Science.gov

Sample records for effective open geometry

  1. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11

    The original goal of this Phase II Superconductivity Partnership Initiative project was to build and operate a prototype Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system using high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils wound from continuously processed dip-coated BSCCO 2212 tape conductor. Using dip-coated tape, the plan was for MRI magnet coils to be wound to fit an established commercial open geometry, 0.2 Tesla permanent magnet system. New electronics and imaging software for a prototype higher field superconducting system would have added significantly to the cost. However, the use of the 0.2 T platform would allow the technical feasibility and the cost issues for HTS systems to be fully established. Also it would establish the energy efficiency and savings of HTS open MRI compared with resistive and permanent magnet systems. The commercial goal was an open geometry HTS MRI running at 0.5 T and 20 K. This low field open magnet was using resistive normal metal conductor and its heat loss was rather high around 15 kolwatts. It was expected that an HTS magnet would dissipate around 1 watt, significantly reduce power consumption. The SPI team assembled to achieve this goal was led by Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology (OST), who developed the method of producing commercial dip coated tape. Superconductive Components Inc. (SCI), a leading US supplier of HTS powders, supported the conductor optimization through powder optimization, scaling, and cost reduction. Oxford Magnet Technology (OMT), a joint venture between Oxford Instruments and Siemens and the world’s leading supplier of MRI magnet systems, was involved to design and build the HTS MRI magnet and cryogenics. Siemens Magnetic Resonance Division, a leading developer and supplier of complete MRI imaging systems, was expected to integrate the final system and perform imaging trials. The original MRI demonstration project was ended in July 2004 by mutual consent of Oxford Instruments and Siemens. Between

  2. Assessment of Geometry and In-Flow Effects on Contra-Rotating Open Rotor Broadband Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawodny, Nikolas S.; Nark, Douglas M.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Application of previously formulated semi-analytical models for the prediction of broadband noise due to turbulent rotor wake interactions and rotor blade trailing edges is performed on the historical baseline F31/A31 contra-rotating open rotor configuration. Simplified two-dimensional blade element analysis is performed on cambered NACA 4-digit airfoil profiles, which are meant to serve as substitutes for the actual rotor blade sectional geometries. Rotor in-flow effects such as induced axial and tangential velocities are incorporated into the noise prediction models based on supporting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results and simplified in-flow velocity models. Emphasis is placed on the development of simplified rotor in-flow models for the purpose of performing accurate noise predictions independent of CFD information. The broadband predictions are found to compare favorably with experimental acoustic results.

  3. Effect of torso geometry on the magnetocardiogram.

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, J H

    1977-01-01

    Calculations of the effect of torso geometry on the extracorporeal magnetic field produced by a simple cardiac source have been carried out. Contrary to the results at present in the literature, it is found that the field solution is stable under perturbations of geometry in the sense that small relative changes in geometry produce comparably small changes in the magnetic field. Thus, simplified torso models may have a wider range of validity and usefulness than was previously thought. PMID:890026

  4. The Effect of Geometry Instruction with Dynamic Geometry Software; GeoGebra on Van Hiele Geometry Understanding Levels of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutluca, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of dynamic geometry software GeoGebra on Van Hiele geometry understanding level of students at 11th grade geometry course. The study was conducted with pre and posttest control group quasi-experimental method. The sample of the study was 42 eleventh grade students studying in the spring term of…

  5. Multiscale Talbot effects in Fibonacci geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Lin; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2015-04-01

    This article investigates the Talbot effects in Fibonacci geometry by introducing the cut-and-projection construction, which allows for capturing the entire infinite Fibonacci structure in a single computational cell. Theoretical and numerical calculations demonstrate the Talbot foci of Fibonacci geometry at distances that are multiples (τ +2){{({{F}μ }+τ {{F}μ +1})}-1}p/(2q) or (τ +2){{({{L}μ }+τ {{L}μ +1})}-1}p/(2q) of the Talbot distance. Here (p, q) are coprime integers, μ is an integer, τ is the golden mean, and {{F}μ } and {{L}μ } are Fibonacci and Lucas numbers, respectively. The image of a single Talbot focus exhibits a multiscale-interval pattern due to the self-similarity of the scaling Fourier spectrum.

  6. The Effect of Dynamic Geometry Software and Physical Manipulatives on Candidate Teachers' Transformational Geometry Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Gül Kaleli

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of using Dynamic Geometry Software (DGS) Cabri II Plus and physical manipulatives on the transformational geometry achievement of candidate teachers. In this study, the semi-experimental method was used, consisting of two experimental and one control groups. The samples of this study were 117 students. A…

  7. Effects of Liner Geometry on Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2002-01-01

    Current aircraft engine nacelles typically contain acoustic liners consisting of perforated sheets bonded onto honeycomb cavities. Numerous models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of these liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess nacelle liner noise suppression. Recent efforts have provided advances in impedance education methodologies that offer more accurate determinations of acoustic liner properties in the presence of grazing flow. The current report provides the results of a parametric study, in which a finite element method was used to assess the effects of variations of the following geometric parameters on liner impedance, with and without the presence of grazing flow: percent open area, sheet thickness, sheet thickness-to-hole diameter ratio and cavity depth. Normal incidence acoustic impedances were determined for eight acoustic liners, consisting of punched aluminum facesheets bonded to hexcell honeycomb cavities. Similar liners were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center grazing incidence tube to determine their response in the presence of grazing flow. The resultant data provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of these perforate, single-layer liner parameters on the acoustic impedance of the liner.

  8. Modeling cavities exhibiting strong lateral confinement using open geometry Fourier modal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häyrynen, Teppo; Gregersen, Niels

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a computationally efficient Fourier-Bessel expansion based open geometry formalism for modeling the optical properties of rotationally symmetric photonic nanostructures. The lateral computation domain is assumed infinite so that no artificial boundary conditions are needed. Instead, the leakage of the modes due to an imperfect field confinement is taken into account by using a basis functions that expand the whole infinite space. The computational efficiency is obtained by using a non-uniform discretization in the frequency space in which the lateral expansion modes are more densely sampled around a geometry specific dominant transverse wavenumber region. We will use the developed approach to investigate the Q factor and mode confinement in cavities where top DBR mirror has small rectangular defect confining the modes laterally on the defect region.

  9. Effects of geometry on slot-jet film cooling performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hyams, D.G.; McGovern, K.T.; Leylek, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    The physics of the film cooling process for shaped, inclined slot-jets with realistic slot-length-to-width ratios (L/s) is studied for a range of blowing ratio (M) and density ratio (DR) parameters typical of gas turbine operations. For the first time in the open literature, the effect of inlet and exit shaping of the slot-jet on both flow and thermal field characteristics is isolated, and the dominant mechanisms responsible for differences in these characteristics are documented. A previously documented computational methodology was applied for the study of four distinct configurations: (1) slot with straight edges and sharp corners (reference case); (2) slot with shaped inlet region; (3) slot with shaped exit region; and (4) slot with both shaped inlet and exit regions. Detailed field results as well as surface phenomena involving adiabatic film effectiveness ({eta}) and heat transfer coefficient (h) are presented. It is demonstrated that both {eta} and h results are vital in the proper assessment of film cooling performance. All simulations were carried out using a multi-block, unstructured/adaptive grid, fully explicit, time-marching solver with multi-grid, local time stepping, and residual smoothing type acceleration techniques. Special attention was paid to and full documentation provided for: (1) proper modeling of the physical phenomena; (2) exact geometry and high quality grid generation techniques; (3) discretization schemes; and (4) turbulence modeling issues. The key parameters M and DR were varied from 1.0 to 2.0 and 1.5 to 2.0, respectively, to show their influence. Simulations were repeated for slot length-to-width ratio (L/s) of 3.0 and 4.5 in order to explain the effects of this important parameter. Additionally, the performance of two popular turbulence models, standard k-F, and RNG k-E, were studied to establish their ability to handle highly elliptic jet/crossflow interaction type processes.

  10. Applied-field MPD thruster geometry effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1991-01-01

    Eight MPD thruster configurations were used to study the effects of applied field strength, propellant, and facility pressure on thruster performance. Vacuum facility background pressures higher than approx. 0.12 Pa were found to greatly influence thruster performance and electrode power deposition. Thrust efficiency and specific impulse increased monotonically with increasing applied field strength. Both cathode and anode radii fundamentally influenced the efficiency specific impulse relationship, while their lengths influence only the magnitude of the applied magnetic field required to reach a given performance level. At a given specific impulse, large electrode radii result in lower efficiencies for the operating conditions studied. For all test conditions, anode power deposition was the largest efficiency loss, and represented between 50 and 80 pct. of the input power. The fraction of the input power deposited into the anode decreased with increasing applied field and anode radii. The highest performance measured, 20 pct. efficiency at 3700 seconds specific impulse, was obtained using hydrogen propellant.

  11. Applied-field MPD thruster geometry effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1991-01-01

    Eight MPD thruster configurations were used to study the effects of applied-field strength, propellant, and facility pressure on thruster performance. Vacuum facility background pressures higher than about 0.12 Pa were found to significantly influence thruster performance and electrode power deposition. Thrust efficiency and specific impulse increased monotonically with increasing applied field strength. Both cathode and anode radii fundamentally influenced the efficiency-specific impulse relationship, while their lengths influenced only the magnitude of the applied magnetic field required to reach a given performance level. At a given specific impulse, large electrode radii result in lower efficiencies for the operating conditions studied. For all test conditions, anode power deposition was the largest efficiency loss, and represented between 50 percent and 80 percent of the input power. The fraction of the input power deposited into the anode decreased with increasing applied field and anode radius. The highest performance measured, 20 percent efficiency at 3700 seconds specific impulse, was obtained using hydrogen propellant.

  12. Cutting Edge Geometry Effect on Plastic Deformation of Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, G. I.; Filippov, A. V.; Proskokov, A. V.; Gorbatenko, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents experimental studies of OT4 titanium alloy machining with cutting edges of various geometry parameters. Experiments were performed at a low speed by the scheme of free cutting. Intensity of plastic shear strain was set for defining of cutting edge geometry effect on machining. Images of chip formed are shown. Estimation of strain magnitude was accomplished with digital image correlation method. Effect of rake angle and cutting edge angle has been studied. Depth of deformed layer and the area of the plastic strain is determine. Results showed that increasing the angle of the cutting edge inclination results in a change the mechanism of chip formation.

  13. Geometry of the human erythrocyte. I. Effect of albumin on cell geometry.

    PubMed Central

    Jay, A W

    1975-01-01

    The effects of albumin on the geometry of human erythrocytes have been studied. Individual red cells, hanging on edge from coverslips were photographed. Enlarged cell profiles were digitized using a Gradicon digitizer (Instronics Ltd., Stittsville, Ontario). Geometric parameters including diameter, area, volume, minimum cylindrical diameter, sphericity index, swelling index, maximum and minimum cell thickness, were calculated for each cell using a CDC 6400 computer. Maximum effect of human serum albumin was reached at about 1 g/liter. Studies of cell populations showed decreases in mean cell diameter of up to 6%, area 6%, and volume 15%, varying from sample to sample. The thickness of the rim was increased while that at the dimple was decreased. Studies of single cells showed that area and volume changes do not occur equally in all cells. Cells with lower sphericity indices showed larger effects. In the presence of albumin, up to 50% of the cells assumed cup-shapes (stomatocytes). These cells had smaller volumes but the same area as biconcave cells. Mechanical agitation could reversibly induce biconcave cells to assume cup shapes without area or volume changes. Experiments with de-fatted human albumins showed that the presence of bound fatty acids in varying concentrations does not alter the observed effects. Bovine serum albumin has similar effects on human erythrocytes as human serum albumin. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 9 PMID:1122337

  14. The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lola, Chanceaux; Thierry, Menand

    2015-04-01

    The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and geometry are studied by means of analogue laboratory experiments. Hot fluid vegetable oil (a magma analogue), that solidifies during its propagation, is injected as a sill in a colder layered gelatine solid (an elastic host rock analogue). The injection flux and temperature are maintained constant during an experiment. In order to vary the importance of solidification and quantify its effect on sill propagation, the injection flux and temperature are systematically varied between each experiment. Depending on the importance of solidification effects, two extreme behaviours for sill propagation dynamics and geometry are observed. When solidification effects are small (high injection temperatures and fluxes), the propagation is continuous and the sill has a regular and smooth surface. Inversely, when solidification effects are important (low injection temperatures and fluxes), sill propagation is discontinuous and occurs by steps. After each propagation step, the sill stalls, thickens progressively by storing hot fluid vegetable oil beneath the partially solidified intrusion, without growing neither in length nor in breadth, and after a pause, the propagation initiates again, soon followed by a new episode of momentary arrest. The geometry of these sills displays folds, ropy structures on their surface, and lobes with imprints of the leading fronts that correspond to each step of surface creation. These experiments show that for a given, constant injected volume, as solidification effects increase, the surface of the sills decreases, their thickness increases, and the number of propagation steps increases. In the same way lower solidification effects promote larger sill surfaces, lower thicknesses, and a lower number of propagation steps. These results have various geological and geophysical implications. Regarding the geometry of sills, 3D seismic studies in sedimentary basins reveal sills with lobate

  15. Ambient Occlusion Effects for Combined Volumes and Tubular Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Mathias; Martin, Tobias; Grosset, A.V. Pascal; Smith, Sean T.; Hansen, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper details a method for interactive direct volume rendering that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube-shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The algorithm extends the recently presented the directional occlusion shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. Stream tube geometries are computed using an effective spline-based interpolation and approximation scheme that avoids self-intersection and maintains coherent orientation of the stream tube segments to avoid surface deforming twists. Furthermore, strategies to reduce the geometric and specular aliasing of the stream tubes are discussed. PMID:23559506

  16. Effect of Dust Coagulation Dynamics on the Geometry of Aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, R.

    1996-01-01

    Master equation gives a more fundamental description of stochastic coagulation processes rather than popular Smoluchowski's equation. In order to examine the effect of the dynamics on the geometry of resulting aggregates, we study Master equation with a rigorous Monte Carlo algorithm. It is found that Cluster-Cluster aggregation model is a good approximation of orderly growth and the aggregates have fluffy structures with a fractal dimension approx. 2. A scaling analysis of Smoluchowski's equation also supports this conclusion.

  17. Particle Geometry and Its Effect on Optical Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Rachael Victoria

    The ability to manipulate small particles with light has opened new avenues for synthesis and experimentation. Building upon expansive previous work in the theoretical study of light scattering, the forces which make optical manip- ulation of matter possible have been extensively studied both analytically and computationally. In this dissertation we will examine the forces on complex particle geometries, in the presence of a focused beam of light, using a two dimensional geometric optics simulation. We begin with a brief overview on the background of optical trapping as well as the theoretical approaches avail- able to model optical trapping forces both analytically and numerically. The results of our numerical geometric optics simulation are shown to be in exact agreement with a previously published, closed form, analytic solution for the optical forces on a solid homogeneous sphere in the geometric optics regime. 1 The trapping behavior of two dimensional circles with an inner cavity of varying size is then investigated. Generalized Lorenz-Mie theory is employed to calculate the force on the particle interacting with an unfocused beam. An infinite cylinder with an inner cavity size on the order of the wavelength of incident light and an unfocused beam, incident normal to the cylinder axis, are used. This result is compared to that found with our geometric optics simulation. We find that, for an inner cavity diameter an order of magnitude or smaller than the wavelength of the incident light, the geometric optics simulation underestimates this force. The same holds true for very large inner cavities, where the dielectric wall thickness is less than half the wavelength. For cavity sizes between these two extremes we find the geometric optics simulation overestimates the force in the direction of beam incidence, by as much as a factor of two. Finally the effect of breaking axial symmetry on the trapping behavior of a two dimensional planar shape is studied

  18. Pin Tool Geometry Effects in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querin, J. A.; Rubisoff, H. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW) there is significant evidence that material can take one of two different flow paths when being displaced from its original position in front of the pin tool to its final position in the wake of the weld. The geometry of the pin tool, along with the process parameters, plays an important role in dictating the path that the material takes. Each flow path will impart a different thermomechanical history on the material, consequently altering the material microstructure and subsequent weld properties. The intention of this research is to isolate the effect that different pin tool attributes have on the flow paths imparted on the FSWed material. Based on published weld tool geometries, a variety of weld tools were fabricated and used to join AA2219. Results from the tensile properties and microstructural characterization will be presented.

  19. Reconstructing the open-field magnetic geometry of solar corona using coronagraph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.; Jones, Shaela; Burkepile, Joan

    2015-04-01

    The upcoming Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter missions will provide an new insight into the inner heliosphere magnetically connected with the topologically complex and eruptive solar corona. Physical interpretation of these observations will be dependent on the accurate reconstruction of the large-scale coronal magnetic field. We argue that such reconstruction can be performed using photospheric extrapolation codes constrained by white-light coronagraph images. The field extrapolation component of this project is featured in a related presentation by S. Jones et al. Here, we focus on our image-processing algorithms conducting an automated segmentation of coronal loop structures. In contrast to the previously proposed segmentation codes designed for detecting small-scale closed loops in the vicinity of active regions, our technique focuses on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal features observed at significant radial distances from the solar surface. Coronagraph images are transformed into a polar coordinate system and undergo radial detrending and initial noise reduction followed by an adaptive angular differentiation. An adjustable threshold is applied to identify candidate coronagraph features associated with the large-scale coronal field. A blob detection algorithm is used to identify valid features against a noisy background. The extracted coronal features are used to derive empirical directional constraints for magnetic field extrapolation procedures based on photospheric magnetograms. Two versions of the method optimized for processing ground-based (Mauna Loa Solar Observatory) and satellite-based (STEREO Cor1 and Cor2) coronagraph images are being developed.

  20. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    PubMed

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number. PMID:24116405

  1. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    PubMed

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number.

  2. Effects of parent vessel geometry on intraaneurysmal flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2006-03-01

    This study shows the influence of the upstream parent artery geometry on intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics of cerebral aneurysms. Patient-specific models of four cerebral aneurysms at four typical locations were constructed from 3D rotational angiography images. Two geometrical models were constructed for each patient, one with the native parent vessel geometry and another with the parent vessel truncated approximately 1cm upstream from the aneurysm. For one aneurysm, two images were used to construct a model as realistic and large as possible - down to the carotid bifurcation - which was cut at seven different locations. Corresponding finite element grids were generated and computational fluid dynamics simulations were carried out under pulsatile flow conditions. It was found that truncated models tended to underestimate the wall shear stress in the aneurysm and to shift the impaction zone to the neck when compared with the native geometry. In one aneurysm the parent vessel included a tortuous segment close to the neck that strongly influenced the flow pattern entering the aneurysm. Thus, including longer portions of the parent vessel beyond this segment did not have a substantial effect. Depending on the dominant geometrical features the length of the parent artery needed for an accurate representation of the intraaneurysmal hemodynamics may vary among individuals. In conclusion, failure to properly model the inflow stream determined by the upstream parent artery can significantly influence the results of intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic models. The upstream portion of the parent vessel of cerebral aneurysms should be included in order to accurately represent the intraaneurysmal hemodynamics.

  3. Effects of Hole Length, Supply Plenum Geometry, and Freestream Turbulence on Film Cooling Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burd, Steven W.; Simon, Terrence W.; Thurman, Douglas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Experimental measurements are presented in this report to document the sensitivity of film cooling performance to the hole length and coolant delivery plenum geometry. Measurements with hot-wire anemometry detail velocity, local turbulence, and spectral distributions over the exit plane of film cooling holes and downstream of injection in the coolant-freestream interaction zone. Measurements of discharge coefficients and adiabatic effectiveness are also provided. Coolant is supplied to the film cooling holes by means of a large, open plenum and through plenums which force the coolant to approach the holes either co-current or counter-current to the freestream. A single row of film cooling holes with 35 degree-inclined streamwise at two coolant-to-freestream velocity ratios, 0.5 and 1.0, is investigated. The coolant-to-freestream density ratio is maintained in the range 0.96 to 1.0. Measurements were taken under high-freestream (FSTI = 12%) and low-freestream turbulence intensity (FSTI = 0.5%) conditions. The results document the effects of the hole L/D, coolant supply plenum geometry, velocity ratio, and FSTI. In general, hole L/D and the supply plenum geometry play influential roles in the film cooling performance. Hole L/D effects, however, are more pronounced. Film cooling performance is also dependent upon the velocity ratio and FSTI.

  4. Weld geometry strength effect in 2219-T87 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Novak, H. L.; Mcilwain, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of the effect of geometry on the mechanical properties of a butt weld joint is worked out based upon the soft interlayer weld model. Tensile tests of 45 TIG butt welds and 6 EB beads-on-plate in 1/4-in. 2219-T87 aluminum plate made under a wide range of heat sink and power input conditions are analyzed using this theory. The analysis indicates that purely geometrical effects dominate in determining variations in weld joint strength with heat sink and power input. Variations in weld dimensions with cooling rate are significant as well as with power input. Weld size is suggested as a better indicator of the condition of a weld joint than energy input.

  5. Effects of electrode geometry on transient plasma induced ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, B.; Gururajan, V.; Eisazadeh-Far, K.; Windom, B.; Singleton, D.; Gundersen, M. A.; Egolfopoulos, F. N.

    2013-05-01

    Achieving effective ignition of reacting mixtures using nanosecond pulsed discharge non-equilibrium transient plasma (TP), requires that the effects of several experimental parameters be quantified and understood. Among them are the electrode geometry, the discharge location especially in non-premixed systems, and the relative ignition performance by spark and TP under the same experimental conditions. In the present investigation, such issues were addressed experimentally using a cylindrical constant volume combustion chamber and a counterflow flame configuration coupled with optical shadowgraph that enables observation of how and where the ignition process starts. Results were obtained under atmospheric pressure and showed that the electrode geometry has a notable influence on ignition, with the needle-to-semicircle exhibiting the best ignition performance. Furthermore, it was determined that under non-premixed conditions discharging TP in the reactants mixing layer was most effective in achieving ignition. It was also determined that in the cases considered, the TP induced ignition initiates from the needle head where the electric field and electron densities are the highest. In the case of a spark, however, ignition was found to initiate always from the hot region between the two electrodes. Comparison of spark and TP discharges in only air (i.e. without fuel) and ignition phenomena induced by them also suggest that in the case of TP ignition is at least partly non-thermal and instead driven by the production of active species. Finally, it was determined that single pulsed TP discharges are sufficient to ignite both premixed and non-premixed flames of a variety of fuels ranging from hydrogen to heavy fuels including F-76 diesel and IFO380 bunker fuel even at room temperature.

  6. The Effect of Geometry on Fatigue Life for Bellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinbong

    A bellows is a component installed in the automobile exhaust system to reduce or prevent the impact from engine. Generally, the specifications on the bellows are determined in the system design process of exhaust system and the component design is carried out to meet the specifications such as stiffness. Consideration of fatigue is generally an important aspect of design on metallic bellows expansion joints. These components are subject to displacement loading which frequently results in cyclic strains. This study has been investigated to analyze the effect of geometry on fatigue life for automotive bellows. 8 node shell element and non-linear method is employed for the analysis. The optimized shapes of the bellows are expected to give good guidelines to the practical designs.

  7. Solvent effect on columnar formation in solar-cell geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Sosa-Vargas, L.; Takanishi, Y.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, Y. W.; Yamamoto, J.; Labardi, M.; Lagerwall, J. P. F.; Shimizu, Y.; Scalia, G.

    2016-03-01

    The efficiency of the conduction of photocurrent in discotic liquid crystals is known to depend on the quality of the columnar organization. Solvents have shown to be able to influence the formation of wire structures on substrates promoting very long and ordered wired formations or bulkier structures depending on the affinity of the solvent with parts of the molecular structure of discotics. Here we present a study on the effect of solvents when the liquid crystal is confined between two substrates with the columns running perpendicular to them, geometry used in solar cells. We focused on toluene and dodecane, solvents that have shown to promote on substrates the formation of aligned and long nanowires and bulk large and isolated fibers, respectively. The phase transition behavior indicates that toluene does not interfere with the columnar formation while dodecane strongly influence increasing the disorder in the structure.

  8. Neoclassical viscosity effects on resistive magnetohydrodynamic modes in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.G.; Oh, Y.H.; Choi, D.I. ); Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W. )

    1992-03-01

    The flux-surface-averaged linearized resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary-layer equations including the compressibility, diamagnetic drift, and neoclassical viscosity terms are derived in toroidal geometry. These equations describe the resistive layer dynamics of resistive MHD modes over the collisionality regime between the banana plateau and the Pfirsch--Schlueter. From the resulting equations, the effects of neoclassical viscosity on the stability of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes are investigated numerically. Also, a study is given for the problem of how the neoclassical resistive MHD mode is generated as the collisionality is reduced. It is shown that the neoclassical viscosity terms give a significant destabilizing effect for the tearing and resistive ballooning modes. This destabilization comes mainly from the reduction of the stabilizing effect of the parallel ion sound compression by the ion neoclassical viscosity. In the banana-plateau collisionality limit, where the compressibility is negligible, the dispersion relations of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes reduce to the same form, with the threshold value of the driving force given by {Delta}{sub {ital c}}=0. On the other hand, with the finite neoclassical effect it is found that the neoclassical resistive MHD instability is generated in agreement with previous results. Furthermore, it is shown that this later instability can be generated in a wide range of the collisionality including near the Pfirsch--Schlueter regime as well as the banana-plateau regime, suggesting that this mode is a probable cause of anomalous transport.

  9. Electrically heated tube investigation of cooling channel geometry effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on the combined effects of cooling channel aspect ratio and curvature for rocket engines are presented. Symmetrically heated tubes with average heat fluxes up to 1.7 MW/m(exp 2) were used. The coolant was gaseous nitrogen at an inlet temperature of 280 K (500 R) and inlet pressures up to 1.0 x 10(exp 7) N/m(exp 2) (1500 psia). Two different tube geometries were tested: a straight, circular cross-section tube, and an aspect-ratio 10 cross-section tube with a 45 deg bend. The circular tube results are compared to classical models from the literature as validation of the system. The curvature effect data from the curved aspect-ratio 10 tube compare favorably to the empirical equations available in the literature for low aspect ratio tubes. This latter results suggest that thermal stratification of the coolant due to diminished curvature effect mixing may not be an issue for high aspect-ratio cooling channels.

  10. Effect of fjord geometry on tidewater glacier stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åkesson, Henning; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.; Nick, Faezeh M.

    2016-04-01

    Many marine-terminating glaciers have thinned, accelerated and retreated during the last two decades, broadly consistent with warmer atmospheric and oceanic conditions. However, these patterns involve considerable spatial and temporal variability, with diverse glacier behavior within the same regions. Similarly, reconstructions of marine-terminating glaciers indicate highly asynchronous retreat histories. While it is well known that retrograde slopes can cause marine ice sheet instabilities, the effect of lateral drag and fjord width has received less attention. Here, we test the hypothesis that marine outlet glacier stability is largely controlled by fjord width, and to a less extent by regional climate forcing. We employ a dynamic flowline model on idealized glacier geometries (representative of different outlet glaciers) to investigate geometric controls on decadal and longer times scales. The model accounts for driving and resistive stresses of glacier flow as well as along-flow stress transfer. It has a physical treatment of iceberg calving and a time-adaptive grid allowing for continuous tracking of grounding-line migration. We apply changes in atmospheric and oceanic forcing and show how wide and narrow fjord sections foster glacier (in)stabilities. We also evaluate the effect of including a surface mass balance - elevation feedback in such a setting. Finally, the relevance of these results to past and future marine-terminating glacier stability is discussed.

  11. Quantifying the combined effects of multiple extreme floods on river channel geometry and on flood hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Mingfu; Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Wright, Nigel G.; Sleigh, P. Andy; Staines, Kate E. H.

    2016-07-01

    Effects of flood-induced bed elevation and channel geometry changes on flood hazards are largely unexplored, especially in the case of multiple floods from the same site. This study quantified the evolution of river channel and floodplain geometry during a repeated series of hypothetical extreme floods using a 2D full hydro-morphodynamic model (LHMM). These experiments were designed to examine the consequences of channel geometry changes on channel conveyance capacity and subsequent flood dynamics. Our results revealed that extreme floods play an important role in adjusting a river channel to become more efficient for subsequent propagation of floods, and that in-channel scour and sediment re-distribution can greatly improve the conveyance capacity of a channel for subsequent floods. In our hypothetical sequence of floods the response of bed elevation was of net degradation, and sediment transport successively weakened even with floods of the same magnitude. Changes in river channel geometry led to significant impact on flood hydraulics and thereby flood hazards. We found that flood-induced in-channel erosion can disconnect the channel from its floodplain resulting in a reduction of floodwater storage. Thus, the frequency and extent of subsequent overbank flows and floodplain inundation decreased, which reduced downstream flood attenuation and increased downstream flood hazard. In combination and in summary, these results suggest that changes in channel capacity due to extreme floods may drive changes in flood hazard. The assumption of unchanging of river morphology during inundation modelling should therefore be open to question for flood risk management.

  12. Effects of spaceflight on rat humerus geometry, biomechanics, and biochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Zernicke, R. F.; Grindeland, R. E.; Kaplansky, A.; Durnova, G. N.; Li, K. C.; Martinez, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a 12.5-day spaceflight (Cosmos 1887 biosatellite) on the geometric, biomechanical, and biochemical characteristics of humeri of male specific pathogen-free rats were examined. Humeri of age-matched basal control, synchronous control, and vivarium control rats were contrasted with the flight bones to examine the influence of growth and space environment on bone development. Lack of humerus longitudinal growth occurred during the 12.5 days in spaceflight. In addition, the normal mid-diaphysial periosteal appositional growth was affected; compared with their controls, the spaceflight humeri had less cortical cross-sectional area, smaller periosteal circumferences, smaller anterior-posterior periosteal diameters, and smaller second moments of area with respect to the bending and nonbending axes. The flexural rigidity of the flight humeri was comparable to that of the younger basal control rats and significantly less than that of the synchronous and vivarium controls; the elastic moduli of all four groups, nonetheless, were not significantly different. Generally, the matrix biochemistry of the mid-diaphysial cross sections showed no differences among groups. Thus, the spaceflight differences in humeral mechanical strength and flexural rigidity were probably a result of the differences in humeral geometry rather than material properties.

  13. Geometry and cooperativity effects in adenosine-carboxylic acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Schlund, Sebastian; Mladenovic, Milena; Basílio Janke, Eline M; Engels, Bernd; Weisz, Klaus

    2005-11-23

    NMR experiments and theoretical investigations were performed on hydrogen bonded complexes of specifically 1- and 7-15N-labeled adenine nucleosides with carboxylic acids. By employing a freonic solvent of CDClF2 and CDF3, NMR spectra were acquired at temperatures as low as 123 K, where the regime of slow hydrogen bond exchange is reached and several higher-order complexes were found to coexist in solution. Unlike acetic acid, chloroacetic acid forms Watson-Crick complexes with the proton largely displaced from oxygen to the nitrogen acceptor in an ion pairing structure. Calculated geometries and chemical shifts of the proton in the hydrogen bridge favorably agree with experimentally determined values if vibrational averaging and solvent effects are taken into account. The results indicate that binding a second acidic ligand at the adenine Hoogsteen site in a ternary complex weakens the hydrogen bond to the Watson-Crick bound carboxylic acid. However, substituting a second adenine nucleobase for a carboxylic acid in the trimolecular complex leads to cooperative binding at Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen faces of adenosine.

  14. Radio flares of compact binary mergers: the effect of non-trivial outflow geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Ben; Piran, Tsvi

    2015-10-01

    The next generation gravitational waves (GW) detectors are most sensitive to GW emitted by compact (neutron star/black hole) binary mergers. If one of those is a neutron star the merger will also emit electromagnetic radiation via three possible channels: gamma-ray bursts and their (possibly orphan) afterglows, Li-Paczynski Macronovae and radio flares. This accompanying electromagnetic radiation is vitally important in confirming the GW detections. It could also reveal a wealth of information regarding the merger and will open a window towards multimessenger astronomy. Identifying and characterizing these counterparts is therefore of utmost importance. In this work, we explore late time radio flares emitted by the dynamically ejected outflows. We build upon previous work and consider the effect of the outflow's non-trivial geometry. Using an approximate method, we estimate the radio light-curves for several ejected matter distributions obtained in numerical simulations. Our method provides an upper limit to the effect of non-sphericity. Together with the spherical estimates, the resulting light curves bound the actual signal. We find that while non-spherical geometries can in principle lead to an enhanced emission, in most cases they result in an increase in the time-scale compared with a corresponding spherical configuration. This would weaken somewhat these signals and might decrease the detection prospects.

  15. Tunneling into microstate geometries: quantum effects stop gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Mayerson, Daniel R.; Puhm, Andrea; Vercnocke, Bert

    2016-07-01

    Collapsing shells form horizons, and when the curvature is small classical general relativity is believed to describe this process arbitrarily well. On the other hand, quantum information theory based (fuzzball/firewall) arguments suggest the existence of some structure at the black hole horizon. This structure can only form if classical general relativity stops being the correct description of the collapsing shell before it reaches the horizon size. We present strong evidence that classical general relativity can indeed break down prematurely, by explicitly computing the quantum tunneling amplitude of a collapsing shell of branes into smooth horizonless microstate geometries. We show that the amplitude for tunneling into microstate geometries with a large number of topologically non-trivial cycles is parametrically larger than e - S BH , which indicates that the shell can tunnel into a horizonless configuration long before the horizon has any chance to form. We also use this technology to investigate the tunneling of M2 branes into LLM bubbling geometries.

  16. Finite-size effects and percolation properties of Poisson geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larmier, C.; Dumonteil, E.; Malvagi, F.; Mazzolo, A.; Zoia, A.

    2016-07-01

    Random tessellations of the space represent a class of prototype models of heterogeneous media, which are central in several applications in physics, engineering, and life sciences. In this work, we investigate the statistical properties of d -dimensional isotropic Poisson geometries by resorting to Monte Carlo simulation, with special emphasis on the case d =3 . We first analyze the behavior of the key features of these stochastic geometries as a function of the dimension d and the linear size L of the domain. Then, we consider the case of Poisson binary mixtures, where the polyhedra are assigned two labels with complementary probabilities. For this latter class of random geometries, we numerically characterize the percolation threshold, the strength of the percolating cluster, and the average cluster size.

  17. Finite-size effects and percolation properties of Poisson geometries.

    PubMed

    Larmier, C; Dumonteil, E; Malvagi, F; Mazzolo, A; Zoia, A

    2016-07-01

    Random tessellations of the space represent a class of prototype models of heterogeneous media, which are central in several applications in physics, engineering, and life sciences. In this work, we investigate the statistical properties of d-dimensional isotropic Poisson geometries by resorting to Monte Carlo simulation, with special emphasis on the case d=3. We first analyze the behavior of the key features of these stochastic geometries as a function of the dimension d and the linear size L of the domain. Then, we consider the case of Poisson binary mixtures, where the polyhedra are assigned two labels with complementary probabilities. For this latter class of random geometries, we numerically characterize the percolation threshold, the strength of the percolating cluster, and the average cluster size. PMID:27575099

  18. Study of Gasdynamic Effect Upon the Weld Geometry When Concumable Electrode Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Grigorieva, E. G.; Mayorova, E. I.

    2016-04-01

    The paper considers the ways of weld geometry controlling when consumable electrode welding under single-jet and double-jet gas shielding. The authors provide comparative results of experimental studies on the effects of shielding gas supply upon the weld geometry in weld joints produced from construction carbon steel 45. It has been established that gas-dynamic effect of the shielding gas has a significant impact upon shaping and weld geometry when consumable electrode welding under double-jet gas shielding.

  19. Effect of geometry of rice kernels on drying modeling results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geometry of rice grain is commonly represented by sphere, spheroid or ellipsoid shapes in the drying models. Models using simpler shapes are easy to solve mathematically, however, deviation from the true grain shape might lead to large errors in predictions of drying characteristics such as, moistur...

  20. [The Effect of Observation Geometry on Polarized Skylight Spectrum].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ren-bin; Wang, Ling-mei; Gao, Jun; Wang, Chi

    2015-03-01

    Study on polarized skylight spectral characters while observation geometry changing in different solar zenith angles (SZA), viewing zenith angles (VZA) or relative azimuth angles (RAA). Simulation calculation of cloudless daylight polarimetric spectrum is realized based on the solver, vector discrete ordinate method, of radiative transfer equation. In the Sun's principal and perpendicular plane, the spectral irradiance data, varying at wavelengths in the range between 0.4 and 3 μm, are calculated to extend the atmospheric polarization spectral information under the conditions: the MODTRAN solar reference spectrur is the only illuminant source; the main influencing factors of polarized radiative transfer include underlying surface albedo, aerosol layers and components, and the absorption of trace gases. Simulation analysis results: (1) While the relative azimuth angle is zero, the magnitude of spectrum U/I is lower than 10(-7) and V/I is negligible, the degree of polarization and the spectrum Q/I are shaped like the letter V or mirror-writing U. (2) In twilight, when the Sun is not in FOV of the detector, the polarization of the daytime sky has two maximum near 0.51 and 2.75 μm, and a minimum near 1.5 μm. For arbitrary observation geometry, the spectral signal of V/I may be ignored. According to observation geometry, choosing different spectral bands or polarized signal will be propitious to targets detection. PMID:26117882

  1. Effects of Hip Geometry on Fracture Patterns of Proximal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Seyyed Morteza; Qoreishy, Mohamad; Keipourfard, Ali; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza Minator; Shokraneh, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some studies have previously shown that geometry of proximal femur can affect the probability of fracture and type of fracture. It happens since the geometry of the proximal femur determines how a force is applied to its different parts. In this study, we have compared proximal femur’s geometric characteristics in femoral neck (FNF), intertrochanteric (ITF) and Subtrochanteric (STF) fractures. Methods: In this study, 60 patients who had hip fractures were studied as case studies. They were divided into FNF, ITF and STF groups based on their fracture types (20 patients in each group). Patients were studied with x-ray radiography and CT scans. Radiological parameters including femoral neck length from lateral cortex to center of femoral head (FNL), diameter of femoral head (FHD), diameter of femoral neck (FND), femoral head neck offset (FHNO), neck-shaft angle (alpha), femoral neck anteversion (beta) were measured and compared in all three groups. Results: Amount of FNL was significantly higher in STF group compared to FNF (0.011) while ITF and STF as well as FNT and ITF did not show a significant different. Also, FND in FNF group was significantly lower than the other two groups, i.e. ITF and STF. In other cases there were no instances of significant statistical difference. Conclusion: Hip geometry can be used to identify individuals who are at the risk of fracture with special pattern. Also, it is important to have more studies in different populations and more in men. PMID:27517071

  2. Children's Use of Geometry and Landmarks To Reorient in an Open Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouteux, Stephane; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2001-01-01

    Eight experiments examined abilities of 3- to 4-year-olds to reorient themselves and locate a hidden object in an open circular space furnished with landmark objects. Findings showed that children failed to use geometric configuration of objects to reorient themselves. Children successfully located the object in relation to a geometric…

  3. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  4. The Effect of Origami-Based Instruction on Spatial Visualization, Geometry Achievement, and Geometric Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arici, Sevil; Aslan-Tutak, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the effect of origami-based geometry instruction on spatial visualization, geometry achievement, and geometric reasoning of tenth-grade students in Turkey. The sample ("n" = 184) was chosen from a tenth-grade population of a public high school in Turkey. It was a quasi-experimental pretest/posttest design. A…

  5. The Effect of Learning Geometry Topics of 7th Grade in Primary Education with Dynamic Geometer's Sketchpad Geometry Software to Success and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesan, Cenk; Caliskan, Sevdane

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of learning geometry topics of 7th grade in primary education with dynamic geometer's sketchpad geometry software to student's success and retention. The experimental research design with The Posttest-Only Control Group was used in this study. In the experimental group, dynamic geometer's…

  6. Effect of geometry in frequency response modeling of nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahani, M. Nasr; Yilmaz, M.; Sonne, M. R.; Hattel, J. H.; Alaca, B. Erdem

    2016-06-01

    The trend towards nanomechanical resonator sensors with increasing sensitivity raises the need to address challenges encountered in the modeling of their mechanical behavior. Selecting the best approach in mechanical response modeling amongst the various potential computational solid mechanics methods is subject to controversy. A guideline for the selection of the appropriate approach for a specific set of geometry and mechanical properties is needed. In this study, geometrical limitations in frequency response modeling of flexural nanomechanical resonators are investigated. Deviation of Euler and Timoshenko beam theories from numerical techniques including finite element modeling and Surface Cauchy-Born technique are studied. The results provide a limit beyond which surface energy contribution dominates the mechanical behavior. Using the Surface Cauchy-Born technique as the reference, a maximum error on the order of 50 % is reported for high-aspect ratio resonators.

  7. Interfacial geometry and D-variation effects in two-phase systems. [binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.; Unnam, J.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the governing diffusion equation for two-phase concentration dependent diffusion coefficients are examined. Solutions were also calculated for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries to compare the effect of interface geometries with those caused by concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients, and two methods of averaging D were considered to determine the best averaging method for different types of D-variations. The effects of interface-location criteria on mass conservation and convergence of interface location, diffusion coefficient variation in the alpha and beta-phases of a two-phase binary alloy system, effect of D(alpha) variation in a cylindrical couple on beta-phase thickness, and geometry and D-variation effects on the degree of homogenization were determined. It is concluded that typical D(alpha)-variations can have a greater influence on the kinetics of interdiffusion than the geometry.

  8. Update on single-screw expander geometry model integrated into an open-source simulation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziviani, D.; Bell, I. H.; De Paepe, M.; van den Broek, M.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a mechanistic steady-state model of a single-screw expander is described with emphasis on the geometric description. Insights into the calculation of the main parameters and the definition of the groove profile are provided. Additionally, the adopted chamber model is discussed. The model has been implemented by means of the open-source software PDSim (Positive Displacement SIMulation), written in the Python language, and the solution algorithm is described. The single-screw expander model is validated with a set of steady-state measurement points collected from a 11 kWe organic Rankine cycle test-rig with SES36 and R245fa as working fluid. The overall performance and behavior of the expander are also further analyzed.

  9. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Shyamal

    2015-05-15

    We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over {sup 4}He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

  10. Effects of hillslope geometry on surface and subsurface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzevari, T.; Noroozpour, S.

    2014-07-01

    Dividing a catchment to subcatchment or hillslope scales allows for better scrutiny of the changes in spatial distribution of rainfall, soil attributes and plant cover across the catchment. An instantaneous unit hydrograph model is suggested for simulating runoff hydrographs for complex hillslopes. This model is able to estimate surface and subsurface flows of the catchment based on the Dunne-Black mechanism. For this purpose, a saturation model is used to separate the saturated and unsaturated zones in complex hillslopes. The profile curvatures (concave, straight and convex) and plan shapes (convergent, parallel and divergent) of complex hillslopes are considered, in order to compute the travel time of surface and subsurface flows. The model was used for prediction of the direct runoff hydrograph and subsurface flow hydrograph of Walnut Gulch No. 125 catchment in Arizona (USA). Based on results, the geometry of hillslopes can change the peak of the direct runoff hydrograph up to two-fold, either higher or lower. The divergent hillslopes show higher peaks in comparison with the parallel and convergent hillslopes. The highest and lowest peak flows correspond to divergent-concave and convergent-straight hillslopes, respectively.

  11. The effect of reactor geometry on frontal polymerization spin modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pojman, John A.; Masere, Jonathan; Petretto, Enrico; Rustici, Mauro; Huh, Do-Sung; Kim, Min Suk; Volpert, Vladimir

    2002-03-01

    Using reactors of different sizes and geometries the dynamics of the frontal polymerization of 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate (HDDA) and pentaerythritol tetraacrylate (PETAC), with ammonium persulfate as the initiator were studied. For this system, the frontal polymerization exhibits complex behavior that depends on the ratio of the monomers. For a particular range of monomers concentration, the polymerization front becomes nonplanar, and spin modes appear. By varying the reactor diameter, we experimentally confirmed the expected shift of the system to a greater number of "hot spots" for larger diameters. For square test tubes a "zig-zag" mode was observed for the first time in frontal polymerization. We confirmed the viscosity-dependence of the spin mode instabilities. We also observed novel modes in cylinder-inside-cylinder reactors. Lastly, using a conical reactor with a continuously varying diameter, we observed what may be evidence for bistability depending on the direction of propagation. We discuss these finding in terms of the standard linear stability analysis for propagating fronts.

  12. Toward physical cosmology: focus on inhomogeneous geometry and its non-perturbative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    We outline the key steps toward the construction of a physical, fully relativistic cosmology. The influence of inhomogeneities on the effective evolution history of the Universe is encoded in backreaction terms and expressed through spatially averaged geometrical invariants. These are absent and potential candidates for the missing dark sources in the standard model. Since they can be interpreted as energies of an emerging scalar field (the morphon), we are in a position to propose a strategy of how phenomenological scalar field models for dark energy, dark matter and inflation, that are usually added as fundamental sources to a homogeneous-geometry (FLRW) cosmology, can be potentially traced back to the inhomogeneous geometrical properties of space and its embedding into spacetime. We lay down a line of arguments that is—thus far only qualitatively—conclusive, and we address open problems of quantitative nature, related to the interpretation of observations. We discuss within a covariant framework (i) the foliation problem and invariant definitions of backreaction effects; (ii) the background problem and the notion of an effective cosmology; (iii) generalizations of the cosmological principle and generalizations of the cosmological equations; (iv) dark energies as energies of an effective scalar field; (v) the global gravitational instability of the standard model and basins of attraction for effective states; (vi) multiscale cosmological models and volume acceleration; (vii) effective metrics and strategies for effective distance measurements on the light cone, including observational predictions; (viii) examples of non-perturbative models, including explicit backreaction models for the LTB solution, extrapolations of the relativistic Lagrangian perturbation theory and scalar metric inhomogeneities. The role of scalar metric perturbations is critically examined and embedded into the non-perturbative framework.

  13. Effect of geometry on the classical entanglement in a chaotic optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sijo K; Sabuco, Juan; Chew, Lock Yue; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2015-12-14

    The effect of boundary deformation on the classical entanglement which appears in the classical electromagnetic field is considered. A chaotic billiard geometry is used to explore the influence of the mechanical modification of the optical fiber cross-sectional geometry on the production of classical entanglement within the electromagnetic fields. For the experimental realization of our idea, we propose an optical fiber with a cross section that belongs to the family of Robnik chaotic billiards. Our results show that a modification of the fiber geometry from a regular to a chaotic regime can enhance the transverse mode classical entanglement.

  14. Effect of probe geometry and optical properties on the sampling depth for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Ricky; Goth, Will; Sharma, Manu; Markey, Mia K.; Tunnell, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The sampling depth of light for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is analyzed both experimentally and computationally. A Monte Carlo (MC) model was used to investigate the effect of optical properties and probe geometry on sampling depth. MC model estimates of sampling depth show an excellent agreement with experimental measurements over a wide range of optical properties and probe geometries. The MC data are used to define a mathematical expression for sampling depth that is expressed in terms of optical properties and probe geometry parameters. PMID:25349033

  15. Effect of probe geometry and optical properties on the sampling depth for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Ricky; Goth, Will; Sharma, Manu; Markey, Mia K; Tunnell, James W

    2014-01-01

    The sampling depth of light for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is analyzed both experimentally and computationally. A Monte Carlo (MC) model was used to investigate the effect of optical properties and probe geometry on sampling depth. MC model estimates of sampling depth show an excellent agreement with experimental measurements over a wide range of optical properties and probe geometries. The MC data are used to define a mathematical expression for sampling depth that is expressed in terms of optical properties and probe geometry parameters. PMID:25349033

  16. Size and Geometry Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Carrara Marble Under Dynamic Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chunjiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2016-05-01

    The effects of specimen size and geometry on the dynamic mechanical properties of Carrara marble including compressive strength, failure strain and elastic modulus are investigated in this research. Four different groups of specimens of different sizes and cross-sectional geometries are loaded under a wide range of strain rates by the split Hopkinson pressure bar setup. The experimental results indicate that all these mechanical properties are significantly influenced by the specimen size and geometry to different extent, hence highlighting the importance of taking into account of the specimen size and geometry in dynamic tests on rock materials. In addition, the transmission coefficient and the determination of strain rate under dynamic tests are discussed in detail.

  17. The effects of geometry in the dynamic response of the cavitating LE-7 LOX pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Takashi

    1993-06-01

    The dynamic response of the cavitating LE-7 LOX pump, which is essential for POGO analysis of the H-II rocket, was determined by generating sinusoidal flow perturbation with a slit-type perturbation valve installed in the main pump discharge line. In a study of suppressing the LE-7 LOX turbopump rotor vibration due to cavitation, it was found that a kind of rotor vibration, thought to be caused by rotating cavitation, disappeared when a certain geometry of inducer housing was used. Therefore, the effects of inducer-housing geometry on cavitation compliance and on the mass flow gain factor were investigated. Comparison of the test results showed that cavitation compliance for the geometry in which the rotor vibration due to rotating cavitation disappeared was much larger than that for the geometry in which the rotor vibration existed.

  18. Weyl problem and Casimir effects in spherical shell geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Zaidi, Hussain; Langsjoen, Luke; Straley, Joseph P.

    2013-04-01

    We compute the generic mode sum that quantifies the effect on the spectrum of a harmonic field when a spherical shell is inserted into vacuum. This encompasses a variety of problems including the Weyl spectral problem and the Casimir effect of quantum electrodynamics. This allows us to resolve several long-standing controversies regarding the question of universality of the Casimir self-energy; the resolution comes naturally through the connection to the Weyl problem. Specifically we demonstrate that in the case of a scalar field obeying Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the shell surface the Casimir self-energy is cutoff dependent while in the case of the electromagnetic field perturbed by a conductive shell the Casimir self-energy is universal. We additionally show that an analog nonrelativistic Casimir effect due to zero-point magnons takes place when a nonmagnetic spherical shell is inserted inside a bulk ferromagnet.

  19. Nitriding of Aluminum Extrusion Die: Effect of Die Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, S. S.; Arif, A. F. M.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2010-04-01

    Nitriding of complex-shaped extrusion dies may result in non-uniform nitride layers and hence a required hardness may not be achieved in some regions of the bearing area. The present study is carried out to assess the effect of extrusion die profile on the characteristics and growth behavior of nitride layers so that the critical die design feature can be identified to enhance the uniformity of the nitride layer. For this purpose, AISI H13 steel samples have been manufactured with profiles similar to those of hot extrusion dies. The samples were then gas nitrided under controlled nitriding potential. The uniformity and depth of nitride layers have been investigated in terms of compound layer and total nitride case depth for selected die features. The results of this study indicated the need to include the effect of profile on the nitride layer for the optimal die design with improved service life.

  20. Effective potentials for 6-coordinated boron: Structural geometry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.-J.; Henley, C. L.

    2000-07-01

    We have built a database of ab initio total energies for elemental boron in over 60 hypothetical crystal structures of varying coordination Z, such that every atom is equivalent. Fitting to each subset with a particular Z, we extract a classical effective potential, written as a sum over coordination shells and dominated by three-atom (bond angle dependent) terms. In the case Z = 6 (lowest in energy and most relevant), the classical potential has a typical error of 0.1 eV/atom, and favors the "inverted-umbrella" environment seen in real boron.

  1. Effect of Tube Geometry on Regenerative Cooling Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parris, Daniel K.; Landrum, D. Brian

    2005-01-01

    The flowfield characteristics in a rocket engine coolant channels are analyzed by use of a commercial CFD and multiphysics software developed by the CFD Research Corp. called CFD-ACE+. The channels are characterized by high Reynolds number flow, varying aspect ratio, varying curvature, asymmetric and symmetric heating. The supercritical hydrogen coolant introduces large property variations that have a strong influence on the developing flow and the resulting heat transfer. This paper only shows the effect of aspect ratio and curvature for constant properties.

  2. Spectral BRDF-based determination of proper measurement geometries to characterize color shift of special effect coatings.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Alejandro; Rabal, Ana; Campos, Joaquín; Martínez-Verdú, Francisco; Chorro, Elísabet; Perales, Esther; Pons, Alicia; Hernanz, María Luisa

    2013-02-01

    A reduced set of measurement geometries allows the spectral reflectance of special effect coatings to be predicted for any other geometry. A physical model based on flake-related parameters has been used to determine nonredundant measurement geometries for the complete description of the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). The analysis of experimental spectral BRDF was carried out by means of principal component analysis. From this analysis, a set of nine measurement geometries was proposed to characterize special effect coatings. It was shown that, for two different special effect coatings, these geometries provide a good prediction of their complete color shift.

  3. Effect of tool geometry on ultrasonic welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Tomohiro; Sakata, Yutaro; Watanabe, Takehiko

    2014-08-01

    Ultrasonic welding of pure aluminum sheets is performed using two weld tools, one with a knurled surface and one with a cylindrical surface. Relative motion behaviors of each weld tool, with respect to the working materials, during ultrasonic welding tests are analyzed using the digital correlation method. Weld microstructure development is investigated on the basis of transitional weld stages in the context of relative motion behaviors. The dominant relative motion is between the two work materials at the beginning of the weld but changes to be the motion between the weld tool and the work material it is in contact with as weld time increases. Thermo-mechanical effects of the relative motion of the weld tool and the work materials, on the development of weld microstructure, are discussed.

  4. Geometry effects on magnetization dynamics in circular cross-section wires

    SciTech Connect

    Sturma, M.; Toussaint, J.-C. E-mail: daria.gusakova@cea.fr; Gusakova, D. E-mail: daria.gusakova@cea.fr

    2015-06-28

    Three-dimensional magnetic memory design based on circular-cross section nanowires with modulated diameter is the emerging field of spintronics. The consequences of the mutual interaction between electron spins and local magnetic moments in such non-trivial geometries are still open to debate. This paper describes the theoretical study of domain wall dynamics within such wires subjected to spin polarized current. We used our home-made finite element software to characterize the variety of domain wall dynamical regimes observed for different constriction to wire diameter ratios d/D. Also, we studied how sizeable geometry irregularities modify the internal micromagnetic configuration and the electron spin spatial distribution in the system, the geometrical reasons underlying the additional contribution to the system's nonadiabaticity, and the specific domain wall width oscillations inherent to fully three-dimensional systems.

  5. The effects of transducer geometry on artifacts common to diagnostic bone imaging with conventional medical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, F William; Owen, Kevin; Tiouririne, Mohamed; Hossack, John A

    2012-06-01

    The portability, low cost, and non-ionizing radiation associated with medical ultrasound suggest that it has potential as a superior alternative to X-ray for bone imaging. However, when conventional ultrasound imaging systems are used for bone imaging, clinical acceptance is frequently limited by artifacts derived from reflections occurring away from the main axis of the acoustic beam. In this paper, the physical source of off-axis artifacts and the effect of transducer geometry on these artifacts are investigated in simulation and experimental studies. In agreement with diffraction theory, the sampled linear-array geometry possessed increased off-axis energy compared with single-element piston geometry, and therefore, exhibited greater levels of artifact signal. Simulation and experimental results demonstrated that the linear-array geometry exhibited increased artifact signal when the center frequency increased, when energy off-axis to the main acoustic beam (i.e., grating lobes) was perpendicularly incident upon off-axis surfaces, and when off-axis surfaces were specular rather than diffusive. The simulation model used to simulate specular reflections was validated experimentally and a correlation coefficient of 0.97 between experimental and simulated peak reflection contrast was observed. In ex vivo experiments, the piston geometry yielded 4 and 6.2 dB average contrast improvement compared with the linear array when imaging the spinous process and interlaminar space of an animal spine, respectively. This work indicates that off-axis reflections are a major source of ultrasound image artifacts, particularly in environments comprising specular reflecting (i.e., bone or bone-like) objects. Transducer geometries with reduced sensitivity to off-axis surface reflections, such as a piston transducer geometry, yield significant reductions in image artifact.

  6. Effects of uncertainty in camera geometry on three-dimensional catheter reconstruction from biplane fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Anthony; Kynor, David B.; Friets, Eric; Triedman, John; Hammer, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Clinical procedures that rely on biplane x-ray images for three-dimensional (3-D) information may be enhanced by three-dimensional reconstructions. However, the accuracy of reconstructed images is dependent on the uncertainty associated with the parameters that define the geometry of the camera system. In this paper, we use a numerical simulation to examine the effect of these uncertainties and to determine the limits required for adequate three-dimensional reconstruction. We then test our conclusions with images of a calibration phantom recorded using a clinical system. A set of reconstruction routines, developed for a cardiac mapping system, were used in this evaluation. The routines include procedures for correcting image distortion and for automatically locating catheter electrodes. Test images were created using a numerical simulation of a biplane x-ray projection system. The reconstruction routines were then applied using accurate and perturbed camera geometries and error maps were produced. Our results indicate that useful catheter reconstructions are possible with reasonable bounds on the uncertainty of camera geometry provided the locations of the camera isocenters are accurate. The results of this study provide a guide for the specification of camera geometry display systems and for researchers evaluating possible methodologies for determining camera geometry.

  7. THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS DETECTOR GEOMETRIES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF CZT USING ONE CRYSTAL

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Duff, M.; Teague, L.

