outcome relationships reflect adverse effects?

    PubMed Central

    Grant, William B.; Karras, Spyridon N.; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A.; Annweiler, Cedric; Boucher, Barbara J.; Juzeniene, Asta; Garland, Cedric F.; Holick, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several reports describe U-shaped 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration–health outcomes, including musculo-skeletal disorders such as falls and fractures, several cancers, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cognitive function, all-cause mortality rates, birth outcomes, allergic reactions, frailty, and some other disorders. This paper reviews reports of U-shaped outcome associations with vitamin D status for evidence of underlying pathophysiological processes, or of confounding, finding that some U-shaped associations appear to be biologically meaningful, but that many could well reflect confounding by factors such as lifestyle, or hypovitaminosis D-related disease onset being masked by self-supplementation that was begun too late to correct developing health problems but before baseline vitamin D status assessment. However, the various U-shaped associations for allergic reactions may be due to vitamin D modulation of the phenotype of the immune response, shifting the Th1-Th2 balance toward Th2 formation. For prostate cancer, there seems to be little effect of 25(OH)D concentration on incidence; however, there is an inverse correlation between 25(OH)D concentration and mortality rates. Future observational studies, and randomized controlled trial data analyses, should include adjustment for data collected on prior long-term vitamin D supplementation and solar UVB exposure, as well as other potential confounders. PMID:27489574

  10. Environmental effects on the shape variation of male ultraviolet patterns in the Brimstone butterfly (Gonepteryx rhamni, Pieridae, Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Pecháček, Pavel; Stella, David; Keil, Petr; Kleisner, Karel

    2014-12-01

    The males of the Brimstone butterfly (Gonepteryx rhamni) have ultraviolet pattern on the dorsal surfaces of their wings. Using geometric morphometrics, we have analysed correlations between environmental variables (climate, productivity) and shape variability of the ultraviolet pattern and the forewing in 110 male specimens of G. rhamni collected in the Palaearctic zone. To start with, we subjected the environmental variables to principal component analysis (PCA). The first PCA axis (precipitation, temperature, latitude) significantly correlated with shape variation of the ultraviolet patterns across the Palaearctic. Additionally, we have performed two-block partial least squares (PLS) analysis to assess co-variation between intraspecific shape variation and the variation of 11 environmental variables. The first PLS axis explained 93% of variability and represented the effect of precipitation, temperature and latitude. Along this axis, we observed a systematic increase in the relative area of ultraviolet colouration with increasing temperature and precipitation and decreasing latitude. We conclude that the shape variation of ultraviolet patterns on the forewings of male Brimstones is correlated with large-scale environmental factors.

  11. Bioaccumulation and effects of different-shaped copper oxide nanoparticles in the deposit-feeding snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum.

    PubMed

    Ramskov, Tina; Selck, Henriette; Banta, Gary; Misra, Superb K; Berhanu, Deborah; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Forbes, Valery E

    2014-09-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NPs) are among the most widely used engineered NPs and are thus likely to end up in the environment, predominantly in sediments. Copper oxide NPs have been found to be toxic to a variety of (mainly pelagic) organisms, but to differing degrees. In the present study, the influence of CuO NP shape on bioavailability and toxicity in the sediment-dwelling freshwater gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum was examined. In 2 separate studies, snails were exposed to either clean sediment or sediment spiked with either aqueous Cu or CuO NPs of different shapes (rods, spheres, or platelets) at 240 µg Cu/g dry weight of sediment (nominal). In neither of the studies was survival found to be related to Cu form (i.e., free ion vs particle) or shape, whereas snail growth was severely influenced by both form and shape. Reproduction was affected (by CuO NP spheres and aqueous Cu) only when estimated as the total number (live plus dead) of juveniles produced per snail per week. Both the aqueous and particulate forms of Cu were available for uptake by snails when mixed into sediment. However, Cu body burden was not directly related to observed effects. The present study stresses the need for both a better understanding of uptake mechanisms and internal distribution pathways of NPs and an assessment of long-term consequences of NP exposure.

  12. Environmental effects on the shape variation of male ultraviolet patterns in the Brimstone butterfly ( Gonepteryx rhamni, Pieridae, Lepidoptera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecháček, Pavel; Stella, David; Keil, Petr; Kleisner, Karel

    2014-12-01

    The males of the Brimstone butterfly ( Gonepteryx rhamni) have ultraviolet pattern on the dorsal surfaces of their wings. Using geometric morphometrics, we have analysed correlations between environmental variables (climate, productivity) and shape variability of the ultraviolet pattern and the forewing in 110 male specimens of G. rhamni collected in the Palaearctic zone. To start with, we subjected the environmental variables to principal component analysis (PCA). The first PCA axis (precipitation, temperature, latitude) significantly correlated with shape variation of the ultraviolet patterns across the Palaearctic. Additionally, we have performed two-block partial least squares (PLS) analysis to assess co-variation between intraspecific shape variation and the variation of 11 environmental variables. The first PLS axis explained 93 % of variability and represented the effect of precipitation, temperature and latitude. Along this axis, we observed a systematic increase in the relative area of ultraviolet colouration with increasing temperature and precipitation and decreasing latitude. We conclude that the shape variation of ultraviolet patterns on the forewings of male Brimstones is correlated with large-scale environmental factors.

  13. Do studies reporting 'U'-shaped serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D-health outcome relationships reflect adverse effects?

    PubMed

    Grant, William B; Karras, Spyridon N; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A; Annweiler, Cedric; Boucher, Barbara J; Juzeniene, Asta; Garland, Cedric F; Holick, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Several reports describe U-shaped 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration-health outcomes, including musculo-skeletal disorders such as falls and fractures, several cancers, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cognitive function, all-cause mortality rates, birth outcomes, allergic reactions, frailty, and some other disorders. This paper reviews reports of U-shaped outcome associations with vitamin D status for evidence of underlying pathophysiological processes, or of confounding, finding that some U-shaped associations appear to be biologically meaningful, but that many could well reflect confounding by factors such as lifestyle, or hypovitaminosis D-related disease onset being masked by self-supplementation that was begun too late to correct developing health problems but before baseline vitamin D status assessment. However, the various U-shaped associations for allergic reactions may be due to vitamin D modulation of the phenotype of the immune response, shifting the Th1-Th2 balance toward Th2 formation. For prostate cancer, there seems to be little effect of 25(OH)D concentration on incidence; however, there is an inverse correlation between 25(OH)D concentration and mortality rates. Future observational studies, and randomized controlled trial data analyses, should include adjustment for data collected on prior long-term vitamin D supplementation and solar UVB exposure, as well as other potential confounders.

  14. Enhanced magnetic hysteresis in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal and its influence on magnetic shape memory effect

    SciTech Connect

    Heczko, O. Drahokoupil, J.; Straka, L.

