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Sample records for effective polar membrane

  1. Exploring the inhibitory effect of membrane tension on cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Gen; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Yugang; Zhang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Cell polarization toward an attractant is influenced by both physical and chemical factors. Most existing mathematical models are based on reaction-diffusion systems and only focus on the chemical process occurring during cell polarization. However, membrane tension has been shown to act as a long-range inhibitor of cell polarization. Here, we present a cell polarization model incorporating the interplay between Rac GTPase, filamentous actin (F-actin), and cell membrane tension. We further test the predictions of this model by performing single cell measurements of the spontaneous polarization of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and non-stem cancer cells (NSCCs), as the former have lower cell membrane tension. Based on both our model and the experimental results, cell polarization is more sensitive to stimuli under low membrane tension, and high membrane tension improves the robustness and stability of cell polarization such that polarization persists under random perturbations. Furthermore, our simulations are the first to recapitulate the experimental results described by Houk et al., revealing that aspiration (elevation of tension) and release (reduction of tension) result in a decrease in and recovery of the activity of Rac-GTP, respectively, and that the relaxation of tension induces new polarity of the cell body when a cell with the pseudopod-neck-body morphology is severed. PMID:28135277

  2. Amiodarone effects on membrane organization evaluated by fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed

    Antunes-Madeira, M C; Videira, R A; Klüppel, M L; Madeira, V V

    1995-03-03

    The effects of amiodarone (0-100 microM) on the physical state of synthetic and native membranes were investigated by fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), probing the bilayer core, and of its anionic propionic acid derivative (DPH-PA), probing the outer regions of the bilayer. In the gel phase of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers, amiodarone broadens the transition profile and shifts the phase transition midpoint to lower temperature values, as evaluated by both probes. On the other hand, the drug orders the fluid phase of the lipid either in hydrophobic core or in the outer regions of the bilayer, as detected by DPH and DPH-PA, respectively. The effects of amiodarone on the thermotropic behaviour of DPPC confirm and extend data in DMPC. Cholesterol concentration modulates to a great extent the effects of amiodarone in the fluid phase of DMPC. Thus, both probes, DPH and DPH-PA, detect either ordering effects of amiodarone for low cholesterol concentrations (< or = 20 mol%) or disordering amiodarone effects at higher cholesterol levels (> 20 mol%). In agreement with the results in models of synthetic lipids, the ordering effects of amiodarone in fluid native membranes of mitochondria and brain microsomes are depressed with the increase in intrinsic cholesterol. The ordering effects in mitochondria may induce bioenergetic dysfunctions and consequently disturbances in the electromechanic functioning of myocardium.

  3. Effects of c-Myc and TGF-Alpha on Polarized Membrane Traffic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    accidental cell death due to excessive ion depletion or accumulation after loss of cell polarity. Interestingly, the CFTR chloride channel, while apical...J. Benos, and R. A. Frizzell. 1994. Polarization-dependent apical membrane CFTR targeting underlies cAMP- stimulated Cl- secretion in epithelial cells

  4. Mechano-capacitive properties of polarized membranes.

    PubMed

    Mosgaard, Lars D; Zecchi, Karis A; Heimburg, Thomas

    2015-10-28

    Biological membranes are capacitors that can be charged by applying a field across the membrane. The charges on the capacitor exert a force on the membrane that leads to electrostriction, i.e. a thinning of the membrane. Since the force is quadratic in voltage, negative and positive voltage have an identical influence on the physics of symmetric membranes. However, this is not the case for a membrane with an asymmetry leading to a permanent electric polarization. Positive and negative voltages of identical magnitude lead to different properties. Such an asymmetry can originate from a lipid composition that is different on the two monolayers of the membrane, or from membrane curvature. The latter effect is called 'flexoelectricity'. As a consequence of permanent polarization, the membrane capacitor is discharged at a voltage different from zero. This leads to interesting electrical phenomena such as outward or inward rectification of membrane permeability. Here, we introduce a generalized theoretical framework, that treats capacitance, polarization, flexoelectricity, piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity in the same language. We show applications to electrostriction, membrane permeability and piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity close to melting transitions, where such effects are especially pronounced.