    2011-06-21

    CdZnTe (CZT) continues to be a major thrust interest mainly due to its potential application as a room temperature radiation detector. The performance of CZT detectors is directly related to the charge collection ability which can be affected by the configuration of the electrical contact. The charge collection efficiency is determined in part by the specific geometry of the anode contact which serves as the readout electrode. In this report, contact geometries including single pixel, planar, coplanar, and dual anode will be systematically explored by comparing the performance efficiencies of the detector using both low and high energy gamma rays. To help eliminate the effect of crystal quality variations, the contact geometries were fabricated on the same crystal detector with minimal polishing between contact placements.

  8. Study of skin model and geometry effects on thermal performance of thermal protective fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fanglong; Ma, Suqin; Zhang, Weiyuan

    2008-05-01

    Thermal protective clothing has steadily improved over the years as new materials and improved designs have reached the market. A significant method that has brought these improvements to the fire service is the NFPA 1971 standard on structural fire fighters’ protective clothing. However, this testing often neglects the effects of cylindrical geometry on heat transmission in flame resistant fabrics. This paper deals with methods to develop cylindrical geometry testing apparatus incorporating novel skin bioheat transfer model to test flame resistant fabrics used in firefighting. Results show that fabrics which shrink during the test can have reduced thermal protective performance compared with the qualities measured with a planar geometry tester. Results of temperature differences between skin simulant sensors of planar and cylindrical tester are also compared. This test method provides a new technique to accurately and precisely characterize the thermal performance of thermal protective fabrics.

  9. The Effect of Intervention on Accuracy of Students' Responses and Reaction Times to Geometry Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babai, Reuven; Zilber, Hanna; Stavy, Ruth; Tirosh, Dina

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect on student performance in drawing their attention to relevant task variables, focusing on accuracy of responses and reaction times. We chose this methodology in order to better understand how such interventions affect the reasoning process. The study employs a geometry task in which the irrelevant salient…

  10. Nanoscale geometry assisted proximity effect correction (NanoPEC) for electron beam direct write nanolithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Ocola, L. E.

    2009-11-01

    Nanoscale geometry assisted proximity effect correction is presented for nanoscale structures and the results clearly show improvements in feature sharpness down to 20 nm structures. The design rule is simple to implement onto existing PEC software and enables implementation of PEC down to the resolution limits of electron beam lithography.

  11. The Effects of Cooperative Learning on Student Achievement and Motivation in a High School Geometry Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Joe D.; Hall, Neff

    In this study, the effects of a form of cooperative group instruction (Student Teams Achievement Divisions) on student motivation and achievement in a high school geometry class were examined. Ninety (mostly 10th-grade) students were randomly assigned to either a control group receiving traditional instruction or one of two treatment groups…

  12. Comparative Effects of Two Modes of Computer-Assisted Instructional Package on Solid Geometry Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambari, Isiaka Amosa; Ezenwa, Victoria Ifeoma; Anyanwu, Romanus Chogozie

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the effects of two modes of computer-assisted instructional package on solid geometry achievement amongst senior secondary school students in Minna, Niger State, Nigeria. Also, the influence of gender on the performance of students exposed to CAI(AT) and CAI(AN) packages were examined. This study adopted a pretest-posttest…

  13. COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF THE EFFECT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON GEOMETRY ON THE HYDROLYSIS OF DIOL EPOXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative studies of the effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon geometry on the hydrolysis of diol epoxides

    The interaction of the diol epoxides (DEs) of both planar and non-planar PAHs with water have been examined using quantum mechanical and molecular dynamics. Th...

  14. The Effect of Tip Geometry on Active-Twist Rotor Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2005-01-01

    A parametric examination of the effect of tip geometry on active-twist rotor system response is conducted. Tip geometry parameters considered include sweep, taper, anhedral, nonlinear twist, and the associated radial initiation location for each of these variables. A detailed study of the individual effect of each parameter on active-twist response is presented, and an assessment offered of the effect of combining multiple tip shape parameters. Tip sweep is shown to have the greatest affect on active-twist response, significantly decreasing the response available. Tip taper and anhedral are shown to increase moderately the active-twist response, while nonlinear twist is shown to have a minimal effect. A candidate tip shape that provides active-twist response equivalent to or greater than a rectangular planform blade is presented.

  15. Effects of Active Subsidence Vs. Existing Basin Geometry on Fluviodeltaic Channels and Stratal Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Kim, W.; Passalacqua, P.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic subsidence and basin topography, both determining the accommodation, are fundamental controls on the basin filling processes. Their effects on the fluvial organization and the resultant subsurface patterns remain difficult to predict due to the lack of understanding about interaction between internal dynamics and external controls. Despite the intensive studies on tectonic steering effects on alluvial architecture, how the self-organization of deltaic channels, especially the distributary channel network, respond to tectonics and basin geometry is mostly unknown. Recently physical experiments and field studies have hinted dramatic differences in fluviodeltaic evolution between ones associated with active differential subsidence and existing basin depth. In this work we designed a series of numerical experiments using a reduced-complexity channel-resolving model for delta formation, and tested over a range of localized subsidence rates and topographic depression in basin geometry. We also used a set of robust delta metrics to analyze: i) shoreline planform asymmetry, ii) channel and lobe geometry, iii) channel network pattern, iv) autogenic timescales, and v) subsurface structure. The modeling results show that given a similar final thickness, active subsidence enhances channel branching with smaller channel sand bodies that are both laterally and vertically connected, whereas existing topographic depression causes more large-scale channel avulsions with larger channel sand bodies. In general, both subsidence and existing basin geometry could steer channels and/or lock channels in place but develop distinct channel patterns and thus stratal architecture.

  16. Polarizability of acetanilide and RDX in the crystal: effect of molecular geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiaousis, D.; Munn, R. W.; Smith, P. J.; Popelier, P. L. A.

    2004-10-01

    Density-functional theory with the B3LYP functional at the 6-311++G** level is used to calculate the dipole moment and the static polarizability for acetanilide and 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) in their in-crystal structures. For acetanilide the dipole moment is 2{1}/{2}% larger than for the gas-phase structure and for RDX (where there is a gross geometry change) it is 15% larger. The polarizability for the in-crystal structure is smaller than for the gas-phase structure by 3% for both species, whereas the in-crystal effective optical polarizability is larger than the gas-phase static polarizability for both crystals. Hence, effects in addition to the molecular geometry change in the crystal must be considered in order to interpret the effective polarizability completely.

  17. Specimen geometry effects on graphite/PMR-15 composites during thermo-oxidative aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.; Meyers, A.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted to establish the effects of specimen geometry on the thermo-oxidative stability and the mechanical properties retention of unidirectional Celion 12000 graphite fiber reinforced PMR-15 polyimide composites. Weight loss, flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength are measured at isothermal aging times as long as 1639 hr at a temperature of 316 C for three different specimen geometries. It is found that the three different types of specimen surfaces exhibit different values of weight loss/unit area. The mechanical properties retention is also found to be dependent on geometry for these composites. The interlaminar shear strength decreases significantly over the complete range of aging times. The flexural strength retention starts showing geometric dependency after about 1000 hr of aging at 316C. Weight loss fluxes, associated with the three different types of exposed surfaces, are calculated and used to develop an empirical mathematical model for predicting the weight loss behavior of unidirectional composites of arbitrary geometries. Data are presented comparing experimentally determined weight loss with weight loss values predicted using the empirical model.

  18. Chiral and Achiral Nanodumbbell Dimers: The Effect of Geometry on Plasmonic Properties.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle W; Zhao, Hangqi; Zhang, Hui; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Grzelczak, Marek; Wang, Yumin; Chang, Wei-Shun; Nordlander, Peter; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Link, Stephan

    2016-06-28

    Metal nanoparticles with a dumbbell-like geometry have plasmonic properties similar to those of their nanorod counterparts, but the unique steric constraints induced by their enlarged tips result in distinct geometries when self-assembled. Here, we investigate gold dumbbells that are assembled into dimers within polymeric micelles. A single-particle approach with correlated scanning electron microscopy and dark-field scattering spectroscopy reveals the effects of dimer geometry variation on the scattering properties. The dimers are prepared using exclusively achiral reagents, and the resulting dimer solution produces no detectable ensemble circular dichroism response. However, single-particle circular differential scattering measurements uncover that this dimer sample is a racemic mixture of individual nanostructures with significant positive and negative chiroptical signals. These measurements are complemented with detailed simulations that confirm the influence of various symmetry elements on the overall peak resonance energy, spectral line shape, and circular differential scattering response. This work expands the current understanding of the influence self-assembled geometries have on plasmonic properties, particularly with regard to chiral and/or racemic samples which may have significant optical activity that may be overlooked when using exclusively ensemble characterization techniques. PMID:27172606

  19. Chiral and Achiral Nanodumbbell Dimers: The Effect of Geometry on Plasmonic Properties.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle W; Zhao, Hangqi; Zhang, Hui; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Grzelczak, Marek; Wang, Yumin; Chang, Wei-Shun; Nordlander, Peter; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Link, Stephan

    2016-06-28

    Metal nanoparticles with a dumbbell-like geometry have plasmonic properties similar to those of their nanorod counterparts, but the unique steric constraints induced by their enlarged tips result in distinct geometries when self-assembled. Here, we investigate gold dumbbells that are assembled into dimers within polymeric micelles. A single-particle approach with correlated scanning electron microscopy and dark-field scattering spectroscopy reveals the effects of dimer geometry variation on the scattering properties. The dimers are prepared using exclusively achiral reagents, and the resulting dimer solution produces no detectable ensemble circular dichroism response. However, single-particle circular differential scattering measurements uncover that this dimer sample is a racemic mixture of individual nanostructures with significant positive and negative chiroptical signals. These measurements are complemented with detailed simulations that confirm the influence of various symmetry elements on the overall peak resonance energy, spectral line shape, and circular differential scattering response. This work expands the current understanding of the influence self-assembled geometries have on plasmonic properties, particularly with regard to chiral and/or racemic samples which may have significant optical activity that may be overlooked when using exclusively ensemble characterization techniques.

  20. Effect of diamond trip geometries on boundary layer transition for hypersonic inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. Y.; Ni, H. L.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yi, M. R.

    2016-10-01

    In order to grasp the effect of diamond trip geometries on boundary layer transition of hypersonic inlet, an experiment at Mach number 6 in a hypersonic wind tunnel was performed for a hypersonic inlet. The heat transfers at the inlet wall were measured through the infrared thermography. The transition region was judged by the comparison of heat transfer between experiment and computation. Ten diamond forced transition trips were designed according to Modern Design of Experiments. The experimental results shown that the effect order of trip geometries on transition region were the trip height, distance between diamond elements and diagonal length of diamond element from the largest to the smallest. Transition region moved forward to the model tip with increasing trip height or trip length, or with decreasing distance between diamond elements, or with increasing diagonal length of element. The optimized configuration was obtained for diamond forced-transition trip when the optimization object was transition region.

  1. Determination of the bead geometry considering formability and stiffness effect using generalized forming limit concept (GFLC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Wan-Gi; Vogel, Sabrina; Bursac, Nikola; Albers, Albert; Volk, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Beads are used in deep drawn sheet metal parts for increasing the part stiffness. Thus, reductions of sheet metal thickness and consequently weight reduction can be reached. Style guides for types and positions of beads exist, which are often applied. However, higher stiffness effects can be realized using numeric optimization. The optimization algorithm considers the two-stepped manufacturing process consisting of deep drawing and bead stamping. The formability in both manufacturing steps represents a limiting factor. Considering nonlinear strain paths using generalized forming limit concept (GFLC), acceptable geometries will be determined in simulation. Among them, the efficient geometry which has higher stiffness effects will be selected in numerical and experimental tests. These will be integrated in the optimization algorithm.

  2. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.; Ciancone, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configutations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  3. Flow visualization study of the effect of injection hole geometry on an inclined jet in crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Ciancone, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization was studied by using neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles, to determine the effect of injection hole geometry on the trajectory of an air jet in a crossflow and to investigate the mechanisms involved in jet deflection. Experimental variables were the blowing rate, and the injection hole geometry cusp facing upstream (CUS), cusp facing downstream (CDS), round, swirl passage, and oblong. It is indicated that jet deflection is governed by both the pressure drag forces and the entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet flow. For injection hole geometries with similar cross-sectional areas and similar mass flow rates, the jet configuration with the larger aspect ratio experienced a greater deflection. Entrainment arises from lateral shearing forces on the sides of the jet, which set up a dual vortex motion within the jet and thereby cause some of the main-stream fluid momentum to be swept into the jet flow. This additional momentum forces the jet nearer the surface. Of the jet configurations, the oblong, CDS, and CUS configurations exhibited the largest deflections. The results correlate well with film cooling effectiveness data, which suggests a need to determine the jet exit configuration of optimum aspect ratio to provide maximum film cooling effectiveness.

  4. Effect of microneedle geometry and supporting substrate on microneedle array penetration into skin.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, Jaspreet Singh; Quek, Ten Cheer; Soon, Wei Jun; Choi, Jaewoong; Zou, Shui; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-11-01

    Microneedles are being fast recognized as a useful alternative to injections in delivering drugs, vaccines, and cosmetics transdermally. Owing to skin's inherent elastic properties, microneedles require an optimal geometry for skin penetration. In vitro studies, using rat skin to characterize microneedle penetration in vivo, require substrates with suitable mechanical properties to mimic human skin's subcutaneous tissues. We tested the effect of these two parameters on microneedle penetration. Geometry in terms of center-to-center spacing of needles was investigated for its effect on skin penetration, when placed on substrates of different hardness. Both hard (clay) and soft (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) substrates underneath rat skin and full-thickness pig skin were used as animal models and human skins were used as references. It was observed that there was an increase in percentage penetration with an increase in needle spacing. Microneedle penetration with PDMS as a support under stretched rat skin correlated better with that on full-thickness human skin, while penetration observed was higher when clay was used as a substrate. We showed optimal geometries for efficient penetration together with recommendation for a substrate that could better mimic the mechanical properties of human subcutaneous tissues, when using microneedles fabricated from poly(ethylene glycol)-based materials.

  5. Effect of microneedle geometry and supporting substrate on microneedle array penetration into skin.

    PubMed

    Kochhar, Jaspreet Singh; Quek, Ten Cheer; Soon, Wei Jun; Choi, Jaewoong; Zou, Shui; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-11-01

    Microneedles are being fast recognized as a useful alternative to injections in delivering drugs, vaccines, and cosmetics transdermally. Owing to skin's inherent elastic properties, microneedles require an optimal geometry for skin penetration. In vitro studies, using rat skin to characterize microneedle penetration in vivo, require substrates with suitable mechanical properties to mimic human skin's subcutaneous tissues. We tested the effect of these two parameters on microneedle penetration. Geometry in terms of center-to-center spacing of needles was investigated for its effect on skin penetration, when placed on substrates of different hardness. Both hard (clay) and soft (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) substrates underneath rat skin and full-thickness pig skin were used as animal models and human skins were used as references. It was observed that there was an increase in percentage penetration with an increase in needle spacing. Microneedle penetration with PDMS as a support under stretched rat skin correlated better with that on full-thickness human skin, while penetration observed was higher when clay was used as a substrate. We showed optimal geometries for efficient penetration together with recommendation for a substrate that could better mimic the mechanical properties of human subcutaneous tissues, when using microneedles fabricated from poly(ethylene glycol)-based materials. PMID:24027112

  6. Finite element analysis of magnetohydrodynamic effects on blood flow in an aneurysmal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raptis, Anastasios; Xenos, Michalis; Tzirtzilakis, Efstratios; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2014-10-01

    Blood flow in an aneurysmal geometry, subjected to a static and uniform magnetic field, was studied. Blood was considered as a Newtonian, incompressible, and electrically conducting fluid. The nonlinear system of partial differential equations, describing the blood flow under the presence of a magnetic field, was discretized by the Galerkin weighted residual method. The transformation in generalized curvilinear coordinates facilitates the solution of the governing equations within arbitrary geometries. Pressure and velocity fields along with wall shear stress distributions were obtained for varying magnetic field intensities and directions. The visualization of the blood streamlines in the dilatation region highlights the effect of a magnetic field on the recirculation zones. The application of static magnetic fields can yield spatio-temporal description of blood flow patterns. The current study discusses implications of the hemodynamic properties estimated by respective screening techniques since the static magnetic field might cause alterations that possibly cannot be detected and thus eliminated.

  7. Effects of valence, geometry and electronic correlations on transport in transition metal benzene sandwich molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolak, M.; Jacob, D.

    2016-11-01

    We study the impact of the valence and the geometry on the electronic structure and transport properties of different transition metal-benzene sandwich molecules bridging the tips of a Cu nanocontact. Our density-functional calculations show that the electronic transport properties of the molecules depend strongly on the molecular geometry which can be controlled by the nanocontact tips. Depending on the valence of the transition metal center certain molecules can be tuned in and out of half-metallic behaviour facilitating potential spintronics applications. We also discuss our results in the framework of an Anderson impurity model, indicating cases where the inclusion of local correlations alters the ground state qualitatively. For Co and V centered molecules we find indications of an orbital Kondo effect.

  8. Effects of dynamical screening on single ionization of sodium by electron impact in doubly symmetric geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Xiangfu; Sun Shiyan

    2011-03-15

    A dynamically screened three-Coulomb-wave model (DS3C) is applied to study the single ionization of sodium by electron impact. Triply differential cross sections (TDCS) are calculated in doubly symmetric geometry at excess energies of 6, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 eV. Comparisons are made among DS3C and the latest experimental data and such theoretical predictions as the three-Coulomb-wave function approach, the distorted-wave Born approximation, and the nonperturbative convergent close-coupling method. The angular distribution and relative magnitude of the present TDCS are found to qualitatively reproduce the reported experimental data. It is shown that dynamically screened effects are important in the geometries studied here.

  9. Effects of valence, geometry and electronic correlations on transport in transition metal benzene sandwich molecules.

    PubMed

    Karolak, M; Jacob, D

    2016-11-01

    We study the impact of the valence and the geometry on the electronic structure and transport properties of different transition metal-benzene sandwich molecules bridging the tips of a Cu nanocontact. Our density-functional calculations show that the electronic transport properties of the molecules depend strongly on the molecular geometry which can be controlled by the nanocontact tips. Depending on the valence of the transition metal center certain molecules can be tuned in and out of half-metallic behaviour facilitating potential spintronics applications. We also discuss our results in the framework of an Anderson impurity model, indicating cases where the inclusion of local correlations alters the ground state qualitatively. For Co and V centered molecules we find indications of an orbital Kondo effect. PMID:27605217

  10. Effects of Using Dynamic Mathematics Software on Preservice Mathematics Teachers' Spatial Visualization Skills: The Case of Spatial Analytic Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kösa, Temel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of using dynamic geometry software on preservice mathematics teachers' spatial visualization skills and to determine whether spatial visualization skills can be a predictor of success in learning analytic geometry of space. The study used a quasi-experimental design with a control group.…

  11. The effect of surface anisotropy and viewing geometry on the estimation of NDVI from AVHRR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, D.; Verstraete, M.; Pinty, B.

    1995-01-01

    Since terrestrial surfaces are anisotropic, all spectral reflectance measurements obtained with a small instantaneous field of view instrument are specific to these angular conditions, and the value of the corresponding NDVI, computed from these bidirectional reflectances, is relative to the particular geometry of illumination and viewing at the time of the measurement. This paper documents the importance of these geometric effects through simulations of the AVHRR data acquisition process, and investigates the systematic biases that result from the combination of ecosystem-specific anisotropies with instrument-specific sampling capabilities. Typical errors in the value of NDVI are estimated, and strategies to reduce these effects are explored. -from Authors

  12. Performance of High Strength Rock Fall Meshes: Effect of Block Size and Mesh Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzi, Olivier; Leonarduzzi, E.; Krummenacher, B.; Volkwein, A.; Giacomini, A.

    2015-05-01

    In rockfall science, the bullet effect refers to the perforation of a rockfall mesh by a small block traveling at high speed. To date, there is still no comprehensive experimental data set investigating the underlying mechanisms of such effect. The bullet effect illustrates the fact that the capacity of a rockfall mesh depends on the size and speed of the impacting block. This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the effect of block size and mesh geometry (aperture and wire diameter) on the mesh performance. The results clearly show that the amount of energy required to perforate the mesh drops as the blocks get smaller. They also suggest that the mesh performance reaches a maximum and reduces to zero when the mesh cannot sustain the static load imposed by very large blocks. The outcome of the first series validates an analytical model for mesh perforation, making it the first simple model capturing the bullet effect. A second series of tests focused on the effect of mesh geometry and it was found that decreasing the mesh aperture by 19 % improves the performance by 50 % while only an extra 30 % could be gained by increasing the wire diameter by 33 %. The outcomes of the second series were used to discuss and redefine a dimensionless geometrical parameter G* and to validate a simple power type equation relating the mesh characteristics and the mesh performance.

  13. Helicopter rotor wake geometry and its influence in forward flight. Volume 1: Generalized wake geometry and wake effect on rotor airloads and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytic investigation to generalize wake geometry of a helicopter rotor in steady level forward flight and to demonstrate the influence of wake deformation in the prediction of rotor airloads and performance is described. Volume 1 presents a first level generalized wake model based on theoretically predicted tip vortex geometries for a selected representative blade design. The tip vortex distortions are generalized in equation form as displacements from the classical undistorted tip vortex geometry in terms of vortex age, blade azimuth, rotor advance ratio, thrust coefficient, and number of blades. These equations were programmed to provide distorted wake coordinates at very low cost for use in rotor airflow and airloads prediction analyses. The sensitivity of predicted rotor airloads, performance, and blade bending moments to the modeling of the tip vortex distortion are demonstrated for low to moderately high advance ratios for a representative rotor and the H-34 rotor. Comparisons with H-34 rotor test data demonstrate the effects of the classical, predicted distorted, and the newly developed generalized wake models on airloads and blade bending moments. Use of distorted wake models results in the occurrence of numerous blade-vortex interactions on the forward and lateral sides of the rotor disk. The significance of these interactions is related to the number and degree of proximity to the blades of the tip vortices. The correlation obtained with the distorted wake models (generalized and predicted) is encouraging.

  14. A Closed-Form Solution for the Effect of Free Edges on Melt Pool Geometry and Solidification Microstructure in Additive Manufacturing of Thin-Wall Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gockel, Joy; Klingbeil, Nathan; Bontha, Srikanth

    2016-04-01

    Laser and electron beam-based additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V are under consideration for application to aerospace components. A critical concern for these processes is the ability to obtain a consistent and desirable microstructure and corresponding mechanical properties of the deposit. Based on the Rosenthal solution for a moving point-heat source, recent work has developed simulation-based process maps for the thermal conditions controlling microstructure (grain size and morphology) in beam-based deposition of semi-infinite geometries, where a steady-state melt pool exists away from free edges. In the current study, the Rosenthal solution is modified to include the effects of free edges. This is accomplished by the superposition of two point-heat sources approaching one another, with the line of symmetry representing the free edge. The result is an exact solution for the case of temperature-independent properties. Dimensionless results for melt pool geometry are determined, and plotted as a function of distance from the free edge. Results are plotted on solidification maps to predict trends in microstructure for Ti-6Al-4V. Finite element analysis is used to verify results. Results suggest that melt pool geometry is more sensitive to free edges than solidification microstructure.

  15. Study of effects of injector geometry on fuel-air mixing and combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, L. H.; Roach, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    An implicit finite-difference method has been developed for computing the flow in the near field of a fuel injector as part of a broader study of the effects of fuel injector geometry on fuel-air mixing and combustion. Detailed numerical results have been obtained for cases of laminar and turbulent flow without base injection, corresponding to the supersonic base flow problem. These numerical results indicated that the method is stable and convergent, and that significant savings in computer time can be achieved, compared with explicit methods.

  16. Effective electron microrefrigeration by superconductor insulator normal metal tunnel junctions with advanced geometry of electrodes and normal metal traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper Agulo, Ian; Kuzmin, Leonid; Fominsky, Michael; Tarasov, Michael

    2004-04-01

    We demonstrate effective electron cooling of the normal metal strip by superconductor-insulator-normal metal (SIN) tunnel junctions. The improvement was achieved by two methods: first, by using an advanced geometry of the superconducting electrodes for more effective removal of the quasiparticles; and second, by adding a normal metal trap just near the cooling junctions. With simple cross geometry and without normal metal traps, the decrease in electron temperature is 56 mK. With the advanced geometry of the superconducting electrodes, the decrease in electron temperature is 129 mK. With the addition of the normal metal traps, the decrease in electron temperature is 197 mK.

  17. Numerical modelling of the effect of changing surface geometry on mountain glacier mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C.; Carrivick, J.; Evans, A.; Carver, S.

    2012-12-01

    Mountain glaciers and ice caps are extremely useful indicators of environmental change. Due to their small size, they have much faster response times to climate changes than the large ice masses of Greenland and Antarctica. Mountain glaciers are important for society as sources of water for energy production and irrigation. The meltwater cycles significantly impact local ecology. Consequently, models assessing the effect of complicated glacier surface geometry on glacier mass balance are becoming increasingly popular. Here we apply such a model to a glacier record spanning 100 years. Our study encompasses the creation of a GIS enabling analysis of changing glacier geometry over the 20th and early 21st Centuries and the development and testing of a novel user-friendly distributed-surface energy balance model that is designed specifically to consider the effect that these changes have on mountain glacier mass balance. Long-term records of mass balance are rare for arctic Mountain glaciers, making model development and evaluation difficult. One exception is Kårsaglaciären in arctic Sweden for which there is a variety of data for the past 100 years, sourced from historical surveys, satellite imagery and recent field work. Firstly, we present the construction of robust three-dimensional glacier surface reconstructions for Kårsaglaciären within a GIS, specifically discussing the methods of interpolation used to create the surfaces. We highlight the methods and importance of inter-model sensitivity analyses as well as Monte Carlo simulations used to assess the effect of the input data utilised in the kriging algorithms. Analyses integral to the modelling stage of the project, such as the geometries of the resultant surfaces as well as the interrelationships between them, will be discussed. Secondly, we present the melt model which has been constructed in order to test the effect of changing geometry on mass balance. Our melt model can carry out systematic testing of

  18. Effect of forebody tangential slot blowing on flow about a full aircraft geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Rizk, Yehia M.; Schiff, Lewis B.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of forebody tangential slot blowing on the flowfield about an F/A-18 aircraft is investigated numerically using solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Computed solutions are obtained for a full aircraft geometry, including the fuselage, wing with deflected leading-edge flap, empennage, and a faired-over engine inlet. The computational slot geometry corresponds to that used in full-scale wind tunnel tests. Solutions are computed using flight test conditions and jet mass flow ratios equivalent to wind tunnel test conditions. The effect of slot location is analyzed by computing two non-time-accurate solutions with a 16 in. slot located 3 in. and 11 in. aft of the nose of the aircraft. These computations resolve the trends observed in the full-scale wind tunnel test data. The flow aft of the leading edge extension (LEX) vortex burst is unsteady. A time-accurate solution is obtained to investigate the flow characteristics aft of the vortex burst, including the effect of blowing on tail buffet.

  19. The Effect of Geometry Teaching with Cabri to Learning Levels of Fourth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutak, Tayfun; Turkdogan, Ali; Birgin, Osman

    2009-01-01

    In the study Cabri was used for teaching geometry at 4th grade. To investigate students' geometry level, a semi-experimental method was used. In the test group, geometry subjects are taught using Cabri. A multiple choice test was used to collect data as pre and post test. Answers were assigned as 1 to correct, 0 to wrong answers. Data were…

  20. Alternating current cloud point extraction on a microchip: the effect of electrode geometry.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Naoki; Maekawa, Chisaki; Sato, Kae

    2015-02-01

    We report on the effect of electrode geometry on alternating current cloud point extraction (ACPE). ACPE is a technique utilized to extract membrane-associated biomolecules in an electrode-integrated microfluidic channel. In this study, we investigated the effect of gap size (4∼22 μm) between microband electrodes on ACPE. A decrease in gap size resulted in efficient and rapid concentration of fluorescent-labeled phospholipids, a model of membrane-associated biomolecules. We also investigated the effect of applied voltage amplitude on ACPE using devices with decreased electrode gap size. When the gap was small, ACPE was achieved with low applied voltages. ACPE of membrane proteins extracted from HeLa cells was also studied to demonstrate the applicability of the ACPE to real samples. The results provide a guideline to improve the performance of ACPE and facilitate application of the ACPE technique as part of an overall analytical process.

  1. The effect of cathode felt geometries on electrochemical characteristics of sodium sulfur (NaS) cells: Planar vs. tubular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Goun; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Lee, Younki; Cho, Namung; Kim, Chang-Soo; Jung, Keeyoung

    2016-09-01

    Two sodium sulfur (NaS) cells, one with a planar design and the other with a tubular design, were subject to discharge-charge cycles in order to investigate the effect of cathode felt geometries on electrochemical characteristics of NaS cells. Their discharge-charge behaviors over 200 cycles were evaluated at the operation temperature of 350 °C with the current densities of 100 mA cm-2 for discharge and 80 mA cm-2 for charge. The results showed that the deviation from theoretical open circuit voltage changes of a planar cell was smaller than those of a tubular cell resulting in potential specific power loss reduction during operation. In order to understand the effect, a three dimensional statistically representative matrix for a cathode felt has been generated using experimentally measured data. It turns out that the area specific fiber number density in the outer side area of a tubular cathode felt is smaller than that of a planar felt resulting in occurrence of larger voltage drops via retarded convection of cathode melts during cell operation.

  2. Investigating pyroclast ejection dynamics using shock-tube experiments: temperature, grain size and vent geometry effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, V.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions eject large quantities of gas and particles into the atmosphere. The portion directly above the vent commonly shows characteristics of underexpanded jets. Understanding the factors that influence the initial pyroclast ejection dynamics is necessary in order to better assess the resulting near- and far-field hazards. Field observations are often insufficient for the characterization of volcanic explosions due to lack of safe access to such environments. Fortunately, their dynamics can be simulated in the laboratory where experiments are performed under controlled conditions. We ejected loose natural particles from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25˚ and 500˚C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), sample-to-vent distance and vent geometry. For each explosion we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle and the production of fines. Further, we varied the setup to allow for different sample-to-gas ratios and deployed four different vent geometries: 1) cylindrical, 2) funnel with a flaring of 30˚, 3) funnel with a flaring of 15˚ and 4) nozzle. The results showed maximum particle velocities up to 296 m/s, gas spreading angles varying from 21˚ to 37˚ and particle spreading angles from 3˚ to 40˚. Moreover we observed dynamically evolving ejection characteristics and variations in the production of fines during the course of individual experiments. Our experiments mechanistically mimic the process of pyroclast ejection. Thus the capability for constraining the effects of input parameters (fragmentation conditions) and conduit/vent geometry on ballistic pyroclastic plumes has been clearly established. These data obtained in the presence of well-documented conduit and vent conditions, should greatly enhance our ability to numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  3. Effect of conductor geometry on source localization: Implications for epilepsy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schlitt, H.; Heller, L.; Best, E.; Ranken, D.; Aaron, R.

    1994-07-01

    We shall discuss the effects of conductor geometry on source localization for applications in epilepsy studies. The most popular conductor model for clinical MEG studies is a homogeneous sphere. However, several studies have indicated that a sphere is a poor model for the head when the sources are deep, as is the case for epileptic foci in the mesial temporal lobe. We believe that replacing the spherical model with a more realistic one in the inverse fitting procedure will improve the accuracy of localizing epileptic sources. In order to include a realistic head model in the inverse problem, we must first solve the forward problem for the realistic conductor geometry. We create a conductor geometry model from MR images, and then solve the forward problem via a boundary integral equation for the electric potential due to a specified primary source. One the electric potential is known, the magnetic field can be calculated directly. The most time-intensive part of the problem is generating the conductor model; fortunately, this needs to be done only once for each patient. It takes little time to change the primary current and calculate a new magnetic field for use in the inverse fitting procedure. We present the results of a series of computer simulations in which we investigate the localization accuracy due to replacing the spherical model with the realistic head model in the inverse fitting procedure. The data to be fit consist of a computer generated magnetic field due to a known current dipole in a realistic head model, with added noise. We compare the localization errors when this field is fit using a spherical model to the fit using a realistic head model. Using a spherical model is comparable to what is usually done when localizing epileptic sources in humans, where the conductor model used in the inverse fitting procedure does not correspond to the actual head.

  4. Downstream effects of dams on channel geometry and bottomland vegetation: Regional patterns in the Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, J.M.; Osterkamp, W.R.; Scott, M.L.; Auble, G.T.

    1998-01-01

    The response of rivers and riparian forests to upstream dams shows a regional pattern related to physiographic and climatic factors that influence channel geometry. We carried out a spatial analysis of the response of channel geometry to 35 dams in the Great Plains and Central Lowlands, USA. The principal response of a braided channel to an upstream dam is channel-narrowing, and the principal response of a meandering channel is a reduction in channel migration rate. Prior to water management, braided channels were most common in the southwestern Plains where sand is abundant, whereas meandering channels were most common in the northern and eastern Plains. The dominant response to upstream dams has been channel-narrowing in the southwestern Plains (e.g., six of nine cases in the High Plains) and reduction in migration rate in the north and east (e.g., all of twelve cases in the Missouri Plateau and Western Lake Regions). Channel-narrowing is associated with a burst of establishment of native and exotic woody riparian pioneer species on the former channel bed. In contrast, reduction in channel migration rate is associated with a decrease in reproduction of woody riparian pioneers. Thus, riparian pioneer forests along large rivers in the southwestern Plains have temporarily increased following dam construction while such forests in the north and east have decreased. These patterns explain apparent contradictions in conclusions of studies that focused on single rivers or small regions and provide a framework for predicting effects of dams on large rivers in the Great Plains and elsewhere. These conclusions are valid only for large rivers. A spatial analysis of channel width along 286 streams ranging in mean annual discharge from 0.004 to 1370 cubic meters per second did not produce the same clear regional pattern, in part because the channel geometries of small and large streams are affected differently by a sandy watershed.

  5. A straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine with a directed guide vane row — Effect of guide vane geometry on the performance —

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takao, Manabu; Kuma, Hideki; Maeda, Takao; Kamada, Yasunari; Oki, Michiaki; Minoda, Atsushi

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study is to show the effect of guide vane geometry on the performance. In order to overcome the disadvantages of vertical axis wind turbine, a straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine (S-VAWT) with a directed guide vane row has been proposed and tested by the authors. According to previous studies, it was clarified that the performance of the turbine can be improved by means of the directed guide vane row. However, the guide vane geometry of S-VAWT has not been optimized so far. In order to clarify the effect of guide vane geometry, the effects of setting angle and gap between rotor blade and guide vane on power coefficient and starting characteristic were investigated in the experiments. The experimental study of the proposed wind turbine was carried out by a wind tunnel. The wind tunnel with a diameter of 1.8m is open jet type. The wind velocity is 8 m/s in the experiments. The rotor has three straight blades with a profile of NACA0018 and a chord length of 100 mm, a diameter of 0.6 m and a blade height of 0.7 m. The guide vane row consists of 3 arc plates.

  6. The effect of chevron alignment signs on driver performance on horizontal curves with different roadway geometries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaohua; Wu, Yiping; Rong, Jian; Ma, Jianming

    2015-02-01

    To develop a practicable and clear guideline for implementing Chevrons on China's highways, it is necessary to understand the effect of Chevrons on driving performance in different roadway geometries. Using a driving simulator, this study tests the effect of China's Chevrons on vehicle speed and lane position on two-lane rural highway horizontal curves with different roadway geometries. The results showed a significant effect of Chevrons on speed reduction, and this function was not significantly affected by curve radius but was statistically affected by curve direction. The speed reduction caused by Chevrons was also significant at the approach of curve, middle of curve and point of tangent. The 85th percentile speed was also markedly lower when Chevrons were present. We also found a significant effect of Chevrons in encouraging participants to drive the vehicle with a more proper lane position at the first half of curves; and this function was slightly affected by curve radius. Meanwhile, the effect of Chevrons on keeping drivers staying in a more stable lane position was also statistically significant at the second half of curves. In sharp curves, the function of Chevrons to make drivers keep a stable lane position was lost. Besides, the impact of curve direction on the function of Chevrons on lane position was always present, and drivers would drive slightly away from Chevrons. Regardless of the curve radius, China's Chevrons at horizontal curves provide an advance warning, speed control and lane position guide for traffic on the nearside of Chevrons. Besides, combing with the function of Chevrons on preventing excessive speed and the benefit to make drivers keep a more proper lane position, China's Chevrons appear to be of great benefit to reduce crashes (e.g., run-off-road) in curves. PMID:25525973

  7. Effect of Ripple Geometry on Vortex Generation, Ejection, and Strength in Oscillatory Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    Turbulent vortex structures generated around bedforms have a large potential for significant suspended sediment transport. In the nearshore, the flow separation over ripples results in the generation of a lee vortex that can entrain sediment during half of the wave cycle. As the flow reverses, the sediment-laden vortex is ejected into the water column. The vortex is translated with the reversed flow and dissipates, releasing its sediment load back to the bed. The generation and ejection processes are functions of the ripple geometry and the wave acceleration. These same processes are also present for other geometries placed near the sea bed. Studies around bottom-seated cylindrical structures have shown multiple generation and ejection events off of the lee of the cylinder during half of the wave cycle. This generation is a function of Keulegan-Carpenter number, which balances the semi-excursion of the wave to the dominant length scale of the structure. In this work, the flow over rippled beds of various geometries over a range of hydrodynamic forcing will be numerically simulated to investigate the generation, ejection mechanisms, and strength of vortices created by this interaction. The simulations will be performed with the finite-difference CFD model, FLOW-3D. An advantage to this model is its ability to resolve complicated geometries in the flow with cartesian grids. In order to resolve the complex, three-dimensional flow field over an approximately two-dimensional rippled bed, a Smagorinsky Large Eddy Simulation closure scheme will be utilized. This model configuration has been shown to accurately predict the lift and drag force coefficients for bottom-mounted cylinders under linear waves, which are dominated by vortex generation and ejection. The three-dimensional vortex structure and strength will be evaluated with swirling strength criterion. Three-dimensional isosurfaces of the swirling strength will allow for the visual identification of the interaction

  8. Integral-geometry characterization of photobiomodulation effects on retinal vessel morphology

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Marconi; Natoli, Riccardo; Valter, Kriztina; Provis, Jan; Maddess, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The morphological characterization of quasi-planar structures represented by gray-scale images is challenging when object identification is sub-optimal due to registration artifacts. We propose two alternative procedures that enhances object identification in the integral-geometry morphological image analysis (MIA) framework. The first variant streamlines the framework by introducing an active contours segmentation process whose time step is recycled as a multi-scale parameter. In the second variant, we used the refined object identification produced in the first variant to perform the standard MIA with exact dilation radius as multi-scale parameter. Using this enhanced MIA we quantify the extent of vaso-obliteration in oxygen-induced retinopathic vascular growth, the preventative effect (by photobiomodulation) of exposure during tissue development to near-infrared light (NIR, 670 nm), and the lack of adverse effects due to exposure to NIR light. PMID:25071966

  9. Anomalous Effect of Surface Diffusion on NMR Signal: Tracing the Fiber Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apalkov, Vadym; Edirisinghe, Neranjan; Cymbalyuk, Gennady

    2008-03-01

    We show the strong qualitative effect of the surface diffusion channel on the echo attenuation of the NMR signal from restricted geometry, e.g. fiber system. In some range of parameters of the system the residual echo signal, which is obtained by subtracting the background value, can have anomalous behavior, which means that the echo signal has a maximum value at some finite value of the magnitude of the gradient pulses. This fact can be used to enhance the accuracy of the measurements by studying the echo signal around the maximum value. Effect described here could be also used for tuning the MRI measurements to trace fibers with particular characteristic diameters or for timely detection of changes in the diffusion coefficients and fiber diameters.

  10. Computational Analysis of an effect of aerodynamic pressure on the side view mirror geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murukesavan, P.; Mu'tasim, M. A. N.; Sahat, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of aerodynamic flow effects on side mirror geometry for a passenger car using ANSYS Fluent CFD simulation software. Results from analysis of pressure coefficient on side view mirror designs is evaluated to analyse the unsteady forces that cause fluctuations to mirror surface and image blurring. The fluctuation also causes drag forces that increase the overall drag coefficient, with an assumption resulting in higher fuel consumption and emission. Three features of side view mirror design were investigated with two input velocity parameters of 17 m/s and 33 m/s. Results indicate that the half-sphere design shows the most effective design with less pressure coefficient fluctuation and drag coefficient.

  11. Numerical modelling of the effect of changing surface geometry on mountain glacier mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Chris; Carrivick, Jonathan; Evans, Andrew; Carver, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Mountain glaciers and ice caps are extremely useful indicators of environmental change. Due to their small size, they have much faster response times to climate changes than the large ice masses of Greenland and Antarctica. Mountain glaciers are important for society as sources of water for energy production and irrigation and the meltwater cycles significantly impact local ecology. We have applied a spatially distributed surface energy balance model to a glacier record spanning 100 years. Our study encompasses (i) the creation of a GIS enabling quantitative analysis of changing glacier geometry; absolute length, area, surface lowering and volume change, over the 20th and early 21st Centuries and (ii) the development and testing of a novel user-friendly distributed-surface energy balance model that is designed specifically to consider the effect that these geometrical changes have on mountain glacier mass balance. Our study site is Kårsaglaciären in Arctic Sweden for which there is a variety of data for the past 100 years, sourced from historical surveys, satellite imagery and recent field work. This contrasts with other Arctic mountain glaciers where long-term records are rare, making model development and evaluation very difficult. Kårsaglaciären has been in a state of negative balance throughout the 20th century. Disintegration of the glacier occurred during the 1920s, breaking the glacier into two separate bodies. Between 1926 and 2008, the glacier retreated 1.3 km and reduced in area by 3.41km2. In 2008 the glacier had an estimated surface area of 0.89km2 and a length of approximately 1.0km. Firstly, we present the GIS based construction of robust three-dimensional glacier surface reconstructions for Kårsaglaciären from 1926 to 2010 using a decadal interval. We highlight the kriging interpolation methods used for surface development and the importance of inter-model sensitivity analyses as well as the use of Monte Carlo simulations used to assess the

  12. Geometry, Electronic Structure, and Pseudo Jahn-Teller Effect in Tetrasilacyclobutadiene Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Ya; Bersuker, Isaac B.

    2016-01-01

    We revealed the origin of the structural features of a series of tetrasilacyclobutadiene analogues based on a detailed study of their electronic structure and the pseudo Jahn-Teller effect (PJTE). Starting with the D4h symmetry of the Si4R4 system with a square four-membered silicon ring as a reference geometry, and employing ab initio calculations of energy profiles along lower-symmetry nuclear displacements in the ground and several excited states, we show that the ground-state boat-like and chair-like equilibrium configurations are produced by the PJT interaction with appropriate excited sates. For Si4F4 a full two-mode b1g−b2g adiabatic potential energy surface is calculated showing explicitly the way of transformation from the unstable D4h geometry to the two equilibrium C2h configurations via the D2h saddle point. The PJTE origin of these structural features is confirmed also by estimates of the vibronic coupling parameters. For Si4R4 with large substituents the origin of their structure is revealed by analyzing the PJT interaction between the frontier molecular orbitals. The preferred chair-like structures of Si4R4 analogues with amido substituents, and heavier germanium-containing systems Ge4R4 (potential precursors for semiconducting materials) are predicted. PMID:26996445

  13. Geometry, Electronic Structure, and Pseudo Jahn-Teller Effect in Tetrasilacyclobutadiene Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Ya; Bersuker, Isaac B.

    2016-03-01

    We revealed the origin of the structural features of a series of tetrasilacyclobutadiene analogues based on a detailed study of their electronic structure and the pseudo Jahn-Teller effect (PJTE). Starting with the D4h symmetry of the Si4R4 system with a square four-membered silicon ring as a reference geometry, and employing ab initio calculations of energy profiles along lower-symmetry nuclear displacements in the ground and several excited states, we show that the ground-state boat-like and chair-like equilibrium configurations are produced by the PJT interaction with appropriate excited sates. For Si4F4 a full two-mode b1g‑b2g adiabatic potential energy surface is calculated showing explicitly the way of transformation from the unstable D4h geometry to the two equilibrium C2h configurations via the D2h saddle point. The PJTE origin of these structural features is confirmed also by estimates of the vibronic coupling parameters. For Si4R4 with large substituents the origin of their structure is revealed by analyzing the PJT interaction between the frontier molecular orbitals. The preferred chair-like structures of Si4R4 analogues with amido substituents, and heavier germanium-containing systems Ge4R4 (potential precursors for semiconducting materials) are predicted.

  14. Effects of Regional Topography and Spacecraft Observation Geometry on Surface Soil Moisture Estimation Accuracies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Akbar, R.; West, R. D.; Colliander, A.; Kim, S.; Dunbar, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active-Passive Mission (SMAP), launched in January 2015, provides near-daily global surface soil moisture estimates via combined Active Radar and Passive Radiometer observations at various spatial resolutions. The goal of this mission is to enhance our understanding of global carbon and water cycles. This presentation will focus on a comprehensive assessment of the SMAP high resolution radar backscatter data (formally the L1C_S0_HiRes data product) obtained over a 3 km Woody Savanna region in north-central California during a 2.5 month period starting late May 2015. The effects of spacecraft observation geometry (fore- and aft-looks as well as ascending and descending obits) along with regional topography on soil moisture estimation abilities will be examined. Furthermore surface soil moisture retrievals, obtained through utilization of different combinations of observation geometries, will be compared to an existing network of in situsensors. Current electromagnetic scattering and emission models do not properly account for surface topography, therefore physical forward model predictions and observations have unaccounted mismatch errors which also affect soil moisture estimation accuracies. The goal of this study is to quantify these soil moisture prediction errors and highlight the need for new and complete Electromagnetic modeling efforts.

  15. Effect of cross-sectional geometry on thermal conductivity of Si1-xGex nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Peixin

    2016-06-01

    By incorporating the direction-dependent phonon-boundary scattering from the surface of the nanowires with different cross-sectional shapes into the linearized phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we theoretically investigate the effect of cross-sectional geometry on the thermal conductivity of Si1-xGex nanowires. It is demonstrated that the surface-to-volume ratio (SVR) is a universal gauge for both pure silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and silicon-germanium nanowires (SiGe NWs), and the thermal conductivity of nanowires decreases monotonically with the increase of SVR. We also find that the thermal conductivity of high-frequency phonons in nanowires is more strongly SVR dependent than that of low-frequency phonons, and the thermal conductivity of high-frequency phonons is severely suppressed by alloy scattering, therefore the SVR dependence on thermal conductivity of Si1-xGex NWs decreases with the increase of Ge atom concentration x (x < 0.5). These findings are useful for understanding and tuning the thermal conductivity of nanowires by geometry.

  16. Effect of boattail geometry on the acoustics of parallel baffles in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.; Unnever, G.; Dudley, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Sound attenuation and total pressure drop of parallel duct baffles incorporating certain boattail geometries were measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel. The baseline baffles were 1.56 m long and 20 cm thick, on 45-cm center-to-center spacings, and spanned the test section from floor to ceiling. Four different boattails were evaluated: a short, smooth (nonacoustic) boattail; a longer, smooth boattail; and two boattails with perforated surfaces and sound-absorbent filler. Acoustic measurements showed the acoustic boattails improved the sound attenuation of the baffles at approximately half the rate to be expected from constant-thickness sections of the same length; that is, 1.5 dB/n, where n is the ratio of acoustic treatment length to duct passage width between baffles. The aerodynamic total pressure loss was somewhat sensitive to tail geometry. Lengthening the tails to reduce the diffusion half-angle from 11 to 5 degrees reduced the total pressure loss approximately 9%. Perforating the boattails, which increased the surface roughness, did not have a large effect on the total pressure loss. Aerodynamic results are compared with a published empirical method for predicting baffle total pressure drop.

  17. Effects of electrode geometry and combination on nerve fibre selectivity in spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Holsheimer, J; Struijk, J J; Tas, N R

    1995-09-01

    The differential effects of the geometry of a rostrocaudal array of electrode contacts on dorsal column fibre and dorsal root fibre activation in spinal cord stimulation are analysed theoretically. 3-D models of the mid-cervical and mid-thoracic vertebral areas are used for the computation of stimulation induced field potentials, whereas a cable model of myelinated nerve fibre is used for the calculation of the excitation thresholds of large dorsal column and dorsal root fibres. The size and spacing of 2-D rectangular electrode contacts are varied while mono-, bi- and tripolar stimulation are applied. The model predicts that the highest preferential stimulation of dorsal root fibres is obtained in monopolar stimulation with a large cathode, whereas dorsal column fibre preference is highest in tripolar stimulation with small contacts and small contact spacings. Fibre type preference is most sensitive to variations of rostrocaudal contact size and least sensitive to variations of lateral contact size. Dorsal root fibre preference is increased and sensitivity to lead geometry is reduced as the distance from contacts to spinal cord is increased.

  18. Organ and effective dose coefficients for cranial and caudal irradiation geometries: photons.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Eckerman, K F; Hertel, N E

    2016-02-01

    With the introduction of new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms. Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for photon irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue kerma and absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to photons ranging in energy from 10 keV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6.1 radiation transport code and the adult reference phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. As with calculations reported in ICRP 116, the effects of charged-particle transport are evident when compared with values obtained by using the kerma approximation. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above ∼30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater. PMID:25935016

  19. Distribution of air-water mixtures in parallel vertical channels as an effect of the header geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Marchitto, Annalisa; Fossa, Marco; Guglielmini, Giovanni

    2009-07-15

    Uneven phase distribution in heat exchangers is a cause of severe reductions in thermal performances of refrigeration equipment. To date, no general design rules are available to avoid phase separation in manifolds with several outlet channels, and even predicting the phase and mass distribution in parallel channels is a demanding task. In the present paper, measurements of two-phase air-water distributions are reported with reference to a horizontal header supplying 16 vertical upward channels. The effects of the operating conditions, the header geometry and the inlet port nozzle were investigated in the ranges of liquid and gas superficial velocities of 0.2-1.2 and 1.5-16.5 m/s, respectively. Among the fitting devices used, the insertion of a co-axial, multi-hole distributor inside the header confirmed the possibility of greatly improving the liquid and gas flow distribution by the proper selection of position, diameter and number of the flow openings between the supplying distributor and the system of parallel channels connected to the header. (author)

  20. Effects of Viewing Geometry and Temperature on Spectral Reflectance of Planetary-analog Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Hibbitts, C.; Klima, R. L.; Greenspon, A. S.; Marusiak, A. G.; Sprague, A. L.; Domingue, D. L.; Helbert, J.; Blewett, D. T.

    2012-12-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has obtained over 2 million spectra of Mercury's surface between 300 and 1450 nm. VIRS reflectance spectra have shown no unequivocal evidence of the crystal-field absorption band centered near 1000-nm wavelength associated with the presence of ferrous iron in silicates. The lack of this absorption, and presence of an oxygen-metal charge transfer (OMCT)-like band at 300-400 nm is consistent with low (< 2-4%), but variable Fe contents in surface minerals. Two key factors that may affect the relative breadth, depth, and band center of subtle bands in reflectance spectra measured by MESSENGER are the viewing geometry of MASCS observations and the high temperature of the dayside Mercury surface, which can exceed 400° C. MESSENGER orbital and pointing constraints restrict reflectance observations of Mercury to phase angles between 78° and 102°, with average incidence and emission angles between 39° and 51°, but ranging from near 0° to 90°. A pilot study at Brown University's Reflectance Laboratory (RELAB) and the optics laboratory of the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) has measured a suite of low-Fe silicates at angles of incidence, emission, and phase, chosen to cover those of the MASCS measurements. The purpose is to provide direct photometric comparisons of known laboratory samples to Mercury observations. We present initial findings that indicate small (~4%) effects of viewing geometry on the 1000-nm band absorption and other spectral features. At APL, we are investigating thermal effects on spectral reflectance of rock-forming minerals from UV through NIR wavelengths under vacuum over a temperature range of -140 to 400°C. Different silicate absorption bands in the 1-4 micron range tend to widen and shallow by up to tens of percent, and shift band center slightly with increasing temperature. In addition, overall reflectance decreases with increasing temperatures

  1. Shear-flow Effects in Open Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2008-11-01

    Interaction between shear flows and plasma instabilities and turbulence in open traps can lead to improved confinement both in experiments and in simulations. Shear flows, driven by biasing end-plates and limiters or by off-axis electron heating, in combination with the finite-larmor-radius (FLR) effects are shown to be efficient in confining plasmas even with unstable flute modes. Interpretation of the observed effects as the ''vortex confinement,'' i.e., confinement of the plasma core in the dead-flow zone of the driven vortex, is shown to agree well with simulations.

  2. Geometry-Induced Memory Effects in Isolated Quantum Systems: Cold-Atom Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chen-Yen; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Memory effects result from the history-dependent behavior of a system, are abundant in our daily life, and have broad applications. Here, we explore the possibilities of generating memory effects in simple isolated quantum systems. By utilizing geometrical effects from a class of lattices supporting flatbands consisting of localized states, memory effects could be observed in ultracold atoms in optical lattices. As the optical lattice continuously transforms from a triangular lattice into a kagome lattice with a flatband, history-dependent density distributions manifest quantum memory effects even in noninteracting systems, including fermionic as well as bosonic systems, in the proper ranges of temperatures. Rapid growth of ultracold technology predicts a bright future for quantum memory-effect systems, and here two prototypical applications of geometry-induced quantum memory effects are proposed: A cold-atom-based accelerometer using an atomic differentiator to record the mechanical change rate of a coupled probe, and an atomic quantum memory cell for storing information with write-in and readout schemes.

  3. Optimal geometry of nonlinear silicon slot waveguides accounting for the effect of waveguide losses.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jun Rong; Chen, Valerian H

    2015-12-28

    The optimal geometry of silicon-organic hybrid slot waveguides is investigated in the context of the efficiency of four-wave mixing (FWM), a χ(3) nonlinear optical process. We study the effect of slot and waveguide widths, as well as waveguide asymmetry on the two-photon absorption (TPA) figure of merit and the roughness scattering loss. The optimal waveguide core width is shown to be 220nm (symmetric) with a slot width of 120nm, at a fixed waveguide height of 220nm. We also show that state-of-the-art slot waveguides can outperform rib waveguides, especially at high powers, due to the high TPA figure-of-merit.

  4. Effect of static mixer geometry on flow mixing and pressure drop in marine scr applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taewha; Sung, Yonmo; Kim, Taekyung; Lee, Inwon; Choi, Gyungmin; Kim, Duckjool

    2014-03-01

    Flow mixing and pressure drop characteristics for marine selective catalytic reduction applications were investigated numerically to develop an efficient static mixer. Two different mixers, line- and swirl-type, were considered. The effect of vane angles on the relative intensity, uniformity index, and pressure drop was investigated in a swirl-type mixer; these parameters are dramatically affected by the mixer geometry. The presence of a mixer, regardless of the mixer type, led to an improvement of approximately 20% in the mixing performance behind the mixer in comparison to not having a mixer. In particular, there was a tradeoff relationship between the uniformity and the pressure drop. Con­sidering the mixing performance and the pressure drop, the swirl-type mixer was more suitable than the line-type mixer in this study.

  5. Optimal Geometry Aspect Ratio of Ellipse-Shaped- Surrounding-Gate Nanowire Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Theoretically ideally round shape of the surrounding gate may not always guarantee because of limitations of the fabrication process in surrounding-gate nanowire field effect transistors (FETs). These limitations may lead to the formation of an ellipse-shaped surrounding gate with major and minor axes of different lengths. In this paper, we for the first time study the electrical characteristics of ellipse-shaped-surrounding-gate silicon nanowire FETs with different ratio of the major and minor axes. By simultaneously simulating engineering acceptable magnitudes of the threshold voltage roll-off, the drain induced barrier lowering, the subthreshold swing, and the on-/off-state current ratio, an optimal geometry aspect ratio between the channel length and the major and minor axes of the ellipse-shaped-surrounding-gate nanowire FET is concluded. PMID:27398546

  6. Effect of neck geometry of resonance cells on noise reduction efficiency in sound-absorbing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarev, P. V.; Anoshkin, A. N.; Pan'kov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The present work formulates the physical and mathematical models capable to forecast acoustic properties of resonance cells in sound absorbing structures. Distribution of acoustic pressure inside the duct and on sidewall cell was found, loss factor of output acoustic pressure wave was calculated for variety of geometric forms of cell's chamber and neck for monochromatic wave in 100-600Hz frequency range. Analysis of the acoustic pressure fields revealed that cell neck geometry strongly influences on cell resonant frequency and on outlet acoustic pressure loss factor. The effectiveness of the proposed by the authors biconical design of the resonant cell was proved, which increased acoustic radiation at the resonance frequency resulting significant increase of loss ratio of wave acoustic pressure at duct outlet.