    2015-05-07

    Enhanced magnetic hysteresis due to boron doping in combination with magnetic shape memory effect in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal results in new interesting functionality of magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys such as mechanical demagnetization. In Ni{sub 50.0}Mn{sub 28.5}Ga{sub 21.5} single crystal, the boron doping increased magnetic coercivity from few Oe to 270 Oe while not affecting the transformation behavior and 10 M martensite structure. However, the magnetic field needed for MSM effect also increased in doped sample. The magnetic behavior is compared to undoped single crystal of similar composition. The evidence from the X-ray diffraction, magnetic domain structure, magnetization loops, and temperature evolution of the magnetic coercivity points out that the enhanced hysteresis is caused by stress-induced anisotropy.

  15. Infrared thermography videos of the elastocaloric effect for shape memory alloys NiTi and Ni2FeGa

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, Garrett J.; Ertekin, Elif; Sehitoglu, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Infrared thermogrpahy was utilized to record the temperature change during tensile loading cycles of two shape memory alloy single crystals with pseudoelastic behavior. During unloading, a giant temperature drop was measured in the gage section due to the elastocaloric effect. This data article provides a video of a [001] oriented Ni2FeGa single crystal, including the corresponding stress–strain curve, shows the temperature drop over one cycle. The second video of a [148] oriented NiTi single crystal depicts the repeatability of the elastocaloric effect by showing two consecutive cycles. The videos are supplied in this paper. For further analysis and enhanced discussion of large temperature change in shape memory alloys, see Pataky et al. [1] PMID:26380838

  16. A photonic-assisted periodic triangular-shaped pulses generator based on FWM effect in an SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jin; Ning, Tigang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hongyao; Li, Yueqin; Zhang, Chan

    2016-12-01

    We propose a photonic-assisted triangular-shaped pulse train generator based on four-wave mixing effect (FWM) in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). A dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder operated at quadrupling RF modulation is employed to generate two primary sidebands (±2nd) in spectrum of the triangular-shaped pulse. Then the FWM effect leads to generation of two new frequency components. By setting the modulation index and bias current of the SOA properly, the generated harmonics of optical intensity can be corresponding to the Fourier components of typical periodic triangular pulses. Finally, a triangular pulse train with tunable repetition rate can be obtained. Numerical simulations have been taken to evaluate the impact of several key parameters to make the scheme more practical.

  17. Infrared thermography videos of the elastocaloric effect for shape memory alloys NiTi and Ni2FeGa.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Garrett J; Ertekin, Elif; Sehitoglu, Huseyin

    2015-12-01

    Infrared thermogrpahy was utilized to record the temperature change during tensile loading cycles of two shape memory alloy single crystals with pseudoelastic behavior. During unloading, a giant temperature drop was measured in the gage section due to the elastocaloric effect. This data article provides a video of a [001] oriented Ni2FeGa single crystal, including the corresponding stress-strain curve, shows the temperature drop over one cycle. The second video of a [148] oriented NiTi single crystal depicts the repeatability of the elastocaloric effect by showing two consecutive cycles. The videos are supplied in this paper. For further analysis and enhanced discussion of large temperature change in shape memory alloys, see Pataky et al. [1].

  18. Enhanced magnetic hysteresis in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal and its influence on magnetic shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heczko, O.; Drahokoupil, J.; Straka, L.

    2015-05-01

    Enhanced magnetic hysteresis due to boron doping in combination with magnetic shape memory effect in Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal results in new interesting functionality of magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys such as mechanical demagnetization. In Ni50.0Mn28.5Ga21.5 single crystal, the boron doping increased magnetic coercivity from few Oe to 270 Oe while not affecting the transformation behavior and 10 M martensite structure. However, the magnetic field needed for MSM effect also increased in doped sample. The magnetic behavior is compared to undoped single crystal of similar composition. The evidence from the X-ray diffraction, magnetic domain structure, magnetization loops, and temperature evolution of the magnetic coercivity points out that the enhanced hysteresis is caused by stress-induced anisotropy.

  19. Effects of pulse shape on strongly driven two-level systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, C. W. S.

    2011-12-15

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of a two-level system driven by strong nonresonant electromagnetic pulses as a function of pulse intensity and detuning. We have explored the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the transition probability as a function of pulse area for five different temporal profiles: Lorentzian, Lorentzian squared, hyperbolic secant, hyperbolic secant squared, and Gaussian. The two-level system consists of a fine-structure doublet in sodium Rydberg states coupled by Raman transitions driven through far-off-resonance intermediate states. The pulses are in the microwave regime and have high fidelity and uniform intensity. Experiments show that, despite the similarity in the pulse shapes, the behavior of the population transfer versus intensity depends dramatically on the temporal shape and that the spectral properties and area of the pulse do not adequately describe the response.

  20. Microscale Repeatability of the Shape-Memory Effect in Fine NiTi Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Joyce Yue; Daly, Samantha H.

    2016-12-01

    An experimental investigation into microscale transformation characteristics of polycrystalline NiTi wires of 500 µm diameter during shape memory cycling is discussed, with emphasis on the characterization of a pronounced heterogeneity in the strain distribution evident during detwinning of the martensite phase upon application of load and its persistence throughout the actuation cycle. Using scanning electron microscopy-digital image correlation, full-field strain maps at the microscale were obtained during shape memory cycling. It was found that the strains induced by detwinning were quite heterogeneous at the microscale, and could display a large degree of similarity with thermo-mechanical cycling that tended to increase as cycling progressed. Residual strain concentrated at locations where strain accumulation from detwinning and plasticity were significant, indicating that martensitic detwinning and the associated plasticity that occurs with it is spatially correlated to the subsequent accumulation of residual strain at the microscale.

  1. The effect of cross linker concentration in the physical properties of shape memory gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, M. Hasnat; Ahmed, Kumkum; Gong, Jin; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2015-04-01

    The shape memory hydrogels were synthesized and studied the physical properties. The gels were made by a hydrophilic monomer named N, N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMAAm) and a hydrophobic monomer named stearyl acrylate (SA). The water-swollen hydrogels show well transparency and shape memory property while gels absorb large water content. The properties were characterized by varying the cross-link concentration, whereas the concentration of other chemical components was remained constant. In this study, the DMAAm and the SA ratio was 3:1 to make one mole solution. It is observed that the swelling ratio slightly depends on the cross-link concentration at certain amount. However, mechanical properties strongly depend on the cross-link concentration. Thermal properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). DSC spactra of dried samples exhibits complex crystalline nature, while swollen samples show homogeneous crystallinity. A well thermal stability is observed regard less of cross-link concentration.

  2. Effect of porcelain shape for strain behavior of strengthened porcelain in impact test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Akemi; Kurachi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Masatoshi; Ota, Toshitaka

    2011-10-01

    Four types of strengthened porcelains were evaluated by an impact examination machine based on ASTM C368-88. The waveform of strain developed on impact was measured by a strain gauge pasted on the inside surface and the outside surface, vertical and horizontal direction of porcelain. In minute scales, procelain deformed into an oval shape as a whole by an impact onto the rim, where the higher tensile strain occurred in the horizontal direction on the inside surface of porcelain. The maximum tensile strain occurred at the impact point. The waveform of strain, that showed two remarkable peaks, was greatly affected by porcelain shape. In addition it was more or less affected by measurement conditions such as impact energy, weight or speed of hammer, weight for holding, and position of backstops.

