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Sample records for effective patient education

  1. Choosing effective patient education materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... varies from person to person. Using a mixed media approach often works best. Keep your assessment of the patient in mind. Consider factors such as literacy and culture as you develop a plan. Avoid ...

  2. Educating Patient Educators: Enhancing Instructional Effectiveness in Physical Therapy for Low Back Pain Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerssens, Jan J.; Sluijs, Emmy M.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; Knibbe, Hanneke J.; Hermans, Irma M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of a training program designed for physical therapists (N=19) to aid them in the enhancement of patient education. Five therapist-skills were tested. After the training only a minority of the trained skills appeared to have improved. Results show that the training program was not very effective. (Author/MKA)

  3. A cost-effectiveness worksheet for patient-education programs.

    PubMed

    Welch, Janet L; Fisher, Mary L; Dayhoff, Nancy E

    2002-07-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a worksheet used by nursing faculty in a graduate clinical nurse specialist course to assist students in learning to estimate the cost-effectiveness of patient-education programs.1 The worksheet was found to be a satisfactory method of facilitating student learning and could also be used in the service arena to evaluate the cost aspects of patient-education programs.

  4. How effective are your patient education materials? Guidelines for developing and evaluating written educational materials.

    PubMed

    Farrell-Miller, P; Gentry, P

    1989-01-01

    Written educational materials are an essential component of a comprehensive education program. To be effective and useful, educational materials must meet the specific needs of the target patient population. Many available educational materials may not meet the needs of your patients, therefore efforts to develop appropriate written educational tools may be necessary. Developing quality educational materials include several steps: conducting a needs assessment, establishing learning objectives, writing the text, and evaluating the piece. The quality of the text is often determined by readability. The text should be written on a level that is appropriate for the patient group. Content and style, layout, color, and illustrations all influence readability and quality. Most important, good quality educational materials help promote the relationship between the patient and the health care professional as well as enhance patient knowledge and self-care.

  5. A strategy for designing effective patient education materials.

    PubMed

    McCabe, B J; Tysinger, J W; Kreger, M; Currwin, A C

    1989-09-01

    Health care professionals have long voiced a concern about the mismatch between patients' reading skills and the readability of printed educational materials. The gap between patients' reading levels and the readability of diet education materials has not been closed in the past 20 years. This article details a strategy for developing effective printed educational materials that was used to develop and revise dietetic materials for patients at a university medical center. The process includes the use of a computerized readability software program to assess reading levels. Three major steps are to (a) analyze patient education needs, (b) develop the instructional plan and materials, and (c) evaluate the materials. Examples are given of the application of the readability program in the development of one diet booklet and in the simplification of four other booklets. Without the readability formulas, the reading level of the materials would have remained above the stated educational levels of the target population, and the objectives of the booklets would not have been achieved. Cautions against overreliance on the readability formulas without other assessment steps are given. A systematic approach including readability assessment is needed to ensure the effectiveness of dietetic educational materials.

  6. Effects of psychosocial education on adaptation in elderly hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Mathers, T R

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this experimental field pilot study was to determine whether the application of psychosocial education sessions had an effect on the adaptation level of elderly hemodialysis patients. A pretest, posttest control group design with two randomly selected groups was used. Ten patients, 4 males and 6 females, age 65 years and older, were randomly selected and stratified according to gender, with 2 males and 3 females assigned to either an experimental or a control group. The Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale, Self-Report (PAIS-SR) was administered as a pretest 1 week prior to implementation of the intervention with the experimental group. It was again given as a posttest 30 days after completion of the intervention. The intervention, 7 psychosocial educational sessions with 7 audiotapes and a companion text module, provided information. These sessions were conducted with the experimental group, 2 days a week, during the subjects' hemodialysis treatments, taking approximately 20 minutes each, over a period of 4 1/2 weeks. Data were analyzed utilizing t-tests and descriptive statistics. No significant differences were found between the scores of the pretest and posttest when comparing the two groups. However, a significant value of 0.035 (p < 0.05) was evident in one domain of the PAIS-SR, the domestic environment, when comparing the scores of the pretest and posttest of the experimental group. The application of psychosocial education sessions did not have a significant effect on the adaptation level of elderly hemodialysis patients.

  7. Patient education in the effective management of hay fever.

    PubMed

    Bartle, Janette

    2016-06-22

    Hay fever, or seasonal allergic rhinitis, is a common condition that affects one in four people in the UK. It is characterised by cold-like symptoms that may include a runny nose, itchy eyes, sneezing and nasal congestion or blockage. Patient education is important in improving patient concordance with treatment regimens and effectively managing hay fever symptoms, and may include advice on ways to avoid pollen. Encouraging patients to start treatment in advance of pollen dispersal, before they experience symptoms, enables optimum management of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Adjunctive treatment, using a nasal douche before applying a nasal corticosteroid spray, is recommended as an aid to nasal hygiene, to improve the efficacy of medication and to reduce allergic inflammation. Often a nasal corticosteroid spray is applied using an incorrect technique, rendering it ineffective. It is important for patients to understand how a nasal corticosteroid spray works and the need for continuous daily treatment using a correct application technique for maximum efficacy of the medication delivered. Standard operating procedures have been developed to demonstrate the effective technique for applying a nasal spray and to improve patients' understanding of the recommended nasal douching treatment. PMID:27332610

  8. Patient Education in Thyrotoxicosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, N. B.; Sturrock, N. D. C.; Sowter, H.; Abbott-Harland, S.; Nichols, E.; Jeffcoate, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    Study aims to assess the need for a thyrotoxicosis patient education programs and evaluates a group education session. Patients with thyrotoxicosis were surveyed to assess their needs. Determined that people with thyrotoxicosis had limited knowledge about their condition. The offer of a group education program has little effect on that knowledge…

  9. [Effect of patient education on neuroleptic treatment of young psychotic patients].

    PubMed

    Goulet, J; Lalonde, P; Lavoie, G; Jodoin, F

    1993-10-01

    This study verifies the effect of the neuroleptic treatment teaching module, the French translation of the Medication Management Module produced by the social skills training programs. Twenty patients from an outpatient clinic (with schizophreniform or schizoaffective schizophrenia) were assigned at random to a test group (n = 10) or a control group (n = 10). The pre-test evaluation found that the two groups were the same with regard to 13 significant parameters. The experimenters used French translations of well-known instruments, and the double-blind method was applied to their respective observations throughout the study. Results were obtained by applying the neuroleptic treatment teaching module three hours per week for two to three months. The post-test evaluation revealed that patients who had been exposed to the education module had an improved understanding of schizophrenia and the medication required to treat it than patients who had not been exposed. The dose of medication prescribed between pre- and post-test evaluations were able to more effectively stabilize patients who had received education than patients who had not. Nevertheless, the education module continues to have no significant effect on the symptomatology (according to the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) and final SAS-II social scores of schizophrenics.

  10. [Patient education of hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Boyer, Dominique; Faillebin, Françoise; de la Brière, Aice

    2013-11-01

    The therapeutic education of patients with hepatitis C helps to improve their health and quality of life. The aim is to encourage compliance with the treatment and the fight against side effects, through to the patient's recovery. PMID:24409616

  11. The Effect of Eye Drop Technique Education in Patients With Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Delesha M; Sayner, Robyn; Blalock, Susan J; Muir, Kelly W; Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth; Lawrence, Scott D; Giangiacomo, Annette L; Goldsmith, Jason A; Tudor, Gail E; Robin, Alan L; Sleath, Betsy L

    2016-08-01

    Education about how to administer eye drops may improve a patient's ability to instill his or her eye drops correctly. Our objectives were to (a) document the methods providers use to educate glaucoma patients about eye drop technique; (b) determine whether eye drop technique education varies by provider and patient characteristics; and (c) evaluate whether education predicts improved patient technique. We conducted an 8-month longitudinal study of 279 glaucoma patients and 15 providers in which we recorded on videotape the content of glaucoma office visits at two time points (baseline and 4- to 6-week follow-up) and videotaped patient eye drop technique at three time points (baseline, 4- to 6-week follow-up, and 8-month follow-up). Mann-Whitney rank sum tests were used to determine whether education was associated with improved patient eye drop technique over time. Ninety-four patients (34%) received technique education at either visit; 31% received verbal education and 10% received a technique demonstration. Only 24 patients (47%) who were new to eye drops received technique education at the baseline visit. Patients who were new to drops at baseline (p = .008) and patients who asked a question about drops (p < .001) were more likely to receive technique education. Education was not associated with improved technique. Eye drop technique education occurs infrequently during glaucoma office visits. Future studies should compare the effectiveness of different educational methods, such as patient demonstration versus provider verbal instruction, to determine which method is best at improving patient eye drop technique. PMID:26751938

  12. Effects on Deaf Patients of Medication Education by Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Hyoguchi, Naomi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-10-01

    Deaf people often experience difficulty in understanding medication information provided by pharmacists due to communication barriers. We held medication education lectures for deaf and hard of hearing (HH) individuals and examined the extent to which deaf participants understood medication-related information as well as their attitude about medication. We used two questionnaires to compare the results from the deaf participants with those from the HH and hearing participants. We found that before the lecture, the deaf participants' understanding of medication use was lower than that of the HH and hearing participants. The deaf participants' knowledge increased after the lecture, but did not improve to the level exhibited by the HH participants. However, the deaf participants felt confident using medication despite their low comprehension levels. In conclusion, adjusting the medication information provided by pharmacists according to the recipient's reading level could help improve deaf patients' knowledge; however, such measures might not increase deaf patients' comprehension levels sufficiently. PMID:27262170

  13. Effectiveness of educational technology to improve patient care in pharmacy curricula.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael A; Benedict, Neal

    2015-02-17

    A review of the literature on the effectiveness of educational technologies to teach patient care skills to pharmacy students was conducted. Nineteen articles met inclusion criteria for the review. Seven of the articles included computer-aided instruction, 4 utilized human-patient simulation, 1 used both computer-aided instruction and human-patient simulation, and 7 utilized virtual patients. Educational technology was employed with more than 2700 students at 12 colleges and schools of pharmacy in courses including pharmacotherapeutics, skills and patient care laboratories, drug diversion, and advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) orientation. Students who learned by means of human-patient simulation and virtual patients reported enjoying the learning activity, whereas the results with computer-aided instruction were mixed. Moreover, the effect on learning was significant in the human-patient simulation and virtual patient studies, while conflicting data emerged on the effectiveness of computer-aided instruction.

  14. Caring for Dying Patients: Attitude of Nursing Students and Effects of Education

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Mojtaba; Rafiei, Hossein; Nassehi, Asra; Soleimani, Farzaneh; Arab, Mansuor; Noormohammadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Education about caring for dying patients could be effective in changing nursing students’ attitude toward caring for dying patients. Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the nursing students’ attitude toward caring for dying patients and effects of education on their attitude. Materials and Methods: The present study enjoys a quasi-experimental method with using one-group pre-test/post-test design conducted in Bam in southeast of Iran. The attitude of nursing students was measured using Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale before and after an educational intervention. Data were analyzed using non-parametric tests in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 18 software. Results: Of 32 students, 30 participated in this study (response rate of 94%). Only 20% of the students reported previous experience of dying patients in their clinical courses. Students showed moderately negative to neutral attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Education has improved students’ attitude significantly (mean score of FATCOD before study were 3.5 ± 0.43 and after intervention were 4.7 ± 0.33) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Educational programs about death and caring for dying patients should be added to undergraduate nursing curricula. Further research recommended examining nursing students’ knowledge about caring for dying patients and the effect of education on their knowledge. PMID:26009673

  15. Effect of different types of self-management education in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Maria de Fátima Ferreira; Neumann, Cristina Rolin; Scain, Suzana Fiore; Rozeno, Raquel Farias; Gross, Jorge Luiz; Leitão, Cristiane Bauermann

    2013-01-01

    Education plays an important role in diabetes mellitus (DM) treatment, as it enables patients to manage their disease. There is a wide range of tested educational interventions, and, to date, no universal model that can be standardized and recognized as effective for all individuals with the disease has been defined. This article aims to review the effect of different types of educational interventions for self-management of glycemic control in patients with DM type 2, in addition to define general recommendations for this treatment strategy. PMID:23850026

  16. Hospital Libraries in Patient's Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iroka, Luke A.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the positive effects of patient education, including the physician patient relationship, improvements in health status, and cost effectiveness. The status of hospital libraries in Nigeria is described, and suggestions for the implementation of patient education programs are made. (5 references) (CLB)

  17. [Effectiveness of therapeutic education and respiratory rehabilitation programs for the patient with asthma].

    PubMed

    Cano-De La Cuerda, Roberto; Useros-Olmo, Ana Isabel; Muñoz-Hellín, Elena

    2010-11-01

    Asthma is a chronic complex and heterogeneous disease, with great variability and has a huge impact, not only on patients who suffer the disease but also their families and society in general. The education of the asthmatic patient and their families is essential for therapeutic intervention. Through continuous, dynamic and adaptive education, changes in attitudes and behaviours of the patient and family can be achieved, and will undoubtedly lead to an improvement in their quality of life. Among other non-pharmacological interventions, respiratory rehabilitation is an alternative treatment, and is primarily aimed at patients with moderate to severe asthma. Although the latest clinical practice guidelines published in the scientific literature recommend two strategies for treatment, the results of relevant publications are diverse. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of therapeutic and educational programs in respiratory rehabilitation of the asthmatic patient. PMID:20846775

  18. Audit-based education: a potentially effective program for improving guideline achievement in CKD patients.

    PubMed

    de Goeij, Moniek C M; Rotmans, Joris I

    2013-09-01

    The achievement of treatment guidelines in patients with chronic kidney disease is poor, and more efforts are needed to improve this. Audit-based education is a program that may contribute to this improvement. de Lusignana et al. investigated whether audit-based education is effective in lowering systolic blood pressure in a primary-care setting. Although the program is inventive and promising, several adjustments are needed before it can be applied as an effective strategy.

  19. Mail Education Is as Effective as In-Class Education in Hypertensive Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miyong T.; Kim, Eun-Young; Han, Hae-Ra; Jeong, Seonghee; Lee, Jong Eun; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Kim B.; Hill, Martha N.

    2010-01-01

    Many Korean American persons have hypertension, but competing life priorities often prevent them from attending health-promotion educational activities. Using principles of community-based participatory research, the authors conducted a prospective clinical trial to determine the effectiveness of a mailed vs an in-class culturally tailored education intervention. A total of 380 hypertensive Korean American persons from the Baltimore/Washington area were assigned to a more intense in-class education group or a less intensive mail education group. Evaluation of postintervention blood pressure (BP) outcomes revealed that significant reductions in systolic BP (13.3 mm Hg and 16.1 mm Hg, respectively) and diastolic BP (9.5 mm Hg and 10.9 mm Hg) and increases in BP control rates (42.3% and 54.3%) were achieved in both groups. No significant differences in BP outcomes between groups, however, were found. In conclusion, education by mail was an effective strategy for improving BP control and may be a viable approach for other immigrant groups if the education materials address their cultural needs. PMID:18326962

  20. Using Standardized Patients in Nursing Education: Effects on Students' Psychomotor Skill Development.

    PubMed

    Sarmasoglu, Senay; Dinç, Leyla; Elçin, Melih

    2016-01-01

    The present study used a quasi-experimental design to examine the effects of using standardized patients for the psychomotor skills development of nursing students. The performance of the experimental group in blood pressure measurement was significantly higher than that of the control group; however, there was no significant difference between the groups with regard to their administration of subcutaneous injections. The results indicated that standardized patients can be integrated into nursing education for developing psychomotor skills of students.

  1. Using Standardized Patients in Nursing Education: Effects on Students' Psychomotor Skill Development.

    PubMed

    Sarmasoglu, Senay; Dinç, Leyla; Elçin, Melih

    2016-01-01

    The present study used a quasi-experimental design to examine the effects of using standardized patients for the psychomotor skills development of nursing students. The performance of the experimental group in blood pressure measurement was significantly higher than that of the control group; however, there was no significant difference between the groups with regard to their administration of subcutaneous injections. The results indicated that standardized patients can be integrated into nursing education for developing psychomotor skills of students. PMID:26102639

  2. The psychological effects of a videotape educational intervention on cardiac catheterization patients.

    PubMed

    Chair, Sek Ying; Chau, Mei Yi; Sit, Janet Wing Hung; Wong, Eliza Mei Ling; Chan, Aileen Wai Kiu

    2012-02-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of death and morbidity worldwide, and cardiac catheterization plays an essential role in its diagnostic evaluation. This quasi-experimental study examined the effectiveness of an educational intervention with the use of videotape and pamphlet among the Chinese patient undergoing the cardiac catheterization, and explored the relationship between anxiety, uncertainty, and other psychological variables. One hundred and thirty two Chinese patients of diagnosed or suspected CAD preparing for the first-time catheterization were recruited. Anxiety level (the Chinese State Anxiety Inventory) and uncertainty (the Chinese version of Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale) were measured before the intervention and within 2 hours before receiving cardiac catheterization; while patients' satisfaction and perceived knowledge gain were measured at 20-24 hours after it. The mean age of the participants was 61.3 and 64.8% of them were male. The findings indicated that the use of videotape to prepare patients for the cardiac catheterization is effective in reducing the level of anxiety (p < 0.001) and the uncertainty (p < 0.001), as the patients experienced higher satisfaction and knowledge level after the educational intervention. Therefore, videotape education is suggested for cardiac catheterization care on top of the usual pamphlet education.

  3. Patient Education: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Jeannette

    Topics included in this annotated bibliography on patient education are (1) background on development of patient education programs, (2) patient education interventions, (3) references for health professionals, and (4) research and evaluation in patient education. (TA)

  4. Medication Adherence in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Effect of Patient Education, Health Literacy, and Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Joplin, Samantha; van der Zwan, Rick; Joshua, Fredrick; Wong, Peter K. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease affecting <1% of the population. Incompletely controlled RA results in fatigue, joint and soft tissue pain, progressive joint damage, reduced quality of life, and increased cardiovascular mortality. Despite an increasing range of disease modifying agents which halt disease progression, poor patient adherence with medication is a significant barrier to management. Objective. The goal of this review was to examine the effectiveness of measures to improve patient medication adherence. Methods. Studies addressing treatment adherence in patients with RA were identified by trawling PsycINFO, Medline, Cochrane, Pubmed, and ProQuest for studies published between January 2000 and October 2014. Articles were independently reviewed to identify relevant studies. Results. Current strategies were of limited efficacy in improving patient adherence with medications used to treat RA. Conclusion. Poor medication adherence is a complex issue. Low educational levels and limited health literacy are contributory factors. Psychological models may assist in explaining medication nonadherence. Increasing patient knowledge of their disease seems sensible. Existing educational interventions appear ineffective at improving medication adherence, probably due to an overemphasis on provision of biomedical information. A novel approach to patient education using musculoskeletal ultrasound is proposed. PMID:26060812

  5. The effect of preoperative education on anxiety of open cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Asilioglu, Kezban; Celik, Sevilay Senol

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of preoperative teaching method on anxiety levels of the patients. This study consisted of 100 patients having open cardiac surgery. Of 100 patients 50 were placed in the intervention group while the remaining 50 were in the control group. The patients in the intervention group were given a planned teaching according to the patient education booklet. Patients in the control group were informed about pre- and postoperative routines by a nurse by the purpose of comparing anxiety levels of the patients in the intervention and control groups. The anxiety level of the patients in control and intervention groups was measured on the 3rd day after the operation by using the Self-Evaluation Questionnaire for State and Trait Anxiety Inventory. The mean postoperative state and trait anxiety score in the control group was slightly higher than the mean of the patients in the intervention group. There was no statistically significant difference in the state and trait anxiety scores between the groups, and the patients in the intervention group had lower scores than the patients in the control group. In addition, all patients in the intervention group stated that they were satisfied with the preoperative teaching given by the researcher. PMID:15062906

  6. Sex Education for Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zitner, David

    1985-01-01

    Sex education evokes a wide variety of responses in the community and from teachers. Consequently, physicians have a responsibility to present sex education material in a factual, objective way. Many people are misinformed about sexual behavior. Physicians can help patients and the community by being aware of appropriate sex education for each age group. A curriculum for sex education, and opportunities to provide sex information for patients of different ages and stages in the lifecycle, are described. PMID:21274069

  7. The effects of education on anxiety levels in patients receiving chemotherapy for the first time: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    Anxiety is one of the most common symptoms experienced by patients receiving their first chemotherapy treatment. Improper prevention and management of anxiety can lead to poor psychosocial outcomes, dissatisfaction with care, and decreased adherence to treatment. A review of the literature was conducted to analyze the effectiveness of patient education at decreasing anxiety. Consistencies were found throughout the literature regarding patient education for this population. Information regarding side effects of treatment, side-effect management strategies, and orientation to the infusion center are the most important topics of education that reduce anxiety. In addition, education performed by nurses before the first chemotherapy infusion in a quiet environment is most effective. Integration of effective patient education programs improves holistic care by increasing emphasis on psychosocial aspects of oncology.

  8. The Effects of Exercise Education Intervention on the Exercise Behaviour, Depression, and Fatigue Status of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wang, Kuo-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design/methodology/approach: This was a pilot study using an exercise education program as an intervention for CKD patients. The authors used the…

  9. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

  10. The write stuff. Simple guidelines can help you write and design effective patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Kripalani, S

    1995-08-01

    Most of the time and energy that go into patient education focus on the brief encounter between a doctor and patient in the physician's office. Although face-to-face interaction is indispensable in educating patients about their conditions, it also poses many problems. The stressful nature of the situation may cause patients to forget to ask questions or forget what they are told, and they may not get enough information to satisfy their needs and curiosities. PMID:7570374

  11. The Effects of Health Education on Patients with Hypertension in China: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, L. J.; Meng, Q.; He, S. W.; Yin, X. L.; Tang, Z. L.; Bo, H. Y.; Lan, X. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study collected on from all research relating to health education and hypertension in China and, with the aid of meta-analysis tools, assessed the outcomes of such health education. The analysis provides a basis for the further development of health-education programmes for patients with hypertension. Methods: Literature searches…

  12. Web-Based Immersive Virtual Patient Simulators: Positive Effect on Clinical Reasoning in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Heiermann, Nadine; Plum, Patrick Sven; Wahba, Roger; Chang, De-Hua; Maus, Martin; Chon, Seung-Hun; Hoelscher, Arnulf H; Stippel, Dirk Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical reasoning is based on the declarative and procedural knowledge of workflows in clinical medicine. Educational approaches such as problem-based learning or mannequin simulators support learning of procedural knowledge. Immersive patient simulators (IPSs) go one step further as they allow an illusionary immersion into a synthetic world. Students can freely navigate an avatar through a three-dimensional environment, interact with the virtual surroundings, and treat virtual patients. By playful learning with IPS, medical workflows can be repetitively trained and internalized. As there are only a few university-driven IPS with a profound amount of medical knowledge available, we developed a university-based IPS framework. Our simulator is free to use and combines a high degree of immersion with in-depth medical content. By adding disease-specific content modules, the simulator framework can be expanded depending on the curricular demands. However, these new educational tools compete with the traditional teaching Objective It was our aim to develop an educational content module that teaches clinical and therapeutic workflows in surgical oncology. Furthermore, we wanted to examine how the use of this module affects student performance. Methods The new module was based on the declarative and procedural learning targets of the official German medical examination regulations. The module was added to our custom-made IPS named ALICE (Artificial Learning Interface for Clinical Education). ALICE was evaluated on 62 third-year students. Results Students showed a high degree of motivation when using the simulator as most of them had fun using it. ALICE showed positive impact on clinical reasoning as there was a significant improvement in determining the correct therapy after using the simulator. ALICE positively impacted the rise in declarative knowledge as there was improvement in answering multiple-choice questions before and after simulator use. Conclusions

  13. Effect of educational television commercial on pre-hospital delay in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Haruo; Kon, Tomoya; Ueno, Tatsuya; Haga, Rie; Yamazaki, Keishi; Yagihashi, Kei; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Administering intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) within 4.5 h or endovascular procedures within 8 h of ischemic stroke onset may reduce the risk of disability. The effectiveness of media campaigns to raise stroke awareness and shorten pre-hospital delay is unclear. We studied 1144 consecutive ischemic stroke patients at Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Japan, between March 2010 and February 2014. From March 2012, the government sponsored an educational campaign based on a television commercial to improve knowledge of stroke symptoms and encourage ambulance calls for facial palsy, arm palsy, or speech disturbance. For the 544 and 600 patients admitted before and during the intervention, respectively, we recorded the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke type, the time when patients or bystanders recognized stroke symptoms, and hospital arrival time. Pre-hospital delay, as the time interval from awareness of stroke to hospital arrival, was categorized as 0-3, 3-6, and 6+ h. The mean pre-hospital delay was shorter (12.0 vs 13.5 h; P = 0.0067), the proportion of patients arriving within 3 h was larger (55.7 vs 46.5 %; P = 0.0021), and the proportion arriving after 6 h was smaller (32.7 vs 39.5 %; P = 0.0162) in the intervention group than in the pre-intervention group. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients treated with r-tPA (6 and 7.5 % of the intervention and pre-intervention groups, respectively). A television-based public education campaign potentially reduced pre-hospital delay for ischemic stroke patients, but the r-tPA treatment rate was unchanged.

  14. Patient Education Thesaurus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Lynn

    This thesaurus was compiled to make the materials in the Patient Education Room of the Donald J. Vincent Medical Library at Riverside Methodist Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, more accessible to patients. Subjects are grouped in fairly broad categories (e.g., Aging & Problems of Aging; Alcohol & Alcohol Abuse; Careers in the Medical Field; Childhood and…

  15. Meta-analysis: The effect of patient education on bowel preparation for colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chen-Wang; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Wang, Horng-Yuan; Chu, Cheng-Hsin; Wang, Tsang-En; Hung, Chien-Yuan; Shieh, Tze-Yu; Lin, Yang-Sheng; Chen, Ming-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: The proportion of outpatients with inadequate bowel preparation before colonoscopy is high owing to patient unawareness of its importance and poor adherence to instructions. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of educational intervention on the quality of bowel preparation before colonoscopy. Patients and methods: A comprehensive literature review identified randomized controlled trials measuring the effect of educational intervention on the quality of bowel preparation. Two reviewers independently screened relevant articles, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias. The primary outcome was the quality of each bowel preparation before colonoscopy, using a particular assessment scale. The secondary outcomes were polyp detection rates during the procedure and the need for a repeat colonoscopy due to incomplete examination. Results: Nine randomized controlled trials were included in this meta-analysis. In all, 2885 patients were enrolled, with 1458 receiving education and 1427 assigned to the control group. An educational intervention before colonoscopy significantly improved bowel preparation (relative risk [RR] = 1.22; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.10 – 1.36), however, no significant differences were identified in polyp detection rates (RR = 1.14; 95 %CI 0.87 – 1.51) or the need for repeat colonoscopy (RR = 0.52; 95 %CI 0.25 – 1.04) between the groups. Asymmetry in the appearance of the funnel plot and the result of Egger test (P < 0.001) suggested that publication bias existed. Conclusions: Evidence from these randomized controlled trials shows that a brief counseling session with patients before colonoscopy ensures better bowel preparation. However, evidence is insufficient to assess improvements in polyp detection rate and avoidance of a repeat colonoscopy. Despite these encouraging observations, this meta-analysis had some limitations, including potential publication bias

  16. The Effect of an Education Program Utilising PRECEDE Model on the Quality of Life in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taghdisi, M. H.; Borhani, M.; Solhi, M.; Afkari, M. E.; Hosseini, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: The problems caused by diabetes have direct and indirect impacts on the quality of life of diabetic patients. An increase of these problems means a decrease in a patient's quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the effect of the educational programme based on the precede model in promoting quality of life of…

  17. The Effects of Pre-Coronary Angioplasty Education and Counselling on Patients and Their Spouses: A Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tooth, Leigh; McKenna, Kryss; Maas, Frikkie; McEniery, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The effect of a precoronary angioplasty education and counseling program on knowledge and psychological status of patients and on knowledge and quality of life/coping status of their spouses was evaluated. Knowledge, psychological status, and coping status of patients (N=40), their spouses, and controls were assessed. Results show that education…

  18. Comparison of Patient Education Methods: Effects on Knowledge of Cardiac Rehabilitation Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Julie Jepsen

    1996-01-01

    Patient education programs for persons undergoing cardiac surgery related to knowledge of cardiac rehabilitation principles were conducted with either traditional (n=49) or collaborative (n=47) educational interventions. The two methods produced similar levels of knowledge, but significant differences appeared depending on whether subjects had…

  19. The Effect of Videotaping Students' Interviews with Patients for Interview Skill Education

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Sung; Hwang, Ji Young; Lim, Ji Eun; Suh, Sang-Yeon; Park, Ki Heum

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of communication between patients and physicians has been proven in many previous studies. The authors analyzed the effect of interview skill education through videotapes which recorded students' interviews with real patients in the outpatient department of family medicine. Methods This study was conducted with all students who chose the elective course of family medicine and one randomly selected student every week from an 'infectious internal medicine' class at Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital during the period from December 2008 to March 2011. All students performed a preliminary examination of a new patient at the outpatient department of family medicine. All consultations were videotaped. Feedback to the student was given on the same day by viewing the videotape together. After feedback, all students performed another preliminary examination of one new patient at the department of family medicine the same week. Three family medicine residents scored all videotapes using 10-item interview skill checklists. Many parts of the checklists were modified using the Arizona Clinical Interview Rating Scales. Results Thirty-three students participated. Of 10 items, nine showed increased scores after feedback. There was a significant change in four items after feedback: 'type of question' (before 2.36 ± 0.60, after 2.73 ± 0.72), 'timeline' (before 2.82 ± 0.68, after 3.18 ± 0.73), 'positive verbal reinforcement' (before 2.24 ± 0.56, after 2.61 ± 0.90), and the total score (before 21.70 ± 2.62, after 23.39 ± 3.13) (P < 0.05). Conclusion Giving feedback to medical school students on medical interview skills using videotapes of students' preliminary consultations with real patients in outpatient settings, was effective in improving the interview areas of 'type of question,' 'timeline,' 'positive verbal reinforcement,' and the total interview scores. PMID:23560207

  20. [Patient education, perioperative management, patient support groups].

    PubMed

    Stöckli, M; Müller, B; Wagner, M

    2007-09-01

    In our division, highly qualified enterostomal therapists treat approximately 300 patients each year Patient care consists of extensive preoperative information, localization of the ideal stoma position and providing patient-education in stoma handling. A regular ambulatory consultation allows early recognition of typical stoma related complications and their effective treatment in a timely manner. Another important issue of our consulting service includes patients concerns, such as social integration and physical independence. The creation of a specialized center provides an efficient and continuous care of enterostomy patients and their relatives. Thus, initial fears and emotional crisis can be addressed and minimalized. It is our goal to provide individual and comprehensive service in order to accommodate our patients needs. PMID:18075148

  1. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Computer-based Patient Education Program in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Ng Yuen Yee; Fai, Tam Sing

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 48 cardiac patients who used an interactive multimedia computer-assisted patient education program and 48 taught by tutorial. The computer-assisted instructional method resulted in significantly better knowledge about exercise and self-management of chronic diseases. (Contains 29 references.) (JOW)

  2. Comparing the Effect of Two Educational Programs on the Quality of Life of Hemodialysis Patients in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Baraz, Shahram; Zarea, Kourosh; Dashtbozorgi, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various researchers have shown that the health level, performance status, and quality of life (QOL) are often less than expected especially in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effect of the two methods of educational programs on health- related QOL (HRQOL) in Iranian HD patients. Patients and Methods: In this quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest interventional study, we employed each subject as his/her own control. The study was conducted at the dialysis units in three major general hospitals affiliated with Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. A total of 90 HD patients were randomly allocated to two 45-patient groups of oral and video education programs, respectively. The educational programs included dietary and fluid regimens, the care of fistula and skin, and stress management. HRQOL was assessed in both groups using a Farsi version of the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) before and after the educational programs. Repeated measures analysis of variance and ANOVA were used for data analysis through SPSS. Results: SF-36 domains of physical functioning (P < 0.021), role physical (P < 0.031), social functioning (P < 0.001) and mental health (P < 0.001) were significantly increased in both oral and vide education groups after the interventions. There was no difference in the effectiveness of the two educational programs. Conclusions: Appropriate interventions may potentially lead to improvement in the HRQOL of these patients. Therefore, video education as an effective, inexpensive, simple, and attractive method is recommended for HD patients. PMID:25389489

  3. Comparison of the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction, walking, and patient education in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee Young; Lee, Haejung; Park, Jina

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Korean mindfulness-based stress reduction (K-MBSR), walking, and patient education regarding diabetes mellitus (DM) on stress response, glycemic control, and vascular inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus. A cluster randomized trial including 56 adults with diabetes mellitus (K-MBSR group = 21, walking group = 18, patient education group = 17) was conducted between 13 July and 14 September 2012. The questionnaire included the Diabetes Distress Scale and Perceived Stress Response Inventory. Fasting blood samples were used to measure levels of cortisol, blood glucose, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). There were no statistically significant differences between the effects of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on stress, glycemic control, or vascular inflammation. However, in the K-MBSR and walking groups, significant reductions in the levels of serum cortisol and PAI-1 were observed. A significant reduction in psychological responses to stress was observed in the walking and patient education groups. Longitudinal studies could provide better insight into the impact of K-MBSR, walking, and patient education on health outcomes in adults with diabetes mellitus.

  4. Comparison of effect between group discussion and educational booklet on Iranian nursing students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to compare the effects between group discussion and educational booklet on nursing students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy in Iran. Methods A two-group, pre-test and post-test design study was conducted in 2015. The study was conducted on 60 nursing students in Kashan, Iran who were randomly allocated into two groups to be trained on patient privacy either through group discussion or by an educational booklet. The students’ attitude and practice was assessed before and after the education using a questionnaire and a checklist. Data analysis was performed through paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, and independent samples t-tests. Results Before the intervention, no significant difference was found between the group designated to group discussion and that designated to the educational booklet in the mean overall score of attitude (P=0.303) and practice (P=0.493) toward patient privacy. After the intervention, the mean attitude score significantly increased in the two groups (P=0.001). Moreover, the students’ practice score increased in the discussion group while it did not significantly change in the booklet group (P=0.001). Conclusion Both methods were effective on the students’ attitude; however, the educational booklet did not affect their practice toward patient privacy. Group discussion can effectively improve the students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy. PMID:27476641

  5. "Open-word" questions: an effective tool in gauging education of patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Netzer, N; Werner, P; Petro, W; Matthys, H

    1996-02-01

    For evaluation of the success of patient education in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), multiple-choice tests are commonly used. Using these tests, however, only passive knowledge can be examined. We attempted to evaluate, with the help of "open-word" questions and keywords, as used in examinations of students of arts, the active knowledge achieved by 12 patients who had been participants in one of our indepth courses of patient education. The results of this "open-word" test were compared with the results of multiple-choice tests with 91 participants. The average results of the "open-word" tests, with 36% correct answers, were remarkably worse than those of the multiple-choice tests with 80% correct answers. In our opinion, this allows the conclusion that the active knowledge attained in the patient-education courses is clearly lower than the passive knowledge achieved, and that, on the other hand, multiple-choice tests cannot be considered as the exclusive method to evaluate the success of patient education because their questions may quite often prove to be too easy. PMID:8901327

  6. Effects of patient education on compliance with basic treatment regimens and health in recent onset active rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Brus, H.; van de Laar, M. A F J; Taal, E.; Rasker, J.; Wiegman, O.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the effects of patient education on compliance and on health in patients with active, recent onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—A randomised, controlled, assessor blinded, one year trial. The experimental group followed an education programme. All patients started on sulphasalazine therapy. Compliance with sulphasalazine was measured by pill counting. Compliance rates with regimens of physical exercise, endurance activities, and energy conservation were measured by questionnaires. Compliance with prescriptions of joint protection was scored using a test for joint protection performance. Health was measured by a Disease Activity Score (function of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, Ritchie score, and number of swollen joints), C reactive protein, Dutch-AIMS scores, and M-HAQ scores, range of motion of shoulder, elbow, and knee joints. Parameters were scored at baseline and after three, six, and 12 months.
RESULTS—Sixty of 65 patients gave informed consent, five of them withdrew from follow up. Compliance with sulphasalazine exceeded 80% with no differences between groups. Compliance with physical exercise (at three months), energy conservation (at three and at 12 months), and joint protection (at three months) improved significantly more in the experimental group. The improvements of health were not different in the groups.
CONCLUSION—Compliance with sulphasalazine among patients with active, recent onset RA is high, whether formal patient education is followed or not. Compliance with physical exercise, energy conservation, and joint protection was increased by patient education. Formal patient education did not improve health status.

 Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis; compliance; health status; patient education PMID:9640129

  7. Professional Preparation in Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigg, R. Morgan, Jr.

    Information on Indiana University's course in patient education is presented, along with sources of additional information on patient education and a summary of a national survey on professional preparation in patient education. An outline of the following course topics is presented: past and current developments, health care delivery, patient…

  8. Effect of Physician-Delivered Patient Education on the Quality of Bowel Preparation for Screening Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Jen; Chang, Chen-Wang; Kuo, Yang-Che; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Wang, Horng-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Inadequate bowel preparation is common in outpatients undergoing screening colonoscopy because of unawareness and poor adherence to instruction. Methods. Herein, 105 consecutive outpatients referred for screening colonoscopy were enrolled in this prospective, colonoscopist-blinded study. The patients were assigned to an intensive-education group, with 10 minutes of physician-delivered education, or to standard care. At the time of colonoscopy, the quality of bowel preparation was assessed using the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS). The primary outcome was a BBPS score ≥5. The secondary outcomes were the mean BBPS score, insertion time, adenoma detection rate, and number of adenomas detected. Results. We analyzed 39 patients who received intensive education and 60 controls. The percentage of adequate bowel preparations with a BBPS score ≥5 was higher in the intensive-education group than in the control group (97.4% versus 80.0%; P = 0.01). The adjusted odds ratio for having a BBPS score ≥5 in the intensive-education group was 10.2 (95% confidence interval = 1.23–84.3; P = 0.03). Other secondary outcomes were similar in the 2 groups. Conclusions. Physician-delivered education consisting of a brief counseling session in addition to written instructions improves the quality of bowel preparation in outpatients undergoing screening colonoscopy. PMID:24454341

  9. Effect of peer education on self-management and psychological status in type 2 diabetes patients with emotional disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Han, Ying; Shi, Jieli; Li, Ruixia; Li, Sufen; Jin, Nana; Gu, Yong; Guo, Honglei

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of peer education in type 2 diabetes patients with emotional disorders on the metabolic index and psychological status. Materials and Methods Educators use psychological scales to screen type 2 diabetes patients with emotional disorders. Participants were divided into usual and peer education groups. Both groups received usual diabetes education. Peer leaders were recruited to provide support with the peer education group for 6 months. The metabolic index, diabetes knowledge, self-management, diabetes-related distress, emotional status and quality of life were compared at the end of the study. Results A total of 127 patients participated in the study. There were 20 peer leaders engaged in the study as volunteers for peer education. All participants completed the study and fulfilled the scales. Improvements in the peer education group were significant compared with the usual education group with respect to anxiety (49.0 ± 9.65 vs 54.0 ± 8.48), depression (51.3 ± 7.97 vs 55.8 ± 7.52), diabetes knowledge (18.8 ± 2.46 vs 16.3 ± 2.08), distress (2.67 ± 0.55 vs 3.02 ± 0.56), self-management (66.5 ± 4.26 vs 62.4 ± 5.88) and quality of life (−1.98 ± 0.82 vs −2.50 ± 0.71), whereas no significant difference existed with respect to the metabolic index. Conclusions Peer education, providing more attention to diabetes patients with emotional disorders, is a preferred model for delivering care. PMID:26221528

  10. Vocal Hygiene Education, Voice Production Therapy, and the Role of Patient Adherence: A Treatment Effectiveness Study in Women with Phonotrauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, Alison; Rutledge, John; Hembree, Amanda; Sheridan, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of vocal hygiene education (VHE) and voice production therapy (VP) in altering patient perception of vocal handicap in adult women with benign, bilateral phonotraumatic vocal fold lesions and the role of adherence in that perception. Method: Sixty-two women were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of VP (n = 31) or…

  11. Twitter Social Media is an Effective Tool for Breast Cancer Patient Education and Support: Patient-Reported Outcomes by Survey

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite reported benefits, many women do not attend breast cancer support groups. Abundant online resources for support exist, but information regarding the effectiveness of participation is lacking. We report the results of a Twitter breast cancer support community participant survey. Objective The aim was to determine the effectiveness of social media as a tool for breast cancer patient education and decreasing anxiety. Methods The Breast Cancer Social Media Twitter support community (#BCSM) began in July 2011. Institutional review board approval with a waiver of informed consent was obtained for a deidentified survey that was posted for 2 weeks on Twitter and on the #BCSM blog and Facebook page. Results There were 206 respondents to the survey. In all, 92.7% (191/206) were female. Respondents reported increased knowledge about breast cancer in the following domains: overall knowledge (80.9%, 153/189), survivorship (85.7%, 162/189), metastatic breast cancer (79.4%, 150/189), cancer types and biology (70.9%, 134/189), clinical trials and research (66.1%, 125/189), treatment options (55.6%, 105/189), breast imaging (56.6%, 107/189), genetic testing and risk assessment (53.9%, 102/189), and radiotherapy (43.4%, 82/189). Participation led 31.2% (59/189) to seek a second opinion or bring additional information to the attention of their treatment team and 71.9% (136/189) reported plans to increase their outreach and advocacy efforts as a result of participation. Levels of reported anxiety before and after participation were analyzed: 29 of 43 (67%) patients who initially reported “high or extreme” anxiety reported “low or no” anxiety after participation (P<.001). Also, no patients initially reporting low or no anxiety before participation reported an increase to high or extreme anxiety after participation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that breast cancer patients’ perceived knowledge increases and their anxiety decreases by participation in a

  12. Effectiveness of antidepressant pharmacotherapy: the impact of medication compliance and patient education.

    PubMed

    Mundt, J C; Clarke, G N; Burroughs, D; Brenneman, D O; Griest, J H

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the impact of a time-phased patient education program (RHYTHMS) on medication compliance and treatment outcomes of primary care patients diagnosed with major depression and started on antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Two hundred forty-six depressed patients, diagnosed and treated at one of three outpatient clinics affiliated with the Kaiser-Permanente Northwest Region (KPNW) healthcare system, were randomly assigned to either receive or not receive (usual care) the educational materials by mail. Depression severity and functional impairment affecting patients' quality of life were assessed at baseline and 4, 12, and 30 weeks later. Self-reported impressions of improvement and patient satisfaction with treatment were also assessed at follow-up. Clinical assessment data were obtained using an interactive voice response (IVR) system. Study subjects were compensated $5, $10, $15, and $25 for completing each assessment (Baseline to Week 30, respectively). Upon study completion, prescription fill data of the subjects were extracted from the KPNW Pharmacy System for analysis of medication compliance. Most of the study subjects (63.5%) responded to the pharmacotherapy treatment by study end-point. Few statistically significant differences in either treatment outcomes or duration of medication compliance were found between the treatment groups, and significant differences found were of fairly small magnitude. Patients not receiving the educational materials initially exhibited a more positive response to treatment (Week 4), but this difference did not persist at later follow-ups and was associated with significantly higher relapse rates. A strong time-dose relationship was evident between the duration of the initial treatment episode and treatment outcomes at follow-up, but randomized treatment assignment did not influence the duration of initial medication compliance. Educational programs designed to encourage depressed patients to

  13. Moving towards health oriented patient education (HOPE).

    PubMed

    Glanville, I K

    2000-01-01

    The economics of prevention supports reimbursement of nurse practitioners for patient education. The role has undergone historical change, shifting from imparting disease-oriented health education (DOPE) toward empowering patients to use their own resources to the fullest to attain health. Nurse practitioners are well suited to provide care that facilitates behavior change and health-oriented patient education (HOPE). Essentials for effective patient education include use of an open communication style, written instructions, and the address of barriers. Adult literacy and reader-friendliness must be considered when assembling written materials. PMID:12119971

  14. Effectiveness of Self-Care Education on the Enhancement of the Self-Esteem of Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Poorgholami, Farzad; Javadpour, Shohreh; Saadatmand, Vahid; Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aim: The assessment of self-esteem in hemodialysis people is becoming increasingly important and necessary. Low self-esteem as a problem in patients undergoing hemodialysis decreases adherence to treatment. The researcher intends to carry out a study in order to investigate the effect of self-care education on enhancement of the self-esteem of patients undergoing hemodialysis in Iran. Method and material: This is a quasi-experimental study. The subjects of the study who were selected based on purposive sampling method consisted of 50 patients with advanced chronic renal disease treated with hemodialysis. Before the intervention, two questionnaires were completed by patients. There was no intervention in the control group and the patients received only routine care in the hospital. In the experimental group, the hemodialysis patients received 5 consecutive one-hour training sessions by the researcher. Then the Rosenberg scale was filled out by the patients 2 month later. Result: According to the results, Paired t-test showed a significant difference between the mean self-esteem score in both groups before and after intervention. Conclusion: Increasing the knowledge and awareness of hemodialysis patients must constitute a cornerstone of therapy and an integral part of nursing responsibilities. Nurses should educate the patients about self-care behaviors and remind them of the dangerous complications of abandoning these. PMID:26383201

  15. Clinical Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of an Education Program for PD Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Arcari, Céline; Mohara, Christine; Pourcel, Laure; Derumeaux, Hélène; Bérard, Emilie; Bourrel, Robert; Molinier, Laurent; Brefel-Courbon, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by its impact on quality of life, constituting a substantial economic burden on society. Education programs implicating patients more in the management of their illness and complementing medical treatment may be a beneficial adjunct in PD. This study assessed the impact of an education program on quality of life and its cost-effectiveness in PD patients. Methods This single-center, prospective, randomized study assessed an education program consisting of individual and group sessions over a 12-month period. A total of 120 PD patients were assigned to either the Treated by Behavioral Intervention group (TTBI) or the no TTBI group. The primary outcome criterion was quality of life assessed using PDQ39. The Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and psychological status were collected. An economic evaluation was performed, including calculations of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Results After 12 months of follow-up, changes recorded in the PDQ39 between the groups were not significantly different but better changes were observed in each dimension in the TTBI group compared to the no TTBI group. UPDRS I, II and total score were significantly improved in TTBI group compared to the no TTBI group. Mean annual costs did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion This study suggested that the education program positively impacts the perceived health of PD patients without increasing medical costs. PMID:27685455

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness of patient education and empowerment to improve patient-provider interactions in antiretroviral therapy clinics in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Maclachlan, Ellen W; Shepard-Perry, Mark G; Ingo, Paulina; Uusiku, James; Mushimba, Ruusa; Simwanza, Ricky; Likoro, Joseph; Brandt, Laura J; Thomas, Katherine K; Kasonka, Claude; Hamunime, Ndapewa; O'Malley, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase patient active engagement during patient-provider interactions, we developed and implemented patient training sessions in four antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinics in Namibia using a "Patient Empowerment" training curriculum. We examined the impact of these trainings on patient-provider interactions after the intervention. We tested the effectiveness of the intervention using a randomized parallel group design, with half of the 589 enrolled patients randomly assigned to receive the training immediately and the remaining randomized to receive the training 6 months later. The effects of the training on patient engagement during medical consultations were measured at each clinic visit for at least 8 months of follow-up. Each consultation was audiotaped and then coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). RIAS outcomes were compared between study groups at 6 months. Using intention-to-treat analysis, consultations in the intervention group had significantly higher RIAS scores in doctor facilitation and patient activation (adjusted difference in score 1.19, p = .004), doctor information gathering (adjusted difference in score 2.96, p = .000), patient question asking (adjusted difference in score .48, p = .012), and patient positive affect (adjusted difference in score 2.08, p = .002). Other measures were higher in the intervention group but did not reach statistical significance. We have evidence that increased engagement of patients in clinical consultation can be achieved via a targeted training program, although outcome data were not available on all patients. The patient training program was successfully integrated into ART clinics so that the trainings complemented other services being provided. PMID:26695005

  17. Patient Education Workshop: Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Jeannette

    This report describes activities of a workshop conducted for fourteen health education practitioners and administrators from a number of different hospital and health care settings and geographical regions to appraise the state of patient education programs. The initiation and growth of patient education programs in a variety of health care…

  18. [Organizing patient education in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Fischer, Eric; Thieffry, Eliane

    2014-02-01

    A central element of the care management of patients with heart failure, therapeutic patient education mobilises caregivers into forming a multi-disciplinary team. In this article, a hospital team shares the different stages in the construction and implementation of a programme for use with hospitalised patients and in consultations. To do this, the nurses undertook training to acquire new educational skills.

  19. Effect of Intensive Salt-Restriction Education on Clinic, Home, and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Levels in Treated Hypertensive Patients During a 3-Month Education Period.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiro; Eguchi, Kazuo; Sato, Toshiko; Onoguchi, Atsuko; Hoshide, Satoshi; Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-05-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that low-salt diet education by nutritionists would lower blood pressure (BP) levels in treated hypertensive patients. The amount of urinary salt excretion and clinic, home, and ambulatory BP values at baseline and at 3 months were measured in 95 patients with hypertension. After randomization to a nutritional education group (E group, n=51) or a control group (C group, n=44), the C group received conventional salt-restriction education and the E group received intensive nutritional education aimed at salt restriction to 6 g/d by nutritionists. From baseline to the end of the study, 24-hour urinary sodium excretion was significantly lowered in the E group compared with the C group (6.8±2.9 g/24 h vs 8.6±3.4 g/24 h, P<.01). Morning home systolic BP tended to be lowered in the E group (P=.051), and ambulatory 24-hour systolic BP was significantly lowered in the E group (-4.5±1.3 mm Hg) compared with the C group (2.8±1.3 mm Hg, P<.001). Intensive nutritional education by nutritionists was shown to be effective in lowering BP in treated hypertensive patients. PMID:26732187

  20. [Patient education in pediatric diabetology].

    PubMed

    Le Tallec, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic education in paediatric diabetology consists of initial education and follow-up education. It can be individual or collective. It forms part of a planned and organised systemic approach, with a skills framework adapted to the patient's age. Supporting the families as well as schools is essential.

  1. THE EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON KNOWLEDGE AND SELF-EFFICACY FOR PAIN CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Daniali, Seyde Shahrbanoo; Shahnazi, Hossein; Kazemi, Samira; Marzbani, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system. The prevalence of it is increasing in our country too. The pain from disorders can affect quality of life. Several studies have pointed to the improvement of patients through educational intervention. This study attempted to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention based on raising the awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with multiple sclerosis during 2015 under the coverage of Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). Materials and methods: This was a quasi-experimental study involving pre-test, post-test and randomized control group conducted on 100 patients with MS referred to the Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). The educational intervention group learned the pain management self-care lesson during 4 weekly sessions. The data were collected through a self-structured questionnaire with adequate validity and reliability, containing demographic data, awareness and self-efficacy of pain control. The data were assessed through descriptive and analytical tests assisted by SPSS 17. The significant level was considered as P<0.05. Results: Concerning the questionnaire, 96% of the items were responded. Most participants were women. The frequency distribution of demographic variables was not significantly different between the two pre-test groups. After the intervention, the mean score of knowledge and efficacy among patients in the intervention group was significantly higher than the control group (P<0.001). Conclusions: Educational interventions can improve awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with MS. Therefore, such interventions can be designed to reduce physical and psychological complications following multiple sclerosis. PMID:27698603

  2. THE EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON KNOWLEDGE AND SELF-EFFICACY FOR PAIN CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Daniali, Seyde Shahrbanoo; Shahnazi, Hossein; Kazemi, Samira; Marzbani, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system. The prevalence of it is increasing in our country too. The pain from disorders can affect quality of life. Several studies have pointed to the improvement of patients through educational intervention. This study attempted to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention based on raising the awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with multiple sclerosis during 2015 under the coverage of Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). Materials and methods: This was a quasi-experimental study involving pre-test, post-test and randomized control group conducted on 100 patients with MS referred to the Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). The educational intervention group learned the pain management self-care lesson during 4 weekly sessions. The data were collected through a self-structured questionnaire with adequate validity and reliability, containing demographic data, awareness and self-efficacy of pain control. The data were assessed through descriptive and analytical tests assisted by SPSS 17. The significant level was considered as P<0.05. Results: Concerning the questionnaire, 96% of the items were responded. Most participants were women. The frequency distribution of demographic variables was not significantly different between the two pre-test groups. After the intervention, the mean score of knowledge and efficacy among patients in the intervention group was significantly higher than the control group (P<0.001). Conclusions: Educational interventions can improve awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with MS. Therefore, such interventions can be designed to reduce physical and psychological complications following multiple sclerosis.