  7. Piston-Liner Crevice Geometry Effect on HCCI Combustion by Multi-Zone Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Espinosa-Loza, F; Martinez-Frias, J; Dibble, R W; Christensen, M; Johansson, B; Hessel, R P

    2002-09-04

    A multi-zone model has been developed that accurately predicts HCCI combustion and emissions. The multizone methodology is based on the observation that turbulence does not play a direct role on HCCI combustion. Instead, chemical kinetics dominates the process, with hotter zones reacting first, and then colder zones reacting in rapid succession. Here, the multi-zone model has been applied to analyze the effect of piston crevice geometry on HCCI combustion and emissions. Three different pistons of varying crevice size were analyzed. Crevice sizes were 0.26, 1.3 and 2.1 mm, while a constant compression ratio was maintained (17:1). The results show that the multi-zone model can predict pressure traces and heat release rates with good accuracy. Combustion efficiency is also predicted with good accuracy for all cases, with a maximum difference of 5% between experimental and numerical results. Carbon monoxide emissions are underpredicted, but the results are better than those obtained in previous publications. The improvement is attributed to the use of a 40-zone model, while previous publications used a 10-zone model. Hydrocarbon emissions are well predicted. For cylinders with wide crevices (1.3 and 2.1 mm), HC emissions do not decrease monotonically as the relative air/fuel ratio ({lambda}) increases. Instead, maximum HC emissions are obtained for an intermediate value of {lambda}. The model predicts this relative air/fuel ratio for maximum HC emissions with very good accuracy. The results show that the multi-zone model can successfully predict the effect of crevice geometry on HCCI combustion, and therefore it has applicability to the design of HCCI engines with optimum characteristics for high efficiency, low emissions and low peak cylinder pressure.

  8. Welding polarity effects on weld spatters and bead geometry of hyperbaric dry GMAW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Long; Wu, Jinming; Huang, Junfen; Huang, Jiqiang; Zou, Yong; Liu, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Welding polarity has influence on welding stability to some extent, but the specific relationship between welding polarity and weld quality has not been found, especially under the hyperbaric environment. Based on a hyperbaric dry welding experiment system, gas metal arc welding(GMAW) experiments with direct current electrode positive(DCEP) and direct current electrode negative(DCEN) operations are carried out under the ambient pressures of 0.1 MPa, 0.4 MPa, 0.7 MPa and 1.0 MPa to find the influence rule of different welding polarities on welding spatters and weld bead geometry. The effects of welding polarities on the weld bead geometry such as the reinforcement, the weld width and the penetration are discussed. The experimental results show that the welding spatters gradually grow in quantity and size for GMAW with DCEP, while GMAW with DCEN can produce fewer spatters comparatively with the increase of the ambient pressure. Compared with DCEP, the welding current and arc voltage waveforms for DCEN is more stable and the distribution of welding current probability density for DCEN is more concentrated under the hyperbaric environment. When the ambient pressure is increased from 0.1 MPa to 1.0 MPa, the effects of welding polarities on the reinforcement, the weld width and the penetration are as follows: an increase of 0.8 mm for the weld reinforcement is produced by GMAW with DCEN and 1.3 mm by GMAW with DCEP, a decrease of 7.2 mm for the weld width is produced by DCEN and 6.1 mm by DCEP; and an increase of 3.9 mm for the penetration is produced by DCEN and 1.9 mm by DCEP. The proposed research indicates that the desirable stability in the welding procedure can be achieved by GMAW with DCEN operation under the hyperbaric environment.

  9. The Effects on Short- and Long-Term Retention and on Transfer of Two Methods of Presenting Selected Geometry Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Joseph A.

    The study was designed to investigate the effects on immediate acquisition, retention and transfer of two methods of presenting selected geometry concepts to sixth grade students. The effects of immediate acquisition and of transfer were measured immediately after presenting the lessons. The effects of retention were measured 1, 11, and 21 days…

  10. Effect of changes in separatrix magnetic geometry on divertor behaviour in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, T. W.; Canik, J. M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Watkins, J. G.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferron, J. R.; Groebner, R. J.; Hill, D. N.; Hyatt, A. W.; Holcomb, C. T.; Luce, T. C.; Makowski, M.; Moyer, R. A.; Osborne, T. E.; Stangeby, P. C.

    2013-11-01

    Results and interpretation of recent experiments on DIII-D designed to evaluate divertor geometries favourable for radiative heat dispersal are presented. Two approaches examined here involved lengthening the parallel connection in the scrape-off layer, L‖, and increasing the radius of the outer divertor separatrix strike point, ROSP, with the goal of reducing target temperature, TTAR, and increasing target density, nTAR. From one-dimensional (1D) two-point modelling based on conducted parallel heat flux, it is expected that: n_{TAR} \\propto R_{OSP}^{2} L_{\\parallel}^{6/7} n_{SEP}^{3} and T_{TAR} \\propto R_{OSP}^{-2} L_{\\parallel}^{{-4}/7} n_{SEP}^{-2} , where nSEP is the midplane separatrix density. These scalings suggest that conditions conducive to a radiative divertor solution can be achieved at low nSEP by increasing either ROSP or L‖. Our data are consistent with the above L‖ scalings. On the other hand, the observed dependence of nTAR and TTAR on ROSP displayed a more complex behaviour, under certain conditions deviating from the above scalings. Our analysis indicates that deviations from the ROSP scaling were due to the presence of convected heat flux, driven by escaping neutrals, in the more open configurations of the larger ROSP cases. A comparison of ‘open’ versus ‘closed’ divertor configurations for the H-mode plasmas in this study show that the ‘closed’ case provides at least 30% reduction in the peaked heat flux at common density with the ‘open’ case and partial divertor detachment at lower plasma density.

  11. Surface Geometry and Stomatal Conductance Effects on Evaporation From Aquatic Macrophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Michael G.; Idso, Sherwood B.

    1987-06-01

    Evaporative water loss rates of several floating and emergent aquatic macrophytes were studied over a 4-year period through comparison of daily evaporative water losses from similar-sized vegetated (E) and open water (E0) surfaces. Two species with planate floating leaves (water fern and water lily) yielded E/E0 values of 0.90 for one and four growing seasons, respectively, and displayed stomatal regulation of potential evaporation. Water hyacinths grown in ponds with different diameters exhibited E/E0 ratios which decreased with increasing pond diameter for both short (0.06-0.36 m) and tall (0.63-0.81 m) plants, producing high linear correlations with amount of peripheral vegetative surface area. The latter relationships suggested an E/E0 value less than unity for a relatively extensive canopy of short water hyacinths and a value of the order of 1.4 for a tall canopy possessing similar two-dimensional surface area characteristics. The latter results were also demonstrated in a separate study utilizing polyurethane foam to insulate the peripheral exposure of tall water hyacinth canopies from advective energy. Finally, simultaneous stomatal conductance and daily E/E0 measurements on cattail and water hyacinth canopies with identical tank diameters indicated that although the mean stomatal conductance of the peripheral exposure of the cattail canopy was 72% less than that of the water hyacinth canopy, its total evaporative water loss was nearly equivalent, due to its greater height. Reducing the surface area of the peripheral cattail exposure by the fractional amount suggested by the stomatal conductance measurements harmonized its surface geometry-evaporation relationship with that of the water hyacinth canopy and once again demonstrated the reality of stomatal control of potential evaporation.

  12. Effect of minodronic acid hydrate on hip geometry in Japanese women with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masako; Sone, Teruki; Fukunaga, Masao

    2010-05-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-based hip structural analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of a bisphosphonate, minodronic acid hydrate, on the geometry of the proximal femur in Japanese patients with osteoporosis. The subjects were 103 postmenopausal patients (average age 63.9 +/- 6.4 years) with primary osteoporosis. Minodronic acid hydrate was administered orally at a dose of 1 mg/day for 12 months. Significant early responses at 3-6 months after the start of administration were observed in all three regions of the proximal femur (narrow neck, intertrochanter, and shaft) in terms of bone density, geometry, and bone strength indices. The outcomes of therapy included a reduction of the internal diameter of the cortical bone (-0.1, -0.6, and -0.2% in the neck, intertrochanter, and shaft, respectively, at 12 months; not significant) and a significant increase in cortical thickness (3.1, 3.7, and 2.0% in the respective regions at 12 months). Furthermore, minodronic acid hydrate induced a significant enlargement of the cross-sectional bone area, which is related to compressive strength; a significant increase in cross-sectional moment of inertia and section modulus (SM 4.9, 5.8, and 2.9% in the neck, intertrochanter, and shaft, respectively, at 12 months; P < 0.001), which are related to the bending strength; and a significant reduction in buckling ratio (BR -3.0% (P < 0.001), -4.2% (P < 0.001), and -1.4% (P < 0.05) in the respective regions at 12 months), which reflects improved cortical stability. These findings show that minodronic acid hydrate reduces age-related endocortical bone resorption, leading to increased cortical thickness and sustained or enhanced bone strength. PMID:19937358

  13. Effects of nanostructure geometry on polymer chain alignment and device performance in nanoimprinted polymer solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Mielczarek, Kamil; Zakhidov, Anvar; Hu, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Among the various organic photovoltaic devices, the conjugated polymer/fullerene approach has drawn the most research interest. The performance of these types of solar cells is greatly determined by the nanoscale morphology of the two components (donor/acceptor) and the molecular orientation/crystallinity in the photoactive layer. This article demonstrates our recent studies on the nanostructure geometry effects on the nanoimprint induced poly(3 hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) chain alignment and photovoltaic performance. Out-of-plane and in-plane grazing incident X-ray diffractions are employed to characterize the chain orientations in P3HT nanogratings with different widths and heights. It is found that nanoimprint procedure changes the initial edge-on alignment in non-imprinted P3HT thin film to a vertical orientation which favors the hole transport, with an organization height H≥ 170 nm and width in the range of 60 nm<= W< 210 nm. Samples with better aligned molecules lead to a larger crystallite sizes as well. Imprinted P3HT/[6,6]-penyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (PCBM) solar cells show an increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE) with the decrease of nanostructure width, and with the increase of height and junction area. Devices with the highest PCE are made by the fully aligned and highest P3HT nanostructures (width w= 60 nm, height h= 170 nm), allowing for the most efficient charge separation, transport and light absorption. We believe this work will contribute to the optimal geometry design of nanoimprinted polymer solar cells.

  14. Effects of Intraframe Distortion on Measures of Cone Mosaic Geometry from Adaptive Optics Scanning Light Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Robert F.; Sulai, Yusufu N.; Dubis, Adam M.; Chui, Toco Y.; Rosen, Richard B.; Michaelides, Michel; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the effects of intraframe distortion due to involuntary eye motion on measures of cone mosaic geometry derived from adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images. Methods We acquired AOSLO image sequences from 20 subjects at 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0° temporal from fixation. An expert grader manually selected 10 minimally distorted reference frames from each 150-frame sequence for subsequent registration. Cone mosaic geometry was measured in all registered images (n = 600) using multiple metrics, and the repeatability of these metrics was used to assess the impact of the distortions from each reference frame. In nine additional subjects, we compared AOSLO-derived measurements to those from adaptive optics (AO)-fundus images, which do not contain system-imposed intraframe distortions. Results We observed substantial variation across subjects in the repeatability of density (1.2%–8.7%), inter-cell distance (0.8%–4.6%), percentage of six-sided Voronoi cells (0.8%–10.6%), and Voronoi cell area regularity (VCAR) (1.2%–13.2%). The average of all metrics extracted from AOSLO images (with the exception of VCAR) was not significantly different than those derived from AO-fundus images, though there was variability between individual images. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the intraframe distortion found in AOSLO images can affect the accuracy and repeatability of cone mosaic metrics. It may be possible to use multiple images from the same retinal area to approximate a “distortionless” image, though more work is needed to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. Translational Relevance Even in subjects with good fixation, images from AOSLOs contain intraframe distortions due to eye motion during scanning. The existence of these artifacts emphasizes the need for caution when interpreting results derived from scanning instruments. PMID:26933523

  15. The Effect of Interfacial Geometry on Charge-Transfer States in the Phthalocyanine/Fullerene Organic Photovoltaic System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong H; Geva, Eitan; Dunietz, Barry D

    2016-05-19

    The dependence of charge-transfer states on interfacial geometry at the phthalocyanine/fullerene organic photovoltaic system is investigated. The effect of deviations from the equilibrium geometry of the donor-donor-acceptor trimer on the energies of and electronic coupling between different types of interfacial electronic excited states is calculated from first-principles. Deviations from the equilibrium geometry are found to destabilize the donor-to-donor charge transfer states and to weaken their coupling to the photoexcited donor-localized states, thereby reducing their ability to serve as charge traps. At the same time, we find that the energies of donor-to-acceptor charge transfer states and their coupling to the donor-localized photoexcited states are either less sensitive to the interfacial geometry or become more favorable due to modifications relative to the equilibrium geometry, thereby enhancing their ability to serve as gateway states for charge separation. Through these findings, we eludicate how interfacial geometry modifications can play a key role in achieving charge separation in this widely studied organic photovoltaic system.

  16. On the Effects of Modeling As-Manufactured Geometry: Toward Digital Twin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerrone, Albert; Hochhalter, Jacob; Heber, Gerd; Ingraffea, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Asimple, nonstandardized material test specimen,which fails along one of two different likely crack paths, is considered herein.The result of deviations in geometry on the order of tenths of amillimeter, this ambiguity in crack pathmotivates the consideration of asmanufactured component geometry in the design, assessment, and certification of structural systems.Herein, finite elementmodels of as-manufactured specimens are generated and subsequently analyzed to resolve the crack-path ambiguity. The consequence and benefit of such a "personalized" methodology is the prediction of a crack path for each specimen based on its as-manufactured geometry, rather than a distribution of possible specimen geometries or nominal geometry.The consideration of as-manufactured characteristics is central to the Digital Twin concept. Therefore, this work is also intended to motivate its development.

  17. Effect of AFM probe geometry on visco-hyperelastic characterization of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Papi, Massimiliano; De Spirito, Marco; Pappalettere, Carmine

    2015-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation is very suited for nano- and microscale mechanical characterization of soft materials. Although the structural response of polymeric networks that form soft matter depends on viscous effects caused by the relative slippage of polymeric chains, the usual assumption made in the AFM-based characterization is that the specimen behaves as a purely elastic material and viscous forces are negligible. However, for each geometric configuration of the AFM tip, there will be a limit indentation rate above which viscous effects must be taken into account to correctly determine mechanical properties. A parametric finite element study conducted on 12 geometric configurations of a blunt cone AFM tip (overall, the study included about 200 finite element analyses) allowed us to determine the limit indentation rate for each configuration. The selected tip dimensions cover commercially available products and account for changes in tip geometry caused by serial measurements. Nanoindentation rates cover typical experimental conditions set in AFM bio-measurements on soft matter. Viscous effects appear to be more significant in the case of sharper tips. This implies that, if quantitative data on sample viscosity are not available, using a rounded indenter and carrying out experiments below the limit indentation rate will allow errors in the determination of mechanical properties to be minimized.

  18. Coulomb three-body effects in ([ital e],2[ital e]) collisions: The ionization of H in coplanar symmetric geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, C.T.; Allan, R.J.; Rasch, J.; Walters, H.R.J.; Zhang, X.; Roeder, J.; Jung, K.; Ehrhardt, H. Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, The Queen's University of Belfast, BT7 1NN Belfast, Northern Ireland Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin Schroedinger Strasse, D6750, Kaiserslautern )

    1994-11-01

    The role of postcollisional and polarization-correlation effects in energy-sharing ([ital e],2[ital e]) collisions is considered. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for the ionization of hydrogen in a symmetric coplanar geometry. A kinematical regime is identified where the triple-differential cross section is sensitive to three-body effects in both the incident and final channels.

  19. Numerical analysis of the effects of non-conventional laser beam geometries during laser melting of metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdar, Shakeel; Li, Lin; Sheikh, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Laser melting is an important industrial activity encountered in a variety of laser manufacturing processes, e.g. selective laser melting, welding, brazing, soldering, glazing, surface alloying, cladding etc. The majority of these processes are carried out by using either circular or rectangular beams. At present, the melt pool characteristics such as melt pool geometry, thermal gradients and cooling rate are controlled by the variation of laser power, spot size or scanning speed. However, the variations in these parameters are often limited by other processing conditions. Although different laser beam modes and intensity distributions have been studied to improve the process, no other laser beam geometries have been investigated. The effect of laser beam geometry on the laser melting process has received very little attention. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of different beam geometries including circular, rectangular and diamond shapes on laser melting of metallic materials. The finite volume method has been used to simulate the transient effects of a moving beam for laser melting of mild steel (EN-43A) taking into account Marangoni and buoyancy convection. The temperature distribution, melt pool geometry, fluid flow velocities and heating/cooling rates have been calculated. Some of the results have been compared with the experimental data.

  20. Unravelling the geometry of data matrices: effects of water stress regimes on winemaking.

    PubMed

    Fushing, Hsieh; Hsueh, Chih-Hsin; Heitkamp, Constantin; Matthews, Mark A; Koehl, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    A new method is proposed for unravelling the patterns between a set of experiments and the features that characterize those experiments. The aims are to extract these patterns in the form of a coupling between the rows and columns of the corresponding data matrix and to use this geometry as a support for model testing. These aims are reached through two key steps, namely application of an iterative geometric approach to couple the metric spaces associated with the rows and columns, and use of statistical physics to generate matrices that mimic the original data while maintaining their inherent structure, thereby providing the basis for hypothesis testing and statistical inference. The power of this new method is illustrated on the study of the impact of water stress conditions on the attributes of 'Cabernet Sauvignon' Grapes, Juice, Wine and Bottled Wine from two vintages. The first step, named data mechanics, de-convolutes the intrinsic effects of grape berries and wine attributes due to the experimental irrigation conditions from the extrinsic effects of the environment. The second step provides an analysis of the associations of some attributes of the bottled wine with characteristics of either the matured grape berries or the resulting juice, thereby identifying statistically significant associations between the juice pH, yeast assimilable nitrogen, and sugar content and the bottled wine alcohol level.

  1. Effects of 3D geometries on cellular gradient sensing and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spill, Fabian; Andasari, Vivi; Mak, Michael; Kamm, Roger D.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-06-01

    During cell migration, cells become polarized, change their shape, and move in response to various internal and external cues. Cell polarization is defined through the spatio-temporal organization of molecules such as PI3K or small GTPases, and is determined by intracellular signaling networks. It results in directional forces through actin polymerization and myosin contractions. Many existing mathematical models of cell polarization are formulated in terms of reaction-diffusion systems of interacting molecules, and are often defined in one or two spatial dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a 3D reaction-diffusion model of interacting molecules in a single cell, and find that cell geometry has an important role affecting the capability of a cell to polarize, or change polarization when an external signal changes direction. Our results suggest a geometrical argument why more roundish cells can repolarize more effectively than cells which are elongated along the direction of the original stimulus, and thus enable roundish cells to turn faster, as has been observed in experiments. On the other hand, elongated cells preferentially polarize along their main axis even when a gradient stimulus appears from another direction. Furthermore, our 3D model can accurately capture the effect of binding and unbinding of important regulators of cell polarization to and from the cell membrane. This spatial separation of membrane and cytosol, not possible to capture in 1D or 2D models, leads to marked differences of our model from comparable lower-dimensional models.

  2. Effect of geometry of hydrodynamically cavitating device on degradation of orange-G.

    PubMed

    Saharan, Virendra Kumar; Rizwani, Manav A; Malani, Aqeel A; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2013-01-01

    In this research work, we have carried out geometric optimization of different cavitating devices using degradation of orange-G dye [OG] as a model pollutant. Three different cavitating devices viz. orifice plate, circular venturi and slit venturi were optimized and the degradation of orange-G dye was studied. The optimization of all three cavitating devices was done in terms of fluid inlet pressure to the cavitating devices and cavitation number. The effect of pH and initial concentration of the dye on the degradation rate was also studied. The geometry of cavitating device (flow cross sectional area, perimeter, shape, etc.) was found to be an important parameter in getting the maximum cavitational effect using hydrodynamic cavitation. The cavitational yield of all three cavitating devices were compared on the basis of mg of total organic carbon (TOC) reduction per unit energy supplied. The slit venturi gives almost 50% higher degradation rate and cavitational yield among all three cavitating devices studied for the same amount of energy supplied.

  3. Geometry effects on cooling in a standing wave cylindrical thermoacousic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd-Ghazali, Normah; Ghazali, Ahmad Dairobi; Ali, Irwan Shah; Rahman, Muhammad Aminullah A.

    2012-06-01

    Numerous reports have established the refrigeration applications of thermoacoustic cooling without compressors and refrigerants. Significant cooling effects can be obtained in a thermoacoustic resonator fitted with a heat exchanging stack and operated at resonance frequency. Past studies, however, have hardly referred to the fundamental relationship between resonant frequency and the resonator geometry. This paper reports the thermoacoustic cooling effects at resonance obtained by changing the diameter of the resonator while holding the length constant and vice versa. Experiments were completed at atmospheric pressure with air as the working fluid using a number of pvc tubes having parallel plate stack from Mylar. The temperature difference measured across the stack showed that a volume increase in the working fluid in general increases the temperature gradient for the quarter-and half-wavelength resonators. Doubling the diameter from 30 mm to 60 mm produced the highest temperature difference due to the greater number of stack plates resulting in a higher overall thermoacaoustic cooling. Increasing the resonator length only produced a small increase in temperature gradient since the resonant frequency at operation is only slightly changed. Investigation on the aspect ratio exhibits no influence on the temperature difference across the stack. This study have shown that the resonator length and diameter do affect the temperature difference across the thermoacoustic stack, and further research should be done to consider the contribution of the stack mass on the overall desired thermoacoustic cooling.

  4. Long-term changes in Jovian synchrotron radio emission - Intrinsic variations or effects of viewing geometry?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Lon L.

    1993-01-01

    Possible causes of the observed long-term variation of Jovian synchrotron radio emission, including both intrinsic changes in the Jovian radiation belts and apparent changes due to variations in the Jovigraphic declination of the earth, D sub E, are investigated. An increase in diffusion rate with other parameters held constant results in an inward displacement of the peak emission radial distance that is not observed. Effects of viewing geometry changes are examined. The possible importance of such effects is suggested by a correlation between the total decimetric radio flux and D sub E, which varies between -3.3 and +3.3 deg during one Jovian orbital period. Because the Jovian central meridian longitudes where the magnetic latitude passes through zero during a given Jovian rotation change substantially with D sub E and since significant longitudinal asymmetries exist in both the volume emissivity and the latitudinal profile of the beam, the total intensity should be at least a partial function of D sub E.

  5. Effects of 3D geometries on cellular gradient sensing and polarization.

    PubMed

    Spill, Fabian; Andasari, Vivi; Mak, Michael; Kamm, Roger D; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2016-01-01

    During cell migration, cells become polarized, change their shape, and move in response to various internal and external cues. Cell polarization is defined through the spatio-temporal organization of molecules such as PI3K or small GTPases, and is determined by intracellular signaling networks. It results in directional forces through actin polymerization and myosin contractions. Many existing mathematical models of cell polarization are formulated in terms of reaction-diffusion systems of interacting molecules, and are often defined in one or two spatial dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a 3D reaction-diffusion model of interacting molecules in a single cell, and find that cell geometry has an important role affecting the capability of a cell to polarize, or change polarization when an external signal changes direction. Our results suggest a geometrical argument why more roundish cells can repolarize more effectively than cells which are elongated along the direction of the original stimulus, and thus enable roundish cells to turn faster, as has been observed in experiments. On the other hand, elongated cells preferentially polarize along their main axis even when a gradient stimulus appears from another direction. Furthermore, our 3D model can accurately capture the effect of binding and unbinding of important regulators of cell polarization to and from the cell membrane. This spatial separation of membrane and cytosol, not possible to capture in 1D or 2D models, leads to marked differences of our model from comparable lower-dimensional models. PMID:27345945

  6. Unravelling the geometry of data matrices: effects of water stress regimes on winemaking

    PubMed Central

    Fushing, Hsieh; Hsueh, Chih-Hsin; Heitkamp, Constantin; Matthews, Mark A.; Koehl, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    A new method is proposed for unravelling the patterns between a set of experiments and the features that characterize those experiments. The aims are to extract these patterns in the form of a coupling between the rows and columns of the corresponding data matrix and to use this geometry as a support for model testing. These aims are reached through two key steps, namely application of an iterative geometric approach to couple the metric spaces associated with the rows and columns, and use of statistical physics to generate matrices that mimic the original data while maintaining their inherent structure, thereby providing the basis for hypothesis testing and statistical inference. The power of this new method is illustrated on the study of the impact of water stress conditions on the attributes of ‘Cabernet Sauvignon’ Grapes, Juice, Wine and Bottled Wine from two vintages. The first step, named data mechanics, de-convolutes the intrinsic effects of grape berries and wine attributes due to the experimental irrigation conditions from the extrinsic effects of the environment. The second step provides an analysis of the associations of some attributes of the bottled wine with characteristics of either the matured grape berries or the resulting juice, thereby identifying statistically significant associations between the juice pH, yeast assimilable nitrogen, and sugar content and the bottled wine alcohol level. PMID:26468072

  7. A new class of actuator surface models incorporating wind turbine blade and nacelle geometry effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaolei; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    It was shown by Kang, Yang and Sotiropoulos that the nacelle has significant effects on the turbine wake even in the far wake region, which the standard actuator line model is not able to predict. We develop a new class of actuator surface models for the blades and nacelle, which is able to resolve the effects of both tip vortices and nacelle vortex. The new nacelle model, which is based on distributing forces from the actual nacelle geometry as in the diffused interface immersed boundary methods, is first tested by carrying out LES of the flow past a sphere and demonstrating good agreement with available in the literature DNS results. The proposed model is subsequently validated by simulating the flow past the hydrokinetic turbine used in the simulations of Kang et al. and good agreement with the measurements is demonstrated. Finally, the proposed model is applied to utility scale wind turbines to elucidate the role of nacelle vortex dynamics on turbine wake meandering. This work was supported by Department of Energy DOE (DE-EE0002980, DE-EE0005482 and DE-AC04-94AL85000), and Sandia National Laboratories. Computational resources were provided by SNL and MSI.

  8. Unravelling the geometry of data matrices: effects of water stress regimes on winemaking.

    PubMed

    Fushing, Hsieh; Hsueh, Chih-Hsin; Heitkamp, Constantin; Matthews, Mark A; Koehl, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    A new method is proposed for unravelling the patterns between a set of experiments and the features that characterize those experiments. The aims are to extract these patterns in the form of a coupling between the rows and columns of the corresponding data matrix and to use this geometry as a support for model testing. These aims are reached through two key steps, namely application of an iterative geometric approach to couple the metric spaces associated with the rows and columns, and use of statistical physics to generate matrices that mimic the original data while maintaining their inherent structure, thereby providing the basis for hypothesis testing and statistical inference. The power of this new method is illustrated on the study of the impact of water stress conditions on the attributes of 'Cabernet Sauvignon' Grapes, Juice, Wine and Bottled Wine from two vintages. The first step, named data mechanics, de-convolutes the intrinsic effects of grape berries and wine attributes due to the experimental irrigation conditions from the extrinsic effects of the environment. The second step provides an analysis of the associations of some attributes of the bottled wine with characteristics of either the matured grape berries or the resulting juice, thereby identifying statistically significant associations between the juice pH, yeast assimilable nitrogen, and sugar content and the bottled wine alcohol level. PMID:26468072

  9. Effects of 3D geometries on cellular gradient sensing and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spill, Fabian; Andasari, Vivi; Mak, Michael; Kamm, Roger D.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-06-01

    During cell migration, cells become polarized, change their shape, and move in response to various internal and external cues. Cell polarization is defined through the spatio-temporal organization of molecules such as PI3K or small GTPases, and is determined by intracellular signaling networks. It results in directional forces through actin polymerization and myosin contractions. Many existing mathematical models of cell polarization are formulated in terms of reaction–diffusion systems of interacting molecules, and are often defined in one or two spatial dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a 3D reaction–diffusion model of interacting molecules in a single cell, and find that cell geometry has an important role affecting the capability of a cell to polarize, or change polarization when an external signal changes direction. Our results suggest a geometrical argument why more roundish cells can repolarize more effectively than cells which are elongated along the direction of the original stimulus, and thus enable roundish cells to turn faster, as has been observed in experiments. On the other hand, elongated cells preferentially polarize along their main axis even when a gradient stimulus appears from another direction. Furthermore, our 3D model can accurately capture the effect of binding and unbinding of important regulators of cell polarization to and from the cell membrane. This spatial separation of membrane and cytosol, not possible to capture in 1D or 2D models, leads to marked differences of our model from comparable lower-dimensional models.

  10. Effect of pore's geometry on the electroosmotic flow and nanoparticle dynamics in the nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulings, Zachery; Melnikov, Dmitriy; Gracheva, Maria

    We theoretically study how the electroosmotic fluid velocity in a charged cylindrical nanopore in a solid state membranes depends on the pore's geometry, electrolyte concentration, and applied electrolyte bias. We find that in long pores, the fluid velocity follows the classical von Smoluchowski result for an infinite pore with a maximum along the pore axis. However, when the pore's length is comparable to its diameter, the velocity profile develops a local minimum along the pore axis with a maximum value near the membrane walls. The minimum becomes more pronounced when the electrolyte concentration and/or applied bias become larger. We attribute this effect to the inhomogeneous electric field distribution in the nanopore with the field along the axis of the pore being smaller than along the pore's walls due to the effects of access resistance on each side of the channel. We also investigate repercussions of such a velocity profile on the transport of a nanoparticle through the nanopore. NSF DMR and CBET Grant No. 1352218.

  11. Comparative effectiveness of topical drugs in dermatologic priority diseases: geometry of randomized trial networks.

    PubMed

    Karimkhani, Chante; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    This commentary explores the fundamentals of network theory, a branch of applied mathematics that has numerous applications in many fields. Maruani et al. (2014) used network theory to analyze the geometry of the evidence base for dermatologic treatments. This is a prime example of the innovative nature of network theory: the mapping of a complex system into an abstract geometry for easier analysis. The interpretation rests upon the two concepts of diversity and co-occurrence. The mathematical foundation of these concepts is briefly reviewed. In addition, examples of the application of network geometry in other dermatologic settings as well as in science and technology are presented.

  12. Development of kink bands in granodiorite: Effect of mechanical heterogeneities, fault geometry, and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chheda, T. D.; Nevitt, J. M.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of monoclinal right-lateral kink bands in Lake Edison granodiorite (central Sierra Nevada, CA) is investigated through field observations and mechanics based numerical modeling. Vertical faults act as weak surfaces within the granodiorite, and vertical granodiorite slabs bounded by closely-spaced faults curve into a kink. Leucocratic dikes are observed in association with kinking. Measurements were made on maps of Hilgard, Waterfall, Trail Fork, Kip Camp (Pollard and Segall, 1983b) and Bear Creek kink bands (Martel, 1998). Outcrop scale geometric parameters such as fault length andspacing, kink angle, and dike width are used to construct a representative geometry to be used in a finite element model. Three orders of fault were classified, length = 1.8, 7.2 and 28.8 m, and spacing = 0.3, 1.2 and 3.6 m, respectively. The model faults are oriented at 25° to the direction of shortening (horizontal most compressive stress), consistent with measurements of wing crack orientations in the field area. The model also includes a vertical leucocratic dike, oriented perpendicular to the faults and with material properties consistent with aplite. Curvature of the deformed faults across the kink band was used to compare the effects of material properties, strain, and fault and dike geometry. Model results indicate that the presence of the dike, which provides a mechanical heterogeneity, is critical to kinking in these rocks. Keeping properties of the model granodiorite constant, curvature increased with decrease in yield strength and Young's modulus of the dike. Curvature increased significantly as yield strength decreased from 95 to 90 MPa, and below this threshold value, limb rotation for the kink band was restricted to the dike. Changing Poisson's ratio had no significant effect. The addition of small faults between bounding faults, decreasing fault spacing or increasing dike width increases the curvature. Increasing friction along the faults decreases slip, so

  13. Propranolol reverses open field effects on frustration.

    PubMed

    Justel, Nadia; Psyrdellis, Mariana; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Mustaca, Alba

    2014-12-01

    Reactivity to a reward is affected by prior experience with different reinforcer values of that reward, a phenomenon known as incentive relativity. Incentive relativity can be studied via the consummatory successive negative contrast (cSNC) paradigm, in which acceptance of 4% sucrose is assessed in animals that had been exposed to 32% sucrose. These downshifted animals usually exhibit significantly less sucrose acceptance than animals that always received the 4% sucrose solution. In previous work, we found that exploration of a novel open field (OF) before the first trial with the downshifted solution attenuated the contrast effect. The goal of the present experiments was to expand the knowledge on the effects of OF exposure on cSNC. We evaluated the effect OF exposure before the second downshift trial and assessed the mediational role of the adrenergic system in the effects of OF during the first and second trial of cSNC. The results indicate that OF applied before the first or second downshift trials exert opposite effects and that the adrenergic system is involved in the acquisition and consolidation of the OF information. PMID:25261228

  14. Effects of branched defect geometry on the propagation of Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Valle, F.; Clough, A. R.; Dutton, B.; Edwards, R. S.

    2014-02-01

    Rayleigh waves can be used for characterisation of surface-breaking defects, giving a measure of the depth and the angle of propagation of a defect with simple (i.e. single crack) geometry. However, surface breaking defects will often grow with a more complicated geometry. We present here results of experimental measurements using laser generated and detected Rayleigh waves on aluminium samples containing machined slots with varied branched geometries. The signal enhancement found in the near-field, and the reflection and transmission of different wavemodes can be used to position the defect and gain an idea of its geometry. This research can be applied to monitor components prone to developing stress corrosion cracking (branched-like defects). Results are shown of the near-field interactions of Rayleigh waves with this type of cracking in stainless steel pipe samples, in order to resolve the spatial extent and geometric alignment of those defects.

  15. An investigation into geometry and microstructural effects upon the ultimate tensile strengths of butt welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical theory was evaluated empirically. This theory predicts weld ultimate tensile strength based on material properties and fusion line angles, mismatch, peaking, and weld widths. Welds were made on 1/4 and 1/2 in. aluminum 2219-T87, their geometries were measured, they were tensile tested, and these results were compared to theoretical predictions. Statistical analysis of results was performed to evaluate correlation of theory to results for many different categories of weld geometries.

  16. Investigation of flaw geometry and loading effects on plane strain fracture in metallic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The effects on fracture and flaw growth of weld-induced residual stresses, combined bending and tension stresses, and stress fields adjacent to circular holes in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5AI-2.5Sn(ELI) titanium alloys were evaluated. Static fracture tests were conducted in liquid nitrogen; fatigue tests were performed in room air, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen. Evaluation of results was based on linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts and was directed to improving existing methods of estimating minimum fracture strength and fatigue lives for pressurized structure in spacecraft and booster systems. Effects of specimen design in plane-strain fracture toughness testing were investigated. Four different specimen types were tested in room air, liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen environments using the aluminum and titanium alloys. Interferometry and holograph were used to measure crack-opening displacements in surface-flawed plexiglass test specimens. Comparisons were made between stress intensities calculated using displacement measurements, and approximate analytical solutions.

  17. Effects of reading-oriented tasks on students' reading comprehension of geometry proof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai-Lin; Lin, Fou-Lai

    2012-06-01

    This study compared the effects of reading-oriented tasks and writing-oriented tasks on students' reading comprehension of geometry proof (RCGP). The reading-oriented tasks were designed with reading strategies and the idea of problem posing. The writing-oriented tasks were consistent with usual proof instruction for writing a proof and applying it. Twenty-two classes of ninth-grade students ( N = 683), aged 14 to 15 years, and 12 mathematics teachers participated in this quasi-experimental classroom study. While the experimental group was instructed to read and discuss the reading tasks in two 45-minute lessons, the control group was instructed to prove and apply the same propositions. Generalised estimating equation (GEE) method was used to compare the scores of the post-test and the delayed post-test with the pre-test scores as covariates. Results showed that the total scores of the delayed post-test of the experimental group were significantly higher than those of the control group. Furthermore, the scores of the experimental group on all facets of reading comprehension except the application facet were significantly higher than those of the control group for both the post-test and delayed post-test.

  18. Effects of Nozzle Geometry and Intermittent Injection of Aerodynamic Tab on Supersonic Jet Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Mikiya; Sano, Takayuki; Fukuda, Masayuki; Kojima, Takayuki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Shiga, Seiichi; Obokata, Tomio

    Effects of the nozzle geometry and intermittent injection of aerodynamic tabs on exhaust noise from a rectangular plug nozzle were investigated experimentally. In JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), a pre-cooled turbojet engine for an HST (Hypersonic transport) is planned. A 1/100-scaled model of the rectangular plug nozzle is manufactured, and the noise reduction performance of aerodynamic tabs, which is small air jet injection from the nozzle wall, was investigated. Compressed air is injected through the rectangular plug nozzle into the atmosphere at the nozzle pressure ratio of 2.7, which corresponds to the take-off condition of the vehicle. Aerodynamic tabs were installed at the sidewall ends, and 4 kinds of round nozzles and 2 kinds of wedge nozzles were applied. Using a high-frequency solenoid valve, intermittent gas injection is also applied. It is shown that, by use of wedge nozzles, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate, necessary to gain 2.3dB reduction in OASPL (Overall sound pressure level), decreases by 29% when compared with round nozzles. It is also shown that, by use of intermittent injection, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate, necessary to gain 2.3dB reduction in OASPL, decreases by about 40% when compared with steady injection. By combination of wedge nozzles and intermittent injection, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate significantly decreases by 57% when compared with the conventional strategy.

  19. Effects of soil settlement and deformed geometry on a historical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardim, Y.; Mustafaraj, E.

    2015-05-01

    Protecting the historical character of a valued structure during the assessment and damage repair process is a very challenging task for many engineers. Heritage protection is complicated by a lack of design details and restrictions on sample extraction needed to obtain accurate material properties and limited studies on the restoration of certain types of historical structures. This study aims to assess the effects of soil settlement on a structure's stress concentrations and the value of laser scanning techniques on structure analysis in obtaining correct data of settlement vs. deformation. Terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) data are used to analyse the 500-year-old historical structure of Naziresha's Mosque. The obtained TLS data allow an accurate definition of the imperfect geometry patterns lying on every side of the structure. The soil profile and general crack formation together with TLS measurement proves that the structure deformed toward the south facade, where a railway and motorway are also located. Stress concentration and mode period results have a considerable difference, which highlights earthquake vulnerability and failure mechanisms and changes the strategy of possible retrofitting.

  20. Effect of nozzle orifice geometry on spray, combustion, and emission characteristics under diesel engine conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S.; Longman, D. E; Ramirez, A. I.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    2011-03-01

    Diesel engine performance and emissions are strongly coupled with fuel atomization and spray processes, which in turn are strongly influenced by injector flow dynamics. Modern engines employ micro-orifices with different orifice designs. It is critical to characterize the effects of various designs on engine performance and emissions. In this study, a recently developed primary breakup model (KH-ACT), which accounts for the effects of cavitation and turbulence generated inside the injector nozzle is incorporated into a CFD software CONVERGE for comprehensive engine simulations. The effects of orifice geometry on inner nozzle flow, spray, and combustion processes are examined by coupling the injector flow and spray simulations. Results indicate that conicity and hydrogrinding reduce cavitation and turbulence inside the nozzle orifice, which slows down primary breakup, increasing spray penetration, and reducing dispersion. Consequently, with conical and hydroground nozzles, the vaporization rate and fuel air mixing are reduced, and ignition occurs further downstream. The flame lift-off lengths are the highest and lowest for the hydroground and conical nozzles, respectively. This can be related to the rate of fuel injection, which is higher for the hydroground nozzle, leading to richer mixtures and lower flame base speeds. A modified flame index is employed to resolve the flame structure, which indicates a dual combustion mode. For the conical nozzle, the relative role of rich premixed combustion is enhanced and that of diffusion combustion reduced compared to the other two nozzles. In contrast, for the hydroground nozzle, the role of rich premixed combustion is reduced and that of non-premixed combustion is enhanced. Consequently, the amount of soot produced is the highest for the conical nozzle, while the amount of NOx produced is the highest for the hydroground nozzle, indicating the classical tradeoff between them.

  1. The effect of cathode geometry on barium transport in hollow cathode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, James E. Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2014-05-14

    The effect of barium transport on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in numerical modeling of a cathode with two different orifice sizes. Despite large differences in cathode emitter temperature, emitted electron current density, internal xenon neutral and plasma densities, and size of the plasma-surface interaction region, the barium transport in the two geometries is qualitatively very similar. Barium is produced in the insert and flows to the surface through the porous structure. A buildup of neutral Ba pressure in the plasma over the emitter surface can suppress the reactions supplying the Ba, restricting the net production rate. Neutral Ba flows into the dense Xe plasma and has a high probability of being ionized at the periphery of this zone. The steady state neutral Ba density distribution is determined by a balance between pressure gradient forces and the drag force associated with collisions between neutral Ba and neutral Xe atoms. A small fraction of the neutral Ba is lost upstream. The majority of the neutral Ba is ionized in the high temperature Xe plasma and is pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field. The steady state Ba{sup +} ion density distribution results from a balance between electrostatic and pressure forces, neutral Xe drag and Xe{sup +} ion drag with the dominant forces dependent on location in the discharge. These results indicate that hollow cathodes are very effective at recycling Ba within the discharge and therefore maintain a high coverage of Ba on the emitter surface, which reduces the work function and sustains high electron emission current densities at moderate temperatures. Barium recycling is more effective in the cathode with the smaller orifice because the Ba is ionized in the dense Xe plasma concentrated just upstream of the orifice and pushed back into the hollow cathode. Despite a lower emitter temperature, the large orifice cathode has a higher Ba loss rate through the orifice

  2. Experimental study of effects of tip geometry on the flow field in a turbine cascade passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongwei; Wang, Lixiang

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of blade tip geometry on the flow field of a turbine cascade at the incidence angle of 0 degree experimentally. The tests were performed in a low-speed turbine cascade wind tunnel. The Reynolds number based on the blade chord was about 172300 at the exit. Traverses of the exit flow field were made in order to measure the overall performance. The effects of using flat tip and grooved tip with a chord-wise channel were studied. The case with the flat tip is referenced as the baseline. The tip clearances are all 1 mm measuring 0.84 percent of the blade span. The depth of channel is 2mm. The flow field at 10% chord downstream from the cascade trailing edge was measured at 38 span-wise positions and 26 pitch-wise positions using a mini five-hole pressure probe. The static pressure distribution on the tip end wall is measured at 16 pitch-wise stations and 17 chord-wise stations. Results show that there exists great pressure gradient in the pressure side for the flat tip and the pressure side squealer tip, which means strong leakage flow. The pressure gradient from the pressure side to the suction side is greatly decreased for the grooved tip, and the resulting leakage flow is weaker. The core of the leakage vortex moves closer to the suction side for the pressure side squealer tip and farther away from the suction side for the suction side squealer tip. The pressure side squealer has little advantages over the flat tip in improving the flow capacity and reducing the overall losses. The suction side squealer tip and grooved tip can effectively decrease the intensity of the tip leakage vortex, improve the flow capacity and reduce loss of the turbine cascade passage and the grooved tip performs the best.

  3. Effect of inlet geometry on macrosegregation during the direct chill casting of 7050 alloy billets: experiments and computer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Eskin, D. G.; Miroux, A.; Subroto, T.; Katgerman, L.

    2012-07-01

    Controlling macrosegregation is one of the major challenges in direct-chill (DC) casting of aluminium alloys. In this paper, the effect of the inlet geometry (which influences the melt distribution) on macrosegregation during the DC casting of 7050 alloy billets was studied experimentally and by using 2D computer modelling. The ALSIM model was used to determine the temperature and flow patterns during DC casting. The results from the computer simulations show that the sump profiles and flow patterns in the billet are strongly influenced by the melt flow distribution determined by the inlet geometry. These observations were correlated to the actual macrosegregation patterns found in the as-cast billets produced by having two different inlet geometries. The macrosegregation analysis presented here may assist in determining the critical parameters to consider for improving the casting of 7XXX aluminium alloys.

  4. The Effect of Using Metacognitive Strategies for Solving Geometry Problems on Students' Achievement and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandaci Sahin, Seher; Kendir, Fatma

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the effect of using metacognitive strategies for problem solving in "geometry" on fifth grade students' achievement, metacognitive skills and attitude. Experimental method was used with a pretest/posttest control group design. Firstly, both groups were subject to a pretest that was comprised…

  5. Enhancing efficiency and power of quantum-dots resonant tunneling thermoelectrics in three-terminal geometry by cooperative effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2014-11-21

    We propose a scheme of multilayer thermoelectric engine where one electric current is coupled to two temperature gradients in three-terminal geometry. This is realized by resonant tunneling through quantum dots embedded in two thermal and electrical resisting polymer matrix layers between highly conducting semiconductor layers. There are two thermoelectric effects, one of which is pertaining to inelastic transport processes (if energies of quantum dots in the two layers are different), while the other exists also for elastic transport processes. These two correspond to the transverse and longitudinal thermoelectric effects, respectively, and are associated with different temperature gradients. We show that cooperation between the two thermoelectric effects leads to markedly improved figure of merit and power factor, which is confirmed by numerical calculation using material parameters. Such enhancement is robust against phonon heat conduction and energy level broadening. Therefore, we demonstrated cooperative effect as an additional way to effectively improve performance of thermoelectrics in three-terminal geometry.

  6. The effects of succinylcholine on mouth opening.

    PubMed

    Van der Spek, A F; Fang, W B; Ashton-Miller, J A; Stohler, C S; Carlson, D S; Schork, M A

    1987-10-01

    Mouth opening and the resistance to opening developed by the muscles of mastication were measured in 63 children anesthetized with halothane and relaxed with succinylcholine, pancuronium, or vecuronium. Measurement of mouth opening, induced by a constant test force, was made when each patient was deeply anesthetized, as judged by clinical parameters. Succinylcholine, vecuronium, or pancuronium was then administered. The mouth opening measurement was repeated immediately after the loss of limb muscle twitch response and 45 s following the loss of twitch response. For the 24 patients receiving succinylcholine, there was a significant reduction in mean mouth opening (P less than 0.0001) and a significant increase in jaw stiffness (P less than 0.0001) immediately after limb relaxation. Forty-five seconds after full limb relaxation was attained, the mean mouth opening was still reduced (P less than 0.0001) and the mean jaw stiffness was still increased (P less than 0.0003) in the succinylcholine group. Patients receiving either vecuronium or pancuronium did not show a significant change of mouth opening or jaw stiffness following limb relaxation. Three patients, who received succinylcholine, required several attempts at tracheal intubation due to increased resistance to mouth opening. Anesthesia and surgery proceeded in all patients. None of the patients developed malignant hyperthermia. In view of the fact that a reduction in mouth opening was a constant finding when succinylcholine was administered during halothane anesthesia, the assumption that isolated "masseter spasm" or jaw stiffness heralds malignant hyperthermia should be reconsidered. PMID:2889402

  7. The effect of discharge chamber geometry on the ignition of low-pressure rf capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lisovskiy, V.; Martins, S.; Landry, K.; Douai, D.; Booth, J.-P.; Cassagne, V.; Yegorenkov, V.

    2005-09-15

    This paper reports measured and calculated breakdown curves in several gases of rf capacitive discharges excited at 13.56 MHz in chambers of three different geometries: parallel plates surrounded by a dielectric cylinder ('symmetric parallel plate'), parallel plates surrounded by a grounded metallic cylinder ('asymmetric parallel plate'), and parallel plates inside a much larger grounded metallic chamber ('large chamber'). The breakdown curves for the symmetric chamber have a multivalued section at low pressure. For the asymmetric chamber the breakdown curves are shifted to lower pressures and rf voltages, but the multivalued feature is still present. At higher pressures the breakdown voltages are much lower than for the symmetric geometry. For the large chamber geometry the multivalued behavior is not observed. The breakdown curves were also calculated using a numerical model based on fluid equations, giving results that are in satisfactory agreement with the measurements.

  8. The Effects of Geometry and Stability of Solid-state Nanopores on Detecting Single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Rollings, Ryan; Graef, Edward; Walsh, Nathan; Nandivada, Santoshi; Benamara, Mourad

    2014-01-01

    In this work we use a combination of 3D-TEM tomography, energy filtered TEM, single molecule DNA translocation experiments, and numerical modeling to show a more precise relationship between nanopore shape and ionic conductance and show that changes in geometry while in solution can account for most deviations between predicted and measured conductance. We compare the structural stability of Ion Beam Sculpted (IBS), IBS-annealed, and TEM drilled nanopores. We demonstrate that annealing can significantly improve the stability of IBS made pores. Furthermore, the methods developed in this work can be used to predict pore conductance and current drop amplitudes of DNA translocation events for a wide variety of pore geometries. We discuss that chemical dissolution is one mechanism of the geometry change for SiNx nanopores and show that small modification in fabrication procedure can significantly increase the stability of IBS nanopores. PMID:25556317

  9. The effects of arcjet thruster operating condition constrictor geometry on the plasma plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Lynnette M.; Sankovic, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of plasma number density and electron temperature were obtained in the plumes of lab arcjet thrusters using electrostatic probes of both spherical and cylindrical geometry. The two arcjet thrusters used had different constrictor and/or nozzle geometries and operated on mixtures of nitrogen, hydrogen, and ammonia to simulate the decomposition products of hydrazine and ammonia. An increase in the measured electron density was observed for both geometries with increasing arc power at a constant mass flow rate and with increasing mass flow rate at a constant arc current. For a given operating condition, the electron number density decreased exponentially off centerline and followed an inverse distance squared relationship along the thrust axis. Typical measured electron temperatures ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 eV.

  10. The effects of arcjet operating condition and constrictor geometry on the plasma plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Lynnette M.; Sankovic, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of plasma number density and electron temperature were obtained in the plumes of lab arcjet thrusters using electrostatic probes of both spherical and cylindrical geometry. The two arcjet thrusters used had different constrictor and/or nozzle geometries and operated on mixtures of nitrogen, hydrogen, and ammonia to simulate the decomposition products of hydrazine and ammonia. An increase in the measured electron density was observed for both geometries with increasing arc power at a constant mass flow rate and with increasing mass flow rate at a constant arc current. For a given operating condition, the electron number density decreased exponentially off centerline and followed an inverse distance squared relationship along the thrust axis. Typical measured electron temperatures ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 eV.

  11. Analysis of the Effect of Geometry Generated Turbulence on HCCI Combustion by Multi-Zone Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Christensen, M; Johansson, B; Hessel, R P

    2004-12-13

    This paper illustrates the applicability of a sequential fluid mechanics, multi-zone chemical kinetics model to analyze HCCI experimental data for two combustion chamber geometries with different levels of turbulence: a low turbulence disc geometry (flat top piston), and a high turbulence square geometry (piston with a square bowl). The model uses a fluid mechanics code to determine temperature histories in the engine as a function of crank angle. These temperature histories are then fed into a chemical kinetic solver, which determines combustion characteristics for a relatively small number of zones (40). The model makes the assumption that there is no direct linking between turbulence and combustion. The results show that the multi-zone model yields good results for both the disc and the square geometries. The model makes good predictions of pressure traces and heat release rates. The experimental results indicate that the high turbulence square geometry has longer burn duration than the low turbulence disc geometry. This difference can be explained by the sequential multi-zone model, which indicates that the cylinder with the square bowl has a thicker boundary layer that results in a broader temperature distribution. This broader temperature distribution tends to lengthen the combustion, as cold mass within the cylinder takes longer to reach ignition temperature when compressed by the expansion of the first burned gases. The multi-zone model, which makes the basic assumption that HCCI combustion is controlled by chemical kinetics, is therefore capable of explaining the experimental results obtained for different levels of turbulence, without considering a direct interaction between turbulence and combustion. A direct connection between turbulence and HCCI combustion may still exists, but it seems to play a relatively minor role in determining burn duration at the conditions analyzed in this paper.

  12. Effect of electrode geometry on performance of EWOD device driven by battery-based system.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ling-Sheng; Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Hong

    2009-10-01

    This study develops a driving system for an electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) device comprising a 9 V battery, an ATmega8535 microprocessor, a DC/DC converter, two regulator ICs and a switch circuit. The driving system greatly improves the portability of the EWOD device and is capable of generating a square wave with voltages ranging from 50~100 V(pp) and frequencies in the range 1~5 kHz. A series of experimental and numerical investigations are performed to investigate the effect of the conducting electrode geometry on the droplet velocity in the EWOD device. Three different electrode configurations are considered, namely a linear array of square electrodes, a series of interdigitated electrodes having either two or three fingers, and a series of interdigitated electrodes having five or six fingers. The experimental results show that the corresponding droplet velocities are 7.25 mm/s, 8.17 mm/s and 7.82 mm/s, respectively. The simulation results indicate that the pressure difference induced within the droplets actuated by the square, interdigitated (2323) and interdigitated (5656) electrodes has a value of 15.5 N/m², 262 N/m² and 141.1 N/m², respectively. The corresponding droplet velocities are 33.8 mm/s, 72.7 mm/s and 64.5 mm/s, respectively. Overall, the experimental and numerical results indicate that the interdigitated (2323) electrode optimizes the transportation of the droplets in the EWOD device. The improved droplet velocity obtained using this particular electrode configuration is attributed to an increased length of the contact line between the droplet and the actuating electrode, which in turn increases the driving force.

  13. Effects of the geomagnetic field on the beaming geometry of TGFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from the Earth's atmosphere in association with thunderstorm activity [e.g., Briggs et al., JGR, 118, 3805, 2013]. Although TGFs are believed to be produced inside thunderclouds (below 15 km altitude), the underlying physical mechanisms are still debated. Large-scale relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) along with relativistic feedback caused by positrons and photons have been proposed to occur in thunderclouds and to produce TGFs [e.g., Dwyer et al., Space Sci. Rev., 173, 133, 2012]. It has also been found that the production of thermal runaway electrons by stepping lightning leaders and their further acceleration could explain the TGF spectra and fluences for intracloud (IC) lightning electric potentials above ˜100 MV [Xu et al., GRL, 39, L08801, 2012; Celestin et al., JGR, 120, 2015]. In both scenarios, runaway electron avalanches take place and the related bremsstrahlung produces the TGF. The impact of the geomagnetic field on RREAs has been seldom studied (with the notable exceptions of Lehtinen et al. [JGR, 104, 24699, 1999], Babich et al. [Geom. Aeron., 44, 243, 2004] and Cramer et al. [AGU Fall Meeting, abstract AE33A-0472, San Francisco, USA, 2015]), particularly in view of recent knowledge acquired about TGF sources properties. In this work, we study the effects of the geomagnetic field on the runaway electron beam geometry in large-scale RREAs and in the vicinity of lightning leaders and the corresponding impact on TGF observations using analytical and numerical means.

  14. Effects of viewing geometry on AVHRR observations of volcanic thermal anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Mouginis-Mark, P.J.; Garbeil, H.; Flament, P. )

    1994-04-01

    The authors investigated the influence of viewing geometry and dynamic range of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor on detecting eruptions on poorly monitored volcanoes. Numerical models of sunwarmed flows and typical active features associated with Hawaiian eruptions (overturning lava lakes, surface flows of three different sizes, and lava tubes with skylights) show that new lava flows at [approximately]1,000 C can be identified at all scan angles if the area of the activity exceeds [approximately]60 m[sup 2] given a background temperature of 20 C. More difficult is the detection of small breakouts of lava flows or tube-fed flows when these features lie towards the edge of the swath; because of the dynamic range and gain setting of the sensor (Bands 3, 4, and 5 saturate at [approximately] 49 C) it is possible that similar thermal signatures may be produced when inactive flows are heated by the Sun. The ability of the AVHRR to detect on-going activity in Hawaii in July 1991 is tested by comparing Landsat Thematic Mapper and nadir AVHRR scenes obtained within [approximately] 3.5 hours of each other. For an active pahoehoe flowfield with a well-developed tube system, this comparison shows that within the area of thermally alarmed AVHRR pixels < 5 % of the TM midinfrared pixels had elevated data values, indicating the relatively small size of the surface activity. An off-nadir AVHRR scene acquired 47.5 h later is used to illustrate the effect of increased pixel size when viewing subpixel hot spots.

  15. Effect of faulting on fluid flow in porous sandstones: Geometry and spatial distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Antonellini, M.; Aydin, A.

    1995-05-01

    We present a methodology to describe fault geometry at different scales and to characterize the distribution of these scales on the flanks of a salt intrusion in the Colorado Plateau (Arches National Park, United States). This methodology is based on the recognition of the physical processes of faulting and on the quantitative characterization of the structural and petrophysical properties of faults in porous sandstones. The methods used include a variety of mapping techniques (photography, aerial photography, string mapping, theodolite surveys, etc.), as well as techniques for determining fluid flow properties. The resulting study is a prototype for understanding seismic and subseismic scales of heterogeneity related to faulting and fracturing in subsurface reservoirs. Slip planes, which are not interconnected, may have poor geometric sealing characteristics. In the hanging wall of a major normal fault, the quantitative spatial distribution of the faults can be correlated with bending of the strata, probably associated with the salt intrusion. The number of deformation bands, the most ubiquitous element, is proportional to the amount of slip on a single major fault. Deformation bands also have a very high density (>100 m{sup -1}) in stepovers between slip planes. In these areas we find the largest anomalies in permeability. In zones of high strata curvature, the average orders of magnitude with respect to the host rock; if complex fault zones are present, the average permeability can drop more than four orders of magnitude in the direction normal to the faults. Finally, by using outcrop and laboratory data that describe the effect of distinctive structural units on fluid flow, we quantify the three-dimensional distribution of permeability in a reservoir analog at any scale, and we show that such permeability distribution could be implemented in a geology-based reservoir simulator.