  3. Local stress-induced effects on AlGaAs/AlOx oxidation front shape

    SciTech Connect

    Chouchane, F.; Almuneau, G. Arnoult, A.; Lacoste, G.; Fontaine, C.; Cherkashin, N.

    2014-07-28

    The lateral oxidation of thick AlGaAs layers (>500 nm) is studied. An uncommon shape of the oxide tip is evidenced and attributed to the embedded stress distribution, inherent to the oxidation reaction. Experimental and numerical studies of the internal strain in oxidized Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As/GaAs structures were carried out by dark-field electron holography and finite element methods. A mapping of the strain distribution around the AlGaAs/oxide interface demonstrates the main role of internal stress on the shaping of the oxide front. These results demonstrate the high relevance of strain in oxide-confined III-V devices, in particular, with over-500-nm thick AlOx confinement layers.

  4. DDA Computations of Porous Aggregates with Forsterite Crystals: Effects of Crystal Shape and Crystal Mass Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lindsay, Sean S.; Harker, David; Woodward, Charles; Kelley, Michael S.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla

    2015-01-01

    Porous aggregate grains are commonly found in cometary dust samples and are needed to model cometary IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Models for thermal emissions from comets require two forms of silicates: amorphous and crystalline. The dominant crystal resonances observed in comet SEDs are from Forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The mass fractions that are crystalline span a large range from 0.0 < or = fcrystal < or = 0.74. Radial transport models that predict the enrichment of the outer disk (>25 AU at 1E6 yr) by inner disk materials (crystals) are challenged to yield the highend-range of cometary crystal mass fractions. However, in current thermal models, Forsterite crystals are not incorporated into larger aggregate grains but instead only are considered as discrete crystals. A complicating factor is that Forsterite crystals with rectangular shapes better fit the observed spectral resonances in wavelength (11.0-11.15 microns, 16, 19, 23.5, 27, and 33 microns), feature asymmetry and relative height (Lindley et al. 2013) than spherically or elliptically shaped crystals. We present DDA-DDSCAT computations of IR absorptivities (Qabs) of 3 micron-radii porous aggregates with 0.13 < or = fcrystal < or = 0.35 and with polyhedral-shaped Forsterite crystals. We can produce crystal resonances with similar appearance to the observed resonances of comet Hale- Bopp. Also, a lower mass fraction of crystals in aggregates can produce the same spectral contrast as a higher mass fraction of discrete crystals; the 11micron and 23 micron crystalline resonances appear amplified when crystals are incorporated into aggregates composed otherwise of spherically shaped amorphous Fe-Mg olivines and pyroxenes. We show that the optical properties of a porous aggregate is not linear combination of its monomers, so aggregates need to be computed. We discuss the consequence of lowering comet crystal mass fractions by modeling IR SEDs with aggregates with crystals, and the implications for radial

  5. Shaping Columbia’s Stability through Strategic Communication: Evaluating U.S. Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-21

    particular context, strategic communication is employed as a post-conflict mechanism to shape the long-term decline of an enemy among a population...consequences. If not, assessment ensures that feedback mechanisms allow for necessary re- framing of the context or adjustment to content...applied to evaluating U.S. strategic communication efforts in campaign planning and as a quality control mechanism during operations. To illustrate

  6. Morphological Evolution of Block Copolymer Particles: Effect of Solvent Evaporation Rate on Particle Shape and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Man; Kim, YongJoo; Yun, Hongseok; Yi, Gi-Ra; Kim, Bumjoon J

    2017-02-28

    Shape and morphology of polymeric particles are of great importance in controlling their optical properties or self-assembly into unusual superstructures. Confinement of block copolymers (BCPs) in evaporative emulsions affords particles with diverse structures, including prolate ellipsoids, onion-like spheres, oblate ellipsoids, and others. Herein, we report that the evaporation rate of solvent from emulsions encapsulating symmetric polystyrene-b-polybutadiene (PS-b-PB) determines the shape and internal nanostructure of micron-sized BCP particles. A distinct morphological transition from the ellipsoids with striped lamellae to the onion-like spheres was observed with decreasing evaporation rate. Experiments and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations showed that the evaporation rate affected the organization of BCPs at the particle surface, which determined the final shape and internal nanostructure of the particles. Differences in the solvent diffusion rates in PS and PB at rapid evaporation rates induced alignment of both domains perpendicular to the particle surface, resulting in ellipsoids with axial lamellar stripes. Slower evaporation rates provided sufficient time for BCP organization into onion-like structures with PB as the outermost layer, owing to the preferential interaction of PB with the surroundings. BCP molecular weight was found to influence the critical evaporation rate corresponding to the morphological transition from ellipsoid to onion-like particles, as well as the ellipsoid aspect ratio. DPD simulations produced morphologies similar to those obtained from experiments and thus elucidated the mechanism and driving forces responsible for the evaporation-induced assembly of BCPs into particles with well-defined shapes and morphologies.

  7. Size effects in the magnetic anisotropy of embedded cobalt nanoparticles: from shape to surface

    PubMed Central

    Oyarzún, Simón; Tamion, Alexandre; Tournus, Florent; Dupuis, Véronique; Hillenkamp, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Strong size-dependent variations of the magnetic anisotropy of embedded cobalt clusters are evidenced quantitatively by combining magnetic experiments and advanced data treatment. The obtained values are discussed in the frame of two theoretical models that demonstrate the decisive role of the shape in larger nanoparticles and the predominant role of the surface anisotropy in clusters below 3 nm diameter. PMID:26439626

  8. Computation of pressure effects of inert-gas mixtures on atomic line shapes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    Recent line-shape experiments on the absorption series of cesium pressurized by various concentration ratios of argon and helium provide an opportunity to study the additivity of perturber interactions. Calculations which assume additivity and which assume additive adiabatic collisions agree well with the reported data. The results suggest that a systematic study of such experiments using accurate digitized data can furnish criteria for the valid applications of the additivity approximation.

  9. Injury reduction effectiveness of selecting running shoes based on plantar shape.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Swedler, David I; Grier, Tyson L; Hauret, Keith G; Bullock, Steven H; Williams, Kelly W; Darakjy, Salima S; Lester, Mark E; Tobler, Steven K; Jones, Bruce H

    2009-05-01

    Popular running magazines and running shoe companies suggest that imprints of the bottom of the feet (plantar shape) can be used as an indication of the height of the medial longitudinal foot arch and that this can be used to select individually appropriate types of running shoes. This study examined whether or not this selection technique influenced injury risk during United States Army Basic Combat Training (BCT). After foot examinations, BCT recruits in an experimental group (E: n = 1,079 men and 451 women) selected motion control, stability, or cushioned shoes for plantar shapes judged to represent low, medium, or high foot arches, respectively. A control group (C: n = 1,068 men and 464 women) received a stability shoe regardless of plantar shape. Injuries during BCT were determined from outpatient medical records. Other previously known injury risk factors (e.g., age, fitness, and smoking) were obtained from a questionnaire and existing databases. Multivariate Cox regression controlling for other injury risk factors showed little difference in injury risk between the E and C groups among men (risk ratio (E/C) = 1.01; 95% confidence interval = 0.88-1.16; p = 0.87) or women (risk ratio (E/C) = 1.07; 95% confidence interval = 0.91-1.25; p = 0.44). In practical application, this prospective study demonstrated that selecting shoes based on plantar shape had little influence on injury risk in BCT. Thus, if the goal is injury prevention, this selection technique is not necessary in BCT.