  3. Accurate Monitoring Leads to Effective Control and Greater Learning of Patient Education Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Katherine A.; O'Neil, Rochelle; Dunlosky, John

    2011-01-01

    Effective management of chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes) can depend on the extent to which patients can learn and remember disease-relevant information. In two experiments, we explored a technique motivated by theories of self-regulated learning for improving people's learning of information relevant to managing a chronic disease. Materials were…

  4. Effect that an educational program for cystic fibrosis patients and caregivers has on the contamination of home nebulizers*

    PubMed Central

    Zuana, Adriana Della; Garcia, Doroti de Oliveira; Juliani, Regina Célia Turola Passos; da Silva, Luiz Vicente Ribeiro Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the pathogens found in home nebulizers and in respiratory samples of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, and to evaluate the effect that a standardized instruction regarding cleaning and disinfection of nebulizers has on the frequency of nebulizer contamination. METHODS: We included 40 CF patients (22 males), all of whom used the same model of nebulizer. The median patient age was 11.2 ± 3.74 years. We collected samples from the nebulizer mouthpiece and cup, using a sterile swab moistened with sterile saline. Respiratory samples were collected by asking patients to expectorate into a sterile container or with oropharyngeal swabs after cough stimulation. Cultures were performed on selective media, and bacteria were identified by classical biochemical tests. Patients received oral and written instructions regarding the cleaning and disinfection of nebulizers. All determinations were repeated an average of two months later. RESULTS: Contamination of the nebulizer (any part) was detected in 23 cases (57.5%). The nebulizer mouthpiece and cup were found to be contaminated in 16 (40.0%) and 19 (47.5%), respectively. After the standardized instruction had been given, there was a significant decrease in the proportion of contaminated nebulizers (43.5%). CONCLUSIONS: In our sample of CF patients, nebulizer contamination was common, indicating the need for improvement in patient practices regarding the cleaning and disinfection of their nebulizers. A one-time educational intervention could have a significant positive impact. PMID:24831395

  5. Educating future leaders in patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Leotsakos, Agnès; Ardolino, Antonella; Cheung, Ronny; Zheng, Hao; Barraclough, Bruce; Walton, Merrilyn

    2014-01-01

    Education of health care professionals has given little attention to patient safety, resulting in limited understanding of the nature of risk in health care and the importance of strengthening systems. The World Health Organization developed the Patient Safety Curriculum Guide: Multiprofessional Edition to accelerate the incorporation of patient safety teaching into higher educational curricula. The World Health Organization Curriculum Guide uses a health system-focused, team-dependent approach, which impacts all health care professionals and students learning in an integrated way about how to operate within a culture of safety. The guide is pertinent in the context of global educational reforms and growing recognition of the need to introduce patient safety into health care professionals’ curricula. The guide helps to advance patient safety education worldwide in five ways. First, it addresses the variety of opportunities and contexts in which health care educators teach, and provides practical recommendations to learning. Second, it recommends shared learning by students of different professions, thus enhancing student capacity to work together effectively in multidisciplinary teams. Third, it provides guidance on a range of teaching methods and pedagogical activities to ensure that students understand that patient safety is a practical science teaching them to act in evidence-based ways to reduce patient risk. Fourth, it encourages supportive teaching and learning, emphasizing the need to establishing teaching environments in which students feel comfortable to learn and practice patient safety. Finally, it helps educators incorporate patient safety topics across all areas of clinical practice. PMID:25285012

  6. [Empowerment by patient education in rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Faller, H; Ehlebracht-König, I; Reusch, A

    2015-09-01

    Due to the chronic course, rheumatic diseases may be associated with both long-lasting pain and movement limitations. Those afflicted by these disorders thus face continuous challenges regarding both adapting to their illness as well as changing their lifestyle habits, for example increasing the physical activity levels. However, patient education may provide patients with the competencies they need to cope with their illness and modify their behavior. Therefore, patient education programs are core elements of rehabilitation in rheumatology. The German Society for Rheumatology has performed pioneering work concerning conceptualization and evaluation of standardized educational programs. In this article some more recent developments and up to date standards for contents and didactics of self-management programs are presented. Empowerment may be considered the overriding aim of these programs, i.e. enabling patients to make informed decisions in situations where their health is involved. Patient-centered didactic methods as used in state of the art concepts mirror the empowerment approach. To foster sustainability of lifestyle changes, detailed planning of behavioral modifications is recommended, thus increasing the chance of transferring changes adopted during rehabilitation into everyday living. Such methods have been proven to be effective and are employed in the updated education concept for patients with fibromyalgia syndrome, which is described here as an example. The Centre for Patient Education offers support in updating and evaluating patient education concepts.

  7. [Empowerment by patient education in rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Faller, H; Ehlebracht-König, I; Reusch, A

    2015-09-01

    Due to the chronic course, rheumatic diseases may be associated with both long-lasting pain and movement limitations. Those afflicted by these disorders thus face continuous challenges regarding both adapting to their illness as well as changing their lifestyle habits, for example increasing the physical activity levels. However, patient education may provide patients with the competencies they need to cope with their illness and modify their behavior. Therefore, patient education programs are core elements of rehabilitation in rheumatology. The German Society for Rheumatology has performed pioneering work concerning conceptualization and evaluation of standardized educational programs. In this article some more recent developments and up to date standards for contents and didactics of self-management programs are presented. Empowerment may be considered the overriding aim of these programs, i.e. enabling patients to make informed decisions in situations where their health is involved. Patient-centered didactic methods as used in state of the art concepts mirror the empowerment approach. To foster sustainability of lifestyle changes, detailed planning of behavioral modifications is recommended, thus increasing the chance of transferring changes adopted during rehabilitation into everyday living. Such methods have been proven to be effective and are employed in the updated education concept for patients with fibromyalgia syndrome, which is described here as an example. The Centre for Patient Education offers support in updating and evaluating patient education concepts. PMID:26224532

  8. Effect of public health nurses’ educational intervention on self-care of the patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zandiyeh, Zahra; Hedayati, Batool; Zare, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is the most common metabolic disease and the sixth cause of mortality in the world. Most of the conducted studies show that the only way to control this disease and prevent its disabling complications is constant administration of self-care. Aim: This study was conducted with the goal of determining the effect of public health nurses’ educational intervention on the self-care of the patients with type 2 diabetes who referred to Hazrat Ali clinic in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: This is a two-group two-step clinical trial with a before–after intervention design in which 50 patients with type 2 diabetes and with a mean age of 40–70 years were selected and assigned to study (n = 25) and control (n = 25) groups by allotting them even and add numbers. Educational intervention was conducted in the study group through seven educational sessions. Mean scores of self-care before and after interventions were compared by Toobert and Glasgow brief self-care activities questionnaire. Results: Results showed no significant difference in the self-care scores before intervention in the two groups (P = 0.67, z = 0.43), but the mean score of self-care showed a significant increase after intervention in the study group, compared to the control group (P = 0.002, z = 3.14). Conclusion: Based on the obtained results, it is suggested to provide constant education of self-care for diabetic patients in health care centers, with more emphasis on a change in self-care skills and behavior. PMID:27462630

  9. The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients…

  10. Virtual patients in geriatric education.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zaldy S; Mulhausen, Paul L; Smith, Stephen R; Ruiz, Jorge G

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators have spurred the development of virtual patient programs to teach geriatrics at the medical undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels. As an instructional tool, the Virtual Patient must be placed in the correct educational context to help educators identify opportunities for its proper use in the curriculum. In this review, the experiences of three medical schools in the development and application of geriatric virtual patients are described as case studies. In each case study, the challenges encountered and solutions developed are presented. Areas of future research in the use of virtual patients in geriatrics education include the determination of the optimal combination of features, the settings of use of virtual patient programs, the underlying pedagogy, and the limitations in its application in clinical instruction. PMID:20509062

  11. Effective teaching strategies and methods of delivery for patient education: a systematic review and practice guideline recommendations.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Audrey Jusko; Cosby, Roxanne; Boyko, Susan; Hatton-Bauer, Jane; Turnbull, Gale

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine effective teaching strategies and methods of delivery for patient education (PE). A systematic review was conducted and reviews with or without meta-analyses, which examined teaching strategies and methods of delivery for PE, were included. Teaching strategies identified are traditional lectures, discussions, simulated games, computer technology, written material, audiovisual sources, verbal recall, demonstration, and role playing. Methods of delivery focused on how to deliver the teaching strategies. Teaching strategies that increased knowledge, decreased anxiety, and increased satisfaction included computer technology, audio and videotapes, written materials, and demonstrations. Various teaching strategies used in combination were similarly successful. Moreover, structured-, culturally appropriate- and patient-specific teachings were found to be better than ad hoc teaching or generalized teaching. Findings provide guidance for establishing provincial standards for the delivery of PE. Recommendations concerning the efficacy of the teaching strategies and delivery methods are provided.

  12. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators…

  13. Education, teaching & training in patient safety.

    PubMed

    Rall, Marcus; van Gessel, Elisabeth; Staender, Sven

    2011-06-01

    Patient Safety is not a side-effect of good patient care by skilled clinicians. Patient safety is a subject on its own, which was traditionally not taught to medical personnel. This must and will dramatically change in the future. The 2010 Helsinki Declaration for Patient Safety in Anaesthesiology states accordingly "Education has a key role to play in improving patient safety, and we fully support the development, dissemination and delivery of patient safety training". Patient safety training is a multidisciplinary topic and enterprise, which requires us to cooperate with safety experts from different fields (e.g. psychologists, educators, human factor experts). Anaesthesiology has been a model for the patient safety movement and its European organisations like ESA and EBA have pioneered the field up to now: Helsinki Patient Safety Declaration and the European Patient Safety Course are the newest establishments. But Anaesthesiology must continue in its efforts in order to stay at the top of the patient safety movement, as many other disciplines gain speed in this topic. We should strive to fulfill the Helsinki Declaration and move even beyond that. As the European Council states: "Education for patient-safety should be introduced at all levels within health-care systems"

  14. Effects of parental gender and level of education on the quality of life and general health of pediatric patients with epilepsy: An outpatient cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Meisam; Amirsalari, Susan; Radfar, Shokofeh; Haidari, Mohsen Reza

    2016-07-01

    The quality of life (QOL) of children with epilepsy has been widely studied, and several problems related to cognition, behavior, social lives, and physical activity among these children have been reported. Family life and parental care are important aspects of the lives of these patients. The impact of parental education on the QOL of pediatric patients with epilepsy is an understudied topic, especially in developing countries. In this study, we investigated the QOL and general health (GH) of patients with epilepsy presenting at the pediatric neurology clinic at Baqiyatallah Hospital and a private clinic. The Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) questionnaire, which is a 92-item epilepsy-specific questionnaire covering physical activity, well-being, cognition, behavior, social activity, overall QOL, and GH, was used for interviewing parents. A total of 106 patients (m=61, 57.5% and f=45, 42.5%) aged 5-17years (mean: 10.31±2.91) participated in the study. Overall, there was no significant difference between the QOL and GH results of male and female patients. However, the maternal education level had a significant impact on the overall QOL (high school: 3.02±0.85 vs. B.Sc.: 3.67±0.61, p<0.05) and GH (high school: 2.81±0.79 vs. B.Sc.: 3.8±0.94, p<0.05) of male patients, while paternal education had no significant effect. A multiple linear regression showed that the maternal education level had an independently significant association with the physical activity of the patients (p=0.02, CI: 1.4-6.25), and the paternal education level had an independently significant association with the well-being of the patients (p=0.02, CI: 0.43-5.36). In addition, the maternal education level (high school vs. B.Sc.) had a significant effect on physical activity, well-being, cognition, and behavior for all of the patients (p<0.05), while the paternal education level (high school vs. B.Sc.) had no significant impact. However, in a comparison of high school vs. higher

  15. Effects of Pharmacist-Led Patient Education on Diabetes-Related Knowledge and Medication Adherence: A Home-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Ee Pin; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Patient education is key to the management of acute and chronic conditions. However, the majority of such educational interventions have been reported from health-care settings. In contrast, this study aims to evaluate whether a home-based intervention can result in better understanding about type 2 diabetes mellitus and can increase…

  16. Patient Susceptibility Limits to the Effectiveness of Preventive Oral Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, David W.

    1977-01-01

    A professor in the Division of Learning Resources, School of Dentistry, University of the Pacific, San Francisco, discusses the importance of dentists' considering individual patient characteristics and of individualizing their instruction of patients in preventive therapy. (MF)

  17. An Examination of the Effects of Pre-Surgical Education on Patient Expectations in Total Knee Arthroplasties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montez-Ray, Natasha Dawn

    2011-01-01

    As patients prepare for total-knee arthroplasty surgery, they have numerous expectations related to their long-term recovery and function. This research discerned whether the use of a pre-surgical patient education class with an additional long-term expectation module addressing recovery during the first 12 months after surgery was more effective…

  18. Patient Education and Adherence to Aerosol Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ari, Arzu

    2015-06-01

    Nonadherence to prescribed medications results in disease instability and poor clinical control, with increases in hospital admissions, emergency room visits, school/work absenteeism, morbidity, and mortality. Poor patient adherence to therapy can be due to lack of cognition, competence, or contrivance. Patients who have not been trained or fail to understand use of drug and device combinations (cognition) often do not have the ability to use an aerosol device correctly (competence). Many patients have the competence to use the device correctly and know why they should use the device in the way they were taught; however, they still contrive to use it in an ineffective and suboptimal manner that reduces its efficiency and effectiveness. Ensuring effective aerosol therapy and optimizing its role in disease management involve not only delivery of aerosolized medications to the lungs, but also understanding why, when, and how to use the medications, competence to use the device, motivation to adhere to therapy, and not contriving to use the device in a way that will prevent effective drug delivery. This paper explains some of the problems with patient education and adherence to aerosol therapy and suggests strategies to evaluate, monitor, and improve patient adherence effectively in primary care. Factors affecting patient adherence to prescribed medications, effective educational interventions, and strategies to promote patient adherence to aerosol therapy are also discussed.

  19. Computer-based Approaches to Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    All articles indexed in MEDLINE or CINAHL, related to the use of computer technology in patient education, and published in peer-reviewed journals between 1971 and 1998 were selected for review. Sixty-six articles, including 21 research-based reports, were identified. Forty-five percent of the studies were related to the management of chronic disease. Thirteen studies described an improvement in knowledge scores or clinical outcomes when computer-based patient education was compared with traditional instruction. Additional articles examined patients' computer experience, socioeconomic status, race, and gender and found no significant differences when compared with program outcomes. Sixteen of the 21 research-based studies had effect sizes greater than 0.5, indicating a significant change in the described outcome when the study subjects participated in computer-based patient education. The findings from this review support computer-based education as an effective strategy for transfer of knowledge and skill development for patients. The limited number of research studies (N = 21) points to the need for additional research. Recommendations for new studies include cost-benefit analysis and the impact of these new technologies on health outcomes over time. PMID:10428001

  20. The effect of written material and verbal method education on anxiety and depression in patients with myocardial infarction in selected hospitals in Iran

    PubMed Central

    AGHAKHANI, NADER; KHADEMVATAN, KAMAL; DEHGHANI, MOHAMMAD REZA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Myocardial infarction (MI) is the damage to the heart muscle, or myocardium, resulting from the lack of blood flow to the heart. MI patients experience mental and emotional problems such as depression and anxiety. These complications could cause delay in resuming work, decreased quality of life and increased risk of death. The role of education in facilitating adaptation is very important in these patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of written material and verbal method education on anxiety and depression in patients with myocardial infarction in Urmia hospital in 2009. Methods: This study was a quasi-experimental study, comparing the effect of education on anxiety and depression in patients with myocardial infarction in hospitals affiliated to Urmia University of Medical Science. 124 patients were selected randomly and divided into two groups. The experimental group was educated through face to face training and an educational booklet (Written Material and Verbal Method). The control group did not receive any intervention. The level of anxiety and depression was evaluated, using HADS questionnaire at 3 intervals: after 48 hours of admission, the discharge day and 2 months after discharge. Results: The findings suggested that MI patients were worried about their social role, interpersonal relations and personal health. Such problems can aggravate symptoms and complicate the future care. There was no significant difference between the control and experimental groups before the intervention, but after the intervention, anxiety and depression in the experimental group was significantly less than that in the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Considering the beneficial results obtained from written materials and verbal method education on reducing anxiety and depression in cases with myocardial infarction, this may be one of the health care goals. More research on more patients is required to achieve more conclusive results

  1. A Study of Professional Nurses' Perceptions of Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum, Julie; Ridenour, Maureen; Shaff, Gaye; Hammons, Mary; Taylor, Monica

    2002-01-01

    Of 124 acute care nurses, 97% felt that patient education was a priority. Inhibiting factors were time, staffing, and patient receptiveness. Enhancers included having time to teach, receiving effective teaching guidance materials, and having access to teaching resources. (SK)

  2. Effects of lifestyle education program for type 2 diabetes patients in clinics: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising worldwide, as has been the global mean fasting plasma glucose level. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a structured individual-based lifestyle education (SILE) program to reduce the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level in type 2 diabetes patients delivered by registered dietitians in primary care clinical settings. Methods This was a 6-month prospective cluster randomized controlled trial in a primary care setting with randomization at the practice level. Twenty general practitioners in 20 clinics in Kanagawa prefecture, Japan, were involved. 193 adults (51% men, mean age 61.3 years) with type 2 diabetes and HbA1c ≥6.5% who received treatment in medical clinics were the participants. A SILE program was implemented through 4 sessions with trained registered dietitians during the 6-month study period. Results were compared with those of a control group who received usual care. The primary endpoint was the change in HbA1c levels at 6 months from baseline. Secondary endpoints were the changes at 6 months from baseline in fasting plasma glucose, lipid profile, blood pressure, BMI, energy, and nutrient intakes (whole day and each meal). Intention-to-treat analysis was conducted. Mixed-effects linear models were used to examine the effects of the treatment. Results The mean change at 6 months from baseline in HbA1c was a 0.7% decrease in the intervention group (n = 100) and a 0.2% decrease in the control group (n = 93) (difference −0.5%, 95%CI: -0.2% to −0.8%, p = 0.004). After adjusting for baseline values and other factors, the difference was still significant (p = 0.003 ~ 0.011). The intervention group had a significantly greater decrease in mean energy intake at dinner compared with the control group and a greater increase in mean vegetable intake for the whole day, breakfast, and lunch as shown in crude and adjusted models. A tendency toward improvement was observed in the other

  3. Prescription Opioid Analgesics: Promoting Patient Safety with Better Patient Education.

    PubMed

    Costello, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Patients expect and deserve adequate postoperative pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely used and effective in controlling postoperative pain, but their use poses risks that many patients don't understand and that all too often result in adverse outcomes. Inappropriate and often dangerous use of prescription medication has increased sharply in the past two decades in the United States. Patients and caregivers must have an adequate understanding of safe use, storage, and disposal of opioids to prevent adverse drug events in patients and others. Nurses play a key role in providing this patient education. This article provides a case study that highlights the risks and important aspects of opioid medication use in the postoperative patient.

  4. Patient education in Europe: united differences.

    PubMed

    Visser, A; Deccache, A; Bensing, J

    2001-07-01

    This issue of Patient Education and Counseling presents the state of the art of patient education in several European countries. It is based on papers presented at a meeting in Paris on the evolution and development of patient education in western, central and eastern Europe (May 1999). Also patient education in the US is presented in this issue. Patient education is defined as all the educational activities directed to patients, including aspects of therapeutic education, health education and clinical health promotion. Five important factors are identified in the development of patient education: (1) research and evidence based standards; (2) the organization of care; (3) training and methodological support; (4) professional values; and (5) acknowledgment, funding and place of patient education in health policy. Several of the discussed common orientations and priorities in the patient education in the reviewed countries are highlighted in this issue. And finally, an example of the possible integrated international practice in patient education in the field of diabetes is described in this issue. Several conclusions are drawn concerning future development of communication in health care within the framework of patient education in Europe.

  5. The Effects on Knowledge of the Systematic Education of Patients with Joint Diseases Treated with NSAIDs and Diuretics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linne, Agneta Bjorck; Liedholm, Hans; Jacobsson, Lennart

    2001-01-01

    In a randomized, controlled trial, patients with joint diseases and concomitant treatment with NSAIDs and diuretics received systematic education. The intervention group was given information focusing on awareness of drug interactions and encouragement of self-adjustment of treatment. Results reveal that the intervention group achieved greater…

  6. Arthritis Self-Management: A Study of the Effectiveness of Patient Education for the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorig, Kate; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of an Arthritis Self Management course for people aged 55-95 (N=200). Results indicated significant gains in knowledge and pain reduction. Trends toward less disability were observed for participants under age 74. (JAC)

  7. The effectiveness of one-on-one nurse education on the outcomes of high-risk adult and pediatric patients with asthma.

    PubMed

    Forshee, J D; Whalen, E B; Hackel, R; Butt, L T; Smeltzer, P A; Martin, J; Lavin, P T; Buchner, D A

    1998-12-01

    The effects of an asthma self-management program on asthma outcomes were evaluated in adult and pediatric patients with asthma who were considered at high risk (i.e., those who were not in control of their disease as determined by resource utilization, medication use, or lack of use). The program consisted of one-on-one nurse-to-patient ("nurse champion") education and subsequent assessment of asthma outcomes using the Asthma Quality Assessment System (AQAS) questionnaire, which measured asthma severity, patient quality of life, asthma awareness and knowledge, confidence in managing asthma, use of peak flow meters, asthma symptoms, medication use, lost work or school days, and affect of asthma. Over the course of six months, nurse champions educated 201 patients from four managed care plans and collected data at baseline and during four follow-up sessions. Adult patients and pediatric patient caregivers reported significant improvements in quality of life, and clinical and process measures. Significant increases in asthma knowledge were observed immediately after patient education, including greater than 89% increase in the proportion of patients who reported that they know "a lot" about the "things that cause asthma symptoms." Significant decreases were also found in work or school days missed, urgent care utilization, and hospital admission rates. Appropriate preventive care visits increased by more than 40%. These results indicate that the nurse champion program was associated with an improvement in asthma outcomes in high-risk adult and pediatric patients and warrant further evaluation in controlled studies. Incorporating one-on-one education programs into asthma management is an effective and rapid means of improving asthma outcomes.

  8. Effect of intensive nursing education on the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration among patients with high-risk diabetic foot: a follow-up analysis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Meng; Yang, Chuan; Lin, Diao Zhu; Xiao, Hui Sheng; Mai, Li Fang; Guo, Yi Chen; Yan, Li

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to discuss the effect of intensive nursing education on the prevention of diabetic foot ulceration among patients at high risk for diabetic foot. One hundred eighty-five diabetes patients at high risk for foot diseases were enrolled in this study and provided with intensive nursing education, including individualized education about diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot diseases, instruction in podiatric care (the right way of washing the foot, the care of foot skin, appropriate choice of shoes and socks, intense examinations and records of feet by patients themselves every day, and the assistant management of calluses). Study subjects were followed up for 2 years. Once the foot ulceration developed, the inducing factors of foot ulceration were inquired about, the ulcers were evaluated, and the incidence of foot ulceration was analyzed before and after the intensive nursing education according to self-paired data. Results showed there were highly statistically significant improvements in the intensive treatment group compared with the control group in plasma glucose, blood pressure, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. More important is that intensive nursing education helps to prevent diabetic foot ulceration and to decrease the rate of amputation among patients at high risk for diabetic foot.

  9. Educator Effectiveness Administrative Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this manual is to provide guidance in the evaluation of educators, highlight critical components of effectiveness training, and offer opportunities for professional growth. The term "educator" includes teachers, all professional and temporary professional employees, education specialists, and school administrators/principals.…

  10. Implications of structural deficits for patient education in Germany.

    PubMed

    Keller, S; Basler, H

    2001-07-01

    Several changes in health politics and legal settings in recent years have affected the structure and practice of health promotion and patient education in Germany. The current legal background and its implications for patient education are discussed. Based on examples from four selected areas (cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, chronic pain, and asthma) the current practice of patient education in Germany is summarized. While many well-structured programs exist that are based on state-of-the-art guidelines, there is a lack of high quality research that documents the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of such approaches. Structural problems and an insufficient number of highly trained personnel result in the fact that many patients do not have access to standardized programs. Persisting compliance problems indicate that there is still room for improvement of patient education interventions. As important for the future, necessary changes in the legal settings and possible implications for the education of the educators are discussed.

  11. The Effect of Face-to-Face Education and Educational Booklet on Heart Health Indexes of the Hospitalized Patients with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili Vardanjani, Safar Ali; Fanisaberi, Laleh; Alirezaee Shahraki, Firozeh; Khalilzadeh, Ahmad; Tavakoli Vardanjani, Abdolazim; Ghani Dehkordi, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Management of risk factors and heart health indexes in the patients who have been diagnosed with myocardial infarction will result in prevention of secondary myocardial infarction, reduction of postimprovement mortality, increase of life span and improvement of life quality. Patient education has been found to be one of the most fundamental and essential care programs on the basis of identification and control of the patients' health criteria. The study is a quasi-experimental research consisting of two groups. In this study, 112 patients with myocardial infarction who were below the age of 70 were selected randomly and divided into two groups (case group and control group) after being matched based on age and sex. The researcher first measured the health indexes including smoking, cholesterol level, body mass, level of anxiety, and amount of systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients who have been diagnosed with myocardial infarction for the first time. He performed education program in case group and analyzed the said variables after four months. He also compared the behaviors in the two groups after being educated. The data was analyzed by SPSS software, version 15 (This product is licensed to FeFDBi, ABiComputer, 1337), and the two groups were compared by using appropriate statistical tests. According to the results, after education period, systolic blood pressure of the case group improves compared with control group (P < 0.05/P = 0.022), case group tends to quit smoking more than control group does (P = 0.013), cholesterol level of case group improves compared with control group (P < 0.0001), changes of body mass are more positive in case group compared with control group (P = 0.012), and anxiety of case group reduces compared with control group (P < 0.0001). PMID:23781336

  12. Effects of needs-based patient education on self-efficacy and health outcomes in people with rheumatoid arthritis: a multicentre, single blind, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ndosi, M; Johnson, D; Young, T; Hardware, B; Hill, J; Hale, C; Maxwell, J; Roussou, E; Adebajo, A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The Educational Needs Assessment Tool (ENAT) is a self-completed questionnaire, which allows patients with arthritis to prioritise their educational needs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of needs-based patient education on self-efficacy, health outcomes and patient knowledge in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Patients with RA were enrolled into this multicentre, single-blind, parallel-group, pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Patients were randomised to either the intervention group (IG) where patients completed ENAT, responses of which were used by the clinical nurse specialist to guide patient education; or control group (CG) in which they received patient education without the use of ENAT. Patients were seen at weeks 0, 16 and 32. The primary outcome was self-efficacy (Arthritis Self Efficacy Scale (ASES)-Pain and ASES-Other symptoms). Secondary outcomes were health status (short form of Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale 2, AIMS2-SF) and patient knowledge questionnaire-RA. We investigated between-group differences using analysis of covariance, adjusting for baseline variables. Results A total of 132 patients were recruited (IG=70 and CG=62). Their mean (SD) age was 54 (12.3) years, 56 (13.3)  years and disease duration 5.2 (4.9) years, 6.7 (8.9) years for IG and CG, respectively. There were significant between-group differences, in favour of IG at week 32 in the primary outcomes, ASES-Pain, mean difference (95% CI) −4.36 (1.17 to 7.55), t=−2.72, p=0.008 and ASES-Other symptoms, mean difference (95% CI) −5.84 (2.07 to 9.62), t=−3.07, p=0.003. In secondary outcomes, the between-group differences favoured IG in AIMS2-SF Symptoms and AIMS2-SF Affect. There were no between-group differences in other secondary outcomes. Conclusions The results suggest that needs-based education helps improve patients’ self-efficacy and some aspects of health status. Trial registration number ISRCTN51523281. PMID:26162769

  13. Nurse-led educative consultation setting personalized tertiary prevention goals after cardiovascular rehabilitation: evaluation of patient satisfaction and long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Dedoncker, Anne; Lejeune, Corinne; Dupont, Catherine; Antoine, Daniel; Laurent, Yves; Casillas, Jean-Marie; Gremeaux, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the perception and long-term effects of an educative consultation performed before cardiac rehabilitation discharge. The patient and the referring nurse summed up the educative interventions, and filled a personalized form summarizing tertiary prevention goals. Fifty patients were contacted by mail at 11 ± 1 months, and called at 4.2 ± 0.2 years after discharge, to evaluate their satisfaction and assess cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) control. Mail response rate was 82%, and 90% of patients believed that it had encouraged them to adopt a healthier lifestyle. Almost half the number of patients declared that they considered the nurse intervention as positive. Telephone response rate was 54%. Most long-term effects were better than usually reported in the field of multidisciplinary secondary prevention of CVRF. Patients felt that this educational action was positive, even though highlighting this role of nurses seems necessary. Additional controlled trials are needed to provide rigorous validation of this strategy.

  14. Developing virtual patients for medical microbiology education.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, David; O'Gorman, Ciaran; Gormley, Gerry J

    2013-12-01

    The landscape of medical education is changing as students embrace the accessibility and interactivity of e-learning. Virtual patients are e-learning resources that may be used to advance microbiology education. Although the development of virtual patients has been widely considered, here we aim to provide a coherent approach for clinical educators.

  15. Placing wireless tablets in clinical settings for patient education

    PubMed Central

    Stribling, Judy C.; Richardson, Joshua E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The authors explored the feasibility and possible benefit of tablet-based educational materials for patients in clinic waiting areas. Methods We distributed eight tablets preloaded with diagnosis-relevant information in two clinic waiting areas. Patients were surveyed about satisfaction, usability, and effects on learning. Technical issues were resolved. Results Thirty-seven of forty patients completed the survey. On average, the patients were satisfied in all categories. Conclusions Placing tablet-based educational materials in clinic waiting areas is relatively easy to implement. Patients using tablets reported satisfaction across three domains: usability, education, and satisfaction. PMID:27076806

  16. The effectiveness of an educational intervention in changing nursing practice and preventing catheter-related infection for patients receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Dinç, L; Erdil, F

    2000-10-01

    Catheter-related infections are one of the most serious complications of TPN therapy. Nurses have important responsibilities in the care of patients who are receiving TPN. This quasi-experimental study was conducted for the purpose of investigating the effectiveness of an educational intervention on changing nursing practice and preventing catheter-related infections in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. The nurses' practice and the colonisation rate of control and comparative group patients in the surgical clinics of Hacettepe University Hospital (Turkey), and related variables were examined before and after an educational intervention. The findings of the study indicate that the intervention was successful in improving appropriate nursing practice, mean scores of nurses' practices were 45.7 before and 66.5 after the intervention (p<0.05). The rate of microorganism colonisation was also decreased but statistical analysis demonstrated no association between nursing practices and microorganism colonisation of catheter cultures.

  17. [Innovative concepts for patient education in medical rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Faller, H; Reusch, A; Meng, K

    2011-04-01

    Patient education aims to empower rehabilitants. While patient education has, in the past, been conceived of as providing solely information, modern self-management concepts now focus on both behavioral competencies and motivational factors. Participants receive all the skills and tools necessary to make informed decisions regarding both their health and lifestyles and to actively participate in the rehabilitation process. Accordingly, didactic methods have changed from predominantly vertical lectures to more patient-oriented and interactive approaches. Meta-analyses have proven that patient education is effective in improving the chronic conditions of patients. However, the implementation of modern concepts into routine care is still suboptimal. The Center of Patient Education, funded by the German Statutory Pension Insurance, has performed a survey of the present state of patient education within medical rehabilitation programs in Germany. Furthermore, quality criteria for patient education have been developed, an internet database presenting self-management programs in a systematic manner has been created, and various services designed to improve educational practice are being offered by the Center of Patient Education. Lastly, a state-of-the-art, self-management education program is described.

  18. Patient Education and Involvement in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andiric, Linda Reynolds

    2010-01-01

    A study conducted on patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty indicated that participants who were offered preadmission education for their procedure had statistically better outcomes than patients who had not attended an educational class. The study further focused on patients' confidence in their ability to take control of their health…

  19. Writing and designing readable patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    Functional illiteracy is a problem often overlooked by nurses. Although the average adult in the United States cannot read above the eighth-grade level, most patient education materials are written on a high-school or college reading level. If patients cannot read educational materials, then there is little hope of them using or understanding the information. Strategies for improving the readability of education materials specific to the needs of nephrology patients are discussed in this article.

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of patient education and empowerment to improve patient–provider interactions in antiretroviral therapy clinics in Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Maclachlan, Ellen W.; Shepard-Perry, Mark G.; Ingo, Paulina; Uusiku, James; Mushimba, Ruusa; Simwanza, Ricky; Likoro, Joseph; Brandt, Laura J.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Kasonka, Claude; Hamunime, Ndapewa; O'Malley, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to increase patient active engagement during patient–provider interactions, we developed and implemented patient training sessions in four antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinics in Namibia using a “Patient Empowerment” training curriculum. We examined the impact of these trainings on patient–provider interactions after the intervention. We tested the effectiveness of the intervention using a randomized parallel group design, with half of the 589 enrolled patients randomly assigned to receive the training immediately and the remaining randomized to receive the training 6 months later. The effects of the training on patient engagement during medical consultations were measured at each clinic visit for at least 8 months of follow-up. Each consultation was audiotaped and then coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). RIAS outcomes were compared between study groups at 6 months. Using intention-to-treat analysis, consultations in the intervention group had significantly higher RIAS scores in doctor facilitation and patient activation (adjusted difference in score 1.19, p = .004), doctor information gathering (adjusted difference in score 2.96, p = .000), patient question asking (adjusted difference in score .48, p = .012), and patient positive affect (adjusted difference in score 2.08, p = .002). Other measures were higher in the intervention group but did not reach statistical significance. We have evidence that increased engagement of patients in clinical consultation can be achieved via a targeted training program, although outcome data were not available on all patients. The patient training program was successfully integrated into ART clinics so that the trainings complemented other services being provided. PMID:26695005

  1. Asthma Education Programme in Russia: Educating Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslennikova, G. Ya.; Morosova, M. E.; Salman, N. V.; Kulikov, S. M.; Oganov, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    U.S. recommendations for asthma management were adapted for use in educating Moscow families with children with asthma (N=252). Use of anti-inflammatory drugs, doctor visits, peak flow rates, and daily peak flow were also measured. One-year follow up showed significant improvement in asthma self-management skills among the education group.…

  2. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  3. Using the Internet for patient education.

    PubMed

    Brooks, B A

    2001-01-01

    The Internet, especially the World Wide Web, has a wealth of health-related information easily accessible to patients and families. Commercial health-related Internet sites offer the "3 C's: content, commerce, and connectivity. Many are quickly adding the 4th "C": communication. A growing concern among health care professionals is the quality and the seemingly overabundance of patient education information available on the Internet. Certainly it is possible for nurses to use the Internet for patient education, but new skills and knowledge are needed by nurses who incorporate this technology into their practice. This article will briefly review the evolution of patient education on the Internet, provide a brief review of the Joint Commission on Accreditation for Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) Patient and Family Education Standards, and offer guidelines for nurses who choose to enhance their patient education efforts by using resources readily available on the Internet.

  4. [Patient education as a constituent of a patient-oriented approach in rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Faller, H; Reusch, A; Ströbl, V; Vogel, H

    2008-04-01

    Patient education is a central component of patient-oriented medical rehabilitation. The aim of patient education is to provide patients with the fundamentals of acting as competent partners in the rehabilitation process. Thus, the goals of educational group programmes are compliance, self-management, and empowerment, which are aspired by means of providing information, training skills, and modifying attitudes. According to expert opinions, such programmes should comply with certain minimum criteria regarding aims, methods, and frameworks, which can then be complemented by additional quality criteria. Furthermore, educational programmes should meet all the substantial requirements and standards of the respective medical area and exhibit proven effectiveness. A nationwide survey of rehabilitation institutions has shown that the implementation of patient education does not meet the quality requirements in all cases, particularly regarding patient-oriented didactics, standardisation, manual-use and evaluation. An additional quality feature is marked by the skills and qualifications of the educators. Instructors should be competent in leading and moderating groups and using various methods and media in order to fulfill the standards of modern educational concepts. As ample evidence has shown, patient participation and improved self-efficacy are indispensable when trying to promote healthy lifestyles in patients. Additional opportunities for enhancing patient orientation and optimizing patient education are provided by measures of behavioural planning and after-care as attempts to convey the behavioural changes in the patients' everyday lives.

  5. Educating Patients about CKD: The Path to Self-Management and Patient-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Narva, Andrew S; Norton, Jenna M; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-04-01

    Patient education is associated with better patient outcomes and supported by international guidelines and organizations, but a range of barriers prevent widespread implementation of comprehensive education for people with progressive kidney disease, especially in the United States. Among United States patients, obstacles to education include the complex nature of kidney disease information, low baseline awareness, limited health literacy and numeracy, limited availability of CKD information, and lack of readiness to learn. For providers, lack of time and clinical confidence combine with competing education priorities and confusion about diagnosing CKD to limit educational efforts. At the system level, lack of provider incentives, limited availability of practical decision support tools, and lack of established interdisciplinary care models inhibit patient education. Despite these barriers, innovative education approaches for people with CKD exist, including self-management support, shared decision making, use of digital media, and engaging families and communities. Education efficiency may be increased by focusing on people with progressive disease, establishing interdisciplinary care management including community health workers, and providing education in group settings. New educational approaches are being developed through research and quality improvement efforts, but challenges to evaluating public awareness and patient education programs inhibit identification of successful strategies for broader implementation. However, growing interest in improving patient-centered outcomes may provide new approaches to effective education of people with CKD. PMID:26536899

  6. Patient Education for the Mentally Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Louise Harding

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the philosophy of the rehabilitation services department at McLean Hospital on patient education for the mentally ill, noting patient library collection and recommended resources on marital problems, sex education, drug manuals, and diagnostic and research findings. A list of magazines subscribed to, color code classification, and 23…

  7. The Effect of Previsit Education in Breast Cancer Patients: A Study of a Shared-decision-making Tool.

    PubMed

    Serpico, Victoria; Liepert, Amy E; Boucher, Kenneth; Fouts, Diane L; Anderson, Layla; Pell, Joyce; Neumayer, Leigh

    2016-03-01

    To enhance shared decision-making for patients with breast cancer, we developed an evidence-based educational breast cancer video (BCV) providing an overview of breast cancer biology, prognostic indicators, and surgical treatment options while introducing health care choice. By providing patients access to a BCV with information necessary to make informed surgical decisions before seeing a surgeon, we aimed to increase patient participation in the decision-making process, while decreasing distress. Patients with a new diagnosis of breast cancer were provided a link to the BCV. Group 1 participated in online pre- and postvideo questionnaires, with the BCV embedded in between. The questionnaires evaluated self-reported baseline knowledge of breast cancer and perceived distress related to the diagnosis. Changes in self-reported responses were analyzed using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test. Group 2 received a survey collecting demographics, decision-making information, and perceptions of the BCV at the time of clinic visit before meeting the surgeon. Group 1 included 69 subjects with 62 per cent reporting improved knowledge and 30 per cent reporting reduced distress in regard to their breast cancer diagnosis. Group 2 included 87 subjects; 94 to 98 per cent felt the BCV provided information and stimulated thoughts and questions to assist in breast cancer treatment decision-making. The BCV was positively received by participants and feasible to implement into clinical practice. Evidence-based media tools improve knowledge and reduce distress in patients with a new diagnosis of breast cancer as well as contributing to the shared decision-making process. PMID:27099063

  8. The POP Program: the patient education advantage.

    PubMed

    Claeys, M; Mosher, C; Reesman, D

    1998-01-01

    In 1992, a preoperative education program was developed for total joint replacement patients in a small community hospital. The goals of the program were to increase educational opportunities for the joint replacement patients, prepare patients for hospitalization, plan for discharge needs, and increase efficiency of the orthopaedic program. Since 1992, approximately 600 patients have attended the education program. Outcomes have included positive responses from patients regarding their preparedness for surgery, increased participation in their plan of care, coordinated discharge planning, decreased length of stay, and progression across the continuum of care. A multidisciplinary approach to preparing patients for surgery allows for a comprehensive and efficient education program. Marketing of successful programs can enhance an institution's competitive advantage and help ensure the hospital's viability in the current health care arena.

  9. Compassionate care: enhancing physician-patient communication and education in dermatology: Part II: Patient education.

    PubMed

    Hong, Judith; Nguyen, Tien V; Prose, Neil S

    2013-03-01

    Patient education is a fundamental part of caring for patients. A practice gap exists, where patients want more information, while health care providers are limited by time constraints or difficulty helping patients understand or remember. To provide patient-centered care, it is important to assess the needs and goals, health beliefs, and health literacy of each patient. This allows health care providers to individualize education for patients. The use of techniques, such as gaining attention, providing clear and memorable explanations, and assessing understanding through "teach-back," can improve patient education. Verbal education during the office visit is considered the criterion standard. However, handouts, visual aids, audiovisual media, and Internet websites are examples of teaching aids that can be used as an adjunct to verbal instruction. Part II of this 2-part series on patient-physician interaction reviews the importance and need for patient education along with specific guidelines and techniques that can be used.

  10. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

  11. Group Education and Nurse-Telephone Follow-Up Effects on Blood Glucose Control and Adherence to Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aliha, Jaleh M.; Asgari, Mina; Khayeri, Feridone; Ramazani, Majid; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Javaheri, Javad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Training and continuous dynamic communication between patients and health professionals in chronic diseases like diabetes, is important. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of diabetes self-care group education and nurse- telephone follow-up on glycemic control and compliance with treatment orders in patients with type 2 diabetes attending to diabetes clinic in khomein. Methods: In this clinical trial, 62 patients with type 2 diabetes who attending to the diabetes clinic selected and were randomly assigned to experiment and control groups. Self-care group education was applied for case group (n = 31) and they were followed up using telephone calls for 12 weeks by a nurse. The control group (n = 31) received the conventional management. Demographic characteristics, compliance with treatment recommendations (diet, drug use, exercise) and blood glucose control indices were recorded before and after interventions. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 16 using independent t-test, paired t-test, Chi-square test, non-parametric tests, mixed model (ANOVA + repeated measure) and ANCOVA. Results: The mean age of intervention and control groups was 50.9 ± 7.3 and 55.1 ± 10.1 years, respectively. Blood glucose indices (FBS, 2 hpp BS, Hb A1C) were improved in both case and control group after intervention but it was only statistically significant in case group P > 0.0001. During study, percentage of patients with very good compliance in control group decrease from 12.5% to zero (0%), whereas in experiment group these amounts increase from 6.5% to 90.3% P > 0.0001. Conclusions: According to the results of the current study self-care group education and 12 weeks follow-up by a nurse using telephone causes significant improvement in metabolic parameters and adherence to treatment recommendations in diabetic patients. PMID:24049598

  12. Education of patients with chronic kidney disease at the interface of primary care providers and nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Wright Nunes, Julie A

    2013-07-01

    Patient education is promoted as an integral part of effective kidney disease management. Programs and tools are available for providers and patients to support patient CKD education in primary care and nephrology. Challenges to providing patient education across practice settings include patients' lack of awareness of CKD as a medical entity, physician perceptions of their own lack of skill and ability to educate patients, differences in how primary care and nephrology physicians perceive collaborative care, and shortage of staff and time to support educational efforts. In addition, there is little research available to guide evidence-based practices for implementing early patient CKD education interventions across medical disciplines. Development and testing of patient education programs using early CKD multidisciplinary care, educational websites, and phone-based applications are all areas of growing research. More work is needed to provide evidence and support that physicians and other health professionals need to ensure a seamless patient education experience across the continuum of care.

  13. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2012-12-01

    Diabetes education has gained a critical role in diabetes care. The empowerment of patients aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification. Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations.

  14. Assessing the effect of culturally specific audiovisual educational interventions on attaining self-management skills for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Poureslami, Iraj; Kwan, Susan; Lam, Stephen; Khan, Nadia A; FitzGerald, John Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient education is a key component in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Delivering effective education to ethnic groups with COPD is a challenge. The objective of this study was to develop and assess the effectiveness of culturally and linguistically specific audiovisual educational materials in supporting self-management practices in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients. Methods Educational materials were developed using participatory approach (patients involved in the development and pilot test of educational materials), followed by a randomized controlled trial that assigned 91 patients to three intervention groups with audiovisual educational interventions and one control group (pamphlet). The patients were recruited from outpatient clinics. The primary outcomes were improved inhaler technique and perceived self-efficacy to manage COPD. The secondary outcome was improved patient understanding of pulmonary rehabilitation procedures. Results Subjects in all three intervention groups, compared with control subjects, demonstrated postintervention improvements in inhaler technique (P<0.001), preparedness to manage a COPD exacerbation (P<0.01), ability to achieve goals in managing COPD (P<0.01), and understanding pulmonary rehabilitation procedures (P<0.05). Conclusion Culturally appropriate educational interventions designed specifically to meet the needs of Mandarin and Cantonese COPD patients are associated with significantly better understanding of self-management practices. Self-management education led to improved proper use of medications, ability to manage COPD exacerbations, and ability to achieve goals in managing COPD. Clinical implication A relatively simple culturally appropriate disease management education intervention improved inhaler techniques and self-management practices. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of self-management education on behavioral change and patient empowerment

  15. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management. PMID:26846749

  16. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management.

  17. The Effect of Educating Health Promotion Strategies on Self-Care Self-Efficacy in Patients Undergoing Kidney Transplantation: A Double Blind Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltannezhad, Fateme; Farsi, Zahra; Jabari Moroei, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-care self-efficacy in patients with end stage renal disease, waiting for kidney transplantation, probably decreases due to facing new conditions and side effects of treatment. Objectives: The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of educating health promotion strategies on self-care self-efficacy in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods: A double blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 52 patients undergoing kidney transplantation in Baqiyatallah Hospital in 2012. Patients were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. The questionnaire of Strategies Used by People to Promote Health (SUPPH) was employed to measure self-care self-efficacy. At first, the two groups filled the questionnaire. Then, the intervention group was trained regarding health promotion strategies within 4 sessions before the transplantation. The control group was trained according to routine protocol of the transplantation unit. Then, the two groups were followed up for two months, and reassessed at the end of the first and second months after the transplantation. The data were analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics including independent samples T test, Chi square and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: In the intervention group, the mean of total self-care self-efficacy was 106.96 ± 25.1 at first, and changed to 135.81 ± 9.65 and 111.19 ± 12.45 after the first and second post-test respectively (P = 0.001). In the control group, the mean of total self-care self-efficacy was 112.73 ± 14.33 at first, and changed to 118.58 ± 17.59 and 108.73 ± 15.93 after the first and second post-test respectively (P = 0.001). Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the first post-test regarding total score of self-care self-efficacy (P = 0.001) and dimensions of reduction of stress (P = 0.001), enjoying life (P = 0.01), and coping (P = 0.001). The mean scores of the intervention group were

  18. Effects of educational intervention on adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration in patients admitted to an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Erimara Dall'Agnol; Fleck, Caren Schlottefeld; Borges, Januário José Vieira; Condessa, Robledo Leal; Vieira, Sílvia Regina Rios

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention on healthcare professionals' adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration in intensive care unit patients. Methods A quasi-experimental study was performed to evaluate intensive care unit professionals' adherence to the tracheobronchial aspiration technical recommendations in intensive care unit patients both before and after a theoretical and practical educational intervention. Comparisons were performed using the chi-square test, and the significance level was set to p<0.05. Results A total of 124 procedures, pre- and post-intervention, were observed. Increased adherence was observed in the following actions: the use of personal protective equipment (p=0.01); precaution when opening the catheter package (p<0.001); the use of a sterile glove on the dominant hand to remove the catheter (p=0.003); the contact of the sterile glove with the catheter only (p<0.001); the execution of circular movements during the catheter removal (p<0.001); wrapping the catheter in the sterile glove at the end of the procedure (p=0.003); the use of distilled water, opened at the start of the procedure, to wash the connection latex (p=0.002); the disposal of the leftover distilled water at the end of the procedure (p<0.001); and the performance of the aspiration technique procedures (p<0.001). Conclusion There was a low adherence by health professionals to the preventive measures against hospital infection, indicating the need to implement educational strategies. The educational intervention used was shown to be effective in increasing adherence to the technical recommendations for tracheobronchial aspiration. PMID:23917976

  19. [Combining clinical pathway and patient education approaches].

    PubMed

    Bonnabel, Laurence; Huteau, Marie-Ève; Filhol, Nathalie; Clottes, Edwige; Massin, Julie; Quenet, François; Stoebner-Delbarre, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The integration of the therapeutic education of the patient into a clinical pathway approach helps to optimise nursing practice. Despite some limits, this method allows the position of the caregiver to evolve, going beyond the required methodological framework. It results in the emergence of several new educational facets which are essential for the patient and enable them to become a player in their own care. PMID:26743372

  20. Developing and evaluating patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Monsivais, Diane; Reynolds, Audree

    2003-01-01

    Nurses should be involved in all aspects of patient education, including the development of print and web resources, but most nurses have not been educated in how to develop these resources. This article discusses the rationale for nurse involvement, describes guidelines for evaluating existing material for credibility and readability, and provides recommendations for rewriting material at an easier-to-read level.

  1. Health literacy and ophthalmic patient education.

    PubMed

    Muir, Kelly W; Lee, Paul P

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, Ebrahimzadeh, Davalos, and Lee wrote in this journal that only 32% of the ophthalmic patient educational materials reviewed were written at or below the recommended eighth-grade reading level. Since that time, the National Assessment of Adult Literacy found that more than one-third of adult Americans possess only basic or below basic health literacy skills, defined as the ability to understand written information in a healthcare setting. Subsequently, investigators have shown that poor health literacy skills are associated with poor prescription medication adherence, increased hospital admissions, and increased mortality. We review the readability of currently available ophthalmic educational materials, with particular attention to the health literacy status of the patient population for which the materials are intended. Examples of prose at various readability levels are provided. Optimizing patient education and improving clinical outcomes requires understanding the attributes that the patient brings to the patient-physician relationship, including health literacy.