  5. Effect of Porosity and Concentration Polarization on Electrolyte Diffusive Transport Parameters through Ceramic Membranes with Similar Nanopore Size

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Virginia; Vega, Victor; García, Javier; Prida, Victor M.; Hernando, Blanca; Benavente, Juana

    2014-01-01

    Diffusive transport through nanoporous alumina membranes (NPAMs) produced by the two-step anodization method, with similar pore size but different porosity, is studied by analyzing membrane potential measured with NaCl solutions at different concentrations. Donnan exclusion of co-ions at the solution/membrane interface seem to exert a certain control on the diffusive transport of ions through NPAMs with low porosity, which might be reduced by coating the membrane surface with appropriated materials, as it is the case of SiO2. Our results also show the effect of concentration polarization at the membrane surface on ionic transport numbers (or diffusion coefficients) for low-porosity and high electrolyte affinity membranes, which could mask values of those characteristic electrochemical parameters.

  6. Fluorescence polarization studies of rat intestinal microvillus membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Schachter, D; Shinitzky, M

    1977-01-01

    Rat intestinal microvillus membranes and lipid extracts prepared from them have been studied by fluorescence polarization with three lipid-soluble fluorophores: diphenylhexatriene, retinol, and anthroyl-stearate. The degree of fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene, which provides an index of the "microviscosity" of the lipid regions of the membrane, is exceptionally high in microvillus membranes, the highest yet reported in normal biological membranes. Both the membrane proteins and lipids were found to contribute to the high values. With each of the three probes the polarization values are higher in ileal microvillus membranes as compared to membranes from proximal intestinal segments. Temperature-dependence studies of the fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene and anthroylstearate demonstrate a phase transition in microvillus membranes and in liposomes prepared from their lipid extracts at approximately 26+/-2 degrees C. Ambient pH influences markedly the diphenylhexatriene fluorescence polarization in microvillus membranes but has little effect on that of human erythrocyte ghost membranes. The "microviscosity" of jejunal microvillus membranes is maximal at pH 6.5-7.0 and decreases as much as 50% at pH 3.0, an effect which depends largely upon the membrane proteins. Addition of calcium ions to suspensions of microvillus membranes increases the fluorescence polarization of retinol and anthroyl-stearate, but not that of diphenyl-hexatriene. This confirms the localization of the last compound to the hydrophobic interior of the membrane, relatively distant from the hydrophilic head groups of the polar lipids. Microvillus membrane proteins solubilized with Triton X-100 give relatively high fluorescence polarization and intensity values with retinol, suggesting the presence of binding proteins which could play a role in the normal absorptive mechanism for the vitamin. PMID:14174

  7. Polarized epithelial membrane traffic: conservation and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mostov, Keith; Su, Tao; ter Beest, Martin

    2003-04-01

    Most cells are polarized and have distinct plasma membrane domains, which are the result of polarized trafficking of proteins and lipids. Great progress has been made in elucidating the highly conserved polarized targeting machinery. A pre-eminent challenge now is to understand the plasticity of polarized traffic, how it is altered by differentiation and dedifferentiation during development, as well as the adaptation of differentiated cells to meet changing physiological needs.

  8. Polarity and membrane transport in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Baron, R

    1989-01-01

    The osteoclast is a highly polarized non-epithelial cell. The apical pole of the cell is determined by the cell's attachment to the extracellular matrix. This attachment forms the sealing zone, delimiting the subosteoclastic bone resorbing compartment. The apical membrane of the cell forms the ruffled-border, which contains some specific membrane proteins and a proton pump ATPase, which acidifies the apical compartment. Newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes are vectorially transported into this apical compartment bound to mannose-6-phosphate receptors. The basolateral membrane is highly enriched in sodium pumps with beta and alpha 1 subunits. Associated with the acidification process is the carbonic anhydrase found in the cytoplasm and membrane-associated and a bicarbonate-chloride exchanger in the membrane.2 These features put the osteoclast in the same functional category as the kidney tubule intercalated cell and the gastric oxyntic cell, both of epithelial origin, which secrete acid in a polarized fashion.