  16. Geometry Effects on Multipole Components and Beam Optics in High-Velocity Multi-Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Deitrick, Kirsten E.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2013-12-01

    Velocity-of-light, multi-spoke cavities are being proposed to accelerate electrons in a compact light-source. There are strict requirements on the beam quality which require that the linac have only small non-uniformities in the accelerating field. Beam dynamics simulations have uncovered varying levels of focusing and defocusing in the proposed cavities, which is dependent on the geometry of the spoke in the vicinity of the beam path. Here we present results for the influence different spoke geometries have on the multipole components of the accelerating field and how these components, in turn, impact the simulated beam properties.

  17. Effect of Weld Tool Geometry on Friction Stir Welded AA2219-T87 Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querin, Joseph A.; Schneider, Judy A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, flat panels of AA2219-T87 were friction stir welded (FSWed) using weld tools with tapered pins The three pin geometries of the weld tools included: 0 (straight cylinder), 30 , and 60 angles on the frustum. For each weld tool geometry, the FSW process parameters were optimized to eliminate defects. A constant heat input was maintained while varying the process parameters of spindle rpm and travel speed. This provided a constant heat input for each FSW weld panel while altering the hot working conditions imparted to the workpiece. The resulting mechanical properties were evaluated from tensile test results of the FSW joint.

  18. Magnetic flux leakage investigation of interacting defects: Stress and geometry effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandache, Catalin

    The Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) non-destructive technique is the most cost-effective way to monitor corrosion on in-service oil and gas pipelines. The method consists of magnetizing the pipe wall and detecting the leakage flux as a defect indication. The MFL signals are used for locating and sizing metal loss defects in the pipe. The shape and amplitude of the MFL signals do not depend only on defect geometry, but also on tool speed, applied flux density, inspection configuration, magnetic properties, and stress state of the pipe wall. The last two factors cannot be accounted for through calibration measurements. High operating pressures of the pipelines, combined with the local variation of both stress and magnetic properties of the material make the MFL field data difficult to interpret. The main objective of this project was the study of interacting defects, a term referring to two sufficiently close corrosion pits that the area between them is subjected to stress superposition and magnetic flux shielding. This research analyzed the stress-dependent magnetic flux leakage (MFL) signatures from various single and interacting defects, electrochemically milled on steel samples at no applied stress or at an applied tensile stress of 46% of the material yield strength, and magnetized at moderate and high field amplitudes. A complementary technique, Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN), capable of concurrently detecting magnetic properties and local stresses on a microscopic scale, was used in interpreting the stress-affected MFL signals. The MBN method was also employed for macroscopic magnetic characterization of the ferromagnetic samples under uniaxial tensile load. Bulk and local MBN experimental results were compared with existing theoretical and numerical models of stress patterns. The MBN results were used to model the MFL response to stress under low MFL applied field conditions. Under high field MFL conditions, stress effects are small and flux shielding dominates

  19. Geometry of the quantum Hall effect: An effective action for all dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabali, Dimitra; Nair, V. P.

    2016-07-01

    We present a general formula for the topological part of the effective action for integer quantum Hall systems in higher dimensions, including fluctuations of the gauge field and metric around background fields of a specified topological class. The result is based on a procedure of integrating up from the Dolbeault index density which applies for the degeneracies of Landau levels, combined with some input from the standard descent procedure for anomalies. Features of the topological action in (2 +1 ), (4 +1 ), (6 +1 ) dimensions, including the contribution due to gravitational anomalies, are discussed in some detail.

  20. The Effect of Designed Geometry Teaching Lesson to the Candidate Teachers' Van Hiele Geometric Thinking Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Gül Kaleli; Koparan, Timur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out how designed Geometry Teaching Lesson affects candidate teachers' Van Hiele Geometric Thinking Levels. For that purpose, 14 weeks long study was performed with 44 candidate teachers who were university students in Turkey. Van Hiele Geometric Thinking Test was applied to candidate teachers before and after…

  1. The Effect of Teacher Pedagogical Content Knowledge and the Instruction of Middle School Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenhart, Sara Talley

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between middle school math teacher pedagogical content knowledge as gathered from a teacher assessment and student Standards of Learning scores. Nine middle-school math teachers at two rural schools were assessed for their pedagogical content knowledge in geometry and measurement in the specific area of…

  2. Effects of Polya Questioning Instruction for Geometry Reasoning in Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chun-Yi; Chen, Ming-Jang

    2015-01-01

    In teaching geometry, most instructors opt for direct demonstration with detailed explanations; however, under this kind of instruction students face considerable difficulties in the development of the reasoning skills required to deal with problems of a geometric nature. This study adopted a nonequivalent pretest-postest quasi-experimental design…

  3. The Effect of Dynamic Geometry Software on Student Mathematics Teachers' Spatial Visualization Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Güven, Bülent; Kosa, Temel

    2008-01-01

    Geometry is the study of shape and space. Without spatial ability, students cannot fully appreciate the natural world. Spatial ability is also very important for work in various fields such as computer graphics, engineering, architecture, and cartography. A number of studies have demonstrated that technology has an important potential to develop…

  4. Assessing the Effectiveness of Learning Solid Geometry by Using an Augmented Reality-Assisted Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Hao-Chiang Koong; Chen, Mei-Chi; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2015-01-01

    This study integrates augmented reality (AR) technology into teaching activities to design a learning system that assists junior high-school students in learning solid geometry. The following issues are addressed: (1) the relationship between achievements in mathematics and performance in spatial perception; (2) whether system-assisted learning…

  5. The Effect of Visual-Chunking-Representation Accommodation on Geometry Testing for Students with Math Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Dake; Ding, Yi; Stegall, Joanna; Mo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Students who struggle with learning mathematics often have difficulties with geometry problem solving, which requires strong visual imagery skills. These difficulties have been correlated with deficiencies in visual working memory. Cognitive psychology has shown that chunking of visual items accommodates students' working memory deficits. This…

  6. Effect of the section geometry of saucepan base on the energy consumption: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayata, Tahir; Yücel, Yılmaz

    2016-08-01

    In this study, it is aimed to obtain a uniform temperature distribution on the top surface of a circular shaped aluminum saucepan base with rectangular section, while it is heated from the bottom surface by burnt gases. For this purpose, an aluminum saucepan with 10 mm thickness has been manufactured and used in the experiments. Water and oil were used to fill the saucepan during the tests. Tests were conducted at 0.7 and 0.9 m3/h gas flow rates. Firstly, experiments were performed for straight base geometry of the aluminum saucepan and then some modifications have been made in the thickness of the base along the radial direction using the temperature values obtained from the test with normal base. Experiments were repeated with modified base to obtain the new temperature distribution. Final comparison of the modified and unmodified base geometry results revealed that the temperatures obtained at the top surface of the modified base is more uniform than the normal base and the energy consumption decreased by up to 31 %. Thus, comparing both geometry to each other in terms of energy efficiency and consumption, modified based geometry is more promising with its shorter heat up time and lower gas consumption.

  7. Landau level quantization for massless Dirac fermions in the spherical geometry: Graphene fractional quantum Hall effect on the Haldane sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniaga, Michael; Peterson, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    We derive the single-particle eigenenergies and eigenfunctions for massless Dirac fermions confined to the surface of a sphere in the presence of a magnetic monopole, i.e., we solve the Landau level problem for electrons in graphene on the Haldane sphere. With the single-particle eigenfunctions and eigenenergies we calculate the Haldane pseudopotentials for the Coulomb interaction in the second Landau level and calculate the effective pseudopotentials characterizing an effective Landau level mixing Hamiltonian entirely in the spherical geometry to be used in theoretical studies of the fractional quantum Hall effect in graphene. Our treatment is analogous to the formalism in the planar geometry and reduces to the planar results in the thermodynamic limit.

  8. Effect of port corner geometry on the internal performance of a rotating-vane-type thrust reverser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Capone, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of reverser port geometry on the internal performance of a nonaxisymmetric rotating-vane-type thrust reverser. Thrust reverser vane positions representing a spoiled-trust (partially deployed) position and a full-reverse-thrust (fully deployed) position were tested with each port geometry variable. The effects of upstream port corner radius and wall angle on internal performance were determined. In addition, the effect of the length of a simulated cooling liner (blunt-base step) near the reverser port entrance was investigated; five different lengths were tested. All tests were conducted with no external flows, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.2 to 5.0.

  9. 14 CFR 1203.401 - Effect of open publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Effect of open publication. 1203.401 Section 1203.401 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.401 Effect of open publication. Public...

  10. 14 CFR 1203.401 - Effect of open publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Effect of open publication. 1203.401 Section 1203.401 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.401 Effect of open publication. Public...

  11. 14 CFR 1203.401 - Effect of open publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Effect of open publication. 1203.401 Section 1203.401 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.401 Effect of open publication. Public...

  12. 14 CFR 1203.401 - Effect of open publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effect of open publication. 1203.401 Section 1203.401 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.401 Effect of open publication. Public...

  13. 14 CFR § 1203.401 - Effect of open publication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Effect of open publication. § 1203.401 Section § 1203.401 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.401 Effect of open publication....

  14. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  15. The Effects on Bay Circulation of Changing Geometry and Location of Katama Inlet, Martha's Vineyard, MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orescanin, M. M.; Elgar, S.; Raubenheimer, B.

    2014-12-01

    Circulation in bays with one or more connections to the ocean depends on the location and morphology of the inlets. Here, field observations and the numerical model ADCIRC are used to investigate circulation in the small (~7 km2 surface area) and shallow (~2 m deep) Katama Bay, Martha's Vineyard, MA, which is connected to Vineyard Sound in the north by the long (~2.5 km), stable, maintained Edgartown Channel, and to the Atlantic Ocean in the south by the variable and ephemeral Katama Inlet, which changes shape in response to storms, as well as to daily waves and tides. Katama Inlet was initiated by a breach in 2007, and has migrated almost 2.5 km to the east where it is now adjacent to Chappaquiddick Island. In a typical decadal cycle, the inlet eventually closes until another storm breaches the sand barrier. As it migrates, Katama Inlet varies in width, length, depth, and orientation. The bathymetry near the inlet was measured pre- and post Hurricane Irene (2011), and in the summers of 2012-2014. In addition, sea levels, waves, and currents were measured in the ocean, the inlets, and the bay from August until October 2011 (including during Hurricane Irene), and in August 2013. Between 2011 and 2013 the inlet migrated 1 km to the east and changed alignment from roughly north-south to east-west. Pressure data from the Atlantic Ocean and northern Edgartown Channel are used to drive ADCIRC using bathymetry measured (1) pre- and (2) post-Irene in 2011, and (3) in 2013. The model is run over month-long periods using a variable Manning's n for friction and including wetting and drying of the coast. The model simulations are consistent with the observations, including the observed changes to the circulation caused by the evolving inlet channel. The results suggest that changes in the geometry, orientation, and location of one inlet may have significant effects on hydrodynamics throughout the bay and in the other channel. Supported by ASD(R&E), ONR, and NSF.

  16. Self-assembly of lamella-forming diblock copolymers confined in nanochannels: Effect of confinement geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Deng, Jian-Hua; Wang, Zheng; Li, Bao-Hui; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-04-01

    The self-assembly of symmetric diblock copolymers confined in the channels of variously shaped cross sections (regular triangles, squares, and ellipses) is investigated using a simulated annealing technique. In the bulk, the studied symmetric diblock copolymers form a lamellar structure with period LL. The geometry and surface property of the confining channels have a large effect on the self-assembled structures and the orientation of the lamellar structures. Stacked perpendicular lamellae with period LL are observed for neutral surfaces regardless of the channel shape and size, but each lamella is in the shape of the corresponding channel's cross section. In the case of triangle-shaped cross sections, stacked parallel lamellae are the majority morphologies for weakly selective surfaces, while morphologies including a triangular-prism-shaped B-cylinder and multiple tridentate lamellae are obtained for strongly selective surfaces. In the cases of square-shaped and ellipse-shaped cross sections, concentric lamellae are the signature morphology for strongly selective surfaces, whereas for weakly selective surfaces, stacked parallel lamellae, and several types of folding lamellae are obtained in the case of square-shaped cross sections, and stacked parallel lamellae are the majority morphologies in the case of ellipse-shaped cross sections when the length of the minor axis is commensurate with the bulk lamellar period. The mean-square end-to-end distance, the average contact number between different species and the surface concentration of the A-monomers are computed to elucidate the mechanisms of the formation of the different morphologies. It is found that the resulting morphology is a consequence of competition among the chain stretching, interfacial energy, and surface energy. Our results suggest that the self-assembled morphology and the orientation of lamellae can be manipulated by the shape, the size, and the surface property of the confining channels. Project

  17. A Genuine Jahn-Teller System with Compressed Geometry and Quantum Effects Originating from Zero-Point Motion.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, José Antonio; García-Fernández, Pablo; García-Lastra, Juan María; Moreno, Miguel

    2016-07-18

    First-principle calculations together with analysis of the experimental data found for 3d(9) and 3d(7) ions in cubic oxides proved that the center found in irradiated CaO:Ni(2+) corresponds to Ni(+) under a static Jahn-Teller effect displaying a compressed equilibrium geometry. It was also shown that the anomalous positive g∥ shift (g∥ -g0 =0.065) measured at T=20 K obeys the superposition of the |3 z(2) -r(2) ⟩ and |x(2) -y(2) ⟩ states driven by quantum effects associated with the zero-point motion, a mechanism first put forward by O'Brien for static Jahn-Teller systems and later extended by Ham to the dynamic Jahn-Teller case. To our knowledge, this is the first genuine Jahn-Teller system (i.e. in which exact degeneracy exists at the high-symmetry configuration) exhibiting a compressed equilibrium geometry for which large quantum effects allow experimental observation of the effect predicted by O'Brien. Analysis of the calculated energy barriers for different Jahn-Teller systems allowed us to explain the origin of the compressed geometry observed for CaO:Ni(+) . PMID:27028895

  18. A Genuine Jahn-Teller System with Compressed Geometry and Quantum Effects Originating from Zero-Point Motion.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, José Antonio; García-Fernández, Pablo; García-Lastra, Juan María; Moreno, Miguel

    2016-07-18

    First-principle calculations together with analysis of the experimental data found for 3d(9) and 3d(7) ions in cubic oxides proved that the center found in irradiated CaO:Ni(2+) corresponds to Ni(+) under a static Jahn-Teller effect displaying a compressed equilibrium geometry. It was also shown that the anomalous positive g∥ shift (g∥ -g0 =0.065) measured at T=20 K obeys the superposition of the |3 z(2) -r(2) ⟩ and |x(2) -y(2) ⟩ states driven by quantum effects associated with the zero-point motion, a mechanism first put forward by O'Brien for static Jahn-Teller systems and later extended by Ham to the dynamic Jahn-Teller case. To our knowledge, this is the first genuine Jahn-Teller system (i.e. in which exact degeneracy exists at the high-symmetry configuration) exhibiting a compressed equilibrium geometry for which large quantum effects allow experimental observation of the effect predicted by O'Brien. Analysis of the calculated energy barriers for different Jahn-Teller systems allowed us to explain the origin of the compressed geometry observed for CaO:Ni(+) .

  19. Effect of separatrix magnetic geometry on divertor behavior in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, T. W.; Canik, J. M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Watkins, J. G.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferron, J. R.; Groebner, R. J.; Hill, D. N.; Hyatt, A. W.; Holcomb, C. T.; Luce, T. C.; Moyer, R. A.; Stangeby, P. C.

    2013-07-01

    We report on recent experiments on DIII-D that examined the effects that variations in the parallel connection length in the scrape-off layer (SOL), L||, and the radial location of the outer divertor target, RTAR, have on divertor plasma properties. Two-point modeling of the SOL plasma predicts that larger values of L|| and RTAR should lower temperature and raise density at the outer divertor target for fixed upstream separatrix density and temperature, i.e., nTAR ∝ [RTAR]2[L||]6/7 and TTAR ∝ [RTAR]-2[L||]-4/7. The dependence of nTAR and TTAR on L|| was consistent with our data, but the dependence of nTAR and TTAR on RTAR was not. The surprising result that the divertor plasma parameters did not depend on RTAR in the predicted way may be due to convected heat flux, driven by escaping neutrals, in the more open configuration of the larger RTAR cases. Modeling results using the SOLPS code support this postulate.

  20. Comparison of Flow Characteristics of Different Sphere Geometries Under the Free Surface Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgoren, M.; Dogan, S.; Okbaz, A.; Aksoy, M. H.; Sahin, B.; Akıllı, H.

    2013-04-01

    Comparison of the experimental results of turbulent flow structures between a smooth sphere and a sphere with a vent hole, roughened, and o-ring is presented in the presence of a free-surface. Dye visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques were performed to examine effects of passive control methods on the sphere wake for Reynolds number Re = 5000 based on the sphere diameter with a 42.5mm in an open water channel. Instantaneous and time-averaged flow patterns in the wake region of the sphere were examined from point of flow physics for the different sphere locations in the range of 0≤h/D≤2.0 where h was the space between the top point of the sphere and the free surface. The ratio of ventilation hole to sphere diameter was 0.15, o-ring was located at 55° with a 2 mm from front stagnation point of the sphere and roughened surface was formed by means of totally 410 circular holes with a 3 mm diameter and around 2 mm depth in an equilateral triangle arrangement. The flow characteristics of instantaneous velocity vectors, vorticity contours, time-averaged streamline patterns, Reynolds stress correlations and streamwise and cross-stream velocity fluctuations for both the smooth and passively controlled sphere were interpreted.

  1. Numerical study of the effect of the channel and electrode geometry on the performance of microfluidic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi Khabbazi, A.; Richards, A. J.; Hoorfar, M.

    Using COMSOL Multiphysics 3.5, 3D numerical models of different microfluidic fuel cells have been developed in this paper to determine the effect of different modifications which have been implemented in the microfluidic fuel cell since its advent. These modifications include the channel geometry aspect ratio and electrode configuration, the third flow between the anolyte and catholyte in the channel (i.e., multi-stream laminar flow), and multiple periodically placed inlets. To be consistent with the convention, the output power of the device is normalized by the electrode surface area; however, the power density calculations are also performed through normalization by the device volume. It is shown that the latter method is more realistic and providing more information from the design point of view since the ultimate goal in designing the microfluidic fuel cell is to fabricate a compact, yet powerful device. Finally, a novel design of the microfluidic fuel cell with a tapered channel is suggested and compared to the non-tapered geometry through the polarization curves. The steps which have been taken in COMSOL to obtain these polarization curves are clearly and thoroughly explained. The Butler-Volmer equation was implemented to incorporate for the electrochemical reactions at the electrodes. The "Conductive Media DC" module, in COMSOL, is used to model the electric fields within the fuel cell. The concentration distributions of the reactant species are obtained using the "Incompressible Navier-Stokes" and "Convection and Diffusion" modules. Solving these equations together predicts the current density for given cell voltage values. The results demonstrate the cell voltage losses due to activation, ohmic and concentration overpotentials. It is shown that for a fixed value of the cell voltage (say 0.45 V), the fuel cell with multiple periodically placed inlets has the highest fuel utilization (i.e., 62.3%); while the "Simple square" geometry depicts 13.8% fuel

  2. Designer switches: Effect of contact geometry on the transient current of a strongly correlated quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goker, Ali Ihsan; Zhu, Zhiyong; Schwingenschlogl, Udo; Manchon, Aurelien

    2011-03-01

    The time-dependent non-crossing approximation is utilized to investigate the influence of the geometry of contacts made of gold on time dependent current through a quantum dot suddenly shifted into the Kondo regime via a gate voltage. For an asymmetrically coupled system, instantaneous conductance exhibits complex fluctuations. We identify the frequencies participating in these fluctuations and they turn out to be proportional to the separation between the sharp features in the density of states and the Fermi level. Increasing ambient temperature or bias quenches the amplitude of these fluctuations. This suggests that the interference between the emerging Kondo resonance and the van Hove singularities in the density of states is the underlying microscopic mechanism for these fluctuations. Based on these observations, we predict that using different electrode geometries would give rise to drastically different transient currents which can be accessed with state-of-the-art ultrafast pump-probe techniques. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology.

  3. Indenter geometry effects on the measurements of mechanical properties by nanoindentation with sharp indenters

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, T.Y.; Pharr, G.M.; Oliver, W.C.

    1996-05-01

    The measurement of mechanical properties by nanoindentation methods is most often conducted using indenters with the Berkovich geometry (a triangular pyramid) or with a sphere. These indenters provide a wealth of information, but there are certain circumstances in which it would be useful to make measurements with indenters of other geometries. We have recently explored how the measurement of hardness and elastic modulus can be achieved using sharp indenters other than the Berkovich. Systematic studies in several materials were conducted with a Vickers indenter, a conical indenter with a half-included tip angle of 70.3{degrees}, and the standard Berkovich indenter. All three indenters are geometrically similar and have nominally the same area-to-depth relationship, but there are distinct differences in the behavior of each. Here, we report on the application of these indenters in the measurement of hardness and elastic modulus by nanoindentation methods and some of the difficulties that occur.

  4. Effect of geometry on drug release from 3D printed tablets.

    PubMed

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Robles Martinez, Pamela; Buanz, Asma; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2015-10-30

    The aim of this work was to explore the feasibility of combining hot melt extrusion (HME) with 3D printing (3DP) technology, with a view to producing different shaped tablets which would be otherwise difficult to produce using traditional methods. A filament extruder was used to obtain approx. 4% paracetamol loaded filaments of polyvinyl alcohol with characteristics suitable for use in fused-deposition modelling 3DP. Five different tablet geometries were successfully 3D-printed-cube, pyramid, cylinder, sphere and torus. The printing process did not affect the stability of the drug. Drug release from the tablets was not dependent on the surface area but instead on surface area to volume ratio, indicating the influence that geometrical shape has on drug release. An erosion-mediated process controlled drug release. This work has demonstrated the potential of 3DP to manufacture tablet shapes of different geometries, many of which would be challenging to manufacture by powder compaction. PMID:25934428

  5. Wind-tunnel investigation of effects of trailing-edge geometry on a NASA supercritical airfoil section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. D.

    1971-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests have been conducted at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 0.81 to determine the effects of trailing-edge geometry on the aerodynamic characteristics of a NASA supercritical airfoil shape. Variations in trailing-edge thicknesses from 0 to 1.5 percent of the chord and a cavity in the trailing edge were investigated with airfoils with maximum thicknesses of 10 and 11 percent of the chord.

  6. Effects of nozzle exit geometry and pressure ratio on plume shape for nozzles exhausting into quiescent air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scallion, William I.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of varying the exit geometry on the plume shapes of supersonic nozzles exhausting into quiescent air at several exit-to-ambient pressure ratios are given. Four nozzles having circular throat sections and circular, elliptical and oval exit cross sections were tested and the exit plume shapes are compared at the same exit-to-ambient pressure ratios. The resulting mass flows were calculated and are also presented.

  7. Study of the Effects of Photometric Geometry on Spectral Reflectance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate how the spectrophotometric properties of planetary surface materials depend on photometric geometry by refining and applying radiative transfer theory to data obtained from spacecraft and telescope observations of planetary surfaces, studies of laboratory analogs, and computer simulations. The goal is to perfect the physical interpretation of photometric parameters in the context of planetary surface geological properties and processes. The purpose of this report is to document the research achievements associated with this study.

  8. Probing bulk physics in the 5/2 fractional quantum Hall effect using the Corbino geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Benjamin; Bennaceur, Keyan; Bilodeau, Simon; Gaucher, Samuel; Lilly, Michael; Reno, John; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Reulet, Bertrand; Gervais, Guillaume

    We present two- and four-point Corbino geometry transport measurements in the second Landau level in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. By avoiding edge transport, we are able to directly probe the physics of the bulk quasiparticles in fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states including 5/2. Our highest-quality sample shows stripe and bubble phases in high Landau levels, and most importantly well-resolved FQH minima in the second Landau level. We report Arrhenius-type fits to the activated conductance, and find that σ0 agrees well with theory and existing Hall geometry data in the first Landau level, but not in the second Landau level. We will discuss the advantages the Corbino geometry could bring to various experiments designed to detect the non-Abelian entropy at 5/2, and our progress towards realizing those schemes. The results of these experiments could complement interferometry and other edge-based measurements by providing direct evidence for non-Abelian behaviour of the bulk quasiparticles. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  9. On the effects of turbine geometry on the far wake dynamics of an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yang, Xiaolei; Kang, Seokkoo

    2013-11-01

    In large-eddy simulation (LES) of multi-turbine arrays actuator disk (AD) or actuator line (AL) models are employed to simulate individual turbines. Such parameterizations do not take into account the details of the turbine geometry and, therefore, cannot be expected to accurately resolve the flow in the near wake. We investigate the performance of AD and AL models by comparing their predictions with laboratory measurements and with LES resolving the geometrical details of the turbine. We simulate the flow past an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine in a fully-developed turbulent flow in an open channel using: turbine-geometry resolving LES (LES-TG) and LES-AD and LES-AL parameterizations. We show that LES-TG reveals very complex large-scale dynamics in the near wake, driven by the interaction of a counter-rotating to the turbine hub vortex and the top-tip shear layer, which appears to influence both the mean flow characteristics and the intensity of wake meandering several rotor diameters downstream. The LES-AD and LES-AL results cannot capture the geometry-induced complex near wake phenomena and yield flows that exhibit important differences with the LES-TG results in the far wake. The mechanisms that give rise to and modeling implications of these differences will be discussed. This work was supported by Department of Energy DOE (DE-EE0002980 and DE-EE0005482) and Xcel Energy through the Renewable Development Fund (grant RD3-42). Computational resources were provided by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  10. Effects of self-heating and phase change on the thermal profile of hydrogen isotopes in confined geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Baxamusa, S. Field, J.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; Suratwala, T.; Sater, J.

    2014-03-28

    Growth of high-quality single-crystal hydrogen in confined geometries relies on the in situ formation of seed crystals. Generation of deuterium-tritium seed crystals in a confined geometry is governed by three effects: self-heating due to tritium decay, external thermal environment, and latent heat of phase change at the boundary between hydrogen liquid and vapor. A detailed computation of the temperature profile for liquid hydrogen inside a hollow shell, as is found in inertial confinement fusion research, shows that seeds are likely to form at the equatorial plane of the shell. Radioactive decay of tritium to helium slowly alters the composition of the hydrogen vapor, resulting in a modified temperature profile that encourages seed formation at the top of the shell. We show that the computed temperature profile is consistent with a variety of experimental observations.

  11. Effective Results of an Open Concept School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobos, Irma; Lewallen, Joy

    2009-01-01

    Open concept schools were a popular architectural design in the 70s. They were built to provide large areas of flexible space for team teaching with small enclosed areas for restrooms, science labs, and special needs classrooms. Because there are no barriers and no closed doors, an attitude of inclusiveness is created merely by the building's…

  12. Cross-section perimeter is a suitable parameter to describe the effects of different baffle geometries in shaken microtiter plates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biotechnological screening processes are performed since more than 8 decades in small scale shaken bioreactors like shake flasks or microtiter plates. One of the major issues of such reactors is the sufficient oxygen supply of suspended microorganisms. Oxygen transfer into the bulk liquid can in general be increased by introducing suitable baffles at the reactor wall. However, a comprehensive and systematic characterization of baffled shaken bioreactors has never been carried out so far. Baffles often differ in number, size and shape. The exact geometry of baffles in glass lab ware like shake flasks is very difficult to reproduce from piece to piece due to the hard to control flow behavior of molten glass during manufacturing. Thus, reproducibility of the maximum oxygen transfer capacity in such baffled shake flasks is hardly given. Results As a first step to systematically elucidate the general effect of different baffle geometries on shaken bioreactor performance, the maximum oxygen transfer capacity (OTRmax) in baffled 48-well microtiter plates as shaken model reactor was characterized. This type of bioreactor made of plastic material was chosen, as the exact geometry of the baffles can be fabricated by highly reproducible laser cutting. As a result, thirty different geometries were investigated regarding their maximum oxygen transfer capacity (OTRmax) and liquid distribution during shaking. The relative perimeter of the cross-section area as new fundamental geometric key parameter is introduced. An empirical correlation for the OTRmax as function of the relative perimeter, shaking frequency and filling volume is derived. For the first time, this correlation allows a systematic description of the maximum oxygen transfer capacity in baffled microtiter plates. Conclusions Calculated and experimentally determined OTRmax values agree within ± 30% accuracy. Furthermore, undesired out-of-phase operating conditions can be identified by using the

  13. Characterizing the Peano fluidic muscle and the effects of its geometry properties on its behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Allan Joshua; Xie, Sheng Quan; Anderson, Iain Alexander

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we explore the basic static and dynamic behavior of a hydraulically actuated Peano muscle and how its geometry affects key static and dynamic performance metrics. The Peano muscle, or pouch motor is a fluid powered artificial muscle. Similar to McKibben pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs), it has the ability to generate the high forces of biological muscles with the low threshold pressure of pleated PAMs, but in a slim, easily distributed form. We found that Peano muscles have similar characteristics to other PAMs, but produce lower free-strains. A test rig capable of measuring high-speed flow rates with a Venturi tube revealed that their efficiency peaks at about 40% during highly dynamic movements. Peano muscles with more tubes and of a greater size do not move faster. Also, their muscle tubes should have an aspect ratio of at least 1:3 and channel width greater than 20% to maximize performance. These findings suggest that finite element modeling be used to optimize more complex Peano muscle geometries.

  14. Effect of geometry on concentration polarization in realistic heterogeneous permselective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Yoav; Shloush, Shahar; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-04-01

    This study extends previous analytical solutions of concentration polarization occurring solely in the depleted region, to the more realistic geometry consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneous ion-permselective medium connecting two opposite microchambers (i.e., a three-layer system). Under the local electroneutrality approximation, the separation of variable methods is used to derive an analytical solution of the electrodiffusive problem for the two opposing asymmetric microchambers. The assumption of an ideal permselective medium allows for the analytic calculation of the 3D concentration and electric potential distributions as well as a current-voltage relation. It is shown that any asymmetry in the microchamber geometries will result in current rectification. Moreover, it is demonstrated that for non-negligible microchamber resistances, the conductance does not exhibit the expected saturation at low concentrations but instead shows a continuous decrease. The results are intended to facilitate a more direct comparison between theory and experiments, as now the voltage drop is across a realistic 3D and three-layer system.

  15. The Effects of Magnetic-field Geometry on Longitudinal Oscillations of Solar Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, M.; Díaz, A. J.; Karpen, J.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the influence of the geometry of the solar filament magnetic structure on the large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations. A representative filament flux tube is modeled as composed of a cool thread centered in a dipped part with hot coronal regions on either side. We have found the normal modes of the system and establish that the observed longitudinal oscillations are well described with the fundamental mode. For small and intermediate curvature radii and moderate to large density contrast between the prominence and the corona, the main restoring force is the solar gravity. In this full wave description of the oscillation a simple expression for the oscillation frequencies is derived in which the pressure-driven term introduces a small correction. We have also found that the normal modes are almost independent of the geometry of the hot regions of the tube. We conclude that observed large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations are driven by the projected gravity along the flux tubes and are strongly influenced by the curvature of the dips of the magnetic field in which the threads reside.

  16. Effect of Weld Tool Geometry on Friction Stir Welded Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querin, Joseph A.; Schneider, Judy A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, flat 0.250" thick Ti-6Al-4V panels were friction stir welded (FSWed) using weld tools with tapered pins. The five different pin geometries of the weld tools included: 0 degree (straight cylinder), 15 degree, 30 degree, 45 degree, and 60 degree angles on the frustum. All weld tools had a smooth 7 degree concave shoulder and were made from microwave sintered tungsten carbide. For each weld tool geometry, the FSW process parameters were optimized to eliminate internal defects. All the welds were produced in position control with a 2.5 degree lead angle using a butt joint configuration for the panels. The process parameters of spindle rpm and travel speed were varied, altering the hot working conditions imparted to the workpiece. Load cells on the FSWing machine allowed for the torque, the plunge force, and the plow force to be recorded during welding. Resulting mechanical properties were evaluated from tensile tests results of the FSWjoints. Variations in the material flow were investigated by use of microstructural analysis including optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and orientation image mapping (aIM).

  17. The Effects of Magnetic-field Geometry on Longitudinal Oscillaitons of Solar Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, M.; Diaz, A. J.; Karpen, J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the geometry of the solar filament magnetic structure on the large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations. A representative filament flux tube is modeled as composed of a cool thread centered in a dipped part with hot coronal regions on either side.We have found the normal modes of the system and establish that the observed longitudinal oscillations are well described with the fundamental mode. For small and intermediate curvature radii and moderate to large density contrast between the prominence and the corona, the main restoring force is the solar gravity. In this full wave description of the oscillation a simple expression for the oscillation frequencies is derived in which the pressure-driven term introduces a small correction. We have also found that the normal modes are almost independent of the geometry of the hot regions of the tube. We conclude that observed large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations are driven by the projected gravity along the flux tubes and are strongly influenced by the curvature of the dips of the magnetic field in which the threads reside.

  18. THE EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC-FIELD GEOMETRY ON LONGITUDINAL OSCILLATIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, M.; Karpen, J.

    2012-09-20

    We investigate the influence of the geometry of the solar filament magnetic structure on the large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations. A representative filament flux tube is modeled as composed of a cool thread centered in a dipped part with hot coronal regions on either side. We have found the normal modes of the system and establish that the observed longitudinal oscillations are well described with the fundamental mode. For small and intermediate curvature radii and moderate to large density contrast between the prominence and the corona, the main restoring force is the solar gravity. In this full wave description of the oscillation a simple expression for the oscillation frequencies is derived in which the pressure-driven term introduces a small correction. We have also found that the normal modes are almost independent of the geometry of the hot regions of the tube. We conclude that observed large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations are driven by the projected gravity along the flux tubes and are strongly influenced by the curvature of the dips of the magnetic field in which the threads reside.

  19. Effect of casting geometry on mechanical properties of two nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. R.; Dreshfield, R. L.; Collins, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine mechanical properties of two rhenium-free modifications of alloy TRW, and to evaluate the suitability of the alloy for use in a small integrally cast turbine rotor. The two alloys were initially developed using stress rupture properties of specimens machined from solid gas turbine blades. Properties in this investigation were determined from cast to size bars and bars cut from 3.8 by 7.6 by 17.8 cm blocks. Specimens machined from blocks had inferior tensile strength and always had markedly poorer rupture lives than cast to size bars. At 1,000 C the cast to size bars had shorter rupture lives than those machined from blades. Alloy R generally had better properties than alloy S in the conditions evaluated. The results show the importance of casting geometry on mechanical properties of nickel base superalloys and suggest that the geometry of a component can be simulated when developing alloys for that component.

  20. Effect of anisotropy and groundwater system geometry on seepage through lakebeds. 2. Numerical simulation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; Pfannkuch, H.O.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of lakes and groundwater is controlled partly by the geologic framework through which the water flows. Two interrelated geometric factors of the groundwater system that affect flow are overall geometry of the system, and anisotropy of the porous media within the system. Numerical simulation analysis was made for variations in the coefficient of anisotropy for each of several lake and groundwater settings having different geometric configurations. These analyses indicate that, for a given geometric setting, as the anisotropy of geologic materials decreases seepage from a lake decreases and depth of the local groundwater flow system associated with the lake increases. Transformation of scale of groundwater systems that have anisotropic media to isotropic equivalents results in a change in the overall geometry. Because of the different slopes of the water table and lakebed resulting from the scale transformations, a series of numerical experiments were made for various geometric configurations for a given anisotropy. These analyses indicate that as thickness of the groundwater system decreases, relative depth of the local flow system increases and seepage from the lake decreases. ?? 1984.

  1. Investigations on the Effects of the Tool Material, Geometry, and Tilt Angle on Friction Stir Welding of Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshad Seighalani, K.; Besharati Givi, M. K.; Nasiri, A. M.; Bahemmat, P.

    2010-10-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) parameters, such as tool material, tool geometry, tilt angle, tool rotational speed, welding speed, and axial force play a major role in the weld quality of titanium alloys. Because of excessive erosion, tool material and geometry play the main roles in FSW of titanium alloys. Therefore, in the present work for the first time, tool material and geometry, tool tilt angle, cooling system and shielding gas effects on macrostructure, microstructure, and mechanical properties of pure titanium weld joint were investigated. Result of this research shows that Ti can be joined by the FSW, using a tool with a shoulder made of tungsten (W) and simple pin made of tungsten carbide (WC). The best conditions for welding were use of compressed air as a cooling system, tool tilt angle of 1°, and a stream of Argon as a shielding medium. Investigation on mechanical properties shows that the tensile strength and the yield strength of the welded joint in the best case could be similar to the corresponding strengths of the base metal.

  2. Effect of surface-plasmon polaritons on spontaneous emission and intermolecular energy-transfer rates in multilayered geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Marocico, C. A.; Knoester, J.

    2011-11-15

    We use a Green's tensor method to investigate the spontaneous emission rate of a molecule and the energy-transfer rate between molecules placed in two types of layered geometries: a slab geometry and a planar waveguide. We focus especially on the role played by surface-plasmon polaritons in modifying the spontaneous emission and energy-transfer rates as compared to free space. In the presence of more than one interface, the surface-plasmon polariton modes split into several branches, and each branch can contribute significantly to modifying the electromagnetic properties of atoms and molecules. Enhancements of several orders of magnitude both in the spontaneous emission rate of a molecule and the energy-transfer rate between molecules are obtained and, by tuning the parameters of the geometry, one has the ability to control the range and magnitude of these enhancements. For the energy-transfer rate interference effects between contributions of different plasmon-polariton branches are observed as oscillations in the distance dependence of this rate.

  3. Effects of electrode geometry on the performance of dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasmas in benzene degradation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-11-15

    In this study, the effects of electrode geometry on benzene degradation in a dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasma reactor with different electrodes were systematically investigated. Three electrodes were employed in the experiments, these were coil, bolt, and rod geometries. The reactor using the coil electrode showed better performance in reducing the dielectric loss in the barrier compared to that using the bolt or rod electrodes. In the case of the coil electrode, both the benzene degradation efficiency and energy yield were higher than those for the other electrodes, which can be attributed to the increased role of surface mediated reactions. Irrespective of the electrode geometry, the packed-bed discharge plasma was superior to the dielectric barrier discharge plasma in benzene degradation at any specific applied voltage. The main gaseous products of benzene degradation were CO, CO2, H2O, and formic acid. Discharge products such as O3, N2O, N2O5, and HNO3 were also detected in the outlet gas. Moreover, the presence of benzene inhibited the formation of ozone because of the competing reaction of oxygen atoms with benzene. This study is expected to offer an optimized approach combining dielectric barrier discharge and packed-bed discharge to improve the degradation of gaseous pollutants.

  4. Monte Carlo study of the effects of system geometry and antiscatter grids on cone-beam CT scatter distributions

    PubMed Central

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Badal, A.; Kyprianou, I. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Vaquero, J. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The proliferation of cone-beam CT (CBCT) has created interest in performance optimization, with x-ray scatter identified among the main limitations to image quality. CBCT often contends with elevated scatter, but the wide variety of imaging geometry in different CBCT configurations suggests that not all configurations are affected to the same extent. Graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are employed over a range of imaging geometries to elucidate the factors governing scatter characteristics, efficacy of antiscatter grids, guide system design, and augment development of scatter correction. Methods: A MC x-ray simulator implemented on GPU was accelerated by inclusion of variance reduction techniques (interaction splitting, forced scattering, and forced detection) and extended to include x-ray spectra and analytical models of antiscatter grids and flat-panel detectors. The simulator was applied to small animal (SA), musculoskeletal (MSK) extremity, otolaryngology (Head), breast, interventional C-arm, and on-board (kilovoltage) linear accelerator (Linac) imaging, with an axis-to-detector distance (ADD) of 5, 12, 22, 32, 60, and 50 cm, respectively. Each configuration was modeled with and without an antiscatter grid and with (i) an elliptical cylinder varying 70–280 mm in major axis; and (ii) digital murine and anthropomorphic models. The effects of scatter were evaluated in terms of the angular distribution of scatter incident upon the detector, scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), artifact magnitude, contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and visual assessment. Results: Variance reduction yielded improvements in MC simulation efficiency ranging from ∼17-fold (for SA CBCT) to ∼35-fold (for Head and C-arm), with the most significant acceleration due to interaction splitting (∼6 to ∼10-fold increase in efficiency). The benefit of a more extended geometry was evident by virtue of a larger air gap—e.g., for a 16 cm

  5. A Survey of Reynolds Number and Wing Geometry Effects on Lift Characteristics in the Low Speed Stall Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, Edward C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of the effects of Reynolds number on the low- speed lift characteristics of wings encountering separated flows at their leading and side edges, with emphasis on the region near the stall. The influence of leading-edge profile and Reynolds number on the stall characteristics of two- dimensional airfoils are reviewed first to provide a basis for evaluating three- dimensional effects associated with various wing planforms. This is followed by examples of the effects of Reynolds number and geometry on the lift characteristics near the stall for a series of three-dimensional wings typical of those suitable for high-speed aircraft and missiles. Included are examples of the effects of wing geometry on the onset and spanwise progression of turbulent reseparation near the leading edge and illustrations of the degree to which simplified theoretical approaches can be useful in defining the influence of the various geometric parameters. Also illustrated is the manner in which the Reynolds number and wing geometry parameters influence whether the turbulent reseparation near the leading edge results in a sudden loss of lift, as in the two-dimensional case, or the formation of a leading-edge vortex with Rs increase in lift followed by a gentle stall as in the highly swept wing case. Particular emphasis is placed on the strong influence of 'induced camber' on the development of turbulent reseparation. R is believed that the examples selected for this report may be useful in evaluating viscous flow solutions by the new computational methods based on the Navier-Stokes equations as well as defining fruitful research areas for the high-Reynolds-number wind tunnels.

  6. Effective leaf area index retrieving from terrestrial point cloud data: coupling computational geometry application and Gaussian mixture model clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Tamura, M.; Susaki, J.

    2014-09-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is one of the most important structural parameters of forestry studies which manifests the ability of the green vegetation interacted with the solar illumination. Classic understanding about LAI is to consider the green canopy as integration of horizontal leaf layers. Since multi-angle remote sensing technique developed, LAI obliged to be deliberated according to the observation geometry. Effective LAI could formulate the leaf-light interaction virtually and precisely. To retrieve the LAI/effective LAI from remotely sensed data therefore becomes a challenge during the past decades. Laser scanning technique can provide accurate surface echoed coordinates with densely scanned intervals. To utilize the density based statistical algorithm for analyzing the voluminous amount of the 3-D points data is one of the subjects of the laser scanning applications. Computational geometry also provides some mature applications for point cloud data (PCD) processing and analysing. In this paper, authors investigated the feasibility of a new application for retrieving the effective LAI of an isolated broad leaf tree. Simplified curvature was calculated for each point in order to remove those non-photosynthetic tissues. Then PCD were discretized into voxel, and clustered by using Gaussian mixture model. Subsequently the area of each cluster was calculated by employing the computational geometry applications. In order to validate our application, we chose an indoor plant to estimate the leaf area, the correlation coefficient between calculation and measurement was 98.28 %. We finally calculated the effective LAI of the tree with 6 × 6 assumed observation directions.

  7. Effect of filler geometry on interfacial friction damping in polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Suhr, J; Joshi, A; Schadler, L; Kane, R S; Koratkar, N A

    2007-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube polycarbonate and C60 polycarbonate nanocomposites were fabricated using a solution mixing method. The composite loss modulus was characterized by application of dynamic (sinusoidal) load to the nanocomposite and the pure polymer samples. For a loading of 1 weight %, the single-walled nanotube fillers generated more than a 250% increase in loss modulus compared to the baseline (pure) polycarbonate. Even though the surface area to volume ratio and surface chemistry of C60 is similar to that for nanotubes, we report no significant increase in the energy dissipation for the 1% weight C60 nanoparticle composite compared to the pure polymer. We explain these observations by comparing qualitatively, the active sliding area (considering both normal and shear stresses) for a representative volume element of the nanotube and the nanoparticle composites. These results highlight the important role played by the filler geometry in controlling energy dissipation in nanocomposite materials. PMID:17450944

  8. Experimental study of effect of stenosis geometry on pressure loss for periodic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselý, Ondřej; Nováková, Ludmila; Adamec, Josef

    2016-03-01

    A stenosis is a narrowing in a tubular organ. In medicine, vessel stenosis poses health risk for people. In the last work, experimental investigation of pressure loss coefficient for varying stenosis eccentricity and shape for steady flow were performed. In this work, experimental investigation of pressure loss for varying stenosis eccentricity and shape under periodic flow were performed. Four models of different geometry were studied, two models are axisymmetric stenoses and two models are eccentric stenoses. All models were stenosis of 75% area reduction. The periodic flow, generated by a controllable pump, has sinus shape in an inlet. The measuring range of medium Reynolds number was from 500 to 1500, range of ratio between an amplitude and medium flow rate was from 0.2 to 0.6 and range of frequency was from 0.2 to 1 Hz. The pressure loss for each conditions was quantified by mean value, amplitude and phase shift against flow rate.

  9. Confinement of water in hydrophobic nanopores: effect of the geometry on the energy of intrusion.

    PubMed

    Karbowiak, Thomas; Weber, Guy; Bellat, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-14

    Water confinement in the hydrophobic nanopores of highly siliceous zeolite having MFI and CHA topology is investigated by high pressure manometry coupled to differential calorimetry. Surprisingly, the intrusion of water is endothermic for MFI but exothermic for CHA. This phase transition depends on the geometry of the environment in which water is confined: channels (MFI) or cavities (CHA). The energy of intrusion is mainly governed by the change in the coordination of water molecules when they are forced to enter the nanopores and to adopt a weaker, hydrogen-bonded structure. At such a nanoscale, the properties of the molecules are governed strongly by geometrical restraints. This implies that the use of classical macroscopic equations such as Laplace-Washburn will have limitations at the molecular level.

  10. Effect of geometry on the nose-region flow-field of shuttle entry-configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, J. J.; Faria, H. T.

    1973-01-01

    In order to determine the convective heat-transfer distribution for the nose region of the space shuttle entry configurations, a three-dimensional flow-field is described which may include extensive regions of separated flow. Because of the complexity of the flow field for the nose region, experimental data are needed to define the relation between the nose geometry and the resultant flow field. According to theoretical solutions of the three-dimensional boundary layer, the boundary layer separates from the leeward generator of a blunted cone at an alpha equal to the cone half-angle. Separation results from the transverse pressure gradient, i.e., the velocity derivative due to crossflow. The boundary layer limiting streamlines converge toward the singular point of sep aration. The separated region is bounded by an ordinary line of separation.

  11. Effect of nozzle geometry on the performance of laser ablative propulsion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Jiao, Long; Tang, Zhiping; Hu, Xiaojun; Peng, Jie

    2016-05-01

    The performance of "ablation mode" laser propulsion thrusters can be improved obviously by nozzle constraint. The nozzle geometry of "ablation mode" laser propulsion thrusters has been studied experimentally with CO2 lasers. Experimental results indicate that the propulsion performance of cylindrical nozzle thrusters is better than expansionary nozzle thrusters at the same lengths. The cylindrical nozzle thrusters were optimized by different laser energies. The results show that two important factors, the length-to-diameter ratio α and the thruster diameter to laser-spot diameter ratio β, affect the propulsion performance of the thruster obviously. The momentum coupling coefficient C m increases with the increase of α, while C m increases at first and then decreases with the increase of β.

  12. Testing and optical modeling of novel concentrating solar receiver geometries to increase light trapping and effective solar absorptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellowhair, Julius; Ho, Clifford K.; Ortega, Jesus D.; Christian, Joshua M.; Andraka, Charles E.

    2015-09-01

    Concentrating solar power receivers are comprised of panels of tubes arranged in a cylindrical or cubical shape on top of a tower. The tubes contain heat-transfer fluid that absorbs energy from the concentrated sunlight incident on the tubes. To increase the solar absorptance, black paint or a solar selective coating is applied to the surface of the tubes. However, these coatings degrade over time and must be reapplied, which reduces the system performance and increases costs. This paper presents an evaluation of novel receiver shapes and geometries that create a light-trapping effect, thereby increasing the effective solar absorptance and efficiency of the solar receiver. Several prototype shapes were fabricated from Inconel 718 and tested in Sandia's solar furnace at an irradiance of ~30 W/cm2. Photographic methods were used to capture the irradiance distribution on the receiver surfaces. The irradiance profiles were compared to results from raytracing models. The effective solar absorptance was also evaluated using the ray-tracing models. Results showed that relative to a flat plate, the new geometries could increase the effective solar absorptance from 86% to 92% for an intrinsic material absorptance of 86%, and from 60% to 73% for an intrinsic material absorptance of 60%.

  13. Effect of the Van Hiele Model in Geometric Concepts Acquisition: The Attitudes towards Geometry and Learning Transfer Effect of the First Three Grades Students in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-ebous, Tahani

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of the van Hiele model in Geometric Concepts Acquisition, and the attitudes towards Geometry and learning transfer of the first three grades students in Jordan. Participants of the study consisted of 60 students from the third grade primary school students from the First Directorate, Amman, in the…

  14. Atmospheric modeling related to Thematic Mapper scan geometry. [atmospheric effects on satellite-borne photography of LANDSAT D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Gleason, J. M.; Cicone, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A simulation study was carried out to characterize atmospheric effects in LANDSAT-D Thematic Mapper data. In particular, the objective was to determine if any differences would result from using a linear vs. a conical scanning geometry. Insight also was gained about the overall effect of the atmosphere on Thematic Mapper signals, together with the effects of time of day. An added analysis was made of the geometric potential for direct specular reflections (sun glint). The ERIM multispectral system simulation model was used to compute inband Thematic Mapper radiances, taking into account sensor, atmospheric, and surface characteristics. Separate analyses were carried out for the thermal band and seven bands defined in the reflective spectral region. Reflective-region radiances were computed for 40 deg N, 0 deg, and 40 deg S latitudes; June, Mar., and Dec. days; and 9:30 and 11:00 AM solar times for both linear and conical scan modes. Also, accurate simulations of solar and viewing geometries throughout Thematic Mapper orbits were made. It is shown that the atmosphere plays an important role in determining Thematic Mapper radiances, with atmospheric path radiance being the major component of total radiances for short wavelengths and decreasing in importance as wavelength increases. Path radiance is shown to depend heavily on the direct radiation scattering angle and on haze content. Scan-angle-dependent variations were shown to be substantial, especially for the short-wavelength bands.

  15. Main rotor free wake geometry effects on blade air loads and response for helicopters in steady maneuvers. Volume 1: Theoretical formulation and analysis of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model and computer program were implemented to study the main rotor free wake geometry effects on helicopter rotor blade air loads and response in steady maneuvers. The theoretical formulation and analysis of results are presented.

  16. Simulating the effects of stellarator geometry on gyrokinetic drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertel, Jessica Ann

    Nuclear fusion is a clean, safe form of energy with abundant fuel. In magnetic fusion energy (MFE) experiments, the plasma fuel is confined by magnetic fields at very high temperatures and densities. One fusion reactor design is the non-axisymmetric, torus-shaped stellarator. Its fully-3D fields have advantages over the simpler, better-understood axisymmetric tokamak, including the ability to optimize magnetic configurations for desired properties, such as lower transport (longer confinement time). Turbulence in the plasma can break MFE confinement. While turbulent transport is known to cause a significant amount of heat loss in tokamaks, it is a new area of research in stellarators. Gyrokinetics is a good mathematical model of the drift-wave instabilities that cause turbulence. Multiple gyrokinetic turbulence codes that had great success comparing to tokamak experiments are being converted for use with stellarator geometry. This thesis describes such adaptations of the gyrokinetic turbulence code, GS2. Herein a new computational grid generator and upgrades to GS2 itself are described, tested, and benchmarked against three other gyrokinetic codes. Using GS2, detailed linear studies using the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) geometry were conducted. The first compares stability in two equilibria with different β=(plasma pressure)/(magnetic pressure). Overall, the higher β case was more stable than the lower β case. As high β is important for MFE experiments, this is encouraging. The second compares NCSX linear stability to a tokamak case. NCSX was more stable with a 20% higher critical temperature gradient normalized by the minor radius, suggesting that the fusion power might be enhanced by ˜ 50%. In addition, the first nonlinear, non-axisymmetric GS2 simulations are presented. Finally, linear stability of two locations in a W7-AS plasma were compared. The experimentally-measured parameters used were from a W7-AS shot in which measured heat fluxes

  17. Effect of electrode geometry on high energy spark discharges in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmouss, Mounia

    The government, aerospace, and transportation industries are deeply invested in developing new technologies to improve the performance and maneuverability of current and future aircraft while reducing aerodynamic noise and environmental impact. One of the key pathways to meet these goals is through aerodynamic flow control, which can involve suppressing or inducing separation, transition and management of turbulence in boundary layers, increasing the lift and reducing the drag of airfoils, and gas mixing to control fluctuating forces and aerodynamic noise [1]. In this dissertation, the complex flow field following a spark discharge is studied for a range of geometries and discharge characteristics, and the possibilities for using the induced flow for aerodynamic control are assessed. This work shows the influence of the electrode configuration on the fluid dynamics following the spark discharge and how the hot gas evolution gives rise to various physical phenomena (i.e. generation of turbulence, inducing vorticity, and gas mixing) that can be used to modify the flow-field structure near the boundary layer on an aerodynamic surface.

  18. Indentation and overall compression behavior of multilayered thin-film composites. Effect of undulating layer geometry

    DOE PAGES

    Jamison, Ryan D.; Shen, Y. -L.

    2015-03-19

    Two finite element models are used to investigate the behavior of aluminum/silicon carbide thin-film layered composites with imperfect internal geometry when subjected to various loadings. In both models, undulating layers are represented by regular waveforms with various amplitudes, wavelengths, and phase offsets. First, uniaxial compressive loading of the composite is considered. The modulus and stress/strain response of the composite is sensitive to both loading direction and frequency of the undulation. Second, the nanoindentation response of the composite is investigated. The derived hardness and modulus are shown to be sensitive to the presence of undulating layers and the relative size ofmore » the indenter to the undulation. Undulating layers create bands of tensile and compressive stress in the indentation direction that are significantly different from the flat layers. The amount of equivalent plastic strain in the Al layers is increased by the presence of undulating layers. The correlations between the two forms of loading, and the implications to composite property measurement are carefully examined in this study.« less

  19. Indentation and overall compression behavior of multilayered thin-film composites. Effect of undulating layer geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, Ryan D.; Shen, Y. -L.

    2015-03-19

    Two finite element models are used to investigate the behavior of aluminum/silicon carbide thin-film layered composites with imperfect internal geometry when subjected to various loadings. In both models, undulating layers are represented by regular waveforms with various amplitudes, wavelengths, and phase offsets. First, uniaxial compressive loading of the composite is considered. The modulus and stress/strain response of the composite is sensitive to both loading direction and frequency of the undulation. Second, the nanoindentation response of the composite is investigated. The derived hardness and modulus are shown to be sensitive to the presence of undulating layers and the relative size of the indenter to the undulation. Undulating layers create bands of tensile and compressive stress in the indentation direction that are significantly different from the flat layers. The amount of equivalent plastic strain in the Al layers is increased by the presence of undulating layers. The correlations between the two forms of loading, and the implications to composite property measurement are carefully examined in this study.

  20. Effects of Cylindrical Charge Geometry and Secondary Combustion Reactions on the Internal Blast Loading of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Matthew A.

    2005-05-01

    An understanding of the detonation phenomenon and airblast behavior for cylindrical high-explosive charges is essential in developing predictive capabilities for tests and scenarios involving these charge geometries. Internal tests on reinforced concrete structures allowed for the analysis of cylindrical charges and the effect of secondary reactions occurring in confined structures. The pressure profiles that occur close to a cylindrical explosive charge are strongly dependent on the length-to-diameter ratio (L/D) of the charge. This study presents a comparison of finite-element code models (i.e., AUTODYN) to empirical methods for predicting airblast behavior from cylindrical charges. Current finite element analysis (FEA) and blast prediction codes fail to account for the effects of secondary reactions (fireballs) that occur with underoxidized explosives. Theoretical models were developed for TNT and validated against literature. These models were then applied to PBX 9501 for predictions of the spherical fireball diameter and time duration. The following relationships for PBX 9501 were derived from this analysis (units of ft, lb, s). Comparison of centrally located equivalent weight charges using cylindrical and spherical geometries showed that the average impulse on the interior of the structure is ~3%–5% higher for the spherical charge. Circular regions of high impulse that occur along the axial direction of the cylindrical charge must be considered when analyzing structural response.