  2. Evaluating a Sexual Health Patient Education Resource

    PubMed Central

    Matzo, Marianne; Troup, Sandi; Hijjazi, Kamal; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-01-01

    This article shares the findings of an evaluation of a patient teaching resource for sexual health entitled Everything Nobody Tells You About Cancer Treatment and Your Sex Life: From A to Z, which was accomplished through systematic conceptualization, construction, and evaluation with women diagnosed with breast or gynecologic cancer. This resource, which has evolved from patient-focused research and has been tested in the clinical setting, can be used in patient education and support. Oncology professionals are committed to addressing quality-of-life concerns for patients across the trajectory of illness. Sexuality is a key concern for patients and impacts relationships and overall quality of life. Through careful assessment, patient education, and support, clinicians can ensure that sexuality is respected as an essential part of patient-centered care. PMID:26557411

  3. Evaluating a Sexual Health Patient Education Resource.

    PubMed

    Matzo, Marianne; Troup, Sandi; Hijjazi, Kamal; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-01-01

    This article shares the findings of an evaluation of a patient teaching resource for sexual health entitled Everything Nobody Tells You About Cancer Treatment and Your Sex Life: From A to Z, which was accomplished through systematic conceptualization, construction, and evaluation with women diagnosed with breast or gynecologic cancer. This resource, which has evolved from patient-focused research and has been tested in the clinical setting, can be used in patient education and support. Oncology professionals are committed to addressing quality-of-life concerns for patients across the trajectory of illness. Sexuality is a key concern for patients and impacts relationships and overall quality of life. Through careful assessment, patient education, and support, clinicians can ensure that sexuality is respected as an essential part of patient-centered care.

  4. Patient education preferences in ophthalmic care

    PubMed Central

    Rosdahl, Jullia A; Swamy, Lakshmi; Stinnett, Sandra; Muir, Kelly W

    2014-01-01

    Background The learning preferences of ophthalmology patients were examined. Methods Results from a voluntary survey of ophthalmology patients were analyzed for education preferences and for correlation with race, age, and ophthalmic topic. Results To learn about eye disease, patients preferred one-on-one sessions with providers as well as printed materials and websites recommended by providers. Patients currently learning from the provider were older (average age 59 years), and patients learning from the Internet (average age 49 years) and family and friends (average age 51 years) were younger. Patients interested in cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and dry eye were older; patients interested in double vision and glasses were younger. There were racial differences regarding topic preferences, with Black patients most interested in glaucoma (46%), diabetic retinopathy (31%), and cataracts (28%) and White patients most interested in cataracts (22%), glaucoma (22%), and macular degeneration (19%). Conclusion Most ophthalmology patients preferred personalized education: one-on-one with their provider or a health educator and materials (printed and electronic) recommended by their provider. Age-related topics were more popular with older patients, and diseases with racial risk factors were more popular with high risk racial groups. PMID:24812493

  5. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial to estimate the effects and costs of a patient centred educational intervention in glaucoma management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Poor glaucoma education is thought to be a causative factor of non-adherence to glaucoma therapy. However, the multi-factorial nature of non-adherent behaviour may explain the failure of purely educational interventions to achieve significant improvement in adherence. Behaviour Change Counselling (BCC) allows both the imparting of information and assessment of patient ambivalence to medication use and may elicit behaviour change in order to achieve better adherence. The chronic and complex nature of glaucoma means that patient non-adherence to glaucoma therapy does not easily correlate with measureable objective clinical endpoints. However, electronic medication monitoring offers an objective method of measuring adherence without reliance on clinical endpoints. Methods/design The study is a randomised controlled trial (RCT) with glaucoma (open angle) or ocular hypertension patients attending a glaucoma clinic and prescribed travoprost. The study will determine whether additional glaucoma education using BCC is beneficial and cost effective in improving adherence with glaucoma therapy. An 8-month follow-up period, using an electronic adherence monitoring device (Travalert® dosing aid, TDA), will indicate if the intervention is likely to be sustained in the longer term. Additionally, a cost-effectiveness framework will be used to estimate the cost benefit of improving adherence. The development of a novel intervention to deliver glaucoma education using BCC required practitioner training and fidelity testing. Five practitioners were successfully trained to become Glaucoma Support Assistants able to deliver the BCC intervention. The research group had prior clinical and investigative experience in this setting, and used multiple strategies to design a method to address the study objectives. Discussion This RCT, using BCC to improve adherence to ocular hypotensive therapy, to our knowledge is the first within this disease area. Using a variety of adherence

  6. Medium-/Long-Term Effects of a Specific Exercise Protocol Combined with Patient Education on Spine Mobility, Chronic Fatigue, Pain, Aerobic Fitness and Level of Disability in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Erika; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Pigatto, Maurizia; Rampudda, Maria Elisa; Doria, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To propose a rehabilitation protocol able to produce immediate and long-term beneficial effects on level of disability and overall performance in ADLs. Materials and Methods. Forty-one FM patients were randomized to an exercise and educational-behavioral programme group (experimental group, EG = 21) or to a control group (CG = 20). Each subject was evaluated before, at the end (T1), and after 6 months (T6) from the conclusion of the rehabilitation treatment using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), the fatigue severity scale (FSS), the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), tender points count (TPC), and spinal active range of motion. The exercise protocol included 20 sessions consisting in self-awareness, stretching, strengthening, spine flexibility, and aerobic exercises, which patients were subsequently educated to perform at home. Results. The two groups were comparable at baseline. At T1, the EG showed a positive trend in FIQ, VAS, HAQ, and FSS scales and significant improvement in 6MWT and in most spinal active range of motion measurements (P between 0.001 and 0.04). The positive results were maintained at the follow-up. Conclusion. The proposed programme was well tolerated and produced immediate and medium-term beneficial effects improving function and strain endurance. This trial is registered with DRKS00005071 on DRKS. PMID:24616894

  7. Patient Education Leads to Better Care for Heart Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Stanley G.

    The staff of a heart and circulatory disease program of a State department of health conducted a special project at a city hospital which showed that a well-organized treatment and education program for patients with congestive heart failure increased the patient's knowledge of his disease, medication, and diet as well as his adherence to a…

  8. [In-patient education after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Schmid-Mohler, Gabriela; Albiez, Thomas; Schäfer-Keller, Petra; Fehr, Thomas; Biotti, Beatrice; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-10-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease who receive a kidney through transplantation enter a new phase in their illness trajectory. The question emerged which knowledge and skills are essential for a safe self-management immediately after the transplantation. The aim of this project was to develop an evidence-based in-patient education programme for renal transplant recipients. A participative action research approach was chosen. An interprofessional group, led by an advanced practice nurse, initiated the project. Based on a systematic literature review and on qualitative interviews with both patients and experts, an in-patient educational programme was developed and implemented. The main elements of the programme focused on taking medications appropriately and on the observation and interpretation of symptoms. The content of the programme was documented in a brochure for patients. The structure of the programme was documented in a guideline with a standardised procedure. The procedure was based on patients' needs and preferences, and therefore provides tailored education. Besides the support received in gaining relevant knowledge, patients are supported in developing practical skills, problem solving, and decision making. An initial evaluation revealed that patients with cognitive impairment have special needs for education that exceeds what exists in the developed programme. As the programme is revised, additional contents on psychosocial issues will be included and the programme will be planned along the clinical pathway. Furthermore, it should begin during the pre-transplant period and continue in a longterm follow-up. PMID:21964935

  9. [Bariatric surgery and patient therapeutic education].

    PubMed

    Mével, Katell

    2015-11-01

    Weight loss surgery or "bariatric surgery", used in cases of severe obesity, is a complex procedure aiming to reduce food intake. An increasingly accessible technique, it requires a long postoperative follow-up and a change in eating habits. Patient therapeutic education encourages the patient to become a player in their care.

  10. Comparing Effectiveness of High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation vs Case-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Ling Yap, Yen; Leng Lee, Wee; Chang Soh, Yee

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether human patient simulation (HPS) is superior to case-based learning (CBL) in teaching diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and thyroid storm (TS) to pharmacy students. Design. In this cross-over, open-label, single center, randomized control trial, final-year undergraduate pharmacy students enrolled in an applied therapeutics course were randomized to HPS or CBL groups. Pretest, posttest, knowledge retention tests, and satisfaction survey were administered to students. Assessment. One hundred seventy-four students participated in this study. The effect sizes attributable to HPS were larger than CBL in both cases. HPS groups performed significantly better in posttest and knowledge retention test compared to CBL groups pertaining to TS case (p<0.05). Students expressed high levels of satisfaction with HPS sessions. Conclusion. HPS was superior to CBL in teaching DKA and TS to final-year undergraduate pharmacy students. PMID:25386018

  11. Implementing a pharmacy patient education center.

    PubMed

    Huntzinger, Paul E

    2003-08-01

    Ambulatory care federal pharmacists may be readily used by beneficiaries to obtain verbal and written pharmaceutical and/or medical information because of their high visibility and accessibility. In addition to information provided for prescription medications, pharmacists may provide medication and disease information through a patient education center. A patient education center may contain written information in the form of pamphlets, booklets, or tear-off sheets, static displays such as posters, or interactive devices such as computers. The purpose of this study is to describe implementation of a patient education center consisting of written information and static displays at a Coast Guard pharmacy. The processes described in this study may be emulated by other health care professionals in a variety of settings.

  12. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  13. Effect of an Educational Program on Adherence to Therapeutic Regimen among Chronic Kidney Disease Stage5 (CKD5) Patients under Maintenance Hemodialysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deif, Hala I. Abo; Elsawi, Khiria; Selim, Mohga; NasrAllah, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease on health care services worldwide is growing and the increased development of educational interventions which help patients to better manage their conditions is evident internationally. It has been recognized that poor adherence can be a serious risk to the health and wellbeing of patients. Adherence to fluid…

  14. Roy’s Adaptation Model-Based Patient Education for Promoting the Adaptation of Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Afrasiabifar, Ardashir; Karimi, Zohreh; Hassani, Parkhideh

    2013-01-01

    Background In addition to physical adaptation and psychosocial adjustment to chronic renal disease, hemodialysis (HD) patients must also adapt to dialysis therapy plan. Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of Roy’s adaptation model-based patient education on adaptation of HD patients. Patients and Methods This study is a semi-experimental research that was conducted with the participation of all patients with end-stage renal disease referred to the dialysis unit of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Yasuj city, 2010. A total of 59 HD patients were randomly allocated to two groups of test and control. Data were collected by a questionnaire based on the Roy’s Adaptation Model (RAM). Validity and reliability of the questionnaire were approved. Patient education was determined by eight one-hour sessions over eight weeks. At the end of the education plan, the patients were given an educational booklet containing the main points of self-care for HD patients. The effectiveness of education plan was assessed two months after plan completion and data were compared with the pre-education scores. All analyses were conducted using the SPSS software (version 16) through descriptive and inferential statistics including correlation, t-test, ANOVA and ANCOVA tests. Results The results showed significant differences in the mean scores of physiological and self-concept models between the test and control groups (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03 respectively). Also a statistical difference (P = 0.04) was observed in the mean scores of the role function mode of both groups. There was no significant difference in the mean scores of interdependence modes between the two groups. Conclusions RAM based patient education could improve the patients’ adaptation in physiologic and self-concept modes. In addition to suggesting further research in this area, nurses are recommended to pay more attention in applying RAM in dialysis centers. PMID:24396575

  15. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  16. Teaching nurses how to teach: strategies to enhance the quality of patient education.

    PubMed

    Fidyk, Lisa; Ventura, Kate; Green, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of a training course for nurses that focused on teach-back as a key strategy for patient education. It describes evaluative methods used to collect feedback and determine effectiveness of education based on nurses' perception and self-assessment of their patient educational skills and improvements made for future courses. Professional Development Specialists can use the concepts in this article to create similar programs to improve the quality of patient education.

  17. Diabetic patient education: determinants of success.

    PubMed

    Day, J L

    2000-01-01

    Education/empowerment is critical if successful self-management is to be achieved. All professional patient interactions have a learning component. Clinical outcomes in diabetes are as dependent on psycho-social factors or learned behaviour as on metabolic state or therapeutic interventions. These factors include targets set, self-management skills, influence of living with diabetes, emotional factors, role of other people, perceived benefits and barriers, feelings of self-efficacy, weight concern and diet barrier. Training in learning processes and factors governing behaviour are essential for all those involved in delivery of patient care. Educational programmes should recognise the wide range of learning strategies used by different people.

  18. Students learning from patients: let's get real in medical education.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

    2008-03-01

    Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of communication skills and empathy within a broad 'professionalism' framework. Paradoxically, while aiming to strengthen patient-student interactions, this approach tends to refocus on the role modelling of the physician, and opportunities for potentially deep collaborative working relationships between students and patients are missed. A radical overhaul of conventional doctor-led medical education may be necessary, that also challenges the orthodoxies of individualistic student-centred approaches, leading to an authentic patient-centred model that shifts the locus of learning from the relationship between doctor as educator and student to the relationship between patient and student, with expert doctor as resource. Drawing on contemporary poststructuralist theory of text and identity construction, and on innovative models of work-based learning, the potential quality of relationship between student and patient is articulated in terms of collaborative knowledge production, involving close reading with the patient as text, through dialogue. Here, a medical 'education' displaces traditional forms of medical 'training' that typically involve individual information reproduction. Students may, paradoxically, improve clinical acumen through consideration of silences, gaps, and contradictions in patients as texts, rather than treating communication as transparent. Such paradoxical effects have been systematically occluded or denied in traditional medical education. PMID:17075690

  19. Educating our patients collaboratively: a novel interprofessional approach.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Rebecca; D'Alimonte, Laura; Osmar, Kari; Court, Arlene; Szumacher, Ewa; Bristow, Bonnie; Robson, Sheila; Dawdy, Krista; Burnett, Julie; Di Prospero, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    Providing cancer patients with more information regarding their treatments allows them to feel more in control, increases self efficacy, and can decrease anxiety. The aims of the present study were to develop an interprofessional group education session and to evaluate the usefulness and acceptability of this session. In addition, informational distress levels pre- and post-education were evaluated. A prostate radiation therapy (RT) education session was developed and facilitated by an interprofessional team. Topics discussed included how RT works, side effects and management, and support services available. Prior to the education session, participants reported their informational RT distress levels using the validated Distress Thermometer (DT). Post-education session, the DT was readministered. In addition, participants completed an acceptability survey to assess format, structure, and usefulness of the education session. Participants agreed that the session contained valuable and useful information helping them understand expectations during treatment, including resource availability, side effects and management, as well as procedural expectation during treatment. All stated they would recommend the session to other patients. The interprofessional nature of the sessions was deemed useful. Suggested areas for improvement included addition of a dietitian, information on long-term side effects, statistics of radiotherapy side effects, impact of radiotherapy on sexual function, and overall quality of life. The group education session significantly improved informational distress levels (p = 0.04). Educating prostate cancer patients utilizing an interprofessional group format can decrease anxiety and stress related to their RT treatment. Future development of group education sessions for other disease site groups may be valuable. PMID:24532366

  20. [Patient education in rheumatology: a way to better disease management using patients' empowerment].

    PubMed

    Lind-Albrecht, Gudrun

    2006-11-01

    Patients' empowerment has become a main issue in modern treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases. Within this concept patient education is an important instrument. Specific standardized programs, developed by multicenter groups under the leadership of the DGRh (German Society for Rheumatology) have become widely used all over Germany. The DGRh takes care of the program quality and of the trainers and heads of courses. Based on modern educational theories for adults and using a modular concept, which must be adapted to the individual situation of the patients, the curricula are put into practice by trainees of the different professions concerned. Controlled studies have not only shown the progress of patients' knowledge, compliance and coping, but also showed striking socioeconomic advantages in long-term follow-up. Patient education leads to a better and cost-effective management of rheumatic diseases.

  1. Investigation of effect on glycosylated hemoglobin, blood pressure, and body mass index of diabetes intensive education program in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Beyazit, Emel; Mollaoğlu, Mukadder

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of a diabetes intensive education program (DIEP) on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1)c), body mass index (BMI), and arterial blood pressure (BP). An 8-week randomized-controlled trial was conducted in Cumhuriyet University Hospital. Diabetes patients were randomized to control group (CG; n = 25) and intervention group (IG; n = 25) who received DIEP, including the factors affecting metabolic control and implementation of diabetes guidelines. Primary outcomes included HbA(1)c, BP, and BMI. After the 8 weeks, there was a significant decrease in HbA(1)c mean values for the intervention group. Also, BP significantly decreased from 143/87 to 130/80 mmHg in the IG as compared with an increase from 137/82 to 137/86 mmHg in the CG. In addition, the results demonstrated that DIEP improved the number of patients at goal for BP (130/80 mmHg). Baseline BMI did not change significantly in either group during the course of the study. These findings show that the DIEP may be effective in decreasing HbA(1)c levels and improving adherence to BP control.

  2. Enhancing cancer pain control regimens through patient education.

    PubMed

    Rimer, B; Levy, M H; Keintz, M K; Fox, L; Engstrom, P F; MacElwee, N

    1987-12-01

    The problem of cancer-related pain afflicts millions of people annually. The study described here was aimed at improving cancer patients' pain control through a planned patient education program. A randomized clinical trial with a Solomon Four-Group design was used to assess the effectiveness of a patient education intervention consisting of nurse counseling and printed materials. The sample included 230 cancer patients. One month later, patients in the experimental group were more likely to have taken their pain medicine on the correct schedule and to have taken the correct dosage. The experimental group also was significantly less likely to report stopping the medicine when they felt better. In addition, they were significantly less worried about tolerance and addiction to pain medicines. Forty-four percent of the experimental group compared to 24% of the control group reported no or mild pain at the posttest. PMID:10315745

  3. Health Literacy: An Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcome.

    PubMed

    Yin, H Shonna; Jay, Melanie; Maness, Leslie; Zabar, Sondra; Kalet, Adina

    2015-09-01

    We have previously proposed that by identifying a set of Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcomes (ESPOs), medical education outcomes research becomes more feasible and likely to provide meaningful guidance for medical education policy and practice. ESPOs are proximal outcomes that are sensitive to provider education, measurable, and linked to more distal health outcomes. Our previous model included Patient Activation and Clinical Microsystem Activation as ESPOs. In this paper, we discuss how Health Literacy, defined as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions," is another important ESPO. Between one-third and one-half of all US adults have limited health literacy skills. Providers can be trained to adopt a "universal precautions approach" to addressing patient health literacy, through the acquisition of specific skills (e.g., teachback, "chunking" information, use of plain language written materials) and by learning how to take action to improve the "health literacy environment." While there are several ways to measure health literacy, identifying which measurement tools are most sensitive to provider education is important, but challenging and complex. Further research is needed to test this model and identify additional ESPOs. PMID:26173523

  4. Developing and Evaluating Patient Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsivais, Diane; Reynolds, Audree

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for nurse involvement in the development of patient education materials. Presents guidelines for evaluating existing material, including print and web resources, for credibility and readability. Makes recommendations for rewriting material at an easier-to-read level. (SK)

  5. Interprofessionalism: Educating to Meet Patient Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirch, Darrell G.; Ast, Cori

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional teams in health care are showing promise in achieving the triple aim--providing better care for the individual patient, reducing costs, and improving population health. To complement current changes in health care delivery in the United States, there is a growing consensus among health professions educators that students should…

  6. Constructing a Patient Education System: A Performance Technology Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edith E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the patient education system described here was to distribute patient education material to and within medical practices managed by a small medical practice management company. The belief was that patient education opportunities improved health care outcomes and increased patient participation in health care decisions and compliance…

  7. Anaphylaxis avoidance and management: educating patients and their caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Kirsi M; Celestin, Jocelyn

    2014-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is an increasingly prevalent problem in westernized countries. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that the increasing numbers of patients at risk for anaphylaxis receive proper education on the etiology and risk factors as well as appropriate treatment of anaphylaxis with epinephrine. The physician’s role is crucial in order to educate the patients and care takers on effective measures to prevent anaphylaxis and empower them to take charge of early recognition and proper management of an anaphylactic reaction to prevent poor outcomes. This review summarizes the clinical presentation, triggers, avoidance, and management of anaphylaxis. PMID:25031541

  8. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes. PMID:25729695

  9. Education in stroke: strategies to improve stroke patient care.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Patrick; Slack, Andrew; Vogel, Mira; Burrows, Sharon; Clark, Philippa

    2002-07-01

    'Stroke units save lives', but organized care requires expert staff and regular training to be effective. However, the quality of inpatient care for stroke remains poor, and stroke education is often fragmented between the health-care professions. This review describes some national and local strategies aimed at ensuring that all patients are cared for by expert staff.

  10. [Therapeutic patient education in chronic hand dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Gelot, P; Avenel-Audran, M; Balica, S; Bensefa, L; Crépy, M-N; Debons, M; Ammari, H; Milpied, B; Raison, N; Vigan, M; Weibel, N; Stalder, J-F; Bernier, C

    2014-06-01

    Hand dermatitis (HD) is usually due to a combination of various interacting factors. It involves significant impairment of the quality of life with psychological and socioeconomic impact. A therapeutic education program in HD.was elaborated by 19 health professionals (dermatologists, occupational clinical physicians, nurses, psychologists, environmental medical advisor) with experience in therapeutic education or skills in HD, according to the recommendations of Haute Autorité de Santé. The program includes an individual medical consultation to perform educational diagnostic, two collective workshops and a medical evaluation consult. Two group workshops "the disease, irritant factors and its treatments" and "the experiences and feelings" were elaborated with learning objectives and educative tools. Different scores were proposed to evaluate the program and acquired skills. Therapeutic education is an efficient way to help patients to adopt skin protection measures essential to healing. We propose a guideline of therapeutic education in HD including skills and educative tools and intended for health professionals to serve as working basis.

  11. Medical education and indigent patient care.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Deborah S

    2003-12-01

    The 20th century model of medical education has focused on a network of urban medical centers serving primarily indigent patients in an unspoken contract of medical services in exchange for student and resident education. The improvement in federal and state reimbursement for indigent care services, along with the decline in reimbursement rates from the private sector, has led to competition for these patients from nonacademic providers. As numbers of patients seeking care at urban teaching centers have steadily declined, concerns about adequate teaching volume and revenue generation have led to very creative problem-solving. Bringing marketing concerns into the indigent care environment is not a straightforward undertaking, but the rewards might far exceed the simple goal of "getting our numbers back up." PMID:14613672

  12. R.E.A.C.H. to Teach: Making Patient and Family Education "Stick".

    PubMed

    Cutilli, Carolyn Crane

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare professionals teach patients and families about their health every day. Regulatory and accreditation organizations mandate patient and family education to promote better health outcomes. And recently, financial rewards for healthcare organizations are being tied to patient satisfaction (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems-HCAHPS). A University of Pennsylvania Health System group of staff and patients, devoted to excellence in patient and family education, developed the graphic "R.E.A.C.H. to Teach." The purpose of the graphic is to make evidence-based practice (EBP) for patient and family education "stick" with staff. The group used concepts from the marketing book, Made to Stick, to demonstrate how to develop effective staff and patient and family education. Ideas (education) that survive ("stick") have the following attributes: simple, unexpected, concrete, credible, emotional, and narrative (story). This article demonstrates how to apply these principles and EBP to patient and family education. PMID:27441879

  13. Patient Education and Self-Care: How Do They Differ?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Lowell S.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses health education for the patient and the differences between patient education and the concept of self-care. Both types of programs may contribute to the public's health at different points on the same continuum. (MF)

  14. Low Literacy Levels in Adults: Implications for Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Evelyn

    1999-01-01

    Health-education materials often require reading levels higher than that of many patients. Nurses need awareness of the prevalence of low literacy and the ability to assess reading levels so they can develop appropriate patient-education materials. (SK)

  15. Patient safety education and baccalaureate nursing students' patient safety competency: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam-Ju; Jang, Haena; Park, Su-Yeon

    2016-06-01

    This cross-sectional study examines baccalaureate nursing programs in South Korea to determine how and to what extent patient safety education was delivered, and to assess nursing students' patient safety competency. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) student evaluation survey and a Patient Safety Competency Self-Evaluation tool were used. We distributed 234 surveys to senior students in four nursing schools; 206 (88%) students responded to the survey. The majority of students (81.6%) reported that they had received patient safety education during coursework. Patient safety education was delivered primarily by lecture rather than during laboratory or simulation sessions. The degree of coverage of QSEN competency and the students' self-reported competency in total and attitude scores showed statistical differences among nursing schools. Students' attitude score was significantly higher than skill and knowledge. Our results confirm the need to revise the nursing curriculum and to use various teaching methods to deliver patient safety education more comprehensively and effectively. Furthermore, there is a need to develop an integrated approach to ensuring students' balanced competency.

  16. The effectiveness of structured patient education for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries of the extremities: a systematic review by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Kristi; Côté, Pierre; Gross, Douglas P; Wong, Jessica J; Yu, Hainan; Sutton, Deborah; Southerst, Danielle; Varatharajan, Sharanya; Mior, Silvano; Stupar, Maja; Shearer, Heather M; Lindsay, Gail M; Jacobs, Craig; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of structured patient education for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries of the extremities. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from January 1, 1990 to March 14, 2015. Paired reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for eligibility. The internal validity of studies was assessed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria. Results from studies with a low risk of bias were synthesized using the best-evidence synthesis methodology. Results: We identified two randomized trials with a low risk of bias. Our review suggests that: 1) multimodal care and corticosteroid injections lead to faster pain relief and improvement than reassurance and advice in the short-term and similar outcomes in the long-term for patients with persistent lateral epicondylitis; and 2) providing health education material alone may be less effective than multimodal care for the management of persistent patellofemoral pain syndrome. Conclusion: Our systematic search of the literature demonstrates that little is known about the effectiveness of structured patient education for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries of the extremities. Two studies suggest that when used alone, structured patient education may be less effective than other interventions used to manage persistent lateral epicondylitis and persistent patellofemoral syndrome. PMID:26816413

  17. E-learning virtual patients for geriatric education.

    PubMed

    Orton, Eric; Mulhausen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based virtual patients (VPs) are an emerging medium for medical education that addresses barriers faced by geriatrics educators. Research has shown VPs to be as effective in changing knowledge and behavior as more traditional forms of teaching. This paper presents a descriptive study of the development of the University of Iowa's GeriaSims VP programs and their effectiveness as tools for geriatric education. More than 85% of the responses to an evaluation survey of GeriaSims users indicated favorable perceptions of instructional effectiveness, efficiency, and ease of use. GeriaSims VP programs were used effectively by multiple levels of learners and provide flexibility to these learners in scheduling their learning. PMID:18215989

  18. Patient education process in teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Seyedin, Hesam; Goharinezhad, Salime; Vatankhah, Soodabeh; Azmal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient education is widely recognized as a core component of nursing. Patient education can lead to quality outcomes including adherence, quality of life, patients' knowledge of their illness and self-management. This study aimed to clarify patient education process in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013. In this descriptive quantitative study, the sample covered 187 head nurses selected from ten teaching hospitals through convenience sampling. Data were collected with a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The questionnaire measured patient education process in four dimensions: need assessment, planning, implementing and evaluating. Results: The overall mean score of patient education was 3.326±0.0524. Among the four dimensions of the patient education process, planning was in the highest level (3.570±0.0591) and the lowest score belonged to the evaluation of patient education (2.840 ±0.0628). Conclusion: Clarifying patient education steps, developing standardized framework and providing easily understandable tool-kit of the patient education program will improve the ability of nurses in delivering effective patient education in general and specialized hospitals. PMID:26478878

  19. Rhinoplasty Education Using a Standardized Patient Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Eric J.; Khosla, Rohit K.; Howell, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Background Comprehensive aesthetic surgery training continues to be a challenge for residency programs. Our residency program developed a rhinoplasty-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) based upon validated methods as part of the residency education curriculum. We report our experience with the rhinoplasty-based OSCE and offer guidance to its incorporation within residency programs. Methods The encounter involved resident evaluation and operative planning for a standardized patient desiring a rhinoplasty procedure. Validated OSCE methods currently used at our medical school were implemented. Residents were evaluated on appropriate history taking, physical examination, and explanation to the patient of treatment options. Examination results were evaluated using analysis of variance (statistical significance P<0.05). Results Twelve residents completed the rhinoplasty OSCE. Medical knowledge assessment showed increasing performance with clinical year, 50% versus 84% for postgraduate year 3 and 6, respectively (P<0.005). Systems-based practice scores showed that all residents incorrectly submitted forms for billing and operative scheduling. All residents confirmed that the OSCE realistically represents an actual patient encounter. All faculty confirmed the utility of evaluating resident performance during the OSCE as a useful assessment tool for determining the Next Accreditation System Milestone level. Conclusions Aesthetic surgery training for residents will require innovative methods for education. Our examination showed a program-educational weakness in billing/coding, an area that will be improved upon by topic-specific lectures. A thoroughly developed OSCE can provide a realistic educational opportunity to improve residents' performance on the nonoperative aspects of rhinoplasty and should be considered as an adjunct to resident education. PMID:27689053

  20. Rhinoplasty Education Using a Standardized Patient Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Eric J.; Khosla, Rohit K.; Howell, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Background Comprehensive aesthetic surgery training continues to be a challenge for residency programs. Our residency program developed a rhinoplasty-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) based upon validated methods as part of the residency education curriculum. We report our experience with the rhinoplasty-based OSCE and offer guidance to its incorporation within residency programs. Methods The encounter involved resident evaluation and operative planning for a standardized patient desiring a rhinoplasty procedure. Validated OSCE methods currently used at our medical school were implemented. Residents were evaluated on appropriate history taking, physical examination, and explanation to the patient of treatment options. Examination results were evaluated using analysis of variance (statistical significance P<0.05). Results Twelve residents completed the rhinoplasty OSCE. Medical knowledge assessment showed increasing performance with clinical year, 50% versus 84% for postgraduate year 3 and 6, respectively (P<0.005). Systems-based practice scores showed that all residents incorrectly submitted forms for billing and operative scheduling. All residents confirmed that the OSCE realistically represents an actual patient encounter. All faculty confirmed the utility of evaluating resident performance during the OSCE as a useful assessment tool for determining the Next Accreditation System Milestone level. Conclusions Aesthetic surgery training for residents will require innovative methods for education. Our examination showed a program-educational weakness in billing/coding, an area that will be improved upon by topic-specific lectures. A thoroughly developed OSCE can provide a realistic educational opportunity to improve residents' performance on the nonoperative aspects of rhinoplasty and should be considered as an adjunct to resident education.

  1. The importance of pharmacist providing patient education in oncology.

    PubMed

    Avery, Mia; Williams, Felecia

    2015-02-01

    The world's increasing diversity requires health care professionals to adjust delivery methods of teaching to accommodate different cultural values and beliefs. The ability to communicate effectively across languages and various cultural practices directly affects patient education outcomes. Pharmacist should be aware of varying modalities and considerations when counseling a patient diagnosed with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy. In more recent years, the medical profession has seen an increase in patient outcomes due to using the multidisciplinary team approach and has benefited by implementing Medication Therapy Management (MTM) programs at various institutions. For the clinical pharmacist, this would mean documentation for these services should be precise and accurate based on the specific patients needs. There are several factors involved in the care and therapy of the patient with cancer. Clinical oncology pharmacist should be aware of the ever-changing role in oncology and be able to implement new practices at their facility for better patient outcomes.

  2. Effectiveness of PRECEDE model for health education on changes and level of control of HbA1c, blood pressure, lipids, and body mass index in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Individual health education is considered to be essential in the overall care of patients with type 2 diabetes (DM2), although there is some uncertainty regarding its metabolic control benefits. There have been very few randomized studies on the effects of individual education on normal care in DM2 patients with a control group, and none of these have assessed the long-term results. Therefore, this study aims to use this design to assess the effectiveness of the PRECEDE (Predisposing, Reinforcing, Enabling, Causes in Educational Diagnosis, and Evaluation) education model in the metabolic control and the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods An open community effectiveness study was carried out in 8 urban community health centers in the North-East Madrid Urban Area (Spain). Six hundred patients with DM2 were randomized in two groups: PRECEDE or conventional model for health promotion education. The main outcome measures were glycated hemoglobin A1c, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, lipids and control criteria during the 2-year follow-up period. Results Glycated hemoglobin A1c and systolic blood pressure (SBP) levels decreased significantly in the PRECEDE group (multivariate analysis of covariance, with baseline glycated hemoglobin A1c, SBP, and variables showing statistically significant differences between groups at baseline visits). The decrease levels in diastolic blood pressure (DBP), triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were nonsignificant. PRECEDE increased compliance in all control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. BMI did not change during the study in either of the two models analyzed. Conclusions PRECEDE health education model is a useful method in the overall treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes, which contributes to decrease glycated hemoglobin A1c and SBP levels and increase the compliance in all the control criteria, except for LDL cholesterol. Trial registration number Clinical

  3. Design considerations for a personalised patient education system.

    PubMed

    Doupi, Persephone; van der Lei, Johan

    2003-01-01

    Patient education is a significant factor in the provision of health care services, contributing to improved disease management and health care outcomes. In order to be most effective, patient education should be adapted to the characteristics of the individual recipient. Computer-based approaches have been explored as a possible means of achieving this goal. The success and capabilities of the resulting applications have been restricted by the absence of a direct link to patient data and the reliance on locally produced written material, which is expensive to produce, update and tailor. In our research project STructured Evaluated Personalized Patient Support (STEPPS), we are investigating the potential of a novel strategy for personalized or tailored patient education, based on the integration of electronic patient record data and material derived from online health information and knowledge resources. In this paper we present an overview of the pertinent technical issues and the way we have addressed them in the context of our development work in the domain of burn care. Further, we discuss how the choices made in the design of the system interrelate with the considerations for its implementation in health care practice settings. PMID:14664080

  4. Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert John

    2010-01-01

    A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual's competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been

  5. The Effects of Death Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitag, Carl B.; Hassler, Shawn David

    Although fear of death is recorded in the writings of the oldest major religions, the study of death and the fear of death have only occurred for the last few decades. Death education courses have grown in number since the early 1970's. College students participated in an investigation of the effects of death education on death anxiety by…

  6. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions when using different patient education methods.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Katja; Salanterä, Sanna; Leppänen, Tiina; Vahlberg, Tero; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2012-07-01

    A randomised controlled trial was used to evaluate elective ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions during internet-based patient education or face-to-face education with a nurse. The internet-based patient education was designed for this study and patients used websites individually based on their needs. Patients in the control group participated individually in face-to-face patient education with a nurse in the ambulatory surgery unit. The theoretical basis for both types of education was the same. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients scored their emotions rather low at intervals throughout the whole surgical process, though their scores also changed during the surgical process. Emotion scores did not decrease after patient education. No differences in patients' emotions were found to result from either of the two different patient education methods. PMID:22919767

  7. Evaluating the effectiveness of a peer-led education intervention to improve the patient safety attitudes of junior pharmacy students: a cross-sectional study using a latent growth curve modelling approach

    PubMed Central

    Walpola, Ramesh L; Fois, Romano A; McLachlan, Andrew J; Chen, Timothy F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the recognition that educating healthcare students in patient safety is essential, changing already full curricula can be challenging. Furthermore, institutions may lack the capacity and capability to deliver patient safety education, particularly from the start of professional practice studies. Using senior students as peer educators to deliver practice-based education can potentially overcome some of the contextual barriers in training junior students. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a peer-led patient safety education programme for junior pharmacy students. Design A repeat cross-sectional design utilising a previously validated patient safety attitudinal survey was used to evaluate attitudes prior to, immediately after and 1 month after the delivery of a patient safety education programme. Latent growth curve (LGC) modelling was used to evaluate the change in attitudes of first-year students using second-year students as a comparator group. Setting Undergraduate university students in Sydney, Australia. Participants 175 first-year and 140 second-year students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy programme at the University of Sydney. Intervention An introductory patient safety programme was implemented into the first-year Bachelor of Pharmacy curriculum at the University of Sydney. The programme covered introductory patient safety topics including teamwork, communication skills, systems thinking and open disclosure. The programme consisted of 2 lectures, delivered by a senior academic, and a workshop delivered by trained final-year pharmacy students. Results A full LGC model was constructed including the intervention as a non-time-dependent predictor of change (χ2 (51)=164.070, root mean square error of approximation=0.084, comparative fit index=0.913, standardised root mean square=0.056). First-year students’ attitudes significantly improved as a result of the intervention, particularly in relation to

  8. Importance of patient/parents education in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Gupta, R

    2001-09-01

    Asthma is fairly common in pediatric age group and the suffering due to asthma continues to increase despite excellent treatments available. One of the four major components of asthma management is patient education and is critical to the success of asthma management. Reasons for continued suffering include that our management strategies are not easily understood by the patient/parents without a simple and careful approach towards this step. Eliciting common concerns and fears is the single and foremost strategy to develop a relationship of trust with the patients/parents. Making them understand about the chronic nature of asthma, need for a long-term care approach, what happens during acute attacks and where medications act are some of the important areas you should be educating about in the beginning. Then comes the skill transfer, i.e. giving them skills to monitor asthma including use of peakflowmeter and use of inhalation devices effectively. Joint development of written plans for medications is essential. Development of plans to control of asthma; jointly with them; including learning about warning signs and a plan to manage acute attack at home is also very important and patient/parents should be having an active participation. Finally, educating them how to identify asthma triggers helps as a long-term strategy to keep control over asthma with or without medications. Reminding patient/parents when to come for follow-up and what would be discussed next time are some important tricks of the trade. PMID:11980470

  9. Does Patient Partnership in Continuing Medical Education (CME) Improve the Outcome in Osteoporosis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazirandeh, Mahmood

    2002-01-01

    Patients (n=672) were screened and instructed about osteoporosis; 53 of their physicians attended lectures, a control group did not. A survey of 258 patients showed doctor-ordered screening tests increased regardless of lecture attendance. Increased patient-initiated discussions about osteoporosis suggest that patient education is effective.…

  10. The Relationship between Continuing Medical Education, Physician Behavior, and Patient Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosinski, Edwin F.

    1987-01-01

    The author reviews studies on the relationship between continuing medical education and its impact on physician behavior. These studies have supported the positive impact of education on physician behavior. The author calls for research on the effect of continuing medical education on patient outcomes. (Author/CH)

  11. Utilization of Communication Robot in Patient Education.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Keitaro; Majima, Yukie

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the population is expected to decrease. Moreover, the proportion of elderly people living alone among the elderly population is expected to increase for both men and women. Therefore, the demand for elderly care is increasing year by year. In this paper, we aim at making environment in which elderly people can receive interactive guidance, and reducing the burden on medical staff such as caregivers and nurses. So, we design a patient education by ARCS model which classifies concepts related to learning motivation, and consider to utilize a communication robot "Pepper". PMID:27332406

  12. Group Health Education in Inpatient Rehabilitation: Patients' Role Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schöpf, Andrea C.; Ullrich, Antje; Nagl, Michaela; Farin, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Group health education is an important aspect of medical rehabilitation. While interaction and active involvement are important characteristics of group health education, little is known about patients' understanding of their role in this form of education. This study explored patients' understanding of their role in group health…

  13. Impact of Standardized New Medication Education Program on Postdischarge Patients' Knowledge and Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tammie R; Coke, Lola

    2016-10-01

    This study, implemented on 2 medical-surgical units, evaluated the impact of a standardized, evidence-based new medication education program. Outcomes evaluated included patient postdischarge knowledge of new medication purpose and side effects, patient satisfaction with new medication, and Medicare reimbursement earn-back potential. As a result, knowledge scores for new medication purpose and side effects were high post intervention. Patient satisfaction with new medication education increased. Value-based purchasing reimbursement earn-back potential improved. PMID:27681515

  14. Impact of Standardized New Medication Education Program on Postdischarge Patients' Knowledge and Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tammie R; Coke, Lola

    2016-10-01

    This study, implemented on 2 medical-surgical units, evaluated the impact of a standardized, evidence-based new medication education program. Outcomes evaluated included patient postdischarge knowledge of new medication purpose and side effects, patient satisfaction with new medication, and Medicare reimbursement earn-back potential. As a result, knowledge scores for new medication purpose and side effects were high post intervention. Patient satisfaction with new medication education increased. Value-based purchasing reimbursement earn-back potential improved.

  15. An initial, qualitative investigation of patient-centered education in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Marc; Borromeo, Chuck; Hess, Sherry; Hochheiser, Harry; Schleyer, Titus

    2013-01-01

    Patient education plays an important role in the delivery of dental care. Current evidence suggests that the emergence of the Internet and other electronic resources are significantly influencing how patients learn about their healthcare. We conducted a qualitative inquiry using a combination of interviews with patients and clinicians, and direct observation of patient education episodes, to begin identifying requirements for customized, patient-centered approaches to education at the point of care. Most patients in our study felt comfortable with the amount and method of education during the dental visit, but 38% sought additional information on the Internet. Dentists and their team members provided patient education mostly verbally, supported by media such as radiographs, images and models. Electronic means, especially the Internet, were little used. Patient education occupied a significant portion of the time of initial comprehensive examination (29%) and routine (7%) dental visits. A deeper understanding of patient knowledge deficits and information needs will be needed to design effective educational interventions. Patient education should be meaningfully integrated into the workflow shared by dentists, their team members and patients, in order to maximize its outcomes.

  16. Educational Effects of Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drachler, Norman

    The review of the press and other media following the May 17, 1954 opinion of "Brown v. Board of Education" summarized here leaves little doubt that the message was not misunderstood. There exists today more segregation in the large cities of our nation than there was in 1954. The schools, though not responsible for the exodus to the suburbs, did…

  17. Patient involvement in education for enhanced quality of care.

    PubMed

    Le Var, R M H

    2002-12-01

    Government policies in the UK are promoting health care practitioners working in partnership with patients and clients as an important constituent of quality in health care delivery. However, for practitioners to work in this way requires experience of such partnerships in the educational preparation. The involvement of patients and clients (i.e. service users) and their carers in the curriculum has been encouraged and supported in England since the early 1990s. From 1998, the comprehensive involvement in all phases of programme provision has been a requirement, ensuring that service users have a real 'voice' in influencing the direction of programmes. Examples of good practice are provided, demonstrating a range of approaches in the different stages of the educational process. Issues to be considered for successful implementation are included. Benefits to education and patient/client care are identified on the basis of literature and recent experience. They are strongly associated with enhanced quality of care. The article argues for a need to continue to broaden implementation for the major benefits of influencing the attitudes and approaches of students, and empowering users, with the end result of enhancing the quality of care. A strategic approach is needed to make user involvement an effective and workable reality. The need for systematic evaluation of the outcomes and for publications is highlighted. The principle of service user involvement in educational preparation is deemed to be equally relevant in other countries.

  18. Patient involvement in education for enhanced quality of care.

    PubMed

    Le Var, R M H

    2002-12-01

    Government policies in the UK are promoting health care practitioners working in partnership with patients and clients as an important constituent of quality in health care delivery. However, for practitioners to work in this way requires experience of such partnerships in the educational preparation. The involvement of patients and clients (i.e. service users) and their carers in the curriculum has been encouraged and supported in England since the early 1990s. From 1998, the comprehensive involvement in all phases of programme provision has been a requirement, ensuring that service users have a real 'voice' in influencing the direction of programmes. Examples of good practice are provided, demonstrating a range of approaches in the different stages of the educational process. Issues to be considered for successful implementation are included. Benefits to education and patient/client care are identified on the basis of literature and recent experience. They are strongly associated with enhanced quality of care. The article argues for a need to continue to broaden implementation for the major benefits of influencing the attitudes and approaches of students, and empowering users, with the end result of enhancing the quality of care. A strategic approach is needed to make user involvement an effective and workable reality. The need for systematic evaluation of the outcomes and for publications is highlighted. The principle of service user involvement in educational preparation is deemed to be equally relevant in other countries. PMID:12492943

  19. Provider documentation of patient education: a lean investigation*

    PubMed Central

    Shipman, Jean P.; Lake, Erica W.; Van Der Volgen, Jessica; Doman, Darrin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The study evaluates how providers give patient education materials and identifies improvements to comply with Meaningful Use (MU) requirements. Methods Thirty-eight patient-provider interactions in two health care outpatient clinics were observed. Results Providers do not uniformly know MU patient education requirements. Providers have individual preferences and find gaps in what is available. Accessing and documenting patient education varies among providers. Embedded electronic health record (EHR) materials, while available, have technical access barriers. Conclusions Providers' EHR skills and knowledge levels contribute to non-standardized patient education delivery. PMID:27076805

  20. Therapeutic patient education in heart failure: do studies provide sufficient information about the educational programme?

    PubMed

    Albano, Maria Grazia; Jourdain, Patrick; De Andrade, Vincent; Domenke, Aukse; Desnos, Michel; d'Ivernois, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    Therapeutic patient education programmes on heart failure have been widely proposed for many years for heart failure patients, but their efficiency remains questionable, partly because most articles lack a precise programme description, which makes comparative analysis of the studies difficult. To analyse the degree of precision in describing therapeutic patient education programmes in recent randomized controlled trials. Three major recent recommendations on therapeutic patient education in heart failure inspired us to compile a list of 23 relevant items that an 'ideal' description of a therapeutic patient education programme should contain. To discover the extent to which recent studies into therapeutic patient education in heart failure included these items, we analysed 19 randomized controlled trials among 448 articles published in this field from 2005 to 2012. The major elements required to describe a therapeutic patient education programme were present, but some other very important pieces of information were missing in most of the studies we analysed: the patient's educational needs, health literacy, projects, expectations regarding therapeutic patient education and psychosocial status; the educational methodology used; outcomes evaluation; and follow-up strategies. Research into how therapeutic patient education can help heart failure patients will be improved if more precise descriptions of patients, educational methodology and evaluation protocols are given by authors, ideally in a standardized format.

  1. Medical Utilization of Kiosks in the Delivery of Patient Education: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yvonne Chan, Yu-Feng; Nagurka, Roxanne; Bentley, Suzanne; Ordonez, Edgardo; Sproule, William

    2014-01-01

    Background: The utilization of kiosks has previously been shown to be effective for collecting information, delivering educational modules, and providing access to health information. We discuss a review of current literature for the utilization of kiosks for the delivery of patient education. Methods: The criteria for inclusion in this literature review were: (1) study discusses the utilization of kiosks for patient health education; (2) study discusses the use of touch screens for patient health information; (3) published in English. Our review includes searches via MEDLINE databases and Google Scholar for the years 1996-2014. Results: Overall, 167 articles were screened for final eligibility, and after discarding duplicates and non-eligible studies with abstract. Full-text review of 28 articles was included in the final analysis. Conclusion: The review of available literature demonstrates the effectiveness of touch screen kiosks to educate patients and to improve healthcare, both at a performance and cost advantage over other modes of patient education. PMID:25097831

  2. Assessment of selected patient educational materials of various chain pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Kirksey, Otis; Harper, Kimberly; Thompson, Stephanie; Pringle, Monica

    2004-01-01

    Pharmacy literature commonly used to inform patients about medication side-effects and complications was examined for readability. Forty-five (45) informational sheets were obtained from nine national and regional pharmacies. According to the McLaughlin's SMOG (Simple Measure of Gobbledegook) formula, the reading level of the informational sheets ranged from grade 8-14 (8 = 8th grade level and 14 = collegiate level), with a mean reading level of 12. The sampled pharmacy educational materials may be too difficult for most Americans to read and comprehend. The pharmacist may assist in increasing patient compliance by offering education in a form that is understandable, which increases the likelihood of adherence to desired health behaviors. PMID:15204820

  3. Differences in Perceived Difficulty in Print and Online Patient Education Materials

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Context: Written patient education materials frequently exceed the reading ability of the general public. Patients are often intimidated by the task of reading patient education materials, perceiving the materials’ difficulty levels as prohibitive, even when they do not exceed the patients’ reading abilities. It is unclear how the delivery mechanism—print or a computer screen—affects a patient’s reading experience through his/her perception of its difficulty. Objective: To determine whether first-year college students perceived online or print-based patient education materials as more difficult to read. Design: Convenience sampling of first-year college students. Results: Some first-year college students perceived online patient education materials to be more difficult to read than print-based ones—even when the reading level of the patient education materials was similar. Demographic information about this sample’s high levels of digital literacy suggests that other populations might also perceive online patient education materials as more difficult to read than print-based equivalents. Patients’ perceptions of the difficulty of patient education materials influenced their ability to effectively learn from those materials. Conclusion: This article concludes with a call for more research into patients’ perceptions of difficulty of patient education materials in print vs on a screen. PMID:25662526

  4. Integrating a Patient Safety Conference into Graduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Biehl, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Institute of Medicine has established aims for improvement in patient care that emphasize safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered medicine. This goal is echoed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Methods The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) graduate medical education program implemented a Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) project whose aim is to support a patient and trainee safety environment. An ongoing biannual patient and learner safety conference is able to capture close calls, safety attitudes, potential learner mistreatment, and trainee fatigue in a nonpunitive manner that supports answering the question, “What was learned and what needs to be improved?” Results Group recommendations were captured at a quality improvement conference. We documented a shift in attitudes away from one where the institution is perceived to be weakest at supporting safety reporting. Conclusions This project is designed to serve as a mechanism for insuring care that is respectful and responsive to patient needs and values. It identifies keys to avoiding wasted re-sources or harmful delay while also seeking to improve care based upon scientific knowledge. PMID:26835179

  5. The impact of a patient education bundle on neurosurgery patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kliot, Tamara; Zygourakis, Corinna C.; Imershein, Sarah; Lau, Catherine; Kliot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background: As reimbursements and hospital/physician performance become ever more reliant on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) and other quality metrics, physicians are increasingly incentivized to improve patient satisfaction. Methods: A faculty and resident team at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Department of Neurological Surgery developed and implemented a Patient Education Bundle. This consisted of two parts: The first was preoperative expectation letters (designed to inform patients of what to expect before, during, and after their hospitalization for a neurosurgical procedure); the second was a trifold brochure with names, photographs, and specialty/training information about the attending surgeons, resident physicians, and nurse practitioners on the neurosurgical service. We assessed patient satisfaction, as measured by HCAHPS scores and a brief survey tailored to our specific intervention, both before and after our Patient Education Bundle intervention. Results: Prior to our intervention, 74.6% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. After our intervention, 78.7% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. “Neurosurgery Patient Satisfaction survey” results showed that 83% remembered receiving the preoperative letter; of those received the letter, 93% found the letter helpful; and 100% thought that the letter should be continued. Conclusion: Although effects were modest, we believe that patient education strategies, as modeled in our bundle, can improve patients’ hospital experiences and have a positive impact on physician performance scores and hospital ratings. PMID:26664909

  6. Applying best practices to designing patient education for patients with end-stage renal disease pursuing kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Stacy L; Waterman, Amy D; Davis, LaShara A; Peipert, John D; Fish, Anne F

    2015-03-01

    Despite the known benefits of kidney transplant, less than 30% of the 615 000 patients living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States have received a transplant. More than 100 000 people are presently on the transplant waiting list. Although the shortage of kidneys for transplant remains a critical factor in explaining lower transplant rates, another important and modifiable factor is patients' lack of comprehensive education about transplant. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known best practices from the broader literature that can be used as an evidence base to design improved education for ESRD patients pursuing a kidney transplant. Best practices in chronic disease education generally reveal that education that is individually tailored, understandable for patients with low health literacy, and culturally competent is most beneficial. Effective education helps patients navigate the complex health care process successfully. Recommendations for how to incorporate these best practices into transplant education design are described. Providing more ESRD patients with transplant education that encompasses these best practices may improve their ability to make informed health care decisions and increase the numbers of patients interested in pursuing transplant.