  9. Affinity membrane chromatography: relationship of dye-ligand type to surface polarity and their effect on lysozyme separation and purification.

    PubMed

    Arica, M Yakup; Yilmaz, Meltem; Yalçin, Emine; Bayramoğlu, Gülay

    2004-06-15

    Two different dye-ligands, i.e. Procion Brown MX-5BR (RB-10) and Procion Green H-4G (RG-5) were immobilised onto poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (pHEMA) membranes. The polarities of the affinity membranes were determined by contact angle measurements. Separation and purification of lysozyme from solution and egg white were investigated. The adsorption data was analysed using two adsorption kinetic models the first order and the second order to determine the best-fit equation for the separation of lysozyme using affinity membranes. The second-order equation for the adsorption of lysozyme on the RB-10 and RG-5 immobilised membranes systems is the most appropriate equation to predict the adsorption capacity for the affinity membranes. The reversible lysozyme adsorption on the RB-10 and RG-5 did not follow the Langmuir model, but obeyed the Temkin and Freundlich isotherm model. Separation and purification were monitored by determining the lysozyme activity using Micrococcus lysodeikticus as substrate. The purities of the eluted lysozyme, as determined by HPLC, were 76 and 92% with recovery 63 and 77% for RB-10 and RG-5 membranes, respectively. For the separation and purification of lysozyme the RG-5 immobilised membrane provided the best results. The affinity membranes are stable when subjected to sanitization with sodium hydroxide after repeated adsorption-elution cycles.

  10. Effect of Esters on the Permeation of Chemicals with Different Polarities through Synthetic Artificial Membranes Using a High-Throughput Diffusion Cell Array.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Takashi; Nishioka, Keisuke; Motoki, Anzu; Yakumaru, Masafumi; Sano, Tomohiko; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 25 kinds of esters that are used in cosmetics on the permeation of four model compounds with different polarities (caffeine [CF], aminopyrine [AMP], benzoic acid [BA], and flurbiprofen [FP]). The amount of each model compound that permeated through two types of artificial membrane (silicone and Strat-M(®)) was measured and correlated with the physicochemical properties of the esters, including their solubility, viscosity, wettability, surface tension, and uptake. The amount of each model compound that permeated through the silicone membrane was not significantly correlated with the solubility of the esters but was significantly correlated with all other measured physical properties of the esters. Similar correlations were observed for the amounts of AMP, BA, and FP that passed through the Strat-M(®) membrane. However, the amount of CF that permeated through the Strat-M(®) membrane also correlated with the solubility of the esters. There was a highly significant correlation between the amount permeating through the silicone and Strat-M(®) membranes because the model compounds had high lipophilicity. These findings demonstrated that to control the permeation of various chemicals through artificial membranes, it is important to consider the uptake of the esters and that the solubility of the esters is also an important consideration when using a more complex membrane.

  11. Nanoscale Membrane Curvature detected by Polarized Localization Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Christopher; Maarouf, Abir; Woodward, Xinxin

    Nanoscale membrane curvature is a necessary component of countless cellular processes. Here we present Polarized Localization Microscopy (PLM), a super-resolution optical imaging technique that enables the detection of nanoscale membrane curvature with order-of-magnitude improvements over comparable optical techniques. PLM combines the advantages of polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence localization microscopy to reveal single-fluorophore locations and orientations without reducing localization precision by point spread function manipulation. PLM resolved nanoscale membrane curvature of a supported lipid bilayer draped over polystyrene nanoparticles on a glass coverslip, thus creating a model membrane with coexisting flat and curved regions and membrane radii of curvature as small as 20 nm. Further, PLM provides single-molecule trajectories and the aggregation of curvature-inducing proteins with super-resolution to reveal the correlated effects of membrane curvature, dynamics, and molecular sorting. For example, cholera toxin subunit B has been observed to induce nanoscale membrane budding and concentrate at the bud neck. PLM reveals a previously hidden and critical information of membrane topology.