  10. Effects of chitosan on the alignment, morphology and shape of calcite crystals nucleating under Langmuir monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyungil; Uysal, Ahmet; Kewalramani, Sumit; Stripe, Benjamin; Dutta, Pulak

    2009-04-22

    The growth of calcium carbonate crystals under Langmuir monolayers was investigated in the presence of chitosan, a soluble derivative of chitin added to the subphase to better simulate the polyelectrolyte-containing in vivo environment. Chitosan causes distinct concentration-dependent changes in the orientation, shape and morphology of the calcite crystals nucleating under acid and sulfate monolayers. Our results suggest that polyelectrolytes may play essential roles in controlling the growth of biogenic calcite crystals.

  11. Effect of thermally induced birefringence on performance of KD*P electro-optics crystal with rectangular shape.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xingliang; Jiang, Menghua; Sun, Zhe; Hui, Yongling; Lei, Hong; Li, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we present what we believe is the first demonstration of a new rectangular KD*P crystal as an electro-optic switch and calculations of the stress-induced birefringence and depolarization loss in the crystal. We simulated and experimentally demonstrate the thermal depolarization loss of crystal in both cylindrical and rectangular shape. The results show that by using a rectangular KD*P crystal, the effects of the thermally induced birefringence and depolarization can be lessened.

  12. Study of the Effect of Ellipsoidal Shape on the Kern and Frenkel Patch Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thienbao; Gunton, James; Rickman, Jeffrey

    In their work on the self-assembly of complex structures, Glotzer and Solomon (Nature Materials 6, 557 - 562 (2007)) identified both interaction and shape anisotropy as two of several means to build complex structures. Advances in fabricating materials and new insights into protein biology have revealed the importance of these types of interactions. The Kern and Frenkel (J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9882 (2003) model of hard spheres carrying interaction patches of various sizes has been used extensively to describe interaction anisotropies important in protein phase transitions. However their model did not also account for shape anisotropy. We studied the role of both shape and interaction anisotropy by applying N=2 and N=4 attractive Kern and Frenkel patches with an interaction range to hard ellipsoids with various aspect ratios and patch coverages. Following Kern and Frenkel, we studied the liquid-liquid phase separation of our particles using a Monte Carlo simulation. We found the critical temperatures for our model using the approximate law of rectilinear diameter and compared them with the original results of Kern and Frenkel. We found that the critical temperatures increased both with aspect ratio and percent coverage. G Harold and Leila Y Mathers Foundation.

  13. Shape effect of Cu-nanoparticles in unsteady flow through curved artery with catheterized stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ashfaq; Nadeem, Sohail

    In this study the arterial flow of Cu-nanofluid through catheterized arteries having a balloon angioplasty with time-varying overlapping stenosis is considered. The nanofluid comprises different shaped nanoparticles such as bricks, cylinders and platelets. In the arteries the nature of Cu-blood nanofluid is examined mathematically by considering it as a different shaped nanoparticles inclusion in viscous fluid in toroidal coordinate system. The problem is solved using a perturbation approximation in terms of a variant of curvature parameter (ɛ) to achieve the axial velocity, the stream function, the resistance impedance, and the wall shear stress distribution of nanofluid. Also, the results were obtained from explicit values of the physical parameters, such as the curvature parameter (ɛ), the balloon height (σ∗), the volume fraction (ϕ) and the shape factor of Cu-nanoparticles (m). The obtained results show that there is a notable difference between curvature and non-curvature annulus flows through catheterized stenosed arteries. The Platlets Cu-nanoparticle in the central portion of the tube are not sheared, and the slight velocity gradients are only found in the layers near the wall of artery than Bricks Cylinders Cu-nanoparticles.

  14. Effects of velocity changing collisions on line shapes of HF in Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeio, Lucio; Green, Sheldon; Monchick, Louis

    1995-06-01

    The generalized Hess method (GHM) gives a line shape expression which is formally equivalent to the Rautian-Sobel'man hard collision model of Dicke narrowing, but differs radically in the definition of one of the relaxation terms. The relaxation term leading to pressure broadening is the same, but the term leading to Dicke narrowing and ultimately to Doppler line shapes at zero density differs in certain important respects: (1) in GHM it is a weighted sum of the pressure broadening coefficient and an optical diffusion coefficient and (2) there is no sharp distinction between ``velocity changing'' and ``phase changing'' collisions. The Dicke narrowing term should thus be understood as including both collision types irretrievably intermixed, with GHM providing a prescription for both relaxation terms. Applied to HF v=0→1, j→j±1 absorption spectra in a bath of Ar and using an accurate interaction potential obtained from spectra of the van der Waals complex and essentially exact close coupling scattering S matrices, GHM provides a rather good description of recently measured line shapes.

  15. Effect of particle shape on capillary forces acting on particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Flury, Markus

    2013-06-25

    The capillary forces exerted by moving air-water interfaces can dislodge particles from stationary surfaces. The magnitude of the capillary forces depends on particle shape, orientation, and surface properties, such as contact angle and roughness. The objective was to quantify, both experimentally and theoretically, capillary force variations as an air-water interface moves over the particles. We measured capillary forces as a function of position, i.e., force-position curves, on particles of different shape by using force tensiometry. The particles (5 mm nominal size) were made of polyacrylate and were fabricated using a 3D printer. Experimental measurements were compared with theoretical calculations. We found that force-position curves could be classified into in three categories according to particle shapes: (1) curves for particles with round cross sections, such as spheroidal particles, (2) curves for particles with fixed cross sections, such cylindrical or cubical particles, and (3) curves for particles with tapering cross sections, such as prismatic or tetrahedral particles. Spheroidal particles showed a continuously varying capillary force. Cylindrical or cubical particles showed pronounced pinning of the air-water interface line at edges. The pinning led to an increased capillary force, which was relaxed when the interface snapped off from the edges. Particles with tapering cross section did not show pinning and showed reduced capillary forces as the air-water interface line perimeter and displacement cross section continuously decrease when the air-water interface moved over the particles.

  16. Slope gradient and shape effects on soil profiles in the northern mountainous forests of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlollahi Mohammadi, M.; Jalali, S. G. H.; Kooch, Y.; Said-Pullicino, D.