  7. Using information technology for patient education: realizing surplus value?

    PubMed

    Stoop, Arjen P; van't Riet, Annemarie; Berg, Marc

    2004-08-01

    Computer-based patient information systems are introduced to replace traditional forms of patient education like brochures, leaflets, videotapes and, to a certain extent, face-to-face communication. In this paper, we claim that though computer-based patient information systems potentially have many advantages compared to traditional means, the surplus value of these systems is much harder to realize than often expected. By reporting on two computer-based patient information systems, both found to be unsuccessful, we will show that building computer-based patient information systems for patient education requires a thorough analysis of the advantages and limitations of IT compared to traditional forms of patient education. When this condition is fulfilled, however, these systems have the potential to improve health status and to be a valuable supplement to (rather than a substitute for) traditional means of patient education. PMID:15288913

  8. Using information technology for patient education: realizing surplus value?

    PubMed

    Stoop, Arjen P; van't Riet, Annemarie; Berg, Marc

    2004-08-01

    Computer-based patient information systems are introduced to replace traditional forms of patient education like brochures, leaflets, videotapes and, to a certain extent, face-to-face communication. In this paper, we claim that though computer-based patient information systems potentially have many advantages compared to traditional means, the surplus value of these systems is much harder to realize than often expected. By reporting on two computer-based patient information systems, both found to be unsuccessful, we will show that building computer-based patient information systems for patient education requires a thorough analysis of the advantages and limitations of IT compared to traditional forms of patient education. When this condition is fulfilled, however, these systems have the potential to improve health status and to be a valuable supplement to (rather than a substitute for) traditional means of patient education.

  9. Integrated Patient Education on U.S. Hospital Web Sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar; Wu, Kerong; Edwards, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    Based on a census of the 2015 Most Wired Hospitals, this content analysis aimed to find out how patient education has been integrated on these best IT hospitals' Web sites to serve the purposes of marketing and meeting online visitors' needs. This study will help hospitals to understand where the weaknesses are in their interactive patient education implementation and come up with a smart integration strategy. The study found that 70% of these hospitals had adopted interactive patient education contents, 76.6% of such contents were from a third-party developer, and only 20% of the hospitals linked their patient education contents to one or more of the hospital's resources while 26% cross-references such contents. The authors concluded that more hospitals should take advantage of modern information communication technology to cross-reference their patient education contents and to integrate such contents into their overall online marketing strategy to benefit patients and themselves.

  10. Integrated Patient Education on U.S. Hospital Web Sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar; Wu, Kerong; Edwards, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    Based on a census of the 2015 Most Wired Hospitals, this content analysis aimed to find out how patient education has been integrated on these best IT hospitals' Web sites to serve the purposes of marketing and meeting online visitors' needs. This study will help hospitals to understand where the weaknesses are in their interactive patient education implementation and come up with a smart integration strategy. The study found that 70% of these hospitals had adopted interactive patient education contents, 76.6% of such contents were from a third-party developer, and only 20% of the hospitals linked their patient education contents to one or more of the hospital's resources while 26% cross-references such contents. The authors concluded that more hospitals should take advantage of modern information communication technology to cross-reference their patient education contents and to integrate such contents into their overall online marketing strategy to benefit patients and themselves. PMID:27139406

  11. A specific nursing educational program in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Momblán, M Antonia; Gómez, Carmen; Santos, Alicia; Porta, Nuria; Esteve, Julia; Úbeda, Inmaculada; Halperin, Irene; Campillo, Beatriz; Guillaumet, Montserrat; Webb, Susan M; Resmini, Eugenia

    2016-07-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a rare endocrine disease, due to cortisol hypersecretion. CS patients have comorbidities, often still present after biochemical cure. Specific nursing healthcare programs to address this disease and achieve improved health related quality of life (HRQoL) are lacking. Thus, an educational nursing intervention, through the development and promotion of specific educational tools, appears to be justified. The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of an educational nursing program in CS patients on HRQoL, clinical parameters, level of pain and physical activity, patterns of rest, and use of health resources. A prospective, randomized study was conducted in two reference hospitals for CS. Sixty-one patients (mean age 47 ± 12.7 years, 83.6 % females) were enrolled and divided into 2 groups: an "intervention" group where educational sessions were performed over 9 months and a "control" group, without these sessions. Specific questionnaires were used at the beginning and end of the study. After educational sessions, the intervention group had a better score in the CushingQoL questionnaire (p < 0.01), reduced level of pain (p < 0.05), improved physical activity (p < 0.01) and healthy lifestyle (p < 0.001) compared to the control group. A correlation between the CushingQoL score and reduced pain (r = 0.46, p < 0.05), improved physical activity (r = 0.89, p < 0.01), and sleep (r = 0.53, p = 0.01) was observed. This educational nursing program improved physical activity, healthy lifestyle, better sleep patterns, and reduced pain in CS patients, influencing HRQoL and reducing consumption of health resources. Moreover, the brief nature of the program suggests it as a good candidate to be used in CS patients.

  12. Patient education materials from the layperson's perspective: the importance of readability.

    PubMed

    Blanck, Alyson W; Marshall, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Accessible patient-friendly materials are a useful and cost-effective way of increasing patients' knowledge and allaying their fears. This article describes how nursing leadership at a hospital in Connecticut created a patient education committee to review and help draft materials and developed a Web site to centralize these materials for staff and patients. A patient panel was implemented to test materials; results highlighted the need for planning and testing of materials on target audiences. PMID:21430472

  13. Patient education on cigarette smoking: the dentist's role.

    PubMed

    Seffrin, J R; Stauffer, D J

    1976-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major cause of illness and premature death in our society. Secondhand smoke is a definite irritant to nonsmokers and can, under certain conditions, have potentially serious effects on the nonsmoker's health. Despite the facts, millions of persons continue to smoke. Although no single health professional reaches all smokers, the dentist has a particularly good opportunity to reach his patients who smoke. By advising and couseling, providing helpful literature, creating an environment in which smoking is prohibited, and setting a good example, the dentist can have a singificant part in his patients' education on cigarette smoking. If the dentist's efforts are even partially successful in modifying behavior of the patient who smokes, much illness will be avoided and many lives saved.

  14. Conventional vs. Tablet Computer-Based Patient Education following Lung Transplantation – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Suhling, Hendrik; Rademacher, Jessica; Zinowsky, Imke; Fuge, Jan; Greer, Mark; Warnecke, Gregor; Smits, Jacqueline M.; Bertram, Anna; Haverich, Axel; Welte, Tobias; Gottlieb, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate immunosuppression is of critical importance in preventing rejection, while avoiding toxicity following lung transplantation. The mainstay immunosuppressants are calcineurin inhibitors, which require regular monitoring due to interactions with other medications and diet. Adherence to immunosuppression and patient knowledge is vital and can be improved through patient education. Education using tablet-computers was investigated. Objective To compare tablet-PC education and conventional education in improving immunosuppression trough levels in target range 6 months after a single education. Secondary parameters were ratio of immunosuppression level measurements divided by per protocol recommended measurements, time and patient satisfaction regarding education. Design Single-centre, open labelled randomised controlled trial. Participants Patients >6 months after lung-transplantation with <50% of calcineurin inhibitor trough levels in target range. Intervention Tablet-pc education versus personal, nurse-led education. Measurements Calcineurin inhibitor levels in target range 6 months after education, level variability, interval adherence, knowledge and adherence was studied. As outcome parameter, renal function was measured and adverse events registered. Results Sixty-four patients were 1:1 randomised for either intervention. Levels of immunosuppression 6 months after education were equal (tablet-PC 58% vs. conventional 48%, p = 0.27), both groups improved in achieving a CNI trough level within target range by either education method (delta tablet-PC 29% vs. conventional 20%). In all patients, level variability decreased (−20.4%), whereas interval adherence remained unchanged. Knowledge about immunosuppression improved by 7% and compliance tests demonstrated universal improvements with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion Education is a simple, effective tool in improving adherence to immunosuppression. Tablet-PC education was

  15. Implementation of an evidence-based education practice change for patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Portz, Denise; Johnston, Mary Pat

    2014-01-01

    As oncology care continues to move toward delivery in the outpatient setting, oncology nurses must find ways to effectively educate patients about diagnosis, treatment, and symptom management. A cancer diagnosis induces high levels of anxiety, often affecting a patient's ability to retain information about his or her disease, treatment, and symptom management. Based on results from the ONS Foundation-supported Breast Cancer Care Quality Measures Set and Breast Cancer Survivorship Quality Measures Set, a community-based, multisite cancer center located in the midwestern United States embarked on a quality project in patient education. The purpose of this article is to describe a quality project that evolved from a review of the patient education process for patients with cancer in three medical oncology clinics to a pilot of a new model for patient education. The pilot identified gaps, developed and implemented evidence-based improvement strategies, and planned for evaluation of process and patient outcomes of this practice change. A pilot study to assess processes and workflows associated with a one-hour separate patient education visit was designed and initiated. Patients and oncology nurses have expressed satisfaction with standardized patient education. Although processes and workflows continue to be evaluated, a proposal was developed, submitted, and accepted by the institutional review board to evaluate patient-centered outcomes.

  16. Effects of Integrating Peace Education in the Nigeria Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olowo, Oluwatoyin Olusegun

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempted to investigate the effects of integrating Peace Education into Nigeria educational system. Four research questions were designed for the study. The researcher designed an instrument tagged: Questionnaire on effect of Integrating Peace Education (QEIPE). The entire population of two hundred respondents spread across Secondary…

  17. Applying best practices to designing patient education for patients with end-stage renal disease pursuing kidney transplant

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Stacy L.; Waterman, Amy D.; Davis, LaShara A.; Peipert, John D.; Fish, Anne F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known benefits of kidney transplant, less than 30% of the 615000 patients living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States have received a transplant. More than 100000 people are presently on the transplant waiting list. Although the shortage of kidneys for transplant remains a critical factor in explaining lower transplant rates, another important and modifiable factor is patients’ lack of comprehensive education about transplant. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known best practices from the broader literature that can be used as an evidence base to design improved education for ESRD patients pursuing a kidney transplant. Best practices in chronic disease education generally reveal that education that is individually tailored, understandable for patients with low health literacy, and culturally competent is most beneficial. Effective education helps patients navigate the complex health care process successfully. Recommendations for how to incorporate these best practices into transplant education design are described. Providing more ESRD patients with transplant education that encompasses these best practices may improve their ability to make informed health care decisions and increase the numbers of patients interested in pursuing transplant. PMID:25758805

  18. Students Learning from Patients: Let's Get Real in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

    2008-01-01

    Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of…

  19. Drug Education Effects. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Michael L.

    This is a research project that was intended to study the effects of a factual drug education program on the attitudes on high school and junior high students toward the use of psychoactive drugs. The approximately 250 eighth and twelfth grade students involved in the study filled out a number of questionnaires designed to measure a variety of…

  20. A dialogue-based approach to patient education

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Natasja K.; Pals, Regitze Anne Saurbrey

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the need for person-centered patient education has become evident. To translate this approach into practice, new theoretically and empirically sound methods and models are required. This brief communication introduces a newly developed toolkit that has shown promise in facilitating person-centered education and active involvement of patients. Two health education models constituting the underlying basis for the toolkit are also presented. PMID:25593847

  1. The effects of preoperative, video-assisted anesthesia education in Spanish on Spanish-speaking patients' anxiety, knowledge, and satisfaction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    West, Amy M; Bittner, Edward A; Ortiz, Vilma E

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effect of an instructional video in Spanish on self-reported anxiety, knowledge about general anesthesia procedures, and satisfaction with the preoperative anesthesia process in patients requiring a Spanish interpreter. This prospective, randomized, nonblinded pilot study took place at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a university-affiliated tertiary-care hospital. Twenty adult, ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 patients, scheduled for elective surgery (gynecological, orthopedic, and intrabdominal surgery) during general anesthesia were studied. Anxiety, knowledge, and patient satisfaction were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). There was a significant reduction in anxiety score in patients who viewed the video compared with those who did not (median reduction 2 vs 0; P = 0.020). There was an increase in satisfaction score in the video group (median increase 2 vs 0; P = 0.046). There was no difference in reported knowledge-improvement scores between the two groups (3.5 vs 4; P = 0.908). In Spanish-speaking patients, the addition of an instructional video in Spanish to a preanesthesia interview decreased anxiety and increased patient satisfaction. PMID:24882604

  2. The effects of preoperative, video-assisted anesthesia education in Spanish on Spanish-speaking patients' anxiety, knowledge, and satisfaction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    West, Amy M; Bittner, Edward A; Ortiz, Vilma E

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effect of an instructional video in Spanish on self-reported anxiety, knowledge about general anesthesia procedures, and satisfaction with the preoperative anesthesia process in patients requiring a Spanish interpreter. This prospective, randomized, nonblinded pilot study took place at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a university-affiliated tertiary-care hospital. Twenty adult, ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 patients, scheduled for elective surgery (gynecological, orthopedic, and intrabdominal surgery) during general anesthesia were studied. Anxiety, knowledge, and patient satisfaction were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). There was a significant reduction in anxiety score in patients who viewed the video compared with those who did not (median reduction 2 vs 0; P = 0.020). There was an increase in satisfaction score in the video group (median increase 2 vs 0; P = 0.046). There was no difference in reported knowledge-improvement scores between the two groups (3.5 vs 4; P = 0.908). In Spanish-speaking patients, the addition of an instructional video in Spanish to a preanesthesia interview decreased anxiety and increased patient satisfaction.

  3. Cancer patient education in Iran: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, Ali; Vahdani, Mariam; Haji-Mahmoodi, Mehregan; Jarvandi, Soghra; Ebrahimi, Mandana

    2002-03-01

    Abstract. This study was carried out to examine the status of cancer patient education in Iran. Using the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer's (MASCC) patient education questionnaire, 310 individuals - a sample of heterogeneous cancer patients ( n=167) and their relatives ( n=143) - were enrolled in the study. The pooled results indicated that only 15% of respondents believed more than 80% of cancer patients were told of their diagnosis. In contrast, 30% of respondents thought less than 20% of patients knew their cancer diagnosis. When asked, "Were you given written materials about (i) cancer, (ii) treatment, and (iii) symptom management", the vast majority of respondents said "No" (91%, 87%, and 87%, respectively). When respondents were asked, "Would you like to learn more about cancer and treatments", 97% said "Yes". Most respondents indicated the need for information on the treatments available (27%) and general information about cancer (20%); most had sought information from health professionals (31%), other cancer patients and friends (29%), and television (22%). Finally, it was found that concern about patients' depression (17%), lack of printed materials (13%), the idea that it was better for patients not to know (12%), and families' requests not to tell the patient (11%) were the most frequently stated barriers to or reasons for restricted cancer patient education. The findings of the study suggest that cancer patient education in Iran is very poor and there is an urgent need to develop policy guidelines on disclosure of cancer diagnoses and patient education.

  4. Sustaining Effect of Intensive Nutritional Intervention Combined with Health Education on Dietary Behavior and Plasma Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rui; Xu, Meihong; Wang, Junbo; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Chen, Qihe; Li, Ye; Gu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Xiaxia; Guo, Qianying; Bao, Lei; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is very common in elderly Chinese individuals. Although nutritional intervention can provide a balanced diet, the sustaining effect on at-home dietary behavior and long-term plasma glucose control is not clear. Consequently, we conducted a long-term survey following one month of experiential nutritional intervention combined with health education. Based on the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident, we found that the food items met the recommended values, the percentages of energy provided from fat, protein, and carbohydrate were more reasonable after one year. The newly formed dietary patterns were "Healthy", "Monotonous", "Vegetarian", "Japanese", "Low energy", and "Traditional" diets. The 2h-PG of female participants as well as those favoring the "Japanese diet" decreased above 12 mmol/L. Participants who selected "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets showed an obvious reduction in FPG while the FPG of participants from Group A declined slightly. "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets also obtained the highest DDP scores, and thus can be considered suitable for T2DM treatment in China. The results of the newly formed dietary patterns, "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets, confirmed the profound efficacy of nutritional intervention combined with health education for improving dietary behavior and glycemic control although health education played a more important role. The present study is encouraging with regard to further exploration of comprehensive diabetes care. PMID:27649232

  5. Sustaining Effect of Intensive Nutritional Intervention Combined with Health Education on Dietary Behavior and Plasma Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rui; Xu, Meihong; Wang, Junbo; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Chen, Qihe; Li, Ye; Gu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Xiaxia; Guo, Qianying; Bao, Lei; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is very common in elderly Chinese individuals. Although nutritional intervention can provide a balanced diet, the sustaining effect on at-home dietary behavior and long-term plasma glucose control is not clear. Consequently, we conducted a long-term survey following one month of experiential nutritional intervention combined with health education. Based on the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident, we found that the food items met the recommended values, the percentages of energy provided from fat, protein, and carbohydrate were more reasonable after one year. The newly formed dietary patterns were "Healthy", "Monotonous", "Vegetarian", "Japanese", "Low energy", and "Traditional" diets. The 2h-PG of female participants as well as those favoring the "Japanese diet" decreased above 12 mmol/L. Participants who selected "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets showed an obvious reduction in FPG while the FPG of participants from Group A declined slightly. "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets also obtained the highest DDP scores, and thus can be considered suitable for T2DM treatment in China. The results of the newly formed dietary patterns, "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets, confirmed the profound efficacy of nutritional intervention combined with health education for improving dietary behavior and glycemic control although health education played a more important role. The present study is encouraging with regard to further exploration of comprehensive diabetes care.

  6. Sustaining Effect of Intensive Nutritional Intervention Combined with Health Education on Dietary Behavior and Plasma Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rui; Xu, Meihong; Wang, Junbo; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Chen, Qihe; Li, Ye; Gu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Xiaxia; Guo, Qianying; Bao, Lei; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is very common in elderly Chinese individuals. Although nutritional intervention can provide a balanced diet, the sustaining effect on at-home dietary behavior and long-term plasma glucose control is not clear. Consequently, we conducted a long-term survey following one month of experiential nutritional intervention combined with health education. Based on the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident, we found that the food items met the recommended values, the percentages of energy provided from fat, protein, and carbohydrate were more reasonable after one year. The newly formed dietary patterns were “Healthy”, “Monotonous”, “Vegetarian”, “Japanese”, “Low energy”, and “Traditional” diets. The 2h-PG of female participants as well as those favoring the “Japanese diet” decreased above 12 mmol/L. Participants who selected “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets showed an obvious reduction in FPG while the FPG of participants from Group A declined slightly. “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets also obtained the highest DDP scores, and thus can be considered suitable for T2DM treatment in China. The results of the newly formed dietary patterns, “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets, confirmed the profound efficacy of nutritional intervention combined with health education for improving dietary behavior and glycemic control although health education played a more important role. The present study is encouraging with regard to further exploration of comprehensive diabetes care. PMID:27649232

  7. The Internet: friend or foe when providing patient education?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Amy Shelton; Klemm, Paula

    2008-02-01

    The Internet has changed how patients with cancer learn about and cope with their disease. Newly diagnosed patients with cancer often have complex educational and informational needs related to diagnosis and treatment. Nurses frequently encounter time and work-related constraints that can interfere with the provision of patient education. They are challenged to educate patients in an environment of rapidly expanding and innovative computer technology. Barriers that hinder nurses in integrating educational Internet resources into patient care include lack of training, time constraints, and inadequate administrative support. Advantages of Internet use for patient education and support include wide-ranging and current information, a variety of teaching formats, patient empowerment, new communication options, and support 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Pitfalls associated with Internet use for patients with cancer include inaccurate information, lack of access, poor quality of online resources, and security and privacy issues. Nurses routinely use computer technology in the workplace and follow rigorous security and privacy standards to protect patient information. Those skills can provide the foundation for the use of online sources for patient teaching. Nurses play an important role in helping patients evaluate the veracity of online information and introducing them to reliable Internet resources. PMID:18258575

  8. Influence of Formal Education on Cognitive Reserve in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Luerding, Ralf; Gebel, Sophie; Gebel, Eva-Maria; Schwab-Malek, Susanne; Weissert, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The concept of cognitive reserve (CR) and its influence on cognitive impairment has attracted increasing interest. One hundred twenty-eight patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) from Southern Germany were evaluated during the years 2000 to 2012. Twenty-seven neuropsychological (NP) tests were applied regarding basic cognitive functions, attention, executive functions, visual perception and construction, memory and learning, problem solving, and language. By this retrospective approach, a comprehensive NP profile of the investigated individuals was established. An effect of timespan of formal education on CR was observed. Enrichment by reading, physical activities, and challenging vocational practices had more profound effects in patients who had undergone a shorter educational period compared to a longer educational period. In summary, our study demonstrates that the advantage of longer formal education periods, compared to shorter formal education periods, can be counterbalanced by high frequencies of reading, physical activities, and challenging vocational practices in patients with MS. PMID:27065941

  9. Quality of doctor-patient communication through the eyes of the patient: variation according to the patient's educational level.

    PubMed

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-10-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In this study we describe patients' perspective in doctor-patient communication according to their educational level, and to what extent these perspectives lean towards the expert opinion on doctor-patient communication. In a multi-center study (Belgium, The Netherlands, UK and Italy), focus group discussions were organised using videotaped medical consultations. A mixed methods approach was used to analyse the data. Firstly, a difference in perspective in communication style was found between the lower educated participants versus the middle and higher educated participants. Secondly, lower educated participants referred positively most to aspects related to the affective/emotional area of the medical consultation, followed by the task-oriented/problem-focused area. Middle and higher educated participants positively referred most to the task-oriented/problem-focused area. The competency of the physician was an important category of communication for all participants, independent of social background. The results indicate that the preferences of lower educated participants lean more towards the expert opinion in doctor-patient communication than the middle and higher educated participants. Patients' educational level seems to influence their perspective on communication style and should be taken into account by physicians. Further quantitative research is needed to confirm these results.

  10. The evolving role of health educators in advancing patient safety: forging partnerships and leading change.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Annette

    2007-04-01

    At least 1.5 million preventable injuries because of adverse drug events occur in the United States each year, according to an Institute of Medicine report. IOM and other organizations at the forefront of health care improvement emphasize that stronger partnerships between patients, their families, and health care providers are necessary to make health care safer. Health educators possess a skill set and an ethical framework that effectively equip them to advance patient and family-centered care and contribute in other significant ways to a safer health care system. Health educators in clinical settings are playing varied and significant roles in advancing patient safety. They are removing barriers to clear communication and forging partnerships between patients, their families, and staff. Health educators are leading patient safety culture change within their institutions and contributing to the shift from provider-centric to patient-centric systems. To expand their impact in improving patient safety, health educators in clinical settings are participating in public awareness campaigns. In seeking to enhance patient safety, health educators face a number of challenges. To successfully manage those, health educators must expand their knowledge, broaden connections, and engage patients and families in meaningful ways.

  11. Teaching in crisis. Patient and family education in critical care.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, M O

    2001-03-01

    Although the critical care setting is not always a positive teaching environment, it is possible to achieve the goal of optimal patient and family education. The critical care nurse must understand the unique learning needs of patients and families who are experiencing a life crisis a recognize that there are substantial obstacles to overcome to educate in this setting. In addition, it takes experience and resources to develop the teaching skills of the bedside nurse, so that those teachable moments are easily recognized and suitably used to give patients and family members valuable information in small doses. The advanced practice nurse is an essential nursing resource who can spearhead the development of teaching skills for all members of the health care team. In addition, the advanced practice nurse is a clinical expert who can assess the educational needs of patients and their families and provide more detailed and individualized health information from a different perspective. Achieving good patient and family education outcomes is possible when patient care continuity is a priority and the advanced practice nurse is an active part of the nursing team. Exploring the use of new technologies and resources to meet patient and family education needs is absolutely necessary. As hospitals continue to evolve and react to the financial demands placed on them, nursing leadership and critical care nurses will need to articulate clearly all of the essential components of patient care, including patient and family education. In keeping with the rich nursing tradition of patient and family education, critical care nurses and advanced practice nurses have the opportunity to demonstrate their unique teaching skills and continue to promote health education as a priority of patient care.

  12. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In…

  13. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated…

  14. Learning Difficulties of Diabetic Patients: A Survey of Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Surveys 85 health care professionals on the learning difficulties of diabetic patients. Results show that educators find it easy to teach techniques: patients master procedures well and make few mistakes. In contrast, diabetic patients seem to have problems learning skills, such as insulin dose adjustment, that require complex problem-solving.…

  15. The REmote Patient Education in a Telemedicine Environment Architecture (REPETE).

    PubMed

    Lai, Albert M; Starren, Justin B; Kaufman, David R; Mendonça, Eneida A; Palmas, Walter; Nieh, Jason; Shea, Steven

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the study was to develop and implement an architecture for remote training that can be used in the narrowband home telemedicine environment. A remote training architecture, the REmote Patient Education in a Telemedicine Environment (REPETE) architecture, using a remote control protocol (RCP) was developed. A set of design criteria was specified. The developed architecture was integrated into the IDEATel home telemedicine unit (HTU) and evaluated against these design criteria using a combination of technical and expert evaluations. Technical evaluation of the architecture demonstrated that remote cursor movements and positioning displayed on the HTU were smooth and effectively real-time. The trainers were able to observe within approximately 2 seconds lag what the patient sees on their HTU screen. Evaluation of the architecture by experts was favorable. Responses to a Likert scale questionnaire regarding audio quality and remote control performance indicated that the expert evaluators thought that the audio quality and remote control performance were adequate for remote training. All evaluators strongly agreed that the system would be useful for training patients. The REPETE architecture supports basic training needs over a narrowband dial-up connection. We were able to maintain an audio chat simultaneously with performing a remote training session, while maintaining both acceptable audio quality and remote control performance. The RCP provides a mechanism to provide training without requiring a trainer to go to the patient's home and effectively supports deictic referencing to on screen objects.

  16. Are end-of-life patient education materials readable?

    PubMed

    Ache, K A; Wallace, L S

    2009-09-01

    Although established guidelines for developing low-literacy patient education materials are available, poorly designed material continue to be disseminated. We evaluated the readability and layout of English-language end-of-life patient education materials available on the Internet. Internet websites of five national palliative care organizations were searched to identify patient education materials for review. A convenience sample of 15 patient education materials per palliative care organization (n = 75) was downloaded and printed. The Simplified Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) was used to calculate the reading grade level (readability) of the text, while the layout features was assessed using criteria from the User-Friendliness Tool (UFT). The reading grade level of patient education materials ranged from 7(th) to 12(th) grade (mean +/- SD = 11.1 +/- 1.9). None of the patient education materials scored high on all UFT criteria. In particular, the greatest need was increasing the amount of white space and improving the way in which information was organized visually. Healthcare providers can only aid in the decision process, patients and their loved ones are ultimately responsible for making these choices. These decisions are important as choices need to be made about end-of-life care while patients are still cognitively able to do so. Well designed end-of-life patient education materials can offer a wealth of knowledge to assist and guide decision making. On the basis of these results, end-of-life patient education materials should be revised so that the average adult is able to understand the message presented, thereby enhancing his/her ability to make informed decisions.

  17. Perpetuating 'New Public Management' at the expense of nurses' patient education: a discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Anne-Louise; Friberg, Febe; Persson, Eva; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to explore the conditions for nurses' daily patient education work by focusing on managers' way of speaking about the patient education provided by nurses in hospital care. An explorative, qualitative design with a social constructionist perspective was used. Data were collected from three focus group interviews and analysed by means of critical discourse analysis. Discursive practice can be explained by the ideology of hegemony. Due to a heavy workload and lack of time, managers could 'see' neither their role as a supporter of the patient education provided by nurses, nor their role in the development of nurses' pedagogical competence. They used organisational, financial, medical and legal reasons for explaining their failure to support nurses' provision of patient education. The organisational discourse was an umbrella term for 'things' such as cost-effectiveness, which were prioritised over patient education. There is a need to remove managerial barriers to the professional development of nurses' patient education. Managers should be responsible for ensuring and overseeing that nurses have the prerequisites necessary for providing patient education as well as for enabling continuous reflective dialogue and opportunities for learning in practice. PMID:25327764

  18. Perpetuating 'New Public Management' at the expense of nurses' patient education: a discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Anne-Louise; Friberg, Febe; Persson, Eva; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to explore the conditions for nurses' daily patient education work by focusing on managers' way of speaking about the patient education provided by nurses in hospital care. An explorative, qualitative design with a social constructionist perspective was used. Data were collected from three focus group interviews and analysed by means of critical discourse analysis. Discursive practice can be explained by the ideology of hegemony. Due to a heavy workload and lack of time, managers could 'see' neither their role as a supporter of the patient education provided by nurses, nor their role in the development of nurses' pedagogical competence. They used organisational, financial, medical and legal reasons for explaining their failure to support nurses' provision of patient education. The organisational discourse was an umbrella term for 'things' such as cost-effectiveness, which were prioritised over patient education. There is a need to remove managerial barriers to the professional development of nurses' patient education. Managers should be responsible for ensuring and overseeing that nurses have the prerequisites necessary for providing patient education as well as for enabling continuous reflective dialogue and opportunities for learning in practice.

  19. Prioritizing the Preferences of Iranian Cancer Patients Regarding Acquisition of Health Information: Strategy for Patient Education.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Jamileh Mahdi; Fard, Farahnaz Ghahreman; Madani, Raihaneh; Iravani, Homa; Kahouei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing cancer patients' preferences to obtain health information can help improve and reform the methods of communicating and providing proper services and consequently lead to effective patient education. The present cross-sectional study to prioritize the preferences of cancer patients regarding the acquisition of health informationwas conducted on cancer patients referred to hospitals affiliated to Semnan University of Medical Sciences in 2015. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was developed. In the field of side effects of medications, 50 (46.7%) reported knowing about weight change, in the area of achieving relative health, 62(57.9%) announced awareness about diet, and 45 (42.1%) reported physical complications as a first regarding information needs. In the area of obtaining information, 50 (46.7%) tended to take their information through means outside of the hospital setting. These results can help with design of clinical information systems, as they inform the most relevant and useful coverage designed for cancer patients. Providing useful information through healthcare providers, the media and clinical information systems can act as a major source of social support for cancer patients. PMID:27356722

  20. [Video-assisted patient education in anaesthesiology: possibilities and limits of a new procedure for improvement of patient information].

    PubMed

    Salzwedel, C; Marz, S; Bauer, M; Schuster, M

    2008-06-01

    In video-assisted patient education (ViPa), patients watch an educational video about the process and the risks of anaesthesia in addition to the preanaesthetic interview with the anaesthesiologist. Used as a supplement to the preanaesthetic visit, the videos can increase patients' knowledge and satisfaction without having any negative effect on perioperative anxiety. Because the video graphically depicts the basic information, the preanaesthetic visit can then focus on specific aspects of the individual patient, i.e. high anxiety or specific questions. The redundant and monotonous explanations about the procedures and risks of anaesthesia by the interviewing anaesthesiologist are partly replaced by the video, but for medico-legal reasons the ViPa cannot totally replace the preanesthetic interview. It can be used in pediatric anaesthesia and reduces parental anxiety. Because of the lack of studies, the effects of the ViPa on perioperative patient compliance, especially for outpatient surgery, and on the economics of anaesthesia clinics are unclear.

  1. Educational Equity: Challenges for Educator Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Jane; Winslow, Emily

    2015-01-01

    With increasingly diverse student populations, educational equity is a bigger challenge than ever for public schools across the United States. While federal government, states, and school districts work to identify and address the root causes of equity gaps, efforts are often hampered by a limited body of research-based strategies and approaches…

  2. Critical pathways: effectiveness in achieving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ireson, C L

    1997-06-01

    Refining the clinical care process to produce high-quality patient outcomes is becoming increasingly important as health care administrators strive for success in a mature managed care environment. This study examines the effect of structuring interventions and the evaluation of patient response, inherent in the critical pathway process, on clinical, length-of-hospital-stay, and financial patient outcomes. This study differs from previous critical pathway trials in that an objective measure of quality was used and the critical pathways were not introduced concurrently with a case management delivery model. The results show that critical pathways may be a significant determinant of improved quality in a managed care environment. The findings also suggest ways to improve nursing practice, nursing education, and nursing informatics.

  3. Effects of Lifestyle Modification on Telomerase Gene Expression in Hypertensive Patients: A Pilot Trial of Stress Reduction and Health Education Programs in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Duraimani, Shanthi; Schneider, Robert H.; Randall, Otelio S.; Nidich, Sanford I.; Xu, Shichen; Ketete, Muluemebet; Rainforth, Maxwell A.; Gaylord-King, Carolyn; Salerno, John W.; Fagan, John

    2015-01-01

    Background African Americans suffer from disproportionately high rates of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Psychosocial stress, lifestyle and telomere dysfunction contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. This study evaluated effects of stress reduction and lifestyle modification on blood pressure, telomerase gene expression and lifestyle factors in African Americans. Methods Forty-eight African American men and women with stage I hypertension who participated in a larger randomized controlled trial volunteered for this substudy. These subjects participated in either stress reduction with the Transcendental Meditation technique and a basic health education course (SR) or an extensive health education program (EHE) for 16 weeks. Primary outcomes were telomerase gene expression (hTERT and hTR) and clinic blood pressure. Secondary outcomes included lifestyle-related factors. Data were analyzed for within-group and between-group changes. Results Both groups showed increases in the two measures of telomerase gene expression, hTR mRNA levels (SR: p< 0.001; EHE: p< 0.001) and hTERT mRNA levels (SR: p = 0.055; EHE: p< 0.002). However, no statistically significant between-group changes were observed. Both groups showed reductions in systolic BP. Adjusted changes were SR = -5.7 mm Hg, p< 0.01; EHE = -9.0 mm Hg, p < 0.001 with no statistically significant difference between group difference. There was a significant reduction in diastolic BP in the EHE group (-5.3 mm Hg, p< 0.001) but not in SR (-1.2 mm Hg, p = 0.42); the between-group difference was significant (p = 0.04). The EHE group showed a greater number of changes in lifestyle behaviors. Conclusion In this pilot trial, both stress reduction (Transcendental Meditation technique plus health education) and extensive health education groups demonstrated increased telomerase gene expression and reduced BP. The association between increased telomerase gene expression and reduced BP

  4. Educational inequalities in patient-centred care: patients' preferences and experiences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Educational attainment is strongly related to specific health outcomes. The pathway in which individual patient-provider interactions contribute to (re)producing these inequalities has yet to be studied. In this article, the focus is on differences between less and more highly educated patients in their preferences for and experiences with patient-centred care., e.g. shared decision making, receiving understandable explanations and being able to ask questions. Methods Data are derived from several Consumer Quality-index (CQ-index) studies. The CQ-index is a family of standardized instruments which are used in the Netherlands to measure quality of care from the patient’s perspective. Results The educational level of patients is directly related to the degree of importance patients attribute to specific aspects of patient-centred care. It has a minor influence on the experienced level of shared decision making, but not on experiences regarding other aspects of patient-centred care. Conclusions All patients regard patient-centred care as important and report positive experiences. However, there is a discrepancy between patient preferences for patient-centred care on one hand and the care received on the other. Less educated patients might receive ‘too much’, and more highly educated patients ‘too little’ in the domains of communication, information and shared decision making. PMID:22900589

  5. Patient Education through Pregnancy Counseling: A Preventive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Linda; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The Gynecology Clinic, Wilce Health Center, Ohio State University, is putting into operation a comprehensive family planning service program that includes (1) patient education, (2) medical care, (3) pregnancy counseling, and (4) reproductive and sexuality counseling. (Author)

  6. Empowering Patients, Engaging Teams: An Interprofessional Continuing Education Pilot.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Aislynn R

    2016-09-01

    Health care is moving from reactive, disease-focused systems to proactive, patient-centered systems focused on the health continuum. This shift requires ongoing education on the part of the health care team to ensure care competence and the ability to meet patients where their needs exist. To maximize outcomes, interprofessional continuing education is necessary to support interprofessional collaboration. One health system embraced this by piloting an interprofessional, continuing education population health course. The course encouraged team members to learn from, with, and about each other while gaining skills in patient engagement. Outcomes showed an increased knowledge and confidence in the ability to support patients, as well as a greater desire to work together as a team toward population health. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(9):421-426. PMID:27580509

  7. Implementing Electronic Tablet-Based Education of Acute Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Tenita; Nelson, Monica J; McKee, Vickie; Bowers, Margaret T; Meggitt, Corilin; Baxt, Sarah K; Washington, Delphine; Saladino, Louise; Lehman, E Philip; Brewer, Cheryl; Locke, Susan C; Abernethy, Amy; Gilliss, Catherine L; Granger, Bradi B

    2016-02-01

    Poor education-related discharge preparedness for patients with heart failure is believed to be a major cause of avoidable rehospitalizations. Technology-based applications offer innovative educational approaches that may improve educational readiness for patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings; however, a number of challenges exist when implementing electronic devices in the clinical setting. Implementation challenges include processes for "on-boarding" staff, mediating risks of cross-contamination with patients' device use, and selling the value to staff and health system leaders to secure the investment in software, hardware, and system support infrastructure. Strategies to address these challenges are poorly described in the literature. The purpose of this article is to present a staff development program designed to overcome challenges in implementing an electronic, tablet-based education program for patients with heart failure. PMID:26830181

  8. The Effects of Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez-Martinez, Claudio-Rafael; Giron, Graciela; De-La-Luz-Arellano, Ivan; Ayon-Bañuelos, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Educational reform implies questions of social production and of state regulation that are the key words in educational reform, education and educational policies. These reforms are always on the political agenda of countries and involve international organisms, since education is a vehicle of development for social progress. A point of departure…

  9. Alcohol Education Provided to Opioid Treatment Program Patients: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Shiela M.; Harris, Gavin; Katigbak, Carina; Rindskopf, David M.; Singh, Sheena; Greenblum, Ilana; Brown, Lawrence S.; Kipnis, Steven; Kritz, Steven A.; Parrino, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol-related problems are especially common among opioid treatment program (OTP) patients, suggesting that educating OTP patients about alcohol and its harmful effects needs to be a priority in OTPs. Using data collected in interviews with a nationwide U.S. sample of OTP directors (N = 200) in 25 states, we identified factors that differentiate…

  10. The art and science of cancer education and evaluation: toward facilitating improved patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lenora; Ousley, Anita; Swarz, Jeffrey; Bingham, Raymond J; Erickson, J Bianca; Ellis, Steven; Moody, Terra

    2011-03-01

    Cancer education is a constantly evolving field, as science continues to advance both our understanding of cancer and its effects on patients, families, and communities. Moving discoveries to practice expeditiously is paramount to impacting cancer outcomes. The continuing education of cancer care professionals throughout their practice life is vital to facilitating the adoption of therapeutic innovations. Meanwhile, more general educational programs serve to keep cancer patients, their families, and the public informed of the latest findings in cancer research. The National Cancer Institute conducted an assessment of the current knowledge base for cancer education which involved two literature reviews, one of the general literature of the evaluation of medical and health education efforts, and the other of the preceding 5 years of the Journal of Cancer Education (JCE). These reviews explored a wide range of educational models and methodologies. In general, those that were most effective used multiple methodologies, interactive techniques, and multiple exposures over time. Less than one third of the articles in the JCE reported on a cancer education or communication product, and of these, only 70% had been evaluated for effectiveness. Recommendations to improve the evaluation of cancer education and the educational focus of the JCE are provided.

  11. [Visual materials for the education of patients with diabetes].

    PubMed

    Morineau, Claudie

    2015-12-01

    Some people living with diabetes are not included in any educational approach due to their cultural or linguistic particularities, their level of elementary education or their metacognitive deficiencies. It is essential for the caregiver to reflect on how to provide adapted and relevant therapeutic education to these patients. In this context, visual materials have been designed in order to be able to offer personalised support.

  12. [Visual materials for the education of patients with diabetes].

    PubMed

    Morineau, Claudie

    2015-12-01

    Some people living with diabetes are not included in any educational approach due to their cultural or linguistic particularities, their level of elementary education or their metacognitive deficiencies. It is essential for the caregiver to reflect on how to provide adapted and relevant therapeutic education to these patients. In this context, visual materials have been designed in order to be able to offer personalised support. PMID:26675098

  13. Facilitating Behavior Change with Low-Literacy Patient Education Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Wallace, Andrea S.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L.; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Delgadillo, Adriana; Bengal, Nikki; Davis, Terry C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe a process for developing low-literacy health education materials that increase knowledge and activate patients toward healthier behaviors. Methods: We developed a theoretically informed process for developing educational materials. This process included convening a multidisciplinary creative team, soliciting stakeholder…

  14. Uses and Limitations of Simulated Patients in Psychiatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Adam M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The use of standardized patients (SPs) is becoming prominent as a learning and evaluation tool in both undergraduate and graduate medical education. As increasing attempts are made to extend this tool to psychiatric training and education, it has been suggested that SPs can be useful not only to expose students to the variety of…

  15. Strengthening patient education for ORT services in the Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    Naimoli, J F; Endsley, S; Roungou, J B; Parker, K; Bryce, J; Doutizonga, R; Gbadjamo, M

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a health worker training program in diarrhea case management and its effect on patient education in health facilities in the Central African Republic (C.A.R.). In 1989, a facility-based assessment of health worker practices in managing diarrheal disease in children under 5 years of age documented serious deficiencies in patient education as performed by health workers. Based on these results, the Ministry of Health (MOH) designed an inservice training program that promoted education as an integral component of curative care. The training program was implemented in all five health regions of the country. An evaluation of the training's impact on the delivery of patient education indicated dramatic increases in the number of messages health workers communicated to mothers. This experience demonstrated that the patient education practices of health workers can be improved through inservice training that integrates the teaching of clinical and communication skills. Additional study in C.A.R. is needed to (1) further improve the quality of patient education for diarrhea and other childhood communicable diseases, (2) determine the impact of patient education on the care provided by mothers in the home following a clinic visit, and (3) assess how operational research can be conducted within the limitations of inservice training programs and routine clinical operations. PMID:8788345

  16. Does Education Have Any Influence on Symptom Score of IBS Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, S K; Tarafder, A J; Chowdhury, M; Alam, M S; Mohsin, M

    2016-04-01

    Despite much research, the pathophysiology of IBS remains poorly understood. So it is very difficult to treat. There is no standard treatment for IBS. Because IBS symptoms can be elicited or exacerbated by diet and stress, this suggests that patient education regarding his or her illness might be beneficial to patients in managing their symptoms. This study was done to see the short term effects of outpatient education in relation to change of symptom score in IBS patients. This is a prospective randomized comparative study. In this study a total of 80 patients were included. Forty patients were given only pharmacological management with Mebevarine hydrochloride 135mg thrice daily half an hour before meal and Amitryptline 10mg at night for six months and another forty were given education in addition to the same pharmacological treatment. In both the study group [medical management only versus medical management with education] changes of symptoms and quality of life of patients of IBS were assessed by using previously used, specially designed symptoms scoring system and a validated IBS-QOL instrument. There was no significant difference in severity of symptoms between only drug treatment group (118.973) and education plus drug treatment group (119.57) before treatment. The difference of improvement between the education group and without education group was not statistically significant (P>0.05), though the subsidence of pain in both the group before and after treatment was statistically significant (P<0.01). PMID:27277368

  17. [Improvements in patient education from the didactical point of view].

    PubMed

    Feicke, J; Spörhase, U

    2012-10-01

    The findings of empirical educational research and the theoretical and experiential knowledge of general didactics and specific didactics of relevant subjects are not adequately considered in the conception and implementation of patient education. The aim of this work is to screen the results of existing research about the quality of instruction, to deduce quality criteria for patient education and to discuss their benefits for the existing practice. The research on the quality of instruction was systematically investigated for this purpose. Subsequently, the 3 empirically validated quality features: "clear structure", "participant-oriented social climate" and "cognitive activation with particular attention to domain-specific components of teaching" we identified were transferred to patient education and concretized by including the theoretical and experiential knowledge of didactics. In the process several domains (conception of manuals, train-the-trainer seminars) were identified in which the quality characteristics can be tied in. The findings of empirical educational research are able to complement the existing measures for quality assurance in the area of patient education. For this purpose the identification and specification together with the possible integration of the 3 quality criteria in the area of patient education are a first step.

  18. Management of patient education in US hospitals: evolution of a concept.

    PubMed

    Giloth, B E

    1990-04-01

    While patient education has been an integral part of health care for centuries, the management of this process is a relatively new concept for US hospitals. Beginning in the late 1960s, documentation of patient education coordinator positions, policies, committee mandates, and other management structures began to appear. National surveys and projects documented the growth of these structures and provided some evidence that their existence positively impacted the number of programs and their effectiveness. Financial pressures on hospitals including the advent of the prospective pricing system, other actions by government and business to control health care costs, and changes in technology have resulted in budget cuts, staff reductions, and reorganizations that have posed new challenges for the development of patient education management. This paper discusses these developments and their impact on management of patient education programs in hospitals.

  19. Educational Technology: Effective Leadership and Current Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courville, Keith

    2011-01-01

    (Purpose) This article describes the basis for effective educational technology leadership and a few of the current initiatives and impacts that are a result of the aforementioned effective leadership. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the role of the educational technology leader in an educational setting; (2) an examination…

  20. Educating the patient: challenges and opportunities with current technology.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeffry

    2011-09-01

    Patients using the Internet are inundated with abundant information on health care that may be correct and may be incorrect. It is becoming the role of clinicians to enable patients to educate themselves by providing information about accurate and reliable Web sites, and to answer questions from literature that patients encounter. In addition, there is a myriad of technological advances to help patients and clinicians access, retrieve, and file information, and numerous communication tools to foster the patient-clinician dialog. This article provides an overview and some recommendations for clinicians to help patients better use information to achieve better outcomes. PMID:21791269

  1. Educating the patient: challenges and opportunities with current technology.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeffry

    2011-09-01

    Patients using the Internet are inundated with abundant information on health care that may be correct and may be incorrect. It is becoming the role of clinicians to enable patients to educate themselves by providing information about accurate and reliable Web sites, and to answer questions from literature that patients encounter. In addition, there is a myriad of technological advances to help patients and clinicians access, retrieve, and file information, and numerous communication tools to foster the patient-clinician dialog. This article provides an overview and some recommendations for clinicians to help patients better use information to achieve better outcomes.

  2. Predischarge education improves adherence to a healthy lifestyle among Jordanian patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eshah, Nidal F

    2013-09-01

    Risk factor reduction and modification of patient lifestyle have become the focus of secondary prevention and cardiac rehabilitation programs. Considering the scarcity of resources in developing countries, nurses can potentially provide great benefit to acute coronary syndrome patients by utilizing hospital time to teach the patients how to lower their risk for recurrence and adopt healthier lifestyles after discharge. The purpose of this study was to identify the effectiveness of a predischarge education on acute coronary syndrome patients' lifestyles. Quasi-experimental pretest-post-test design was used. The patients assigned to the experimental group were offered predischarge education that stimulates lifestyle modification and adoption of a healthier lifestyle. The experimental group scored significantly higher than the control group in three lifestyle components - health responsibilities, nutrition, and interpersonal relations. In conclusion, predischarge education helps motivate acute coronary syndrome patients to adhere to a healthy lifestyle postdischarge. Therefore, nurses must be educated and prepared to be qualified health educators, and health education should continue as one of the most important daily nursing practices, thus it is invested in the preparation of acute coronary patients' discharge plan. PMID:23302042

  3. Predischarge education improves adherence to a healthy lifestyle among Jordanian patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eshah, Nidal F

    2013-09-01

    Risk factor reduction and modification of patient lifestyle have become the focus of secondary prevention and cardiac rehabilitation programs. Considering the scarcity of resources in developing countries, nurses can potentially provide great benefit to acute coronary syndrome patients by utilizing hospital time to teach the patients how to lower their risk for recurrence and adopt healthier lifestyles after discharge. The purpose of this study was to identify the effectiveness of a predischarge education on acute coronary syndrome patients' lifestyles. Quasi-experimental pretest-post-test design was used. The patients assigned to the experimental group were offered predischarge education that stimulates lifestyle modification and adoption of a healthier lifestyle. The experimental group scored significantly higher than the control group in three lifestyle components - health responsibilities, nutrition, and interpersonal relations. In conclusion, predischarge education helps motivate acute coronary syndrome patients to adhere to a healthy lifestyle postdischarge. Therefore, nurses must be educated and prepared to be qualified health educators, and health education should continue as one of the most important daily nursing practices, thus it is invested in the preparation of acute coronary patients' discharge plan.

  4. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed. Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels. Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism. PMID:23667310

  5. Facilitating Behavior Change With Low-literacy Patient Education Materials

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Wallace, Andrea S.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Schillinger, Dean; Arnold, Connie L.; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Delgadillo, Adriana; Bengal, Nikki; Davis, Terry C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe a process for developing low-literacy health education materials that increase knowledge and activate patients toward healthier behaviors. Methods We developed a theoretically informed process for developing educational materials. This process included convening a multidisciplinary creative team, soliciting stakeholder input, identifying key concepts to be communicated, mapping concepts to a behavioral theory, creating a supporting behavioral intervention, designing and refining materials, and assessing efficacy. Results We describe the use of this process to develop a diabetes self-management guide. Conclusions Developing low-literacy health education materials that will activate patients toward healthier behaviors requires attention to factors beyond reading level. PMID:17931139

  6. Effectiveness of continuing medical education.

    PubMed Central

    Marinopoulos, Spyridon S; Dorman, Todd; Ratanawongsa, Neda; Wilson, Lisa M; Ashar, Bimal H; Magaziner, Jeffrey L; Miller, Redonda G; Thomas, Patricia A; Prokopowicz, Gregory P; Qayyum, Rehan; Bass, Eric B

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Despite the broad range of continuing medical education (CME) offerings aimed at educating practicing physicians through the provision of up-to-date clinical information, physicians commonly overuse, under-use, and misuse therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. It has been suggested that the ineffective nature of CME either accounts for the discrepancy between evidence and practice or at a minimum contributes to this gap. Understanding what CME tools and techniques are most effective in disseminating and retaining medical knowledge is critical to improving CME and thus diminishing the gap between evidence and practice. The purpose of this review was to comprehensively and systematically synthesize evidence regarding the effectiveness of CME and differing instructional designs in terms of knowledge, attitudes, skills, practice behavior, and clinical practice outcomes. REVIEW METHODS We formulated specific questions with input from external experts and representatives of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) which nominated this topic. We systematically searched the literature using specific eligibility criteria, hand searching of selected journals, and electronic databases including: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), PsycINFO, and the Educational Resource Information Center (ERIC). Two independent reviewers conducted title scans, abstract reviews, and then full article reviews to identify eligible articles. Each eligible article underwent double review for data abstraction and assessment of study quality. RESULTS Of the 68,000 citations identified by literature searching, 136 articles and 9 systematic reviews ultimately met our eligibility criteria. The overall quality of the literature was low and consequently firm conclusions were

  7. Providing community education: lessons learned from Native Patient Navigators.

    PubMed

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Krebs, Linda U; Harjo, Lisa; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Pingatore, Noel; Isham, Debra; Duran, Florence Tinka; Denny, Loretta; Lindstrom, Denise; Crawford, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum (NNACC) was a community-based participatory research study among five American Indian organizations. The intervention required lay Native Patient Navigators (NPNs) to implement and evaluate community education workshops in their local settings. Community education was a new role for the NPNs and resulted in many lessons learned. NPNs met quarterly from 2008 through 2013 and shared lessons learned with one another and with the administrative team. In July 2012, the NPNs prioritized lessons learned throughout the study that were specific to implementing the education intervention. These were shared to help other navigators who may be including community education within their scope of work. The NPNs identified eight lessons learned that can be divided into three categories: NPN education and training, workshop content and presentation, and workshop logistics and problem-solving. A ninth overarching lesson for the entire NNACC study identified meeting community needs as an avenue for success. This project was successful due to the diligence of the NPNs in understanding their communities' needs and striving to meet them through education workshops. Nine lessons were identified by the NPNs who provided community education through the NNACC project. Most are relevant to all patient navigators, regardless of patient population, who are incorporating public education into navigation services. Due to their intervention and budget implications, many of these lessons also are relevant to those who are developing navigation research.