  1. Interactive effects of nutrition, environment, and rat-strain on cortical and vertebral bone geometry and biomechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernicke, R. F.; Li, K.-C.; Salem, G. J.; Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to generate comparative data on the sensitivity of cortical- and vertebral-bone adaptations in two different rat strains maintained at conditions typical for spaceborne experiments conducted by U.S.A. and USSR. The effects of cage environment, diet, and rat-strain on the cortical (humerus) and vertebral (T7) bones of male Taconic-Sprague-Dawley and Czechoslovakian-Wistar rats were investigated using different flight-simulation cages (one rat/cage for U.S.A.; ten rats/cage for USSR conditions) and fed either U.S.A. or USSR diet. The results showed significant effects of these factors on the humeral and vertebral geometry and mechanical properties, as well as significant interactive effects on the mechanical properties of the humerus.

  2. Effects of temperature, particle features and vent geometry on volcanic jet dynamics, a shock-tube investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, Valeria; Kueppers, Ulrich; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The lowermost part of an eruptive plume commonly shows characteristics of an underexpanded jet. The dynamics of this gas-thrust region are likely to be a direct consequence of intrinsic (magma properties, overpressure) and extrinsic (vent geometry, weather) eruption conditions. Additionally, they affect the subsequent evolution of the eruptive column and have, therefore, important hazard assessment implications for both near- and far-field. Direct observation of eruptive events is possible, but often insufficient for complete characterization. Important complementary data can be achieved using controlled and calibrated laboratory experiments. Loose natural particles were ejected from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25° and 500°C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), density (basaltic and phonolitic), gas-particle ratio and vent geometry (nozzle, cylindrical, funnel with a flaring of 15° and 30°, respectively). For each experiment, we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle, the presence of electric discharges and the production of fines and analysed their dynamic evolution. Data shows velocity of up to 296 m/s and deceleration patterns following nonlinear paths. Gas spreading angles range between 21° and 41° while the particle spreading angles between 3° and 32°. Electric discharges, in the form of lightning, are observed, quantified and described. Moreover, a variation in the production of fines is recognized during the course of single experiments. This experimental investigation, which mechanistically mimics the process of pyroclast ejection, is shown to be capable of constraining the effects of input parameters and conduit/vent geometry on pyroclastic plumes. Therefore, the results should greatly enhance the ability of numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  3. Opposite effects of plasma homocysteine and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation on carotid artery geometry in asymptomatic adults.

    PubMed

    Demuth, K; Moatti, N; Hanon, O; Benoit, M O; Safar, M; Girerd, X

    1998-12-01

    Studies of symptomatic patients have identified hyperhomocysteinemia as an independent risk factor for vascular disease. In case-control studies, a point mutation (C677T) in the gene encoding 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) has also been linked to an increased risk of vascular disease through its effect on homocysteinemia. Our aim was to extend these observations to asymptomatic subjects by studying the influence of both homocysteinemia and its mutation on carotid artery geometry. We examined 144 subjects free of atherosclerotic lesions. Fasting homocysteinemia was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection. MTHFR genotype was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction followed by HinfI digestion. Carotid artery geometry was characterized by internal diameter and intima-media thickness, as assessed by a high-resolution echo-tracking system. Subjects in the upper homocysteine tertile had a greater carotid internal diameter than did subjects in the middle and lower tertiles (6516+/-770 versus 6206+/-641 and 5985+/-558 microm, respectively; P<0.001). Subjects homozygous for the mutation had a smaller carotid artery internal diameter than did subjects heterozygous or homozygous for the wild-type allele (5846+/-785 versus 6345+/-673 and 6199+/-671 microm, respectively; P<0.05). Homocysteinemia was not significantly increased in subjects homozygous for the mutation. In multivariate regression analysis, homocysteinemia was independently and positively associated with lumen diameter (P=0.0008) and wall thickness (P=0.020). Conversely, homozygosity for the mutation was negatively associated with internal diameter (P=0.009). These preliminary data suggest that mildly elevated homocysteinemia and homozygosity for the MTHFR C677T mutation are associated with opposite preclinical modifications of carotid artery geometry. If confirmed, these results may have important implications for new treatment strategies for vascular disease

  4. Numerical investigation of the influence of elevated turbulence levels on the cooling effectiveness of an anti-vortex hole geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repko, Timothy William

    A novel film cooling hole geometry for use in gas turbine engines has been investigated numerically by solving the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations in a commercial CFD code (STAR-CCM+) with varying turbulence intensity and length scale using the k-o SST turbulence model. Both steady and unsteady results were considered in order to investigate the effects of freestream turbulence intensity and length scale on this novel anti-vortex hole (AVH) concept. The AVH geometry utilizes two side holes, one on each side of the main hole, to attempt to mitigate the vorticity from the jet from the main hole. The AVH concept has been shown by past research to provide a substantial improvement over conventional film cooling hole designs. Past research has been limited to low turbulence intensity and small length scales that are not representative of the turbulent flow exiting the combustor. Three turbulence intensities (Tu = 5, 10 and 20%) and three length scales normalized by the main cooling hole diameter (Λ x/dm = 1, 3, 6) were considered in this study for a total of nine turbulence conditions. The highest intensity, largest length scale turbulence case (Tu = 20, Λx/dm = 6) is considered most representative of engine conditions and was shown to have the best cooling performance. Results show that the turbulence in the hot gases exiting the combustor can aid in the film cooling for the AVH geometry at high blowing ratios (BR = 2.0), where the blowing ratio is essentially the ratio of the jet-to-mainstream mass flux ratios. Length scale was shown to have an insignificant effect on the cooling performance at low turbulence intensity and a moderate effect at higher turbulence intensities. The adiabatic film cooling effectiveness was shown to increase as the turbulence intensity was elevated. The convective heat transfer coefficient was also shown to increase at the turbulence intensity was elevated. An increase in the heat transfer coefficient is a deleterious effect and

  5. The effect of electric field geometry on the performance of electromembrane extraction systems: footprints of a third driving force along with migration and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Hamid Reza; Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed; Mohammadi, Jamil; Nojavan, Saeed; Abrari, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of electric field vectors was first calculated for electromembrane extraction (EME) systems in classical and cylindrical electrode geometries. The results showed that supported liquid membrane (SLM) has a general field amplifying effect due to its lower dielectric constant in comparison with aqueous donor/acceptor solutions. The calculated norms of the electric field vector showed that a DC voltage of 50 V can create huge electric field strengths up to 64 kV m(-1) and 111 kV m(-1) in classical and cylindrical geometries respectively. In both cases, the electric field strength reached its peak value on the inner wall of the SLM. In the case of classical geometry, the field strength was a function of the polar position of the SLM whereas the field strength in cylindrical geometry was angularly uniform. In order to investigate the effect of the electrode geometry on the performance of real EME systems, the analysis was carried out in three different geometries including classical, helical and cylindrical arrangements using naproxen and sodium diclofenac as the model analytes. Despite higher field strength and extended cross sectional area, the helical and cylindrical geometries gave lower recoveries with respect to the classical EME. The observed decline of the signal was proved to be against the relations governing migration and diffusion processes, which means that a third driving force is involved in EME. The third driving force is the interaction between the radially inhomogeneous electric field and the analyte in its neutral form.

  6. Effect of ocular shape and vascular geometry on retinal hemodynamics: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Dziubek, Andrea; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Harris, Alon; Hirani, Anil N; Rusjan, Edmond; Thistleton, William

    2016-08-01

    A computational model for retinal hemodynamics accounting for ocular curvature is presented. The model combines (i) a hierarchical Darcy model for the flow through small arterioles, capillaries and small venules in the retinal tissue, where blood vessels of different size are comprised in different hierarchical levels of a porous medium; and (ii) a one-dimensional network model for the blood flow through retinal arterioles and venules of larger size. The non-planar ocular shape is included by (i) defining the hierarchical Darcy flow model on a two-dimensional curved surface embedded in the three-dimensional space; and (ii) mapping the simplified one-dimensional network model onto the curved surface. The model is solved numerically using a finite element method in which spatial domain and hierarchical levels are discretized separately. For the finite element method, we use an exterior calculus-based implementation which permits an easier treatment of non-planar domains. Numerical solutions are verified against suitably constructed analytical solutions. Numerical experiments are performed to investigate how retinal hemodynamics is influenced by the ocular shape (sphere, oblate spheroid, prolate spheroid and barrel are compared) and vascular architecture (four vascular arcs and a branching vascular tree are compared). The model predictions show that changes in ocular shape induce non-uniform alterations of blood pressure and velocity in the retina. In particular, we found that (i) the temporal region is affected the least by changes in ocular shape, and (ii) the barrel shape departs the most from the hemispherical reference geometry in terms of associated pressure and velocity distributions in the retinal microvasculature. These results support the clinical hypothesis that alterations in ocular shape, such as those occurring in myopic eyes, might be associated with pathological alterations in retinal hemodynamics. PMID:26445874

  7. The effects of geometry and length scale on nanomechanical properties in constrained systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungk, John Michael

    2005-07-01

    The determination of mechanical properties in nanoscale geometries is becoming increasingly important as microsystem and integrated circuit technologies continue to mature. Many devices produced by these technologies are composed of materials with critical sample dimensions smaller than 100 nm. In microelectronics, this can be the thickness of a metallization or dielectric layer, while wear coatings on MEMS devices are frequently thinner than this length scale. Since structures of this type are susceptible to plasticity and fracture as a result of either contact or residual stresses, it is critical that the mechanical behavior of the individual components be well described. This thesis is directed at the development of methods for characterizing the mechanical properties in small volume systems. Using instrumented indentation techniques, typically called nanoindentation, a systematic study of the mechanical response of materials ranging from ductile metals to brittle ceramics was executed. More specifically, investigations into how single length scale approaches may be used to describe mechanical properties such as indentation hardening, ductile film delamination and strain energy release rates were performed. In addition, the acoustic energy released during the fracture of brittle ceramics was related to both stress intensity and a strain energy release rate. Finite element simulations of nanoindentation tests were performed using ABAQUS, a commercially available material modeling software program. These simulations were used to separate individual film and substrate responses from the experimentally observed film/substrate composite mechanical behavior. Finally, quasi-tribological experiments were performed to probe for transitions in friction or wear response as the local deformation varied from the nanoscale to the macroscale.

  8. STABILITY OF A CYLINDRICAL SOLUTE-SOLVENT INTERFACE: EFFECT OF GEOMETRY, ELECTROSTATICS, AND HYDRODYNAMICS*

    PubMed Central

    LI, BO; SUN, HUI; ZHOU, SHENGGAO

    2015-01-01

    The solute-solvent interface that separates biological molecules from their surrounding aqueous solvent characterizes the conformation and dynamics of such molecules. In this work, we construct a solvent fluid dielectric boundary model for the solvation of charged molecules and apply it to study the stability of a model cylindrical solute-solvent interface. The motion of the solute-solvent interface is defined to be the same as that of solvent fluid at the interface. The solvent fluid is assumed to be incompressible and is described by the Stokes equation. The solute is modeled simply by the ideal-gas law. All the viscous force, hydrostatic pressure, solute-solvent van der Waals interaction, surface tension, and electrostatic force are balanced at the solute-solvent interface. We model the electrostatics by Poisson’s equation in which the solute-solvent interface is treated as a dielectric boundary that separates the low-dielectric solute from the high-dielectric solvent. For a cylindrical geometry, we find multiple cylindrically shaped equilibrium interfaces that describe polymodal (e.g., dry and wet) states of hydration of an underlying molecular system. These steady-state solutions exhibit bifurcation behavior with respect to the charge density. For their linearized systems, we use the projection method to solve the fluid equation and find the dispersion relation. Our asymptotic analysis shows that, for large wavenumbers, the decay rate is proportional to wavenumber with the proportionality half of the ratio of surface tension to solvent viscosity, indicating that the solvent viscosity does affect the stability of a solute-solvent interface. Consequences of our analysis in the context of biomolecular interactions are discussed. PMID:26877555

  9. A cost-effective laser scanning method for mapping stream channel geometry and roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Norris; Nathanson, Marcus; Lundgren, Niclas; Rehnström, Robin; Lyon, Steve

    2015-04-01

    In this pilot project, we combine an Arduino Uno and SICK LMS111 outdoor laser ranging camera to acquire high resolution topographic area scans for a stream channel. The microprocessor and imaging system was installed in a custom gondola and suspended from a wire cable system. To demonstrate the systems capabilities for capturing stream channel topography, a small stream (< 2m wide) in the Krycklan Catchment Study was temporarily diverted and scanned. Area scans along the stream channel resulted in a point spacing of 4mm and a point cloud density of 5600 points/m2 for the 5m by 2m area. A grain size distribution of the streambed material was extracted from the point cloud using a moving window, local maxima search algorithm. The median, 84th and 90th percentiles (common metrics to describe channel roughness) of this distribution were found to be within the range of measured values while the largest modelled element was approximately 35% smaller than its measured counterpart. The laser scanning system captured grain sizes between 30mm and 255mm (coarse gravel/pebbles and boulders based on the Wentworth (1922) scale). This demonstrates that our system was capable of resolving both large-scale geometry (e.g. bed slope and stream channel width) and small-scale channel roughness elements (e.g. coarse gravel/pebbles and boulders) for the study area. We further show that the point cloud resolution is suitable for estimating ecohydraulic parameters such as Manning's n and hydraulic radius. Although more work is needed to fine-tune our system's design, these preliminary results are encouraging, specifically for those with a limited operational budget.

  10. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Installation Effects for Conventional and Unconventional Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    As extensive experimental campaign was performed to study the aeroacoustic installation effects of an open rotor with respect to both a conventional tube and wing type airframe and an unconventional hybrid wing body airframe. The open rotor rig had two counter rotating rows of blades each with eight blades of a design originally flight tested in the 1980s. The aeroacoustic installation effects measured in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel included those from flow effects due to inflow distortion or wake interaction and acoustic propagation effects such as shielding and reflection. The objective of the test campaign was to quantify the installation effects for a wide range of parameters and configurations derived from the two airframe types. For the conventional airframe, the open rotor was positioned in increments in front of and then over the main wing and then in positions representative of tail mounted aircraft with a conventional tail, a T-tail and a U-tail. The interaction of the wake of the open rotor as well as acoustic scattering results in an increase of about 10 dB when the rotor is positioned in front of the main wing. When positioned over the main wing a substantial amount of noise reduction is obtained and this is also observed for tail-mounted installations with a large U-tail. For the hybrid wing body airframe, the open rotor was positioned over the airframe along the centerline as well as off-center representing a twin engine location. A primary result was the documentation of the noise reduction from shielding as a function of the location of the open rotor upstream of the trailing edge of the hybrid wing body. The effects from vertical surfaces and elevon deflection were also measured. Acoustic lining was specially designed and inserted flush with the elevon and airframe surface, the result was an additional reduction in open rotor noise propagating to the far field microphones. Even with the older blade design used, the experiment provided

  11. Investigation on the reflector/moderator geometry and its effect on the neutron beam design in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Y; Rahmani, F; Khalafi, H

    2015-12-01

    In order to provide an appropriate neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), a special Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) must be designed based on the neutron source specifications. A typical BSA includes moderator, reflector, collimator, thermal neutron filter, and gamma filter. In common BSA, the reflector is considered as a layer which covers the sides of the moderator materials. In this paper, new reflector/moderator geometries including multi-layer and hexagonal lattice have been suggested and the effect of them has been investigated by MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. It was found that the proposed configurations have a significant effect to improve the thermal to epithermal neutron flux ratio which is an important neutron beam parameter.

  12. The effect of the velocity model, stations geometry, seismic phases and environmental noise level on earthquake location quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; D'Anna, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The precision and accuracy in the estimation of focal parameters mainly depend by the seismic network features and by the velocity model used in the localization process. The number and geometry of the stations that detect a seismic event heavily affect the quality of the localization. To well constrain a hypocenter it is essential that a sufficient number of stations, near and around the epicenter, recording with good signal to noise ratio the event. Large azimuthal gap or the lack of stations near the epicenter can lead to a mistaken location. Low signal to noise ratio due to high-level environmental noise, can lead to large errors in the seismic phases picking thus compromising the precision of the hypocentral location. A not optimized velocity model may lead to strongly biased location affected by important systematic errors. In this work, by means of numerical simulation, will be investigated the effects of these parameters on the quality of the hypocenter estimation. With this goal were simulated different stations geometries, characterized also by different levels of environmental noise, and earthquakes location was carry out by introducing random and systematic errors in both velocity model and seismic phases arrival times. The results of simulations were summarized in focal parameters errors maps.

  13. The Effects of Void Geometry and Contact Angle on the Absorption of Liquids into Porous Calcium Carbonate Structures.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Cathy J.; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Matthews, G. Peter; Gane, Patrick A. C.; James, Philip W.

    2001-07-15

    The absorption (permeation) of alcohols into porous blocks of calcium carbonate has been studied experimentally and with a computer model. The experimental measurement was of change in apparent weight of a block with time after contact with liquid. The modeling used the previously developed 'Pore-Cor' model, based on unit cells of 1000 cubic pores connected by cylindrical throats. To gain some insight into absorption into voids of complex geometry, and to provide a representation of heterogeneities in surface interaction energy, the cylindrical throats were converted to double cones. Relative to cylinders, such geometries caused hold-ups of the percolation of nonwetting fluids with respect to increasing applied pressure, and a change in the rate of absorption of wetting fluids. Both the measured absorption of the alcohols and the simulated absorption of the alcohols and of water showed significant deviations from that predicted by an effective hydraulic radius approximation. The simulation demonstrated the development of a highly heterogeneous wetting front, and of preferred wetting pathways that were perturbed by inertial retardation. The findings are useful in the design of high-performance, low-waste pigments for paper coatings, and environmentally friendly printing inks, as well as in wider industrial, environmental, and geological contexts. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  14. Interaction strength and model geometry effects on the structure of crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfield structure of a range of symmetric crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions of varying strength is presented. The test geometry, consisting of a symmetric pair of opposing sharp fins at angle of attack, alpha, mounted to a flat plate, is studied experimentally for a range of alpha from 7 to 15 degrees at Mach numbers of 3 and 4. Results reveal that the basic flowfield shock structure remains similar in nature over the range of interaction strengths examined, with the only changes being in the scale and location of the various features present. The separated flow regions are classified as being either completely or partially separated, the completely separated case being the one in which the entire incoming boundary layer separates from the plate surface. For the current experiments, all but the weakest of the interactions exhibited complete boundary layer separation. Finally, the effects of model geometry are analyzed by comparing data for shock generators of varying lengths, with the results showing no evidence of upstream influence due to the shock generator trailing edges.

  15. Continuous flow micro-bioreactors for the production of biopharmaceuticals: the effect of geometry, surface texture, and flow rate.

    PubMed

    Garza-García, Lucía D; García-López, Erika; Camacho-León, Sergio; Del Refugio Rocha-Pizaña, María; López-Pacheco, Felipe; López-Meza, Julián; Araiz-Hernández, Diana; Tapia-Mejía, Eduardo J; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Rodríguez-González, Ciro A; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2014-04-01

    We used continuous flow micro-devices as bioreactors for the production of a glycosylated pharmaceutical product (a monoclonal antibody). We cultured CHO cells on the surface of PMMA/PDMS micro-channels that had been textured by micromachining and coated with fibronectin. Three different micro-channel geometries (a wavy channel, a zigzag channel, and a series of donut-shape reservoirs) were tested in a continuous flow regime in the range of 3 to 6 μL min(-1). Both the geometry of the micro-device and the flow rate had a significant effect on cell adhesion, cell proliferation, and monoclonal antibody production. The most efficient configuration was a series of donut-shaped reservoirs, which yielded mAb concentrations of 7.2 mg L(-1) at residence times lower than one minute and steady-state productivities above 9 mg mL(-1) min(-1). These rates are at about 3 orders of magnitude higher than those observed in suspended-cell stirred tank fed-batch bioreactors.

  16. Effects of ridge geometry on mantle dynamics in an oceanic triple junction region: Implications for the Azores Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgen, Jennifer E.; Sankar, Ravi D.

    2010-09-01

    Plate boundary geometry can affect the nature of magmatism along a mid-ocean ridge. The Azores Plateau is located in a complex geological setting that includes a triple junction (TJ), an oblique and recently-formed ultra-slow-spreading ridge, a zone of diffuse seafloor deformation, a major fracture zone, and a postulated hotspot. The precise character of the hotspot is somewhat debated, as some lines of evidence indicate it may not be a classic deep-seated plume. However, seismic and gravity data suggest plateau crustal thicknesses of ˜ 8 km or more, implying some mechanism for excess melting. To assess the role of ridge geometry in creating the Azores Plateau, this study uses a finite element numerical model to isolate the effects of selected aspects of plate boundary configuration on mantle flow and melt production in a TJ kinematically similar to the Azores TJ. The model focuses on the slowest-spreading ridge in the TJ, analogous to the Terceira Rift. The effect of the varying ridge obliquity observed along the Terceira Rift is also assessed using an independent 1-D melting model. In general, relatively little melt production is predicted along the Terceira Rift analogue, except for regions closest to the TJ where the proximity of a faster-spreading ridge increases temperatures within the melting zone. In the 1-D melting model with mantle temperatures of 1350 °C, melt thicknesses of ˜ 2 km are calculated for the least oblique segments, while more oblique segments produce little to no melt. The presence of a long discontinuity (simulating the Gloria FZ) has little effect on mantle dynamics for axial distances < 350 km from the TJ, although crustal production is predicted to diminish to zero within ˜ 150 km of the discontinuity. When several ridge geometrical effects are combined (i.e., a TJ, time-limited spreading, a ridge discontinuity, and depressed spreading rates within ˜ 100 km of the TJ point), ˜ 2.5 km of variability in melt thickness can be produced

  17. Joint effects of illumination geometry and object shape in the perception of surface reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Maria; Brainard, David H

    2011-01-01

    Surface properties provide useful information for identifying objects and interacting with them. Effective utilization of this information, however, requires that the perception of object surface properties be relatively constant across changes in illumination and changes in object shape. Such constancy has been studied separately for changes in these factors. Here we ask whether the separate study of the illumination and shape effects is sufficient, by testing whether joint effects of illumination and shape changes can be predicted from the individual effects in a straightforward manner. We found large interactions between illumination and object shape in their effects on perceived glossiness. In addition, analysis of luminance histogram statistics could not account for the interactions. PMID:23145259

  18. NIR spectral trends of HED meteorites: Can we discriminate between the magmatic evolution, mechanical mixing and observation geometry effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, P.; Barrat, J.-A.; Grisolle, F.; Quirico, E.; Schmitt, B.; Moynier, F.; Gillet, P.; Beck, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite (HED) suite is a family of differentiated meteorites that provide a unique opportunity to study the differentiation of small bodies. The likely parent-body of this meteorite group, (4) Vesta is presently under study by the Dawn mission, scrutinizing its surface in the visible and NIR infrared range. Here, we discuss how well the magmatic trends observed in HED might be retrieved from NIR spectroscopy, by studying laboratory spectra of 10 HED meteorites together with spectra from the RELAB database. We show that although an exsolution process did occur for most eucrites (i.e. decomposition of a primary calcic pyroxene into a high-Ca and low-Ca pyroxene), it does not affect the “bulk pyroxene” trend retrieved from the location of the pyroxene crystal field bands (Band I with a maximum of absorption around at about 1 μm and Band II around 2 μm). Absolute values of the chemical composition appears however to deviate from the expected chemical composition. We show that mechanical mixture (i.e. impact gardening) will produce a linear mixing in the pyroxenes band position diagram (Band I position vs Band II position). This diagram also reveals that howardite are not pure mixtures of an average eucrite and average diogenite. Because asteroid surfaces are expected to show topography, we also study the effect of observation geometry on the NIR spectra of an eucrite and a diogenite by measuring the bi-directional reflectance spectra from 0.4 to 4.6 μm. Results show that these meteorites tend to act as forward scatterers, leading to a decrease of integrated band area (relative to the continuum) at high phase angles. The position of the two strong crystal field bands shows only small variability with observation geometry. Retrieval of the magmatic trends from the Band I vs Band II diagram should not be affected by observation geometry effects. Finally we performed NIR reflectance measurement on olivine diogenites. The presence of olivine

  19. Effectiveness of high temperature innovative geometry fixed ceramic matrix regenerators used in glass furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołkowycki, Grzegorz

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the effectiveness of waste heat recovery regenerators equipped with innovative ceramic matrix forming an integral part of a real glass furnace. The paper full description of the regenerators' matrix structure with its dimensions, thermo-physical properties and operating parameters is included experimentally determined was the effectiveness of the regenerators has been descrbed using the obtained experimental data such as the operating temperature, gas flows as well as the gases generated during the liquid glass manufacturing process. The effectiveness values refer not only to the heating cycle when the regenerator matrix is heated by combustion gases but also to the cooling cycle in which the matrix is cooled as a result of changes in the direction of the flowing gas. On the basis of the determined effectiveness values for both cycles and measurement uncertainties it was possible, to calculate the weighted average efficiency for each of the regenerators.

  20. Electrokinetic properties of monovalent electrolytes confined in charged nanopores: effect of geometry and ionic short-range correlations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Arellano, Enrique; Olivares, Wilmer; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo; Jiménez-Angeles, Felipe

    2009-02-15

    The electrokinetic properties (such as capillary conductance, electroviscosity, and the streaming potential) are obtained for a restricted primitive model electrolyte confined in a slitlike nanopore made up of two infinite parallel plates and in a cylindrical cavity of infinite extension. The hypernetted chain/mean spherical approximation (HNC/MSA) is used to obtain the equilibrium ionic concentration profiles inside the pores, which in turn are used to calculate the electrokinetic properties via linear hydrodynamic equations. Our results are compared with those obtained via the classical Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. Important quantitative and qualitative effects, attributed to geometry and to the proper consideration of short-range correlations by HNC/MSA, are discussed. PMID:19062031

  1. A Study of Pore Geometry Effects on Anisotropy in Hydraulic Permeability Using the Lattice-Boltzmann Method

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Mark L.; Ward, Andy L.; Rector, David R.

    2006-09-01

    We hypothesize that anisotropy in soil properties arises from pore-scale heterogeneity caused by the alignment of aspherical soil particles. We developed a method to predict the permeability tensor from particle shape and packing structure. Digital geometry maps were created for the pore space in regular cubic and random packs of particles with various aspect ratios using a numerical packing algorithm. The lattice-Boltzmann method was used to simulate saturated flow through these packs, and the effect of particle shape and degree of alignment on the permeability tensor was characterized. Results show that the degree of anisotropy in permeability depends not only upon particle shape and alignment, but also on the three-dimensional structure of the pack. In random packs, more oblate particles and higher degrees of particle alignment lead to reduced permeability perpendicular to the direction of particle alignment compared to the direction parallel to particle alignment.

  2. The Effect of Taper Angle and Spline Geometry on the Initial Stability of Tapered, Splined Modular Titanium Stems.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Jeffery L; Small, Scott R; Rodriguez, Jose A; Kang, Michael N; Glassman, Andrew H

    2015-07-01

    Design parameters affecting initial mechanical stability of tapered, splined modular titanium stems (TSMTSs) are not well understood. Furthermore, there is considerable variability in contemporary designs. We asked if spline geometry and stem taper angle could be optimized in TSMTS to improve mechanical stability to resist axial subsidence and increase torsional stability. Initial stability was quantified with stems of varied taper angle and spline geometry implanted in a foam model replicating 2cm diaphyseal engagement. Increased taper angle and a broad spline geometry exhibited significantly greater axial stability (+21%-269%) than other design combinations. Neither taper angle nor spline geometry significantly altered initial torsional stability. PMID:25754255

  3. A numerical study of the effects of geometry on the performance of a supersonic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Dean R.; Northam, G. B.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to investigate the effects of two combustor scale parameters, the expansion angle and the length of the constant area combustor section, on the mixing and combustion within a supersonic combustor. This study uses the SPARK 3D Navier-Stokes code. Turbulence is modeled utilizing an algebraic eddy viscosity model and the chemical mechanism is modeled with a 7-reaction, 7-species finite-rate chemistry model. The calculations show that, even at the relatively low flight Mach numbers (5-7) associated with the conditions examined, the chemical constituents are far from equilibrium, and therefore that kinetics effects are important.

  4. Mathematical analysis of the effect of rotor geometry on cup anemometer response.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Andrés, Ángel; Pindado, Santiago; Sorribes-Palmer, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The calibration coefficients of two commercial anemometers equipped with different rotors were studied. The rotor cups had the same conical shape, while the size and distance to the rotation axis varied. The analysis was based on the 2-cup positions analytical model, derived using perturbation methods to include second-order effects such as pressure distribution along the rotating cups and friction. The comparison with the experimental data indicates a nonuniform distribution of aerodynamic forces on the rotating cups, with higher forces closer to the rotating axis. The 2-cup analytical model is proven to be accurate enough to study the effect of complex forces on cup anemometer performance. PMID:25110735

  5. Mathematical Analysis of the Effect of Rotor Geometry on Cup Anemometer Response

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Andrés, Ángel; Sorribes-Palmer, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The calibration coefficients of two commercial anemometers equipped with different rotors were studied. The rotor cups had the same conical shape, while the size and distance to the rotation axis varied. The analysis was based on the 2-cup positions analytical model, derived using perturbation methods to include second-order effects such as pressure distribution along the rotating cups and friction. The comparison with the experimental data indicates a nonuniform distribution of aerodynamic forces on the rotating cups, with higher forces closer to the rotating axis. The 2-cup analytical model is proven to be accurate enough to study the effect of complex forces on cup anemometer performance. PMID:25110735

  6. Mathematical analysis of the effect of rotor geometry on cup anemometer response.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Andrés, Ángel; Pindado, Santiago; Sorribes-Palmer, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The calibration coefficients of two commercial anemometers equipped with different rotors were studied. The rotor cups had the same conical shape, while the size and distance to the rotation axis varied. The analysis was based on the 2-cup positions analytical model, derived using perturbation methods to include second-order effects such as pressure distribution along the rotating cups and friction. The comparison with the experimental data indicates a nonuniform distribution of aerodynamic forces on the rotating cups, with higher forces closer to the rotating axis. The 2-cup analytical model is proven to be accurate enough to study the effect of complex forces on cup anemometer performance.

  7. Learning Geometry Problem Solving by Studying Worked Examples: Effects of Learner Guidance and Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokosmaty, Sahar; Sweller, John; Kalyuga, Slava

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that instruction that relies heavily on studying worked examples is more effective for less experienced learners compared to instruction emphasizing problem solving. However, the guidance associated with studying some worked examples may reduce the performance of more experienced learners. This study investigated…

  8. Reconstruction of effective cloud field geometry from series of sunshine number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, Viorel; Paulescu, Marius; Brabec, Marek

    2016-07-01

    A new method is proposed for extracting the parameters of effective cloud field models from time series of sunshine number (SSN). Data of SSN number and point cloudiness during 2009 and 2010 at Timisoara (Romania, South Eastern Europe; temperate continental climate) are used to illustrate the method. Two procedures of fitting the estimated point cloudiness to the observed point cloudiness data are proposed and tested. Seven simple effective cloud field models are analyzed. All models underestimate the point cloudiness. The MBE ranges between - 0.06 and - 0.23 while RMSE between 0.15 and 0.38, depending on the month and the duration of the SSN data averaging interval. The best model is based on a field of clouds of semicircle form. This agrees with previous results obtained in the semi-arid climate of Great South Plains in US. The dynamics of the effective cloud field is reconstructed during all months of 2010 at Timisoara. The time series of effective cloud fields are dominated by semicircle clouds but short episodes of semielliptic clouds, ellipsoid clouds, truncated cone clouds and cuboidal clouds are included in the series.

  9. Airlift column photobioreactors for Porphyridium sp. culturing: part I. effects of hydrodynamics and reactor geometry.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hu-Ping; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H

    2012-04-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms have been attracting world attention for their great potential as renewable energy sources in recent years. Cost effective production in large scale, however, remains a major challenge to overcome. It is known to the field that turbulence could help improving the performance of photobioreactors due to the so-called flashing light effects. Better understanding of the multiphase fluid dynamics and the irradiance distribution inside the reactor that cause the flashing light effects, as well as quantifying their impacts on the reactor performance, thus, are crucial for successful design and scale-up of photobioreactors. In this study, a species of red marine microalgae, Porphyridium sp., was grown in three airlift column photobioreactors (i.e., draft tube column, bubble column, and split column). The physical properties of the culture medium, the local fluid dynamics and the photobioreactor performances were investigated and are reported in this part of the manuscript. Results indicate that the presence of microalgae considerably affected the local multiphase flow dynamics in the studied draft tube column. Results also show that the split column reactor works slightly better than the draft tube and the bubble columns due to the spiral flow pattern inside the reactor.

  10. Effects of irradiation geometry on treatment plan optimization with linac-based radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M H; Stelzer, K J; Mayberg, M R; Winn, H R

    1996-08-01

    A comparison was made of different treatment plans to determine the effect on the three-dimensional dose distributions of varying the allowed parameters in linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery with circular collimators; these parameters are arc position, length, and weighting, and collimator diameter. For the class of eccentrically shaped target volumes that are not so irregular as to require several separate isocenters, it was found that superior dose distributions could be achieved by varying arc length, arc position, arc weighting, and collimator diameter. An analysis of the results achieved with an automated planning program indicates that, in general, the variables of arc position and arc length are of greater importance than collimator size or beam weighting. However, there are cases where varying these latter two parameters does result in markedly better dose distributions. A deeper investigation into the effects of multiple collimators on the dose distribution in the area of steepest gradient demonstrated that multiple collimator sizes do not significantly degrade the dose falloff, which is in fact mostly determined by the effects of intersecting arcs. PMID:8873037

  11. Experimental characterization of fluid film effects in various steam generator tube support geometries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Haslinger, K.H.

    1995-03-01

    Fluid film characteristics inside cylindrical steam generator tube support holes and near anti-vibration bar supports were determined experimentally. Test results were evaluated and empirical formulations were developed which adequately represent the observed fluid film phenomena. The empirical formulations are suited for incorporation into the ABAQUS computer code which has been developed by Foster Wheeler for EPRI for prediction of the dynamic behavior and work rates of vibrating steam generator tubes with non-linear support characteristics. A short rigid tube was cycled sinusoidally inside special, instrumented tube support samples. Alignment features enabled accurate positioning of the tube, thereby producing either non-contact or impact conditions with known excitation frequency, tube orbit, and amplitude. The complement of measurements consisted of the instantaneous values for tube motion, tube velocity, tube acceleration, contact condition, and the force exchange between tube and support. These measurements were digitized with high sampling rates and subsequently tabulated and graphed. Review of various 2-D and 3-D collages for a water environment at ambient revealed that the fluid film reaction forces, for reasonably large gaps between tube and support, are primarily dependent on tube acceleration, and to a lesser extent on tube velocity. For smooth cylindrical support surfaces there also exists a strong squeeze film effect for small gaps up to impact, and a suction effect during rebound. The squeeze film effect was found to be dependent on the instantaneous gap and tube velocity values. As influenced by the fluid viscosity, the dependency of the fluid reaction force on tube acceleration and on tube velocity was found to vary and was characterized in the experiments for one support clearance condition.

  12. Sensing (un)binding events via surface plasmons: effects of resonator geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Claudio, Virginia; Käll, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    The resonance conditions of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) can be perturbed in any number ways making plasmon nanoresonators viable tools in detection of e.g. phase changes, pH, gasses, and single molecules. Precise measurement via LSPR of molecular concentrations hinge on the ability to confidently count the number of molecules attached to a metal resonator and ideally to track binding and unbinding events in real-time. These two requirements make it necessary to rigorously quantify relations between the number of bound molecules and response of plasmonic sensors. This endeavor is hindered on the one hand by a spatially varying response of a given plasmonic nanosensor. On the other hand movement of molecules is determined by stochastic effects (Brownian motion) as well as deterministic flow, if present, in microfluidic channels. The combination of molecular dynamics and the electromagnetic response of the LSPR yield an uncertainty which is little understood and whose effect is often disregarded in quantitative sensing experiments. Using a combination of electromagnetic finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the plasmon resonance peak shift of various metal nanosensors (disk, cone, rod, dimer) and stochastic diffusion-reaction simulations of biomolecular interactions on a sensor surface we clarify the interplay between position dependent binding probability and inhomogeneous sensitivity distribution. We show, how the statistical characteristics of the total signal upon molecular binding are determined. The proposed methodology is, in general, applicable to any sensor and any transduction mechanism, although the specifics of implementation will vary depending on circumstances. In this work we focus on elucidating how the interplay between electromagnetic and stochastic effects impacts the feasibility of employing particular shapes of plasmonic sensors for real-time monitoring of individual binding reactions or sensing low concentrations

  13. Electric polarization, magnetoelectric effect, and orbital state of a layered iron oxide with frustrated geometry.

    PubMed

    Nagano, A; Naka, M; Nasu, J; Ishihara, S

    2007-11-23

    A layered iron oxide RFe2O4 (R denotes rare-earth-metal elements) is an exotic dielectric material with charge-order (CO) driven electric polarization and magnetoelectric effect caused by spin-charge coupling. In this paper, a theory of electronic structure and dielectric property in RFe2O4 is presented. Charge frustration in paired-triangular lattices allows a charge imbalance without inversion symmetry. Spin frustration induces reinforcement of this polar CO by a magnetic ordering. We also analyze an orbital model for the Fe ion which does not show a conventional long-range order.

  14. Experimental study of the thermodynamic effect in a cavitating flow on a simple Venturi geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovšek, M.; Dular, M.

    2015-12-01

    The thermodynamic effects in cavitating flow are observed on a simple Venturi profile. A thorough experimental investigation of the temperature field on cavitating flow has been performed in water of 100°C at different operating conditions. Temperature measurements were performed with Infra-Red (IR) high-speed camera, while visualisation was made with conventional high-speed camera. Both, average temperature fields and temperature dynamics are presented at different operating conditions and compared with collected data in visual spectrum. In the vicinity of the throat a temperature depression up to 0.5 K was recorded.

  15. Transient particle acceleration in strongly magnetized neutron stars. II - Effects due to a dipole field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1991-01-01

    Sheared Alfven waves generated by nonradial crustal disturbances above the polar cap of a strongly magnetized neutron star induce an electric field component parallel to B. An attempt is made to determine the manner in which the strong radial dependence of B affects the propagation of these sheared Alfven waves, and whether this MHD process is still an effective particle accelerator. It is found that although the general field equation is quite complicated, a simple wavelike solution can still be obtained under the conditions of interest for which the Alfven phase velocity decouples from the wave equation. The results may be applicable to gamma-ray burst sources.

  16. Computational Analysis of Particle Nucleation in Dilution Tunnels: Effect of Flow Configuration and Tunnel Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Satbir; Adams, Peter; Misquitta, Ashwin; Lee, Kyung; Lipsky, Eric; Robinson, Allen

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of fine particle emission from combustion sources is important to understand their health effects, and to develop emissions regulations. Dilution sampling is the most commonly used technique to measure particle number distribution because it simulates the cooling of combustion exhaust with atmospheric air. Experiments suggest that the measured distribution is dependent on the dilution ratio used and the tunnel design. In the present work, computational analysis is performed to investigate the effect of tunnel flow and geometric parameters on H2SO4-H2O binary nucleation inside dilution tunnels using a large-eddy-simulation (LES) based model. Model predictions suggest that the experimental trends are likely due to differences in the level of turbulence inside the tunnels. It is found that the interaction of dilution air and combustion exhaust in the mixing layer greatly impacts the extent of nucleation. In general, a cross-flow configuration with enhanced turbulent mixing leads to greater number of nucleation-mode particles than an axial-flow configuration.

  17. Effect of flow and active mixing on bacterial growth in a colon-like geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Jonas; Segota, Igor; Arnoldini, Markus; Groisman, Alex; Hwa, Terence

    The large intestine harbors bacteria from hundreds of species, with bacterial densities reaching up to 1012 cells per gram. Many different factors influence bacterial growth dynamics and thus bacterial density and microbiota composition. One dominant force is flow which can in principle lead to a washout of bacteria from the proximal colon. Active mixing by Contractions of the colonic wall together with bacterial growth might counteract such flow-forces and allow high bacterial densities to occur. As a step towards understanding bacterial growth in the presence of mixing and flow, we constructed an in-vitro setup where controlled wall-deformations of a channel emulate Contractions. We investigate growth along the channel under a steady nutrient inflow. In the limits of no or very frequent Contractions, the device behaves like a plug-flow reactor and a chemostat respectively. Depending on mixing and flow, we observe varying spatial gradients in bacterial density along the channel. Active mixing by deformations of the channel wall is shown to be crucial in maintaining a steady-state bacterial population in the presence of flow. The growth-dynamics is quantitatively captured by a simple mathematical model, with the effect of mixing described by an effective diffusion term.

  18. Effect of surface interactions and geometry on the motion of micro bio robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Denise; Beattie, Elizabeth E.; Steager, Edward B.; Kumar, Vijay

    2013-10-01

    Micro Bio Robots (MBRs) are synthetic microstructures with a monolayer of flagellated bacteria adhered to the surface. The flagella of the bacteria propel the microstructure causing it to rotate and translate in a fluidic environment on a planar surface in the absence of external forces. This paper investigates the force contributions of bacteria adhered to the edge versus the center of the micro-structure by selectively altering their behavior using near-UV light. In particular, we investigate the forces that cause predominant clockwise MBR rotation when viewed from above. Additionally, asymmetric shapes, particularly gears, are used to compare the effect of the adherent bacteria with that of collisions among free-swimming bacteria and the microstructure. We find that bacteria adhered near the edge of the MBR interact with the glass substrate under the MBR, accounting for statistically biased clockwise rotation of MBRs.

  19. Geometry effect on the strain-induced self-rolling of semiconductor membranes.

    PubMed

    Chun, Ik Su; Challa, Archana; Derickson, Brad; Hsia, K Jimmy; Li, Xiuling

    2010-10-13

    Semiconductor micro- and nanotubes can be formed by strain-induced self-rolling of membranes. The effect of geometrical dimensions on the self-rolling behavior of epitaxial mismatch-strained In(x)Ga(1-x)As-GaAs membranes are systematically studied both experimentally and theoretically using the finite element method. The final rolling direction depends on the length and width of the membrane as well as the diameter of the rolled-up tube. The energetics of the final states, the history of rolling process, and the kinetic control of the etching anisotropy ultimately determine the rolling behavior. Results reported here provide critical information for precise positioning and uniform large area assembly of semiconducting micro- and nanotubes for applications in photonics, microelectromechanical systems, etc.

  20. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Faiz Aslam, Muhammad Altaf, Khurram Shirazi, Irfan

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  1. The role of airfoil geometry in minimizing the effect of insect contamination of laminar flow sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maresh, J. L.; Bragg, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    A method has been developed to predict the contamination of an airfoil by insects and the resultant performance penalty. Insect aerodynamics have been modeled and the impingement of insects on an airfoil are solved by calculating their trajectories. Upon impact, insect rupture and the resulting height of the debris is determined based on experimental data. A boundary layer analysis is performed to determine which insects cause boundary layer transition and the resultant drag penalty. A contaminated airfoil figure of merit is presented to be used to compare airfoil susceptibility. Results show that the insect contamination effects depend on accretion conditions, airfoil angle of attack and Reynolds number. The importance of the stagnation region to designing airfoils for minimum drag penalties is discussed.

  2. Integration effects of pylon geometry on a high-wing transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.; Lamb, Milton

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the installation effects of a series of pylons that had differing cross-sectional shapes on the pressure distributions and aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/24-scale high wing transport. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers at 0.70 and 0.80 at angles of attack from -3 degrees to 4 degrees with the pylons tested at various toe angles between 5 degrees inboard and 5 degrees outboard. Results of this study indicate that the installed drag was lowest for the pylons with a compression pylon type design which kept the flow under the wing in the pylon/wing junction comparable to the clean wing velocities.

  3. Effect of anisotropy and groundwater system geometry on seepage through lakebeds. 1. Analog and dimensional analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfannkuch, H.O.; Winter, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    Distribution of seepage through lakebeds is controlled partly by geometric configuration of the lake and of the groundwater system interacting with the lake. To evaluate the effect of these factors, conductive-paper electric-analog models were used to analyze a number of lake and groundwater settings having different geometric configurations. Most settings analyzed are of lakes that do not penetrate the groundwater system. The width ratio, the ratio of half the lake width to thickness of the groundwater system, is the principal geometric characteristic used in this study. Because the distribution of groundwater seepage into a lake is not uniform across the lakebed, the concept of a streamlinecrowding factor is developed, and is used to determine seepage patterns from geometric characteristics of the lake and its contiguous groundwater system. Analysis of fourteen different width ratios of lake and groundwater systems indicates that lakes can be defined by three general groups of seepage patterns, which include flow patterns, volumes and rates: (1) lakes having width ratios less than ??? 0.6 show relatively uniform distribution of seepage across the lakebed; (2) lakes having width ratios of ??? 0.6 to ??? 2.0 change in absolute and relative streamline crowding in the near-shore region; and (3) lakes having width ratios greater than ??? 2.0 show stable flow patterns near shore; however, with increasing lake width, the relative streamline crowding increases relative to that width. For deep lakes and those in anisotropic media, the crowding effect is decreased, resulting in more uniform seepage across the lakebed. ?? 1984.

  4. Effect of modification to tongue and impeller geometry on unsteady flow, pressure fluctuations, and noise in a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, R.; Chu, S.; Katz, J.

    1997-07-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), pressure, and noise measurements are used to study the effect of modifications to tongue and impeller geometries on the flow structure and resulting noise in a centrifugal pump. It is demonstrated that the primary sources of noise are associated with interactions of the nonuniform outflux from the impeller (jet/wake phenomenon) with the tongue. Consequently, significant reduction of noise is achieved by increasing the gap between the tongue and the impeller up to about 20% of the impeller radius. Further increase in the gap affects the performance adversely with minimal impact on the noise level. When the gap is narrow, the primary sources of noise are impingement of the wake on the tip of the tongue, and tongue oscillations when the pressure difference across it is high. At about 20% gap, the entire wake and its associated vorticity trains miss the tongue, and the only (quite weak) effect of nonuniform outflux is the impingement of the jet on the tongue. An attempt is also made to reduce the nonuniformity in outflux from the impeller by inserting short vanes between the blades. They cause reduction in the size of the original wakes, but generate an additional jet/wake phenomenon of their own. Both wakes are weak to a level that their impacts on local pressure fluctuations and noise are insignificant. The only remaining major contributor to noise is tongue oscillations. This effect is shown to be dependent on the stiffness of the tongue.

  5. Solubility Limits in Lennard-Jones Mixtures: Effects of Disparate Molecule Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Kippi M.; Perkyns, John S.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand general effects of the size and energy disparities between macromolecules and solvent molecules in solution, especially for macromolecular constructs self-assembled from smaller molecules, we use the first- and second-order exact bridge diagram extensions of the HNC integral equation theory to investigate single-component, binary, ternary, and quaternary mixtures of Lennard-Jones fluids. For pure fluids, we find that the HNCH3 bridge function integral equation (i.e., exact to third order in density) is necessary to quantitatively predict the pure gas and pure liquid sides of the coexistence region of the phase diagram of the Lennard-Jones fluid. For the mixtures, we find that the HNCH2 bridge function integral equation is sufficient to qualitatively predict solubility in the binary, ternary, and quaternary mixtures, up to the nominal solubility limit. The results, as limiting cases, should be useful to several problems, including accurate phase diagram predictions for complex mixtures, design of self-assembling nanostructures via solvent controls, and the solvent contributions to the conformational behavior of macromolecules in complex fluids. PMID:25621892

  6. Nonradiative Plasmon Decay and Hot Carrier Dynamics: Effects of Phonons, Surfaces, and Geometry.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ana M; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Goddard, William A; Atwater, Harry A

    2016-01-26

    The behavior of metals across a broad frequency range from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies is of interest in plasmonics, nanophotonics, and metamaterials. Depending on the frequency, losses of collective excitations in metals can be predominantly classical resistive effects or Landau damping. In this context, we present first-principles calculations that capture all of the significant microscopic mechanisms underlying surface plasmon decay and predict the initial excited carrier distributions so generated. Specifically, we include ab initio predictions of phonon-assisted optical excitations in metals, which are critical to bridging the frequency range between resistive losses at low frequencies and direct interband transitions at high frequencies. In the commonly used plasmonic materials, gold, silver, copper, and aluminum, we find that resistive losses compete with phonon-assisted carrier generation below the interband threshold, but hot carrier generation via direct transitions dominates above threshold. Finally, we predict energy-dependent lifetimes and mean free paths of hot carriers, accounting for electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering, to provide insight toward transport of plasmonically generated carriers at the nanoscale. PMID:26654729

  7. Geometry effects on Rayleigh-Bénard convection in rotating annular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Álvarez, J. J.; Serre, E.; del Arco, E. Crespo; Busse, F. H.

    2014-06-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection is investigated in rotating annular cavities at a moderate dimensionless rotation rate Ω =60. The onset of convection is in the form of azimuthal traveling waves that set in at the sidewalls and at values of the Rayleigh number significantly below the value of the onset of convection in an infinitely extended layer. The present study addresses the effects of curvature and confinement on the onset of sidewall convection by using three-dimensional spectral solutions of the Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations. Such solutions demonstrate that the curvature of the outer boundary promotes the onset of the wall mode, while the opposite curvature of the inner boundary tends to delay the onset of the wall mode. An inner sidewall with a radius as low as one tenth of its height is sufficient, however, to support the onset of a sidewall mode. When radial confinement is increased the two independent traveling waves interact and eventually merge to form a nearly steady pattern of convection.

  8. Unravelling Doping Effects on PEDOT at the Molecular Level: From Geometry to Thermoelectric Transport Properties.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen; Zhao, Tianqi; Xi, Jinyang; Wang, Dong; Shuai, Zhigang

    2015-10-14

    Tuning carrier concentration via chemical doping is the most successful strategy to optimize the thermoelectric figure of merit. Nevertheless, how the dopants affect charge transport is not completely understood. Here we unravel the doping effects by explicitly including the scattering of charge carriers with dopants on thermoelectric properties of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), PEDOT, which is a p-type thermoelectric material with the highest figure of merit reported. We corroborate that the PEDOT exhibits a distinct transition from the aromatic to quinoid-like structure of backbone, and a semiconductor-to-metal transition with an increase in the level of doping. We identify a close-to-unity charge transfer from PEDOT to the dopant, and find that the ionized impurity scattering dominates over the acoustic phonon scattering in the doped PEDOT. By incorporating both scattering mechanisms, the doped PEDOT exhibits mobility, Seebeck coefficient and power factors in very good agreement with the experimental data, and the lightly doped PEDOT exhibits thermoelectric properties superior to the heavily doped one. We reveal that the thermoelectric transport is highly anisotropic in ordered crystals, and suggest to utilize large power factors in the direction of polymer backbone and low lattice thermal conductivity in the stacking and lamellar directions, which is viable in chain-oriented amorphous nanofibers.

  9. Effects of mesh resolution on large eddy simulation of reacting flows in complex geometry combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Boudier, G.; Gicquel, L.Y.M.; Poinsot, T.J.

    2008-10-15

    The power of current parallel computers is becoming sufficient to apply large eddy simulation (LES) tools to reacting flows not only in academic configurations but also in real gas turbine chambers. The most limiting factor in performing LES of real systems is the mesh size, which directly controls the overall cost of the simulation, so that the effects of mesh resolution on LES results become a key issue. In the present work, an unstructured compressible LES solver is used to compute the reacting flow in a domain corresponding to a sector of a realistic helicopter chamber. Three grids ranging from 1.2 to 44 million elements are used for LES and results are compared in terms of mean and fluctuating fields as well as of pressure spectra. Results show that the mean temperature, reaction rate, and velocity fields are almost insensitive to the grid size. The RMS field of the resolved velocity is also reasonably independent of the mesh, while the RMS fields of temperature exhibit more sensitivity to the grid, as expected from the fact that most of the combustion process proceeds at small scales. The acoustic field exhibits a limited sensitivity to the mesh, suggesting that LES is adapted to the computation of combustion instabilities in complex systems. (author)

  10. {theta} parameter in loop quantum gravity: Effects on quantum geometry and black hole entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rezende, Danilo Jimenez; Perez, Alejandro

    2008-10-15

    The precise analog of the {theta}-quantization ambiguity of Yang-Mills theory exists for the real SU(2) connection formulation of general relativity. As in the former case {theta} labels representations of large gauge transformations, which are superselection sectors in loop quantum gravity. We show that unless {theta}=0, the (kinematical) geometric operators such as area and volume are not well defined on spin network states. More precisely the intersection of their domain with the dense set Cyl in the kinematical Hilbert space H of loop quantum gravity is empty. The absence of a well-defined notion of area operator acting on spin network states seems at first in conflict with the expected finite black hole entropy. However, we show that the black hole (isolated) horizon area--which in contrast to kinematical area is a (Dirac) physical observable--is indeed well defined, and quantized so that the black hole entropy is proportional to the area. The effect of {theta} is negligible in the semiclassical limit where proportionality to area holds.

  11. Solubility Limits in Lennard-Jones Mixtures: Effects of Disparate Molecule Geometries.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Kippi M; Perkyns, John S; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2015-07-23

    In order to better understand general effects of the size and energy disparities between macromolecules and solvent molecules in solution, especially for macromolecular constructs self-assembled from smaller molecules, we use the first- and second-order exact bridge diagram extensions of the HNC integral equation theory to investigate single-component, binary, ternary, and quaternary mixtures of Lennard-Jones fluids. For pure fluids, we find that the HNCH3 bridge function integral equation (i.e., exact to third order in density) is necessary to quantitatively predict the pure gas and pure liquid sides of the coexistence region of the phase diagram of the Lennard-Jones fluid. For the mixtures, we find that the HNCH2 bridge function integral equation is sufficient to qualitatively predict solubility in the binary, ternary, and quaternary mixtures, up to the nominal solubility limit. The results, as limiting cases, should be useful to several problems, including accurate phase diagram predictions for complex mixtures, design of self-assembling nanostructures via solvent controls, and the solvent contributions to the conformational behavior of macromolecules in complex fluids.

  12. Beam geometry, alignment, and wavefront aberration effects on interferometric differential wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiangzhi; Gillmer, S. R.; Ellis, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Heterodyne interferometry is a widely accepted methodology with high resolution in many metrology applications. As a functionality enhancement, differential wavefront sensing (DWS) enables simultaneous measurement of displacement, pitch, and yaw using a displacement interferometry system and a single beam incident on a plane mirror target. The angular change is measured using a weighted phase average between symmetrically adjacent quadrant photodiode pairs. In this paper, we present an analytical model to predict the scaling of differential phase signals based on fundamental Gaussian beams. Several numerical models are presented to discuss the effects of physical beam parameters, detector size, system alignment errors, and beam wavefront aberrations on the DWS technique. The results of our modeling predict rotational scaling factors and a usable linear range. Furthermore, experimental results show the analytically predicted scaling factor is in good agreement with empirical calibration. Our three degree-of-freedom interferometer can achieve a resolution of 0.4 nm in displacement and 0.2 μrad in pitch and yaw simultaneously.

  13. A study on geometry effect of transmission coil for micro size magnetic induction coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung Hwa; Jun, Byoung Ok; Kim, Seunguk; Lee, Gwang Jun; Ryu, Mingyu; Choi, Ji-Woong; Jang, Jae Eun

    2016-05-01

    The effects of transmission (Tx) coil structure have been studied for micro-size magnetic induction coil. The size of the receiving (Rx) coil should be shrunk to the micrometer level for the various new applications such as micro-robot and wireless body implanted devices. In case of the macro-scale magnetic induction coil, the power transmission efficiency is generally considered to be higher as the inductance of the transmission coil became larger; however, the large size difference between macro-size Tx coil and micro-size Rx coil can decrease the power transmission efficiency due to the difference of resonance frequency. Here, we study a correlation of the power transmission with the size and distance between the macro-size Tx and micro-size Rx coils using magnetic induction technique. The maximum power efficiency was 0.28/0.23/0.13/0.12% at the distance of 0.3/1/3/5 cm between Rx and Tx coil. In addition, more efficient wireless power transferring method is suggested with a floating coil for the body implantable devices. The voltage output increased up to 5.4 mV than the original one Tx coil system. The results demonstrated the foundational wireless power transferring system with enhanced power efficiency.