    2016-12-01

    In order to evaluate the variability of the soil profiles at two shapes (concave and convex) and five positions (summit, shoulder, back slope, footslope and toeslope) of a slope, a study of a virgin area was made in a Beech stand of mountain forests, northern Iran. Across the slope positions, the soil profiles demonstrated significant changes due to topography for two shape slopes. The solum depth of the convex slope was higher than the concave one in all five positions, and it decreased from the summit to shoulder and increased from the mid to lower slope positions for both convex and concave slopes. The thin solum at the upper positions and concave slope demonstrated that pedogenetic development is least at upper slope positions and concave slope where leaching and biomass productivity are less than at lower slopes and concave slope. A large decrease in the thickness of O and A horizons from the summit to back slope was noted for both concave and convex slopes, but it increased from back slope toward down slope for both of them. The average thickness of B horizons increased from summit to down slopes in the case of the concave slope, but in the case of convex slope it decreased from summit to shoulder and afterwards it increased to the down slope. The thicknesses of the different horizons varied in part in the different positions and shape slopes because they had different plant species cover and soil features, which were related to topography.

  17. Recent breakthrough development of the magnetic shape memory effect in Ni Mn Ga alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, O.; Ge, Y.; Sozinov, A.; Hannula, S.-P.; Lindroos, V. K.

    2005-10-01

    Magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys or ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) materials discovered by Ullakko et al (1996 Appl. Phys. Lett. 69 1966-8) have received increasing interest, since they can produce a large strain with rather high frequencies without a change in the external temperature. These materials have potential for actuator and sensor applications. MSM materials exhibit giant magnetic field induced strain (MFIS) based on the rearrangements of the crystallographic domains (twin variants). The magnetization energy of the material is lowered when such twin variants that have the easy axis of magnetization along the field start to grow due to twin boundary motion. Currently, the best working MSM materials are the near-stoichiometric Ni2MnGa Heusler alloys in which the properties are highly composition dependent. Their modulated martensitic structures, 5M and 7M, show 6% or 10% response respectively in a magnetic field less than 800 kA m-1. The MSM service temperature of the 5M alloys is between 150 and 333 K, and the optimal frequency region is up to 500 Hz. The fatigue life of the MSM elements has been shown to be at least 50 × 106 shape change cycles. This paper reviews the research work carried out at Helsinki University of Technology on MSM materials since 1998.

  18. Growth of Au nanoparticle films and the effect of nanoparticle shape on plasmon peak wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Horikoshi, S. Matsumoto, N.; Kato, T.; Omata, Y.

    2014-05-21

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and thus have potential for use in a wide range of applications. A facile technique for the preparation of NP films using an electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma sputtering method without a dewetting process is described. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) observations revealed that the Au NPs grew independently as island-like particles during the first stage of sputtering and then coalesced with one another as sputtering time increased to ultimately form a continuous film. A plasmon absorption peak was observed via optical measurement of absorption efficiency. The LSPR peak shifted toward longer wavelengths (red shift) with an increase in sputtering time. The cause of this plasmon peak shift was theoretically investigated using the finite-difference time-domain calculation method. A realistic statistical distribution of the particle shapes based on FE-SEM observations was applied for the analysis, which has not been previously reported. It was determined that the change in the shape of the NPs from spheroidal to oval or slender due to coalescence with neighbouring NPs caused the LSPR peak shift. These results may enable the design of LSPR devices by controlling the characteristics of the nanoparticles, such as their size, shape, number density, and coverage.

  19. Icing flight research: Aerodynamic effects of ice and ice shape documentation with stereo photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, K. L.; Mcknight, R. C.; Ranaudo, R. J.; Perkins, P. J., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Aircraft icing flight research was performed in natural icing conditions. A data base consisting of icing cloud measurements, ice shapes, and aerodynamic measurements is being developed. During research icing encounters the icing cloud was continuously measured. After the encounter, the ice accretion shapes on the wing were documented with a stereo camera system. The increase in wing section drag was measured with a wake survey probe. The overall aircraft performance loss in terms of lift and drag coefficient changes was obtained by steady level speed/power measurements. Selective deicing of the airframe components was performed to determine their contributions to the total drag increase. Engine out capability in terms of power available was analyzed for the iced aircraft. It was shown that the stereo photography system can be used to document ice shapes in flight and that the wake survey probe can measure increases in wing section drag caused by ice. On one flight, the wing section drag coefficient (c sub d) increased approximately 120 percent over the uniced baseline at an aircraft angle of attack of 6 deg. On another flight, the aircraft darg coefficient (c sub d) increased by 75 percent over the uniced baseline at an aircraft lift coefficient (C sub d) of 0.5.

  20. Effects of velocity changing collisions on line shapes of HF in Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Demeio, L.; Green, S.; Monchick, L.

    1995-06-15

    The generalized Hess method (GHM) gives a line shape expression which is formally equivalent to the Rautian--Sobel`man hard collision model of Dicke narrowing, but differs radically in the definition of one of the relaxation terms. The relaxation term leading to pressure broadening is the same, but the term leading to Dicke narrowing and ultimately to Doppler line shapes at zero density differs in certain important respects: (1) in GHM it is a weighted sum of the pressure broadening coefficient and an optical diffusion coefficient and (2) there is no sharp distinction between ``velocity changing`` and ``phase changing`` collisions. The Dicke narrowing term should thus be understood as including both collision types irretrievably intermixed, with GHM providing a prescription for both relaxation terms. Applied to HF {ital v}=0{r_arrow}1, {ital j}{r_arrow}{ital j}{plus_minus}1 absorption spectra in a bath of Ar and using an accurate interaction potential obtained from spectra of the van der Waals complex and essentially exact close coupling scattering {ital S} matrices, GHM provides a rather good description of recently measured line shapes. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Spray Forming of NiTi and NiTiPd Shape-Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mabe, James; Ruggeri, Robert; Noebe, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    In the work to be presented, vacuum plasma spray forming has been used as a process to deposit and consolidate prealloyed NiTi and NiTiPd powders into near net shape actuators. Testing showed that excellent shape memory behavior could be developed in the deposited materials and the investigation proved that VPS forming could be a means to directly form a wide range of shape memory alloy components. The results of DSC characterization and actual actuation test results will be presented demonstrating the behavior of a Nitinol 55 alloy and a higher transition temperature NiTiPd alloy in the form of torque tube actuators that could be used in aircraft and aerospace controls.

  2. Laser Spray Fabrication for Net-Shape Rapid Product Realization LDRD

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.; Ensz, M.T.; Greene, D.L.; Griffith, M.L.; Harwell, L.D.; Jeantette, F.P.; Keicher, D.M.; Oliver, M.S.; Reckaway, D.E.; Romero, J.A.; Schlienger, M.E.; Smugeresky, J.D.

    1999-04-01

    The primary purpose of this LDRD project was to characterize the laser deposition process and determine the feasibility of fabricating complex near-net shapes directly from a CAD solid model. Process characterization provided direction in developing a system to fabricate complex shapes directly from a CAD solid model. Our goal for this LDRD was to develop a system that is robust and provides a significant advancement to existing technologies (e.g., polymeric-based rapid prototyping, laser welding). Development of the process will allow design engineers to produce functional models of their designs directly from CAD files. The turnaround time for complex geometrical shaped parts will be hours instead of days and days instead of months. With reduced turnaround time, more time can be spent on the product-design phase to ensure that the best component design is achieved. Maturation of this technology will revolutionize the way the world produces structural components.