  8. Health Literacy, Education Levels, and Patient Portal Usage During Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sharon E.; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kripalani, Sunil; Goggins, Kathryn M.; Jackson, Gretchen Purcell

    2015-01-01

    Patient portal adoption has rapidly increased, and portal usage has been associated with patients’ sociodemographics, health literacy, and education. Research on patient portals has primarily focused on the outpatient setting. We explored whether health literacy and education were associated with portal usage in an inpatient population. Among 60,159 admissions in 2012–2013, 23.3% of patients reported limited health literacy; 50.4% reported some post-secondary education; 34.4% were registered for the portal; and 23.4% of registered patients used the portal during hospitalization. Probability of registration and inpatient portal use increased with educational attainment. Health literacy was associated with registration but not inpatient use. Among admissions with inpatient use, educational attainment was associated with viewing health record data, and health literacy was associated use of appointment and health education tools. The inpatient setting may provide an opportunity to overcome barriers to patient portal adoption and reduce disparities in use of health information technologies. PMID:26958286

  9. Promoting Immigrant Women's Cardiovascular Health Redesigning Patient Education Interventions.

    PubMed

    Fredericks, Suzanne; Guruge, Sepali

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death among women from low- to middle-income countries. The most common cardiovascular nursing intervention is that of patient education. However, the applicability of this intervention is questionable, as these educational initiatives are typically designed and evaluated using samples of "white" homogeneous males. Using the social determinants of health framework, this discursive article identifies specific strategies for redesigning existing cardiovascular education interventions to enhance their applicability to immigrant women. The recommendations will allow nurses to enhance the educational support offered resulting in the reduction and/or prevention of cardiovascular-related symptoms and/or complications. PMID:26517345

  10. The Use of Standardized Patients in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Stacy E.; Weidner, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Standardized patients are widely used in health care programs to both teach and evaluate the communication and clinical skills of students. Although athletic training education programs (ATEPs) commonly use simulations, little information exists related to the use and implementation of standardized patients (SPs). Objective: To provide…

  11. A new approach for patient education: beyond constructivism.

    PubMed

    Giordan, A; Jacquemet, S; Golay, A

    1999-09-01

    Over the last ten years, research developed in science education, especially at the University of Geneva, has demonstrated that education must be centered on interactions between the learner's conceptions and a systemic educational environment. Transposed to a medical knowledge, this new model, originally conceived by the authors and called the 'allosteric learning model', offers new ways of considering patient education. After criticizing the 'grand theories' of learning, mainly the latest ones called constructivist models, the authors suggest a new set of micromodels designed to explain thoroughly the functioning of the patient's thought process (questions, frame of references, semantic network,...) and his understanding of medical information on his own disease. For health care providers, these models also offer a series of new pedagogical approaches both efficient and original to regulate the act of education based on confrontation, mobilisation, integration, etc.

  12. [Patient education for children and adolescents with chronic diseases].

    PubMed

    Tubiana-Rufi, Nadia

    2009-12-01

    The education of children with chronic diseases and of their parents is a treatment procedure that must be integrated into the management of the child's disease: it is essential for his or her physical and psychological health and quality of life. This continuous process is part of long-term follow-up and of the child's development; it is not a procedure that can be carried out once and for all. The program must include initial, follow-up, and advanced education. Treatment education for parents occurs simultaneously with the child's medical management and has the same requirements as that of the child (which means that the time spent in this education requires financial support). The role of the pediatrics departments serving these children is essential, and they must work with other participants, whose roles are not identical to they perform in education for adult patients. Pediatric patient education requires an interdisciplinary pediatric team with specific skills and appropriate liaison with those involved in other aspects of the child's life (e.g., daycare and school). The child's psychological development is central to the design and implementation of pediatric patient education programs. Knowledge of child development is critical in providing these services for children and adolescents; training in this field is required in addition to that necessary for adult patient education. Epidemiologic findings of the increased incidence of several chronic diseases in children must be considered in decisions about the resources allocated to coping with them. The particularities and requirements of adolescence and its interactions with chronic disease must also be considered in specific patient education programs for adolescents, and in the training and skills of healthcare professionals.

  13. Patient literacy and the readability of smoking education literature.

    PubMed Central

    Meade, C D; Byrd, J C

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if primary care clinic patients read at a level congruent to the reading grade level of available smoking literature. Reading estimates of smoking education literature (N = 49) ranged from grade 3 to college level (median = 9.5). Reading skills of 258 smoking patients were estimated by reported years of schooling (median = 10), and by scores on the Wide-Range Achievement Test (median = 6). A serious disparity existed between the reading estimates of smoking education literature and the literacy skills of patients in our sample. PMID:2913844

  14. An Analysis, Using Concept Mapping, of Diabetic Patients' Knowledge, before and after Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, C.; d'Ivernois, J. F.; Assal, J. P.; Slama, G.; Hivon, R.

    2002-01-01

    Assesses whether concept maps used with diabetic patients could describe their cognitive structure, before and after having followed an educational program. Involves 10 diabetic patients and shows that concept maps can be a suitable technique to explore the type and organization of the patients' prior knowledge and to visualize what they have…

  15. Patient Education in University Health Services: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Planning and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensley, Loren B., Jr.; Moffitt, Patrick B.

    1978-01-01

    This article looks at the patient education program and explains the role of the patient education intern at Central Michigan University. Included are helpful recommendations for persons interested in developing similar health education programs. (YG)

  16. Development of a preoperative neuroscience educational program for patients with lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Butler, David S; Diener, Ina; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2013-05-01

    Postoperative rehabilitation for lumbar radiculopathy has shown little effect on reducing pain and disability. Current preoperative education programs with a focus on a biomedical approach feature procedural and anatomical information, and these too have shown little effect on postoperative outcomes. This report describes the development of an evidence-based educational program and booklet for patients undergoing lumbar surgery for radiculopathy using a recently conducted systematic review of neuroscience education for musculoskeletal pain. The previous systematic review produced evidence for neuroscience education as well as best-evidence synthesis of the content and delivery methods for neuroscience education for musculoskeletal pain. These evidence statements were extracted and developed into patient-centered messages and a booklet, which was then evaluated by peer and patient review. The neuroscience educational booklet and preoperative program convey key messages from the previous systematic review aimed at reducing fear and anxiety before surgery and assist in developing realistic expectations regarding pain after surgery. Key topics include the decision to undergo surgery, pain processing, peripheral nerve sensitization, effect of anxiety and stress on pain, surgery and the nervous system, and decreasing nerve sensitization. Feedback from the evaluations of the booklet and preoperative program was favorable from all review groups, suggesting that this proposed evidence-based neuroscience educational program may be ready for clinical application.

  17. Creating Competitive Advantage through Effective Management Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Clinton O.; Ariss, Sonny S.

    2002-01-01

    Managers trained in executive education programs (n=203) identified ways in which management education can increase an organization's competitive advantage: exposure to new ideas and practices, skill development, and motivation. Characteristics of effective management education included experience-based learning orientation, credible instructors,…

  18. Educators’ perspectives about how older hospital patients can engage in a falls prevention education programme: a qualitative process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Anne-Marie; McPhail, Steven M; Francis-Coad, Jacqueline; Waldron, Nicholas; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Flicker, Leon; Ingram, Katharine; Haines, Terry P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Falls are the most frequent adverse event reported in hospitals. Patient and staff education delivered by trained educators significantly reduced falls and injurious falls in an older rehabilitation population. The purpose of the study was to explore the educators’ perspectives of delivering the education and to conceptualise how the programme worked to prevent falls among older patients who received the education. Design A qualitative exploratory study. Methods Data were gathered from three sources: conducting a focus group and an interview (n=10 educators), written educator notes and reflective researcher field notes based on interactions with the educators during the primary study. The educators delivered the programme on eight rehabilitation wards for periods of between 10 and 40 weeks. They provided older patients with individualised education to engage in falls prevention and provided staff with education to support patient actions. Data were thematically analysed and presented using a conceptual framework. Results Falls prevention education led to mutual understanding between staff and patients which assisted patients to engage in falls prevention behaviours. Mutual understanding was derived from the following observations: the educators perceived that they could facilitate an effective three-way interaction between staff actions, patient actions and the ward environment which led to behaviour change on the wards. This included engaging with staff and patients, and assisting them to reconcile differing perspectives about falls prevention behaviours. Conclusions Individualised falls prevention education effectively provides patients who receive it with the capability and motivation to develop and undertake behavioural strategies that reduce their falls, if supported by staff and the ward environment. PMID:26656027

  19. Preferred Method of Education Among Patients in Ophthalmic Care in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    AlHilali, Sara M.; AlMuammar, Abdulrahman M.; AlKahtani, Eman; Khandekar, Rajiv; AlJasser, Abdulrahman A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Educating patients about their diagnosis and proposed management is integral part of healthcare. Often patient noncompliance is due to a lack of knowledge that could result in irreversible ocular damage. In an era where access to information is virtually unlimited, an understanding of the preferred method of eye care education among patients is required for greater effectiveness in lowering morbidity and mortality of diseases. Subjects and Methods: Patients visiting the ophthalmology clinics of a tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were interviewed. This cross-sectional study was conducted between December 2014 and March 2015. A representative sample of 200 patients was enrolled. Close-ended questionnaire covering current and client preferred health promotion methods were used to collect clients’ response. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results: Out of the 200 participants, 110 (55%) were males. The majority (n = 154; 77%) listed an ophthalmologist as their current primary source of information regarding their eye condition. Approximately half of the participants (n = 95; 48%) were keen to be educated regarding the causes of the eye disease. The top four educational methods preferred by patients were one-on-one session with an eye care provider (n = 116; 58%), a group session with an eye care provider (n = 30; 15%), an application on a smartphone (n = 53; 27%), video lectures on eye health and diseases (n = 8; 4%). Conclusion: Majority of patients in ophthalmic care prefer a one-on-one session with an eye care provider for their eye care education. PMID:27162447

  20. Efficacy of Virtual Patients in Medical Education: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consorti, Fabrizio; Mancuso, Rosaria; Nocioni, Martina; Piccolo, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the Effect Size (ES) from randomized studies comparing the effect of educational interventions in which Virtual patients (VPs) were used either as an alternative method or additive to usual curriculum versus interventions based on more traditional methods. Meta-analysis was designed, conducted and reported…

  1. Implementing effective staff education about advance directives.

    PubMed

    DesRosiers, M; Navin, P

    1997-01-01

    The Patient Self-Determination Act of 1990 guarantees the right to refuse medical or surgical treatment and the right to draft advance directives. This review of the current literature provides those in nursing staff development and inservice education with an overview of advance directives and their implications for nursing education and practice. Possible core subjects for inclusion in planned, purposeful, advance directive education programs are examined, including cultural sensitivity, facilitator skills, interviewing techniques, legal information, patient autonomy, and reasoning and decision making. This review provides a platform for future research.

  2. ETHICAL MODELS OF PHYSICIAN--PATIENT RELATIONSHIP REVISITED WITH REGARD TO PATIENT AUTONOMY, VALUES AND PATIENT EDUCATION.

    PubMed

    Borza, Liana Rada; Gavrilovici, Cristina; Stockman, René

    2015-01-01

    The present paper revisits the ethical models of patient--physician relationship from the perspective of patient autonomy and values. It seems that the four traditional models of physician--patient relationship proposed by Emanuel & Emanuel in 1992 closely link patient values and patient autonomy. On the other hand, their reinterpretation provided by Agarwal & Murinson twenty years later emphasizes the independent expression of values and autonomy in individual patients. Additionally, patient education has been assumed to join patient values and patient autonomy. Moreover, several authors have noted that, over the past few decades, patient autonomy has gradually replaced the paternalistic approach based on the premise that the physician knows what is best for the patient. Neither the paternalistic model of physician-patient relationship, nor the informative model is considered to be satisfactory, as the paternalistic model excludes patient values from decision making, while the informative model excludes physician values from decision making. However, the deliberative model of patient-physician interaction represents an adequate alternative to the two unsatisfactory approaches by promoting shared decision making between the physician and the patient. It has also been suggested that the deliberative model would be ideal for exercising patient autonomy in chronic care and that the ethical role of patient education would be to make the deliberative model applicable to chronic care. In this regard, studies have indicated that the use of decision support interventions might increase the deliberative capacity of chronic patients.

  3. A perioperative education program for pediatric patients and their parents.

    PubMed

    Adams, Holly A

    2011-04-01

    Preparing pediatric patients for surgery is crucial to positive patient and parent experiences. Through preoperative screening, observation, and postoperative feedback, clinical staff nurses at the Yellowstone Surgery Center (YSC) in Billings, Montana, identified a need to provide increased information to pediatric patients and their parents regarding the surgical process and postoperative expectations for recovery. The director of nursing developed a program for patients that includes preoperative education and a hands-on experience. The YSC Kids program is a customizable program that includes nine initiatives designed specifically for children. The program has been shown to successfully educate pediatric patients and their parents about the entire perioperative process, thus easing their anxiety about an unfamiliar situation.

  4. The Patient Educator Presentation in Dental Education: Reinforcing the Importance of Learning About Rare Conditions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul C; Graham, Jasmine; Oling, Rebecca; Frantz, Kate E

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a patient educator presentation (PEP) on pemphigus vulgaris would increase second-year dental students' awareness of the importance of learning about rare conditions and improve their retention of rare disease knowledge. The study involved students' subjective assessments of a PEP experience at two U.S. dental schools. In this mixed methods study, cross-sectional data were obtained by surveys and in-depth interviews. Questions focused on students' assessment of the messages acquired from the PEP and its likely impact on their future clinical care. At University 1, students completed paper surveys with open-ended questions and participated in a focus group. At University 2, students completed an online survey consisting of rating scale and open-ended questions. Responses to open-ended questions were categorized into themes. At University 1, 79 students (out of a possible 102; response rate 77.5%) completed the survey, and an additional ten students participated in a focus group. At University 2, 30 students (out of a possible 104; response rate 28.8%) completed the survey. At Universities 1 and 2, 88% and 100%, respectively, of respondents stated the PEP would influence their future clinical decision making. The vast majority of respondents (94% and 100% at University 1 and University 2, respectively) were of the opinion that the personal testimonial from a patient would help them recall information about pemphigus vulgaris in five years' time. Respondents from both universities commented that the PEP emphasized the importance of not dismissing a patient's concerns. These results suggest that a presentation by a patient with a rare condition can be an effective educational tool for preclinical dental students. PMID:27139204

  5. The Patient Educator Presentation in Dental Education: Reinforcing the Importance of Learning About Rare Conditions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul C; Graham, Jasmine; Oling, Rebecca; Frantz, Kate E

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a patient educator presentation (PEP) on pemphigus vulgaris would increase second-year dental students' awareness of the importance of learning about rare conditions and improve their retention of rare disease knowledge. The study involved students' subjective assessments of a PEP experience at two U.S. dental schools. In this mixed methods study, cross-sectional data were obtained by surveys and in-depth interviews. Questions focused on students' assessment of the messages acquired from the PEP and its likely impact on their future clinical care. At University 1, students completed paper surveys with open-ended questions and participated in a focus group. At University 2, students completed an online survey consisting of rating scale and open-ended questions. Responses to open-ended questions were categorized into themes. At University 1, 79 students (out of a possible 102; response rate 77.5%) completed the survey, and an additional ten students participated in a focus group. At University 2, 30 students (out of a possible 104; response rate 28.8%) completed the survey. At Universities 1 and 2, 88% and 100%, respectively, of respondents stated the PEP would influence their future clinical decision making. The vast majority of respondents (94% and 100% at University 1 and University 2, respectively) were of the opinion that the personal testimonial from a patient would help them recall information about pemphigus vulgaris in five years' time. Respondents from both universities commented that the PEP emphasized the importance of not dismissing a patient's concerns. These results suggest that a presentation by a patient with a rare condition can be an effective educational tool for preclinical dental students.

  6. Utilization of Blood Glucose Data in Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Kumah-Crystal, Yaa; Mulvaney, Shelagh

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have tested clinical and behavioral approaches for improving glycemic control in people with diabetes. We review research to identify how blood glucose (BG) values have been used in patient-focused clinical research and interventions. We sought to describe the frequency that BG values have been the focus of patient education research and to characterize the different methods to integrate BG into an intervention, the approaches implemented to support patient education and behavior change, and the nature of communication about BG values. Thirty-four eligible studies were identified that included patient education using BG values. Information regarding the study and intervention characteristics include: 1) Characteristics of the study sample, 2) How BG values were obtained, 3) Use of a graphical interface for BG values, 4) Use of a BG log, 5) BG interpretation and regimen adjustments, 6) Recommended actions to patient, 7) Modality of intervention, and 8) Intervention communication schedule. The review demonstrated that new BG technologies provide outstanding opportunities for greater access to BG data, and for patient support and intervention. However, it also indicated a need to improve and expand support for people with diabetes in their daily use of BG values to maintain and improve glycemic control. In order to make the most sustainable impact on behavior, generalizable skills such as problem solving need to be integrated into BG education. PMID:24057927

  7. Influence of nutritional education on hemodialysis patients' knowledge and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Amanpour, Farzaneh; Dadgari, Ali

    2016-03-01

    To determine the effects of educational instructions on hemodialysis patients' knowledge and quality of life (QOL), we studied 99 patients randomly assigned to control and experimental groups after participation in a pretest exam. The two groups were not significantly different in terms of demographic composition. The instrument used in this study was a questionnaire regarding patients' knowledge and the standard questionnaire to assess QOL for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Then, intervention (nutritional education) was conducted in the experimental group lasting for 12 weeks. After 16 weeks, a post test regarding subjects' knowledge on dietary instructions and their QOL were as conducted. There was no significant difference in QOL score and knowledge score before and after intervention in the control group, but there was a significant difference in the experimental group. In addition, after the intervention, the difference in knowledge and QOL score persisted between the two groups. The results of this study supported the positive effects of educational program on patients' knowledge and QOL among ESRD patients. It is recommended that dietary instruction be included in all educational programs to improve ESRD patients' QOL.

  8. Developing and producing a patient education video on care of the permanent right atrial catheter.

    PubMed

    Akcasu, N; Bodenmiller, S

    1994-07-01

    Because of current trends in health care, nurses must find efficient, cost-effective, and innovative ways to provide quality patient education. In working with the pediatric oncology population, it is necessary to teach several family members how to care for the patient. One of the skills families must learn is care of the permanent right atrial catheter (PRAC). Although nurses and families together agreed a videotape would be extremely helpful in learning PRAC care, there was no videotape available to meet these needs. We developed and produced a patient education video on care of the permanent right atrial catheter. This article discusses identifying and organizing resources and finances, steps involved in writing and editing a script, and the producing/videotaping process. By sharing our experience, we hope to enable other nurses to create their own patient education materials.

  9. A problem-solving education intervention in caregivers and patients during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bevans, Margaret; Wehrlen, Leslie; Castro, Kathleen; Prince, Patricia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Soeken, Karen; Zabora, James; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in informal caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. Patient/caregiver teams attended three 1-hour problem-solving education sessions to help cope with problems during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Primary measures included the Cancer Self-Efficacy Scale-transplant and Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Active caregivers reported improvements in self-efficacy (p < 0.05) and distress (p < 0.01) post-problem-solving education; caregiver responders also reported better health outcomes such as fatigue. The effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation caregivers supports its inclusion in future interventions to meet the multifaceted needs of this population.

  10. Duration of general practice consultations: association with patient occupational and educational status.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, J H; Sanson-Fisher, R

    1997-04-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that the majority of health care visits are made to general practitioners, and that socio-economically disadvantaged individuals are significantly more likely to use such services. Relatively little is known, however, about the quality of general practice care provided to patients of different socio-economic status. The specific aims of the study were to determine whether an association existed between consultation duration and patient educational and occupational status, and if an association was evident, to determine the extent of association after taking into account a range of identified confounding variables and the effect of a clustered sample design. Consecutive consultations from a randomly selected sample of general practitioners were audiotaped and their durations measured electronically. Patient education and occupational status were obtained by questionnaire. Information concerning a range of additional patient, practitioner and consultation variables was also assessed in order to identify possible confounders of the association between consultation duration and patient occupational and educational status. No association was evident between consultation duration and level of patient educational qualification. Independent of identified confounding variables and the effect of a clustered sample design, general practitioners spent less time with those patients employed in unskilled occupations. Unskilled patients received 2.1 min or 21% less time per consultation than patients in professional occupations. The odds of patients in unskilled occupations receiving a long consultation (> 10 min) were 26% less than the odds of patients in professional occupations. The finding of an occupational status differential in the duration of general practice consultations suggests that socio-economically disadvantaged patients may not be receiving the health care they require. Further research is required to confirm these findings and to

  11. Strategies for improving the quality of verbal patient and family education: a review of the literature and creation of the EDUCATE model

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Cara

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Patient and family education includes print, audio-visual methods, demonstration, and verbal instruction. Our objective was to study verbal instruction as a component of patient and family education and make recommendations for best practices for healthcare providers who use this method. Methods: We conducted a literature review of articles from 1990 to 2014 about verbal education and collaborated on departmental presentations to determine best practices. A survey was sent to all nursing staff to determine perceptions of verbal education and barriers to learning. Results: Through our work, we were able to identify verbal education models, best practices, and needs. We then constructed the EDUCATE model of verbal education, which built upon our findings. Conclusion: Verbal education of patients and family members requires a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account learning styles, literacy, and culture to apply clear communication and methods for the assessment of learning. Providers need the skills, time, and training to effectively perform patient and family verbal education every time they care for patients. Further research needs to be performed on how to test, document, and quantify patients' comprehension and retention of verbal instructions. PMID:25750796

  12. Asthma patient education opportunities in predominantly minority urban communities.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Luis E; McLean, Don

    2007-12-01

    Disenfranchised ethnic minority communities in the urban United States experience a high burden of asthma. Conventional office-based patient education often is insufficient to promote proper asthma management and coping practices responsive to minority patients' environments. This paper explores existing and alternative asthma information and education sources in three urban minority communities in western New York State to help design other practical educational interventions. Four focus groups (n = 59) and four town hall meetings (n = 109) were conducted in one Hispanic and two black communities. Focus groups included adult asthmatics or caretakers of asthmatics, and town meetings were open to all residents. A critical theory perspective informed the study. Asthma information and education sources, perceptions of asthma and ways of coping were elicited through semi-structured interviews. Data analysis followed a theory-driven immersion-crystallization approach. Several asthma education and information resources from the health care system, media, public institutions and communities were identified. Intervention recommendations highlighted asthma workshops that recognize participants as teachers and learners, offer social support, promote advocacy, are culturally appropriate and community-based and include health care professionals. Community-based, group health education couched on people's experiences and societal conditions offers unique opportunities for patient asthma care empowerment in minority urban communities.

  13. The Medical Education and Best Practice in Orthopedic Patient Care in Poland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2012-07-01

    The leadership organization focuses on education, teamwork, customer relationship and developing strategy which help in building added value, in managing activities, time and quality. Everyday orthopedic experience shows that medical education is a mixture of: specific knowledge, skills and attitudes of people working together, and that creates effective teamwork in a hospital environment. Apart from the main reason of medical education, teaching about disease treatment and health problem solving, medical education should also concentrate on human factors and behavioral aspects of patient treatment in hospital.Assessment of an organization and medical education process by cultural and teamwork criteria, offers a powerful new way to think about performance at the frontlines of healthcare and in the future it could be gold standard for assessing the success of an organization, and standards in medical education, not only in orthopedics.

  14. Collaborative Education To Ensure Patient Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

    Results of a joint meeting between national advisory councils in medicine and nursing on physician-nurse collaboration to enhance patient safety are reported. Recommendations on which participants reached consensus are organized by these Institute of Medicine (IOM) themes: establish a national focus to create leadership through research and…

  15. Outward Bound: An Innovative Patient Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Thomas F.; Gaylor, Michael S.

    A 1975 Dartmouth Outward Bound Mental Health Project, begun with a pilot project for disturbed adolescents, has evolved into an ongoing treatment option in three separate clinical settings for psychiatric patients and recovering alcoholics. Outward Bound consists of a series of prescribed physical and social tasks where the presence of stress,…

  16. Outpatient education reduces emergency room use by patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Franchette T; Hoang, Kathy; Hollen, Christopher; Swearingen, Richard; Hakimi, Andrea S; King, Jeanne Ann; Thompson, David

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a costly diagnosis, with emergency room (ER) visits and hospital admissions comprising a large portion of total direct cost. An educational intervention to decrease the number of ER visits was implemented on outpatients with epilepsy, using educational handouts and DVD. The number of ER visits declined significantly in the four months following intervention compared with the preceding four months. This finding supports patient education as a valuable tool to reduce ER use, which may, in turn, cut down on health-care cost. PMID:25499153

  17. [COMETE: a tool to develop psychosocial competences in patient education].

    PubMed

    Saugeron, Benoit; Sonnier, Pierre; Marchais, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a detailed description of the development and use of the COMETE tool. The COMETE tool is designed to help medical teams identify, develop or evaluate psychosocial skills in patient education and counselling. This tool, designed in the form of a briefcase, proposes methodological activities and cards that assess psychosocial skills during a shared educational assessment, group meetings or during an individual evaluation. This tool is part of a support approach for medical teams caring for patients with chronic diseases. PMID:27392049

  18. Effectiveness of E-learning in pharmacy education.

    PubMed

    Salter, Sandra M; Karia, Ajay; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2014-05-15

    Over the past 2 decades, e-learning has evolved as a new pedagogy within pharmacy education. As learners and teachers increasingly seek e-learning opportunities for an array of educational and individual benefits, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. This systematic review of the literature examines the quality of e-learning effectiveness studies in pharmacy, describes effectiveness measures, and synthesizes the evidence for each measure. E-learning in pharmacy education effectively increases knowledge and is a highly acceptable instructional format for pharmacists and pharmacy students. However, there is limited evidence that e-learning effectively improves skills or professional practice. There is also no evidence that e-learning is effective at increasing knowledge long term; thus, long-term follow-up studies are required. Translational research is also needed to evaluate the benefits of e-learning at patient and organizational levels.

  19. TextWithSurgeryPatients - A Research Hypothesis in Enhancing Education and Physical Assessment for Abdominal Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Medical surgical nurses may not have the time or resources to provide effective pre- and post-operative instructions for patients in today's healthcare system. And, making timely physical assessments following discharge from the hospital is not always straightforward. Therefore, the risk for readmission associated with post-surgical complications is a concern. At present, mobile healthcare technologies and patient care are precipitously evolving and may serve as a resource to enhance communication between the healthcare provider and patient. A mobile telephone text message (short message service [SMS]) intervention for abdominal surgical patients may foster effective education (communication) and timely self-reported physical assessment in the home environment hence preventing deleterious outcomes. The aim of this research proposal is to identify the feasibility of using a SMS intervention via smart phones to improve health outcomes via timely communication, reach large numbers of at-risk surgical patients and, establish and sustain uniform protocols in a cost-efficient manner. PMID:27332251

  20. A pilot study of an exercise-based patient education program in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Stephanie; Mahli, Mohammed; Drosselmeyer, Julia; Lutz, Christina; Liebherr, Magnus; Schubert, Patric; Haas, Christian T

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical exercise leads to numerous positive effects in PwMS. However, long-term effects of exercise may only be achievable if training is implemented in daily routine. Enabling patients to exercise regularly, we developed a patient education program focused on evidence-based information of training. PwMS were educated in neurophysiological effects of physical exercise, exercise-induced benefits for PwMS, and risk factors (e.g., weather). Fifteen PwMS were analyzed before (T 0) and after (T 1) a 12-week patient education. Afterwards, participants performed their exercises autonomously for 32 weeks and were tested in sustainability tests (T 2). Guided interviews were carried out, additionally. Significant improvements from T 0 to T 1 were found in 6MWT, gait velocity, TUG, fatigue, and quality of life. Significant results of TUG and gait velocity from T 1 to T 2 demonstrated that participants kept few effects after the 32-week training phase. Qualitative analyses showed improved self-confidence and identified training strategies and barriers. This pilot study provides evidence that PwMS are able to acquire good knowledge about physical exercise and apply this knowledge successfully in training management. One might conclude that this exercise-based patient education seems to be a feasible option to maintain or improve patients' integral constitution concerning physical and mental health. PMID:25587449

  1. A Pilot Study of an Exercise-Based Patient Education Program in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahli, Mohammed; Drosselmeyer, Julia; Lutz, Christina; Liebherr, Magnus; Schubert, Patric; Haas, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical exercise leads to numerous positive effects in PwMS. However, long-term effects of exercise may only be achievable if training is implemented in daily routine. Enabling patients to exercise regularly, we developed a patient education program focused on evidence-based information of training. PwMS were educated in neurophysiological effects of physical exercise, exercise-induced benefits for PwMS, and risk factors (e.g., weather). Fifteen PwMS were analyzed before (T0) and after (T1) a 12-week patient education. Afterwards, participants performed their exercises autonomously for 32 weeks and were tested in sustainability tests (T2). Guided interviews were carried out, additionally. Significant improvements from T0 to T1 were found in 6MWT, gait velocity, TUG, fatigue, and quality of life. Significant results of TUG and gait velocity from T1 to T2 demonstrated that participants kept few effects after the 32-week training phase. Qualitative analyses showed improved self-confidence and identified training strategies and barriers. This pilot study provides evidence that PwMS are able to acquire good knowledge about physical exercise and apply this knowledge successfully in training management. One might conclude that this exercise-based patient education seems to be a feasible option to maintain or improve patients' integral constitution concerning physical and mental health. PMID:25587449

  2. Draping Education to Promote Patient Dignity: Canadian Physiotherapy Student and Instructor Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nicole; Lusty, Christopher; Averns, Henry; Hopman, Wilma

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the perceptions of educators and students in Canadian entry-level professional physiotherapy programmes with respect to the current draping curriculum and the methods of delivery of that content and to determine if there is a need for additional draping education time and resources in these programmes. Methods: Canadian university physiotherapy students (n=127) and educators (n=183) completed questionnaires designed by the authors. Data were collected via Survey Monkey, exported as Excel files, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and Pearson chi-square analysis. Results: Students and educators agreed that dignity as a concept and draping as a skill to protect patient dignity are both important and should be included in Canadian physiotherapy curricula. Respondents also agreed that students often have difficulty with draping. Educators identified barriers to teaching draping while students identified components of an effective educational resource on draping. Conclusions: To enhance the development of effective draping skills among entry-level physiotherapists, draping education should be included in Canadian physiotherapy curricula. An effective draping educational resource should be developed for educators and students. PMID:23450117

  3. Informed consent: can we educate patients?

    PubMed

    Askew, G; Pearson, K W; Cryer, D

    1990-10-01

    Previous reports have shown consent to be 'short' of informed in many cases. One hundred patients, including a control group, were interviewed between 2 and 7 days after their operations. Those given an information sheet before the operation had a better recall of their operations than the controls, the overall awareness being 97 and 69% respectively. This may have medico-legal implications but further studies are required.

  4. Effective Online Instruction in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford-Ferre, Heather Glynn; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2012-01-01

    Online education has emerged as an effective and increasingly common alternative to face-to-face instruction in postsecondary education. This article is a summary of effective practices in online instructional methods, including course design, interaction among course participants, and instructor preparation and support.

  5. Profile of an Effective Urban Music Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Vicki D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a profile of an effective urban music educator in an effort to provide strategies for university teacher training programs to prepare students to teach in urban schools. The study examined urban music teachers' (N = 158) educational background, effective and ineffective characteristics, perceived…

  6. Estimation of Unreimbursed Patient Education Costs at a Large Group Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Arthur R.; McDougall, John C.; Bruggeman, Sandra K.; Erwin, Patricia J.; Kroshus, Margo E.; Naessens, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: A search of the literature on the cost of patient education found that provider education time per patient per day was rarely reported and usually not derivable from published reports. Costs of continuing education needed by health professionals to support patient education also were not given. Without this information, it is…

  7. Patient Education and Health Promotion: Clinical Health Promotion--The Conceptual Link.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraher, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Presents a model linking health promotion, health education, and patient education. The bases for distinctions between health education, patient education, and clinical health promotion are examined. The linking elements of the model are patient role, relationships adopted, and focus of the encounter; i.e., disease process vs. disease management.…

  8. [The cure of type 2 diabetes and patient education].

    PubMed

    Lagger, G; Chambouleyron, M; Correia, J C; Sittarame, F; Miganne, G; Lasserre Moutet, A; Golay, A

    2015-03-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a potentially reversible disease. Patient education encompasses a deep investment of the health care providers, who with the aid of pedagogic tools, help the pa tient commit to this path. This facilitates the learning of uncommon knowledge and skills required. Whether or not it leads to a complete remission of the disease may not be the main purpose. The main goal lies in the patient's motivation to learn and change on a long term basis.

  9. Therapeutic patient education and exercise therapy in patients with cervicogenic dizziness: a prospective case series clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Minguez-Zuazo, Ana; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; Saiz, Beatriz Moral; La Touche, Roy; Lara, Sergio Lerma

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment for patients with cervicogenic dizziness that consisted of therapeutic education and exercises. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory and Neck Disability Index were used. Secondary outcomes included range of motion, postural control, and psychological variables. Seven patients (two males and five females) aged 38.43±14.10 with cervicogenic dizziness were included. All the participants received eight treatment sessions. The treatment was performed twice a week during a four weeks period. Outcome measures included a questionnaire (demographic data, body chart, and questions about pain) and self-reported disability, pain, and psychological variables. Subjects were examined for cervical range of motion and postural control. All of these variables were assessed pre- and postintervention. Participants received eight sessions of therapeutic education patient and therapeutic exercise. The majority of participants showed an improvement in catastrophism (mean change, 11.57±7.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.96–18.17; d=1.60), neck disability (mean change, 5.14±2.27.28; 95% CI, 3.04–7.24; d=1.32), and dizziness disability (mean change, 9.71±6.96; 95% CI, 3.26–16.15; d=1.01). Patients also showed improved range of motion in the right and left side. Therapeutic patient education in combination with therapeutic exercise was an effective treatment. Future research should investigate the efficacy of therapeutic patient education and exercise with larger sample sizes of patients with cervicogenic dizziness. PMID:27419118

  10. Therapeutic patient education and exercise therapy in patients with cervicogenic dizziness: a prospective case series clinical study.

    PubMed

    Minguez-Zuazo, Ana; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; Saiz, Beatriz Moral; La Touche, Roy; Lara, Sergio Lerma

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment for patients with cervicogenic dizziness that consisted of therapeutic education and exercises. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory and Neck Disability Index were used. Secondary outcomes included range of motion, postural control, and psychological variables. Seven patients (two males and five females) aged 38.43±14.10 with cervicogenic dizziness were included. All the participants received eight treatment sessions. The treatment was performed twice a week during a four weeks period. Outcome measures included a questionnaire (demographic data, body chart, and questions about pain) and self-reported disability, pain, and psychological variables. Subjects were examined for cervical range of motion and postural control. All of these variables were assessed pre- and postintervention. Participants received eight sessions of therapeutic education patient and therapeutic exercise. The majority of participants showed an improvement in catastrophism (mean change, 11.57±7.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.96-18.17; d=1.60), neck disability (mean change, 5.14±2.27.28; 95% CI, 3.04-7.24; d=1.32), and dizziness disability (mean change, 9.71±6.96; 95% CI, 3.26-16.15; d=1.01). Patients also showed improved range of motion in the right and left side. Therapeutic patient education in combination with therapeutic exercise was an effective treatment. Future research should investigate the efficacy of therapeutic patient education and exercise with larger sample sizes of patients with cervicogenic dizziness.

  11. Therapeutic patient education and exercise therapy in patients with cervicogenic dizziness: a prospective case series clinical study.

    PubMed

    Minguez-Zuazo, Ana; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; Saiz, Beatriz Moral; La Touche, Roy; Lara, Sergio Lerma

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment for patients with cervicogenic dizziness that consisted of therapeutic education and exercises. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory and Neck Disability Index were used. Secondary outcomes included range of motion, postural control, and psychological variables. Seven patients (two males and five females) aged 38.43±14.10 with cervicogenic dizziness were included. All the participants received eight treatment sessions. The treatment was performed twice a week during a four weeks period. Outcome measures included a questionnaire (demographic data, body chart, and questions about pain) and self-reported disability, pain, and psychological variables. Subjects were examined for cervical range of motion and postural control. All of these variables were assessed pre- and postintervention. Participants received eight sessions of therapeutic education patient and therapeutic exercise. The majority of participants showed an improvement in catastrophism (mean change, 11.57±7.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.96-18.17; d=1.60), neck disability (mean change, 5.14±2.27.28; 95% CI, 3.04-7.24; d=1.32), and dizziness disability (mean change, 9.71±6.96; 95% CI, 3.26-16.15; d=1.01). Patients also showed improved range of motion in the right and left side. Therapeutic patient education in combination with therapeutic exercise was an effective treatment. Future research should investigate the efficacy of therapeutic patient education and exercise with larger sample sizes of patients with cervicogenic dizziness. PMID:27419118

  12. Role of health care providers in educational training of patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rabbone, Ivana; De Vito, B; Sacchetti, Carla; Cerutti, Franco

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a high prevalence chronic disease, in which several health care providers are involved in the treatment of patients. Multifaceted professional and organizational interventions that facilitate structured and regular review of patients are effective in improving the process of care. Moreover, patient education and enhancement of role of nurses improve clinical outcomes and process of care. As diabetic management requires strict commitment of the patients, their educational therapy is mandatory. Therapeutic Patient Education (TPE) is a continous process, integrated in health care; it is a permanent care process, patient-centred, that must be adapted to the evolution of illness and to the patient's lifestyle; TPE must be structured and organized and it should receive benefits from the appropriate pedagogic means. Since the publication of DCCT data it was clear that intensive insulin therapy had been successfully applied only in centers where a diabetologist, a specialized nurse, a dietician, a psycologist and a motivated patient worked all together, i.e. where there was a "team". The team has to follow a pedagogic, multidisciplinary and patient-centred methodology of care. Well structured integration between health care providers may help to avoid the burn-out syndrome.

  13. [Patient education and treatment documentation - Law to Improve the Rights of Patients].

    PubMed

    Meltendorf, G; Meltendorf, C

    2013-07-01

    The Law to Improve the Rights of Patients came into force with the promulgation in the (German) Federal Law Gazette on February 25, 2013. Thus administrations of medical institutions and doctors of all disciplines should themselves acquaint with the statutory regulations and their impact on the daily practice. The present article describes and explains the statutory regulations concerning patient education and treatment documentation.

  14. [Patient education and treatment documentation - law to improve the rights of patients].

    PubMed

    Meltendorf, Gerhard; Meltendorf, Christian

    2013-07-01

    The Law to Improve the Rights of Patients came into force with the promulgation in the German Federal Law Gazette on February 25, 2013. Thus administrations of medical institutions and doctors of all disciplines should acquaint themselves with the statutory regulations and their impact on the daily practice. The present article describes and explains the statutory regulations concerning patient education and treatment documentation.

  15. Effectiveness of Supplemental Educational Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deke, John; Gill, Brian; Dragoset, Lisa; Bogen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    One of the modifications of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (known as the No Child Left Behind Act) gave parents of low-income students in low-performing schools a choice of Supplemental Educational Services (SEdS). SEdS include tutoring or other academic support services offered outside the regular school day, at no charge to students…

  16. Effective Communication in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The intent for this paper is to show that communication within the higher education field is a current problem. By looking first at the different styles, forms, and audiences for communication, the reader will hopefully gain perspective as to why this is such a problem in higher education today. Since the Millennial generation is the newest set of…

  17. Character Education: Developing Effective Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Annette Kusgen

    1998-01-01

    A literature review revealed what does not work in character education: lecturing, authoritative teaching styles, external codes of ethics, and lack of student participation in setting ethics agendas. What works are use of community context; enhanced school, family, and community environment; peer education; cooperative learning; and giving…

  18. Human Patient Simulators in Nursing Education: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehring, Wendy M.; Ellis, Wayne E.; Lashley, Felissa R.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the human patient simulator and discusses the value of this technology for undergraduate and graduate nursing education, research, and evaluation. Highlights include an example of the use of the simulator; critical incident nursing management as a framework for instruction using the simulator; and administrative considerations. (LRW)

  19. The Development of Kidney Stone Dietary Plans for Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Darwin; Mayo, M. Leah; Abraham, Victor E.

    2011-01-01

    Currently patient education programs and urology practices provide individuals with "lists of foods to avoid" for dietary management of kidney stones. However, "planned diets" that include daily meal plans and recipes provide structure and specificity for diet management and are preferred by many individuals. This article describes the development…

  20. Standardized Patients in Art Therapy Education: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Helen; Deaver, Sarah; Johansson, Mark; Calisch, Abby

    2013-01-01

    Simulation is used widely in medical and health professions educational programs. Standardized patients (SPs) are individuals who are trained to simulate specific symptoms or conditions as part of a structured learning experience with students. In this qualitative, phenomenological study the researcher interviewed 8 first-year graduate art therapy…

  1. [Osteoarthritis and patient therapeutic education, learning to move more].

    PubMed

    Coudeyre, Emmanuel; Gay, Chloé; Bareyre, Loïc; Coste, Nicolas; Chérillat, Marie-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    As part of the prevention strategies offered to people with osteoarthritis, therapeutic education plays a key role. It seeks to help the patient become a player in their own care and focuses in particular on the factors influencing regular participation in suitable physical activity. PMID:27633694

  2. The Use of Readability Formulas in Patient Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Paul J.; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine the SMOG readability formula scores of currently available patient education materials. It was hypothesized that the reading level of the materials would be higher than 7.5, the reading level of the average American citizen; and that there would be a significant reduction in the measured document reading levels…

  3. Standardized handoff report form in clinical nursing education: An educational tool for patient safety and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Lim, Fidelindo; Pajarillo, Edmund J Y

    2016-02-01

    Effective change-of-shift handoff communication is a core competency in the generalist education of nurses. The use of a standardized handoff tool that fosters higher order thinking and clinical reasoning is fundamental in clinical education and nursing practice (AACN, 2008). A checklist that prompts students to implement evidence-based safety alerts will increase students' confidence and autonomy, prevent errors, promote patient safety, and successfully transform theoretical learning into competent practice. High-quality handoffs and contextualized post-conference debriefing using key items in the handoff form will help increase students' feelings of precision, accuracy, improve their self-image, and enhance their sense of professional belonging. PMID:26573150

  4. [A patient-expert in patient education. The story of practice].

    PubMed

    Helle, Patrick; Clavagnier, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    The notion of patient-expert has existed in France since the years 2000 and has been used by patients' associations, notably the Association François Aupetit (AFA). Patrick Helle, who suffers from a chronic inflammatory disease, holds a degree in therapeutic education. He organizes and hosts workshops on this topic, alone or in cooperation with healthcare professionals at three public hospitals. This patient-expert serves as a bridge between caregivers and patients, sharing his experience as a patient and transmitting experiential knowledge. He shares his story with us.

  5. Educating patients: understanding barriers, learning styles, and teaching techniques.

    PubMed

    Beagley, Linda

    2011-10-01

    Health care delivery and education has become a challenge for providers. Nurses and other professionals are challenged daily to assure that the patient has the necessary information to make informed decisions. Patients and their families are given a multitude of information about their health and commonly must make important decisions from these facts. Obstacles that prevent easy delivery of health care information include literacy, culture, language, and physiological barriers. It is up to the nurse to assess and evaluate the patient's learning needs and readiness to learn because everyone learns differently. This article will examine how each of these barriers impact care delivery along with teaching and learning strategies will be examined.

  6. Bootstrapping Results of Exercise Therapy and Education for Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witta, E. Lea; Brubaker, Craig

    2003-01-01

    When studies are conducted over a period of time, the sample size typically decreases. In a study of the effects of exercise therapy and education with recovering congestive heart failure (CHF) patients (Brubaker, Witta, & Angelopoulus, 2003), the sample size decreased from over 40 to 9 participants after an 18-month time span. Although the…

  7. What happens when patients know more than their doctors? Experiences of health interactions after diabetes patient education: a qualitative patient-led study

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Rosamund; Humphrey, Charlotte; Sandall, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of patient education on the lives of people with diabetes, including the effect on interactions with doctors and other healthcare professionals. Design Qualitative user-led study using longitudinal interviews and 146 h of participant observation. Data were analysed using a narrative approach. Participants 21 patients with type 1 diabetes, those either about to attend a patient education course or those who had completed the course in the previous 10 years. Setting Established patient education centres in three UK teaching hospitals teaching the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) course. Results Both postcourse and several years later, most participants spoke of the experience of taking part in education as life-changingly positive. It helped them understand how to gain control over a very complex disease and freed them from dependence on medical advice and restrictive regimes. However, interactions within the health system following patient education could be fraught. Participants emerged from the course with greater condition-specific knowledge than many of the healthcare professionals they encountered. When these professionals did not understand what their patients were trying to do and were uncomfortable trusting their expertise, there could be serious consequences for these patients' ability to continue effective self-management. Conclusions Patients who have in-depth knowledge of their condition encounter problems when their expertise is seen as inappropriate in standard healthcare interactions, and expertise taught to patients in one branch of medicine can be considered non-compliant by those who are not specialists in that field. Although patient education can give people confidence in their own self-management skills, it cannot solve the power imbalance that remains when a generalist healthcare professional, however well meaning, blocks access to medication and supplies needed to manage chronic diseases

  8. Quality physical education: a commentary on effective physical education teaching.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Ben

    2014-06-01

    In my commentary in response to the 3 articles (McKenzie & Lounsbery, 2013; Rink, 2013; Ward, 2013), I focus on 3 areas: (a) content knowledge, (b) a holistic approach to physical education, and (c) policy impact. I use the term quality teaching rather than "teacher effectiveness." Quality teaching is a term with the potential to move our attention beyond a focus merely on issues of effectiveness relating to the achievement of prespecified objectives. I agree with Ward that teacher content knowledge is limited in physical education, and I argue that if the student does not have a connection to or relationship with the content, this will diminish their learning gains. I also argue for a more holistic approach to physical education coming from a broader conception. Physical educators who teach the whole child advocate for a plethora of physical activity, skills, knowledge, and positive attitudes that foster healthy and active playful lifestyles. Play is a valuable educational experience. I also endorse viewing assessment from different perspectives and discuss assessment through a social-critical political lens. The 3 articles also have implications for policy. Physical education is much broader than just physical activity, and we harm the future potential of our field if we adopt a narrow agenda. Looking to the future, I propose that we broaden the kinds of research that we value, support, and appreciate in our field.

  9. Nutrition education intervention for dependent patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malnutrition in dependent patients has a high prevalence and can influence the prognosis associated with diverse pathologic processes, decrease quality of life, and increase morbidity-mortality and hospital admissions. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of an educational intervention for caregivers on the nutritional status of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Methods/Design Intervention study with control group, randomly allocated, of 200 patients of the Home Care Program carried out in 8 Primary Care Centers (Spain). These patients are dependent and at risk of malnutrition, older than 65, and have caregivers. The socioeconomic and educational characteristics of the patient and the caregiver are recorded. On a schedule of 0–6–12 months, patients are evaluated as follows: Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), food intake, dentures, degree of dependency (Barthel test), cognitive state (Pfeiffer test), mood status (Yesavage test), and anthropometric and serum parameters of nutritional status: albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, haemoglobin, lymphocyte count, iron, and ferritin. Prior to the intervention, the educational procedure and the design of educational material are standardized among nurses. The nurses conduct an initial session for caregivers and then monitor the education impact at home every month (4 visits) up to 6 months. The North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) methodology will be used. The investigators will study the effect of the intervention with caregivers on the patient’s nutritional status using the MNA test, diet, anthropometry, and biochemical parameters. Bivariate normal test statistics and multivariate models will be created to adjust the effect of the intervention. The SPSS/PC program will be used for statistical analysis. Discussion The nutritional status of dependent patients has been little studied. This study allows us to know nutritional risk from different points of view: diet

  10. Readability of Online Patient Educational Materials on Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Shnaekel, Asa; Hadden, Kristie; Barnes, C Lowry

    2015-01-01

    Low health literacy is associated with a poorer ability to understand and follow health instructions and advice, poorer health outcomes, and poorer use of health care services. Patients with low health literacy have difficulty accessing and understanding online health materials that are not written in plain language. This study assessed the readability of patient education materials that are focused on pain, a significant contributor to clinical outcomes after orthopaedic surgery. Results revealed that the overall mean readability level of the documents that were accessed online was higher than the 10th grade. Efforts should focus on making patient education easier to understand for the nearly 80 million Americans who struggle with health literacy. PMID:26731388

  11. Patient safety education for undergraduate medical students: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To reduce harm caused by health care is a global priority. Medical students should be able to recognize unsafe conditions, systematically report errors and near misses, investigate and improve such systems with a thorough understanding of human fallibility, and disclose errors to patients. Incorporating the knowledge of how to do this into the medical student curriculum is an urgent necessity. This paper aims to systematically review the literature about patient safety education for undergraduate medical students in terms of its content, teaching strategies, faculty availability and resources provided so as to identify evidence on how to promote patient safety in the curriculum for medical schools. This paper includes a perspective from the faculty of a medical school, a major hospital and an Evidence Based Medicine Centre in Sichuan Province, China. Methods We searched MEDLINE, ERIC, Academic Source Premier(ASP), EMBASE and three Chinese Databases (Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, CBM; China National Knowledge Infrastructure, CNKI; Wangfang Data) from 1980 to Dec. 2009. The pre-specified form of inclusion and exclusion criteria were developed for literature screening. The quality of included studies was assessed using Darcy Reed and Gemma Flores-Mateo criteria. Two reviewers selected the studies, undertook quality assessment, and data extraction independently. Differing opinions were resolved by consensus or with help from the third person. Results This was a descriptive study of a total of seven studies that met the selection criteria. There were no relevant Chinese studies to be included. Only one study included patient safety education in the medical curriculum and the remaining studies integrated patient safety into clinical rotations or medical clerkships. Seven studies were of a pre and post study design, of which there was only one controlled study. There was considerable variation in relation to contents, teaching strategies, faculty

  12. Determinants of Residential Adult Education Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafka, James J.

    Advocates of residential education have isolated three determinants of residential adult education effectiveness: isolation from the outside environment; concentration on content; and group support. This study investigated the independent and collective relationships of different levels of these determinants with cognitive gain and posttest…

  13. Designing Educational Social Machines for Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee-King, Matthew; Krivenski, Maria; Brenton, Harry; Grimalt-Reynes, Andreu; d'Inverno, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report on our development of an educational social machine based on the concept that feedback in communities is an effective means to support the development of communities of learning and practice. Key challenges faced by this work are how best to support educational and social interactions, how to deliver personalised tuition, and how to…

  14. Review of the Effects of Citizenship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geboers, Ellen; Geijsel, Femke; Admiraal, Wilfried; ten Dam, Geert

    2013-01-01

    Based on the assumption that schools can play a significant role in the citizenship development of students, in most contemporary modern societies schools are obligated to provide citizenship education. However, the effectiveness of different forms of citizenship education is still unclear. From the empirical literature on citizenship over the…

  15. How Effective Are Outdoor Education Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    Twelve classes of students in grades 4 through 6 studied beaver ecology, either at an outdoor-education center near Toronto or in the classroom. Results indicate that outdoor education was more effective in promoting students' cognitive achievement than classroom study, but did not confirm the popular belief that outdoor programs influence…

  16. Readability--its applicability to education of patients by pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Adams, R C; Smith, T P; Metts, J K; Ross, J W

    1979-11-01

    The applicability of readability to the development of pharmacy educational materials is reviewed. The importance of reading skills must be recognized in all areas of education, including pharmacy patient education. If people are to perform certain tasks, they must understand the instructions for those tasks. To be understandable, the instructions must be written on the reading level of the people who will be following the instructions. Readability has been defined as those characteristics of reading materials, involving certain mental processes, that make for ease or difficulty of comprehension of the reading material. It is the task of the reader to use as few or as many of these mental processes as necessary to grasp the intended meaning of the material. It has been estimated that the average reading level of the American public is approximately 7th to 8th grade. However, many adults do not have sufficient reading skills to comprehend fully material written on these levels. Therefore, pharmacy educational material should be written on the reading level of the patient population it serves. Several readability formulas have been developed to evaluate the various characteristics of reading material that lead to reading comprehension. Among the ones recommended for use with pharmacy educational materials are the Fry Readability Graph and the Gunning Fog Index. PMID:10244957

  17. Nursing education: a catalyst for the patient safety movement.

    PubMed

    Neudorf, Kim; Dyck, Netha; Scott, Darlene; Davidson Dick, Diana

    2008-01-01

    Creating a culture of safety in healthcare systems is a goal of leaders in the patient safety movement. Commitment of leadership to safety in the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) Nursing Division has resulted in the development of the Patient Safety Project Team (PSPT) and a steady shift in the culture of the organization toward a systems approach to patient safety. Graduates prepared with the competencies necessary to be diligent about their practice and skilled in determining the root causes of system error in healthcare will become leaders in shifting the healthcare culture to strengthen patient safety. The PSPT believes this cultural shift begins with the education system. It involves modifications to curricula content, facilitation of multidisciplinary processes, and inclusion of theory and practice that reflect critical inquiry into healthcare and nursing education systems to ensure patient safety. In this paper the practical approaches and initiatives of the PSPT are reviewed. The integration of Patient Safety Core Curriculum modules for competency development is described. The policy for reporting adverse events and near misses is outlined. In addition, the student-focused reporting tool, the results and the implications for teaching in the clinical setting are discussed. Processes used to engage faculty are also addressed.