  14. Effect of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation channel geometry on separation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ki Hun; Lee, Ju Yong; Williams, P Stephen; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2010-06-11

    The separation efficiencies of three different asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) channel designs were evaluated using polystyrene latex standards. Channel breadth was held constant for one channel (rectangular profile), and was reduced either linearly (trapezoidal profile) or exponentially (exponential profile) along the length for the other two. The effective void volumes of the three channel types were designed to be equivalent. Theoretically, under certain flow conditions, the mean channel flow velocity of the exponential channel could be arranged to remain constant along the channel length, thereby improving separation in AF4. Particle separation obtained with the exponential channel was compared with particle separation obtained with the trapezoidal and rectangular channels. We demonstrated that at a certain flow rate condition (outflow/inflow rate=0.2), the exponential channel design indeed provided better performance with respect to the separation of polystyrene nanoparticles in terms of reducing band broadening. While the trapezoidal channel exhibited a little poorer performance than the exponential, the strongly decreasing mean flow velocity in the rectangular channel resulted in serious band broadening, a delay in retention time, and even failure of larger particles to elute. PMID:20439106

  15. Effect of Roller Geometry on Roller Bearing Load-Life Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrical roller bearings typically employ roller profile modification to equalize load distribution, minimize stress concentration at roller ends and allow for a small amount of misalignment. The 1947 Lundberg-Palmgren analysis reported an inverse fourth power relation between load and life for roller bearings with line contact. In 1952, Lundberg and Palmgren changed their load-life exponent to 10/3 for roller bearings, assuming mixed line and point contact. The effect of roller-crown profile was reanalyzed in this paper to determine the actual load-life relation for modified roller profiles. For uncrowned rollers (line contact), the load-life exponent is p = 4, in agreement with the 1947 Lundberg-Palmgren value but crowning reduces the value of the exponent, p. The lives of modern roller bearings made from vacuum-processed steels significantly exceed those predicted by the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The Zaretsky rolling-element bearing life model of 1996 produces a load-life exponent of p = 5 for flat rollers, which is more consistent with test data. For the Zaretsky model with fully crowned rollers p = 4.3. For an aerospace profile and chamfered rollers, p = 4.6. Using the 1952 Lundberg-Palmgren value p = 10/3, the value incorporated in ANSI/ABMA and ISO bearing standards, can create significant life calculation errors for roller bearings.

  16. EFFECT OF GEOMETRY AND OPERATING PARAMETERS ON SIMULATED SOFC STACK TEMPERATURE UNIFORMITY

    SciTech Connect

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Lai, Canhai; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-08-10

    A uniform temperature field is desirable in the solid oxide fuel cell stack to avoid local hot regions that contribute to material degradation, thermal stresses, and differences in electrochemical performance. Various geometric and operational design changes were simulated by numerical modeling of co-flow and counter-flow multi-cell stacks, and the effects on stack maximum temperature, stack temperature difference, and maximum cell temperature difference were characterized. The results showed that 40-60% on-cell steam reforming of methane and a reduced reforming rate of 25-50% of the nominal rate was beneficial for a more uniform temperature field. Fuel exhaust recycling up to 30% was shown to be advantageous for reforming fuels and co-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel, but counter-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel showed higher temperature differences. Cells with large aspect ratios showed a more uniform temperature response due to either the strong influence of the inlet gas temperatures or the greater thermal exchange with the furnace boundary condition. Improved lateral heat spreading with thicker interconnects was demonstrated, but greater improvements towards a uniform thermal field for the same amount of interconnect mass could be achieved using thicker heat spreader plates appropriately distributed along the stack height.

  17. Effects of shoe sole geometry on toe clearance and walking stability in older adults.

    PubMed

    Thies, S B; Price, C; Kenney, L P J; Baker, R

    2015-07-01

    Thirty-five percent of people above age 65 fall each year, and half of their falls are associated with tripping: tripping, an apparently 'mundane' everyday problem, therefore, significantly impacts on older people's health and associated medical costs. To avoid tripping and subsequent falling, sufficient toe clearance during the swing phase is crucial. We previously found that a rocker-shaped shoe sole enhances toe clearance in young adults, thereby decreasing their trip-risk. This study investigates whether such sole design also enhances older adults' toe clearance, without inadvertently affecting their walking stability. Toe clearance and its variability are reported together with measures of walking stability for twelve older adults, walking in shoes with rocker angles of 10°, 15°, and 20°. Surface inclinations (flat, incline, decline) were chosen to reflect a potential real-world environment. Toe clearance increased substantially from the 10° to the 15° rocker angle (p=0.003) without compromising measures of walking stability (p>0.05). A further increase in rocker angle to 20° resulted in less substantial enhancement of toe clearance and came at the cost of a decrease in gait speed on the decline. The novelty of this investigation lies in the exploration of the trade-off between reduction of trip-risk through footwear design and adverse effects on walking stability on real-life relevant surfaces. Our two studies suggest that the current focus on slip-resistance in footwear design may need to be generalised to include other factors that affect trip-risk.

  18. Spacetime symmetries, Newton-Cartan geometry and the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Dam

    2015-03-01

    Spacetime symmetries place powerful constraints on the physics of quantum Hall states from spacetime symmetries. These symmetries can be seen by putting the quantum Hall system on a curved manifold. By doing so, one discovers that the action is invariant with respect to time-preserving diffeomorphisms. The diffeomorphism invariance remains nontrivial on the lowest Landau level when inter Landau level mixing is negligible. In the talk we will extract physical consequences of the diffeomorphism invariance for physical observables in flat space. In particular, we relate the leading dependence of the Hall conductivity on wavenumber to the shift. We show how the spectral densities of the components of the stress tensor satisfy several sum rules, one of which involves the static projected structure factor and another involves the shift. From the sum rules one can deduce an inequality between the leading k4 coefficient of the static structure factor and the shift. The inequality is saturated for a large class of trial wavefunctions. The sum rules suggest that if the magneto-roton continues to exist as a sharp resonance at small wavenumber, it should be a ``chiral massive graviton,'' i.e., a particle with spin 2 of one circular polarization. This is demonstrated explicitly in a toy model, where which the sum rules are saturated by one single gapped mode. We argue that the circular polarization of the magneto-roton can be in principle observed by polarized Raman scatterings. The most convenient formalism to write down effective actions satisfying local diffeomorphism invariance turns out to be the Newton-Cartan formalism, introduced by Elie Cartan in 1922-1923 in his attempt to rewrite Newton's gravity in a coordinate-invariant way. We describe the structure of the Newton-Cartan space, including the construction of the connection. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-13ER4195, ARO-MURI Grant 63834-PH-MUR, NSF Grant DMR-0820054, and a Simons Investigator grant from the Simons

  19. Effects of display geometry and pixel structure on stereo display usability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulkens, Edwin; Roberts, John W.

    2001-06-01

    for inconsistencies, so any improvement in stereo realism increases the number of people who can enjoy it. Despite the importance of providing consistent 3-D cues, no existing display system can do a perfect job of displaying any significant variety of stereo images, nor will such a perfect display be created in the next several decades. It is therefore important to look at the sources of 3-D cue inconsistencies in terms of the severity of impact on the viewing experience, and the effort required to minimize the effect of each inconsistency.

  20. Effects of system geometry and other physical factors on photon sensitivity of high-resolution positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habte, F.; Foudray, A. M. K.; Olcott, P. D.; Levin, C. S.

    2007-07-01

    We are studying two new detector technologies that directly measure the three-dimensional coordinates of 511 keV photon interactions for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems designed for small animal and breast imaging. These detectors are based on (1) lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystal arrays coupled to position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD) and (2) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). The detectors have excellent measured 511 keV photon energy resolutions (<=12% FWHM for LSO-PSAPD and <=3% for CZT) and good coincidence time resolutions (2 ns FWHM for LSO-PSAPD and 8 ns for CZT). The goal is to incorporate the detectors into systems that will achieve 1 mm3 spatial resolution (~1 mm3, uniform throughout the field of view (FOV)), with excellent contrast resolution as well. In order to realize 1 mm3 spatial resolution with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is necessary to significantly boost coincidence photon detection efficiency (referred to as photon sensitivity). To facilitate high photon sensitivity in the proposed PET system designs, the detector arrays are oriented 'edge-on' with respect to incoming 511 keV annihilation photons and arranged to form a compact FOV with detectors very close to, or in contact with, the subject tissues. In this paper, we used Monte Carlo simulation to study various factors that limit the photon sensitivity of a high-resolution PET system dedicated to small animal imaging. To optimize the photon sensitivity, we studied several possible system geometries for a fixed 8 cm transaxial and 8 cm axial FOV. We found that using rectangular-shaped detectors arranged into a cylindrical geometry does not yield the best photon sensitivity. This is due to the fact that forming rectangular-shaped detectors into a ring produces significant wedge-shaped inter-module gaps, through which Compton-scattered photons in the detector can escape. This effect limits the center point source photon sensitivity to

  1. Effects of system geometry and other physical factors on photon sensitivity of high-resolution positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Habte, F; Foudray, A M K; Olcott, P D; Levin, C S

    2007-07-01

    We are studying two new detector technologies that directly measure the three-dimensional coordinates of 511 keV photon interactions for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems designed for small animal and breast imaging. These detectors are based on (1) lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystal arrays coupled to position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD) and (2) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). The detectors have excellent measured 511 keV photon energy resolutions (geometries for a fixed 8 cm transaxial and 8 cm axial FOV. We found that using rectangular-shaped detectors arranged into a cylindrical geometry does not yield the best photon sensitivity. This is due to the fact that forming rectangular-shaped detectors into a ring produces significant wedge-shaped inter-module gaps, through which Compton-scattered photons in the detector can escape. This effect limits the center point source

  2. Effects of system geometry and other physical factors on photon sensitivity of high-resolution positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Foudray, A M K; Olcott, P D

    2013-01-01

    We are studying two new detector technologies that directly measure the three-dimensional coordinates of 511 keV photon interactions for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems designed for small animal and breast imaging. These detectors are based on (1) lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystal arrays coupled to position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD) and (2) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). The detectors have excellent measured 511 keV photon energy resolutions (≤12% FWHM for LSO-PSAPD and ≤3% for CZT) and good coincidence time resolutions (2 ns FWHM for LSO-PSAPD and 8 ns for CZT). The goal is to incorporate the detectors into systems that will achieve 1 mm3 spatial resolution (~1 mm3, uniform throughout the field of view (FOV)), with excellent contrast resolution as well. In order to realize 1 mm3 spatial resolution with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is necessary to significantly boost coincidence photon detection efficiency (referred to as photon sensitivity). To facilitate high photon sensitivity in the proposed PET system designs, the detector arrays are oriented ‘edge-on’ with respect to incoming 511 keV annihilation photons and arranged to form a compact FOV with detectors very close to, or in contact with, the subject tissues. In this paper, we used Monte Carlo simulation to study various factors that limit the photon sensitivity of a high-resolution PET system dedicated to small animal imaging. To optimize the photon sensitivity, we studied several possible system geometries for a fixed 8 cm transaxial and 8 cm axial FOV. We found that using rectangular-shaped detectors arranged into a cylindrical geometry does not yield the best photon sensitivity. This is due to the fact that forming rectangular-shaped detectors into a ring produces significant wedge-shaped inter-module gaps, through which Compton-scattered photons in the detector can escape. This effect limits the center point source photon

  3. Effects of system geometry and other physical factors on photon sensitivity of high-resolution positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Habte, F; Foudray, A M K; Olcott, P D; Levin, C S

    2007-07-01

    We are studying two new detector technologies that directly measure the three-dimensional coordinates of 511 keV photon interactions for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems designed for small animal and breast imaging. These detectors are based on (1) lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystal arrays coupled to position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD) and (2) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). The detectors have excellent measured 511 keV photon energy resolutions (geometries for a fixed 8 cm transaxial and 8 cm axial FOV. We found that using rectangular-shaped detectors arranged into a cylindrical geometry does not yield the best photon sensitivity. This is due to the fact that forming rectangular-shaped detectors into a ring produces significant wedge-shaped inter-module gaps, through which Compton-scattered photons in the detector can escape. This effect limits the center point source

  4. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  5. Effect of bearing geometry and structure support on transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication of metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Jin, Zhongming; Roberts, Paul; Grigoris, Peter

    2007-01-01

    An effective lubrication can significantly reduce wear of metal-on-metal artificial hip joints. The improvement of the lubrication can be achieved through the optimisation of the bearing geometry in terms of a small clearance and/or the structural support such as a polyethylene backing underneath a metallic bearing in a sandwich acetabular cup form. The separate effects of these two factors on fluid film lubrication of 28 mm diameter metal-on-metal total hip joints under walking conditions were numerically investigated in this paper. The results show that a larger lubricant film due to the polyethylene backing can be significantly enhanced by the transient squeeze-film action, particularly during the stance phase, and a similar lubricant film can be developed for both the monolithic cup relying on the smaller clearance and the sandwich cup benefiting from the polyethylene backing. Both cup systems can function in a wide range of lubrication regimes, covering both mixed and fluid film, under the current design and manufacture conditions.

  6. On the effects of geometry, defects, and material asymmetry on the mechanical response of shape memory alloy cellular lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamooz Ravari, M. R.; Nasr Esfahani, S.; Taheri Andani, M.; Kadkhodaei, M.; Ghaei, A.; Karaca, H.; Elahinia, M.

    2016-02-01

    Shape memory alloy (such as NiTi) cellular lattice structures are a new class of advanced materials with many potential applications. The cost of fabrication of these structures however is high. It is therefore necessary to develop modeling methods to predict the functional behavior of these alloys before fabrication. The main aim of the present study is to assess the effects of geometry, microstructural imperfections and material asymmetric response of dense shape memory alloys on the mechanical response of cellular structures. To this end, several cellular and dense NiTi samples are fabricated using a selective laser melting process. Both cellular and dense specimens were tested in compression in order to obtain their stress-strain response. For modeling purposes, a three -dimensional (3D) constitutive model based on microplane theory which is able to describe the material asymmetry was employed. Five finite element models based on unit cell and multi-cell methods were generated to predict the mechanical response of cellular lattices. The results show the considerable effects of the microstructural imperfections on the mechanical response of the cellular lattice structures. The asymmetric material response of the bulk material also affects the mechanical response of the corresponding cellular structure.

  7. THE GEOMETRY EFFECTS OF AN EXPANDING UNIVERSE ON THE DETECTION OF COOL NEUTRAL GAS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, S. J.

    2012-03-20

    Recent high-redshift surveys for 21 cm absorption in damped Ly{alpha} absorption systems (DLAs) take the number of published searches at z{sub abs} > 2 to 25, the same number as at z{sub abs} < 2, although the detection rate at high redshift remains significantly lower (20% compared to 60%). Using the known properties of the DLAs to estimate the unknown profile widths of the 21 cm non-detections and including the limits via a survival analysis, we show that the mean spin temperature/covering factor degeneracy at high redshift is, on average, double that of the low-redshift sample. This value is significantly lower than the previous factor of eight for the spin temperatures and is about the same factor as in the angular diameter distance ratios between the low- and high-redshift samples. That is, without the need for the several pivotal assumptions, which lead to an evolution in the spin temperature, we show that the observed distribution of 21 cm detections in DLAs can be accounted for by the geometry effects of an expanding universe. That is, as yet there is no evidence of the spin temperature of gas-rich galaxies evolving with redshift.

  8. Spread of excitation in 3-D models of the anisotropic cardiac tissue. II. Effects of fiber architecture and ventricular geometry.

    PubMed

    Franzone, P C; Guerri, L; Pennacchio, M; Taccardi, B

    1998-01-15

    We investigate a three-dimensional macroscopic model of wave-front propagation related to the excitation process in the left ventricular wall represented by an anisotropic bidomain. The whole left ventricle is modeled, whereas, in a previous paper, only a flat slab of myocardial tissue was considered. The direction of cardiac fibers, which affects the anisotropic conductivity of the myocardium, rotates from the epi- to the endocardium. If the ventricular wall is conceived as a set of packed surfaces, the fibers may be tangent to them or more generally may cross them obliquely; the latter case is described by an "imbrication angle." The effect of a simplified Purkinje network also is investigated. The cardiac excitation process, more particularly the depolarization phase, is modeled by a nonlinear elliptic equation, called an eikonal equation, in the activation time. The numerical solution of this equation is obtained by means of the finite element method, which includes an upwind treatment of the Hamiltonian part of the equation. By means of numerical simulations in an idealized model of the left ventricle, we try to establish whether the eikonal approach contains the essential basic elements for predicting the features of the activation patterns experimentally observed. We discuss and compare these results with those obtained in our previous papers for a flat part of myocardium. The general rules governing the spread of excitation after local stimulations, previously delineated for the flat geometry, are extended to the present, more realistic monoventricular model.

  9. Assessment at full scale of nozzle/wing geometry effects on OTW aeroacoustic characteristics. [Over The Wing STOL engine configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, D.; Von Glahn, U.

    1979-01-01

    The effects on acoustic characteristics of nozzle type and location on a wing for STOL engine over-the-wing configurations are assessed at full scale on the basis of model-scale data. Three types of nozzle configurations are evaluated: a circular nozzle with external deflector mounted above the wing, a slot nozzle with external deflector mounted on the wing and a slot nozzle mounted on the wing. Nozzle exhaust plane locations with respect to the wing leading edge are varied from 10 to 46 percent chord (flaps retracted) with flap angles of 20 deg (take-off attitude) and 60 deg (approach attitude). Perceived noise levels (PNL) are calculated as a function of flyover distance at 152 m altitude. From these plots, static EPNL values, defined as flyover relative noise levels, are calculated and plotted as a function of lift and thrust ratios. From such plots the acoustic benefits attributable to variations in nozzle/deflector/wing geometry at full scale are assessed for equal aerodynamic performance.

  10. Assessment at full scale of nozzle/wing geometry effects on OTW aero-acoustic characteristics. [short takeoff aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, D.; Vonglahn, U.

    1979-01-01

    The effects on acoustic characteristics of nozzle type and location on a wing for STOL engine over-the-wing configurations are assessed at full scale on the basis of model-scale data. Three types of nozzle configurations are evaluated: a circular nozzle with external deflector mounted above the wing, a slot nozzle with external deflector mounted on the wing and a slot nozzle mounted on the wing. Nozzle exhaust plane locations with respect to the wing leading edge are varied from 10 to 46 percent chord (flaps retracted) with flap angles of 20 (takeoff altitude) and 60 (approach attitude). Perceived noise levels (PNL) are calculated as a function of flyover distance at 152 m altitude. From these plots, static EPNL values, defined as flyover relative noise levels, are calculated and plotted as a function of lift and thrust ratios. From such plots the acoustic benefits attributable to variations in nozzle/deflector/wing geometry at full scale are assessed for equal aerodynamic performance.

  11. Effect of punch tip geometry and embossment on the punch tip adherence of a model ibuprofen formulation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Matthew; Ford, James L; MacLeod, Graeme S; Fell, John T; Smith, George W; Rowe, Philip H; Dyas, A Mark

    2004-07-01

    The sticking of a model ibuprofen-lactose formulation with respect to compaction force, punch tip geometry and punch tip embossment was assessed. Compaction was performed at 10, 25 or 40 kN using an instrumented single-punch tablet press. Three sets of 'normal' concave punches were used to evaluate the influence of punch curvature and diameter. The punches were 10, 11 and 12 mm in diameter, respectively. The 10-mm punch was embossed with a letter 'A' logo to assess the influence of an embossment on sticking. Flat-faced punches (12.5 mm) were used for comparison with the concave tooling. Surface profiles (Taylor Hobson Talysurf 120) of the upper punch faces were obtained to evaluate the surface quality of the tooling used. Following compaction, ibuprofen attached to the upper punch face was quantified by spectroscopy. Increasing punch curvature from flat-faced punches to concave decreased sticking. Altering punch diameter of the concave punches had no effect on sticking when expressed as microg mm(-2). The embossed letter 'A' logo increased sticking considerably owing to the probable concentration of shear stresses at the lateral faces of the embossed logo.

  12. Transport phenomena and the effects of reactor geometry for epitaxial GaN growth in a vertical MOCVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chien-Fu; Tsai, Tsung-Yen; Huang, Yen-Hsiu; Lee, Ming-Tsang; Horng, Ray-Hua

    2015-12-01

    In this study a numerical simulation was carried out to analyze the transport phenomena in a vertical type metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor for Gallium Nitride (GaN) growth. The simulated results were compared and validated by experiment. The effects of showerhead design and chamber height are investigated and discussed. It was found that, by properly adjusting the height of the chamber, both the growth rate and film uniformity could be significantly improved. This is attributed to the suppression of the thermal and mass transfer boundary layers by the injection flow of reacting gas mixtures, as well as the confined vertical vortices caused by the geometry of the reduced space. However, inappropriate design of the distance between the showerhead and the susceptor can result in uneven distribution of the organic source in the vicinity of the substrate surface resulting in an uneven growth rate of the GaN film. Consequently, there exists an optimal chamber height that will give the best growth rate and uniformity to the GaN film as discussed in this study. This study provides comprehensive insight into the transport phenomena of GaN growth that includes coupled heat and mass transfer as well as chemical reactions. The results provide important information in a succinct format and enable decisions to be made about the showerhead and the geometrical design and size of a vertical MOCVD reactor.

  13. Digital breast tomosynthesis: studies of the effects of acquisition geometry on contrast-to-noise ratio and observer preference of low-contrast objects in breast phantom images.

    PubMed

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Chan, Heang-Ping; Schmitz, Andrea; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Telang, Santosh; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Helvie, Mark A; Paramagul, Chintana; Neal, Colleen; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Larson, Sandra C; Carson, Paul L

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acquisition geometry in digital breast tomosynthesis was evaluated with studies of contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) and observer preference. Contrast-detail (CD) test objects in 5 cm thick phantoms with breast-like backgrounds were imaged. Twelve different angular acquisitions (average glandular dose for each ~1.1 mGy) were performed ranging from narrow angle 16° with 17 projection views (16d17p) to wide angle 64d17p. Focal slices of SART-reconstructed images of the CD arrays were selected for CNR computations and the reader preference study. For the latter, pairs of images obtained with different acquisition geometries were randomized and scored by 7 trained readers. The total scores for all images and readings for each acquisition geometry were compared as were the CNRs. In general, readers preferred images acquired with wide angle as opposed to narrow angle geometries. The mean percent preferred was highly correlated with tomosynthesis angle (R = 0.91). The highest scoring geometries were 60d21p (95%), 64d17p (80%), and 48d17p (72%); the lowest scoring were 16d17p (4%), 24d9p (17%) and 24d13p (33%). The measured CNRs for the various acquisitions showed much overlap but were overall highest for wide-angle acquisitions. Finally, the mean reader scores were well correlated with the mean CNRs (R = 0.83). PMID:25211509

  14. Effect of geometry variations on lee-surface vortex-induced heating for flat-bottom three-dimensional bodies at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    Studies have shown that vortices can produce relatively severe heating on the leeward surfaces of conceptual hypersonic vehicles and that surface geometry can strongly influence this vortex-induced heating. Results which show the effects of systematic geometry variations on the vortex-induced lee-surface heating on simple flat-bottom three-dimensional bodies at angles of attack of 20 deg and 40 deg are presented. The tests were conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 6 and at a Reynolds number of 1.71 x 10 to the 7th power per meter.

  15. Main rotor free wake geometry effects on blade air loads and response for helicopters in steady maneuvers. Volume 2: Program listings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, S. G.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model and computer program was implemented to study the main rotor free wake geometry effects on helicopter rotor blade air loads and response in steady maneuvers. Volume 1 (NASA CR-2110) contains the theoretical formulation and analysis of results. Volume 2 contains the computer program listing.

  16. Effects of Video-Based Cooperative, Competitive and Individualized Instructional Strategies on the Performance of Senior Secondary Schools Students in Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambari, Amosa Isiaka; Shittu, Ahmed Tajudeen; Daramola, Florence Olutunu; James, Moses

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of video-based cooperative, competitive and individualized instructional strategies on the performance of senior secondary schools' students in geometry in Nigeria. It also examined the influence of gender on students' achievement. Pretest, posttest, experimental control group design was adopted for this study.…

  17. Dynamical gauge effects in an open quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Price, Craig; Liu, Qi; Gemelke, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    We describe new experimental techniques for simulation of high-energy field theories based on an analogy between open thermodynamic systems and effective dynamical gauge-fields following SU(2) × U(1) Yang-Mills models. By coupling near-resonant laser-modes to atoms moving in a disordered optical environment, we create an open system which exhibits a non-equilibrium phase transition between two steady-state behaviors, exhibiting scale-invariant behavior near the transition. By measuring transport of atoms through the disordered network, we observe two distinct scaling behaviors, corresponding to the classical and quantum limits for the dynamical gauge field. This behavior is loosely analogous to dynamical gauge effects in quantum chromodynamics, and can mapped onto generalized open problems in theoretical understanding of quantized non-Abelian gauge theories. Additional, the scaling behavior can be understood from the geometric structure of the gauge potential and linked to the measure of information in the local disordered potential, reflecting an underlying holographic principle. We acknowledge support from NSF Award No.1068570, and the Charles E. Kaufman Foundation.

  18. Scar and antiscar quantum effects in open chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, L

    1999-05-01

    We predict and numerically observe strong periodic orbit effects in the properties of weakly open quantum systems with a chaotic classical limit. Antiscars lead to a large number of exponentially narrow isolated resonances when the single-channel (or tunneling) opening is located on a short unstable orbit of the closed system; the probability to remain in the system at long times is thus exponentially enhanced over the random matrix theory prediction. The distribution of resonance widths and the probability to remain are quantitatively given in terms of only the stability matrix of the orbit on which the opening is placed. The long-time remaining probability density is nontrivially distributed over the available phase space; it can be enhanced or suppressed near orbits other than the one on which the lead is located, depending on the periods and classical actions of these other orbits. These effects of the short periodic orbits on quantum decay rates have no classical counterpart, and first appear on times scales much larger than the Heisenberg time of the system. All the predictions are quantitatively compared with numerical data. PMID:11969492

  19. Effects of mold geometry and taper angles on the filling mechanism of a nanoimprinted polymer using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Da; Fang, Te-Hua; Lin, Jen-Fin

    2014-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate how the nanoimprint lithography mechanism influences the filling interaction and mechanical deformation on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) surfaces. The effects of two mold geometries and various taper angles were investigated using stress, slip vector, molecular trajectories, and applied force analysis. For the PMMA formation mechanism on a concave-like mold imprint, the molecules were extruded upward into the mold space after the molecules on two sides were downward compressed by the mold. The formation mechanism is opposite to that for the tip-like mold imprint because the molecules are firstly compressed downward by the tip. The results show that the slowest filled areas of the pattern were at the two corners of the tip where stress value was low. The filling speed in both the tip-like mold and the concave-like mold imprint increased with the taper angle increased due to filling space and smaller capillary flow. Due to the effect of capillary flow, the concave-like mold needs much more loading force to transfer the pattern than the tip-like mold. The loading force and curve oscillation increased with the taper angle in the tip-like mold imprint, but they significantly increased with decreasing taper angle in the concave-like mold. The high stress was mainly concentrated on the molecules near the tip and underneath the mold for the tip-like mold and the concave-like mold imprint, respectively. The relationship of the magnitude of taper angle to the loading force is similar to stress and slip vector.

  20. Effect of imaging geometry on evaluating natural white-spot lesions using quantitative light-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masatoshi; Eckert, George J; Stookey, George K; Zero, Domenick T

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of imaging geometry on evaluating natural white-spot lesions with quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). A total of 34 specimens were prepared from extracted human premolars and permanent molars with white spots on the interproximal surface. The specimens were each adjusted to a final thickness of 3.0 mm. Images were acquired with the QLF system perpendicular to the white spots and at 5 degrees intervals up to 30 degrees above and below the perpendicular. The specimens were rotated around the buccolingual axis of the tooth (pitch angle) and around the long axis of the tooth (roll angle). The averages of fluorescence loss (DeltaF, %) and lesion size (mm2) were determined with QLF. Another variable, DeltaQ, which was defined as the fluorescence loss integrated over the lesion size (% x mm2), was also calculated. DeltaF was smaller when lesions were viewed from the cervical direction (angles less than 90 degrees ), and became bigger when viewed from the coronal direction. Roll angle did not significantly affect DeltaF. Apparent lesion size diminished with deviations from 90 degrees in both directions for pitch and roll angles. DeltaQ was affected by pitch and roll angles with the largest value at 90 degrees and values decreasing in both directions from 90 degrees. In general, there were significant differences for angles larger than 20 degrees from the perpendicular for all three QLF variables. This study suggests that angle is an important factor to control when performing QLF studies; however, small changes (deviations within 20 degrees ) have a minimal effect on QLF variables. PMID:14684976

  1. Single chamber fuel cells: Flow geometry, rate and composition considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Ionel C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-11-17

    Four different single chamber fuel cell designs were compared using propane-air gas mixtures. Gas flow around the electrodes has a significant influence on the open circuit voltage and the power density of the cell. The strong influence of flow geometry is likely due to its effect on gas composition, particularly on the oxygen chemical potential at the two electrodes as a result of gas mixing. The chamber design which exposes the cathode first to the inlet gas was found to yield the best performance at lower flow rates, while the open tube design with the electrodes equally exposed to the inlet gas worked best at higher flow rates.

  2. EFFECT OF COMBUSTOR INLET GEOMETRY ON ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE AND FLOW FIELD BEHAVIOUR OF THE LOW SWIRL INJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Therkelsen, Peter L.; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, Robert K.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Martin, Scott M.

    2009-11-30

    Low Swirl Injector (LSI) technology is a lean premixed combustion method that is being developed for fuel-flexible gas turbines. The objective of this study is to characterize the fuel effects and influences of combustor geometry on the LSI's overall acoustic signatures and flowfields. The experiments consist of 24 flames at atmospheric condition with bulk flows ranging between 10 and 18 m/s. The flames burn CH{sub 4} (at {phi} = 0.6 & 0.7) and a blend of 90% H{sub 2} - 10% CH{sub 4} by volume (at {phi} = 0.35 & 0.4). Two combustor configurations are used, consisting of a cylindrical chamber with and without a divergent quarl at the dump plane. The data consist of pressure spectral distributions at five positions within the system and 2D flowfield information measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results show that acoustic oscillations increase with U{sub 0} and {phi}. However, the levels in the 90% H{sub 2} flames are significantly higher than in the CH{sub 4} flames. For both fuels, the use of the quarl reduces the fluctuating pressures in the combustion chamber by up to a factor of 7. The PIV results suggest this to be a consequence of the quarl restricting the formation of large vortices in the outer shear layer. A Generalized Instability Model (GIM) was applied to analyze the acoustic response of baseline flames for each of the two fuels. The measured frequencies and the stability trends for these two cases are predicted and the triggered acoustic mode shapes identified.

  3. Effects of repetitive loading on bone mass and geometry in young male tennis players: a quantitative study using MRI.

    PubMed

    Ducher, Gaele; Daly, Robin M; Bass, Shona L

    2009-10-01

    Pre- and early puberty seem to be the most opportune times for exercise to improve bone strength in girls, but few studies have addressed this issue in boys. This study investigated the site-, surface-, and maturity-specific exercise-induced changes in bone mass and geometry in young boys. The osteogenic effects of loading were analyzed by comparing the playing and nonplaying humeri of 43 male pre-, peri-, and postpubertal competitive tennis players 10-19 yr of age. Total bone area, medullary area, and cortical area were determined at the mid (40-50%) and distal humerus (60-70%) of both arms using MRI. Humeral bone mass (BMC) was derived from a whole body DXA scan. In prepubertal boys, BMC was 17% greater in the playing compared with nonplaying arm (p < 0.001), which was accompanied by a 12-21% greater cortical area, because of greater periosteal expansion than medullary expansion at the midhumerus and periosteal expansion associated with medullary contraction at the distal humerus. Compared with prepuberty, the side-to-side differences in BMC (27%) and cortical area (20-33%) were greater in peripuberty (p < 0.01). No differences were found between peri- and postpuberty despite longer playing history in the postpubertal players. The osteogenic response to loading was greater in peri- compared with prepubertal boys, which is in contrast with our previous findings in girls and may be caused by differences in training history. This suggests that the window of opportunity to improve bone mass and size through exercise may be longer in boys than in girls.

  4. Effect of Transcatheter Mitral Annuloplasty With the Cardioband Device on 3-Dimensional Geometry of the Mitral Annulus.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Mani; Agricola, Eustachio; Alfieri, Ottavio; Baldus, Stephan; Colombo, Antonio; Filardo, Giovanni; Hammerstingl, Christophe; Huntgeburth, Michael; Kreidel, Felix; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; LaCanna, Giovanni; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Maisano, Francesco; Nickenig, Georg; Pollock, Benjamin D; Roberts, Bradley J; Vahanian, Alec; Grayburn, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    This study was performed to assess the acute intraprocedural effects of transcatheter direct mitral annuloplasty using the Cardioband device on 3-dimensional (3D) anatomy of the mitral annulus. Of 45 patients with functional mitral regurgitation (MR) enrolled in a single arm, multicenter, prospective trial, 22 had complete pre- and post-implant 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) images stored in native data format that allowed off-line 3D reconstruction. Images with the highest volume rate and best image quality were selected for analysis. Multiple measurements of annular geometry were compared from baseline to post-implant using paired t tests with Bonferroni correction to account for multiple comparisons. The device was successfully implanted in all patients, and MR was reduced to moderate in 2 patients, mild in 17 patients, and trace in 3 patients after final device cinching. Compared with preprocedural TEE, postprocedural TEE showed statistically significantly reductions in annular circumference (137 ± 15 vs 128 ± 17 mm; p = 0.042), intercommissural distance (42.4 ± 4.3 vs 38.6 ± 4.4 mm; p = 0.029), anteroposterior distance (40.0 ± 5.4 vs 37.0 ± 5.7 mm; p = 0.025), and aortic-mitral angle (117 ± 8° vs 112 ± 8°; p = 0.032). This study demonstrates that transcatheter direct mitral annuloplasty with the Cardioband device results in acute remodeling of the mitral annulus with successful reduction of functional MR.

  5. Effects of Insulin Therapy on Myocardial Lipid Content and Cardiac Geometry in Patients with Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, Drazenka; Winhofer, Yvonne; Promintzer-Schifferl, Miriam; Wohlschläger-Krenn, Evelyne; Anderwald, Christian Heinz; Wolf, Peter; Scherer, Thomas; Reiter, Gert; Trattnig, Siegfried; Luger, Anton; Krebs, Michael; Krssak, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Recent evidence suggests a link between myocardial steatosis and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Insulin, as a lipogenic and growth-promoting hormone, might stimulate intramyocardial lipid (MYCL) deposition and hypertrophy. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the short-term effects of insulin therapy (IT) on myocardial lipid content and morphology in patients with T2DM. Methods Eighteen patients with T2DM were recruited (age 56±2 years; HbA1c: 10.5±0.4%). In 10 patients with insufficient glucose control under oral medication IT was initiated due to secondary failure of oral glucose lowering therapy (IT-group), while 8 individuals did not require additional insulin substitution (OT-group). In order to assess MYCL and intrahepatic lipid (IHLC) content as well as cardiac geometry and function magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and imaging (MRI) examinations were performed at baseline (IT and OT) and 10 days after initiation of IT. Follow up measurements took place 181±49 days after IT. Results Interestingly, basal MYCLs were 50% lower in IT- compared to OT-group (0.41±0.12 vs. 0.80±0.11% of water signal; p = 0.034). After 10 days of IT, an acute 80%-rise in MYCL (p = 0.008) was observed, while IHLC did not change. Likewise, myocardial mass (+13%; p = 0.004), wall thickness in end-diastole (+13%; p = 0.030) and concentricity, an index of cardiac remodeling, increased (+28%; p = 0.026). In the long-term MYCL returned to baseline, while IHCL significantly decreased (−31%; p = 0.000). No acute changes in systolic left ventricular function were observed. Conclusions/Interpretation The initiation of IT in patients with T2DM was followed by an acute rise in MYCL concentration and myocardial mass. PMID:23226508

  6. FSI Simulations of Pulse Wave Propagation in Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: The Effects of Sac Geometry and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Han; Lin, Kexin; Shahmirzadi, Danial

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to quantify the effects of geometry and stiffness of aneurysms on the pulse wave velocity (PWV) and propagation in fluid–solid interaction (FSI) simulations of arterial pulsatile flow. Spatiotemporal maps of both the wall displacement and fluid velocity were generated in order to obtain the pulse wave propagation through fluid and solid media, and to examine the interactions between the two waves. The results indicate that the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac and variations in the sac modulus affect the propagation of the pulse waves both qualitatively (eg, patterns of change of forward and reflective waves) and quantitatively (eg, decreasing of PWV within the sac and its increase beyond the sac as the sac stiffness increases). The sac region is particularly identified on the spatiotemporal maps with a region of disruption in the wave propagation with multiple short-traveling forward/reflected waves, which is caused by the change in boundary conditions within the saccular region. The change in sac stiffness, however, is more pronounced on the wall displacement spatiotemporal maps compared to those of fluid velocity. We conclude that the existence of the sac can be identified based on the solid and fluid pulse waves, while the sac properties can also be estimated. This study demonstrates the initial findings in numerical simulations of FSI dynamics during arterial pulsations that can be used as reference for experimental and in vivo studies. Future studies are needed to demonstrate the feasibility of the method in identifying very mild sacs, which cannot be detected from medical imaging, where the material property degradation exists under early disease initiation. PMID:27478394

  7. Water slug formation and motion in gas flow channels: the effects of geometry, surface wettability, and gravity.

    PubMed

    Cheah, May J; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Benziger, Jay B

    2013-08-01

    Water emerging from ∼100 μm pores into millimeter-size gas flow channels forms drops that grow and become slugs which span the flow channel. Flowing gas causes the slugs to detach and move down the channel. The effect of channel geometry, surface wettability, and gravity on the formation and motion of water slugs has been analyzed using high-speed video images of the drops and differential pressure-time traces. Drops grow and appear, assuming a sequence of shapes that minimize the total interfacial energy of the gas-liquid and liquid-solid interfaces. The drops are initially spherical caps centered on the pore (the liquid contacts one wall). Above a certain size, the drops move to the corner, forming "corner drops" (the liquid contacts two walls). Corner drops grow across the channel, evolving into partial liquid bridges (drops confined by three walls), and finally the drops span the channel cross-section forming slugs (contacting all four walls). Smaller slugs are formed in channels with hydrophobic walls than in channels with hydrophilic walls. Smaller slugs are formed in channels with curved walls than in square or rectangular channels. Slugs move when the differential gas pressure overcomes the force to move the advancing and receding gas-liquid-solid contact lines of the slugs. Residual water left behind in corners by moving slugs reduces the barriers for drops to form slugs, causing the steady-state slug volumes to be smaller than those seen at start-up in dry channels.

  8. Effects of vehicle seat and belt geometry on belt fit for children with and without belt positioning booster seats.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew P; Ebert-Hamilton, Sheila M; Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A; Rupp, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    more likely to experience poor shoulder belt fit due to outboard and forward D-ring locations when sitting on the booster. Taller children experienced more-outboard shoulder belt fit in conditions without shoulder belt routing by the booster and in the one booster with poor shoulder belt routing. Adjustable shoulder belt routing on three of the highback boosters effectively eliminated stature effects, providing approximately the same shoulder belt fit for all children. Seat back angle did not have a significant effect on shoulder belt fit. The results of this study have broad applicability toward the improvement of occupant restraints for children The data show substantial effects of booster design on belt fit, particularly the effects of alternative lap and torso belt routing approaches. The data quantify the critical importance of belt anchorage location for child belt fit, providing an important foundation for efforts to optimize belt geometry for children.

  9. Effects of vehicle seat and belt geometry on belt fit for children with and without belt positioning booster seats.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew P; Ebert-Hamilton, Sheila M; Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A; Rupp, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    more likely to experience poor shoulder belt fit due to outboard and forward D-ring locations when sitting on the booster. Taller children experienced more-outboard shoulder belt fit in conditions without shoulder belt routing by the booster and in the one booster with poor shoulder belt routing. Adjustable shoulder belt routing on three of the highback boosters effectively eliminated stature effects, providing approximately the same shoulder belt fit for all children. Seat back angle did not have a significant effect on shoulder belt fit. The results of this study have broad applicability toward the improvement of occupant restraints for children The data show substantial effects of booster design on belt fit, particularly the effects of alternative lap and torso belt routing approaches. The data quantify the critical importance of belt anchorage location for child belt fit, providing an important foundation for efforts to optimize belt geometry for children. PMID:22703990

  10. Nonmonotonic behavior of the {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} eigenvalue of the one-speed neutron transport problem in two-dimensional cylindrical (R,Z) geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, A.K.; Paranjape, S.D.; Kumar, V.; Sahni, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    Nonmonotonic variation of the {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} eigenvalue (average number of secondaries per collision) with increasing {alpha}, the strength of forward scattering, has been observed earlier for one-dimensional infinite homogeneous slabs and infinitely long homogeneous cylinders. The authors have developed the Integral Transform (IT) method, an accurate semi-analytical method to obtain the C eigenvalue for a homogeneous cylinder (two-dimensional system). They are thus able to detect any nonmonotonic variation of C (with {alpha}) using the Sahni and Sjoestrand criterion. Along with the IT method, the authors also present the results obtained by the well-known numerical techniques like the discrete ordinates method using a high quadrature order and the Monte Carlo method for the same problem. The S{sub N} results show disagreement with the other two methods when one of the dimensions is very small (<0.05{lambda}{sub t}). They believe that even the 16th order quadrature set cannot integrate the angular flux accurately in these extreme situations. 12 refs., 9 tabs.

  11. Pyroelectric effect enhancement through product property under open circuit condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. H. S.; Huang, Z.

    2009-07-01

    An analytical model for the pyroelectric (PY) effect under open circuit condition and 2-2 connectivity laminates of various pairs of PY and nonpyroelectric (NP)/elastic materials has been developed. It is evident from our analysis that there indeed is a substantial dissimilarity between the PY coefficients and figure of merit for efficiency for various PY-NP pairs under short circuit and open circuit conditions. We believe this implies that there should be a greater distinction made between the PY coefficients under these two electrical conditions than previously thought. The indicators for various PY-NP material pairs that can be utilized to determine their PY coefficient enhancement potential under open circuit condition have been identified. The investigated PY materials are lead zirconate titanate (PZT-5H and PZT-5A), barium titanate, lithium tantalate, lithium niobate, and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), while the NP materials are stainless steel, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon), chlorinated polyvinyl chloride thermoplastic (CPVC), aluminum, zinc, and Invar 36. Extraordinarily large PY coefficient of 97×10-4 C m-2 K-1 at minimum thickness ratio Rmin is expected for PZT-5H-CPVC pair while PVDF-CPVC could show increase in the secondary PY coefficient of up to 350%. In addition, where the figure of merit for efficiency is concerned, for the same volume of the composite PZT-5A-PTFE pair it reaches 24, a 24-fold increase in efficiency at Rmin. Our analysis techniques should provide a methodological way for appraising the potentials of particular PY material and its 2-2 laminates for applications under open circuit condition such as PY X-ray generation, electron accelerator, and nuclear fusion.

  12. Analysis and modeling of photomask edge effects for 3D geometries and the effect on process window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Marshal A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2009-03-01

    Simulation was used to explore boundary layer models for 1D and 2D patterns that would be appropriate for fast CAD modeling of physical effects during design. FDTD simulation was used to compare rigorous thick mask modeling to a thin mask approximation (TMA). When features are large, edges can be viewed as independent and modeled as separate from one another, but for small mask features, edges experience cross-talk. For attenuating phase-shift masks, interaction distances as large as 150nm were observed. Polarization effects are important for accurate EMF models. Due to polarization effects, the edge perturbations in line ends become different compared to a perpendicular edge. For a mask designed to be real, the 90o transmission created at edges produces an asymmetry through focus, which is also polarization dependent. Thick mask fields are calculated using TEMPEST and Panoramic Technologies software. Fields are then analyzed in the near field and on wafer CDs to examine deviations from TMA.

  13. Development of procedures for calculating stiffness and damping properties of elastomers. Part 3: The effects of temperature, dissipation level and geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, A. J.; Tessarzik, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of temperature, dissipation level and geometry on the dynamic behavior of elastomer elements were investigated. Force displacement relationships in elastomer elements and the effects of frequency, geometry and temperature upon these relationships are reviewed. Based on this review, methods of reducing stiffness and damping data for shear and compression test elements to material properties (storage and loss moduli) and empirical geometric factors are developed and tested using previously generated experimental data. A prediction method which accounts for large amplitudes of deformation is developed on the assumption that their effect is to increase temperature through the elastomers, thereby modifying the local material properties. Various simple methods of predicting the radial stiffness of ring cartridge elements are developed and compared. Material properties were determined from the shear specimen tests as a function of frequency and temperature. Using these material properties, numerical predictions of stiffness and damping for cartridge and compression specimens were made and compared with corresponding measurements at different temperatures, with encouraging results.

  14. Enhancement of performance in porous bead-based microchip sensors: Effects of chip geometry on bio-agent capture

    PubMed Central

    Kulla, Eliona; Chou, Jie; Simmons, Glennon; Wong, Jorge; McRae, Michael P.; Patel, Rushi; Floriano, Pierre N.; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Leach, Robin J.; Thompson, Ian M.; McDevitt, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring low concentrations of clinically-important biomarkers using porous bead-based lab-on-a-chip (LOC) platforms is critical for the successful implementation of point-of-care (POC) devices. One way to meet this objective is to optimize the geometry of the bead holder, referred to here as a micro-container. In this work, two geometric micro-containers were explored, the inverted pyramid frustum (PF) and the inverted clipped pyramid frustum (CPF). Finite element models of this bead array assay system were developed to optimize the micro-container and bead geometries for increased pressure, to increase analyte capture in porous bead-based fluorescence immunoassays. Custom micro-milled micro-container structures containing an inverted CPF geometry resulted in a 28% reduction in flow-through regions from traditional anisotropically-etched pyramidal geometry derived from Si-111 termination layers. This novel “reduced flow-through” design resulted in a 33% increase in analyte penetration into the bead and twofold increase in fluorescence signal intensity as demonstrated with C-Reactive Protein (CRP) antigen, an important biomarker of inflammation. A consequent twofold decrease in the limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) of a proof-of-concept assay for the free isoform of Prostate-Specific Antigen (free PSA), an important biomarker for prostate cancer detection, is also presented. Furthermore, a 53% decrease in the bead diameter is shown to result in a 160% increase in pressure and 2.5-fold increase in signal, as estimated by COMSOL models and confirmed experimentally by epi-fluorescence microscopy. Such optimizations of the bead micro-container and bead geometries have the potential to significantly reduce the LODs and reagent costs for spatially programmed bead-based assay systems of this type. PMID:26097696

  15. Combinatorial Geometry Printer Plotting.

    1987-01-05

    Picture generates plots of two-dimensional slices through the three-dimensional geometry described by the combinatorial geometry (CG) package used in such codes as MORSE and QAD-CG. These plots are printed on a standard line printer.

  16. Turbine engine variable geometry device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, Casimir (Inventor); Lenz, Herman N. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A variable geometry device for use with the turbine nozzle of a turbine engine of the type having a support housing and a combustion chamber contained within the support housing. A pair of spaced walls in the support housing define an annular and radially extending nozzle passageway. The outer end of the nozzle passageway is open to the combustion chamber while the inner end of the nozzle passageway is open to one or more turbine stages. A plurality of circumferentially spaced nozzle vanes are mounted to one of the spaced walls and protrude across the nozzle passageway. An annular opening is formed around the opposite spaced wall and an annular ring is axially slidably mounted within the opening. A motor is operatively connected to this ring and, upon actuation, axially displaces the ring within the nozzle passageway. In addition, the ring includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced slots which register with the nozzle vanes so that the vane geometry remains the same despite axial displacement of the ring.

  17. 43 CFR 2091.5-4 - Segregative effect and opening: Water power withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-4 Segregative effect and opening: Water power... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Segregative effect and opening: Water power withdrawals. 2091.5-4 Section 2091.5-4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public...

  18. 43 CFR 2091.5-4 - Segregative effect and opening: Water power withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-4 Segregative effect and opening: Water power... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Segregative effect and opening: Water power withdrawals. 2091.5-4 Section 2091.5-4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public...

  19. 43 CFR 2091.5-4 - Segregative effect and opening: Water power withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-4 Segregative effect and opening: Water power... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Segregative effect and opening: Water power withdrawals. 2091.5-4 Section 2091.5-4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public...

  20. 43 CFR 2091.5-4 - Segregative effect and opening: Water power withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-4 Segregative effect and opening: Water power... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Segregative effect and opening: Water power withdrawals. 2091.5-4 Section 2091.5-4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public...

  1. Radiofrequency catheter ablation: different cooled and noncooled electrode systems induce specific lesion geometries and adverse effects profiles.

    PubMed

    Dorwarth, Uwe; Fiek, Michael; Remp, Thomas; Reithmann, Cristopher; Dugas, Martin; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Hoffmann, Ellen

    2003-07-01

    The success and safety of standard catheter radiofrequency ablation may be limited for ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare different cooled and noncooled catheter systems in terms of their specific lesion geometry, incidence of impedance rise, and crater and coagulum formation to facilitate appropriate catheter selection for special indications. The study investigated myocardial lesion generation of three cooled catheter systems (7 Fr, 4-mm tip): two saline irrigation catheters with a showerhead-type electrode tip (sprinkler) and a porous metal tip and an internally cooled catheter. Noncooled catheters (7 Fr) had a large tip electrode (8 mm) and a standard tip electrode (4 mm). RF energy was delivered on isolated porcine myocardium superfused with heparinized pig blood (37 degrees C) at power settings of 10-40 W. Both irrigated systems were characterized by a large lesion depth (8.1 +/- 1.6 mm) and a large lesion diameter (13.8 +/- 1.6 mm). In comparison, internally cooled lesions showed a similar lesion depth (8.0 +/- 1.0 mm), but a significantly smaller lesion diameter (12.3 +/- 1.2 mm,P = 0.04). Large tip lesions had a similar lesion diameter (14.5 +/- 1.6 mm), but a significantly smaller lesion depth (6.3 +/- 1.0 mm,P = 0.002) compared to irrigated lesions. However, lesion volume was not significantly different between the three cooled and the large tip catheter. To induce maximum lesion size, power requirements were three times higher for the irrigation systems and two times higher for the internally cooled and the large tip catheter compared to the standard catheter. Impedance rise was rarest with irrigated and large tip ablation. In case of impedance rise crater formation was a frequent observation (61-93%). Irrigated catheters prevented coagulum formation most effectively. Irrigated rather than internally cooled ablation appears to be most adequate for the induction of deep and

  2. Effect of Impeller Geometry on Lift-Off Characteristics and Rotational Attitude in a Monopivot Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kento; Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Yamane, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    The effect of the flow path geometry of the impeller on the lift-off and tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller against the hydrodynamic force was investigated in a centrifugal blood pump with an impeller supported by a single-contact pivot bearing. Four types of impeller were compared: the FR model with the flow path having both front and rear cutouts on the tip, the F model with the flow path having only a front cutout, the R model with only a rear cutout, and the N model with a straight flow path. First, the axial thrust and the movement about the pivot point, which was loaded on the surface of the impeller, were calculated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Next, the lift-off point and the tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller were measured experimentally. The CFD analysis showed that the axial thrust increased gently in the FR and R models as the flow rate increased, whereas it increased drastically in the F and N models. This difference in axial thrust was likely from the higher pressure caused by the smaller circumferential velocity in the gap between the top surface of the impeller and the casing in the FR and R models than in the F and N models, which was caused by the rear cutout. These results corresponded with the experimental results showing that the impellers lifted off in the F and N models as the flow rate increased, whereas it did not in the FR and R models. Conversely, the movement about the pivot point increased in the direction opposite the side with the pump outlet as the flow rate increased. However, the tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller, which oriented away from the pump outlet, was less than 0.8° in any model under any conditions, and was considered to negligibly affect the rotational attitude of the impeller. These results confirm that a rear cutout prevents lift-off of the impeller caused by a decrease in the axial thrust.

  3. On the in-vivo deformation of the mitral valve anterior leaflet: Effects of annular geometry and referential configuration

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Eckert, Chad E.; Koomalsingh, Kevin; McGarvey, Jeremy; Minakawa, Mashito; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Alteration of the native mitral valve (MV) shape has been hypothesized to have a profound effect on the local tissue stress distribution, and is potentially linked to limitations in repair durability. The present study was undertaken to elucidate the relation between MV annular shape and central mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) strain history, using flat annuloplasty in an ovine model. In addition, we report for the first time the presence of residual in-vivo leaflet strains. In-vivo leaflet deformations were measured using sonocrystal transducers sutured to the MVAL (n=10), with the 3D positions acquired over the full cardiac cycle. In six animals a flat ring was sutured to the annulus and the transducer positions recorded, while in the remaining four the MV was excised from the exsanguinated heart and the stress-free transducer positions obtained. In the central region of the MVAL the peak stretch values, referenced to the minimum left ventricular pressure (LVP), were 1.10 ± 0.01 and 1.31 ± 0.03 (mean ± standard error) in the circumferential and radial directions, respectively. Following flat ring annuloplasty, the central MVAL contracted 28% circumferentially and elongated 16% radially at minimum LVP, and the circumferential direction was under a negative strain state during the entire cardiac cycle. After valve excision from the exsanguinated heart, the MVAL contracted significantly (18% and 30% in the circumferential and radial directions, respectively), indicating the presence of substantial in-vivo residual strains. While the physiological function of the residual strains (and their associated stresses) are at present unknown, accounting for their presence is clearly necessary for accurate computational simulations of MV function. Moreover, we demonstrated that changes in annular geometry dramatically alter valvular functional strains in-vivo. As levels of homeostatic strains are related to tissue remodeling and homeostasis, our results suggest that

  4. Geometry and Erdkinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nathaniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Chronicles a teacher's first year teaching geometry at the Hershey Montessori Farm School in Huntsburg, Ohio. Instructional methods relied on Euclid primary readings and combined pure abstract logic with practical applications of geometry on the land. The course included geometry background imparted by Montessori elementary materials as well as…

  5. Eyes open versus eyes closed - Effect on human rotational responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Conrad, III; Furman, Joseph M. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of eyelid closure on the response to rotational vestibular stimulation was assessed by evaluating 16 normal human subjects with both earth vertical axis (EVA) and earth horizontal axis (EHA) yaw rotations with either eyes closed (EC) or eyes open in the dark (EOD). Results indicated that for EVA rotation, the subjects' responses were of larger magnitude and less variable with EOD than with EC. However, for EHA rotation, responses were of larger magnitude and equally variable with EC as compared to EOD. Data also indicated that the quality of the EHA response with EC was altered because eyelid closure influenced the amount of periodic gaze. It is concluded that eyelid closure has an effect upon both canalocular and otolithocular reflexes and it is suggested that both EVA and EHA rotational testing be performed with EOD rather than with EC.

  6. Analysis of the influence of the cell geometry, orientation and cell proximity effects on the electric field distribution from direct RF exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastián, J. L.; Muñoz, S.; Sancho, M.; Miranda, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper shows the importance of using a cell model with the proper geometry, orientation and internal structure to study possible cellular effects from direct radiofrequency exposure. For this purpose, the electric field intensity is calculated, using the finite element numerical technique, in single- and multilayer spherical, cylindrical and ellipsoidal mammalian cell models exposed to linearly polarized electromagnetic plane waves of frequencies 900 and 2450 MHz. An extensive analysis is performed on the influence that the cell geometry and orientation with respect to the external field have in the value of the electric field induced in the membrane and cytoplasm. We also show the significant role that the cytoplasmic and extracellular bound water layers play in determining the electric field intensity for the cylindrical and ellipsoidal cell models. Finally, a study of the mutual interactions between cells shows that polarizing effects between cells significantly modify the values of field intensity within the cell.

  7. The safest parameters for FUS-induced blood-brain barrier opening without effects on the opening volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Olumolade, Yemi; Wang, Shutao; Wu, Shih-Ying; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-11-01

    Acoustic cavitation has been identified as the main physical mechanism for the focused ultrasound (FUS) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. In this paper, the mechanism of stable cavitation (SC) and inertial cavitation (IC) responsible for BBB opening was investigated. Thirty-three (n=33) mice were intravenously injected with bubbles of 4-5 μm in diameter. The right hippocampus was then sonicated using focused 1.5-MHz ultrasound and three different studies were carried out. First, pulse lengths (PLs) of 0.1, 0.5, 2, and 5 ms at 0.18- MPa peak rarefactional pressure with 5-Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and 5-minute duration were used to identify the threshold of PL using SC. Second, the effects of the duty cycle and exposure time were investigated. Third, the BBB opening size was compared between the SC and the IC. In the case of IC-induced BBB opening, a burst sequence (3-cycles PL; 5-Hz burst repetition frequency (BRF); 30 s duration) at 0.45 MPa was applied. Passive cavitation detection was performed with each sonication to detect whether a broadband response was obtained, i.e., if IC occurred, during BBB opening. The properties of BBB opening were measured through MRI. The threshold of PL for BBB opening was identified between 0.1 and 0.5 ms using SC, but the BBB can be opened in few cycles using IC. The BBB opening volume and normalized intensity increased with the PL, but reached saturation when the PL was above 2 ms. Once the PL threshold was reached, the same exposure time induced a similar BBB opening volume, but longer sonication duration induced higher MR intensity. The duty cycle was found not to play an important role on the BBB opening. Comparable BBB opening volume (20-25 mm3) could be reached between long PL (7500 cycles, i.e., 5 ms) at 0.18 MPa and 3 cycles at 0.45 MPa. 3-kDa fluorescently tagged dextran may be able to diffuse to the parenchyma after IC-induced BBB opening at 0.45 MPa but not after SC-induced BBB opening at 0.18 MPa.