  3. Net shape fabrication of calcium phosphate scaffolds with multiple material domains.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangmin; Rustom, Laurence E; McDermott, Anna M; Boerckel, Joel D; Johnson, Amy J Wagoner; Alleyne, Andrew G; Hoelzle, David J

    2016-01-08

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) materials have been proven to be efficacious as bone scaffold materials, but are difficult to fabricate into complex architectures because of the high processing temperatures required. In contrast, polymeric materials are easily formed into scaffolds with near-net-shape forms of patient-specific defects and with domains of different materials; however, they have reduced load-bearing capacity compared to CaPs. To preserve the merits of CaP scaffolds and enable advanced scaffold manufacturing, this manuscript describes an additive manufacturing process that is coupled with a mold support for overhanging features; we demonstrate that this process enables the fabrication of CaP scaffolds that have both complex, near-net-shape contours and distinct domains with different microstructures. First, we use a set of canonical structures to study the manufacture of complex contours and distinct regions of different material domains within a mold. We then apply these capabilities to the fabrication of a scaffold that is designed for a 5 cm orbital socket defect. This scaffold has complex external contours, interconnected porosity on the order of 300 μm throughout, and two distinct domains of different material microstructures.

  4. The sex-limited effects of mutations in the EGFR and TGF-β signaling pathways on shape and size sexual dimorphism and allometry in the Drosophila wing.

    PubMed

    Testa, Nicholas D; Dworkin, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Much of the morphological diversity in nature-including among sexes within a species-is a direct consequence of variation in size and shape. However, disentangling variation in sexual dimorphism for both shape (SShD), size (SSD), and their relationship with one another remains complex. Understanding how genetic variation influences both size and shape together, and how this in turn influences SSD and SShD, is challenging. In this study, we utilize Drosophila wing size and shape as a model system to investigate how mutations influence size and shape as modulated by sex. Previous work has demonstrated that mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling components can influence both wing size and shape. In this study, we re-analyze this data to specifically address how they impact the relationship between size and shape in a sex-specific manner, in turn altering the pattern of sexual dimorphism. While most mutations influence shape overall, only a subset have a genotypic specific effect that influences SShD. Furthermore, while we observe sex-specific patterns of allometric shape variation, the effects of most mutations on allometry tend to be small. We discuss this within the context of using mutational analysis to understand sexual size and shape dimorphism.

  5. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Environmental effects shaping the galaxy stellar mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidzon, I.; Cucciati, O.; Bolzonella, M.; De Lucia, G.; Zamorani, G.; Arnouts, S.; Moutard, T.; Ilbert, O.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; de la Torre, S.; Di Porto, C.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Granett, B. R.; Guennou, L.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.

    2016-02-01

    We exploit the first public data release of VIPERS to investigate environmental effects in the evolution of galaxies between z ~ 0.5 and 0.9. The large number of spectroscopic redshifts (more than 50 000) over an area of about 10 deg2 provides a galaxy sample with high statistical power. The accurate redshift measurements (σz = 0.00047(1 + zspec)) allow us to robustly isolate galaxies living in the lowest and highest density environments (δ< 0.7 and δ> 4, respectively) as defined in terms of spatial 3D density contrast δ. We estimate the stellar mass function of galaxies residing in these two environments and constrain the high-mass end (ℳ ≳ 1011 ℳ⊙) with unprecedented precision. We find that the galaxy stellar mass function in the densest regions has a different shape than was measured at low densities, with an enhancement of massive galaxies and a hint of a flatter (less negative) slope at z< 0.8. We normalise each mass function to the comoving volume occupied by the corresponding environment and relate estimates from different redshift bins. We observe an evolution of the stellar mass function of VIPERS galaxies in high densities, while the low-density one is nearly constant. We compare these results to semi-analytical models and find consistent environmental signatures in the simulated stellar mass functions. We discuss how the halo mass function and fraction of central/satellite galaxies depend on the environments considered, making intrinsic and environmental properties of galaxies physically coupled, hence difficult to disentangle. The evolution of our low-density regions is described well by the formalism introduced by Peng et al. (2010, ApJ, 721, 193), and is consistent with the idea that galaxies become progressively passive because of internal physical processes. The same formalism could also describe the evolution of the mass function in the high density regions, but only if a significant contribution from dry mergers is considered. Based on

  6. Effective bilayer expansion and erythrocyte shape change induced by monopalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine. Quantitative light microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, L M; Wu, W G

    1990-01-01

    When human erythrocytes are treated with exogenous monopalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (MPPC), the normal biconcave disk shape red blood cells (RBC) become spiculate echinocytes. The present study examines the quantitative aspect of the relationship between effective bilayer expansion and erythrocyte shape change by a newly developed method. This method is based on the combination of direct surface area measurement of micropipette and relative bilayer expansion measurement of 13C crosspolarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Assuming that 13C NMR chemical shift of fatty acyl chain can be used as an indicator of lateral packing of membrane bilayers, it is possible for us to estimate the surface area expansion of red cell membrane induced by MPPC from that induced by ethanol. Partitions of lipid molecules into cell membrane were determined by studies of shape change potency as a function of MPPC and red cell concentration. It is found that 8(+/- 0.5) x 10(6) molecules of MPPC per cell will effectively induce stage three echinocytes and yield 3.2(+/- 0.2)% expansion of outer monolayer surface area. Surface area of normal cells determined by direct measurements from fixed geometry of red cells aspirated by micropipette was 118.7 +/- 8.5 microns2. The effective cross-sectional area of MPPC molecules in the cell membrane therefore was determined to be 48(+/- 4) A2, which is in agreement with those determined by x-ray from model membranes and crystals of lysophospholipids. We concluded that surface area expansion of RBC can be explained by a simple consideration of cross-sectional area of added molecules and that erythrocyte shape changes correspond quantitatively to the incorporated lipid molecules. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:2393706

  7. The effect of cultivation on the size, shape, and persistence of disease patches in fields.

    PubMed

    Truscott, J E; Gilligan, C A

    2001-06-19

    Epidemics of soil-borne plant disease are characterized by patchiness because of restricted dispersal of inoculum. The density of inoculum within disease patches depends on a sequence comprising local amplification during the parasitic phase followed by dispersal of inoculum by cultivation during the intercrop period. The mechanisms that control size, shape, and persistence have received very little rigorous attention in epidemiological theory. Here we derive a model for dispersal of inoculum in soil by cultivation that takes account into the discrete stochastic nature of the system in time and space. Two parameters, probability of movement and mean dispersal distance, characterize lateral dispersal of inoculum by cultivation. The dispersal parameters are used in combination with the characteristic area and dimensions of host plants to identify criteria that control the shape and size of disease patches. We derive a critical value for the probability of movement for the formation of cross-shaped patches and show that this is independent of the amount of inoculum. We examine the interaction between local amplification of inoculum by parasitic activity and subsequent dilution by dispersal and identify criteria whereby asymptomatic patches may persist as inoculum falls below a threshold necessary for symptoms to appear in the subsequent crop. The model is motivated by the spread of rhizomania, an economically important soil-borne disease of sugar beet. However, the results have broad applicability to a very wide range of diseases that survive as discrete units of inoculum. The application of the model to patch dynamics of weed seeds and local introductions of genetically modified seeds is also discussed.