  18. Disclosing discourses: biomedical and hospitality discourses in patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Öresland, Stina; Friberg, Febe; Määttä, Sylvia; Öhlen, Joakim

    2015-09-01

    Patient education materials have the potential to strengthen the health literacy of patients. Previous studies indicate that readability and suitability may be improved. The aim of this study was to explore and analyze discourses inherent in patient education materials since analysis of discourses could illuminate values and norms inherent in them. Clinics in Sweden that provided colorectal cancer surgery allowed access to written information and 'welcome letters' sent to patients. The material was analysed by means of discourse analysis, embedded in Derrida's approach of deconstruction. The analysis revealed a biomedical discourse and a hospitality discourse. In the biomedical discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as the messenger of medical information while that of the patients as the carrier of diagnoses and recipients of biomedical information. In the hospitality discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as hosts who invite and welcome the patients as guests. The study highlights the need to eliminate paternalism and fosters a critical reflective stance among professionals regarding power and paternalism inherent in health care communication.

  19. Implementing a patient education intervention about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevention and effect on knowledge and behavior in veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Charlesnika T.; Hill, Jennifer N.; Guihan, Marylou; Chin, Amy; Goldstein, Barry; Richardson, Michael S. A.; Anderson, Vicki; Risa, Kathleen; Kellie, Susan; Cameron, Kenzie A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and effect of a nurse-administered patient educational intervention about Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevention on knowledge and behavior of Veterans with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D). Design Blinded, block-randomized controlled pilot trial. Setting Two Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) SCI Centers. Participants Veterans were recruited March–September 2010 through referral by a healthcare provider from inpatient, outpatient, and residential care settings. Intervention Thirty participants were randomized to the nurse-administered intervention and 31 to the usual care group. The intervention included a brochure and tools to assist nurses in conducting the education. Outcome measures Pre- and post-intervention measurement of knowledge and behaviors related to MRSA and prevention strategies and feasibility measures related to implementation. Results Participants were primarily male (95.1%), white (63.9%), with tetraplegia (63.9%) and mean age and duration of injury of 64.3 and 20.5 years, respectively. The intervention groups mean knowledge score significantly increased between pre- and post-test (mean change score = 1.70, 95% confidence interval, CI 0.25–3.15) while the usual care groups score did not significantly change (mean change score = 1.45, 95% CI −0.08–2.98). However, the mean knowledge change between intervention and usual care groups was not significantly different (P = 0.81). Overall behavior scores did not significantly differ between treatment groups; however, the intervention group was more likely to report intentions to clean hands (90.0% vs. 64.5%, P = 0.03) and asking providers about MRSA status (46.7% vs. 16.1%, P = 0.01). Nurse educators reported that the quality of the intervention was high and could be implemented in clinical care. Conclusions A targeted educational strategy is feasible to implement in SCI/D clinical practices and may improve some

  20. Educating patients about warfarin therapy using information technology: A survey on healthcare professionals’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Sayeed; Mullan, Judy; Bajorek, Beata

    Objective To explore healthcare professionals' views about the benefits and challenges of using information technology (IT) resources for educating patients about their warfarin therapy. Methods A cross-sectional survey of both community and hospital-based healthcare professionals (e.g., doctors, pharmacists and nurses) involved using a purpose-designed questionnaire. The questionnaires were distributed using a multi-modal approach to maximise response rates. Results Of the total 300 questionnaires distributed, 109 completed surveys were received (43.3% response rate). Over half (53.2%) of the healthcare participants were aged between 40-59 years, the majority (59.5%) of whom were female. Fifty nine (54.1%) participants reported having had no access to warfarin-specific IT-based patient education resources, and a further 19 (38.0%) of the participants who had IT-access reported that they never used such resources. According to the healthcare participants, the main challenges associated with educating their patients about warfarin therapy included: patient-related factors, such as older age, language barriers, cognitive impairments and/or ethnic backgrounds or healthcare professional factors, such as time constraints. The healthcare professionals reported that there were several aspects about warfarin therapy which they found difficult to educate their patients about which is why they identified computers and interactive touch screen kiosks as preferred IT devices to deliver warfarin education resources in general practices, hospital-based clinics and community pharmacies. At the same time, the healthcare professionals also identified a number of facilitators (e.g., to reinforce warfarin education, to offer reliable and easily comprehensible information) and barriers (e.g., time and costs of using IT resources, difficulty in operating the resources) that could impact on the effective implementation of these devices in educating patients about their warfarin therapy

  1. Education and Decision Making at the Time of Triptan Prescribing: Patient Expectations vs Actual Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Paul G.; Pavlovic, Jelena M.; Lettich, Alyssa; Wells, Rebecca E.; Robertson, Carrie E.; Mullin, Kathleen; Charleston, Larry; Dodick, David W.; Schwedt, Todd J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Optimizing patient satisfaction with their medical care and maximizing patient adherence with treatment plans requires an understanding of patient preferences regarding education and their role in decision making when treatments are prescribed. Objective To assess the congruence between patient expectations and actual practice regarding education and decision making at the time a triptan is prescribed. Methods This multicenter cross-sectional survey was performed by headache fellow members of the American Headache Society Headache Fellows Research Consortium at their respective tertiary care headache clinics. Migraine patients who were new patients to the headache clinic and who were current triptan users (use within prior 3 months and for ≥1 year) or past triptan users (no use within 6 months; prior use within 2 years) completed questionnaires that assessed the education they received and their role in decision making at the time a triptan was first prescribed as well as their desire for education and participation in decision making when a triptan is prescribed. Results Consistent with patient preference, most participants received the majority of their education about the triptan from the prescriber's office (70.2%). In descending rank order, participants most desired to be informed about how to decide if a triptan should be taken, when during the course of migraine a triptan should be taken, possible side effects, cost, and how to obtain refills. Regarding side effects, most participants preferred to receive education about the most common side effects of a triptan rather than addressing all possible side effects. Regarding triptan dosing, participants desired to be informed in descending order of importance about taking other medications with triptans, how many doses can be taken for each migraine, how many doses can be taken each week/month, what to do if the triptan does not work, and the triptan mechanism of action. The vast majority of

  2. Quality Physical Education: A Commentary on Effective Physical Education Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Ben

    2014-01-01

    In my commentary in response to the 3 articles (McKenzie & Lounsbery, 2013; Rink, 2013; Ward, 2013), I focus on 3 areas: (a) content knowledge, (b) a holistic approach to physical education, and (c) policy impact. I use the term "quality teaching" rather than "teacher effectiveness." Quality teaching is a term with the…

  3. [Health education in transplant patients and their families in an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Pueyo-Garrigues, M; San Martín Loyola, Á; Caparrós Leal, M C; Jiménez Muñoz, C

    2016-01-01

    Health Education (HE) is extremely important in transplant patients and their families in order to promote suitable self-care in this new stage of life. Intensive Care Units offer various opportunities by nurses in order to improve their Health Education. This process could start in this unit where the interaction between nurse and family is constant. The HE of transplant patient includes three dimensions: Knowledge: information about self-care in order to have a healthy way of life, and getting some information on how to reduce anxiety in patients and their families; Skills: as regards the abilities to properly apply the Health Education, where the families are really important; and finally Attitudes: ambivalent attitudes that are experienced by transplant patients. The objective is to describe the level of development of HE for critical transplant patients and their families from Intensive Care Units. A non-systematic literature review was performed in Pubmed and CINHAL data bases. In conclusion, it is emphasised that the skill of the HE nurse in an Intensive Care Units is important to promote lifestyles appropriate to the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor needs of transplant patients. Its implementation entails positive effects on clinical outcomes of the patient, decreased morbidity and mortality, costs, and health resources. PMID:26810953

  4. [Health education in transplant patients and their families in an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Pueyo-Garrigues, M; San Martín Loyola, Á; Caparrós Leal, M C; Jiménez Muñoz, C

    2016-01-01

    Health Education (HE) is extremely important in transplant patients and their families in order to promote suitable self-care in this new stage of life. Intensive Care Units offer various opportunities by nurses in order to improve their Health Education. This process could start in this unit where the interaction between nurse and family is constant. The HE of transplant patient includes three dimensions: Knowledge: information about self-care in order to have a healthy way of life, and getting some information on how to reduce anxiety in patients and their families; Skills: as regards the abilities to properly apply the Health Education, where the families are really important; and finally Attitudes: ambivalent attitudes that are experienced by transplant patients. The objective is to describe the level of development of HE for critical transplant patients and their families from Intensive Care Units. A non-systematic literature review was performed in Pubmed and CINHAL data bases. In conclusion, it is emphasised that the skill of the HE nurse in an Intensive Care Units is important to promote lifestyles appropriate to the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor needs of transplant patients. Its implementation entails positive effects on clinical outcomes of the patient, decreased morbidity and mortality, costs, and health resources.

  5. Written orthopedic patient education materials from the point of view of empowerment by education.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Kirsi; Salanterä, Sanna; Katajisto, Jouko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2004-02-01

    Written patient education materials are one way of supporting patient empowerment. The aim of this study was to evaluate written orthopedic patient education materials (n = 25) drawn from a university hospital's electronic databank. In the absence of suitable tools for evaluation, an analytic framework was developed by a panel of nursing scientists and clinical experts. The materials were evaluated from the point of view of empowerment by their external appearance, content and instructiveness. In terms of their external appearance the materials were well prepared, but much was left to be desired with regard to contents and instructiveness. Development needs to focus on making better use of methods of visual representation, on increasing the coverage of content areas that so far have received less attention, like social, experiential, ethical and financial empowerment, and on providing a more focused perspective on the patient.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness and Educational Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques of cost-effectiveness analysis and their applications to educational policy are discussed. Recommendations are made to increase the capacity of evaluators, policy analysts, and decision makers to use these tools appropriately for resource allocation. (SLD)

  7. An efficient and effective teaching model for ambulatory education.

    PubMed

    Regan-Smith, Martha; Young, William W; Keller, Adam M

    2002-07-01

    Teaching and learning in the ambulatory setting have been described as inefficient, variable, and unpredictable. A model of ambulatory teaching that was piloted in three settings (1973-1981 in a university-affiliated outpatient clinic in Portland, Oregon, 1996-2000 in a community outpatient clinic, and 2000-2001 in an outpatient clinic serving Dartmouth Medical School's teaching hospital) that combines a system of education and a system of patient care is presented. Fully integrating learners into the office practice using creative scheduling, pre-rotation learning, and learner competence certification enabled the learners to provide care in roles traditionally fulfilled by physicians and nurses. Practice redesign made learners active members of the patient care team by involving them in such tasks as patient intake, histories and physicals, patient education, and monitoring of patient progress between visits. So that learners can be active members of the patient care team on the first day of clinic, pre-training is provided by the clerkship or residency so that they are able to competently provide care in the time available. To assure effective education, teaching and learning times are explicitly scheduled by parallel booking of patients for the learner and the preceptor at the same time. In the pilot settings this teaching model maintained or improved preceptor productivity and on-time efficiency compared with these outcomes of traditional scheduling. The time spent alone with patients, in direct observation by preceptors, and for scheduled case discussion was appreciated by learners. Increased satisfaction was enjoyed by learners, teachers, clinic staff, and patients. Barriers to implementation include too few examining rooms, inability to manipulate patient appointment schedules, and learners' not being present in a teaching clinic all the time.

  8. Numerical distance effect in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pourrahimi, Ali Mohammad; Mazhari, Shahrzad; Shabani, Mohammad; Tabrizi, Yousef Moghadas; Sheibani, Vahid

    2016-03-23

    There is growing evidence showing that mental representation of numbers is impaired in patients with schizophrenia. Yet, no study has examined the distance effect in the patients. We assessed the distance effect using two number size comparison tasks, with different number references (5 and 7) in 23 patients and 28 healthy individuals. Response times and error rates significantly increased when the distances between the centered references and the targets decreased in both groups. However, patients responded significantly slower and had more error rates compared to controls. Our finding indicates distance effect in patients is similar to the controls, indicating an automatic numerical processing is preserved in patients with schizophrenia.

  9. Patient education in nursing-Polish literature condition.

    PubMed

    Slusarska, Barbara; Zarzycka, Danuta; Wysokiński, Mariusz; Sadurska, Agnieszka

    2004-04-01

    The aim of the review is to present the results of an analysis and evaluation of the state of research on patient education based on the Polish nursing literature. A review and analysis of 139 research works was carried out, which during the years of 1990-2001 appeared in Polish nursing journals as well as in post-conference and convention proceedings and reports. The collected material was evaluated according to the following criteria: defining the research problem, defining and operationalising the variables studied, the research tool applied, the research method used, the size and selection of the research sample, the results achieved. The analysis of research works carried out in the area of patient education became the basis of the objective knowledge of the current state of research and its relation to the nursing practice in this area.

  10. A health/patient education database for family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P A; Ruby, C; Craig, M D

    1991-01-01

    Using pilot project funding from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation (AAFP/F) developed a program by which health/patient education print materials were reviewed. Favorably reviewed materials were entered into a database accessible through the AAFP/F's Huffington Library. The review service and resulting database were designed to help the busy clinician identify scientifically accurate, reliable materials for use in patient education. The review process developed for the project is described, as is the database and its use by family physicians. Research findings from the pilot project are discussed, some of which assisted in planning the self-supporting second phase of the program. PMID:1958908

  11. Assessment of an Interactive Computer-Based Patient Prenatal Genetic Screening and Testing Education Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Jennifer M.; Sorenson, James R.; Bowling, J. Michael; Jennings-Grant, Tracey

    2005-01-01

    The Enhancing Patient Prenatal Education study tested the feasibility and educational impact of an interactive program for patient prenatal genetic screening and testing education. Patients at two private practices and one public health clinic participated (N = 207). The program collected knowledge and measures of anxiety before and after use of…

  12. [Patient education and treatment documentation - Law to Improve the Rights of Patients].

    PubMed

    Meltendorf, G; Meltendorf, C

    2013-07-01

    The Law to Improve the Rights of Patients came into force with the promulgation in the (German) Federal Law Gazette on February 25, 2013. Thus administrations of medical institutions and doctors of all disciplines should themselves acquaint with the statutory regulations and their impact on the daily practice. The present article describes and explains the statutory regulations concerning patient education and treatment documentation. PMID:23824480

  13. [Patient education and treatment documentation - law to improve the rights of patients].

    PubMed

    Meltendorf, Gerhard; Meltendorf, Christian

    2013-07-01

    The Law to Improve the Rights of Patients came into force with the promulgation in the German Federal Law Gazette on February 25, 2013. Thus administrations of medical institutions and doctors of all disciplines should acquaint themselves with the statutory regulations and their impact on the daily practice. The present article describes and explains the statutory regulations concerning patient education and treatment documentation. PMID:23888409

  14. The effect of health education video on ocular massage after trabeculectomy.

    PubMed

    Hua, Liu; Yingjuan, Lv; Jingshu, Zhao; Wei, Cao

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different ocular massage health education methods on ocular massage in glaucoma patients after trabeculectomy. Eighty-six patients with glaucoma after trabeculectomy (86 eyes) were randomly divided into two health education groups. One group was a watch video group (43 patients, 43 eyes), while the other was an orally taught health education group (43 patients, 43 eyes). Patients were followed up for 1 week, 1 month, and 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge. Records of the patient responses after health education, compliance of patients with follow-up, and intraocular pressure were determined. Measurements included intraocular pressure and differences between the watch video and orally taught health education groups. The differences between the watch video group and orally taught health education group were not statistically significant at 1 week and 1 month, while the differences were statistically significant at 3, 6, and 12 months. The results indicated that health education videos can enable glaucoma patients to have a better mastery of ocular massage after trabeculectomy. According to the needs of patients, health education video use produced good results and should be promoted.

  15. Hospital-based patient education programs and the role of the hospital librarian.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, C L

    1978-01-01

    This paper examines current advances in hospital-based patient education, and delineates the role of the hospital librarian in these programs. Recently, programs of planned patient education have been recognized by health care personnel and the public as being an integral part of health care delivery. Various key elements, including legislative action, the advent of audiovisual technology, and rising health care costs have contributed to the development of patient education programs in hospitals. As responsible members of the hospital organization, hospital librarians should contribute their expertise to patient education programs. They are uniquely trained with skills in providing information on other health education programs; in assembling, cataloging, and managing collections of patient education materials; and in providing documentation of their use. In order to demonstrate the full range of their skills and to contribute to patient care, education, and research, hospital librarians should actively participate in programs of planned patient education. PMID:418835

  16. Dentists' skills with fearful patients: education and treatment.

    PubMed

    Brahm, Carl-Otto; Lundgren, Jesper; Carlsson, Sven G; Nilsson, Peter; Hultqvist, Johanna; Hägglin, Catharina

    2013-06-01

    The aims were to explore dentists' skills in dental fear, current strategies when treating fearful adult patients, and the possible need for additional education among dentists working in Sweden. A sample of 1,293 members of the Association of Public Health Dentists in Sweden were asked to respond to a Web survey concerning dental fear. The response rate was 69% (n = 889); 91% trained in Sweden and 9% trained in another country. The most frequently used pharmacological anxiety-reducing techniques were medication with a midazolame mixture (72%) and benzodiazepine tablets (77%), and the most commonly used psychological techniques were relaxation (68%), distraction (66%), and Tell-Show-Do (86%). A larger proportion of dentists trained in Sweden, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries, reported that they had received undergraduate training in dental fear. Dentists trained in Sweden more often reported competence in pharmacological and psychological anxiety-reducing techniques, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries. Higher levels of self-rated efficacy in treating fearful patients accompanied additional education in dental fear after graduation. In conclusion, Swedish dentists use a variety of techniques to meet the needs of fearful dental patients. Competence in anxiety-reducing techniques is associated with self-efficacy and the site of education. PMID:23659263

  17. What can virtual patient simulation offer mental health nursing education?

    PubMed

    Guise, V; Chambers, M; Välimäki, M

    2012-06-01

    This paper discusses the use of simulation in nursing education and training, including potential benefits and barriers associated with its use. In particular, it addresses the hitherto scant application of diverse simulation devices and dedicated simulation scenarios in psychiatric and mental health nursing. It goes on to describe a low-cost, narrative-based virtual patient simulation technique which has the potential for wide application within health and social care education. An example of the implementation of this technology in a web-based pilot course for acute mental health nurses is given. This particular virtual patient technique is a simulation type ideally suited to promoting essential mental health nursing skills such as critical thinking, communication and decision making. Furthermore, it is argued that it is particularly amenable to e-learning and blended learning environments, as well as being an apt tool where multilingual simulations are required. The continued development, implementation and evaluation of narrative virtual patient simulations across a variety of health and social care programmes would help ascertain their success as an educational tool.

  18. Virtual glaucoma clinics: patient acceptance and quality of patient education compared to standard clinics

    PubMed Central

    Court, Jennifer H; Austin, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Virtual glaucoma clinics allow rapid, reliable patient assessment but the service should be acceptable to patients and concordance with treatment needs to be maintained with adequate patient education. This study compares experiences and understanding of patients reviewed via the virtual clinic versus the standard clinic by way of an extended patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ). Patients and methods One hundred PSQs were given to consecutive patients attending glaucoma clinics in October 2013. All 135 patients reviewed via the virtual clinic from April 2013 until August 2013 were sent postal PSQs in September 2013. Data were obtained for demographics, understanding of glaucoma, their condition, satisfaction with their experience, and quality of information. Responses were analyzed in conjunction with the clinical records. Results Eighty-five percent of clinic patients and 63% of virtual clinic patients responded to the PSQ. The mean satisfaction score was over 4.3/5 in all areas surveyed. Virtual clinic patients’ understanding of their condition was very good, with 95% correctly identifying their diagnosis as glaucoma, 83% as ocular hypertension and 78% as suspects. There was no evidence to support inferior knowledge or self-perceived understanding compared to standard clinic patients. Follow-up patients knew more about glaucoma than new patients. Over 95% of patients found our information leaflet useful. Forty percent of patients sought additional information but less than 20% used the internet for this. Conclusion A substantial proportion of glaucoma pathway patients may be seen by non-medical staff supervised by glaucoma specialists via virtual clinics. Patients are accepting of this format, reporting high levels of satisfaction and non-inferior knowledge to those seen in standard clinics. PMID:25987832

  19. [Health education, patient education and health promotion: educational methods and strategies].

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help public health actors with an interest in health promotion and health care professionals involved in therapeutic education to develop and implement an educational strategy consistent with their vision of health and health care. First, we show that the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the French Charter for Popular Education share common values. Second, an examination of the career and work of Paulo Freire, of Ira Shor's pedagogical model and of the person-centered approach of Carl Rogers shows how the work of educational practitioners, researchers and theorists can help health professionals to implement a truly "health-promoting" or "therapeutic" educational strategy. The paper identifies a number of problems facing health care professionals who become involved in education without reflecting on the values underlying the pedagogical models they use.

  20. [Health education, patient education and health promotion: educational methods and strategies].

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help public health actors with an interest in health promotion and health care professionals involved in therapeutic education to develop and implement an educational strategy consistent with their vision of health and health care. First, we show that the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the French Charter for Popular Education share common values. Second, an examination of the career and work of Paulo Freire, of Ira Shor's pedagogical model and of the person-centered approach of Carl Rogers shows how the work of educational practitioners, researchers and theorists can help health professionals to implement a truly "health-promoting" or "therapeutic" educational strategy. The paper identifies a number of problems facing health care professionals who become involved in education without reflecting on the values underlying the pedagogical models they use. PMID:24313072

  1. Computer Aided Instruction/Management of Nursing Protocols, Continuing Education and Patient Education for Remote Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Masten, Yondell; Conover, Katherine P.

    1988-01-01

    Utilization of computer networks to provide instruction for health care providers and patients can increase knowledge for the participants and reduce the disadvantages of current methods of instruction, i.e., sporadic, inconsistent, hurried instruction patterns. Nursing protocols and nursing and patient education modules were developed as components of KARENET (Kellogg Affiliated Remote Environments Network), linking rural Morton, Texas, and the Health Sciences Center at Lubbock. Both health care providers and patient participants benefit from utilization of knowledge provided by the methodology of CAI/CMI.

  2. Is patient education helpful in providing care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A qualitative study involving French nurses.

    PubMed

    Fall, Estelle; Chakroun, Nadia; Dalle, Nathalie; Izaute, Marie

    2013-09-01

    This French study explored nurses' involvement in patient education for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study design was qualitative. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 16 hospital nurses. Data analysis was performed according to Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological method, and supported by specific qualitative analysis software (Sphinx). The results showed the important role of hospital nurses in rheumatoid arthritis care. Patient education is a core part of nurses' work, allowing them to give patients information and emotional support. The interviewees displayed skills in helping patients learn to care for themselves. However, patient education mostly concerned patients who are already committed to their health care. Non-adherent patients warrant special attention; their acceptance of their disease, perceptions about disease and treatment, motivation, and autonomy should be specifically addressed. French nurses could benefit from more training, and could be aided by psychologists. Ambulatory services could also be developed for patient education in France, based on examples from other countries. PMID:23480278

  3. Dynamics of effective oral presentations. Strategies for nurse educators.

    PubMed

    Beitz, J M

    1994-05-01

    Oral presentations can and should be exciting events for learners and educators. Inservice faculty members who are new educators have a plethora of sources that they can use to develop and refine their presentation skills. Just as individuals learn to read by reading and write by writing, staff instructors learn to teach well by teaching. Focus on developing your teaching versatility by combining strategies, because varying methods will appeal to learners' different learning styles. Whether you are a novice or seasoned teacher, you can constantly improve your teaching skills. When you execute an effective presentation, everyone wins. You experience and enjoy your own professional growth, and learners benefit from quality educational experiences. The most important benefit of effective presentations is that surgical patients receive competent care from well-informed, up-to-date clinicians.

  4. Shaping Patient Education in Rural Hospitals: Learning from the Experiences of Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheckel, Martha; Hedrick-Erickson, Jennifer; Teunis, Jamie; Deutsch, Ashley; Roers, Anna; Willging, Anne; Pittman, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Patient education is a crucial aspect of nursing practice, but much of the research about it is quantitative and has been conducted in urban medical centers. These urban-based studies have limited utility for nurses working in rural hospitals where the populations they serve often have unique and challenging health contexts and cultures. Since…

  5. Training and Action for Patient Safety: Embedding Interprofessional Education for Patient Safety within an Improvement Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Beverley L.; Lawton, Rebecca; Armitage, Gerry; Bibby, John; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite an explosion of interest in improving safety and reducing error in health care, one important aspect of patient safety that has received little attention is a systematic approach to education and training for the whole health care workforce. This article describes an evaluation of an innovative multiprofessional, team-based…

  6. Towards a HPV Vaccine Knowledgebase for Patient Education Content.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dennis; Cunningham, Rachel; Boom, Julie; Amith, Muhammad; Tao, Cui

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is a widespread sexually transmitted infection that can be prevented with vaccination. However, HPV vaccination rates in the United States are disappointingly low. This paper will introduce a patient oriented web ontology intended to provide an interactive way to educate patients about HPV and the HPV vaccine that will to empower patients to make the right vaccination decision. The information gathered for this initial draft of the ontology was primarily taken from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vaccine Information Statements. The ontology currently consists of 160 triples, 141 classes, 52 properties and 55 individuals. For future iterations, we aim to incorporate more information as well as obtain subject matter expert feedback to improve the overall quality of the ontology. PMID:27332237

  7. Online virtual patients - A driver for change in medical and healthcare professional education in developing countries?

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, David; Borgstein, Eric; Grant, Mary E; Begg, Michael

    2009-08-01

    The development of online virtual patients has proved to be an effective vehicle for pedagogical and technological skills transfer and capacity building for medical and healthcare educators in Malawi. A project between the University of Edinburgh and the University of Malawi has delivered more than 20 collaboratively developed, virtual patients, contextualised for in-country medical and healthcare education and, more significantly, a cadre of healthcare professionals skilled in developing digital resources and integrating these into their emerging curricula. The process of engaging with new approaches to teaching and delivering personalised, context sensitive content via a game-informed, technology-supported process has contributed to the ability of healthcare educators in Malawi to drive pedagogical change, meet the substantial challenges of delivering new curricula, cope with increasing student numbers and promote teacher professional development. This initial phase of the project has laid the foundation for a broader second phase that focuses on promoting curriculum change, developing educational infrastructure and in-country capacity to create, and integrate digital resources into education and training across multi-professional groups and across educational levels.

  8. Bringing electronic patient records into health professional education: towards an integrative framework.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Joe, Ron; Otto, Tony

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss our approach for integrating electronic patient records into health professional education. Electronic patient record (EPR) use is increasing globally. The EPR is considered the cornerstone of the modernization and streamlining of healthcare worldwide. However, despite the importance of the EPR, health professional education in much of the world provides health professional students (who will become the practicing health professionals of the future) with limited access or knowledge about the EPR. New ways of exposing students to EPRs will be needed in order to ensure that health professionals will adopt and use this complex technology wisely and effect the positive benefits EPRs are expected to bring to healthcare globally. In this paper we describe: (a) a framework we have developed for integrating EPRs into health professional education and (b) an innovative Web portal, known as the University of Victoria Electronic Health Record (EHR) Educational Portal (which houses a number of EPRs) that can be used to explore the integration of EPRs in health professional education. It is hoped that adoption and use of EPRs will ultimately be improved through the use of the portal to allow students virtual and ubiquitous access to example EPRs, coupled with principled educational approaches for integrating EPR technology into health professional curricula.

  9. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Teresa L; Medberry, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients' conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include (1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and (2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skill set to assert one's needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences.

  10. The multimedia computer for office-based patient education: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wofford, James L; Smith, Edward D; Miller, David P

    2005-11-01

    Use of the multimedia computer for education is widespread in schools and businesses, and yet computer-assisted patient education is rare. In order to explore the potential use of computer-assisted patient education in the office setting, we performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (search date April 2004 using MEDLINE and Cochrane databases). Of the 26 trials identified, outcome measures included clinical indicators (12/26, 46.1%), knowledge retention (12/26, 46.1%), health attitudes (15/26, 57.7%), level of shared decision-making (5/26, 19.2%), health services utilization (4/26, 17.6%), and costs (5/26, 19.2%), respectively. Four trials targeted patients with breast cancer, but the clinical issues were otherwise diverse. Reporting of the testing of randomization (76.9%) and appropriate analysis of main effect variables (70.6%) were more common than reporting of a reliable randomization process (35.3%), blinding of outcomes assessment (17.6%), or sample size definition (29.4%). We concluded that the potential for improving the efficiency of the office through computer-assisted patient education has been demonstrated, but better proof of the impact on clinical outcomes is warranted before this strategy is accepted in the office setting.

  11. Health Literacy and Education as Mediators of Racial Disparities in Patient Activation Within an Elderly Patient Cohort.

    PubMed

    Eneanya, Nwamaka D; Winter, Michael; Cabral, Howard; Waite, Katherine; Henault, Lori; Bickmore, Timothy; Hanchate, Amresh; Wolf, Michael; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) assesses facets of patient engagement to identify proactive health behaviors and is an important predictor of health outcomes. Health literacy and education are also important for patient participation and successful navigation of the health care system. Because health literacy, education, and patient activation are associated with racial disparities, we sought to investigate whether health literacy and education would mediate racial differences in patient activation. Participants were 265 older adults who participated in a computer-based exercise interventional study. Health literacy was assessed using the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA). Of 210 eligible participants, 72% self-identified as Black and 28% as White. In adjusted analyses, education and health literacy each significantly reduced racial differences in patient activation. These findings are especially important when considering emerging data on the significance of patient activation and new strategies to increase patient engagement. PMID:27524777

  12. Effective Teaching in Physical Education: Slovenian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pišot, Rado; Plevnik, Matej; Štemberger, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Regular quality physical education (PE) contributes to the harmonized biopsychosocial development of a young person--to relaxation, neutralization of negative effects of sedentary hours, and other unhealthy habits/behaviors. The evaluation approach to PE effectiveness provides important information to PE teachers and also to students. However,…

  13. Peer Effects in Higher Education. Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Gordon C.; Zimmerman, David J.

    This paper, prepared as a chapter for a forthcoming book, describes the potential significance of student peer effects for the economic structure and behavior of higher education. The existence of student peer effects would motivate much of the restricted supply, student queuing, and selectivity, and institutional competition via merit and honors…

  14. Theories on Educational Effectiveness and Ineffectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheerens, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Following Snow's (1973) description of an "inductive" process of theory formation, this article addresses the organization of the knowledge base on school effectiveness. A multilevel presentation stimulated the conceptualization of educational effectiveness as an integration of system-level, school-level, and classroom-level…

  15. Leading Educationally Effective Family-Centered Bedside Rounds

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Amonpreet K.; Amin, Harish J.; McLaughlin, Kevin; Lockyer, Jocelyn

    2013-01-01

    Background Family-centered bedside rounds (family-centered rounds) enable learning and clinical care to occur simultaneously and offer benefits to patients, health care providers, and multiple levels of learners. Objective We used a qualitative approach to understand the dimensions of successful (ie, educationally positive) family-centered rounds from the perspective of attending physicians and residents. Methods We studied rounds in a tertiary academic hospital affiliated with the University of Calgary. Data were collected from 7 focus groups of pediatrics residents and attendings and were analyzed using grounded theory. Results Attending pediatricians and residents described rounds along a spectrum from successful and highly educational to unsuccessful and of low educational value. Perceptions of residents and attendings were influenced by how well the environment, educational priorities, and competing priorities were managed. Effectiveness of the manager was the core variable for successful rounds led by persons who could develop predictable rounds and minimize learner vulnerability. Conclusions Success of family-centered rounds in teaching settings depended on making the education and patient care aims of rounds explicit to residents and attending faculty. The role of the manager in leading rounds also needs to be made explicit. PMID:24455007

  16. Nurse led Patient Education Programme for patients undergoing a lung resection for primary lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increase in the number of patients undergoing lung resection for primary or suspected primary lung cancer in the UK due to improved staging techniques, dedicated thoracic surgeons and other initiatives such as preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation. This has had an impact on local healthcare resources requiring new ways of delivering thoracic surgical services. When considering service changes, patient reported outcomes are pivotal in terms of ensuring that the experience of care is enhanced and may include elements such as involving patients in their care, reducing the length of inpatient stay and reducing postoperative complications. The implementation of a thoracic surgical Patient Education Programme (PEP) has the potential to address these measures and improve the psychological and physical wellbeing of patients who require a lung resection. It may also assist in their care as an inpatient and to enhance recovery after surgery both in the short and long term. PMID:25984358

  17. Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with chronic heart failure undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure requires a complex treatment regimen on a life-long basis. Therefore, self-care/self-management is an essential part of successful treatment and comprehensive patient education is warranted. However, specific information on program features and educational strategies enhancing treatment success is lacking. This trial aims to evaluate a patient-oriented and theory-based self-management educational group program as compared to usual care education during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. Methods/Design The study is a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in four cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are patient education groups that comprise HF patients recruited within 2 weeks after commencement of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Cluster randomization was chosen for pragmatic reasons, i.e. to ensure a sufficient number of eligible patients to build large-enough educational groups and to prevent contamination by interaction of patients from different treatment allocations during rehabilitation. Rehabilitants with chronic systolic heart failure (n = 540) will be consecutively recruited for the study at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. Data will be assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months using patient questionnaires. In the intervention condition, patients receive the new patient-oriented self-management educational program, whereas in the control condition, patients receive a short lecture-based educational program (usual care). The primary outcome is patients’ self-reported self-management competence. Secondary outcomes include behavioral determinants and self-management health behavior (symptom monitoring, physical activity, medication adherence), health-related quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Treatment effects will be evaluated separately for each follow-up time point using multilevel regression analysis, and adjusting for baseline values. Discussion This

  18. Patient information and education with modern media: the Spine Society of Europe Patient Line.

    PubMed

    Pellisé, Ferran; Sell, P

    2009-08-01

    The role of the patient as an active partner in health care, and not just a passive object of diagnostic testing and medical treatment, is widely accepted. Providing information to patients is considered a crucial issue and the central focus in patient educational activities. It is necessary to educate patients on the nature of the outcomes and the benefits and risks of the procedures to involve them in the decision-making process and enable them to achieve fully informed consent. Information materials must contain scientifically reliable information and be presented in a form that is acceptable and useful to patients. Given the mismatch between public beliefs and current evidence, strategies for changing the public perceptions are required. Traditional patient education programmes have to face the potential barriers of storage, access problems and the need to keep content materials up to date. A computer-based resource provides many advantages, including "just-in-time" availability and a private learning environment. The use of the Internet for patient information needs will continue to expand as Internet access becomes readily available. However, the problem is no longer in finding information, but in assessing the credibility and validity of it. Health Web sites should provide health information that is secure and trustworthy. The large majority of the Web sites providing information related to spinal disorders are of limited and poor quality. Patient Line (PL), a patient information section in the Web site of Eurospine, was born in 2005 to offer patients and the general population the accumulated expertise represented by the members of the society and provide up-to-date information related to spinal disorders. In areas where evidence is scarce, Patient Line provides a real-time opinion of the EuroSpine membership. The published data reflect the pragmatic and the common sense range of treatments offered by the Eurospine membership. The first chapters have been

  19. Patient education on the internet: opportunities and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Peter F; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2002-04-01

    The Internet, an increasingly pervasive part of our culture, has vastly increased the rate at which information is disseminated. Unfortunately, a substantial portion of medical information on the Internet is false or misleading. Realizing this, many patients would like their physicians to help guide their online searches for medical information, but most physicians do not feel comfortable enough with the Internet to provide this service. A recent poll by Cyberdialogue (2000) found that 70% of all patients would like their physicians to recommend a health care web site for their condition, but that only 4% of patients receive such a recommendation. In recommending medical web sites, physicians need to consider the quality of the web site, the quality of the content, and especially the ethics of the site. The most important ethical standard a web site must meet is the clear separation of its editorial comment from promotional material. Patients do not have enough knowledge to distinguish unbiased information from information designed to push a product or service. There are organizations such as the Health on the Net Foundation and the E-Health Code of Ethics that have established clear quality and ethical criteria, but very few resources exist for these organizations to use in policing the sites that claim to adhere to their criteria. The National Institutes of Health recently started a consumer web site (www.medlineplus.gov) that takes web sites that adhere to their stringent criteria and places them on their web site, thus ensuring proper compliance. Patient education from sources other than face-to-face contact with a physician should be seen as an adjunct to the medical practice of physicians, and not as competition. Information is a form of therapy, and should lead to better referrals, more realistic outcome expectations, better treatment compliance, and better outcomes. As long as patients are referred to information that is unbiased, well-written, and not

  20. Facilitating oral chemotherapy treatment and compliance through patient/family-focused education.

    PubMed

    Moore, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Oral chemotherapy is assuming an increasingly important role in cancer therapy. Pharmaceutical firms continue to invest heavily in oral drug development with approximately 25% of more than 400 antineoplastic drugs currently in the development pipeline planned as oral agents. New treatments, patient preference, and the economic realities of cancer care delivery present physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and cancer center administrators with a challenge to restructure and reorganize to provide cost-effective and high-quality care to cancer patients. Oncology nurses are uniquely positioned to step into new roles emphasizing patient and family education and support. A discussion of the Health Belief Model provides an increased understanding of patient motivation and helps healthcare providers increase compliance among patients using oral therapies. This article provides an overview of the current status of oral cancer therapy in the United States and takes into consideration a historical perspective; illustrates pharmacology, indications, administration, and side effect profile through an exemplar agent; discusses potential advantages of and challenges to integration of oral therapies; and discusses alternative methods of patient and family education to improve compliance and outcome.

  1. Advancing educational continuity in primary care residencies: an opportunity for patient-centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Judith L; Hirsh, David; Aagaard, Eva; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Smith, Marie; Hardman, Joseph; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2015-05-01

    Continuity of care is a core value of patients and primary care physicians, yet in graduate medical education (GME), creating effective clinical teaching environments that emphasize continuity poses challenges. In this Perspective, the authors review three dimensions of continuity for patient care-informational, longitudinal, and interpersonal-and propose analogous dimensions describing continuity for learning that address both residents learning from patient care and supervisors and interprofessional team members supporting residents' competency development. The authors review primary care GME reform efforts through the lens of continuity, including the growing body of evidence that highlights the importance of longitudinal continuity between learners and supervisors for making competency judgments. The authors consider the challenges that primary care residency programs face in the wake of practice transformation to patient-centered medical home models and make recommendations to maximize the opportunity that these practice models provide. First, educators, researchers, and policy makers must be more precise with terms describing various dimensions of continuity. Second, research should prioritize developing assessments that enable the study of the impact of interpersonal continuity on clinical outcomes for patients and learning outcomes for residents. Third, residency programs should establish program structures that provide informational and longitudinal continuity to enable the development of interpersonal continuity for care and learning. Fourth, these educational models and continuity assessments should extend to the level of the interprofessional team. Fifth, policy leaders should develop a meaningful recognition process that rewards academic practices for training the primary care workforce. PMID:25470307

  2. Role of physiotherapy and patient education in lymphedema control following breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shiang-Ru; Hong, Rong-Bin; Chou, Willy; Hsiao, Pei-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This retrospective cohort study evaluated whether education in combination with physiotherapy can reduce the risk of breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Methods We analyzed 1,217 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer between January 2007 and December 2011 who underwent tumor resection and axillary lymph node dissection. The patients were divided into three groups: Group A (n=415), who received neither education nor physiotherapy postsurgery; Group B (n=672), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery; and Group C (n=130), who received an educational program on BCRL between Days 0 and 7 postsurgery, followed by a physiotherapy program. All patients were monitored until October 2013 to determine whether BCRL developed. BCRL risk factors were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results During the follow-up, 188 patients (15.4%) developed lymphedema, including 77 (18.6%) in Group A, 101 (15.0%) in Group B, and 10 (7.7%) in Group C (P=0.010). The median period from surgery to lymphedema was 0.54 years (interquartile range =0.18–1.78). The independent risk factors for BCRL included positive axillary lymph node invasion, a higher (>20) number of dissected axillary lymph nodes, and having undergone radiation therapy, whereas receiving an educational program followed by physiotherapy was a protective factor against BCRL (hazard ratio =0.35, 95% confidence interval =0.18–0.67, P=0.002). Conclusion Patient education that begins within the first week postsurgery and is followed by physiotherapy is effective in reducing the risk of BCRL in women with breast cancer. PMID:25750536

  3. Use effective communication channels. Health education.

    PubMed

    Hubley, J

    1988-03-01

    This article describes different ways of communicating health education. Individual and group counseling are the most effective ways of changing people's behavior. It is a method by which, it could relieve anxieties, and offer better ways that explain information and help people make decisions on sexual and risk behavior subjects. Drawings, cartoons, visual aids and magazines could be of help in discussions. In the discussion of sensitive and embarrassing topics, it is much better for the use of traditional drama, storytelling, puppets etc. Leaflets and poster use are useful in the back up on counseling and health education programs. Establishing a health education regarding the struggle on AIDS takes time and effort, and it is best that counselors or educators are able to share their experiences and evaluate limited programs on this matter.

  4. Patient Education Self-Management During Surgical Recovery: Combining Mobile (iPad) and a Content Management System

    PubMed Central

    Moradkhani, Anilga; Douglas, Kristin S. Vickers; Prinsen, Sharon K.; Fischer, Erin N.; Schroeder, Darrell R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this investigation was to assess whether a new electronic health (e-health) platform, combining mobile computing and a content management system, could effectively deliver modular and “just-in-time” education to older patients following cardiac surgery. Subjects and Methods: Patients were provided with iPad® (Apple®, Cupertino, CA) tablets that delivered educational modules as part of a daily “to do” list in a plan of care. The tablet communicated wirelessly to a dashboard where data were aggregated and displayed for providers. Results: A surgical population of 149 patients with a mean age of 68 years utilized 5,267 of 6,295 (84%) of education modules delivered over a 5.3-day hospitalization. Increased age was not associated with decreased use. Conclusions: We demonstrate that age, hospitalization, and major surgery are not significant barriers to effective patient education if content is highly consumable and relevant to patients' daily care experience. We also show that mobile technology, even if unfamiliar to many older patients, makes this possible. The combination of mobile computing with a content management system allows for dynamic, modular, personalized, and “just-in-time” education in a highly consumable format. This approach presents a means by which patients may become informed participants in new healthcare models. PMID:24443928

  5. Does addition of `mud-pack and hot pool treatment' to patient education make a difference in fibromyalgia patients? A randomized controlled single blind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bağdatlı, Ali Osman; Donmez, Arif; Eröksüz, Rıza; Bahadır, Güler; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled single-blind study is to explore whether addition of mud-pack and hot pool treatments to patient education make a significant difference in short and mild term outcomes of the patients with fibromyalgia. Seventy women with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to either balneotherapy with mud-pack and hot pool treatments (35) or control (35) groups. After randomization, five patients from balneotherapy group and five patients from control group were dropped out from the study with different excuses. All patients had 6-h patient education programme about fibromyalgia syndrome and were given a home exercise programme. The patients in balneotherapy group had heated pool treatment at 38 °C for 20 min a day, and mud-pack treatment afterwards on back region at 45 °C. Balneotherapy was applied on weekdays for 2 weeks. All patients continued to take their medical treatment. An investigator who was blinded to the intervention assessed all the patients before and after the treatment, at the first and the third months of follow-up. Outcome measures were FIQ, BDI and both patient's and physician's global assessments. Balneotherapy group was significantly better than control group at after the treatment and at the end of the first month follow-up assessments in terms of patient's and physician's global assessment, total FIQ score, and pain intensity, fatigue, non-refreshed awaking, stiffness, anxiety and depression subscales of FIQ. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of BDI scores. It is concluded that patient education combined with 2 weeks balneotherapy application has more beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome as compared to patient education alone.

  6. Does addition of 'mud-pack and hot pool treatment' to patient education make a difference in fibromyalgia patients? A randomized controlled single blind study.

    PubMed

    Bağdatlı, Ali Osman; Donmez, Arif; Eröksüz, Rıza; Bahadır, Güler; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled single-blind study is to explore whether addition of mud-pack and hot pool treatments to patient education make a significant difference in short and mild term outcomes of the patients with fibromyalgia. Seventy women with fibromyalgia syndrome were randomly assigned to either balneotherapy with mud-pack and hot pool treatments (35) or control (35) groups. After randomization, five patients from balneotherapy group and five patients from control group were dropped out from the study with different excuses. All patients had 6-h patient education programme about fibromyalgia syndrome and were given a home exercise programme. The patients in balneotherapy group had heated pool treatment at 38 °C for 20 min a day, and mud-pack treatment afterwards on back region at 45 °C. Balneotherapy was applied on weekdays for 2 weeks. All patients continued to take their medical treatment. An investigator who was blinded to the intervention assessed all the patients before and after the treatment, at the first and the third months of follow-up. Outcome measures were FIQ, BDI and both patient's and physician's global assessments. Balneotherapy group was significantly better than control group at after the treatment and at the end of the first month follow-up assessments in terms of patient's and physician's global assessment, total FIQ score, and pain intensity, fatigue, non-refreshed awaking, stiffness, anxiety and depression subscales of FIQ. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of BDI scores. It is concluded that patient education combined with 2 weeks balneotherapy application has more beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome as compared to patient education alone. PMID:25917265

  7. Adolescent cancer patients' perspectives on their educational experiences: Ten case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Nancy Smith

    The goal of this study was to explore the educational experiences of adolescent cancer patients in treatment for cancer and enrolled in hospital, homebound, or community schools. The incidence of students who have or had cancer is becoming more prevalent in schools today because of increases in the population, the incidence rate of cancer, and the survival rate of cancer. The number of students surviving cancer has increased over 41% in the past ten years and underscores the importance of assuring an excellent education to children and adolescents with cancer so that they may enjoy a good quality of life as long-term survivors. This study explored the educational experiences of students who were adolescent cancer patients and identified educational and psychosocial issues important to their success. The goal of this research effort was to provide educators and medical staff with a deeper understanding of the unique psychoeducational needs of this population and to provide a foundation for developing ideas for improving the educational programs and support available to students who continue their middle and high school education while undergoing treatment for cancer. Participants included ten cancer patient whose mean age at onset of disease was 13.8 +/- 1.7 years, and mean age at interview was 15.2 +/- 1.8 years. The researcher conducted individual, in-depth, ethnographic interviews of students, and one parent and one teacher of each student. Case studies of the students included extensive dialogue of each of the contributing participants. An analysis of the case studies was conducted by coding emerging themes so that topics could be fully explored and compared between individuals, groups of individuals, and educational settings to identify the meaning that these students placed on the educational and psychosocial issues that they voiced as important. Advantages and disadvantages of each educational situation, homebound, hospital school, and community school, were

  8. A Survey of the Practice of Patient Education with Spinal Cord Injured Patients in Rehabilitation Centers in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, June B.; Bendel, Judith G.

    Practices in patient education for spinal cord injured persons in 10 hospital rehabilitation centers were examined. Surveys revealed that a majority of the centers conducted patient education (designed to provide facts about the injury as well as psychological support). Findings revealed a large number of staff involved, but a wide difference in…

  9. Dental education and special-needs patients: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    McTigue, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric dentists have, by tradition and default, provided care for persons with special health care needs (PSHCN), regardless of age. Deinstitutionalization of PSHCN in the 1960s, however, overwhelmed the dental care system, and oral health care became one of the greatest unmet needs of this population. This presentation follows the history of training for dentists in this aspect of care, from the first demonstration programs in the 1970s to the current educational programs in U.S. dental schools. Today's dental students must be competent in assessing the treatment needs of PSHCN, but accreditation standards do not require competency in the treatment of this group of patients. Recommendations to rectify this include revising dental school curricula to be more patient-centered, improving technology in schools, earlier clinical experiences for dental students, and the use of community-based clinics.

  10. Teaching Environmental Consumer Education Effectively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cude, Brenda J.

    1993-01-01

    Effective strategies include (1) helping consumers see how lifestyles and consumer behavior are related; (2) limiting amount of new terminology used; (3) dispelling myths and misperceptions; (4) doing product life-cycle analysis; and (5) emphasizing long-term goals for behavior change. (JOW)

  11. Patient Education Corner. Accessing and evaluating the Internet for patient and family education.

    PubMed

    Cutilli, Carolyn Crane

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade, the Internet has become a vast resource for healthcare information. Multiple Web sites, produced by the federal government, healthcare institutions, and individual healthcare providers, give Americans a wealth of useful information sources. Nurses recognize that more Americans than ever before are using the Internet and that nurses are in an excellent position to help patients learn how to search for healthcare topics and evaluate the information found. This article will focus on seeking information, judging the quality of the information, and listing specific Web sites. PMID:17035921

  12. Translational educational research: a necessity for effective health-care improvement.

    PubMed

    McGaghie, William C; Issenberg, S Barry; Cohen, Elaine R; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Wayne, Diane B

    2012-11-01

    Medical education research contributes to translational science (TS) when its outcomes not only impact educational settings, but also downstream results, including better patient-care practices and improved patient outcomes. Simulation-based medical education (SBME) has demonstrated its role in achieving such distal results. Effective TS also encompasses implementation science, the science of health-care delivery. Educational, clinical, quality, and safety goals can only be achieved by thematic, sustained, and cumulative research programs, not isolated studies. Components of an SBME TS research program include motivated learners, curriculum grounded in evidence-based learning theory, educational resources, evaluation of downstream results, a productive research team, rigorous research methods, research resources, and health-care system acceptance and implementation. National research priorities are served from translational educational research. National funding priorities should endorse the contribution and value of translational education research.