  12. Polarization effects. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of polarized proton beams in ISABELLE is important for several general reasons: (1) With a single longitudinally polarized proton beam, effects involving parity violation can be identified and hence processes involving weak interactions can be separated from those involving strong and electromagnetic interactions. (2) Spin effects are important in the strong interactions and can be useful for testing QCD. The technique for obtaining polarized proton beams in ISABELLE appears promising, particularly in view of the present development of a polarized proton beam for the AGS. Projections for the luminosity in ISABELLE for collisions of polarized protons - one or both beams polarized with longitudinal or transverse polarization - range from 1/100 to 1 times the luminosity for unpolarized protons.

  13. Complex Polarity: Building Multicellular Tissues Through Apical Membrane Traffic.

    PubMed

    Román-Fernández, Alvaro; Bryant, David M

    2016-12-01

    The formation of distinct subdomains of the cell surface is crucial for multicellular organism development. The most striking example of this is apical-basal polarization. What is much less appreciated is that underpinning an asymmetric cell surface is an equally dramatic intracellular endosome rearrangement. Here, we review the interplay between classical cell polarity proteins and membrane trafficking pathways, and discuss how this marriage gives rise to cell polarization. We focus on those mechanisms that regulate apical polarization, as this is providing a number of insights into how membrane traffic and polarity are regulated at the tissue level.

  14. The polarized EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    W. Bentz; I. C. Cloet; A. W. Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We calculate both the spin independent and spin dependent nuclear structure functions in an effective quark theory. The nucleon is described as a composite quark-diquark state, and the nucleus is treated in the mean field approximation. We predict a sizable polarized EMC effect, which could be confirmed in future experiments.

  15. Mechano-capacitive properties of polarized membranes and the application to conductance measurements of lipid membrane patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecchi, Karis A.; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Heimburg, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes are capacitors that can be charged by applying an electric field across the membrane. The charges on the capacitor exert a force on the membrane that leads to electrostriction, i.e., a thinning of the membrane. This effect is especially strong close to chain melting transitions. A consequence is voltage induced pore formation in the lipid membrane. Since the force is quadratic in voltage, negative and positive voltages have an identical influence on the physics of symmetric membranes. This is not the case for a membrane with an asymmetry leading to a permanent electric polarization. Positive and negative voltages of identical magnitude lead to different physical properties. Such an asymmetry can originate from a lipid composition that is different on the two monolayers of the membrane, or from membrane curvature. The latter effect is called flexoelectricity. It was investigated in detail by A.G. Petrov in the recent decades. As a consequence of permanent polarization, the membrane capacitor is discharged at a voltage different from zero. This leads to interesting electrical phenomena such as outward or inward rectification of membrane permeability. The changes in current-voltage relationships are consistent with the known magnitude of the flexoelectric effect.

  16. Effect of concentration polarization on permselectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    abu-Rjal, Ramadan; Chinaryan, Vahe; Bazant, Martin Z.; Rubinstein, Isaak; Zaltzman, Boris

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the variation of permselectivity in the course of concentration polarization is systematically analyzed for a three-layer membrane system consisting of a nonperfectly permselective ion exchange membrane, homogeneous or heterogeneous, flanked by two diffusion layers of a binary univalent electrolyte. For a heterogeneous membrane, an ionic transport model is proposed, which is amenable to analytical treatment. In this model, assuming a constant fixed charge in the membrane and disregarding water splitting, the entire transport problem is reduced to solution of a single algebraic equation for the counterion transport number. It is concluded that for both types of membrane the concentration polarization may significantly affect the permselectivity of the system through the effects of the induced nonuniformity of the coion diffusion flux in the membrane (convexity of the coion concentration profile) and varying membrane-solution interface concentration. While the former is significant for low membrane fixed charge density, for a heterogeneous membrane, the latter might be considerably affected by the flux focusing effect at the permeable membrane segments.