  8. Shape and surface chemistry effects on the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of metallic nanorods and nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Favi, Pelagie Marlene; Valencia, Mariana Morales; Elliott, Paul Robert; Restrepo, Alejandro; Gao, Ming; Huang, Hanchen; Pavon, Juan Jose; Webster, Thomas Jay

    2015-12-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (such as gold and silver) have been intensely studied for wound healing applications due to their ability to be easily functionalized, possess antibacterial properties, and their strong potential for targeted drug release. In this study, rod-shaped silver nanorods (AgNRs) and gold nanorods (AuNRs) were fabricated by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD), and their cytotoxicity toward human skin fibroblasts were assessed and compared to sphere-shaped silver nanospheres (AgNSs) and gold nanospheres (AuNSs). Results showed that the 39.94 nm AgNSs showed the greatest toxicity with fibroblast cells followed by the 61.06 nm AuNSs, ∼556 nm × 47 nm (11.8:1 aspect ratio) AgNRs, and the ∼534 nm × 65 nm (8.2:1 aspect ratio) AuNRs demonstrated the least amount of toxicity. The calculated IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) value for the AgNRs exposed to fibroblasts was greater after 4 days of exposure (387.3 μg mL(-1)) compared to the AgNSs and AuNSs (4.3 and 23.4 μg mL(-1), respectively), indicating that these spherical metallic nanoparticles displayed a greater toxicity to fibroblast cells. The IC50 value could not be measured for the AuNRs due to an incomplete dose response curve. The reduced cell toxicity with the presently developed rod-shaped nanoparticles suggests that they may be promising materials for use in numerous biomedical applications.

  9. Effects of interface treatment on the fatigue behaviour of shape memory alloy reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, S. R.; Harish, K.; Vasireddi, Ramakrishna; Benal, M. M.; Mahapatra, D. R.

    2015-04-01

    Interfacial properties of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) reinforced polymer matrix composites can be enhanced by improving the interfacial bonding. This paper focuses on studying the interfacial stresses developed in the SMAepoxy interface due to various laser shot penning conditions. Fiber-pull test-setup is designed to understand the role of mechanical bias stress cycling and thermal actuation cycling. Phase transformation is tracked over mechanical and thermal fatigue cycles. A micromechanics based model developed earlier based on shear lag in SMA and energy based consistent homogenization is extended here to incorporate the stress-temperature phase diagram parameters for modeling fatigue.

  10. Dynamic-Data Driven Modeling of Uncertainties and 3D Effects of Porous Shape Memory Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-03

    heating the SMA. The cooling time is still an issue. SMAs have a limited life span due to naturally occurring fatigue in the alloy. Micro scale crystal...mathematical model for Joule heated SMAs. In Section 3 we describe the virtual shaker device and the DDDAS. In Section 4 we discuss personnel and...properties of SMAs (Sec. 2.1) and a mathematical model for Joule heated SMAs (Sec. 2.2). 2.1. Properties of SMAs Shape memory alloys (SMAs) and

  11. DDA Computations of Porous Aggregates with Forsterite Crystals: Effects of Crystal Shape and Crystal Mass Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lindsay, Sean S.; Harker, David; Woodward, Charles; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla

    2015-08-01

    Porous aggregate grains are commonly found in cometary dust samples and are needed to model cometary IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Models for thermal emissions from comets require two forms of silicates: amorphous and crystalline. The dominant crystal resonances observed in comet SEDs are from Forsterite (Mg2SiO4). The mass fractions that are crystalline span a large range from 0.0 ≤ fcrystal ≤ 0.74. Radial transport models that predict the enrichment of the outer disk (>25 AU at 1E6 yr) by inner disk materials (crystals) are challenged to yield the highend-range of cometary crystal mass fractions. However, in current thermal models, Forsterite crystals are not incorporated into larger aggregate grains but instead only are considered as discrete crystals. A complicating factor is that Forsterite crystals with rectangular shapes better fit the observed spectral resonances in wavelength (11.0-11.15 μm, 16, 19, 23.5, 27, and 33 μm), feature asymmetry and relative height (Lindley et al. 2013) than spherically or elliptically shaped crystals. We present DDA-DDSCAT computations of IR absorptivities (Qabs) of 3 μm-radii porous aggregates with 0.13 ≤ fcrystal ≤ 0.35 and with polyhedral-shaped Forsterite crystals. We can produce crystal resonances with similar appearance to the observed resonances of comet Hale-Bopp. Also, a lower mass fraction of crystals in aggregates can produce the same spectral contrast as a higher mass fraction of discrete crystals; the 11µm and 23 µm crystalline resonances appear amplified when crystals are incorporated into aggregates composed otherwise of spherically shaped amorphous Fe-Mg olivines and pyroxenes. We show that the optical properties of a porous aggregate is not linear combination of its monomers, so aggregates need to be computed. We discuss the consequence of lowering comet crystal mass fractions by modeling IR SEDs with aggregates with crystals, and the implications for radial transport models of our

  12. Effect of laser radiation on optical properties of disk shaped quantum dot in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Vinod; Silotia, Poonam

    2011-10-01

    The optical absorption coefficients and changes in the refractive index in GaAs/AlGaAs, disk shaped quantum dots (DSQD) with simultaneously applied laser and magnetic field are studied in detail. The use of the density matrix formalism is made to study the variations in linear and non-linear polarizability with the frequency of the electric field. It is found that the absorption coefficient and the refractive index changes depend not only on the optical wave but also on the strength of the static magnetic field.

  13. Observation of compressibility-related effects in shaped charge jet penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. J., III; Wahll, M. J.; Backofen, J. E., Jr.

    1982-06-01

    Penetration results are reported for four low strength materials attacked by a non-precision, copper-shaped charge jet. The materials are methanol, Plexiglas, glycerol, and mild steel. The results are not entirely consistent with the recent compressibility-based predictions by B. S. Haugstad and O. S. Dullum [J. Appl. Phys. 52, 5066 (1981)] and by N. A. Zlatin and A. A. Kozhushko [Combust. Explos. Shock Waves USSR 16, 559 (1980)]. Methanol and Plexiglas have extraordinary penetration resistance due to a combination of shock wave formation, plastic flow resistance, vaporization, and decomposition. The more chemically stable glycerol has simpler behavior that is similar to mild steel.

  14. Numerical study of the effect of the shape of the phase diagram on the eutectic freezing temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ode, M.; Shimono, M.; Sasajima, N.; Yamada, Y.; Bloembergen, P.