  13. The Future of Graduate Medical Education: A Systems-Based Approach to Ensure Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Bagian, James P

    2015-09-01

    In the past 15 years, there has been growing recognition that improving patient safety must be more systems based and sophisticated than the traditional approach of simply telling health care providers to "be more careful." Drawing from his own experience, the author discusses barriers to systems-based patient safety initiatives and emphasizes the importance of overcoming those barriers. Physicians may be slow to adopt standardized patient safety initiatives because of a resistance to standardization, but faculty in training institutions have a responsibility to model safe, effective, systems-based approaches to patient care in order to instill these values in the residents they teach. Importantly, graduate medical education (GME) is well positioned to influence not only how future physicians provide care to patients but also how today's physicians and health care systems improve patient safety and care. The necessary systems-based knowledge and skills are rooted in both understanding and proficiently identifying threats to patient safety, their underlying causes, the development and implementation of effective countermeasures, and the measurement of whether the threat has been successfully addressed. This knowledge and its application is notably absent in the operation of most institutions that sponsor GME training programs in terms of didactic instruction and everyday demonstrated proficiency. Most important of all, faculty must model the behavior and competencies that are desirable in future physicians and not fall into the trap of the "do as I say, not as I do" mentality, which can have a corrosive deleterious effect on the next generation of physicians.

  14. The Future of Graduate Medical Education: A Systems-Based Approach to Ensure Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Bagian, James P

    2015-09-01

    In the past 15 years, there has been growing recognition that improving patient safety must be more systems based and sophisticated than the traditional approach of simply telling health care providers to "be more careful." Drawing from his own experience, the author discusses barriers to systems-based patient safety initiatives and emphasizes the importance of overcoming those barriers. Physicians may be slow to adopt standardized patient safety initiatives because of a resistance to standardization, but faculty in training institutions have a responsibility to model safe, effective, systems-based approaches to patient care in order to instill these values in the residents they teach. Importantly, graduate medical education (GME) is well positioned to influence not only how future physicians provide care to patients but also how today's physicians and health care systems improve patient safety and care. The necessary systems-based knowledge and skills are rooted in both understanding and proficiently identifying threats to patient safety, their underlying causes, the development and implementation of effective countermeasures, and the measurement of whether the threat has been successfully addressed. This knowledge and its application is notably absent in the operation of most institutions that sponsor GME training programs in terms of didactic instruction and everyday demonstrated proficiency. Most important of all, faculty must model the behavior and competencies that are desirable in future physicians and not fall into the trap of the "do as I say, not as I do" mentality, which can have a corrosive deleterious effect on the next generation of physicians. PMID:26312603

  15. [An evidence-based patient information and patient education programme: the SOR SAVOIR PATIENT].

    PubMed

    Carretier, Julien; Leichtnam-Dugarin, Line; Delavigne, Valérie; Brusco, Sylvie; Philip, Thierry; Fervers, Béatrice

    2004-04-01

    The development of good-quality patient information is a major challenge to improve quality of cancer care. The SOR SAVOIR PATIENT program aims to improve patients' understanding of cancer treatment and to facilitate their participation in clinical decisions. This programme develops evidence-based information for cancer patients based on clinical practice guidelines in oncology, the "Standards, Options and Recommendations" (SOR) which are used as primary information sources. "Translation" of SOR guidelines to laymen uses a multidisciplinary approach involving specialists in cancer care, psychologists, linguists and anthropologists. The development actively involves cancer patients using focus group methods, individual interviews and postal surveys. The SOR SAVOIR PATIENT program is conducted by the FNCLCC and the 20 French regional cancer centres, with active participation of specialists (public and private), learned societies and institutions, collaborating in multidisciplinary working groups. The leaflets Understanding scanner and Understanding Magnetic Resonance Imaging available in this edition of Bulletin du Cancer have been developed by a multidisciplinary group (radiologist, oncologist, methodologist, health care practioners, psychologist, linguist) and 30 patients, experienced patients and caregivers. These leaflets stem from a collection of patients documents on radiological examinations (Understanding mammography, Ultrasound, etc.) which have been developed to help patients and caregivers to better understand these examinations.

  16. Multilevel Design Efficiency in Educational Effectiveness Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cools, Wilfried; De Fraine, Bieke; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Onghena, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    In educational effectiveness research, multilevel data analyses are often used because research units (most frequently, pupils or teachers) are studied that are nested in groups (schools and classes). This hierarchical data structure complicates designing the study because the structure has to be taken into account when approximating the accuracy…

  17. Competencies for Effective Leadership in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spendlove, Marion

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to set out to investigate the role of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Rector, or Principal of a university, and the competencies (attitudes, knowledge and behaviour) that are needed for effective leadership in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews were held with…

  18. The Effects of Accountability on Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezende, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of a higher education accountability system in Brazil. For each discipline, colleges were assigned a grade that depended on the scores of their students on the ENC, an annual mandatory exam. These grades were then disclosed to the public and colleges were rewarded or penalized based on them. I find that the ENC had…

  19. Effective Child Guidance: An Educator's Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Brent Mathews

    This guidebook is designed to assist educators in becoming more effective child guidance leaders within the school system. Sections discuss the following areas: (1) indicators of current emotional problems; (2) children's common emotional problems, including fears, separation and loss, misbehavior motivations, aggressiveness, stealing, lying,…

  20. Instructional Models Effective in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Diane H.; Swan, Michael K.

    The purpose of this study was to identify which instructional models based on the framework of Joyce, Weil, and Showers, could be used effectively in distance education over the Interactive Video Network (IVN) system in North Dakota. Instructional models have been organized into families such as Information Processing, Social, Personal, and…

  1. Models of Effective Migrant Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattera, Gloria

    Intended to encourage both migrant and non-migrant educators to explore the possibilities of adopting and/or adapting the cited programs or appropriate components into their own units, this volume updates the 1974 description of some of the many programs that have proven effective in serving migrant students. Chapter I summarizes seven programs…

  2. Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education--Consensus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rink, Judith

    2014-01-01

    This article synthesizes the series of manuscripts on teacher effectiveness in physical education recently published by the "Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport" and highlights both the consensus and points of disagreement. Although there is much agreement as to the mission to develop a physically active lifestyle, there is a great…

  3. Effects of Government Regulations on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernhard, John T.; Hannah, Robert W.

    Results of a self-study conducted by Western Michigan University on the effects of government regulations on higher education are presented. The self-study, conducted with the aid of questionnaires, followup visits, or telephone calls, addressed the following main concerns: (1) academic programs; (2) maintenance, buildings, physical plant, and…

  4. Effective Civic Education: An Educational Effectiveness Model for Explaining Students' Civic Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isac, Maria Magdalena; Maslowski, Ralf; van der Werf, Greetje

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a comprehensive educational effectiveness model is tested in relation to student's civic knowledge. Multilevel analysis was applied on the dataset of the IEA Civic Education Study (CIVED; Torney-Purta, Lehmann, Oswald, & Schulz, 2001), which was conducted among junior secondary-school students (age 14), their schools, and their…

  5. Characteristics of Health Educators Desired by Inner-City Health Clinic Patients: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James; Sidani, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    A group (n = 170) of inner-city, predominantly African American, health clinic patients were asked to identify the characteristics they desired in a new clinic health educator. A plurality (44%) of the patients perceived a bachelor's degree would be a sufficient level of education. The vast majority of patients claimed the sex of the health…

  6. Pediatrics Education in an AHEC Setting: Preparing Students to Provide Patient Centered Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Steven Owens

    2012-01-01

    Patient centered medicine is a paradigm of health care that seeks to treat the whole person, rather than only the illness. The physician must understand the patient as a whole by considering the patient's individual needs, social structure, socioeconomic status, and educational background. Medical education includes ways to train students in this…

  7. Decreasing pediatric patient anxiety about radiology imaging tests: prospective evaluation of an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Annette J; Steele, Jennifer; Russell, Gregory B; Moran, Rhonda; Fredericks, Kirsten P; Jennings, S Gregory

    2009-12-01

    This trial investigated anxiety levels and effect of an educational coloring book (CB) among pediatric patients about to undergo radiology imaging tests. Control group (N = 101) and intervention group (N = 175) children ages 3-10 years and their parents were surveyed to determine anxiety levels before the imaging test, with the intervention group being surveyed after patient and parental review of the CB. Anxiety was low for all subjects overall compared with findings from previously published literature, perhaps related to systemic measures to make children's hospitals more child friendly in recent years. Review of the CB was not associated with decreased anxiety among patients or parents. However, among a subgroup with higher baseline parental anxiety, there was a trend toward lower patient anxiety in the intervention group. Most parents indicated that the CB was informative and helped them and their child be less worried, and that they were pleased to have received the CB.

  8. Effects of Educational Interventions for Chronic Airway Disease on Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Yeon; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Kim, Sang-Ha; Kim, Tae-Eun; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Rhee, Chin Kook; Park, Yong Bum; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Yum, Ho-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Education has been known to essential for management of chronic airway diseases. However the real benefits remain unclear. We evaluated the effectiveness of an organized educational intervention for chronic airway diseases directed at primary care physicians and patients. The intervention was a 1-month education program of three visits, during which subjects were taught about their disease, an action plan in acute exacerbation and inhaler technique. Asthma control tests (ACT) for asthma and, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment tests (CAT) for COPD subjects were compared before and after education as an index of quality of life. Educational effectiveness was also measured associated with improvement of their knowledge for chronic airway disease itself, proper use of inhaler technique, and satisfaction of the subjects and clinicians before and after education. Among the 285 participants, 60.7% (n = 173) were men and the mean age was 62.2 ± 14.7. ACT for asthma and CAT in COPD patients were significantly improved by 49.7% (n = 79) and 51.2% (n = 65) more than MCID respectively after education (P < 0.05). In all individual items, knowledge about their disease, inhaler use and satisfaction of the patients and clinicians were also improved after education (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates the well-organized education program for primary care physicians and patients is a crucial process for management of chronic airway diseases.

  9. Combining Software Games with Education: Evaluation of its Educational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virvou, Maria; Katsionis, George; Manos, Konstantinos

    2005-01-01

    Computer games are very popular among children and adolescents. In this respect, they could be exploited by educational software designers to render educational software more attractive and motivating. However, it remains to be explored what the educational scope of educational software games is. In this paper, we explore several issues concerning…

  10. Nutritional education for management of osteodystrophy (NEMO) trial: Design and patient characteristics, Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Karavetian, Mirey; Abboud, Saade; Elzein, Hafez; Haydar, Sarah; de Vries, Nanne

    2014-02-01

    THIS STUDY AIMS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECT OF A TRAINED DEDICATED DIETITIAN ON CLINICAL OUTCOMES AMONG LEBANESE HEMODIALYSIS (HD) PATIENTS: and thus demonstrate a viable developing country model. This paper describes the study protocol and baseline data. The study was a multicenter randomized controlled trial with parallel-group design involving 12 HD units: assigned to cluster A (n = 6) or B (n = 6). A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients in cluster A were randomly assigned as per dialysis shift to the following: Dedicated Dietitian (DD) (n = 133) and Existing Practice (EP) (n = 138) protocols. Cluster B patients (n = 299) received Trained Hospital Dietitian (THD) protocol. Dietitians of the DD and THD groups were trained by the research team on Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative nutrition guidelines. DD protocol included: individualized nutrition education for 2 hours/month/HD patient for 6 months focusing on renal osteodystrophy and using the Trans-theoretical theory for behavioral change. EP protocol included nutrition education given to patients by hospital dietitians who were blinded to the study. The THD protocol included nutrition education to patients given by hospital dietitian as per the training received but within hospital responsibilities, with no set educational protocol or tools. Baseline data revealed that 40% of patients were hyperphosphatemics (> 5.5 mg/dl) with low dietary adherence and knowledge of dietary P restriction in addition to inadequate daily protein intake (58.86%± 33.87% of needs) yet adequate dietary P intake (795.52 ± 366.94 mg/day). Quality of life (QOL) ranged from 48-75% of full health. Baseline differences between the 3 groups revealed significant differences in serum P, malnutrition status, adherence to diet and P chelators and in 2 factors of the QOL: physical and social functioning. The data show room for improvement in the nutritional status of the patients. The NEMO trial may be able to

  11. The impact of an educational program on HCV patient outcomes using boceprevir in community practices (OPTIMAL trial)

    PubMed Central

    Rustgi, Vinod; Brown, Robert S.; Patel, Vishal; Kugelmas, Marcelo; Regenstein, Fredric; Balart, Luis; LaBrecque, Douglas; Brown, Kimberly; Avila, Mark; Biederman, Michael; Freed, Glenn; Smith, Richard; Bernstein, Marc; Arnold, Hays; Cahan, Joel; Fink, Scott; Katkov, William; Massoumi, Hatef; Harrison, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Although effective, direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapies for genotype 1 (GT 1) hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been associated with compliance challenges. Additionally, treatment at predominantly community-based centers has been associated with low retention of patients on treatment and higher dropout rates. The OPTIMAL Phase IV interventional trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01405027) was designed to evaluate the impact of an education program for community investigator (CI) sites participating in a Chronic Liver Disease Foundation study treating chronic GT 1 HCV patients. Methods: This physician educational program was administered by 22 Hepatology Centers of Educational Expertise (HCEE) academic sites to 33 CI sites asked to participate from December 2011 to July 2012. The HCEE mentors from DAA-experienced academic sites educated those at CI sites on therapeutic management, practice, and patient outcomes through a series of four standardized educational sequence visits regarding the use of first generation HCV protease inhibitors and the overall treatment of HCV. Results: Treatment duration compliance rates for patients treated at CI sites versus those treated at HCEE academic sites were evaluable in 77 of 84 HCEE academic site patients, 102 of 113 patients treated at CI sites, and 179 of 197 overall patients. The treatment duration compliance rates for patients treated at HCEE academic sites, CI sites and overall were 85.4 ± 25.39%, 83.8 ± 27.37%, and 84.5 ± 26.48%, respectively, and did not differ statistically between the groups (p = 0.49). Almost half (47%) of the patients in the study achieved a sustained virological response for 24 weeks (SVR24) regardless of the type of site (p = 0.64). Safety profiles were similar at both HCEE and CI sites. Conclusions: These results demonstrated that education of CI sites unfamiliar with DAAs resulted in patient outcomes consistent with those observed at DAA-experienced academic sites. PMID

  12. Patient education, disease activity and physical function: can we be more targeted? A cross sectional study among people with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and hand osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In order to target educational needs of patients more effectively, an Austrian-German educational needs assessment tool (OENAT) was developed, the educational needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and hand osteoarthritis (HOA) were described and the relationships between educational needs, gender, disease activity and function were explored. Methods The English ENAT was adapted into Austrian-German using Beaton's cross-cultural adaptation process. Internal construct validity was assessed by Rasch analysis. Educational needs across diagnostic groups and subgroups of patients were summarized descriptively and their relationship with disease activity and physical functioning explored. Results The sample comprised 130 RA, 125 PsA and 48 HOA patients. Their mean ages ± SD were 56 ± 14, 51 ± 11 and 64 ± 7 years for RA, PsA and HOA; disease duration was 11 ± 9, 11 ± 11 and 14 ± 9 years, respectively. More than 70% in each patient group expressed interest in receiving education about their disease. The educational needs differed significantly between women and men in all 3 groups. In RA and PsA, female patients expressed significantly higher educational needs than men in 'movements’ and 'feelings’ domains (p=0.04 and p=0.03 for RA and p<0.01 and p=0.01 for PsA). Female patients in the HOA group had significantly higher scores on all domains except for the 'movements’. Older patients with PsA scored significantly higher than their younger counterparts in the 'pain’ domain (p=0.05). RA patients with disease duration >5 years), expressed higher educational needs in 'movements’ (p<0.01). Educational background had effects in the PsA group only, patients with basic education had greater scores than those with higher education on 'movements’ and 'arthritis process’ (p=0.01). In the RA group, DAS28 correlated significantly with 'movements’ (r=0.24, p=0.01), 'feelings’ (r=0.22, p

  13. More than just a pamphlet: development of an innovative computer-based education program for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, J M; Nyhof-Young, J; Friedman, A; Catton, P

    2001-09-01

    Patients with cancer continue to lack practical information regarding their illness and report low levels of awareness and use of patient services. The challenge to educators is to find cost-effective and timely ways to deliver a complex mix of interesting and high-quality information and expertise to this large and diverse audience, while still tailoring the content to individual needs and situations. In the present article, we describe the Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) computer-based patient education program. The program is aimed toward empowering those dealing with cancer and provides comprehensive medical information and support via an interactive Intranet web site containing information about cancer (the Oncology Interactive Education Series), library resources, Internet links, information about PMH services, and a hospital calendar of events. Preliminary evaluation results have provided valuable direction for on-going program development and suggest that the program is easy to use, informative, and enjoyable for patients, families, volunteers, and health professionals. PMID:11553428

  14. EDUC’AVK: Reduction of Oral Anticoagulant-related Adverse Events After Patient Education: A Prospective Multicenter Open Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Labarère, José; Yver, Jacqueline; Satger, Bernadette; Allenet, Benoit; Berremili, Touffek; Fontaine, Michèle; Franco, Guy; Bosson, Jean Luc

    2008-01-01

    Background Long-term oral anticoagulation treatment is associated with potential morbidity. Insufficient patient education is linked to poorly controlled anticoagulation. However the impact of a specific educational program on anticoagulation related morbidity remains unknown. Objective To evaluate the effect of an oral anticoagulation patient education program in reducing both hemorrhagic and recurrent thrombotic complications. Design/Participants We conducted a prospective, multicenter open randomized study, comparing an interventional group who received a specific oral anticoagulation treatment educational program with a control group. Eligible patients were older than 18 and diagnosed as having deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism requiring therapy with a vitamin K antagonist for 3 months or more. Our primary outcome was the occurrence of hemorrhagic or thromboembolic events. Results During the 3-month follow-up the main outcome criteria were observed 20 times (6.6% of patients), 5 (3.1%) in the experimental and 15 (10.6%) in the control group. Consequently, in multivariate analysis, the cumulative risk reduction in the experimental group was statistically significant (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.1 – 0.7,  < 0.01). Conclusions Patient education using an educational program reduced VKA-related adverse event rates. PMID:18566863

  15. [Patient safety in education and training of healthcare professionals in Germany].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Barbara; Siebert, H; Euteneier, A

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve patient safety, healthcare professionals who care for patients directly or indirectly are required to possess specific knowledge and skills. Patient safety education is not or only poorly represented in education and examination regulations of healthcare professionals in Germany; therefore, it is only practiced rarely and on a voluntary basis. Meanwhile, several training curricula and concepts have been developed in the past 10 years internationally and recently in Germany, too. Based on these concepts the German Coalition for Patient Safety developed a catalogue of core competencies required for safety in patient care. This catalogue will serve as an important orientation when patient safety is to be implemented as a subject of professional education in Germany in the future. Moreover, teaching staff has to be trained and educational and training activities have to be evaluated. Patient safety education and training for (undergraduate) healthcare professional will require capital investment.

  16. From theory to pamphlet: the 3Ws and an H process for the development of meaningful patient education resources.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Christine Tina; Papadakos, Janet; Catton, Pamela; Houston, Patricia; McKernan, Patricia; Jusko Friedman, Audrey

    2014-06-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of patient education given the prevalence and consequences of low health literacy in Canada and the USA. Research has shown that in addition to plain language, the use of theories of learning can contribute to the effectiveness of patient education resources, and as such, various guidelines and toolkits have been put together to help healthcare providers utilize these theories. Despite these efforts, this knowledge is not consistently applied in practice. To address this gap, we describe a new theory-based protocol, the "3Ws and an H," that is designed to guide healthcare providers in the production of effective patient education resources. Adult learning theory underpins each step of the process, and by using the "3Ws and an H," relevant theories are applied as the steps of the protocol are followed. To facilitate the adoption of this process, we describe it using a resource development project for survivors of endometrial cancer as an example.

  17. Patient and family satisfaction levels in the intensive care unit after elective cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of a preoperative patient education intervention

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Patricia; Chiu, Chun Hung; Ho, Ka Man; Gomersall, Charles David; Underwood, Malcolm John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients and their families are understandably anxious about the risk of complications and unfamiliar experiences following cardiac surgery. Providing information about postoperative care in the intensive care unit (ICU) to patients and families may lead to lower anxiety levels, and increased satisfaction with healthcare. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative patient education provided for patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods and analysis 100 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft, with or without valve replacement surgery, will be recruited into a 2-group, parallel, superiority, double-blinded randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to either preoperative patient education comprising of a video and ICU tour with standard care (intervention) or standard education (control). The primary outcome measures are the satisfaction levels of patients and family members with ICU care and decision-making in the ICU. The secondary outcome measures are patient anxiety and depression levels before and after surgery. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the Joint Chinese University of Hong Kong—New Territories East Cluster Clinical Research Ethics Committee (reference number CREC 2015.308). The findings will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Study participants will receive a 1-page plain language summary of results. Trial registration number ChiCTR-IOR-15006971. PMID:27334883

  18. Iranian Nurses’ Views on Barriers and Facilitators in Patient Education: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramezanli, Somayeh; Jahromi, Zohreh Badiyepeymaie

    2015-01-01

    Background: As a major factor in patient-centered care, patient education has a great impact on the quality of care provided by nurses; however, clinical nurses’ performance with regard to patient education is not satisfactory. This study is an attempt to investigate barriers and facilitators in patient education from nurses’ point of view. Methods: 122 nurses at Jahrom University of Medical Sciences participated in this descriptive-cross sectional study. Sampling was based on the census method. The questionnaire used to collect data included questions about nurses’ demography, barriers (10 questions), and facilitators (10 questions) in patient education. The questionnaire was designed to be completed independently. To analyze the data, the researchers used descriptive statistics, including frequency, mean and standard deviation. Results: The highest scores related to barriers to patient education were: nurses’ insufficient knowledge, patients’ physical and emotional unpreparedness, and lack of a proper environment for education. The most important facilitators, on the other hand, were: enhancement of instructing nurses’ knowledge and skills, motivating nurses, and a step-by-step approach to patient education. Conclusion: It is important that nurses be prepared and motivated to train their patients. By satisfactory patient education on the part of nurses, patients will be more willing to cooperate in the treatment process. PMID:26156926

  19. Development of SMOG-Cro readability formula for healthcare communication and patient education.

    PubMed

    Brangan, Sanja

    2015-03-01

    Effective communication shows a positive impact on patient satisfaction, compliance and medical outcomes, at the same time reducing the healthcare costs. Written information for patients needs to correspond to health literacy levels of the intended audiences. Readability formulas correlate well with the reading and comprehension tests but are considered an easier and quicker method to estimate a text difficulty. SMOG readability formula designed for English language needs to be modified if used for texts in other languages. The aim of this study was to develop a readability formula based on SMOG, that could be used to estimate text difficulty of written materials for patients in Croatian language. Contras- tive analysis of English and Croatian language covering a corpus of almost 100,000 running words showed clear linguis- tic differences in the number of polysyllabic words. The new formula, named SMOG-Cro, is presented as an equation: SMOG-Cro = 2 + √4+ syllables, with the score showing the number of years of education a person needs to be able to understand a piece of writing. The presented methodology could help in the development of readability formulas for other languages. We hope the results of this study are soon put into practice for more effective healthcare communication and patient education, and for development of a health literacy assessment tool in Croatian language.

  20. SCI-U: E-learning for patient education in spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, John D.; Badger-Brown, Karla M.; Legassic, Matthew S.; Walia, Saagar; Wolfe, Dalton L.

    2012-01-01

    Background/objectives To develop an online patient education resource for use in spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Participants The development process involved more than 100 subject-matter experts (SMEs) (rehabilitation professionals and consumers) from across Canada. Preliminary evaluation was conducted with 25 end-users. Methods An iterative development process was coordinated by a project team; SMEs (including patients) developed the content in working groups using wiki-based tools. Multiple rounds of feedback based on early prototypes helped improve the courses during development. Results Five courses were created, each featuring more than 45 minutes of video content and hundreds of media assets. Preliminary evaluation results indicate that users were satisfied by the courses and perceived them to be effective. Conclusions This is an effective process for developing multimedia patient education resources; the involvement of patients in all parts of the process was particularly helpful. Future work will focus on implementation, integration into clinical practice and other delivery formats (smart phones, tablets). PMID:23031169

  1. Development of SMOG-Cro readability formula for healthcare communication and patient education.

    PubMed

    Brangan, Sanja

    2015-03-01

    Effective communication shows a positive impact on patient satisfaction, compliance and medical outcomes, at the same time reducing the healthcare costs. Written information for patients needs to correspond to health literacy levels of the intended audiences. Readability formulas correlate well with the reading and comprehension tests but are considered an easier and quicker method to estimate a text difficulty. SMOG readability formula designed for English language needs to be modified if used for texts in other languages. The aim of this study was to develop a readability formula based on SMOG, that could be used to estimate text difficulty of written materials for patients in Croatian language. Contras- tive analysis of English and Croatian language covering a corpus of almost 100,000 running words showed clear linguis- tic differences in the number of polysyllabic words. The new formula, named SMOG-Cro, is presented as an equation: SMOG-Cro = 2 + √4+ syllables, with the score showing the number of years of education a person needs to be able to understand a piece of writing. The presented methodology could help in the development of readability formulas for other languages. We hope the results of this study are soon put into practice for more effective healthcare communication and patient education, and for development of a health literacy assessment tool in Croatian language. PMID:26040062

  2. Structured patient education: the X-PERT Programme.

    PubMed

    Deakin, Trudi; Whitham, Claire

    2009-09-01

    The X-PERT Programme seeks to develop the knowledge, skills and confidence in diabetes treatment for health-care professionals and diabetes self-management. The programme trains health-care professionals to deliver the six-week structured patient education programme to people with diabetes. Over 850 health-care professionals have attended the X-PERT 'Train the Trainer' course and audit results document improved job satisfaction and competence in diabetes treatment and management. National audit statistics for X-PERT implementation to people with diabetes illustrate excellent attendance rates, improved diabetes control, reduced weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and waist circumference and more confidence in self-managing diabetes that has impacted positively on quality of life.

  3. Best practices for stroke patient and family education in the acute care setting: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    After a stroke, patients and families face many changes--physical, mental, and emotional. It is imperative that the nurse is able to appropriately educate the patient and family in preparation for discharge from the acute care center.

  4. Assessment of Telemedicine in Surgical Education and Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Demartines, Nicolas; Mutter, Didier; Vix, Michel; Leroy, Joël; Glatz, Dieter; Rösel, Fritz; Harder, Felix; Marescaux, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    Objective To analyze the value of teleconferencing for patient care and surgical education by assessing the activity of an international academic network. Summary Background Data The uses of telemedicine include teleeducation, training, and consulting, and surgical teams are now involved, sharing diagnostic information and opinions without the need for travel. However, the value of telematics in surgery remains to be assessed. Methods During a 2-year period, weekly surgical teleconferences were held among six university hospitals in four European countries. To assess the accuracy of telediagnosis for surgical cases, 60 randomly selected cases were analyzed by a panel of surgeons. Participants’ opinions were analyzed by questionnaire. Results Seventy teleconferences (50 lectures and 271 case presentations) were held. Ninety-five of the 114 participants (83.3%) completed the final questionnaire. Eighty-six percent rated the surgical activity as good or excellent, 75.7% rated the scientific level as good or excellent, 55.8% rated the daily clinical activity as good or excellent, and 28.4% rated the manual surgical technique as good or excellent. The target organ was identified in all the cases; the organ structure and pathology were considered well defined in 93.3%, and the fine structure was considered well defined in 58.3%. Diagnosis was accurate in 17 cases (28.3%), probable in 25 (41.7%), possible but uncertain in 16 (26.7%), and not possible in 2 cases (3.3%). Discussion among the remote sites increased the rate of valuable therapeutic advice from 55% of cases before the discussion to 95% after the discussion. Eighty-six percent of the surgeons expressed satisfaction with telematics for medical education and patient care. Conclusions Participant satisfaction was high, transmission of clinical documents was accurate, and the opportunity to discuss case documentation and management significantly improved diagnostic potential, resulting in an accuracy rate of up

  5. Patient Education and Support During CKD Transitions: When the Possible Becomes Probable.

    PubMed

    Green, Jamie A; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-07-01

    Patients transitioning from kidney disease to kidney failure require comprehensive patient-centered education and support. Efforts to prepare patients for this transition often fail to meet patients' needs due to uncertainty about which patients will progress to kidney failure, nonindividualized patient education programs, inadequate psychosocial support, or lack of assistance to guide patients through complex treatment plans. Resources are available to help overcome barriers to providing optimal care during this time, including prognostic tools, educational lesson plans, decision aids, communication skills training, peer support, and patient navigation programs. New models are being studied to comprehensively address patients' needs and improve the lives of kidney patients during this high-risk time.

  6. Patient Education and Support During CKD Transitions: When the Possible Becomes Probable.

    PubMed

    Green, Jamie A; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-07-01

    Patients transitioning from kidney disease to kidney failure require comprehensive patient-centered education and support. Efforts to prepare patients for this transition often fail to meet patients' needs due to uncertainty about which patients will progress to kidney failure, nonindividualized patient education programs, inadequate psychosocial support, or lack of assistance to guide patients through complex treatment plans. Resources are available to help overcome barriers to providing optimal care during this time, including prognostic tools, educational lesson plans, decision aids, communication skills training, peer support, and patient navigation programs. New models are being studied to comprehensively address patients' needs and improve the lives of kidney patients during this high-risk time. PMID:27324676

  7. Effective teaching in physical education: Slovenian perspective.

    PubMed

    Pisot, Rado; Plevnik, Matej; Stemberger, Vesna

    2014-06-01

    Regular quality physical education (PE) contributes to the harmonized biopsychosocial development of a young person--to relaxation, neutralization of negative effects of sedentary hours, and other unhealthy habits/behaviors. The evaluation approach to PE effectiveness provides important information to PE teachers and also to students. However, evaluating effectiveness of teaching, especially the effectiveness of teaching PE, is a difficult task, because PE is a constant process of enriching knowledge and developing skills, as well as having a possible impact on students' health and mental well-being. Many attempts to evaluate PE teachers' effectiveness exist in Slovenia, but currently, none are being implemented in the national PE curricula. As part of recent discussion on PE teaching effectiveness (McKenzie & Lounsbery, 2013; Rink, 2013; Ward, 2013), we share our views from a Slovenian perspective.

  8. Patient education in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant: what patients wish they had known about quality of life.

    PubMed

    Jim, H S L; Quinn, G P; Gwede, C K; Cases, M G; Barata, A; Cessna, J; Christie, J; Gonzalez, L; Koskan, A; Pidala, J

    2014-02-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but patient education is often overlooked. The aim of the current qualitative study was to examine education regarding post-HCT QOL from the patient's perspective. Allogeneic HCT recipients participated in one of four focus groups. Participants were asked to recall what they had been told about post-HCT QOL as they were preparing for transplant, how their QOL differed from what they expected and how to educate future patients about post-HCT QOL. Verbatim transcripts were coded for both a priori and emergent themes using content analysis. A total of 24 patients participated (54% female, mean age 51, range 23-73 years). Participants frequently expressed the desire for additional education regarding post-HCT QOL, particularly late complications. They noted that late complications were often unexpected, had a profound impact on their QOL and threatened their ongoing sense of recovery. They emphasized that the timing, content and format of education regarding QOL should be flexible to meet their diverse needs. Findings from the current study draw attention to the importance of patient education regarding post-HCT QOL as well as additional QOL research designed with patient education in mind.

  9. In Sickness and in Health--Till Education Do Us Part: Education Effects on Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arendt, Jacob Nielsen

    2008-01-01

    This study provides the first estimates of the causal impact of education on hospitalization. It improves upon existing studies on health and education by using a larger data set and more efficient estimation methods. Using a Danish school reform to identify a causal effect of education on hospitalization, we find that education has a substantial…

  10. The Importance of Indirect Teaching Behaviour and Its Educational Effects in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Hyunwoo; Choi, Euichang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical education teacher behaviour has been a subject of study in physical education including physical education teacher education for 30 years. However, the research on teacher behaviour has tended to focus on direct teaching behaviour (DTB) to demonstrate the benefits of effective teaching, centred on a technical understanding of…

  11. [Dissertations 25 years after the date 5. The dentist and patient education: 25 years later].

    PubMed

    Eijkman, M A J

    2005-07-01

    In 1979 the thesis 'The dentist and patient education' was published. Based on theory and research, it was the aim of the thesis to provide physicians, dentists, dental students, and dental hygienists theoretical and practical tools to be of assistance in daily patient education. During the last 25 years the insights in patient education and shared decision making were further developed. Two literature studies were published in books. Some research projects were carried out and published in articles. Nowadays, individual based patient education is an essential part of dentists' and dental hygienists' daily work. When compared with the period 1970-1985, at present, multimedia campaigns on oral disease prevention are extremely scarce. Communication skills of dentists appeared to be strongly related to patients' satisfaction of oral care delivery. In the Netherlands, the ethical principle of informed consent has been legislated in 1995 and, as a consequence, activities in the field of patient education are more juridically characterized.

  12. Drug treatment program patients' hepatitis C virus (HCV) education needs and their use of available HCV education services

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Shiela M; Astone-Twerell, Janetta; Munoz-Plaza, Corrine E; Des Jarlais, Don C; Gwadz, Marya; Hagan, Holly; Osborne, Andrew; Rosenblum, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Background In spite of the disproportionate prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among drug users, many remain uninformed or misinformed about the virus. Drug treatment programs are important sites of opportunity for providing HCV education to their patients, and many programs do, in fact, offer this education in a variety of formats. Little is known, however, about the level of HCV knowledge among drug treatment program patients, and the extent to which they utilize their programs' HCV education services. Methods Using data collected from patients (N = 280) in 14 U.S. drug treatment programs, we compared patients who reported that they never injected drugs (NIDUs) with past or current drug injectors (IDUs) concerning their knowledge about HCV, whether they used HCV education opportunities at their programs, and the facilitators and barriers to doing so. All of the programs were participating in a research project that was developing, implementing, and evaluating a staff training to provide HCV support to patients. Results Although IDUs scored higher on an HCV knowledge assessment than NIDUs, there were many gaps in HCV knowledge among both groups of patients. To address these knowledge gaps, all of the programs offered at least one form of HCV education: all offered 1:1 sessions with staff, 12 of the programs offered HCV education in a group format, and 11 of the programs offered this education through pamphlets/books. Only 60% of all of the participating patients used any of their programs' HCV education services, but those who did avail themselves of these HCV education opportunities generally assessed them positively. In all, many patients were unaware that HCV education was offered at their programs through individual sessions with staff, group meetings, and books/pamphlets, (42%, 49%, and 46% of the patients, respectively), and 22% were unaware that any HCV education opportunities existed. Conclusion Efforts especially need to focus on ensuring

  13. Health, economic, psychological and social impact of educating carers of patients with advanced pulmonary disease (protocol).

    PubMed

    Sladek, R M; Jones, T; Phillips, P A; Luszcz, M; Rowett, D; Eckermann, S; Woodman, R J; Frith, P

    2011-09-01

    People with advanced pulmonary disease (APD), such as those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, have markedly impaired quality of life. Home Oxygen Therapy (HOT) itself is burdensome, although it often improves survival duration and quality of life in these patients. The exact burdens on informal caregivers of these patients are unknown. The central purpose of the pragmatic randomized controlled study described in this protocol is to determine the effectiveness of improving the skills and knowledge of carers of patients with APD who use HOT. Specifically we aimed to estimate the incremental impact of this carer intervention above usual care on health, economic, psychological and social domains for patient and carer dyads relative to the level of current burden. Eligible patients and their carers were recruited through three major hospitals, and randomized to an intervention or control group. The carers in the intervention group received two home-delivered education sessions based on the principles of academic detailing. Participants are currently being followed over 12 months. The primary outcome will be the proportion of patients surviving without a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related readmission / residential (non respite) care over 12 months. Carer secondary outcomes include perceived caregiver burden, level of expected and received social support, perceived level of mastery, self esteem, health related quality of life and disability, and ability to conduct domestic chores and household maintenance, social activities and provide service to others, and fatigue. Secondary patient outcomes include health related quality of life and disability, and current respiratory health status.

  14. Narrative in interprofessional education and practice: implications for professional identity, provider-patient communication and teamwork.

    PubMed

    Clark, Phillip G

    2014-01-01

    Health and social care professionals increasingly use narrative approaches to focus on the patient and to communicate with each other. Both effective interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP) require recognizing the various values and voices of different professions, how they relate to the patient's life story, and how they interact with each other at the level of the healthcare team. This article analyzes and integrates the literature on narrative to explore: self-narrative as an expression of one's professional identity; the co-creation of the patient's narrative by the professional and the patient; and the interprofessional multi-vocal narrative discourse as co-constructed by members of the healthcare team. Using a narrative approach to thinking about professional identity, provider-patient communication, and interprofessional teamwork expands our thinking about both IPE and IPP by providing new insights into the nature of professional practice based on relationships to oneself, the patient, and others on the team. How professionals define themselves, gather and present information from the patient, and communicate as members of a clinical team all have important dimensions that can be revealed by a narrative approach. Implications and conclusions for the further development of the narrative approach in IPE and IPP are offered.

  15. A Review of Evaluations of Effectiveness in Continuing Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, James D.

    1987-01-01

    The literature evaluating the effectiveness of continuing education in dentistry is reviewed critically. Levels of effectiveness of continuing dental education reported by the studies has tended to be low, and no distinctions in effectiveness can be made among different educational methods. (CH)

  16. Self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Monninkhof, E; van der Valk, P; van der Palen, J; van Herwaarden, C; Partridge, M; Zielhuis, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: The idea of self-management is to teach patients how to carry out the activities of daily living optimally in the face of their physiological impairment, and to prevent or decrease the severity of exacerbations by means of life style adaptation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) the value of self-management education is not clear. This review was undertaken to clarify the effectiveness of self-management programmes in COPD. Methods: A search was made of the Cochrane Airways Group trial registers, Medline, reference lists, and abstracts of medical conferences for controlled trials of self-management education in patients with COPD. Two reviewers independently assessed each paper for methodological quality and extracted the data. Results: The reviewers included 12 articles describing eight randomised controlled trials and one controlled clinical trial in which self-management education was compared with usual care. The studies assessed a broad spectrum of outcome measures with different follow up times so meta-analysis could not be undertaken. Self-management education had no effect on hospital admissions, emergency room visits, days lost from work, and lung function. Inconclusive results were observed on health related quality of life, COPD symptoms, and use of healthcare facilities such as doctor and nurse visits. Self-management education reduced the need for rescue medication and led to increased use of courses of oral steroids and antibiotics for respiratory symptoms. Conclusions: Insufficient data were obtained to make recommendations because of the wide variation in outcome measures used and other limitations to generalisations in the current published literature. Further research in this area is needed. PMID:12728158

  17. Tobacco cessation treatment education for dental students using standardized patients.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Jacqueline A; Carrico, Ruth M; Myers, John A; Scott, David A; Wilson, Richard W; Worth, Celeste T

    2014-06-01

    The use of standardized patients (SPs) shows promise in tobacco cessation treatment (TCT) training by providing a simulated clinical environment for dental students to practice counseling skills with individuals trained to portray patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in attitudes, perceptions, and knowledge between dental students who received a lecture and practice sessions with SPs and those who received a lecture only. Dental students in an introductory clinical course at one dental school were invited to participate in the study by completing a pre and post questionnaire. The pre questionnaire was administered to all students prior to a tobacco cessation lecture. Students were group-randomized to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group completed the post questionnaire after the lecture and practice sessions with SPs, and the control group completed it after the lecture only. Of ninety-eight students who attended the lecture and were invited to participate in the study, a total of ninety-four from the two groups (96 percent) provided two linkable questionnaires for analysis. In the results, training with lecture and SPs increased the students' understanding of barriers, subjective norms, perceived skills, self-efficacy, and intentions to provide TCT more than those in the lecture only; however, it did not significantly increase their attitudes and knowledge. These findings suggest that using SPs is a valuable educational method to promote the provision of TCT by dental students and graduates. PMID:24882775

  18. Effective Compensatory Education Sourcebook. Volume IV: Project Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Kathleen J.; And Others

    This directory is a compendium of 108 outstanding Education Consolidation Improvement Act Chapter 1 compensatory education projects selected for recognition by the United States Department of Education in 1987. It is the fourth volume in the "Effective Compensatory Education Sourcebook" series. Volume 1 consists of a review of the literature on…

  19. Designing and Implementing Effective Adapted Physical Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.

    2011-01-01

    "Designing and Implementing Effective Adapted Physical Education Programs" was written to assist adapted and general physical educators who are dedicated to ensuring that the physical and motor needs of all their students are addressed in physical education. While it is anticipated that adapted physical educators, where available, will typically…

  20. Special Education: A Systematic Approach to Efficiency and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haar, Jean M.; Robicheau, Jerry W.; Palladino, John

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and the efficacy of regional special education programs. Focus groups were conducted in an independent school district and two special education cooperatives. Focus groups were conducted with general education teachers, special education teachers, principals, paraprofessionals,…

  1. The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program as an Educational Tool and Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabe, Darren W.; Bailie, George R.; Manley, Harold J.; Yeaw, Barbara F.

    1998-01-01

    The Early Patient-Oriented Care Program provides early clinical education for pharmacy students and clinical services for patients. Six students were assigned to visit 12-15 hemodialysis patients monthly under preceptor supervision. Topics covered include approach to patient, medical information retrieval, pharmaceutical care philosophy,…

  2. An 8-Week Knee Osteoarthritis Treatment Program of Hyaluronic Acid Injection, Deliberate Physical Rehabilitation, and Patient Education is Cost Effective at 2 Years Follow-up: The OsteoArthritis Centers of AmericaSM Experience

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2014-01-01

    Numerous nonsurgical interventions have been reported to improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA) over the short term. However, longer follow-up is required to accurately characterize outcomes such as cost effectiveness and delayed arthroplasty. A total of 553 patients with symptomatic knee OA who previously underwent a single 8-week multimodal treatment program were contacted at 1 year (n = 336) or 2 years (n = 217) follow-up. The percentage of patients who underwent knee arthroplasty was 10% at 1 year and 18% at 2 years following program completion. The treatment program was highly cost effective at $12,800 per quality-adjusted life year at 2 years. Cost effectiveness was maintained under a variety of plausible assumptions and regardless of gender, age, body mass index, disease severity, or knee pain severity. In summary, a single 8-week multimodal knee OA treatment program is cost effective and may lower knee arthroplasty utilization through 2 years follow-up. PMID:25574144

  3. The effect of nanotechnology on education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viriyavejakul, Chantana

    2008-04-01

    The research objective was to study 1) the situation and readiness of the Thai education for the integration of nanotechnology and 2) to propose the plans, the strategies and guidelines for educational reform to adapt nanotechnology to the system. The data collection was done by 4 methods: 1) documentary study, 2) observation, 3) informal interviews, and 4) group discussion. The findings revealed that: 1. William Wresch's Theory (1997) was used in this research to study of the situation and readiness of the Thai education for the integration of nanotechnology. 1) Getting connected to nanotechnology by search engine websites, libraries, magazines, books, and discussions with experts. 2) Curriculum integration: nanotechnology should be integrated in many branches of engineering, such as industrial, computer, civil, chemical, electrical, mechanical, etc. 3) Resources for educators: nanotechnology knowledge should be spread in academic circles by publications and the Internet websites. 4) Training and professional resources for teachers: Teachers should be trained by experts in nanotechnology and researchers from the National Nanotechnology Center. This will help trainees get correct knowledge, comprehension, and awareness in order to apply to their professions and businesses in the future. 2. As for the plans, the strategies, and guidelines for educational reform to adapt nanotechnology to the present system, I analyzed the world nanotechnology situation that might have an effect on Thai society. The study is based on the National Plan to Develop Nanotechnology. The goal of this plan is to develop nanotechnology to be the national strategy within 10 years (2004-2013) and have it integrated into the Thai system. There are 4 parts in this plan: 1) nanomaterials, 2) nanoelectronics, 3) nanobiotechnology, and 4) human resources development. Data for human resource development should be worked with the present technology and use the country's resources to produce many

  4. Patient education in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant: What patients wish they had known about quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather S.L.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Gwede, Clement K.; Cases, Mallory G.; Barata, Anna; Cessna, Julie; Christie, Juliette; Gonzalez, Luis; Koskan, Alexis; Pidala, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but patient education is often overlooked. The goal of the current qualitative study was to examine education regarding post-HCT QOL from the patient’s perspective. Allogeneic HCT recipients participated in one of four focus groups. Participants were asked to recall what they had been told about post-HCT QOL as they were preparing for transplant, how their QOL differed from what they expected, and how to educate future patients about post-HCT QOL. Verbatim transcripts were coded for both a priori and emergent themes using content analysis. A total of 24 patients participated (54% female, mean age 51, range 23-73). Participants frequently expressed the desire for additional education regarding post-HCT QOL, particularly late complications. They noted that late complications were often unexpected, had a profound impact on their QOL, and threatened their ongoing sense of recovery. They emphasized that the timing, content, and format of education regarding QOL should be flexible to meet their diverse needs. Findings from the current study draw attention to the importance of patient education regarding post-HCT QOL as well as additional QOL research designed with patient education in mind. PMID:24121210

  5. The Diffusion Process of Patient Education in Dutch Community Pharmacy: An Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronk, M. C. M.; Blom, A. Th. G.; Van Burg, A.; Jonkers, R.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies barriers and facilitators to the implementation of patient education in community pharmacies and classifies these barriers and facilitators into the diffusion stages of Rogers'"Innovations in Organizations" model. Discusses the implementation of patient education activities that require individual and organizational change in…

  6. Quality Assessment of Diabetes Online Patient Education Materials from Academic Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorcely, Brenda; Agarwal, Nitin; Raghuwanshi, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the readability of type 2 diabetes online patient education materials from academic institutions in the northeast USA and the American Diabetes Association. Many US residents utilise the Internet to obtain health information. Studies have shown that online patient education materials…

  7. Health Related Quality of Life May Increase when Patients with a Stoma Attend Patient Education – A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adaptation to living with a stoma is complex, and studies have shown that stoma creation has a great impact on patients' health related quality of life. The objective was to explore the effect of a structured patient education program on health related quality of life. Therefore, we implemented interventions aimed at increasing health related quality of life during and after hospital admission. Materials and Methods We designed a case/control study aimed at adult patients admitted to the surgical ward for stoma creation, irrespective of type of stoma or reason for creation of stoma. We included 50 patients in the study. Health related quality of life was measured before hospital discharge, three months and six months after stoma creation. The program included educational interventions involving lay-teachers, alongside health professional teachers. Results We found a significant rise in health related quality of life in the intervention group (P<0.001) and no significant change in the control group (P = 0.144). However, we found no significant differences when comparing between groups at 3 and 6 months (p = 0.12 and p =  0.63, respective). Additionally, there were differences in scores in health related quality of life baseline (p = 0.045) with lower scores in the intervention group compared with the intervention group. However, there were no significant differences in the demographic variables at baseline Conclusions Educational activities aimed at increase in knowledge and focusing on patients' psychosocial needs may lead to a rise in patients' health related quality of life. When patients with a stoma attend a structured patient education program it is possible to improve their health related quality of life compared with patients with a stoma, who do not attend the program. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01154725 PMID:24609004

  8. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education Programmes in the Management of Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines and recommendations on patient education programmes of any type, targeted specially to individuals with OA and which were designed to improve the clinical effectiveness of managing OA. Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group contacted specialized organizations that focus on management for…

  9. A Pilot Project to Develop and Assess a Health Education Programme for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atak, Nazli; Arslan, Umit

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The current research was designed to develop a health education programme for type 2 diabetes mellitus based on the Taba-Tyler model and to evaluate its effect. Design: The study was quasi-experimental in design. Setting: Fifty-five patients from the Endocrinology and Metabolism Unit, University Hospital of Ankara. Method: An education…

  10. The Educational Effectiveness of a Simulation/Game in Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashibuchi, Megumi; Sakamoto, Akira

    2001-01-01

    Examines the educational effectiveness of a game named POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE for sex education in a Japanese high school. Compares the effectiveness of educational videos with game conditions and discusses results that show the value of playing the game in the role of the opposite sex. (Author/LRW)

  11. Exploring the self-learning experiences of patients with depression participating in a multimedia education program.

    PubMed

    Chou, Mei-Hsien; Lin, Mei-Feng; Hsu, Mei-Chi; Wang, Yao-Hua; Hu, Huei-Fan

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the self-learning experiences of depression patients on interactive multimedia education program. Qualitative in-depth interviews were employed. Fourteen patients with a first episode of major depression were recruited from a psychiatric outpatient department. Explanations of the purposes of the exercise and on-the-spot teaching were provided by the researcher before the study began. A tape-recorded, semi-structured interview format was employed after two weeks. Data analysis was performed in the framework of line-by-line content, contextual and thematic analysis. Eight subjects successfully completed the entire learning activities. Content analysis revealed 4 main aspects of successful self-learning experiences: the triggering of learning motivation, the enjoyment of self-paced learning, support for the effects of learning materials, and the gaining of self- awareness and changes. The factors influencing learning performance were related to: environmental impact, the degree of familiarity with traditional learning, possession or non-possession of the necessary computer operation skills, and good computer support. However, the findings provide a preliminary understanding of the application of interactive multimedia education programs in terms of self-learning outcomes and recognizing key elements of learning impediments among the study sample. A larger sample size with different clinical contexts is recommended to determine the effect and generalizability for future research. Furthermore, the creation of a computerized learning environment with different educational styles is crucial to patients' success in obtaining depression-related information and understanding effective adaptive skills. PMID:15619180

  12. Barrier Factors to the Completion of Diabetes Education in Korean Diabetic Adult Patients: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2007-2012

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Tae; Jung, Se Young; Oh, Seung-Min; Jeong, Su-Min; Choi, Yoon-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a disease with high social burdens and is expected to increase gradually. A long-term management is essential for the treatment of diabetes, requiring patient self-cares. Diabetes education is important for such self-cares, but it does not sufficiently take place. In addition, little studies have been conducted on the barriers to the completion of diabetes education. This study, thus, aimed to analyze the factors related to the completion of diabetes education and investigate its barriers. Methods Of 50,405 respondents to the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a total of 3,820 were selected for the analysis, excluding those aged 29 or younger and those with missing values. The completion of diabetes education was set as a dependent variable and an analysis was made on the factors that affect the dependent variable. A multivariable logistic regression was employed for the analysis. Results Lower educational level was associated with less diabetes education, and the degree of diabetes education was lower in the group with male, the group that didn't have a family history or was not aware of a family history, the group that was not currently aware of diabetes and the group without a spouse. There was no difference in the completion of diabetes education by underlying diseases, family income level, age, residing area, economic activity status, insurance coverage, smoking, and drinking. Conclusion Diabetes education is of importance for the treatment and management of diabetes. Currently, however, diabetes education is not sufficiently carried out in Korea. The completion rate of diabetes education was low in male, patients without or not knowing a family history, patients who were not currently aware of their diabetes, patients without a spouse, and patients with low educational level. Therefore, encouraging these patients to take the education will be a more effective approach to increase the completion rate

  13. Development of self-care educational material for patients with heart failure in Japan: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naoko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Sano, Miho; Seki, Satomi; Kogure, Asuka; Kobukata, Kihoko; Ochiai, Ryota; Wakita, Sanae; Kazuma, Keiko

    2012-06-01

    This study assessed the need for information regarding heart failure and self-care, developed self-care educational material, and investigated the feasibility of the material. A total of 22 hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 63 years) completed a self-administered questionnaire. We found that more than 90% of patients desired information, particularly about heart failure symptoms, time to notify healthcare providers, prognosis, and exercise/physical activity. After examining the eight existing brochures for Japanese heart failure patients, we developed self-care educational material. This was based on heart failure guidelines and on the results of our inquiry regarding information needs. Finally, a pilot study was conducted in nine hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 57 years). None of the patients had difficulty reading or understanding the educational material. The self-administrated questionnaire survey revealed that comprehension of the following improved after the educational sessions with the material: heart failure symptoms, medication, weighing, sodium intake, and fluid intake (P < 0.05). In conclusion, heart failure patients have a great need for information about heart failure. Our pilot study suggests that the material was readable and had a beneficial effect on heart failure comprehension. PMID:22339764

  14. Patients with special needs: dental students' educational experiences, attitudes, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Vainio, Lauren; Krause, Meggan; Inglehart, Marita R

    2011-01-01

    Accreditation standards require U.S. dental schools to prepare their graduates for the diagnosis of treatment needs of patients with special health care needs (SHCN). The objective of this study was to explore dental students' perceptions of their education about these issues, their satisfaction with this education, and their professional attitudes and behavioral intentions concerning treating patients with SHCN in the future. Web-based survey data were collected from forty-nine dental student leaders in thirteen U.S. dental schools and paper-and-pencil survey data from 397 dental students at a Midwestern dental school. Most respondents agreed that it is important to be educated about providing care for patients with SHCN and that they will provide care for these patients in the future. However, their satisfaction with their education was not equally positive. Their perceived quality of their dental education was correlated with their confidence concerning treating SHCN patients; their confidence was in turn correlated with their intentions to include these patients in their patient families in their future professional lives. In conclusion, dental students are strongly motivated to learn about providing care for patients with SHCN. The better their dental education prepares them for this task, the more confident they will be when treating these patients and the more likely they will be to provide care for these patients.