  17. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization.

  18. ROCK1-directed basement membrane positioning coordinates epithelial tissue polarity.

    PubMed

    Daley, William P; Gervais, Elise M; Centanni, Samuel W; Gulfo, Kathryn M; Nelson, Deirdre A; Larsen, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    The basement membrane is crucial for epithelial tissue organization and function. However, the mechanisms by which basement membrane is restricted to the basal periphery of epithelial tissues and the basement membrane-mediated signals that regulate coordinated tissue organization are not well defined. Here, we report that Rho kinase (ROCK) controls coordinated tissue organization by restricting basement membrane to the epithelial basal periphery in developing mouse submandibular salivary glands, and that ROCK inhibition results in accumulation of ectopic basement membrane throughout the epithelial compartment. ROCK-regulated restriction of PAR-1b (MARK2) localization in the outer basal epithelial cell layer is required for basement membrane positioning at the tissue periphery. PAR-1b is specifically required for basement membrane deposition, as inhibition of PAR-1b kinase activity prevents basement membrane deposition and disrupts overall tissue organization, and suppression of PAR-1b together with ROCK inhibition prevents interior accumulations of basement membrane. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of wild-type PAR-1b results in ectopic interior basement membrane deposition. Significantly, culture of salivary epithelial cells on exogenous basement membrane rescues epithelial organization in the presence of ROCK1 or PAR-1b inhibition, and this basement membrane-mediated rescue requires functional integrin β1 to maintain epithelial cell-cell adhesions. Taken together, these studies indicate that ROCK1/PAR-1b-dependent regulation of basement membrane placement is required for the coordination of tissue polarity and the elaboration of tissue structure in the developing submandibular salivary gland.

  19. Decoupling Polarization of the Golgi Apparatus and GM1 in the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bisel, Blaine; Calamai, Martino; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization is a process of coordinated cellular rearrangements that prepare the cell for migration. GM1 is synthesized in the Golgi apparatus and localized in membrane microdomains that appear at the leading edge of polarized cells, but the mechanism by which GM1 accumulates asymmetrically is unknown. The Golgi apparatus itself becomes oriented toward the leading edge during cell polarization, which is thought to contribute to plasma membrane asymmetry. Using quantitative image analysis techniques, we measure the extent of polarization of the Golgi apparatus and GM1 in the plasma membrane simultaneously in individual cells subject to a wound assay. We find that GM1 polarization starts just 10 min after stimulation with growth factors, while Golgi apparatus polarization takes 30 min. Drugs that block Golgi polarization or function have no effect on GM1 polarization, and, conversely, inhibiting GM1 polarization does not affect Golgi apparatus polarization. Evaluation of Golgi apparatus and GM1 polarization in single cells reveals no correlation between the two events. Our results indicate that Golgi apparatus and GM1 polarization are controlled by distinct intracellular cascades involving the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways, respectively. Analysis of cell migration and invasion suggest that MEK/ERK activation is crucial for two dimensional migration, while PI3K activation drives three dimensional invasion, and no cumulative effect is observed from blocking both simultaneously. The independent biochemical control of GM1 polarity by PI3K and Golgi apparatus polarity by MEK/ERK may act synergistically to regulate and reinforce directional selection in cell migration. PMID:24312472