    2013-09-11

    To evaluate the reliability of metal-carbon eutectic systems as fixed points for the next generation of high-temperature standards the effect of thermodynamic properties related to the shape of eutectic phase diagram on the freezing temperature is investigated within the context of the numerical multi-phase-field model. The partition coefficient and liquidus slopes of the two solids involved in the eutectic reaction are varied deliberately and independently. The difference between the eutectic temperature and the freezing temperature is determined in dependence of the solid/liquid (s/l) interface shape and concentration. Where appropriate reference is made to the Jackson-Hunt analytical theory. It is shown that there are mainly two typical conditions to decrease the undercooling: 1) a small liquidus slope and 2) the associated difference between the eutectic composition and the liquid composition during solidification.

  15. Inversion-mode GaAs wave-shaped field-effect transistor on GaAs (100) substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingyun; Si, Mengwei; Wu, Heng; Ye, Peide D.; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G.; Shao, Jiayi; Manfra, Michael J.

    2015-02-16

    Inversion-mode GaAs wave-shaped metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (WaveFETs) are demonstrated using atomic-layer epitaxy of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} as gate dielectric on (111)A nano-facets formed on a GaAs (100) substrate. The wave-shaped nano-facets, which are desirable for the device on-state and off-state performance, are realized by lithographic patterning and anisotropic wet etching with optimized geometry. A well-behaved 1 μm gate length GaAs WaveFET shows a maximum drain current of 64 mA/mm, a subthreshold swing of 135 mV/dec, and an I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} ratio of greater than 10{sup 7}.

  16. Thickness-dependent electronic structure modulation of ferromagnetic films on shape memory alloy substrates based on a pure strain effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chun; Hu, Di; Gong, Kui; Jiang, Xumin; Yin, Jianjuan; Cao, Yi; Tang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Zhongfu; Yu, Guanghua; Andrew Evans, D.

    2016-11-01

    Pure strain-induced electronic structure modulation in ferromagnetic films is critical for developing reliable strain-assisted spintronic devices with low power consumption. For the conventional electricity-controlled strain engineering, it is difficult to reveal the pure strain effect on electronic structure tunability due to the inseparability of pure strain effect and surface charge effect. Here, a non-electrically controlled NiTi shape memory alloy was utilized as a strain output substrate to induce a pure strain on attached Fe films through a thermally controlled shape memory effect. The pure strain induced electronic structure evolution was revealed by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and correlated with first-principles calculations and magnetic anisotropy measurements. A compressive strain enhances the shielding effect for core electrons and significantly tunes their binding energy. Meanwhile, the strain modifies the partial density of states of outer d orbits, which may affect spin-orbit coupling strength and related magnetic anisotropy. This work helps for clarifying the physical nature of the pure strain effect and developing the pure-strain-assisted spintronic devices.

  17. Effect of duct shape, Mach number, and lining construction on measured suppressor attenuation and comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W. A.; Krejsa, E. A.; Coats, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Noise attenuation was measured for several types of cylindrical suppressors that use a duct lining composed of honeycomb cells covered with a perforated plate. The experimental technique used gave attenuation data that were repeatable and free of noise floors and other sources of error. The suppressor length, the effective acoustic diameter, suppressor shape and flow velocity were varied. The agreement among the attenuation data and two widely used analytical models was generally satisfactory. Changes were also made in the construction of the acoustic lining to measure their effect on attenuation. One of these produced a very broadband muffler.

  18. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the nonlinear intersubband transitions and refractive index changes of different QW shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Emine; Sokmen, Ismail

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the linear and nonlinear intersubband transitions and the refractive index changes in the conduction band of different quantum well shapes are theoretically calculated within framework of the effective mass approximation. Results obtained show that intersubband properties and the energy levels in different QWs can be modified and controlled by the hydrostatic pressure. The modulation of the absorption coefficients and the refractive index changes which can be suitable for good performance optical modulators and various infrared optical device applications can be easily obtained by tuning the hydrostatic pressure strength.

  19. The effect of vertical velocity probability distribution shape on cloud activation of aerosols: off-line calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonttila, J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Räisänen, P.; Kokkola, H.; Järvinen, H.

    2012-04-01

    Off-line calculations of cloud activation of aerosols using a probability density function (PDF) for vertical velocity (w) are performed. The focus is on the variation of the shape of the PDF using two functional formulations: the Normal distribution PDF and the Pearson type IV PDF. The Normal distribution provides a familiar example, as it has been widely used to approximate vertical velocity distributions in numerous applications, including climate models. Pearson type IV distribution provides an alternative that, to our knowledge, has not been employed before to describe the vertical velocity PDF. The advantage of the Pearson distribution is its versatility in representing skewed and more peaked distribution shapes compared to the Normal distribution, though this is obtained at the expense of increased mathematical complexity. The experiments are performed using a box model, in which the environmental conditions, including the aerosol size distribution (bi-modal) and chemical composition (ammonium-sulphate particles) are prescribed as constants. Measured size distributions comprising clean and polluted cases are used. Cloud activation of aerosols is calculated by integrating over the positive side of the PDF of w, which yields the mean number of activated particles (Nact). The mean, variance, and skewness of the PDFs along with the type of the PDF itself are altered in order to explore the effect of the PDF shape on the activation process. All experiments are repeated for three well-documented activation parameterizations: Lin & Leaitch, Abdul-Razzak & Ghan and Fountoukis & Nenes. The results show that for symmetric distributions of w (skewness = 0) there is a maximum difference of 10-15 % in Nact between the cases with w given by the Normal distribution, and the more peaked Pearson distribution. The largest differences are seen for the most polluted cases. Nact in clean cases will saturate rather quickly with respect to the maximum supersaturation and, hence

  20. Orientational ordering of confined hard rods: The effect of shape anisotropy on surface ordering and capillary nematization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliabadi, R.; Moradi, M.; Varga, S.

    2015-09-01

    We examine the ordering properties of rectangular hard rods with length L and diameter D at a single planar wall and between two parallel hard walls using the second virial density-functional theory. The theory is implemented in the three-state Zwanzig approximation, where only three mutually perpendicular directions are allowed for the orientations of hard rods. The effect of varying shape anisotropy is examined at L /D =10 ,15 ,and 20 . In contact with a single hard wall, the density profiles show planar ordering, damped oscillatory behavior, and a wall-induced surface ordering transition below the coexisting isotropic density of a bulk isotropic-nematic (I -N ) phase transition. Upon approaching the coexisting isotropic density, the thickness of the nematic film diverges logarithmically, i.e., the nematic wetting is complete for any shape anisotropy. In the case of confinement between two parallel hard walls, it is found that the continuous surface ordering transition depends strongly on the distance between confining walls H for H L . The minimal density at which a surface ordering transition can be realized is located at around H ˜2 D for all studied shape anisotropies due to the strong interference effect between the two hard walls. The first-order I -N phase transition of the bulk system becomes a surface ordered isotropic IB to capillary nematic NB phase transition in the slit pore. This first-order IB-NB transition weakens with decreasing pore width and terminates in a critical point for all studied shape anisotropies.