  15. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of the characteristics of gout patient education resources.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip C; Schumacher, H Ralph

    2013-06-01

    Patient education is an important aspect of gout management, but there is evidence that many patients lack adequate knowledge of their condition. Our aim was to examine the characteristics of gout patient education resources. Ten gout patient information resources were examined for readability (Flesch-Kincaid reading level, the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook measure and the Flesch Reading Ease Score), qualitative characteristics such as figure and jargon use and whether they included information on the major points of gout. The median readability grade level of the examined resources was 8.5. The difference in readability grade level between the highest and the lowest education resource was 6.3 grade levels. The information content of the resources was high with an average of only 3.9 proposed criteria of 19 (19 %) absent from the resources. Jargon use was low and concepts were usually explained. However, important information regarding acute flare prophylaxis during urate-lowering therapy initiation and titration and treating serum uric acid to target was absent from 60 % of the patient education resources. There was poor use of key messages at the start. Gout patient resources have a wide range of readability. Thirty percent of resources were above the average reading level of rheumatology outpatients reported in previous studies. Sixty percent of gout patient resources omit education items that could impact on patient adherence and in turn patient outcomes. Further research is needed into the literacy levels and education requirements of patients with gout.

  16. Dietary Interventions in Multiple Sclerosis: Development and Pilot-Testing of an Evidence Based Patient Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Riemann-Lorenz, Karin; Eilers, Marlene; von Geldern, Gloria; Schulz, Karl-Heinz; Köpke, Sascha; Heesen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background Dietary factors have been discussed to influence risk or disease course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Specific diets are widely used among patients with MS. Objective To design and pilot-test an evidence based patient education program on dietary factors in MS. Methods We performed a systematic literature search on the effectiveness of dietary interventions in MS. A web-based survey among 337 patients with MS and 136 healthy controls assessed knowledge, dietary habits and information needs. An interactive group education program was developed and pilot-tested. Results Fifteen randomised-controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the systematic review. Quality of evidence was low and no clear benefit could be seen. Patients with MS significantly more often adhered to a `Mediterranean Diet`(29.7% versus 14.0%, p<0.001) compared to controls. 143 (42%) of the patients with MS had tried special MS diets. Important information needs addressed effectiveness of MS diets (44%) and relation between nutrition and MS (43%). A pilot test of our newly developed patient education program with 13 participants showed excellent comprehensibility and the MS-specific content was judged as very important. However, the poor evidence base for dietary approaches in MS was perceived disappointing. Conclusions Development and pilot-testing of an evidence-based patient education program on nutrition and MS is feasible. Patient satisfaction with the program suffers from the lack of evidence. Further research should focus on generating evidence for the potential influence of lifestyle habits (diet, physical activity) on MS disease course thus meeting the needs of patients with MS. PMID:27764237

  17. Education's Effect on Income Inequality: An Economic Globalisation Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Utilising a globalisation framework this study contributes to discussions concerning inequality, education, and development by re-examining the effects of educational and economic variables on income inequality. This research shows that the effects of education on income inequality are affected by the level of economic freedom in a country, and…

  18. Cooperative Education: An Effective Education for Minority Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Asa S.

    Cooperative education, the combination of periods of on-campus classroom instruction with periods of off-campus experience, is particularly well suited to the needs of minority students in higher education. At a traditional four-year college, minority students are inclined to confine their associations to their own members, both on campus and at…

  19. Randomized controlled trial of an educational booklet for patients presenting with back pain in general practice.

    PubMed

    Roland, M; Dixon, M

    1989-06-01

    A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate an educational booklet on back pain for patients presenting to five group practices during one calendar year. The booklet had no immediate effect on consultations for back pain, but in the period from two weeks to one year after presentation significantly fewer patients in the group receiving the booklet consulted with back pain (35.6%) than in the control group (42.2%) (P less than 0.05). There were no significant differences between the booklet and control groups in certified absence from work owing to back pain. Referral to hospital, referral to physiotherapy, admissions to hospital and laminectomies were all less common in the booklet group. The reduction in the combined referral rate to physiotherapy and hospital, and the reduction in laminectomy rate almost reached statistical significance at the 5% level. In replying to a questionnaire sent one year after entry to the study 94.1% of respondents in the booklet group said that they had read the book, 84.0% said that they found it useful, and 68.0% said that they still had a copy. Scores on a 15-item test of knowledge about back pain were significantly higher in the group of patients who had received the booklet than in the control group. The results suggest that the booklet had some effect in altering both the knowledge and behaviour of patients with back pain. The provision of an educational booklet was a method of giving information which was appreciated by both patients and doctors.

  20. User involvement as sharing knowledge – an extended perspective in patient education

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Anita; Fagermoen, May Solveig

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient education is undergoing a paradigm shift in which the perspectives of patients are increasingly being incorporated into learning programs. Access to the users’ experience is now considered a prerequisite for the development of quality health services, but how this user experience is incorporated is somewhat unclear. The inclusion of experiential knowledge and user involvement can challenge professional authority, roles, and working methods because knowledge sharing is different from persuasion, professional explanation, and consent. Dialogue and collaboration between professionals and users are essential to effective user involvement; however, little is understood about the characteristics of their collaboration. Objective To describe characteristics of the collaboration between users and health professionals in developing, implementing, and evaluating patient education courses in hospitals. Design, setting, and methods A field study was conducted in three different hospitals. Data collection comprised open observations in meetings of 17 different collaboration groups with a total of 100 participants, and 24 interviews with users and professionals. The data analyses included both thematic and the Systematic Data Integration approach. Results Two contrasting types of collaboration emerged from the analyses; knowledge sharing and information exchange. The first was characterized by mutual knowledge sharing, involvement, and reciprocal decision making. Characteristics of the second were the absence of dialogue, meagre exploration of the users’ knowledge, and decisions usually made by the professionals. Conclusion Collaboration between users and health personnel takes place in an asymmetric relationship. Mutual knowledge sharing was found to be more than the exchange of information and consultation and also to be a prerequisite for shared decision making. In developing patient education when users are involved the health professionals have the

  1. Filming the family: a documentary film to educate clinicians about family caregivers of patients with brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Rabow, Michael W; Goodman, Steffanie; Chang, Susan; Berger, Mitchel; Folkman, Susan

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the educational value of a documentary film about family caregiving for patients with brain tumors. The method used in this study is a pre-post survey among neurosurgeons, neuro-oncologist, and other clinician viewers. Viewers evaluated the film highly and reported an intention to change their practice as a result of watching the film. Following viewing, participants felt more strongly that "all families of patients with brain cancers should meet with a social worker" (P = 0.01) and that "family caregivers greatly impact the health of patients" (P = 0.002), and they were less likely to believe that "supporting family caregivers is primarily someone else's job" (P = 0.009). A documentary film about family caregiving is an effective educational tool to increase awareness among neurosurgery/neuro-oncology clinicians about the importance and needs of family caregivers of patients with brain tumors.

  2. Improving handwashing in hospitals: a patient education and empowerment program.

    PubMed

    McGuckin, M

    2001-11-01

    Each year, about 5% of people admitted to U.S. hospitals (about 2 million people) acquire an infection there. These infections cause nearly 20,000 deaths each year, and cost an estimated $4.5 billion to treat. Handwashing is the single most effective measure for preventing hospital-acquired infections. Despite widespread knowledge of the importance of handwashing, health care workers wash their hands far less often than is indicated. This Issue Brief describes a novel strategy to improve handwashing among hospital personnel, by involving the people with the most to gain--the patients themselves.

  3. Alopecia areata and its effects on patients.

    PubMed

    McGettigan, Maureen L

    2013-12-01

    The onset of alopecia areata creates a roller coaster of emotions. Like the disease, a patient's emotions are unpredictable. The lack of control over one's body is both frightening and intimidating. Alopecia areata not only impacts an individual but it also has a halo effect, impacting family and friends, thereby increasing the number of people affected by the disease. PMID:24326550

  4. [Medical nutritional therapy and therapeutic patient education in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Jansà, Margarida; Murillo, Serafin; Vidal, Mercè

    2011-05-01

    This article includes an introduction to the current approach to dietary treatment of diabetes. Are provided the nutritional recommendations to primary secondary and tertiary prevention of diabetes, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) adapted to different types of diabetes, treatments and special situations. Secondly, it introduces the concept of Therapeutic Education, especially education and nutritional diet for persons with diabetes and their families, the educational objectives in food according to type of diabetes type 1 or type 2 in different treatment modalities and educational strategies recommended by the Diabetes Education Study Group (wear) of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) to facilitate better adherence to dietary treatment.

  5. Importance of patient education on home medical care waste disposal in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Yukihiro

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Attached office nurses more recovered medical waste from patients’ homes. • Most nurses educated their patients on how to store home medical care waste in their homes and on how to separate them. • Around half of nurses educated their patients on where to dispose of their home medical care waste. - Abstract: To determine current practices in the disposal and handling of home medical care (HMC) waste, a questionnaire was mailed to 1965 offices nationwide. Of the office that responded, 1283 offices were analyzed. Offices were classified by management configuration: those attached to hospitals were classified as ”attached offices” and others as “independent offices”. More nurses from attached offices recovered medical waste from patients’ homes than those from independent offices. Most nurses educated their patients on how to store HMC waste in their homes (79.3% of total) and on how to separate HMC waste (76.5% of total). On the other hand, only around half of nurses (47.3% from attached offices and 53.2% from independent offices) educated their patients on where to dispose of their HMC waste. 66.0% of offices replied that patients had separated their waste appropriately. The need for patient education has emerged in recent years, with education for nurses under the diverse conditions of HMC being a key factor in patient education.

  6. A patient-centered approach to the development and pilot of a warfarin pharmacogenomics patient education tool for health professionals

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Megan R.; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Abdalrhim, Ahmed D.; Han, Leona C.; McBane, Robert D.; Fiksdal, Alexander S.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe an exploratory project to develop and pilot a novel patient educational tool that explains the concept of pharmacogenomics and its impact on warfarin dosing that can be utilized by health professionals providing patient counseling. Methods A pharmacogenomics educational tool prototype was developed by an interdisciplinary team. During the pilot of the tool, focus group methodology was used to elicit input from patients based upon their perspectives and experiences with warfarin. Focus group sessions were audio-recorded and transcribed, and the data was analyzed through consensus coding in NVivo. Results The focus group participants were generally unfamiliar with the concept of pharmacogenomics but were receptive to the information. They thought the patient education tool was informative and would provide the most benefit to patients newly initiated on warfarin therapy. Conclusions Preliminary results from this exploratory project suggest that implementation and further feasibility testing of this pharmacogenomics patient education tool should be performed in a population of newly initiated patients taking warfarin. PMID:25729462

  7. The effects of comprehensive home physiotherapy and supervision on patients with ankylosing spondylitis--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kraag, G; Stokes, B; Groh, J; Helewa, A; Goldsmith, C

    1990-02-01

    Fifty-three patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were randomly allocated; 26 experimental patients received physiotherapy and disease education, 27 control patients received neither. The primary treatment outcome was change in spinal mobility measured at 4 months by fingertip-to-floor distance. Experimental patients had more improvement in fingertip-to-floor distance (p2 less than 0.004) and in function (p2 less than 0.001) than control patients. Physiotherapy with disease education is effective in the treatment of patients with AS.

  8. Good teaching is good teaching: A narrative review for effective medical educators.

    PubMed

    Berman, Anthony C

    2015-01-01

    Educators have tried for many years to define teaching and effective teachers. More specifically, medical educators have tried to define what characteristics are common to successful teachers in the healthcare arena. The goal of teacher educators has long been to determine what makes an effective teacher so that they could do a better job of preparing future teachers to have a positive impact on the learning of their students. Medical educators have explored what makes some of their colleagues more able than others to facilitate the development of healthcare professionals who can successfully and safely meet the needs of future patients. Although there has historically been disagreement regarding the characteristics that need be developed in order for teachers to be effective, educational theorists have consistently agreed that becoming an effective teacher is a complex task. Such discussions have been central to deciding what education at any level is really all about. By exploring the literature and reflecting upon the personal experiences encountered in his lengthy career as a teacher, and as a teacher of teachers, the author reaches the conclusions that teaching is both art and science, that "good teaching is good teaching" regardless of the learning environment or the subject to be explored, and that the characteristics making up an effective medical educator are really not much different than those making up effective educators in any other area.

  9. Balancing Patient Care and Student Education: Learning to Deliver Bad News in an Optometry Teaching Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spafford, Marlee M.; Schryer, Catherine F.; Creutz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of…

  10. Comparison of Two Educational Methods on Nurses' Adoption of Safe Patient Handling Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folami, Florence

    2010-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries caused by patient lifting and transfers are a concern to health care workers. The Safe Patient Handling Act calls for all health care organizations to move to mechanical assistance from previous manual methods of transfers. This research analyzed two different educational programs that addressed safe patient handling for…

  11. Pre-Operative Education Classes Prior to Robotic Prostatectomy Benefit Both Patients and Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Collin, Carrie; Bellas, Nicholas; Haddock, Peter; Wagner, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    As part of a process improvement initiative, we designed, implemented, and assessed the impact of pre-surgical education classes for patients scheduled to undergo robotic prostatectomy. Our aim was to both enhance patient access to important procedural information related to their surgery, and also limit the need for the repeated dissemination of information during patient calls to the office.

  12. Pre-Operative Education Classes Prior to Robotic Prostatectomy Benefit Both Patients and Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Collin, Carrie; Bellas, Nicholas; Haddock, Peter; Wagner, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    As part of a process improvement initiative, we designed, implemented, and assessed the impact of pre-surgical education classes for patients scheduled to undergo robotic prostatectomy. Our aim was to both enhance patient access to important procedural information related to their surgery, and also limit the need for the repeated dissemination of information during patient calls to the office. PMID:26821448

  13. Effect of Regular Exercise Program on Depression in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Jahangir; Abdi, Alireza; Rezaei, Mansour; Heydarnezhadian, Jafar; Jalali, Rostam

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Depression is the most common psychological disorder in hemodialysis patients which decreases their quality of life and increases the mortality. This study was conducted to assess the effect of regular exercise on depression in hemodialysis patients. Methods. In a randomized clinical trial, 51 hemodialysis patients were allocated in two groups. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scale was used to assessing depression rate in participants. Designed program was educated using poster and face-to-face methods for case group. Intervention was carried out three times a week for ten weeks. At the beginning and the end of the study, depression rate of the subjects was assessed. Data was analyzed by SPSS16 software and descriptive and inferential statistics. Findings. According to the results of this study, there were no differences between case and control groups in depression rate at the beginning of the study, but there was significant difference after intervention (P = 0.016). In the beginning of the study, the mean and SD of depression in case group were 23.8 ± 9.29 and reduced to 11.07 ± 12.64 at the end (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The regular exercise program could reduce the depression in hemodialysis patients; therefore it is suggested for training this program for hemodialysis patients. This trial is registered with Iranian Registry of Clinical Trial (IRCT) number IRCT201205159763N1. PMID:27347502

  14. The problems of anticholinergic adverse effects in older patients.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, M

    1993-01-01

    concentration to frank delirium. Even mild effects can reduce function and increase dependency. At any level of care, the loss of independence increases the caregiver burden, costs, and most importantly, can negatively affect quality of life. Many age-related and disease-related conditions may predispose elderly patients to anticholinergic drug toxicity. Careful attention to anticholinergic effects when prescribing drugs, patient education, regular review of the entire drug regimen, and familiarity with the signs and symptoms of anticholinergic toxicity will help to reduce the risk of drug-induced problems. PMID:8369593

  15. Who Is Providing and Who Is Getting Asthma Patient Education: An Analysis of 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Shaival S.; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; McCullough, Joel Emery; Henley, Eric; Zeitz, Howard Jerome; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2008-01-01

    Patient education in asthma management is important; however, there is little known about the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education or how often primary care physicians provide it. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education. It was a cross-sectional study using 2001…

  16. Effects of Multicultural Education Courses and Biblical Education Courses in Changing Attitudes and Prejudice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, D. Clark

    2011-01-01

    This study showed selected effects on students from a Southern Regional Christian University taking multicultural education courses and Biblical education courses. Besides quantitative data, qualitative data were used. Qualitative data were gathered from student interviews from multicultural and Biblical education courses. The students completed a…

  17. Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education. Teacher Education Yearbook VIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, D. John, Ed.; Byrd, David M., Ed.

    This yearbook addresses the nation's need to train and retain good teachers, exploring exemplary practices in teacher education. There are four sections divided into 12 chapters. The book begins with a forward, "Research on Effective Models for Teacher Education: Powerful Teacher Education Programs" (E.M. Guyton). Section 1, "Models for Enhancing…

  18. Community-Based Eco-Education: Sound Ecology and Effective Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niesenbaum, Richard A.; Gorka, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the development of a college-level eco-educational course that attempts to capitalize on the ecological and educational strengths of ecotourism by establishing a partnership with a local community. Makes suggestions for establishing community partnerships for effective international eco-educational program development. (Contains 15…

  19. A prospective study of nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Weight loss in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common clinical manifestation that may have clinical significance. Objectives To evaluate if there is a difference between nutrition education and oral nutritional supplementation on nutritional status in patients with AD. Methods A randomized, prospective 6-month study which enrolled 90 subjects with probable AD aged 65 years or older divided into 3 groups: Control Group (CG) [n = 27], Education Group (EG) [n = 25], which participated in an education program and Supplementation Group (SG) [n = 26], which received two daily servings of oral nutritional supplementation. Subjects were assessed for anthropometric data (weight, height, BMI, TSF, AC and AMC), biochemical data (total protein, albumin, and total lymphocyte count), CDR (Clinical Dementia Rating), MMSE (Mini-mental state examination), as well as dependence during meals. Results The SG showed a significant improvement in the following anthropometric measurements: weight (H calc = 22.12, p =< 0.001), BMI (H calc = 22.12, p =< 0.001), AC (H calc = 12.99, p =< 0.002), and AMC (H calc = 8.67, p =< 0.013) compared to the CG and EG. BMI of the EG was significantly greater compared to the CG. There were significant changes in total protein (H calc = 6.17, p =< 0.046), and total lymphocyte count in the SG compared to the other groups (H cal = 7.94, p = 0.019). Conclusion Oral nutritional supplementation is more effective compared to nutrition education in improving nutritional status. PMID:21943331

  20. Effects of Welfare Reform on Vocational Education and Training

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Dhaval M.; Reichman, Nancy E.; Corman, Hope; Das, Dhiman

    2011-01-01

    Exploiting variation in welfare reform across states and over time and using relevant comparison groups, this study estimates the effects of welfare reform on an important source of human capital acquisition among women at risk for relying on welfare: vocational education and training. The results suggest that welfare reform reduced enrollment in full-time vocational education and had no significant effects on part-time vocational education or participation in other types of work-related courses, though there appears to be considerable heterogeneity across states with respect to the strictness of educational policy and the strength of work incentives under welfare reform. In addition, we find evidence of heterogeneous effects by prior educational attainment. We find no evidence that the previously-observed negative effects of welfare reform on formal education (including college enrollment), which we replicated in this study, have been offset by increases in vocational education and training. PMID:22125356

  1. Sexuality Education: An Evaluation of Programs and Their Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Douglas

    This document is the first volume of a six-volume report on sexuality education. This volume summarizes the structure and content of sexuality education in the United States, reviews the literature on the effects of sexuality education, describes the evaluation methods, provides a description of and the evaluation data for each program, and…

  2. Effective Mathematics Teaching in Finnish and Swedish Teacher Education Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmi, Kirsti; Ryve, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This article explores effective mathematics teaching as constructed in Finnish and Swedish teacher educators' discourses. Based on interview data from teacher educators as well as data from feedback discussions between teacher educators and prospective teachers in Sweden and Finland, the analysis shows that several aspects of the recent…

  3. Personal Finance Education: Effective Practice Guide for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielhofer, Thomas; Kerr, David; Gardiner, Clare

    2010-01-01

    This document provides guidance on effective practice in delivering personal finance education in secondary schools. It is based on the findings from research carried out by NFER (the National Foundation for Educational Research) on behalf of pfeg (Personal Finance Education Group) as part of an evaluation of Learning Money Matters (LMM). This…

  4. Unobservable Family Effects and the Apparent External Benefits of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, John

    2001-01-01

    Uses data from a sample of New Zealand twins to test the relationship between education and volunteering, holding unobservable family effects constant. Results show that education significantly reduces the probability of volunteering and the supply of volunteer hours. Volunteering may not be an external benefit of education. (Contains 18…

  5. Two Instructional Designs for Dialogic Citizenship Education: An Effect Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuitema, Jaap; Veugelers, Wiel; Rijlaarsdam, Gert; ten Dam, Geert

    2009-01-01

    Background: Despite the renewed interest in citizenship education, relatively little is known about effective ways to realize citizenship education in the classroom. In the literature on citizenship education, dialogue is considered to be a crucial element. However, there is very little, if any, empirical research into the different ways to…

  6. Positioning for Effectiveness: Applying Marketing Concepts to Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenburg, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates how colleges can use distance education to attract and retain a "critical mass" of learners for distance programs. Explores alternative ways to view distance education market opportunities and determine which avenues to pursue. Suggests how to be more effective in all aspects of distance education programs. (13 citations) (YKH)

  7. Computer-based learning for ESRD patient education: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J K; Frisby, A J

    1995-07-01

    Computer use in everyday life has expanded human potential in virtually every possible arena. In health care, computer technology affects direct clinical care through diagnostics, treatment, monitoring, and documentation processes. Patient care systems use computer technology to manage billing, scheduling, and multiple other administrative functions. Computer technology for education of health care professionals has been primarily in selected undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree programs. Computer-based continuing education for health care professionals has been available for at least a decade, but computer-based patient education is just now beginning to emerge as a learning option. This article describes examples of patient education programs using different types of hardware and software and explores potential areas for further development of this area for end-stage renal disease patients and families. Computer technology is not a replacement for professional involvement in patient education, but rather offers a new arena of media to enhance and expand current teaching and learning resources. Computer-based learning is characterized by features representative of many highly regarded principles of adult education. Further, instructional design concepts used for program development are fundamentally sound for patient education.

  8. Postgraduate education needs of Nurses’ who are caregivers for patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Uğur, Esra; Demir, Hulya; Akbal, Elif

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Diabetic management process requires nurses with expert knowledge and patient care skills. This study was carried out to identify nurses’ diabetic care approaches and their post graduate education needs in order to develop a “Basic Diabetes Patient Care Education Program” in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods: The descriptive study, using the survey technique, was carried out in a university hospital with 87 bedside nurses who were caring for diabetic patients. Investigators developed data collection tool consisting of closed ended questions and opportunities for open-ended responses. Results: Among the 87 nurses, 88.5% were staff nurses, and 11.5% were nurse managers. The mean age was 27.41 ± 4.82 and years of professional experience was 6.86 ± 4.23. The 41.4% of nurses stated that they were caring for 1-2 patients with diabetes per week and 72.4% of nurses stated that they had attended an educational session about diabetes after graduation. The 95.4% of nurses reported a need for a continuous education program for diabetes patient care. Medication regimen (69.0%) and special care applications such as wound care (54.0%) were the most needed educational requirements. There were no difference in educational needs based on basic education or years of professional experience (p>0.05). Conclusions: Nurses caring for patients with diabetes should be supported by orientation, in-service education and continuing education programs. Additionally, the placement of patient care courses for chronic diseases, like diabetes, into the core curriculum of nursing schools would be useful in responding to actual patient care and family needs. PMID:26150859

  9. A model of genetic guidance for hemoglobinopathy patients and laboratory diagnosis of family members as educational and preventive measures

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tatiana Dela-Sávia; Freire, Adriana Sousa; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de Paula; García-Zapata, Marco Túlio Antônio

    2012-01-01

    Background: The high frequency of hemoglobinopathies in Brazil constitutes a public health problem and thus educational and preventive measures are necessary to reduce the incidence. Genetic guidance, a modality of genetic counseling, and family screening are measures that can assist in reproductive decisions and mitigate clinical, psychological and social problems of families with these disorders. Objetive: The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of educational and preventive measures for hemoglobinopathies using genetic guidance and laboratory screening of families. Methods: The diagnoses of patients with hemoglobinopathies were confirmed and then the level of knowledge about their disease was evaluated and genetic guidance was provided. Three months later, the level of assimilated information of these patients was evaluated. In addition, laboratory diagnosis of family members was carried out. Results: Diagnosis of sickle cell anemia was confirmed for most patients. Moreover, the majority of the patients who had a low level of knowledge before genetic guidance (68.8%) demonstrated a higher level of assimilated information after the process (81.8%). Almost 70% of the family members had hemoglobin changes and some had hemoglobinopathies(2.6%). They were duly informed about the results of the examinations, which made it possible to investigate further. Conclusion: Genetic guidance and family screening were effective preventive and educational measures that improved the quality of life of patients, preventing complications and sequels and allowed the referral of those who may transmit altered genes for clinical diagnosis and to genetic counseling services. PMID:23125541

  10. Analysis on the effectiveness of gifted education by studying perceptions of science gifted education recipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hyun-Chul; Ryu, Chun-Ryol; Choi, Jinsu; Park, Kyeong-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The necessity of science gifted education is persistently emphasized in the aspect of developing individuals' potential abilities and enhancing national competitiveness. In the case of Korea, gifted education has been conducted on a national level ever since the country established legal and institutional strategies for gifted education in 2000. Even though 15 years has passed since a full-scale implementation of gifted education has started, there are few researches on the effectiveness of gifted education. Therefore, considering the splashdown effect, that a long period of time is needed to obtain reliable assessments on education effectiveness, this research surveyed gifted education recipients to study the effectiveness of gifted education. For this cause, we developed an questionnaire and conducted a survey of university students who had experience of receiving science gifted education. We deduced the following from the analysis. First, generally the recipients were satisfied with their gifted education experiences, but thought that not enough opportunities were provided on problem solving ability enhancement and career related aspects. Second, schools considered 'experiments' as the most effective teaching method, regardless to the stage of education. In addition, they perceived 'discussions and presentations' as effective education methods for elementary school students; 'theme investigating classes' for middle school students; and lectures for high school students. It could be seen that various experiences were held important for elementary school students and as students went into high school education, more emphasis was placed on the importance of understanding mathematical and scientific facts. Third, on gifted education teaching staffs, satisfaction of professionalism on specialities were high but satisfaction of variety of teaching methods were relatively low. In this research, to encourage science gifted students to meet their potentials, we propose

  11. Educating to manage the accelerated change environment effectively: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Menix, K D

    2001-01-01

    Without appropriate educational preparation, nurse managers may not have the competencies to manage accelerated change effectively. Part 1 of this two-part series provided the condensed findings from an extensive review of nursing, business, and higher education literature. Part 2 describes the results of a Delphi study whereby baccalaureate-prepared nurse manager experts and nurse educator experts in baccalaureate nursing programs validated what linear and nonlinear change management concepts they believed were relevant in managing change in today's dynamic environment. Staff development educators and administrators, as organizational change agents, can use the validated concepts to develop educational offerings to promote effective change management. PMID:12759940

  12. The impact of medical terminology on readability of patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Sand-Jecklin, Kari

    2007-01-01

    Most health-related literature is written above the reading ability of the lay audience; however, no studies to date have identified the impact of medical terms on readability of health education materials. The purpose of this study was to identify whether there was a change in calculated reading levels of patient education brochures after medical terms were removed from analysis passages. The reading levels of 5 patient education brochures were analyzed before and after removal of medical terms, using both the Fry and Simple Measure of Gobbledegook (SMOG) readability formulas. Results indicated that the reading levels for all brochures were significantly lower after removal of medical terminology, but they remained above the 5th to 6h grade level recommended by health education experts. Findings hold implications for healthcare professionals in relation to the development and evaluation of patient education materials.

  13. The Social Effectiveness of Internet Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovsiannikov, A. A.; Monakhov, S. V.

    2007-01-01

    A system of education is a unique social institution, the purpose of which is to develop and multiply human capital. Based on the education system it is possible to judge the situation in the country and society not only at the present time but also in the future. A system of education also should be seen as an ideological institution: it produces…

  14. Meaninglessness in terminally ill cancer patients: a validation study and nurse education intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Murata, Hisayuki; Hirai, Kei; Tamura, Keiko; Kataoka, Jun; Ohnishi, Hideki; Akizuki, Nobuya; Kurihara, Yukie; Akechi, Tatsuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2007-08-01

    Recent empirical studies revealed that fostering patients' perception of meaning in their life is an essential task for palliative care clinicians. However, few studies have reported the effects of training programs for nurses specifically aimed at improving skills to relieve the meaninglessness of terminally ill cancer patients, and we have had no specific measurement instruments. The primary aims of this study were 1) to validate measurement tools to quantify nurses' self-reported practice and attitudes toward caring for terminally ill cancer patients feeling meaninglessness and 2) to explore the effects of the five-hour educational workshop focusing on meaninglessness on nurses' self-reported practice, attitudes toward caring for such patients, confidence, burnout, death anxiety, and meaning of life. A quasi-experimental pre-post questionnaire survey was performed on 147 nurses. The questionnaire was distributed before the intervention workshop and one and six months after. The workshop consisted of lecture, role-play, and the exercise of assessment and care planning based on two vignette verbatim records. First, using the first questionnaire sample and an additional sample of 20 nurses for the test-retest examination, we validated a six-item Self-Reported Practice scale, and an eight-item Attitudes Toward Caring for Patients Feeling Meaninglessness scale with three subscales (Willingness to Help, Positive Appraisal, and Helplessness). The nurses also completed a scale to assess confidence in caring for terminally ill patients with meaninglessness, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Death Attitude Inventory, the Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying scale, the Self-Reported Practice Score in General Communication, and the three pain-related items from the Palliative Care Quiz for Nursing. For the Self-Reported Practice scale and the subscales of the Attitudes Toward Caring for Patients Feeling Meaninglessness scale, the Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0

  15. Introducing Physical Education to Hospital Learning--Can Patients Participate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Issaka, Ayuba; Hopkins, Liza

    2015-01-01

    Children and young people with chronic health conditions are at greater risk of school absence and poorer educational achievement than their healthy peers. A range of strategies are implemented in home, school and hospital settings to improve the connection of these children and young people to their educational pathways, yet gaps in provision…

  16. Utilizing Educational Theoretical Models to Support Effective Physical Education Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Wayne; Edwards, Allan; de Meyrick, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Physical education (PE) pedagogy has traditionally been viewed as drillstyle teaching. Whilst this traditional pedagogical approach provides exposure to various skills, used within a school-based PE and sporting context, it does not demonstrate a student's competence associated with their ability to apply these skills in complex game situations.…

  17. Reducing readmissions using teach-back: enhancing patient and family education.

    PubMed

    Peter, Debra; Robinson, Paula; Jordan, Marie; Lawrence, Susan; Casey, Krista; Salas-Lopez, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a quality improvement initiative, implemented by a patient education workgroup within a tertiary Magnet® facility. The project focused on the association between inadequate care transitions in patients with heart failure and subsequent costly readmissions. The teach-back initiative was piloted with patients hospitalized with heart failure, because of this population's high risk of readmission. Learning outcomes included documented improvements in patients' understanding of their disease and reduced readmission rates.

  18. Reducing readmissions using teach-back: enhancing patient and family education.

    PubMed

    Peter, Debra; Robinson, Paula; Jordan, Marie; Lawrence, Susan; Casey, Krista; Salas-Lopez, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a quality improvement initiative, implemented by a patient education workgroup within a tertiary Magnet® facility. The project focused on the association between inadequate care transitions in patients with heart failure and subsequent costly readmissions. The teach-back initiative was piloted with patients hospitalized with heart failure, because of this population's high risk of readmission. Learning outcomes included documented improvements in patients' understanding of their disease and reduced readmission rates. PMID:25479173

  19. Students or Patients? Provision of Education in the Mental Health Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Peter; Godding, Bernard

    1992-01-01

    British government proposals for community care of psychiatric patients require a response from adult educators about the need for learning opportunities both inside and outside institutions for people with mental health problems. (SK)

  20. DIFFERENTIAL PATIENT RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION, COUNSELING, AND DENTAL TREATMENT. PAPER PRESENTED AT A NATIONAL SEMINAR ON ADULT EDUCATION RESEARCH (CHICAGO, FEBRUARY 11-13, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LUPTON, DANIEL E.

    RESEARCH (1) ANALYZED SPECIFIC OUTCOMES OF COUNSELING, INSTRUCTION, AND DENTAL THERAPY, AND (2) DETERMINED THE RELATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF PATIENT EDUCATION FOR RELIEF OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT (TMJ) DYSFUNCTION. SIXTY ADULT PATIENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS TMJ RESEARCH CENTER WERE RANDOMLY ASSIGNED TO ONE OF THREE PROGRAMS--DENTISTRY,…

  1. Virtual patient care: an interprofessional education approach for physician assistant, physical therapy and occupational therapy students.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Michael J; Platko, Christina M; Cleghorn, Susan M; Booth, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this retrospective qualitative case report is to describe how a case-based, virtual patient interprofessional education (IPE) simulation activity was utilized to achieve physician assistant (PA), physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) student IPE learning outcomes. Following completion of a virtual patient case, 30 PA, 46 PT and 24 OT students were required to develop a comprehensive, written treatment plan and respond to reflective questions. A qualitative analysis of the submitted written assignment was used to determine whether IPE learning objectives were met. Student responses revealed three themes that supported the learning objectives of the IPE experience: benefits of collaborative care, role clarification and relevance of the IPE experience for future practice. A case-based, IPE simulation activity for physician assistant and rehabilitation students using a computerized virtual patient software program effectively facilitated achievement of the IPE learning objectives, including development of greater student awareness of other professions and ways in which collaborative patient care can be provided.

  2. Strategic planning in patient education: a key element of successful management.

    PubMed

    Cordell, B J; Linnell, K E; Price, J L

    1988-02-01

    Strategic Planning is a useful technique for patient education planning in health care facilities. The consultants to the planning process at a Veterans Administration Medical Center outline the lessons of strategic planning in an effort to guide and encourage newcomers. The Seattle VA Medical Center planning outcomes are described to emphasize the benefits. The authors enthusiastically recommend strategic planning as a management tool for patient education committees.

  3. Influence of Education on the Pattern of Cognitive Deterioration in Ad Patients: The Cognitive Reserve Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carret, N.L.; Auriacombe, S.; Letenneur, L.; Bergua, V.; Dartigues, J.F.; Fabrigoule, C.

    2005-01-01

    The cognitive reserve hypothesis proposes that a high educational level could delay the clinical expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) although neuropathologic changes develop in the brain. Therefore, some studies have reported that when the clinical signs of the disease emerge, high-educated patients may decline more rapidly than low-educated…

  4. Computer-Based Education for Patients with Hypertension: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saksena, Anuraag

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the benefits of using computer-based interventions to provide patient education to individuals with hypertension. Methods: MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, and PsychINFO were searched from 1995 to April 2009 using keywords related to "computers," "hypertension," "education," and "clinical trial." Additional…

  5. Exploring Interprofessional Education through a High-Fidelity Human Patient Simulation Scenario: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossler, Kelly Lynn

    2013-01-01

    High-fidelity human patient simulation has emerged as a valuable medium to reinforce educational content within programs of nursing. As simulation learning experiences have been identified as augmenting both didactic lecture content and clinical learning, these experiences have expanded to incorporate interprofessional education. Review of…

  6. The role of patient education in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes: an overview.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Adriana; Sasso, Loredana; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Giustina, Andrea; Gazzaruso, Carmine

    2016-07-01

    The management of type 2 diabetes mellitus includes ability and empowerment of the patient to change lifestyle, maintain an adequate diet and physical activity, manage the disease, and follow a specific program of periodic medical checks and education sessions. In addition, the patient should be able to correctly identify and adequately solve problems related to the disease and actively collaborate with the healthcare system. To obtain these goals, therapeutic patient education (TPE) is now considered a crucial element not only in the treatment but also in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Several trials showed that TPE is able to improve clinical, lifestyle, and psycho-social outcomes. Nevertheless, studies have not clarified the ideal characteristics of a comprehensive patient education program in clinical practice. Other work is needed to answer open questions regarding the type of PTE (individual or group education), themes, frequency and number of education sessions, contact time between educator and patient, background of educators, use of new technologies, and barriers to self-management. The present review discusses these points on the basis of the most recent data of the literature.

  7. On a Practical Exercise with OJE (On the Job Education) and Educational Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashiki, Tetsusei; Uenishi, Keisuke; Seino, Satoshi; Kaga, Atsuko; Matsumura, Nobuhiko; Murata, Masato; Yamamoto, Takao; Sato, Takehiko; Zako, Masaru; Narumi, Kunihiro

    In this paper, an educational program for practical exercise based on OJE (On the Job Education) method has been described. The program consists of two parts; one is a long-term group seminar for a year to educate the planning and problem solving through aggressive self-developments, another is a short-term program for 2 days to educate leadership. In the group seminar, graduate students of engineering and economics have discussed. The procedure and the educational effect are described. OJE is an educational method which has been made a plan to generate the motivation. As the participants have given a good score in the evaluation to our educational method, it is recognized that OJE is an effective method.

  8. Improvement in Stress, General Self-Efficacy, and Health Related Quality of Life following Patient Education for Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Haugland, Trude; Veenstra, Marijke; Vatn, Morten H; Wahl, Astrid K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate changes in general self-efficacy, health related quality of life (HRQoL), and stress among patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET) following a multidisciplinary educational intervention. Forty-one patients were enrolled in this exploratory pilot study. A total of 37 patients completed the full 26-week intervention based on the principles of self-efficacy. General self-efficacy was measured by the General Self-Efficacy Scale, HRQoL was measured with the SF-36, and stress was measured with the Impact of Event Scale. Mixed effect models were used to evaluate changes in general self-efficacy, mental and physical components of HRQoL, and stress adjusting for demographic and clinical variables. Results showed significant improvements in patients' general self-efficacy (β = 0.71; P < 0.05), physical component scores of HRQoL (β = 3.09; P < 0.01), and stress (β = -2.10, P = 0.008). Findings suggest that patients with NET have the capacity to improve their ability to cope with their disease, problem-solve, improve their physical status, and reduce their stress following an educational intervention based on the principles of self-efficacy. These preliminary data provide a basis for future randomized controlled trials to test interventions to improve HRQoL for patients with NET. PMID:23738063

  9. Diversity, trust, and patient care: affirmative action in medical education 25 years after Bakke.

    PubMed

    DeVille, Kenneth; Kopelman, Loretta M

    2003-08-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court's seminal 1978 Bakke decision, now 25 years old, has an ambiguous and endangered legacy. Justice Lewis Powell's opinion provided a justification that allowed leaders in medical education to pursue some affirmative action policies while at the same time undermining many other potential defenses. Powell asserted that medical schools might have a "compelling interest" in the creation of a diverse student body. But Powell's compromise jeopardized affirmative action since it blocked many justifications for responding to increases in political opposition and legal challenges. The Bakke decision and its moral background and legal legacy are traced and analyzed. Despite recent legal setbacks, the framework sketched by Powell can be used to defend diversity in medical education both morally and legally as a "compelling state interest." Because trust is a central component of the physician-patient relationship and a prerequisite to the profession's ability to provide effective medical care, the state has a compelling interest in training physicians with whom patients can feel comfortable and safe if the population is (1) distrustful; (2) underserved; (3) faces significant discrimination in the allocation of benefits, goods and services and (4) affirmative action programs would be likely to promote their trust in the system. Similar narrowly-tailored arguments could be used in other professions and for other groups. Bakke is an important background for the pending Grutter case. PMID:14610693

  10. The Effect of Hardiness Education on Hardiness and Burnout on Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Jaye

    2015-01-01

    Nurse leaders need to be aware of the costly implications of staff retention, unit finances, and patient satisfaction caused by unmanaged stress and burnout as well as staff disengagement. It is vital to the organizational behavior of the health care facility for nurse managers to promote, educate, and screen for hardiness in their staff. Hardiness education can lessen the effects of stress and burnout. Nurse managers and executives can give their staff valuable tools and resources to enhance hardiness and coping abilities through hardiness education. PMID:26477118

  11. Educator Talk Ratio as a Quality Indicator in Group-Based Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenov, Vibeke; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Folker, Anna P.; Skinner, Timothy C.; Willaing, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate participants' experiences of and satisfaction with the content and outcome of 13 different sessions of a 4-day diabetes education programme and to compare participants' experiences with the extent of educator talk in the sessions. A 10-second event coding was used to evaluate educators'…

  12. Effect of Medical Education on Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatry and Individuals with Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Marzellus; Harendza, Sigrid; Meyer, Jelka; Drabik, Anna; Reimer, Jens; Kuhnigk, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to explore the effect of medical education on students' attitudes toward psychiatry and psychiatric patients, and examined the usefulness of a new evaluation tool: the 6-item Psychiatric Experience, Attitudes, and Knowledge (PEAK-6). Method: Authors studied the attitudes of 116 medical students toward psychiatry…

  13. The role of group education on quality of life in patients with a stoma.

    PubMed

    Altuntas, Y E; Kement, M; Gezen, C; Eker, H H; Aydin, H; Sahin, F; Okkabaz, N; Oncel, M

    2012-11-01

    Stoma education has been traditionally given in a one-to-one setting. Since 2007, daily group education programmes were organised for stoma patients and their relatives by our stoma therapy unit. The programmes included lectures on stoma and stoma care, and social activities in which patients shared their experiences with each other. Patients were also encouraged to expand interaction with each other and organise future social events. A total of 72 patients [44 (61.1%) male with a mean (± SD) age of 56.8 ± 13.6 years] with an ileostomy (n= 51, 70.8%), a colostomy (n= 18, 25.0%) or a urostomy (n= 3, 4.2%) were included in the study. Patients were asked to answer a survey (SF-36) face-to-face before the initiation of the programme, which was repeated 3 months later via telephone call. The comparison of pre-education and post-education SF-36 scores revealed a statistically significant improvement in all 8-scale profiles, but not in vitality scale, and both psychometrically-based and mental health summary measures. Analyses disclosed that married patients and those who were living at rural districts seem to have the most improvement in life quality particularly in bodily pain, general health and role-emotional scales and mental health summary measure. In our opinion, group educations may be beneficial for stoma patients, and stoma therapy units may consider organising similar activities. PMID:22672332

  14. Patient Preferences for Receiving Education on Venous Thromboembolism Prevention – A Survey of Stakeholder Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Shihab, Hasan M.; Farrow, Norma E.; Shaffer, Dauryne L.; Hobson, Deborah B.; Kulik, Susan V.; Zaruba, Paul D.; Shermock, Kenneth M.; Kraus, Peggy S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Streiff, Michael B.; Haut, Elliott R.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients and is largely preventable. Strategies to decrease the burden of VTE have focused on improving clinicians’ prescribing of prophylaxis with relatively less emphasis on patient education. Objective To develop a patient-centered approach to education of patients and their families on VTE: including importance, risk factors, and benefit/harm of VTE prophylaxis in hospital settings. Design, Setting and Participants The objective of this study was to develop a patient-centered approach to education of patients and their families on VTE: including importance, risk factors, and benefit/harm of VTE prophylaxis in hospital settings. We implemented a three-phase, web-based survey (SurveyMonkey) between March 2014 and September 2014 and analyzed survey data using descriptive statistics. Four hundred twenty one members of several national stakeholder organizations and a single local patient and family advisory board were invited to participate via email. We assessed participants’ preferences for VTE education topics and methods of delivery. Participants wanted to learn about VTE symptoms, risk factors, prevention, and complications in a context that emphasized harm. Although participants were willing to learn using a variety of methods, most preferred to receive education in the context of a doctor-patient encounter. The next most common preferences were for video and paper educational materials. Conclusions Patients want to learn about the harm associated with VTE through a variety of methods. Efforts to improve VTE prophylaxis and decrease preventable harm from VTE should target the entire continuum of care and a variety of stakeholders including patients and their families. PMID:27031330

  15. Effecting change in elementary school science education

    SciTech Connect

    Parravano, C.

    1994-12-31

    The mission of the Merck Institute for Science Education is to improve the quality of science education during the formative years of kindergarten through eighth grade. To accomplish this mission, the Institute has three primary goals: Transform the teaching of science to communicate the excitement and relevance of science; Reform the education of teachers to instill in tomorrow`s teachers an understanding and appreciation of science; and Create a consensus on the importance of elementary science education among leaders in education, business, and science. Merck has made a minimum ten year commitment of funding and resources to the Institute. The Institute will work very closely with faculty, administration, and community leaders in target school districts to enhance science education in the elementary grades of their schools. Once the Institute`s goals have been achieved in these initial partner districts, the Institute will replicate its programs in other districts.

  16. My Interventional Drug-Eluting Stent Educational App (MyIDEA): Patient-Centered Design Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Adhir; Groo, Vicki; Dickens, Carolyn; Field, Jerry; Baumann, Matthew; Welland, Betty; Gutowski, Gerry; Flores Jr, Jose D; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Bahroos, Neil; Hynes, Denise M; Wilkie, Diana J

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient adherence to medication regimens is critical in most chronic disease treatment plans. This study uses a patient-centered tablet app, “My Interventional Drug-Eluting Stent Educational App (MyIDEA).” This is an educational program designed to improve patient medication adherence. Objective Our goal is to describe the design, methodology, limitations, and results of the MyIDEA tablet app. We created a mobile technology-based patient education app to improve dual antiplatelet therapy adherence in patients who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention and received a drug-eluting stent. Methods Patient advisers were involved in the development process of MyIDEA from the initial wireframe to the final launch of the product. The program was restructured and redesigned based on the patient advisers’ suggestions as well as those from multidisciplinary team members. To accommodate those with low health literacy, we modified the language and employed attractive color schemes to improve ease of use. We assumed that the target patient population may have little to no experience with electronic tablets, and therefore, we designed the interface to be as intuitive as possible. Results The MyIDEA app has been successfully deployed to a low-health-literate elderly patient population in the hospital setting. A total of 6 patients have interacted with MyIDEA for an average of 17.6 minutes/session. Conclusions Including patient advisers in the early phases of a mobile patient education development process is critical. A number of changes in text order, language, and color schemes occurred to improve ease of use. The MyIDEA program has been successfully deployed to a low-health-literate elderly patient population. Leveraging patient advisers throughout the development process helps to ensure implementation success. PMID:26139587

  17. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

  18. Catalyzing Effective Science Education: Contributions from the NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Denise A.; Bartolone, L.; Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B. L.; Schultz, G. R.; Peticolas, L.; Schwerin, T.; Shipp, S.; Astrophysics E/PO Community, NASA; NASA Astrophysics Forum Team

    2013-06-01

    Advancing scientific literacy and strengthening the Nation’s future workforce through stimulating, informative, and effective learning experiences are core principles of the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) education and public outreach (E/PO) program. To support and coordinate its E/PO community in offering a coherent suite of activities and experiences that effectively meet the needs of the education community, NASA SMD has created four Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (Astrophysics, Planetary Science, Heliophysics, Earth Science). Forum activities include: professional development to raise awareness of the existing body of best practices and educational research; analysis and cataloging of SMD-funded education materials with respect to AAAS Benchmarks for Science Literacy; Working Groups that assemble needs assessment and best practices data relevant to Higher Education, K-12 Formal Education, and Informal Science Education audiences; and community collaborations that enable SMD E/PO community members to develop new partnerships and to learn and share successful strategies and techniques. This presentation will highlight examples of Forum and community-based activities related to astronomy education and teacher professional development, within the context of the principles articulated within the NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards. Among these are an emerging community of practice for K-12 educators and online teacher professional development and resources that incorporate misconception research and authentic experiences with NASA Astrophysics data.

  19. Evaluation of a standardized patient education program for inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: impact on illness knowledge and self-management behaviors up to 1 year.

    PubMed

    Meng, Karin; Seekatz, Bettina; Haug, Günter; Mosler, Gabriele; Schwaab, Bernhard; Worringen, Ulrike; Faller, Hermann

    2014-04-01

    Patient education is an essential part of the treatment of coronary heart disease in cardiac rehabilitation. In Germany, no standardized and evaluated patient education programs for coronary heart disease have been available so far. In this article, we report the evaluation of a patient-oriented program. A multicenter quasi-experimental, sequential cohort design study of patients with coronary heart disease (n = 434) in inpatient cardiac rehabilitation was conducted. Intervention patients received the new patient-oriented program, control patients a traditional lecture-based program (usual care). Primary outcome illness knowledge and secondary behavioral and health outcomes were assessed at admission, discharge and 6- and 12-months follow-up. We found a significant, small between-group intervention effect in both patients' medical illness and treatment knowledge and behavior change knowledge at discharge (medical: η(2) = 0.013; behavior change: η(2) = 0.011) and after 12 months (medical: η(2) = 0.015). Furthermore, a significant, small effect was observed for physical activity after 12 months (η(2) = 0.011), but no effects on healthy diet and medication adherence emerged. Superiority of the patient-oriented educational program for patients with coronary heart disease was partially confirmed. The program produced improved illness knowledge and physical activity compared with usual care after 1 year.

  20. Teacher and Leader Effectiveness in High-Performing Education Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda, Ed.; Rothman, Robert, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The issue of teacher effectiveness has risen rapidly to the top of the education policy agenda, and the federal government and states are considering bold steps to improve teacher and leader effectiveness. One place to look for ideas is the experiences of high-performing education systems around the world. Finland, Ontario, and Singapore all have…