  8. Effects of bleed-hole geometry and plenum pressure on three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer/bleed interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, Wei J.; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Shih, Tom I.-P.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate 3D shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions on a flat plate with bleed through one or more circular holes that vent into a plenum. This study was focused on how bleed-hole geometry and pressure ratio across bleed holes affect the bleed rate and the physics of the flow in the vicinity of the holes. The aspects of the bleed-hole geometry investigated include angle of bleed hole and the number of bleed holes. The plenum/freestream pressure ratios investigated range from 0.3 to 1.7. This study is based on the ensemble-averaged, 'full compressible' Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations closed by the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model. Solutions to the ensemble-averaged N-S equations were obtained by an implicit finite-volume method using the partially-split, two-factored algorithm of Steger on an overlapping Chimera grid.

  9. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  10. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  11. Effects of spanwise nozzle geometry and location on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing configuration at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.; Yip, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    A V/STOL tunnel study was performed to determine the effects of spanwise blowing on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a model using a vectored-over-wing powered lift concept. The effects of spanwise nozzle throat area, internal and external nozzle geometry, and vertical and axial location were investigated. These effects were studied at a Mach number of 0.186 over an angle-of-attack range from 14 deg to 40 deg. A high pressure air system was used to provide jet-exhaust simulation. Engine nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to approximately 3.75.

  12. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  13. Radiocarbon dating of open systems with bomb effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.; Long, A.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1986-01-01

    The application of radiocarbon dating is extended to include systems that are slowly exchanging carbon with the atmosphere. Simple formulae are derived that relate the true age and the exchange rate of carbon to the apparent radiocarbon age. A radiocarbon age determination does not give a unique true age and exchange rate but determines a locus of values bounded by a minimum age and a minimum exchange rate. It is found that for radiocarbon ages as large as 10,000 years it is necessary to correct for the anthropogenic radiocarbon produced in the atmosphere by nuclear weapons testing. A one-term exponential approximation, with an e-folding time of 14.43 years, is used to model this effect and is shown to be accurate to within 3 percent for exchange time constants of 100 years and greater. The approach developed here is not specific to radiocarbon and can be applied to other radioisotopes in open systems.

  14. Radiocarbon dating of open systems with bomb effect

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, C.P.; Long, A.; Friedmann, E.I.

    1986-03-10

    The application of radiocarbon dating is extended to include systems that are slowly exchanging carbon with the atmosphere. Simple formulae are derived that relate the true age and the exchange rate of carbon to the apparent radiocarbon age. A radiocarbon age determination does not give a unique true age and exchange rate but determines a locus of values bounded by a minimum age and a minimum exchange rate. It is found that for radiocarbon ages as large as 10,000 years it is necessary to correct for the anthropogenic radiocarbon produced in the atmosphere by nuclear weapons testing. A one-term exponential approximation, with an e-folding time of 14.43 years, is used to model this effect and is shown to be accurate to within 3% for exchange time constants of 100 years and greater. The approach developed here is not specific to radiocarbon and can be applied to other radioisotopes in open systems.

  15. Effect of fuel and nozzle geometry on the off-axis oscillation of needle in diesel injectors using high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Wang, J.

    2016-05-01

    The diesel spray characteristics are strongly influenced by the flow dynamics inside the injector nozzle. Moreover, the off-axis oscillation of needle could lead to variation of orifice flow in the nozzle. In this paper, the needle oscillation was investigated using high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging and quantitative image processing. The effects of fuel, injection pressure and nozzle geometry on the needle oscillation were analyzed. The results showed that the vertical and horizontal oscillation of needle was independent on the injection pressure. The maximum oscillation range of 14μ m was found. Biodiesel application slightly decreased the needle oscillation due to high viscosity. The needle oscillation range increased generally with increasing hole number. The larger needle oscillation in multi-hole injectors was dominated by the geometry problem or production issue at lower needle lift. In addition, the influence of needle oscillation on the spray morphology was also discussed.

  16. Effects of open-top chambers on 'Valencia' orange trees

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Takemoto, B.K.; Kats, G.; Dawson, P.J.; Morrison, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Young 'Valencia' orange trees (Citrus sinensis(L) Osbeck) were grown for four years in large open-top chambers with ambient (nonfiltered) air or in outside air to determine any effects of the chambers on the air pollutant susceptibility of the trees. Long-term ozone average concentrations (12 hours, growing season) were 8% lower, and cumulative ozone dose (hourly values >0.1 microL/L) was 29% lower in ambient chambers compared to outside air. Fruit yields were much higher (>39%) for ambient chamber trees than for outside trees over three harvests, due at least partly to less fruit drop during the growing season for ambient chamber trees. Ambient chamber trees were much larger than outside trees and produced over twice as much leaf material over four years of study. Leaves on ambient chamber trees were larger and less dense than on outside trees. Leaves on ambient chamber trees were under more stress than leaves on outside trees during summer months; with lower stomatal conductances (14% average) and transpiration rates (12%), and more negative leaf water pressure potentials (28%). In contrast, leaves on ambient chamber trees had higher net photosynthetic rates (13%) and higher leaf starch concentrations prior to tree flowering (31%), than leaves on outside trees. While these results indicated large long-term impacts on tree growth which must be considered when using open-top chambers, they did not indicate any net effect of chambers on the air pollutant susceptibility of trees which would limit the usefulness of chamber tree data for air quality impact assessment purposes.

  17. The Effect of Network Geometry on Electron Transport in a Titanium Dioxide Photoanode of a Dye-sensitized Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Sonia Susan

    The dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a photoelectrochemical cell that has garnered considerable attention because of its high efficiencies and potentially low production costs. The technology is based on a layer of mesoscopic TiO 2 particles, which significantly increases the optical path of the incident light that is harvested by the surface-anchored sensitizer molecules, whilst keeping an efficient contact with the electrolytic solution. The solar cell configuration that first achieved a high efficiency (˜7.5%) had a randomly connected network of titania nanoparticles, ruthenium polypyridyl complexes as the sensitizer, and an iodide/triiodide redox couple dissolved in an organic electrolyte. While the disordered nanoparticle network has a high surface area which maximizes the photogenerated electron density, the nanostructure also has a large number of surface states. These surface states act as traps and are known to limit the transport of electrons within such electrodes thereby hindering progress in achieving higher efficiencies. The structural disorder at the contact between two crystalline nanoparticles leads to enhanced scattering of free electrons, thus reducing electron mobility. An interconnected photoanode architecture offers the potential for improved electron transport by reducing the degree of disorder. This Thesis investigates the effect of the TiO2 network geometry on electron movement within the DSSC. In this regard, inverse opal structures with hexagonally close-packed pores and macroscopic (˜microm) order are synthesized and evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively (via FFT) with respect to their degree of interconnectedness. An inverse opal TiO2 electrode possesses advantages that supplement those of current disordered electrodes: (a) high surface area for dye adhesion, (b) large area contact between the sensitizer and the electrolyte, which aids electron transfer reactions, and (c) scattering of incident radiation due to the inherent

  18. 43 CFR 2091.5-5 - Segregative effect and opening: Federal Power Act withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-5 Segregative effect and opening: Federal... laws; however, the lands remain open to the location, lease or disposal of the mineral estate. (2) The... lands from the operation of the mining laws. (See part 3730). (b) Lands withdrawn under section 24...

  19. 43 CFR 2091.5-5 - Segregative effect and opening: Federal Power Act withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-5 Segregative effect and opening: Federal... laws; however, the lands remain open to the location, lease or disposal of the mineral estate. (2) The... lands from the operation of the mining laws. (See part 3730). (b) Lands withdrawn under section 24...

  20. 43 CFR 2091.5-5 - Segregative effect and opening: Federal Power Act withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-5 Segregative effect and opening: Federal... laws; however, the lands remain open to the location, lease or disposal of the mineral estate. (2) The... lands from the operation of the mining laws. (See part 3730). (b) Lands withdrawn under section 24...

  1. 43 CFR 2091.5-5 - Segregative effect and opening: Federal Power Act withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-5 Segregative effect and opening: Federal... laws; however, the lands remain open to the location, lease or disposal of the mineral estate. (2) The... lands from the operation of the mining laws. (See part 3730). (b) Lands withdrawn under section 24...

  2. Scaling the effects of moose browsing on forage distribution, from the geometry of plant canopies to landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Jager, N. R.; Pastor, J.; Hodgson, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity influences large herbivores by altering their feeding rates, but as herbivores attempt to maximize feeding rates they also create spatial heterogeneity by altering plant growth. Herbivore feeding rates thus provide a quantitative link between the causes and consequences of spatial heterogeneity in herbivore-dominated ecosystems. The fractal geometry of plant canopies determines both the density and mass of twigs available to foraging herbivores. These properties determine a threshold distance between plants (d*) that distinguishes the mechanisms regulating herbivore intake rates. When d* is greater than the actual distance between plants (d), intake is regulated by the rate of food processing in the mouth. But when d* < d, intake is regulated by the rate at which the herbivore encounters new plants. Alterations to plant geometry due to past browsing could change the rate at which herbivores encounter and process bites of plant tissue, modify d* relative to d, and thus change intake rates and the distribution of mechanisms regulating it across landscapes. We measured changes in the geometry of aspen (Populus tremuloides) and balsam fir (Abies balsamea) saplings along gradients of moose browsing from 2001 to 2005 at Isle Royale National Park, Michigan, USA. For aspen saplings, fractal dimension of bite density, bite mass, and forage biomass responded quadratically to increasing moose browsing and were greatest at -3-4 g-g.m-2.yr"1 consumption. For balsam fir, in contrast, these same measures declined steadily with increasing moose browsing. The different responses of plant canopies to increased browsing altered d* around plants. In summer, d* > d for aspen saplings at all prior consumption levels. Food processing therefore regulated summer moose feeding rates across our landscapes. In winter, changes in bite mass due to past browsing were sufficient to cause d* < d for aspen and balsam fir. Therefore, travel velocity and food processing

  3. An experimental investigation of the cooling channel geometry effects on the internal forced convection of liquid methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo, Adrian

    Rocket engine fuel alternatives have been an area of discussion for use in high performance engines and deep spaceflight missions. In particular, LCH4 has showed promise as an alternative option in regeneratively cooled rocket engines due to its non-toxic nature, similar storage temperatures to liquid oxygen, and its potential as an in situ resource. However, data pertaining to the heat transfer characteristics of LCH4 is limited. For this reason, a High Heat Transfer Test Facility (HHTTF) at the University of Texas at El Paso's (UTEP) Center for Space Exploration Technology and Research has been developed for the purpose of flowing LCH4 through several heated tube geometry designs subjected to a constant heat flux. In addition, a Methane Condensing Unit (MCU) is integrated to the system setup to supply LCH4 to the test facility. Through the use of temperature and pressure measurements, this experiment will serve not only to study the heat transfer characteristics of LCH4; it serves as a method of simulating the cooling channels of a regeneratively cooled rocket engine at a subscale level. The cross sections for the cooling channels investigated are a 1.8 mm x 1.8 mm square channel, 1.8 mm x 4.1 mm rectangular channel, 3.2 mm and 6.34 mm inside diameter channel, and a 1.8 mm x 14.2 mm high aspect ratio cooling channel (HARCC). The test facility is currently designed for test pressures between 1.03 MPa to 2.06 MPa and heat fluxes up to 5 MW/m2. Results show that at the given test pressures, the Reynolds number reaches up to 140,000 for smaller cooling channels (3.2 mm diameter tube and 1.8 mm x 4.1 mm rectangle) while larger cooling channel geometries (6.35 mm diameter and HARCC) reached Reynolds number around 70,000. Nusselt numbers reached as high as 320 and 265 for a 3.2 mm diameter tube and 1.8 mm x 4.1 mm rectangular channel respectively. For cooling channel geometries with 6.35 mm diameter and HARCC geometry, Nusselt numbers reached 136 (excluding an outlier

  4. Effects of valve geometry and tissue anisotropy on the radial stretch and coaptation area of tissue-engineered heart valves.

    PubMed

    Loerakker, S; Argento, G; Oomens, C W J; Baaijens, F P T

    2013-07-26

    Tissue engineering represents a promising technique to overcome the limitations of the current valve replacements, since it allows for creating living autologous heart valves that have the potential to grow and remodel. However, also this approach still faces a number of challenges. One particular problem is regurgitation, caused by cell-mediated tissue retraction or the mismatch in geometrical and material properties between tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) and their native counterparts. The goal of the present study was to assess the influence of valve geometry and tissue anisotropy on the deformation profile and closed configuration of TEHVs. To achieve this aim, a range of finite element models incorporating different valve shapes was developed, and the constitutive behavior of the tissue was modeled using an established computational framework, where the degree of anisotropy was varied between values representative of TEHVs and native valves. The results of this study suggest that valve geometry and tissue anisotropy are both important to maximize the radial strains and thereby the coaptation area. Additionally, the minimum degree of anisotropy that is required to obtain positive radial strains was shown to depend on the valve shape and the pressure to which the valves are exposed. Exposure to pulmonary diastolic pressure only yielded positive radial strains if the anisotropy was comparable to the native situation, whereas considerably less anisotropy was required if the valves were exposed to aortic diastolic pressure.

  5. Optically defined mechanical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barasheed, Abeer Z.; Müller, Tina; Sankey, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    In the field of optomechanics, radiation forces have provided a particularly high level of control over the frequency and dissipation of mechanical elements. Here we propose a class of optomechanical systems in which light exerts a similarly profound influence over two other fundamental parameters: geometry and mass. By applying an optical trap to one lattice site of an extended phononic crystal, we show it is possible to create a tunable, localized mechanical mode. Owing to light's simultaneous and constructive coupling with the structure's continuum of modes, we estimate that a trap power at the level of a single intracavity photon should be capable of producing a significant effect within a realistic, chip-scale device.

  6. Organic solvent-induced changes in membrane geometry in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells - a common narcotic effect?

    PubMed

    Meulenberg, Cécil J W; de Groot, Aart; Westerink, Remco H S; Vijverberg, Henk P M

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to organic solvents may cause narcotic effects. At the cellular level, these narcotic effects have been associated with a reduction in neuronal excitability caused by changes in membrane structure and function. In order to critically test whether changes in membrane geometry contribute to these narcotic effects, cultured human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells have been exposed to selected organic solvents. The solvent-induced changes in cell membrane capacitance were investigated using the whole-cell patch clamp technique for real-time capacitance measurements. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to the cyclic hydrocarbons m-xylene, toluene, and cyclohexane caused a rapid and reversible increase of membrane capacitance. The aliphatic, nonpolar n-hexane did not cause a detectable change of whole-cell membrane capacitance, whereas the amphiphiles n-hexanol and n-hexylamine caused an increase of membrane capacitance and a concomitant reduction in membrane resistance. Despite a large difference in dielectric properties, the chlorinated hydrocarbons 1,1,2,2-tetrachoroethane and tetrachloroethylene caused a similar magnitude increase in membrane capacitance. The theory on membrane capacitance has been applied to deduce changes in membrane geometry caused by solvent partitioning. Although classical observations have shown that solvents increase the membrane capacitance per unit area of membrane, i.e., increase membrane thickness, the present results demonstrate that solvent partitioning predominantly leads to an increase in membrane surface area and to a lesser degree to an increase in membrane thickness. Moreover, the present results indicate that the physicochemical properties of each solvent are important determinants for its specific effects on membrane geometry. This implies that the hypothesis that solvent partitioning is associated with a common perturbation of membrane structure needs to be revisited and cannot account for the commonly observed narcotic effects of

  7. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone suppressive therapy on bone geometry in the hip area of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jae Hoon; Jung, Kyong Yeun; Kim, Kyoung Min; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Park, Young Joo; Park, Do Joon; Jang, Hak Chul

    2016-02-01

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism has been reported to increase the fracture risk. However, the effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressive therapy on bone geometry in the hip area of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TSH suppression on bone geometry in the hip area of pre- and postmenopausal women with DTC. We conducted a retrospective cohort study including 99 women with DTC (25 pre- and 74 postmenopausal) who had received TSH suppressive therapy for at least 3years and 297 control subjects (75 and 222, respectively) matched for sex and age. Bone mineral density (BMD) in the spine and hip area and bone geometry at the femoral neck measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were compared between patients and controls. The association between thyroid hormone and bone parameters was investigated. All analyses of bone parameters were adjusted for age, body mass index, and serum calcium levels. In premenopausal subjects, TSH suppressive therapy was not associated with poor bone parameters. In postmenopausal subjects, patients with DTC undergoing TSH suppression showed lower cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI), cross-sectional area, and section modulus and thinner cortical thickness at the femoral neck than those of control subjects, whereas their femoral neck BMD was comparable with controls. Total hip BMD was lower in postmenopausal patients than in controls. CSMI and section modulus at the femoral neck were independently associated with serum free T4 levels in postmenopausal patients. The difference in femoral neck bone geometry between patients and controls was only apparent in postmenopausal DTC patients with free T4 >1.79ng/dL (23.04pmol/l), and not in those with free T4 levels ≤1.79ng/dL (23.04pmol/l). TSH suppression in postmenopausal DTC patients was associated with decreased bone strength by altering bone geometry rather than BMD in the hip area

  8. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone suppressive therapy on bone geometry in the hip area of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jae Hoon; Jung, Kyong Yeun; Kim, Kyoung Min; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Park, Young Joo; Park, Do Joon; Jang, Hak Chul

    2016-02-01

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism has been reported to increase the fracture risk. However, the effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressive therapy on bone geometry in the hip area of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TSH suppression on bone geometry in the hip area of pre- and postmenopausal women with DTC. We conducted a retrospective cohort study including 99 women with DTC (25 pre- and 74 postmenopausal) who had received TSH suppressive therapy for at least 3years and 297 control subjects (75 and 222, respectively) matched for sex and age. Bone mineral density (BMD) in the spine and hip area and bone geometry at the femoral neck measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were compared between patients and controls. The association between thyroid hormone and bone parameters was investigated. All analyses of bone parameters were adjusted for age, body mass index, and serum calcium levels. In premenopausal subjects, TSH suppressive therapy was not associated with poor bone parameters. In postmenopausal subjects, patients with DTC undergoing TSH suppression showed lower cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI), cross-sectional area, and section modulus and thinner cortical thickness at the femoral neck than those of control subjects, whereas their femoral neck BMD was comparable with controls. Total hip BMD was lower in postmenopausal patients than in controls. CSMI and section modulus at the femoral neck were independently associated with serum free T4 levels in postmenopausal patients. The difference in femoral neck bone geometry between patients and controls was only apparent in postmenopausal DTC patients with free T4 >1.79ng/dL (23.04pmol/l), and not in those with free T4 levels ≤1.79ng/dL (23.04pmol/l). TSH suppression in postmenopausal DTC patients was associated with decreased bone strength by altering bone geometry rather than BMD in the hip area

  9. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Thrust Efficiency of a Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley; Polzin, Kurt; Emsellem, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA) [4, 5] is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and permanent magnets that are arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the inductive coil is high. The use of a conical theta-pinch coil is under investigation. The conical geometry serves to provide neutral propellant containment and plasma plume focusing that is improved relative to the more common planar geometry of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) [2, 3], however a conical coil imparts a direct radial acceleration of the current sheet that serves to rapidly decouple the propellant from the coil, limiting the direct axial electromagnetic acceleration in favor of an indirect acceleration mechanism that requires significant heating of the propellant within the volume bounded by the current sheet. In this paper, we describe thrust stand measurements performed to characterize the performance

  10. Effects of surface texture and measurement geometry on the near infrared water-of-hydration absorption bands. Implications for the Martian regolith water content.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Schmitt, B.

    Near-IR reflectance spectroscopy is widely used to detect mineral hydration on Solar System surfaces by the observation of absorption bands at 1.9 and 3 µm. Recent studies established empirical relationships between the strength of the 3 µm band and the water content of the studied minerals (Milliken et al., 2005). These results have especially been applied to the OMEGA dataset to derive global maps of the Martian regolith water content (Jouglet et al., 2006 and Milliken et al., 2006). However, parameters such as surface texture and measurement geometry are known to have a strong effect on reflectance spectra but their influence on the hydration bands is poorly documented. The aim of this work is the determination of the quantitative effects of particle size, mixing between materials with different albedo and measurement geometry on the absorption bands at 1.9 and 3 µm. We used both an experimental and a modeling approach to study these effects. Bidirectional reflectance spectra were measured for series of well characterized samples (smectite, volcanic tuff and coals, pure and mixed) and modeled with optical constants of a smectite (Roush, 2005). Criteria commonly used to estimate the strength of the bands were then calculated on these spectra. We show that particle size has a strong effect on the 1.9 and 3 µm bands strength, especially for the finest particles (less than 200 µm). Mixing between a fine smectite powder and anthracite powders with various particle sizes (modeled by a synthetic neutral material) highlights the strong effect of the materials albedo on the hydration band estimation criteria. Measurement geometry has a significant effect on the bands strength for high phase angles. Furthermore, the relative variations of band strength with measurement geometry appear very dependent on the surface texture. We will present in details the relationships between these physical parameters and various criteria chosen to estimate the hydration bands

  11. RSRM Propellant Grain Geometry Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Andrew A.; Endicott, Joni B.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is composed of viewgraphs about the RSRM propellant grain geometry modification project, which hopes to improve personnel and system safety by modifying propellant grain geometry to improve structural factors of safety. Using techniques such as Finite Element Analysis to determine blend radii required to reduce localized stresses, and ballistic predictions to ensure that the ballistics, ignition transient and Block Model have not been adversely affected, the project hopes to build and test FSM-10 with a new design, and determine flight effectivity pending successful test evaluation.

  12. Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices: A Simple, Low-Cost, Effective Method for Increasing Transparency

    PubMed Central

    Kidwell, Mallory C.; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Baranski, Erica; Piechowski, Sarah; Falkenberg, Lina-Sophia; Sonnleitner, Carina; Fiedler, Susann; Nosek, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Beginning January 2014, Psychological Science gave authors the opportunity to signal open data and materials if they qualified for badges that accompanied published articles. Before badges, less than 3% of Psychological Science articles reported open data. After badges, 23% reported open data, with an accelerating trend; 39% reported open data in the first half of 2015, an increase of more than an order of magnitude from baseline. There was no change over time in the low rates of data sharing among comparison journals. Moreover, reporting openness does not guarantee openness. When badges were earned, reportedly available data were more likely to be actually available, correct, usable, and complete than when badges were not earned. Open materials also increased to a weaker degree, and there was more variability among comparison journals. Badges are simple, effective signals to promote open practices and improve preservation of data and materials by using independent repositories. PMID:27171007

  13. Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices: A Simple, Low-Cost, Effective Method for Increasing Transparency.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Mallory C; Lazarević, Ljiljana B; Baranski, Erica; Hardwicke, Tom E; Piechowski, Sarah; Falkenberg, Lina-Sophia; Kennett, Curtis; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sonnleitner, Carina; Hess-Holden, Chelsey; Errington, Timothy M; Fiedler, Susann; Nosek, Brian A

    2016-05-01

    Beginning January 2014, Psychological Science gave authors the opportunity to signal open data and materials if they qualified for badges that accompanied published articles. Before badges, less than 3% of Psychological Science articles reported open data. After badges, 23% reported open data, with an accelerating trend; 39% reported open data in the first half of 2015, an increase of more than an order of magnitude from baseline. There was no change over time in the low rates of data sharing among comparison journals. Moreover, reporting openness does not guarantee openness. When badges were earned, reportedly available data were more likely to be actually available, correct, usable, and complete than when badges were not earned. Open materials also increased to a weaker degree, and there was more variability among comparison journals. Badges are simple, effective signals to promote open practices and improve preservation of data and materials by using independent repositories. PMID:27171007

  14. Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices: A Simple, Low-Cost, Effective Method for Increasing Transparency.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Mallory C; Lazarević, Ljiljana B; Baranski, Erica; Hardwicke, Tom E; Piechowski, Sarah; Falkenberg, Lina-Sophia; Kennett, Curtis; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sonnleitner, Carina; Hess-Holden, Chelsey; Errington, Timothy M; Fiedler, Susann; Nosek, Brian A

    2016-05-01

    Beginning January 2014, Psychological Science gave authors the opportunity to signal open data and materials if they qualified for badges that accompanied published articles. Before badges, less than 3% of Psychological Science articles reported open data. After badges, 23% reported open data, with an accelerating trend; 39% reported open data in the first half of 2015, an increase of more than an order of magnitude from baseline. There was no change over time in the low rates of data sharing among comparison journals. Moreover, reporting openness does not guarantee openness. When badges were earned, reportedly available data were more likely to be actually available, correct, usable, and complete than when badges were not earned. Open materials also increased to a weaker degree, and there was more variability among comparison journals. Badges are simple, effective signals to promote open practices and improve preservation of data and materials by using independent repositories.

  15. Unusual large-pitch banding in poly(L-lactic acid): Effects of composition and geometry confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Eamor M.; Lugito, Graecia; Hsieh, Ya-Ting; Nurkhamidah, Siti

    2014-02-24

    Lamellar patterns and orientations in blends of two crystalline polymers: poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and low-molecular-weight poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) were investigated using polarizing light optical microscopy (POM), and atomic and scanning electron microscopy (AFM, SEM). Specific etching off of PEO was used to reveal the complex earlier-grown PLLA lamellae patterns with various PEO content in blends. Banding of extremely long pitch (50 μm) in crystallized PLLA spherulites was induced by two kinetic factors: geometry confinement by top cover and introduction of diluent such as PEO. The mechanisms and correlation among the lamellar assembly, ring bands, and cracks are exemplified. Lamellar patterns and ring-band types in blends were found to vary with respect to not only blend compositions, but also confinement of top-cover.

  16. The effect of gravitational spin-orbit coupling on the circular photon orbit in the Schwarzschild geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Xiong, Cai-Dong; Qiu, Qi; Wang, Yun-Xiang; Shi, Shuang-Jin

    2016-06-01

    The (1,\\quad 0)\\oplus (0,\\quad 1) representation of the group SL(2, C) provides a six-component spinor equivalent to the electromagnetic field tensor. By means of the (1,\\quad 0)\\oplus (0,\\quad 1) description, one can treat the photon field in curved spacetime via spin connection and the tetrad formalism, which is of great advantage to study the gravitational spin-orbit coupling of photons. Once the gravitational spin-orbit coupling is taken into account, the traditional radius of the circular photon orbit in the Schwarzschild geometry should be replaced with two different radiuses corresponding to the photons with the helicities of +/- 1, respectively. Owing to the splitting of energy levels induced by the spin-orbit coupling, photons (from Hawking radiations, say) escaping from a Schwarzschild black hole are partially polarized, provided that their initial velocities possess nonzero tangential components.

  17. Frustrated Order on Extrinsic Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Grason, Gregory M.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2012-01-03

    We study, numerically and theoretically, defects in an anisotropic liquid that couple to the extrinsic geometry of a surface. Though the intrinsic geometry tends to confine topological defects to regions of large Gaussian curvature, extrinsic couplings tend to orient the order along the local direction of maximum or minimum bending. This additional frustration is generically unavoidable, and leads to complex ground-state thermodynamics. Using the catenoid as a prototype, we show, in contradistinction to the well-known effects of intrinsic geometry, that extrinsic curvature expels disclinations from the region of maximum curvature above a critical coupling threshold. On catenoids lacking an “inside-outside” symmetry, defects are expelled altogether above a critical neck size.

  18. Effects of Land Use Development on Urban Open Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esbah, Hayriye; Deniz, Bulent

    City of Aydin has grown extremely due to immigration from the eastern part of Turkey, immigration from rural areas to urban areas of the city and alterations in economic and social structure of the nation. The rapid expansion of the urban area results in dramatic change in the open space system of the town. Understanding this transformation is important to generate sustainable planning in the area. The purpose of this study is to elaborate the different open space opportunities in Aydin and to detect the change in these areas. Black and white aerial photographs from 1977 and 1993 and Ikonos 2002 images are utilized for the analysis in GIS environment. First, 14 different open space types are defined and the open spaces are delineated from the aerials and satellite images. Second, the change in the area of these patches is analyzed. The results indicate that urban open spaces are negatively affected by historic land use development. The natural and agricultural patches diminished while semi-natural or man made open space patches increased. Opportunities to increase the variability in the open space types should be embraced to promote sustainability in the urban matrix. Ecological design of the man made open spaces is necessary to increase their contribution in this endeavor.

  19. LOGO Based Instruction in Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mian Muhammad

    The objective of this pretest-posttest Quasi-Experimental Design study was to determine the effects of LOGO Based Instruction (LBI) compared to instruction by teacher lecture and pencil-and-paper activities on: (1) students' understanding of the concepts of point, ray, line, and line segment; (2) students' attitudes toward learning geometry,…

  20. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry and Current Sheet Trajectory of a Conical Theta Pinch Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Bonds, Kevin W.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented demonstrating the e ect of inductive coil geometry and current sheet trajectory on the exhaust velocity of propellant in conical theta pinch pulsed induc- tive plasma accelerators. The electromagnetic coupling between the inductive coil of the accelerator and a plasma current sheet is simulated, substituting a conical copper frustum for the plasma. The variation of system inductance as a function of plasma position is obtained by displacing the simulated current sheet from the coil while measuring the total inductance of the coil. Four coils of differing geometries were employed, and the total inductance of each coil was measured as a function of the axial displacement of two sep- arate copper frusta both having the same cone angle and length as the coil but with one compressed to a smaller size relative to the coil. The measured relationship between total coil inductance and current sheet position closes a dynamical circuit model that is used to calculate the resulting current sheet velocity for various coil and current sheet con gura- tions. The results of this model, which neglects the pinching contribution to thrust, radial propellant con nement, and plume divergence, indicate that in a conical theta pinch ge- ometry current sheet pinching is detrimental to thruster performance, reducing the kinetic energy of the exhausting propellant by up to 50% (at the upper bound for the parameter range of the study). The decrease in exhaust velocity was larger for coils and simulated current sheets of smaller half cone angles. An upper bound for the pinching contribution to thrust is estimated for typical operating parameters. Measurements of coil inductance for three di erent current sheet pinching conditions are used to estimate the magnetic pressure as a function of current sheet radial compression. The gas-dynamic contribution to axial acceleration is also estimated and shown to not compensate for the decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration

  1. Congenic Strains Confirm the Pleiotropic Effect of Chromosome 4 QTL on Mouse Femoral Geometry and Biomechanical Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kristianto, Jasmin; Litscher, Suzanne J.; Johnson, Michael G.; Patel, Forum; Patel, Mital; Fisher, Jacqueline; Zastrow, Ryley K.; Radcliff, Abigail B.; Blank, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    A pleiotropic quantitative trait locus (QTL) for bone geometry and mechanical performance in mice was mapped to distal chromosome 4 via an intercross of recombinant congenic mice HcB-8 and HcB-23. To study the QTL in isolation, we have generated C3H.B10-(rs6355453-rs13478087) (C.B.4.3) and C3H.B10-(rs6369860-D4Mit170) (C.B.4.2) congenic strains that harbor ~20 Mb and ~3 Mb, respectively, of chromosome 4 overlapping segments from C57BL/10ScSnA (B10) within the locus on a C3H/DiSnA (C3H) background. Using 3-point bend testing and standard beam equations, we phenotyped these mice for femoral mid-diaphyseal geometry and biomechanical performance. We analyzed the results via 2-way ANOVA, using sex and genotype as factors. In the C.B.4.3 strain, we found that homozygous B10/B10 male mice had smaller cross sectional area (CSA) and reduced total displacement than homozygous C3H/C3H mice. Sex by genotype interaction was also observed for maximum load and stiffness for C3H/C3H and B10/B10 mice, respectively. In C.B.4.2 strain, we found that homozygous B10/B10 mice had lower total displacement, post-yield displacement (PYD), stiffness, yield load and maximum load than mice harboring C3H allele. Sex by genotype interaction was observed in B10/B10 mice for perimeter, outer minor axis (OMA) and CSA. There were no significant differences in tissue level mechanical performance, which suggest that the QTL acts primarily on circumferential bone size. These data confirm the prior QTL mapping data and support other work demonstrating the importance of chromosome 4 QTL on bone modeling and bone responses to mechanical loading. PMID:26849124

  2. Geometry + Technology = Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Funsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Several interactive geometry software packages are available today to secondary school teachers. An example is The Geometer's Sketchpad[R] (GSP), also known as Dynamic Geometry[R] software, developed by Key Curriculum Press. This numeric based technology has been widely adopted in the last twenty years, and a vast amount of creativity has been…

  3. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability and compares it to…

  4. Solar Wind Acceleration: Modeling Effects of Turbulent Heating in Open Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, Lauren N.; Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-06-01

    We present two self-consistent coronal heating models that determine the properties of the solar wind generated and accelerated in magnetic field geometries that are open to the heliosphere. These models require only the radial magnetic field profile as input. The first code, ZEPHYR (Cranmer et al. 2007) is a 1D MHD code that includes the effects of turbulent heating created by counter-propagating Alfven waves rather than relying on empirical heating functions. We present the analysis of a large grid of modeled flux tubes (> 400) and the resulting solar wind properties. From the models and results, we recreate the observed anti-correlation between wind speed at 1 AU and the so-called expansion factor, a parameterization of the magnetic field profile. We also find that our models follow the same observationally-derived relation between temperature at 1 AU and wind speed at 1 AU. We continue our analysis with a newly-developed code written in Python called TEMPEST (The Efficient Modified-Parker-Equation-Solving Tool) that runs an order of magnitude faster than ZEPHYR due to a set of simplifying relations between the input magnetic field profile and the temperature and wave reflection coefficient profiles. We present these simplifying relations as a useful result in themselves as well as the anti-correlation between wind speed and expansion factor also found with TEMPEST. Due to the nature of the algorithm TEMPEST utilizes to find solar wind solutions, we can effectively separate the two primary ways in which Alfven waves contribute to solar wind acceleration: 1) heating the surrounding gas through a turbulent cascade and 2) providing a separate source of wave pressure. We intend to make TEMPEST easily available to the public and suggest that TEMPEST can be used as a valuable tool in the forecasting of space weather, either as a stand-alone code or within an existing modeling framework.

  5. Convection-Enhanced Transport into Open Cavities : Effect of Cavity Aspect Ratio.

    PubMed

    Horner, Marc; Metcalfe, Guy; Ottino, J M

    2015-09-01

    Recirculating fluid regions occur in the human body both naturally and pathologically. Diffusion is commonly considered the predominant mechanism for mass transport into a recirculating flow region. While this may be true for steady flows, one must also consider the possibility of convective fluid exchange when the outer (free stream) flow is transient. In the case of an open cavity, convective exchange occurs via the formation of lobes at the downstream attachment point of the separating streamline. Previous studies revealed the effect of forcing amplitude and frequency on material transport rates into a square cavity (Horner in J Fluid Mech 452:199-229, 2002). This paper summarizes the effect of cavity aspect ratio on exchange rates. The transport process is characterized using both computational fluid dynamics modeling and dye-advection experiments. Lagrangian analysis of the computed flow field reveals the existence of turnstile lobe transport for this class of flows. Experiments show that material exchange rates do not vary linearly as a function of the cavity aspect ratio (A = W/H). Rather, optima are predicted for A ≈ 2 and A ≈ 2.73, with a minimum occurring at A ≈ 2.5. The minimum occurs at the point where the cavity flow structure bifurcates from a single recirculating flow cell into two corner eddies. These results have significant implications for mass transport environments where the geometry of the flow domain evolves with time, such as coronary stents and growing aneurysms. Indeed, device designers may be able to take advantage of the turnstile-lobe transport mechanism to tailor deposition rates near newly implanted medical devices.

  6. Geometry of membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Vadim A; Escalada, Artur; Akimov, Sergey A; Shnyrova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes define the functional geometry of intracellular space. Formation of new membrane compartments and maintenance of complex organelles require division and disconnection of cellular membranes, a process termed membrane fission. Peripheral membrane proteins generally control membrane remodeling during fission. Local membrane stresses, reflecting molecular geometry of membrane-interacting parts of these proteins, sum up to produce the key membrane geometries of fission: the saddle-shaped neck and hour-glass hemifission intermediate. Here, we review the fundamental principles behind the translation of molecular geometry into membrane shape and topology during fission. We emphasize the central role the membrane insertion of specialized protein domains plays in orchestrating fission in vitro and in cells. We further compare individual to synergistic action of the membrane insertion during fission mediated by individual protein species, proteins complexes or membrane domains. Finally, we describe how local geometry of fission intermediates defines the functional design of the protein complexes catalyzing fission of cellular membranes. PMID:25062896

  7. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Porosity Open Cell Nickel Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, Alan D.; Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of high-porosity open cell nickel foam samples was measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using a standard steady-state technique. The samples, measuring 23.8 mm, 18.7 mm, and 13.6 mm in thickness, were constructed with layers of 1.7 mm thick foam with a porosity of 0.968. Tests were conducted with the specimens subjected to temperature differences of 100 to 1000 K across the thickness and at environmental pressures of 10(exp -4) to 750 mm Hg. All test were conducted in a gaseous nitrogen environment. A one-dimensional finite volume numerical model was developed to model combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in the foam. The radiation heat transfer was modeled using the two-flux approximation. Solid and gas conduction were modeled using standard techniques for high porosity media. A parameter estimation technique was used in conjunction with the measured and predicted thermal conductivities at pressures of 10(exp -4) and 750 mm Hg to determine the extinction coefficient, albedo of scattering, and weighting factors for modeling the conduction thermal conductivity. The measured and predicted conductivities over the intermediate pressure values differed by 13%.

  8. Modeling and three dimensional simulation of the neutral dynamics in an air discharge confined in a microcavity. II. Analysis of the wall and geometry effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichwald, O.; Bayle, P.; Yousfi, Y.; Jugroot, M.

    1998-11-01

    This article is devoted to the analysis of the confinement effects of the neutral dynamics generated by a short-gap (0.5 mm) discharge inside three different microcavity geometries (cylinder, cube, and bricklike) filled with air at atmospheric pressure (760 Torr) and ambient temperature (293 K). The discharge is modelled by two mathematical functions representing the Joule heating and the momentum transfer between charged and neutral particles. Their spatio-temporal evolution are taken from experimental results with 470 ns for the duration and 13.5 W for the maximum injected power. The neutral gas evolution is described by the classical transport equations and solved by a powerful numerical monotonic upstream-centered scheme for conversion laws. Because of the microcavity dimensions considered, particular care has been used in the analysis of the thermal and hydrodynamics boundary layers which condition the gas-solid interaction in terms of viscous slip effects and thermal exchanges. The results presented show the microcavity geometry effects on the distribution of the initial cylindrical pressure wave as soon as it reaches the lateral walls. They show the specificity of the cube and bricklike microcavities due to the delayed reflections on the corners leading to a more heterogeneous gas behavior than in the case of the cylindrical microcavity. We also discuss the specific gas behaviors near the wall resulting from heat exchange and viscous stress.

  9. The effects of sea level and palaeotopography on lithofacies distribution and geometries in heterozoan carbonates, south-eastern Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.L.; Franseen, E.K.; Goldstein, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    This study utilized three-dimensional exposures to evaluate how sea-level position and palaeotopography control the facies and geometries of heterozoan carbonates. Heterozoan carbonates were deposited on top of a Neogene volcanic substrate characterized by palaeotopographic highs, palaeovalleys, and straits that were formed by subaerial erosion, possibly original volcanic topography, and faults prior to carbonate deposition. The depositional sequence that is the focus of this study (DS1B) consists of 7-10 fining upward cycles that developed in response to relative sea-level fluctuations. A complete cycle has a basal erosion surface overlain by deposits of debrisflows and high-density turbidity currents, which formed during relative sea-level fall. Overlying tractive deposits most likely formed during the lowest relative position of sea level. Overlying these are debrites grading upward to high-density turbidites and low-density turbidites that formed during relative sea-level rise. The tops of the cycles consist of hemipelagic deposits that formed during the highest relative position of sea level. The cycles fine upward because upslope carbonate production decreased as relative sea level rose due to less surface area available for shallow-water carbonate production and partial drowning of substrates. The cycles are dominated by two end-member types of facies associations and stratal geometries that formed in response to fluctuating sea-level position over variable substrate palaeotopography. One end-member is termed 'flank flow cycle' because this type of cycle indicates dominant sediment transport down the flanks of palaeovalleys. Those cycles drape the substrate, have more debrites, high-density turbidites and erosion on palaeovalley flanks, and in general, the lithofacies fine down the palaeovalley flanks into the palaeovalley axes. The second end-member is termed 'axial flow cycle' because it indicates a dominance of sediment transport down the axes of

  10. 43 CFR 2091.5-3 - Segregative effect and opening: Emergency withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-3 Segregative effect and opening: Emergency withdrawals... withdrawal unless segregation is effected by the publication in the Federal Register of a notice of...

  11. 43 CFR 2091.5-3 - Segregative effect and opening: Emergency withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-3 Segregative effect and opening: Emergency withdrawals... withdrawal unless segregation is effected by the publication in the Federal Register of a notice of...

  12. 43 CFR 2091.5-3 - Segregative effect and opening: Emergency withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-3 Segregative effect and opening: Emergency withdrawals... withdrawal unless segregation is effected by the publication in the Federal Register of a notice of...

  13. 43 CFR 2091.5-3 - Segregative effect and opening: Emergency withdrawals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.5-3 Segregative effect and opening: Emergency withdrawals... withdrawal unless segregation is effected by the publication in the Federal Register of a notice of...

  14. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied - in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry - neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  15. Effect of Bubbles on Liquid Nitrogen Breakdown in Plane-Plane Electrode Geometry From 100-250 kPa

    SciTech Connect

    Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; Pace, Marshall O

    2011-01-01

    Liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) is used as the cryogen and dielectric for many high temperature superconducting, high voltage applications. When a quench in the superconductor occurs, bubbles are generated which can affect the dielectric breakdown properties of the LN(2). Experiments were performed using plane-plane electrode geometry where bubbles were introduced into the gap through a pinhole in the ground electrode. Bubbles were generated using one or more kapton heaters producing heater powers up to 30 W. Pressure was varied from 100-250 kPa. Breakdown strength was found to be relatively constant up to a given heater power and pressure at which the breakdown strength drops to a low value depending on the pressure. After the drop the breakdown strength continues to drop gradually at higher heater power. This is particularly illustrated at 100 kPa. After the drop in breakdown strength the breakdown is believed to be due to the formation of a vapor bridge. Also the heater power at which the breakdown strength changes from that of LN(2) to that of gaseous nitrogen increases with increasing pressure. The data can provide design constraints for high temperature superconducting fault current limiters (FCLs) so that the formation of a vapor bridge can be suppressed or avoided.

  16. Mechanical properties and cellular response of novel electrospun nanofibers for ligament tissue engineering: Effects of orientation and geometry.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Hannah M; Kelly, Daniel J; Popat, Ketul C; Trujillo, Nathan A; Dunne, Nicholas J; McCarthy, Helen O; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are a promising material for ligamentous tissue engineering, however weak mechanical properties of fibers to date have limited their clinical usage. The goal of this work was to modify electrospun nanofibers to create a robust structure that mimics the complex hierarchy of native tendons and ligaments. The scaffolds that were fabricated in this study consisted of either random or aligned nanofibers in flat sheets or rolled nanofiber bundles that mimic the size scale of fascicle units in primarily tensile load bearing soft musculoskeletal tissues. Altering nanofiber orientation and geometry significantly affected mechanical properties; most notably aligned nanofiber sheets had the greatest modulus; 125% higher than that of random nanofiber sheets; and 45% higher than aligned nanofiber bundles. Modifying aligned nanofiber sheets to form aligned nanofiber bundles also resulted in approximately 107% higher yield stresses and 140% higher yield strains. The mechanical properties of aligned nanofiber bundles were in the range of the mechanical properties of the native ACL: modulus=158±32MPa, yield stress=57±23MPa and yield strain=0.38±0.08. Adipose derived stem cells cultured on all surfaces remained viable and proliferated extensively over a 7 day culture period and cells elongated on nanofiber bundles. The results of the study suggest that aligned nanofiber bundles may be useful for ligament and tendon tissue engineering based on their mechanical properties and ability to support cell adhesion, proliferation, and elongation.

  17. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied – in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry – neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  18. Two-dimensional electrical modeling of asymmetric radio-frequency discharges for geometry effect analysis. Comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radouane, K.; Despax, B.; Yousfi, M.; Couderc, J. P.; Klusmann, E.; Meyer, H.; Schulz, R.; Schulze, J.

    2001-11-01

    A self-consistent two-dimensional particle model coupled to the external circuit equations was developed in an asymmetrical configuration for the self-bias voltage calculation and the reactor design study. An intermediate modeling was performed in one and two symmetrical geometries. The one-dimensional model is used to optimize the computing time which is reduced by a factor of 10 by using some optimization techniques. It is also used to validate the charged particle and basic data choices. We have shown that the consideration of only two charged particle species (electron and H3+ positive ion) is sufficient in the present hydrogen radio-frequency discharge modeling. Computational results (i.e., power density and self-bias voltage) are in good agreement with experimental results. A strong gradient of the plasma parameters (such as electric field, potential, charged particle densities and energies) was observed in the periphery of the driven electrode. Furthermore, the present two-dimensional asymmetric model shows that the interelectrode distance increase (from 1.7 up to 3.7 cm) can lead to reducing the plasma heterogeneity due to the geometrical electric field.

  19. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients for a sitting female hybrid computational phantom exposed to monoenergetic protons in idealized irradiation geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. C.; Santos, W. S.; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.; Hunt, John G.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    The conversion coefficients (CCs) relate protection quantities, mean absorbed dose (DT) and effective dose (E), with physical radiation field quantities, such as fluence (Φ). The calculation of CCs through Monte Carlo simulations is useful for estimating the dose in individuals exposed to radiation. The aim of this work was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed and effective doses per fluence (DT/ Φ and E/Φ) using a sitting and standing female hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. The radiation transport code MCNPX was used to develop exposure scenarios implementing the female UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the abdominal region, such as ovaries, uterus and urinary bladder, especially in the AP, RLAT and LLAT geometries. Anatomical differences caused by changing the posture of the female UFH/NCI phantom led an attenuation of incident protons with energies below 150 MeV by the thigh of the phantom in the sitting posture, for the front-to-back irradiation, and by the arms and hands of the phantom in the standing posture, for the lateral irradiation.

  20. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients for a sitting female hybrid computational phantom exposed to monoenergetic protons in idealized irradiation geometries.

    PubMed

    Alves, M C; Santos, W S; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E; Hunt, John G; Carvalho Júnior, A B

    2014-12-21

    The conversion coefficients (CCs) relate protection quantities, mean absorbed dose (DT) and effective dose (E), with physical radiation field quantities, such as fluence (Φ). The calculation of CCs through Monte Carlo simulations is useful for estimating the dose in individuals exposed to radiation. The aim of this work was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed and effective doses per fluence (DT/ Φ and E/Φ) using a sitting and standing female hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. The radiation transport code MCNPX was used to develop exposure scenarios implementing the female UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the abdominal region, such as ovaries, uterus and urinary bladder, especially in the AP, RLAT and LLAT geometries. Anatomical differences caused by changing the posture of the female UFH/NCI phantom led an attenuation of incident protons with energies below 150 MeV by the thigh of the phantom in the sitting posture, for the front-to-back irradiation, and by the arms and hands of the phantom in the standing posture, for the lateral irradiation.

  1. Star-dust geometries in galaxies: The effect of interstellar matter distributions on optical and infrared properties of late-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capuano, J. M., Jr.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Witt, A. N.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of substantial amounts of interstellar dust in late-type galaxies affects observable parameters such as the optical surface brightness, the color, and the ratio of far-infrared to optical luminosity of these galaxies. We conducted radiative transfer calculations for late-type galaxy environments to examine two different scenarios: (1) the effects of increasing amounts of dust in two fixed geometries with different star distributions; and (2) the effects of an evolving dust-star geometry in which the total amount of dust is held constant, for three different star distributions. The calculations were done for ten photometric bands, ranging from the far-ultraviolet to the near-infrared (K), and scattered light was included in the galactic surface brightness at each wavelength. The energy absorbed throughout these ten photometric bands was assumed to re-emerge in the far-infrared as thermal dust emission. We also considered the evolutionary contraction of a constant amount of dust relative to pre-existing star distributions.

  2. The slab geometry laser. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, J. M.; Kane, T. J.; Kuhn, K.; Byer, R. L.; Unternahrer, J.

    1984-01-01

    Slab geometry solid-state lasers offer significant performance improvements over conventional rod-geometry lasers. A detailed theoretical description of the thermal, stress, and beam-propagation characteristics of a slab laser is presented. The analysis includes consideration of the effects of the zig-zag optical path, which eliminates thermal and stress focusing and reduces residual birefringence.

  3. SU-C-304-01: Investigation of Various Detector Response Functions and Their Geometry Dependence in a Novel Method to Address Ion Chamber Volume Averaging Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B; Lebron, S; Li, J; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, C; Yan, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel convolution-based approach has been proposed to address ion chamber (IC) volume averaging effect (VAE) for the commissioning of commercial treatment planning systems (TPS). We investigate the use of various convolution kernels and its impact on the accuracy of beam models. Methods: Our approach simulates the VAE by iteratively convolving the calculated beam profiles with a detector response function (DRF) while optimizing the beam model. At convergence, the convolved profiles match the measured profiles, indicating the calculated profiles match the “true” beam profiles. To validate the approach, beam profiles of an Elekta LINAC were repeatedly collected with ICs of various volumes (CC04, CC13 and SNC 125) to obtain clinically acceptable beam models. The TPS-calculated profiles were convolved externally with the DRF of respective IC. The beam model parameters were reoptimized using Nelder-Mead method by forcing the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. We evaluated three types of DRFs (Gaussian, Lorentzian, and parabolic) and the impact of kernel dependence on field geometry (depth and field size). The profiles calculated with beam models were compared with SNC EDGE diode-measured profiles. Results: The method was successfully implemented with Pinnacle Scripting and Matlab. The reoptimization converged in ∼10 minutes. For all tested ICs and DRFs, penumbra widths of the TPS-calculated profiles and diode-measured profiles were within 1.0 mm. Gaussian function had the best performance with mean penumbra width difference within 0.5 mm. The use of geometry dependent DRFs showed marginal improvement, reducing the penumbra width differences to less than 0.3 mm. Significant increase in IMRT QA passing rates was achieved with the optimized beam model. Conclusion: The proposed approach significantly improved the accuracy of the TPS beam model. Gaussian functions as the convolution kernel performed consistently better than Lorentzian and

  4. Noncommutative Geometry and Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Connes, Alain

    2006-11-03

    In this very short essay we shall describe a 'spectral' point of view on geometry which allows to start taking into account the lessons from both renormalization and of general relativity. We shall first do that for renormalization and explain in rough outline the content of our recent collaborations with Dirk Kreimer and Matilde Marcolli leading to the universal Galois symmetry of renormalizable quantum field theories provided by the renormalization group in its cosmic Galois group incarnation. As far as general relativity is concerned, since the functional integral cannot be treated in the traditional perturbative manner, it relies heavily as a 'sum over geometries' on the chosen paradigm of geometric space. This will give us the occasion to discuss, in the light of noncommutative geometry, the issue of 'observables' in gravity and our joint work with Ali Chamseddine on the spectral action, with a first attempt to write down a functional integral on the space of noncommutative geometries.

  5. What Is Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  6. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  7. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  8. Induced geometry from disformal transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang-Fang; Huang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    In this note, we use the disformal transformation to induce a geometry from the manifold which is originally Riemannian. The new geometry obtained here can be considered as a generalization of Weyl integrable geometry. Based on these results, we further propose a geometry which is naturally a generalization of Weyl geometry.

  9. The effect of lance geometry and carbon coating of silicon lances on propidium iodide uptake in lance array nanoinjection of HeLa 229 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, John W.; Lindstrom, Dallin L.; Hanks, Brad W.; Hope, Sandra; Jensen, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    Connecting technology to biologic discovery is a core focus of non-viral gene therapy biotechnologies. One approach that leverages both the physical and electrical function of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in cellular engineering is a technology previously described as lance array nanoinjection (LAN). In brief, LAN consists of a silicon chip measuring 2 cm by 2 cm that has been etched to contain an array of 10 μm tall, solid lances that are spaced every 10 μm in a grid pattern. This array of lances is used to physically penetrate hundreds of thousands of cells simultaneously and to then electrically deliver molecular loads into cells. In this present work, two variables related to the microfabrication of the silicon lances, namely lance geometry and coating, are investigated. The purpose of both experimental variables is to assess these parameters’ effect on propidium iodide (PI), a cell membrane impermeable dye, uptake to injected HeLa 229 cells. For the lance geometry experimentation, three different microfabricated lance geometries were used which include a flat/narrow (FN, 1 μm diameter), flat/wide (FW, 2-2.5 μm diameter), and pointed (P, 1 μm diameter) lance geometries. From these tests, it was shown that the FN lances had a slightly better cell viability rate of 91.73% and that the P lances had the best PI uptake rate of 75.08%. For the lance coating experimentation, two different lances were fabricated, both silicon etched lances with some being carbon coated (CC) in a  <100 nm layer of carbon and the other lances being non-coated (Si). Results from this experiment showed no significant difference between lance types at three different nanoinjection protocols (0V, +1.5V DC, and  +5V Pulsed) for both cell viability and PI uptake rates. One exception to this is the comparison of CC/5V Pul and Si/5V Pul samples, where the CC/5V Pul samples had a cell viability rate 5% higher. Both outcomes were unexpected and reveal how to better

  10. Software Geometry in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alion, Tyler; Viren, Brett; Junk, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) involves many detectors. The experiment's near detector (ND) facility, may ultimately involve several detectors. The far detector (FD) will be significantly larger than any other Liquid Argon (LAr) detector yet constructed; many prototype detectors are being constructed and studied to motivate a plethora of proposed FD designs. Whether it be a constructed prototype or a proposed ND/FD design, every design must be simulated and analyzed. This presents a considerable challenge to LBNE software experts; each detector geometry must be described to the simulation software in an efficient way which allows for multiple authors to easily collaborate. Furthermore, different geometry versions must be tracked throughout their use. We present a framework called General Geometry Description (GGD), written and developed by LBNE software collaborators for managing software to generate geometries. Though GGD is flexible enough to be used by any experiment working with detectors, we present it's first use in generating Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) files to interface with LArSoft, a framework of detector simulations, event reconstruction, and data analyses written for all LAr technology users at Fermilab. Brett is the other of the framework discussed here, the General Geometry Description (GGD).

  11. Common Geometry Module

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and onmore » top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.« less

  12. The effect of aggregation on visibility in open water.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Johnsen, Sönke

    2016-09-28

    Aggregation is a common life-history trait in open-water taxa. Qualitative understanding of how aggregation by prey influences their encounter rates with predators is critical for understanding pelagic predator-prey interactions and trophic webs. We extend a recently developed theory on underwater visibility to predict the consequences of grouping in open-water species in terms of increased visual detection of groups by predators. Our model suggests that enhanced visibility will be relatively modest, with maximum detection distance typically only doubling for a 100-fold increase in the number of prey in a group. This result suggests that although larger groups are more easily detected, this cost to aggregation will in many cases be dominated by benefits, especially through risk dilution in situations where predators cannot consume all members of a discovered group. This, in turn, helps to explain the ubiquity of grouping across a great variety of open-water taxa. PMID:27655767

  13. Geometries and tautomerism of OHN hydrogen bonds in aprotic solution probed by H/D isotope effects on (13)C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Tolstoy, Peter M; Guo, Jing; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-10-14

    The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of 17 OHN hydrogen-bonded complexes formed by CH(3)(13)COOH(D) with 14 substituted pyridines, 2 amines, and N-methylimidazole have been measured in the temperature region between 110 and 150 K using CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl mixture as solvent. The slow proton and hydrogen bond exchange regime was reached, and the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group were measured. In combination with the analysis of the corresponding (1)H chemical shifts, it was possible to distinguish between OHN hydrogen bonds exhibiting a single proton position and those exhibiting a fast proton tautomerism between molecular and zwitterionic forms. Using H-bond correlations, we relate the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts of the carboxyl group with the OHN hydrogen bond geometries.

  14. Loewner's conjecture, the Besicovitch barrel, and relative systolic geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, I K

    2002-04-30

    The paper is devoted to relative systolic geometry on a compact manifold with boundary. Sufficient conditions ensuring the intersystolic rigidity or intersystolic softness of such manifolds are analyzed. Several open questions are formulated.

  15. Uncontrolled disorder effects in fabricating photonic quantum simulators on a kagome geometry: A projected-entangled-pair-state versus exact-diagonalization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinkhani, Amin; Dezfouli, Bahareh Ghannad; Ghasemipour, Fatemeh; Rezakhani, Ali T.; Saberi, Hamed

    2014-06-01

    We propose a flexible numerical framework for extracting the energy spectra and photon transfer dynamics of a unit kagome cell with disordered cavity-cavity couplings under realistic experimental conditions. A projected-entangled pair state (PEPS) Ansatz to the many-photon wave function allows us to gain a detailed understanding of the effects of undesirable disorder in fabricating well-controlled and scalable photonic quantum simulators. The correlation functions associated with the propagation of two-photon excitations reveal intriguing interference patterns peculiar to the kagome geometry and promise at the same time a highly tunable quantum interferometry device with a signature for the formation of resonant or Fabry-Peŕot-like transmission of photons. Our results justify the use of the proposed PEPS technique for addressing the role of disorder in such quantum simulators in the microwave regime and promises sophisticated numerical machinery for yet further explorations of the scalability of the resulting kagome arrays. The introduced methodology and the physical results may also pave the way for unraveling exotic phases of correlated light on a kagome geometry.

  16. Chiral modification of platinum: ab initio study of the effect of hydrogen coadsorption on stability and geometry of adsorbed cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Konstanze R; Seitsonen, Ari P; Baiker, Alfons

    2015-11-01

    The cinchona alkaloids cinchonidine and cinchonine belong to the most efficient chiral modifiers for the noble metal-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of C=O and C=C bonds. Under reaction conditions these modifiers are coadsorbed on the noble metal surface with hydrogen. Using density functional theory, we studied the effect of coadsorbed hydrogen on the adsorption mode of cinchonidine and cinchonine on a Pt(111) surface at different hydrogen coverages. The theoretical study indicates that the presence of coadsorbed hydrogen affects both the adsorption geometry as well as the stability of the adsorbed cinchona alkaloids. At all hydrogen coverages the cinchona alkaloids are found to be adsorbed via anchoring of the quinoline moiety. In the absence of hydrogen as well as at low hydrogen coverage the quinoline moiety adsorbs nearly parallel to the surface, whereas at higher hydrogen coverage it becomes tilted. Higher hydrogen coverage as well as partial hydrogenation of the quinoline part of the cinchona alkaloid and hydrogen transfer to the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond at 10, 11 position of the quinuclidine moiety destabilize the adsorbed cinchona alkaloid, whereas hydrogen transfer to the nitrogen atom of the quinoline and the quinuclidine moiety stabilizes the adsorbed molecule. The stability as well as the adsorption geometry of the cinchona alkaloids are affected by the coadsorbed hydrogen and are proposed to influence the efficiency of the enantiodifferentiating ability of the chirally modified platinum surface.

  17. Chiral modification of platinum: ab initio study of the effect of hydrogen coadsorption on stability and geometry of adsorbed cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Konstanze R; Seitsonen, Ari P; Baiker, Alfons

    2015-11-01

    The cinchona alkaloids cinchonidine and cinchonine belong to the most efficient chiral modifiers for the noble metal-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of C=O and C=C bonds. Under reaction conditions these modifiers are coadsorbed on the noble metal surface with hydrogen. Using density functional theory, we studied the effect of coadsorbed hydrogen on the adsorption mode of cinchonidine and cinchonine on a Pt(111) surface at different hydrogen coverages. The theoretical study indicates that the presence of coadsorbed hydrogen affects both the adsorption geometry as well as the stability of the adsorbed cinchona alkaloids. At all hydrogen coverages the cinchona alkaloids are found to be adsorbed via anchoring of the quinoline moiety. In the absence of hydrogen as well as at low hydrogen coverage the quinoline moiety adsorbs nearly parallel to the surface, whereas at higher hydrogen coverage it becomes tilted. Higher hydrogen coverage as well as partial hydrogenation of the quinoline part of the cinchona alkaloid and hydrogen transfer to the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond at 10, 11 position of the quinuclidine moiety destabilize the adsorbed cinchona alkaloid, whereas hydrogen transfer to the nitrogen atom of the quinoline and the quinuclidine moiety stabilizes the adsorbed molecule. The stability as well as the adsorption geometry of the cinchona alkaloids are affected by the coadsorbed hydrogen and are proposed to influence the efficiency of the enantiodifferentiating ability of the chirally modified platinum surface. PMID:26426825

  18. Wind-tunnel investigation of the effects of blade tip geometry on the interaction of torsional loads and performance for an articulated helicopter rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, W. T.; Mantay, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    The Langley transonic dynamics tunnel was used to determine the degree of correlation between rotor performance and the dynamic twist generated by changes in blade tip geometry using an articulated rotor with four different tip geometries at advance ratios of 0.20, 0.30 and 0.35. Based on the data obtained, it is concluded that: (1) there appears to be no strong correlation between blade torsion loads and rotor performance prediction; (2) for a given rotor task at each advance ratio investigated, both the azimuthal variation of torsional moment and the mean torsional moment at 81% radius are configuration dependent; (3) reducing the nose down twist on the advancing blade appears to be more important to forward flight performance than increasing the nose down twist on the retreating blade; (4) the rotor inflow model used was important in predicting the performance of the adaptive rotor; and (5) neither rigid blade solidity effects, inflow environment, nor blade torsion loads can be used alone to accurately predict active rotor performance.

  19. FINAL REPORT: GEOMETRY AND ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Isadore M.

    2008-03-04

    The effect on mathematics of collaborations between high-energy theoretical physics and modern mathematics has been remarkable. Mirror symmetry has revolutionized enumerative geometry, and Seiberg-Witten invariants have greatly simplified the study of four manifolds. And because of their application to string theory, physicists now need to know cohomology theory, characteristic classes, index theory, K-theory, algebraic geometry, differential geometry, and non-commutative geometry. Much more is coming. We are experiencing a deeper contact between the two sciences, which will stimulate new mathematics essential to the physicists’ quest for the unification of quantum mechanics and relativity. Our grant, supported by the Department of Energy for twelve years, has been instrumental in promoting an effective interaction between geometry and string theory, by supporting the Mathematical Physics seminar, postdoc research, collaborations, graduate students and several research papers.

  20. Instructional Diagnosis: Effective Open-Ended Faculty Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Tim; And Others

    A faculty evaluation technique was used to classify responses from open-ended evaluations to determine elements of university teaching that were of greatest concern to students and to determine the feasibility of comparing subgroups by instructor gender, class size, and school. Small Group Instructional Diagnosis (SGID) was used--a form of course…

  1. Effects of Open Enrollment in Minnesota. ERS Research Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

    In recent years, many policy makers, including officials in the Federal Government and the National Governors' Association, have advocated public school choice as the answer to the problems of public education. In 1987, Minnesota was the first state to pass legislation implementing a statewide, interdistrict, open enrollment plan for public…

  2. Effect of Colored Light on Stomatal Opening Rates of Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Kana, T M; Miller, J H

    1977-02-01

    The average opening rate of Vicia faba L. stomata was determined over an initial 20-minute light period following darkness. Nonsaturating intensities of broad band red and blue light had similar quantum effectiveness for the promotion of opening, whereas broad band green was about 40% and far red about 5% as effective. The opening rates under saturating red, green, and blue light were the same. Net photosynthesis was measured under various intensities of the same red, green, and blue light spectra. Red and blue light were equally efficient in causing photosynthesis, whereas green was 60% as effective. The light compensation points for the three colors were at higher intensities than those which saturated the opening rate response. These data suggest that only a single pigment system, probably the photosynthetic pigments, is responsible for initiating the light-induced opening response in V. faba stomata.

  3. Effect of Short Study Abroad Course on Student Openness to Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Baraem; Morgan, Mark; Hayes, Kirby

    2006-01-01

    An important contributing factor to students' willingness to work with diverse people is their "openness" to diversity. The objective of this study was to test the effect of a short (3-wk) study abroad course to China on the openness to diversity/challenge of the 23 students participating in the China study abroad course. Students were given the…

  4. 43 CFR 2091.7-1 - Segregative effect and opening: Classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.7-1 Segregative effect and opening: Classifications. (a)(1... laws, including the mining laws, but not the mineral leasing laws, the material disposal laws, and...

  5. 43 CFR 2091.7-1 - Segregative effect and opening: Classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.7-1 Segregative effect and opening: Classifications. (a)(1... laws, including the mining laws, but not the mineral leasing laws, the material disposal laws, and...

  6. 43 CFR 2091.7-1 - Segregative effect and opening: Classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.7-1 Segregative effect and opening: Classifications. (a)(1... laws, including the mining laws, but not the mineral leasing laws, the material disposal laws, and...

  7. 43 CFR 2091.7-1 - Segregative effect and opening: Classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SPECIAL LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.7-1 Segregative effect and opening: Classifications. (a)(1... laws, including the mining laws, but not the mineral leasing laws, the material disposal laws, and...

  8. The Effect of Reductions in Public Library Opening Hours on Book Issues: A Statistical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loynes, Robert; Proctor, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Discusses statistical analyses of the effect of reduction in opening hours on book issues, or borrowing, of public library authorities (PLAs) in the United Kingdom. Demonstrates the difficulties involved in using statistical data to make accurate predictions of the impact of opening hour reductions on borrowing. (Author/LRW)

  9. Transversely Hessian foliations and information geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyom, Michel Nguiffo; Wolak, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A family of probability distributions parametrized by an open domain Λ in Rn defines the Fisher information matrix on this domain which is positive semi-definite. In information geometry the standard assumption has been that the Fisher information matrix is positive definite defining in this way a Riemannian metric on Λ. If we replace the "positive definite" assumption by "0-deformable" condition a foliation with a transvesely Hessian structure appears naturally. We develop the study of transversely Hessian foliations in view of applications in information geometry.

  10. Geometry Dependence of Stellarator Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, P. Xanthopoulos and A.H. Boozer

    2009-08-10

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST, we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry-dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the 2D structure of the microturbulence over that surface, and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrodinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  11. Inversion gate capacitance of undoped single-gate and double-gate field-effect transistor geometries in the extreme quantum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Amlan

    2015-05-28

    We present first-principle analytical derivations and numerically modeled data to show that the gate capacitance per unit gate area C{sub G} of extremely thin undoped-channel single-gate and double-gate field-effect transistor geometries in the extreme quantum limit with single-subband occupancy can be written as 1/C{sub G} = 1/C{sub OX} + N{sub G}/C{sub DOS} + N{sub G}/ηC{sub WF}, where N{sub G} is the number of gates, C{sub OX} is the oxide capacitance per unit area, C{sub DOS} is the density-of-states capacitance per unit area, C{sub WF} is the wave function spreading capacitance per unit area, and η is a constant on the order of 1.

  12. Effects of temperature, humidity, sample geometry, and other variables on Bruceton type 12 impact initiation of HMX-based high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Avilucea, Gabriel R; Aragon, Daniel J; Peterson, Paul D; Preston, Daniel N; Hartline, Ernest L; Hagelberg, Stephanie I

    2009-01-01

    The drop weight impact test, developed at Bruceton Naval Research Laboratory 60 years ago, is still the most commonly used configuration for evaluating sensitivity of explosives to non-shock ignition. The standard drop weight impact test is performed under ambient conditions for temperature and humidity - variations in which are known to significantly affect the probability of reaction. We have performed a series of impact tests in an attempt to characterize the effect of temperature, humidity, sample geometry (height, mass, L/d, and pressed density), sample confinement, and impact surface properties (strength and coefficient of friction) on the probability of reaction in a drop weight impact test. Differences in the probability of reaction have been determined across a range of drop heights for each configuration. The results clearly show significant shifts in the probability of reaction and in the slope of the reaction probability curve for several of the variables.

  13. Effect of direct and indirect exchange interactions on geometries and binding energies of molecular complexes. The dimer (CL2)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Laurens; Block, Ruud

    1981-07-01

    An analysis is made of the most stable geometry and the energy of interaction for the chlorine dimer, on the basis of a model which was previously used for interpreting hydrogen bonding in the dimers (HF)2 and (H2O)2 and the molecular complex HFṡH2O. In the model, an analogy is assumed between the phenomenon of indirect exchange (''superexchange'') in ionic solids with paramagnetic cations and weak binding energies (≊1 kcal/mole) of molecular complexes. First-order exchange perturbation theory and an ''effective-electron'' description of the system are employed. The model predicts a nonplanar structure lacking a center of symmetry. The dimerization energy is estimated to lie between 1.4 and 2.0 kcal/mole. Agreement with experimental information is analyzed. We also briefly discuss the dimer (F2)2.

  14. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  15. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  16. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d -dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s =-1 ,0 ,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d . In d =1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d >1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t . Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but

  17. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d-dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s=-1,0,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d. In d=1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d>1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t. Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but its

  18. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d-dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s=-1,0,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d. In d=1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d>1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t. Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but its

  19. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  20. Numerical evaluation of the effects of planform geometry and inflow conditions on flow, turbulence structure, and bed shear velocity at a stream confluence with a concordant bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, George; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Rhoads, Bruce; Sukhodolov, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    This study numerically investigates the effects of variations in inflow conditions and planform geometry on large-scale coherent flow structures and bed friction velocities at a stream confluence with natural bathymetry and concordant bed morphology. Several numerical experiments are conducted in which either the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode or the wake mode dominates within the mixing interface (MI) between the two confluent streams as the junction angle and alignments of the tributaries are altered. In the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode, the MI contains mostly corotating vortices driven by the mean transverse shear across the MI, while in the wake mode the MI contains counterrotating vortices forming by the interaction of the separated shear layers on the two sides of a zone of stagnant fluid near the junction corner. A large angle between the two incoming streams is not necessary for the development of strongly coherent streamwise-oriented vortical (SOV) cells in the immediate vicinity of the MI. Results show that such SOV cells can develop and produce high bed friction velocities even for cases with a low angle between the two tributaries and for cases where the downstream channel is approximately aligned with the axes of the two tributaries (low-curvature cases). SOV cells tend not to develop only when the incoming streams are parallel and aligned with the downstream channel (junction angle of zero), and the incoming flows produce a strong Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. Under such conditions, quasi 2-D MI vortices play the primary role in mixing and the production of high bed shear velocities. Simulations with and without natural bed morphology/local bank line irregularities indicate that planform geometry and inflow conditions primarily govern the development of coherent flow structures, but that bathymetric and bank line effects can locally modify details of these structures.

  1. Differential effect of elevated blood pressure on left ventricular geometry types in black and white young adults in a community (from the Bogalusa Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Wei; Ruan, Litao; Toprak, Ahmet; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Berenson, Gerald S

    2011-03-01

    Hypertension and left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy are both more common in blacks than in whites. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that blood pressure (BP) has a differential effect on the LV geometry types in black versus white asymptomatic young adults. As a part of the Bogalusa Heart Study, echocardiography and cardiovascular risk factor measurements were performed in 780 white and 343 black subjects (aged 24 to 47 years). Four LV geometry types were identified as normal, concentric remodeling, eccentric, and concentric hypertrophy. Compared to the white subjects, the black subjects had a greater prevalence of eccentric (15.7% vs 9.1%, p <0.001) and concentric (9.3% vs 4.1%, p <0.001) hypertrophy. On multivariate logistic regression analyses, adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, lipids, and glucose, the black subjects showed a significantly stronger association of LV concentric hypertrophy with BP (systolic BP, odds ratio [OR] 3.74, p <0.001; diastolic BP, OR 2.86, p <0.001) than whites (systolic BP, OR 1.50, p = 0.037; and diastolic BP, OR 1.35, p = 0.167), with p values for the race difference of 0.007 for systolic BP and 0.026 for diastolic BP. LV eccentric hypertrophy showed similar trends for the race difference in the ORs; however, the association between eccentric hypertrophy and BP was not significant in the white subjects. With respect to LV concentric remodeling, its association with BP was not significant in either blacks or whites. In conclusion, elevated BP levels have a greater detrimental effect on LV hypertrophy patterns in the black versus white young adults. These findings suggest that blacks might be more susceptible than whites to BP-related adverse cardiac remodeling.

  2. Møller's Energy-Momentum Complex for a Spacetime Geometry on a Noncommutative Curved D3-Brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radinschi, I.; Grammenos, T.

    2008-05-01

    Møller’s energy-momentum complex is employed in order to determine the energy and momentum distributions for a spacetime described by a “generalized Schwarzschild” geometry in (3+1)-dimensions on a noncommutative curved D3-brane in an effective, open bosonic string theory. The geometry considered is obtained by an effective theory of gravity coupled with a nonlinear electromagnetic field and depends only on the generalized (effective) mass and charge which incorporate corrections of first order in the noncommutativity parameter.

  3. Computational synthetic geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sturmfels, B. )

    1988-01-01

    This book deals with methods for realizing abstract geometric objects in concrete vector spaces. It considers a large class of problems from convexity and discrete geometry including constructing convex polytopes from simplicial complexes, vector geometries from incidence structures and hyperplane arrangements from oriented matroids. It appears that algorithms for these constructions exist if and only if arbitrary polynomial equations are decidable with respect to the underlying field. Besides such complexity theorems, a variety of symbolic algorithms are discussed, and the methods are applied to obtain mathematical results on convex polytopes, projective configurations and the combinatories of Grassmann varieties.

  4. Stringy differential geometry, beyond Riemann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Imtak; Lee, Kanghoon; Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2011-08-01

    While the fundamental object in Riemannian geometry is a metric, closed string theories call for us to put a two-form gauge field and a scalar dilaton on an equal footing with the metric. Here we propose a novel differential geometry that treats the three objects in a unified manner, manifests not only diffeomorphism and one-form gauge symmetry but also O(D,D) T-duality, and enables us to rewrite the known low energy effective action of them as a single term. Further, we develop a corresponding vielbein formalism and gauge the internal symmetry that is given by a direct product of two local Lorentz groups, SO(1,D-1)×SŌ(1,D-1). We comment that the notion of cosmological constant naturally changes.

  5. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  6. Triple-shape effect in polymer-based composites by cleverly matching geometry of active component with heating method.

    PubMed

    Razzaq, M Y; Behl, M; Kratz, K; Lendlein, A

    2013-10-11

    A triple-shape effect is created for a segmented device consisting of an active component encapsulated in a highly flexible polymer network. Segments with the same composition but different interface areas can be recovered independently either at specific field strengths (Hsw ) during inductive heating, at a specific time during environmentally heating, or at different airflow during inductive heating at constant H. Herein the type of heating method regulates the sequence order.

  7. Long-distance correlation-length effects and hydrodynamics of 4He films in a Corbino geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Stephen R. D.; Perron, Justin K.; Gasparini, Francis M.

    2016-09-01

    Previous measurements of the superfluid density ρs and specific heat for 4He have identified effects that are manifest at distances much larger than the correlation length ξ3 D [Perron et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 499 (2010), 10.1038/nphys1671; Perron and Gasparini, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 035302 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.035302; Perron et al., Phys. Rev. B 87, 094507 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.094507]. We report here measurements of the superfluid density which are designed to explore this phenomenon further. We determine the superfluid fraction ρs/ρ from the resonance of 34-nm films of varying widths 4 ≤W ≤100 μ m . The films are formed across a Corbino ring separating two chambers where a thicker 268-nm film is formed. This arrangement is realized using lithography and direct Si-wafer bonding. We identify two effects in the behavior of ρs/ρ : one is hydrodynamic, for which we present an analysis, and the other is a correlation-length effect which manifests as a shift in the transition temperature Tc relative to that of a uniform 34-nm film uninfluenced by proximity effects. We find that one can collapse both ρs/ρ and the quality factor of the resonance onto universal curves by shifting Tc as Δ Tc˜W-ν . This scaling is a surprising result on two counts: it involves a very large length scale W relative to the magnitude of ξ3 D and the dependence on W is not what is expected from correlation-length finite-size scaling which would predict Δ Tc˜W-1 /ν .

  8. Calculation of the effect of tip geometry on noncontact atomic force microscopy using a qPlus sensor.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Julian; Shaw, Gordon A

    2013-01-01

    In qPlus atomic force microscopy the tip length can in principle approach the length of the cantilever. We present a detailed mathematical model of the effects this has on the dynamic properties of the qPlus sensor. The resulting, experimentally confirmed motion of the tip apex is shown to have a large lateral component, raising interesting questions for both calibration and force-spectroscopy measurements.

  9. Calculation of the effect of tip geometry on noncontact atomic force microscopy using a qPlus sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Gordon A

    2013-01-01

    Summary In qPlus atomic force microscopy the tip length can in principle approach the length of the cantilever. We present a detailed mathematical model of the effects this has on the dynamic properties of the qPlus sensor. The resulting, experimentally confirmed motion of the tip apex is shown to have a large lateral component, raising interesting questions for both calibration and force-spectroscopy measurements. PMID:23400392

  10. The Forces Applied by Cilia Depend Linearly on Their Frequency Due to Constant Geometry of the Effective Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Teff, Zvi; Priel, Zvi; Gheber, Levi A.

    2008-01-01

    Mucus propelling cilia are excitable by many stimulants, and have been shown to increase their beating frequency up to threefold, by physiological extracellular stimulants, such as adenosine-triphosphate, acetylcholine, and others. This is thought to represent the evolutionary adaptation of mucociliary systems to the need of rapid and efficient cleansing the airways of foreign particles. However, the mucus transport velocity depends not only on the beat frequency of the cilia, but on their beat pattern as well, especially in the case of mucus bearing cilia that beat in a complex, three-dimensional fashion. In this study, we directly measured the force applied by live ciliary tissues with an atomic force microscope, and found that it increases linearly with the beating frequency. This implies that the arc swept by the cilia during their effective stroke remains unchanged during frequency increase, thus leading to a linear dependence of transport velocity on the beat frequency. Combining the atomic force microscope measurements with optical measurements, we have indications that the recovery stroke is performed on a less inclined plane, leading to an effective shortening of the overall path traveled by the cilia tip during this nontransporting phase of their beat pattern. This effect is observed to be independent of the type of stimulant (temperature or chemical), chemical (adenosine-triphosphate or acetylcholine), or concentration (1 μM–100 μM), indicating that this behavior may result from internal details of the cilium mechanical structure. PMID:17872955

  11. Advanced geometries and regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Bulanov, S. V.; Turchetti, G.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.

    2013-07-26

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project.

  12. Spacetime and Euclidean geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Dieter; Jacobson, Ted

    2006-04-01

    Using only the principle of relativity and Euclidean geometry we show in this pedagogical article that the square of proper time or length in a two-dimensional spacetime diagram is proportional to the Euclidean area of the corresponding causal domain. We use this relation to derive the Minkowski line element by two geometric proofs of the spacetime Pythagoras theorem.

  13. Listening to Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including…

  14. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  15. Teaching Geometry with Tangrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Dorothy S.; Bologna, Elaine M.

    1982-01-01

    Geometry is viewed as the most neglected area of the elementary school mathematics curriculum. Tangram activities provide numerous worthwhile mathematical experiences for children. A method of constructing tangrams through paper folding is followed by suggested spatial visualization, measurement, and additional activities. (MP)

  16. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  17. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  18. The Helen of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John

    2010-01-01

    The cycloid has been called the Helen of Geometry, not only because of its beautiful properties but also because of the quarrels it provoked between famous mathematicians of the 17th century. This article surveys the history of the cycloid and its importance in the development of the calculus.

  19. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  20. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  1. GEOMETRY, TENTATIVE GUIDES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLIER, KATHERINE M.

    PRESENTED IS A FUSED COURSE IN PLANE, SOLID, AND COORDINATE GEOMETRY. ELEMENTARY SET THEORY, LOGIC, AND THE PRINCIPLE OF SEPARATION PROVIDE UNIFYING THREADS THROUGHOUT THE TEXT. THE TWO CURRICULUM GUIDES HAVE BEEN PREPARED FOR USE WITH TWO DIFFERENT TEXTS. EITHER CURRICULUM GUIDE MAY BE USED DEPENDING UPON THE CHOICE OF THE TEACHER AND THE NEEDS…

  2. Geometry of PDE's. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prástaro, Agostino

    2008-02-01

    Following our previous results on this subject [R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(I): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. The general theory, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 239-266; R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(II): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. Applications to Riemannian geometry PDE's, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 267-285; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's and Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 1996; A. Prástaro, Quantum and integral (co)bordism in partial differential equations, Acta Appl. Math. (5) (3) (1998) 243-302; A. Prástaro, (Co)bordism groups in PDE's, Acta Appl. Math. 59 (2) (1999) 111-201; A. Prástaro, Quantized Partial Differential Equations, World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore, 2004, 500 pp.; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. I: Integral bordism groups in PDE's, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006) 547-566; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. II: Variational PDE's and integral bordism groups, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 321 (2006) 930-948; A. Prástaro, Th.M. Rassias, Ulam stability in geometry of PDE's, Nonlinear Funct. Anal. Appl. 8 (2) (2003) 259-278; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, I, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1967; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, II, Collier-MacMillan, Canada, Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, 1968], integral bordism groups of the Navier-Stokes equation are calculated for smooth, singular and weak solutions, respectively. Then a characterization of global solutions is made on this ground. Enough conditions to assure existence of global smooth solutions are given and related to nullity of integral characteristic numbers of the boundaries. Stability of global solutions are related to some characteristic numbers of the space-like Cauchy dataE Global solutions of variational problems constrained by (NS) are classified by means of suitable integral bordism groups too.

  3. Effect of ceramic membrane channel geometry and uniform transmembrane pressure on limiting flux and serum protein removal during skim milk microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael C; Hurt, Emily E; Barbano, David M

    2015-11-01

    Our objectives were to determine the effects of a ceramic microfiltration (MF) membrane's retentate flow channel geometry (round or diamond-shaped) and uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) on limiting flux (LF) and serum protein (SP) removal during skim milk MF at a temperature of 50°C, a retentate protein concentration of 8.5%, and an average cross-flow velocity of 7 m·s(-1). Performance of membranes with round and diamond flow channels was compared in UTP mode. Performance of the membrane with round flow channels was compared with and without UTP. Using UTP with round flow channel MF membranes increased the LF by 5% when compared with not using UTP, but SP removal was not affected by the use of UTP. Using membranes with round channels instead of diamond-shaped channels in UTP mode increased the LF by 24%. This increase was associated with a 25% increase in Reynolds number and can be explained by lower shear at the vertices of the diamond-shaped channel's surface. The SP removal factor of the diamond channel system was higher than the SP removal factor of the round channel system below the LF. However, the diamond channel system passed more casein into the MF permeate than the round channel system. Because only one batch of each membrane was tested in our study, it was not possible to determine if the differences in protein rejection between channel geometries were due to the membrane design or random manufacturing variation. Despite the lower LF of the diamond channel system, the 47% increase in membrane module surface area of the diamond channel system produced a modular permeate removal rate that was at least 19% higher than the round channel system. Consequently, using diamond channel membranes instead of round channel membranes could reduce some of the costs associated with ceramic MF of skim milk if fewer membrane modules could be used to attain the required membrane area. PMID:26298765

  4. Effects of gene deletion of the tissue inhibitor of the matrix metalloproteinase-type 1 (TIMP-1) on left ventricular geometry and function in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roten, L.; Nemoto, S.; Simsic, J.; Coker, M. L.; Rao, V.; Baicu, S.; Defreyte, G.; Soloway, P. J.; Zile, M. R.; Spinale, F. G.

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in the expression and activity of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of the MMPs (TIMPs) have been implicated in tissue remodeling in a number of disease states. One of the better characterized TIMPs, TIMP-1, has been shown to bind to active MMPs and to regulate the MMP activational process. The goal of this study was to determine whether deletion of the TIMP-1 gene in mice, which in turn would remove TIMP-1 expression in LV myocardium, would produce time-dependent effects on LV geometry and function. Age-matched sibling mice (129Sv) deficient in the TIMP-1 gene (TIMP-1 knock-out (TIMP-1 KO), n=10) and wild-type mice (n=10) underwent comparative echocardiographic studies at 1 and 4 months of age. LV catheterization studies were performed at 4 months and the LV harvested for histomorphometric studies. LV end-diastolic volume and mass increased (18+/-4 and 38+/-3%, respectively, P<0.05) at 4 months in the TIMP-1 KO group; a significant increase compared to wild-type controls (P<0.05). At 4 months, LV and end-diastolic wall stress was increased by over two-fold in the TIMP-1 KO compared to wild type (P<0.05). However, LV systolic pressure and ejection performance were unchanged in the two groups of mice. LV myocyte cross-sectional area was unchanged in the TIMP-1 KO mice compared to controls, but myocardial fibrillar collagen content was reduced. Changes in LV geometry occurred in TIMP-1 deficient mice and these results suggest that constitutive TIMP-1 expression participates in the maintenance of normal LV myocardial structure. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Sandwich-type mixed tetrapyrrole rare-earth triple-decker compounds. Effect of the coordination geometry on the single-molecule-magnet nature.

    PubMed

    Kan, Jinglan; Wang, Hailong; Sun, Wei; Cao, Wei; Tao, Jun; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2013-08-01

    Employment of the raise-by-one step method starting from M(TClPP)(acac) (acac = monoanion of acetylacetone) and [Pc(OPh)8]M'[Pc(OPh)8] led to the isolation and free modulation of the two rare-earth ions in the series of four mixed tetrapyrrole dysprosium sandwich complexes {(TClPP)M[Pc(OPh)8]M'[Pc(OPh)8]} [1-4; TClPP = dianion of meso-tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl)porphyrin; Pc(OPh)8 = dianion of 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octa(phenoxyl)phthalocyanine; M-M' = Dy-Dy, Y-Dy, Dy-Y, and Y-Y]. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals different octacoordination geometries for the two metal ions in terms of the twist angle (defined as the rotation angle of one coordination square away from the eclipsed conformation with the other) between the two neighboring tetrapyrrole rings for the three dysprosium-containing isostructural triple-decker compounds, with the metal ion locating between an inner phthalocyanine ligand and an outer porphyrin ligand with a twist angle of 9.64-9.90° and the one between two phthalocyanine ligands of 25.12-25.30°. Systematic and comparative studies over the magnetic properties reveal magnetic-field-induced single-molecule magnet (SMM), SMM, and non-SMM nature for 1-3, respectively, indicating the dominant effect of the coordination geometry of the spin carrier, instead of the f-f interaction, on the magnetic properties. The present result will be helpful for the future design and synthesis of tetrapyrrole lanthanide SMMs with sandwich molecular structures.

  6. Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses.

  7. Crossing shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions - Variable angle and shock generator length geometry effects at Mach 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdonoff, S. M.; Stokes, W. L.

    1992-01-01

    By comparing the detailed wall static pressure distributions for 9 inch and 11 inch long fins generating a crossing shock configuration at M = 2.93, the high resolution results of the 9 inch fins are shown to be free of exit effects. Analysis of the static pressure profiles have delineated the limited regions where the single fin results are valid. The characteristics of the complex interaction, with varying shock wave strength, have been described. The data provide a critical test for computational fluid dynamics which, in its initial phase, has performed poorly in predicting the measured wall static pressure distributions.

  8. Effect of crystal thickness and geometry on the alpha-particle resolution of CsI (Tl)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinez, P.; Senftle, F.E.

    1960-01-01

    The resolution of CsI(Tl) for Po210 alpha particles has been measured as a function of crystal thickness. The best resolution of a 12;-in. diam cylindrical crystal was obtained for a thickness of 0.38 mm, and the effect of thickness on the resolution is discussed. Based on the proposed model, a conical crystal was designed, which yielded a line width of 1.8% for Po 210 alpha particles with a selected photomultiplier tube. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  9. Effect of geometry and scale for axial and radial flow membrane chromatography-Experimental study of bovin serum albumin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Teepakorn, Chalore; Fiaty, Koffi; Charcosset, Catherine

    2015-07-17

    During the last 10 years, membrane chromatography (MC) has been increasingly reported for biomolecule purification at both small and large scales. Although, several axial and radial flow MC devices are commercialized, the effect of the device dimensions on the adsorption performance has not been fully investigated. In this study, axial and radial flow anion ion-exchange MC devices were used for bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption. For both axial and radial flow, three devices at different scales were compared, two having similar diameter and two similar bed height. The pressure drop and the flow distribution using acetone as a non-binding solute were measured, as well as BSA breakthrough curves at different flow rates and BSA loading concentrations. For all devices, it was observed that the flow rate had no effect on the breakthrough curve, which confirms the advantage of MC to be used at high flow rates. In addition, the BSA binding capacity increased with increasing BSA concentration, which suggests that it could be preferable to work with concentrated solutions rather than with very dilute solutions, when using buffer at high phosphate concentration. For both axial and radial flow, the bed height had a negative impact on the binding capacity, as the lowest binding capacities per membrane volume were obtained with the devices having the highest bed height. Radial flow MC has potential at large-scale applications, as a short bed thickness can be combined with a large inlet surface area.

  10. Coulomb blockade based field-effect transistors exploiting stripe-shaped channel geometries of self-assembled metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Hauke; Willing, Svenja; Möller, Sandra; Volkmann, Mirjam; Klinke, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Metallic nanoparticles offer possibilities to build basic electric devices with new functionality and improved performance. Due to the small volume and the resulting low self-capacitance, each single nanoparticle exhibits a high charging energy. Thus, a Coulomb-energy gap emerges during transport experiments that can be shifted by electric fields, allowing for charge transport whenever energy levels of neighboring particles match. Hence, the state of the device changes sequentially between conducting and non-conducting instead of just one transition from conducting to pinch-off as in semiconductors. To exploit this behavior for field-effect transistors, it is necessary to use uniform nanoparticles in ordered arrays separated by well-defined tunnel barriers. In this work, CoPt nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution are synthesized by colloidal chemistry. These particles are deposited via the scalable Langmuir-Blodgett technique as ordered, homogeneous monolayers onto Si/SiO2 substrates with pre-patterned gold electrodes. The resulting nanoparticle arrays are limited to stripes of adjustable lengths and widths. In such a defined channel with a limited number of conduction paths the current can be controlled precisely by a gate voltage. Clearly pronounced Coulomb oscillations are observed up to temperatures of 150 K. Using such systems as field-effect transistors yields unprecedented oscillating current modulations with on/off-ratios of around 70%.

  11. Coulomb blockade based field-effect transistors exploiting stripe-shaped channel geometries of self-assembled metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Hauke; Willing, Svenja; Möller, Sandra; Volkmann, Mirjam; Klinke, Christian

    2016-08-14

    Metallic nanoparticles offer possibilities to build basic electric devices with new functionality and improved performance. Due to the small volume and the resulting low self-capacitance, each single nanoparticle exhibits a high charging energy. Thus, a Coulomb-energy gap emerges during transport experiments that can be shifted by electric fields, allowing for charge transport whenever energy levels of neighboring particles match. Hence, the state of the device changes sequentially between conducting and non-conducting instead of just one transition from conducting to pinch-off as in semiconductors. To exploit this behavior for field-effect transistors, it is necessary to use uniform nanoparticles in ordered arrays separated by well-defined tunnel barriers. In this work, CoPt nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution are synthesized by colloidal chemistry. These particles are deposited via the scalable Langmuir-Blodgett technique as ordered, homogeneous monolayers onto Si/SiO2 substrates with pre-patterned gold electrodes. The resulting nanoparticle arrays are limited to stripes of adjustable lengths and widths. In such a defined channel with a limited number of conduction paths the current can be controlled precisely by a gate voltage. Clearly pronounced Coulomb oscillations are observed up to temperatures of 150 K. Using such systems as field-effect transistors yields unprecedented oscillating current modulations with on/off-ratios of around 70%.

  12. The effect of landing system coverage and path geometry on lateral position errors at the runway threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The results of an analytical study performed to determine the effect of the azimuth coverage of a Microwave Landing System (MLS) on the ability of an airplane, with an initial navigation position estimate error, to navigate to the runway threshold are presented. The test path chosen for this study consists of an initial straight segment leading into a 130 deg turn with a 2286 m radius and ending in a straight-in final approach segment. The test path configuration was varied by changing the MLS azimuth coverage angle and the final approach length. The aircraft was positioned with an inital offset to the left or right of the desired path along the line of intersection with the MLS azimuth coverage. A fast time computer simulation program, using a simplistic point mass model of the airplane, was used for this study. The data from this study indicates that the lateral position errors at the runway are primarily a function of the final approach length. The effect of the azimuth coverage on the lateral position errors was restricted by the turn characteristics of the horizontal steering control laws.

  13. Comparison of the Effects of Tool Geometry for Friction Stir Welding Thin Sheet Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merry, Josh; Takeshita, Jennifer; Tweedy, Bryan; Burford, Dwight

    2006-01-01

    In this presentation, the results of a recent study on the effect of pin tool design for friction stir welding thin sheets (0.040") of aluminum alloys 2024 and 7075 are provided. The objective of this study was to investigate and document the effect of tool shoulder and pin diameter, as well as the presence of pin flutes, on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature. Specifically, the comparison between three tools will include: FSW process load analysis (tool forces required to fabricate the welds), Static Mechanical Properties (ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation), and Process window documenting the range of parameters that can be used with the three pin tools investigated. All samples were naturally aged for a period greater than 10 days. Prior research has shown 7075 may require post weld heat treatment. Therefore, an additional pair of room temperature and cryogenic temperature samples was post-weld aged to the 7075-T7 condition prior to mechanical testing.

  14. Coulomb blockade based field-effect transistors exploiting stripe-shaped channel geometries of self-assembled metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Hauke; Willing, Svenja; Möller, Sandra; Volkmann, Mirjam; Klinke, Christian

    2016-08-14

    Metallic nanoparticles offer possibilities to build basic electric devices with new functionality and improved performance. Due to the small volume and the resulting low self-capacitance, each single nanoparticle exhibits a high charging energy. Thus, a Coulomb-energy gap emerges during transport experiments that can be shifted by electric fields, allowing for charge transport whenever energy levels of neighboring particles match. Hence, the state of the device changes sequentially between conducting and non-conducting instead of just one transition from conducting to pinch-off as in semiconductors. To exploit this behavior for field-effect transistors, it is necessary to use uniform nanoparticles in ordered arrays separated by well-defined tunnel barriers. In this work, CoPt nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution are synthesized by colloidal chemistry. These particles are deposited via the scalable Langmuir-Blodgett technique as ordered, homogeneous monolayers onto Si/SiO2 substrates with pre-patterned gold electrodes. The resulting nanoparticle arrays are limited to stripes of adjustable lengths and widths. In such a defined channel with a limited number of conduction paths the current can be controlled precisely by a gate voltage. Clearly pronounced Coulomb oscillations are observed up to temperatures of 150 K. Using such systems as field-effect transistors yields unprecedented oscillating current modulations with on/off-ratios of around 70%. PMID:27232949

  15. Gully geometry: what are we measuring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalí, Javier; Giménez, Rafael; Ángel Campo, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    Gully erosion has attracted the attention of many scientists during the last decades, and gullies are an important source of sediment within catchments. For succeeding in gully erosion research, gullies must be properly characterized. Characterization includes the determination of gully morphology and volume, being the definition of gully width (W) and depth (D) -and consequently related variables such as the well-known W/D ratio- key issues toward to this goal. However, and surprisingly, universally accepted criteria (rules or guidance) to define gully morphology are lacking. This because the protocol every researcher follows to measure the eroded channel geometry is generally taken for granted and most of the time even no explanation is given about it. For example, when analyzing a gully cross section we usually just identify gully depth with gully maximum depth. But, is this the right protocol? What does this length really represent? What is its meaning? All this uncertainties can lead to non-comparable results and then important inconsistencies. So, to define universal rules of procedure would allow gully scientists "speak the same language" and then deliver truly comparable gully geometry and volume. On the other hand, there are other misunderstandings. For example, very frequently we characterize or depict a whole gully only through some of its cross sections. Again, is this correct? The problem is even more complex when considering that gully geometry may (largely) change along the channel. The main aim of this presentation is to highlight some (unnoticed) common flaws when measuring and describing gully geometry, hoping ultimately to open a debate on that subject. For this last purpose, a conceptual approach to define gully cross section width and other derived variables is firstly proposed. It is based on the subtraction of a highly detailed digital elevation model of a landscape surface containing the studied gully (DEM1) from a detailed spatial

  16. An introduction to Minkowski geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, David L.

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental ideas of Minkowski geometries are presented. Learning about Minkowski geometries can sharpen our students' understanding of concepts such as distance measurement. Many of its ideas are important and accessible to undergraduate students. Following a brief overview, distance and orthogonality in Minkowski geometries are thoroughly discussed and many illustrative examples and applications are supplied. Suggestions for further study of these geometries are given. Indeed, Minkowski geometries are an excellent source of topics for undergraduate research and independent study.

  17. The effect of disc geometry on heat transfer in a rotating cavity with a radial outflow of fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farthing, P. R.; Owen, J. M.

    1987-05-01

    Flow visualization and heat transfer measurements have been obtained in a cavity consisting of two nonplane disks of 762 mm diameter and a peripheral shroud, all of which could be rotated up to 2000 rev/min. Results show that cobs made of foam material have little effect on the isothermal structure inside a rotating cavity with a radial outflow of air. A similar flow structure to that previously observed for a cavity with plane disks is found. It is also noted that, providing the source region does not fill the entire cavity, solutions of the turbulent integral boundary-layer equations provide a good approximation to the Nusselt numbers measured on the heated downstream disc.

  18. Effects of anisotropy in simple lattice geometries on many-body properties of ultracold fermions in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubeva, Anna; Sotnikov, Andrii; Hofstetter, Walter

    2015-10-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic hopping amplitudes on quantum phases of ultracold fermions in optical lattices described by the repulsive Fermi-Hubbard model. In particular, using dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) we investigate the dimensional crossover between the isotropic square and the isotropic cubic lattice. We analyze the phase transition from the antiferromagnetic to the paramagnetic state and observe a significant change in the critical temperature: depending on the interaction strength, the anisotropy can lead to both a suppression or increase. We also investigate the localization properties of the system, such as the compressibility and double occupancy. Using the local-density approximation in combination with DMFT we conclude that density profiles can be used to detect the mentioned anisotropy-driven transitions.

  19. Effects of filament geometry on the arc efficiency of a high-intensity He{sup +} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kobuchi, T.; Kisaki, M.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Shinto, K.; Tsumori, K.; Kaneko, O.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Hirano, Y.; Wada, M.

    2008-10-15

    A strongly focusing high-intensity He{sup +} ion source equipped with three concave electrodes has been designed and constructed as the beam source for a high-energy He{sup 0} neutral beam probe system to diagnose fusion-produced alpha particles in thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The reduction of heat load onto the concave extraction electrodes is particularly important for a long pulse operation, as the heat load deforms the electrodes and thus the beam focal length. The effects on the arc efficiency (beam current/arc power) of the ion source due to the discharge filament structure (straight-type and L-shape-type filaments), size (filament diameters of 2 and 1.5 mm), number, and the locations have been studied. Choice of the appropriate filament structure improved the arc efficiency by 17%.

  20. Effects of planform geometry on hover performance of a 2-meter-diameter model of a four-bladed rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, A. E., III; Althoff, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    Hover tests were conducted on three small scale rotors to evaluate the effects of blade planform taper on rotor hover performance. Tests were conducted on a rectangular swept-tip configuration, on a configuration with a 3 to 1 taper over the outboard 20 percent of the span, and on a configuration with a 5 to 1 taper over the outboard 20 percent of the blade span. The investigation covered a range of thrust coefficients from 0 to 0.0075 and a range of tip speeds from 300 to 600 ft/sec. The tests showed that both tapered configurations had better hover performance than the swept-tip rectangular configuration and that the 3 to 1 taper configuration was better than the 5 to 1 taper configuration. The test results were compared with predictions made with a prescribed wake analysis, a momentum analysis, and a simplified free wake analysis.

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme and matrix metalloproteinase inhibition with developing heart failure: comparative effects on left ventricular function and geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElmurray, J. H. 3rd; Mukherjee, R.; New, R. B.; Sampson, A. C.; King, M. K.; Hendrick, J. W.; Goldberg, A.; Peterson, T. J.; Hallak, H.; Zile, M. R.; Spinale, F. G.

    1999-01-01

    The progression of congestive heart failure (CHF) is left ventricular (LV) myocardial remodeling. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to tissue remodeling and therefore MMP inhibition may serve as a useful therapeutic target in CHF. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition favorably affects LV myocardial remodeling in CHF. This study examined the effects of specific MMP inhibition, ACE inhibition, and combined treatment on LV systolic and diastolic function in a model of CHF. Pigs were randomly assigned to five groups: 1) rapid atrial pacing (240 beats/min) for 3 weeks (n = 8); 2) ACE inhibition (fosinopril, 2.5 mg/kg b.i.d. orally) and rapid pacing (n = 8); 3) MMP inhibition (PD166793 2 mg/kg/day p.o.) and rapid pacing (n = 8); 4) combined ACE and MMP inhibition (2.5 mg/kg b.i.d. and 2 mg/kg/day, respectively) and rapid pacing (n = 8); and 5) controls (n = 9). LV peak wall stress increased by 2-fold with rapid pacing and was reduced in all treatment groups. LV fractional shortening fell by nearly 2-fold with rapid pacing and increased in all treatment groups. The circumferential fiber shortening-systolic stress relation was reduced with rapid pacing and increased in the ACE inhibition and combination groups. LV myocardial stiffness constant was unchanged in the rapid pacing group, increased nearly 2-fold in the MMP inhibition group, and was normalized in the ACE inhibition and combination treatment groups. Increased MMP activation contributes to the LV dilation and increased wall stress with pacing CHF and a contributory downstream mechanism of ACE inhibition is an effect on MMP activity.

  2. 2015 Accomplishments-Tritium aging studies on stainless steel. Effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of hydrogen isotopes, crack orientation, and specimen geometry on the fracture toughness of stainless steels. Fracture toughness variability was investigated for Type 21-6-9 stainless steel using the 7K0004 forging. Fracture toughness specimens were cut from the forging in two different geometric configurations: arc shape and disc shape. The fracture toughness properties were measured at ambient temperature before and after exposure to hydrogen gas and compared to prior studies. There are three main conclusions that can be drawn from the results. First, the fracture toughness properties of actual reservoir forgings and contemporary heats of steel are much higher than those measured in earlier studies that used heats of steel from the 1980s and 1990s and forward extruded forgings which were designed to simulate reservoir microstructures. This is true for as-forged heats as well as forged heats exposed to hydrogen gas. Secondly, the study confirms the well-known observation that cracks oriented parallel to the forging grain flow will propagate easier than those oriented perpendicular to the grain flow. However, what was not known, but is shown here, is that this effect is more pronounced, particularly after hydrogen exposures, when the forging is given a larger upset. In brick forgings, which have a relatively low amount of upset, the fracture toughness variation with specimen orientation is less than 5%; whereas, in cup forgings, the fracture toughness is about 20% lower than that forging to show how specimen geometry affects fracture toughness values. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) specifies minimum specimen section sizes for valid fracture toughness values. However, sub-size specimens have long been used to study tritium effects because of the physical limitation of diffusing hydrogen isotopes into stainless steel at mild temperatures so as to not disturb the underlying forged microstructure. This study shows

  3. Odd gravitational harmonics of Jupiter: Effects of spherical versus nonspherical geometry and mathematical smoothing of the equatorially antisymmetric zonal winds across the equatorial plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-10-01

    Unlike the even gravitational coefficients of Jupiter that are caused by both the rotational distortion and the equatorially symmetric zonal winds, the odd jovian gravitational coefficients are directly linked to the depth of the equatorially antisymmetric zonal winds. Accurate estimation of the wind-induced odd coefficients and comparison with measurements of those coefficients would be key to understanding the structure of the zonal winds in the deep interior of Jupiter. We consider two problems in connection with the jovian odd gravitational coefficients. In the first problem, we show, by solving the governing equations for the northern hemisphere of Jupiter subject to an appropriate condition at the equatorial plane, that the effect of non-spherical geometry makes an insignificant contribution to the lowermost-order odd gravitational coefficients. In the second problem, we investigate the effect of the equatorial smoothing used to avoid the discontinuity in the winds across the equatorial plane when the thermal wind equation is adopted to compute the odd gravitational coefficients. We reveal that, because of the dominant effect of the equatorial smoothing, the odd gravitational coefficients so obtained for deep zonal winds do not reflect physically realistic dynamics taking place in the deep interior of Jupiter.

  4. The effects of once-weekly teriparatide on hip geometry assessed by hip structural analysis in postmenopausal osteoporotic women with high fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Sone, Teruki; Ito, Masako; Fukunaga, Masao; Tomomitsu, Tatsushi; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Shiraki, Masataka; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2014-07-01

    Weekly administration of teriparatide has been shown to reduce the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures in patients with osteoporosis at higher fracture risk in Japan. However, its efficacy for hip fracture has not been established. To gain insight into the effect of weekly teriparatide on the hip, hip structural analysis (HSA) based on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed using the data of 209 postmenopausal osteoporotic women who had participated in the original randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial assessing the effects of once-weekly 56.5 μg teriparatide for 72 weeks. The DXA scans, obtained at baseline, 48 weeks and 72 weeks, were analyzed to extract bone mineral density (BMD) and cross-sectional geometrical indices at the narrowest point on the neck (NN), the intertrochanteric region (IT), and the proximal shaft. Compared with placebo after 72 weeks, the teriparatide group showed significantly higher BMD, average cortical thickness, bone cross-sectional area, and section modulus, and lower buckling ratio at both the NN and IT regions. No significant expansion of periosteal diameter was observed at these regions. There were no significant differences in BMD and HSA indices at the shaft region. The results indicate that overall structural strength in the proximal femur increased compared to placebo, suggesting that once-weekly teriparatide effectively reverses changes in hip geometry and strength with aging. PMID:24727160

  5. Effectiveness: N(sub TU) relationships for the design and performance evaluation of additional shell-and-tube heat exchanger geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-11-01

    This Data Item 88021, an addition to the Sub-series on Heat Transfer, complements ESDU 86018 by extending the range of configurations covered there and in particular considering the effect of using small numbers of baffles for E- and J-shells and the use of J-shells in series. It also explores the limitations of the assumptions associated with the effectiveness - N(sub TU) method and shows where those assumptions break down. The curves presented for each exchanger geometry show the locus of designs for which a temperature cross may occur and the locus of 95 percent heat transfer effectiveness which indicates the region of uneconomic design. The method assumes a linear temperature/enthalpy relationship (constant specific heat capacity) for both streams. It applies to boiling or condensing flow of a single component with no temperature change, or boiling and condensing flow of a mixture that is always two-phase. It excludes conditions in which transition from single- to two-phase flow occurs. However, by use of average property values, it is possible to extend the method to apply to cases where there is some variation of physical and thermodynamic properties with temperature.

  6. The effects of once-weekly teriparatide on hip geometry assessed by hip structural analysis in postmenopausal osteoporotic women with high fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Sone, Teruki; Ito, Masako; Fukunaga, Masao; Tomomitsu, Tatsushi; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Shiraki, Masataka; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2014-07-01

    Weekly administration of teriparatide has been shown to reduce the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures in patients with osteoporosis at higher fracture risk in Japan. However, its efficacy for hip fracture has not been established. To gain insight into the effect of weekly teriparatide on the hip, hip structural analysis (HSA) based on dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed using the data of 209 postmenopausal osteoporotic women who had participated in the original randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial assessing the effects of once-weekly 56.5 μg teriparatide for 72 weeks. The DXA scans, obtained at baseline, 48 weeks and 72 weeks, were analyzed to extract bone mineral density (BMD) and cross-sectional geometrical indices at the narrowest point on the neck (NN), the intertrochanteric region (IT), and the proximal shaft. Compared with placebo after 72 weeks, the teriparatide group showed significantly higher BMD, average cortical thickness, bone cross-sectional area, and section modulus, and lower buckling ratio at both the NN and IT regions. No significant expansion of periosteal diameter was observed at these regions. There were no significant differences in BMD and HSA indices at the shaft region. The results indicate that overall structural strength in the proximal femur increased compared to placebo, suggesting that once-weekly teriparatide effectively reverses changes in hip geometry and strength with aging.

  7. Using Dynamic Geometry Software to Improve Eight Grade Students' Understanding of Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect of dynamic geometry software (DGS) on students' learning of transformation geometry. A pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design was used. Participants in the study were 68 eighth grade students (36 in the experimental group and 32 in the control group). While the experimental group students were studying the…

  8. A numerical study of the effect of geometry variation, turbulence models, and dissipation on the flow past control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaussee, Denny S.

    1993-01-01

    The steady 3D viscous flow past the ONERA M6 wing and a slender delta wing-body with trailing edge control surfaces has been computed. A cell-centered finite-volume Navier-Stokes patched zonal method has been used for the numerical simulation. Both diagonalized and LUSGS schemes have been implemented. Besides the standard nonplanar zonal interfacing techniques, a new virtual zone capability has been employed. For code validation, the transonic flow past the ONERA M5 wing is calculated for angles-of-attack of 3.06 deg and 5.06 deg and compared with the available experiments. The wing-body computational results are compared with experimental data for both trailing-edge flaps deflected. The experimental flow conditions are M subinfinity = 0.4, a turbulent Reynolds number of 5.41 million based on a mean aerodynamic chord of 25.959 inches, adiabatic wall, and angles-of-attack varying from 0 deg to 23.85 deg. The computational results are presented for the 23.85 deg angle-of-attack case. The effects of the base flow due to a model sting, the varying second and fourth order numerical dissipation, and the turbulence model are all considered.

  9. Geometry definition with MAZE

    SciTech Connect

    Nebeck, H.E.

    1986-08-01

    The MAZE mesh generator represents an arbitrary two dimensional region of space as an ordered collection of quadrilateral elements. Each element is defined by its four corner points (nodes) and an integer material number. Models are created by subdividing the region(s) of interest into one or more PARTS and specifying the element distribution in each part. Then, parts can be merged together to form the meshed representation of the entire region. Applying boundary conditions and describing material properties completes the model construction process. This activity takes place in three distinct phases: phase I-define geometry, subdivide regions into elements; phase II-refine geometry, establish interface and boundary conditions; phase III-describe material properties. This work presents explanations and examples of the phase I commands, along with an overview of the MAZE mesh generation process.

  10. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  11. Inflation from quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin

    2002-12-23

    Quantum geometry predicts that a universe evolves through an inflationary phase at small volume before exiting gracefully into a standard Friedmann phase. This does not require the introduction of additional matter fields with ad hoc potentials; rather, it occurs because of a quantum gravity modification of the kinetic part of ordinary matter Hamiltonians. An application of the same mechanism can explain why the present day cosmological acceleration is so tiny.

  12. Geometry of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2007-12-01

    Preface; 1. Convexity, colours and statistics; 2. Geometry of probability distributions; 3. Much ado about spheres; 4. Complex projective spaces; 5. Outline of quantum mechanics; 6. Coherent states and group actions; 7. The stellar representation; 8. The space of density matrices; 9. Purification of mixed quantum states; 10. Quantum operations; 11. Duality: maps versus states; 12. Density matrices and entropies; 13. Distinguishability measures; 14. Monotone metrics and measures; 15. Quantum entanglement; Epilogue; Appendices; References; Index.

  13. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  14. Effects of fuselage forebody geometry on low-speed lateral-directional characteristics of twin-tail fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, P. C.; Gilbert, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    Low-speed, static wind-tunnel tests were conducted to explore the effects of fighter fuselage forebody geometry on lateral-directional characteristics at high angles of attack and to provide data for general design procedures. Effects of eight different forebody configurations and several add-on devices (e.g., nose strakes, boundary-layer trip wires, and nose booms) were investigated. Tests showed that forebody design features such as fineness ratio, cross-sectional shape, and add-on devices can have a significant influence on both lateral-directional and longitudinal aerodynamic stability. Several of the forebodies produced both lateral-directional symmetry and strong favorable changes in lateral-directional stability. However, the same results also indicated that such forebody designs can produce significant reductions in longitudinal stability near maximum lift and can significantly change the influence of other configuration variables. The addition of devices to highly tailored forebody designs also can significantly degrade the stability improvements provided by the clean forebody.

  15. Using Open Plan with integrated Xbase applications for effective project management solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Freier, K.D.; Hirschi, E.J.

    1994-04-01

    Open Plan`s open architecture allows the user many advantages that are not available from other project management software. One of these advantages is its ability to interface with various database management systems, thereby allowing the user to develop a project management system tailored to their specific needs. This open architecture offers maximum flexability to the user to personalize reports, screens, data structures, and develop customized management systems. Using Xbase, applications can be developed for every facet of a complete project management system including baseline development, performance measurement, reporting, and analysis. These applications can range from simple routines such as user-defined status worksheets, milestone logs and other reports, to complex cost,and schedule control systems. The combined power of Xbase and Open Plan can be used to produce effective project management solutions. Customized applications are easily obtainable allowing the user to gather information more timely and efficiently, produce customized reports, and analyze project management information more effectively.

  16. The Other Mozart Effect: An Open Letter to Music Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on five observations of children and adults involved in music activities and discusses three issues related to experimental research. Argues against the Mozart Effect, stating that the effects of music instruction seen within the classroom everyday are more significant. Discusses the results of Mozart Effect studies and educational…

  17. Integral geometry and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  18. Integral geometry and holography

    DOE PAGES

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulkmore » curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.« less

  19. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-05-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems.

  20. Effect of Group-Selection Opening Size on Breeding Bird Habitat Use in a Bottomland Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Moorman, C.E.; D.C. Guynn, Jr.

    2001-12-01

    Research on the effects of creating group-selection openings of various sizes on breeding birds habitat use in a bottomland hardwood forest of the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Creation of 0.5-ha group selection openings in southern bottomland forests should provide breeding habitat for some field-edge species in gaps and habitat for forest-interior species and canopy-dwelling forest-edge species between gaps provided that enough mature forest is made available.