  20. Decoupling polarization of the Golgi apparatus and GM1 in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Bisel, Blaine; Calamai, Martino; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization is a process of coordinated cellular rearrangements that prepare the cell for migration. GM1 is synthesized in the Golgi apparatus and localized in membrane microdomains that appear at the leading edge of polarized cells, but the mechanism by which GM1 accumulates asymmetrically is unknown. The Golgi apparatus itself becomes oriented toward the leading edge during cell polarization, which is thought to contribute to plasma membrane asymmetry. Using quantitative image analysis techniques, we measure the extent of polarization of the Golgi apparatus and GM1 in the plasma membrane simultaneously in individual cells subject to a wound assay. We find that GM1 polarization starts just 10 min after stimulation with growth factors, while Golgi apparatus polarization takes 30 min. Drugs that block Golgi polarization or function have no effect on GM1 polarization, and, conversely, inhibiting GM1 polarization does not affect Golgi apparatus polarization. Evaluation of Golgi apparatus and GM1 polarization in single cells reveals no correlation between the two events. Our results indicate that Golgi apparatus and GM1 polarization are controlled by distinct intracellular cascades involving the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways, respectively. Analysis of cell migration and invasion suggest that MEK/ERK activation is crucial for two dimensional migration, while PI3K activation drives three dimensional invasion, and no cumulative effect is observed from blocking both simultaneously. The independent biochemical control of GM1 polarity by PI3K and Golgi apparatus polarity by MEK/ERK may act synergistically to regulate and reinforce directional selection in cell migration.

  1. Dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein-protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Dzikovski, Boris G; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H; McDermott, Ann E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of sixfold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement effect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces.

  2. Polarity governed selective amplification of through plane proton shuttling in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Manu; Chattanahalli Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Raja Kottaichamy, Alagar; Pottachola Shafi, Shahid; Gaikwad, Pramod; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Ottakam Thotiyl, Musthafa

    2017-03-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) anisotropically conducts protons with directional dominance of in plane ionic transport (σ IP) over the through plane (σ TP). In a typical H2-O2 fuel cell, since the proton conduction occurs through the plane during its generation at the fuel electrode, it is indeed inevitable to selectively accelerate GO's σ TP for advancement towards a potential fuel cell membrane. We successfully achieved ∼7 times selective amplification of GO's σ TP by tuning the polarity of the dopant molecule in its nanoporous matrix. The coexistence of strongly non-polar and polar domains in the dopant demonstrated a synergistic effect towards σ TP with the former decreasing the number of water molecules coordinated to protons by ∼3 times, diminishing the effects of electroosmotic drag exerted on ionic movements, and the latter selectively accelerating σ TP across the catalytic layers by bridging the individual GO planes via extensive host guest H-bonding interactions. When they are decoupled, the dopant with mainly non-polar or polar features only marginally enhances the σ TP, revealing that polarity factors contribute to fuel cell relevant transport properties of GO membranes only when they coexist. Fuel cell polarization and kinetic analyses revealed that these multitask dopants increased the fuel cell performance metrics of the power and current densities by ∼3 times compared to the pure GO membranes, suggesting that the functional group factors of the dopants are of utmost importance in GO-based proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  3. Localization of flunitrazepam in artificial membranes. A spectrophotometric study about the effect the polarity of the medium exerts on flunitrazepam acid-base equilibrium.

    PubMed

    García, D A; Perillo, M A

    1997-02-21

    In the present paper we tried to test the hypothesis that nonspecific flunitrazepam-membrane interactions are consistent with drug molecules accommodated between lipid molecules, becoming an integral part of the bilayer. We developed a spectrophotometric method to determine FNTZH+ equilibrium dissociation constant and applied it to the study of the acid-base equilibria of this drug in homogeneous media of different polarity. In these conditions, pK decreased with the decrement in the dielectric constant (D) of the media. These results, analyzed under the light of the theory developed by Fernandez and Fromherz (1977; J. Phys. Chem. 81, 1755-1761) let us infer that flunitrazepam is localized a region with D = 60. This D value is lower that Dwater = 78 and higher than D of hydrocarbon chains zone (D = 2-5) and would correspond to D of the region of polar groups. This result is compatible with the hypothesis.

  4. Calculation of polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-09-01

    Basically there are two areas of accelerator applications that involve beam polarization. One is the acceleration of a polarized beam (most likely a proton beam) in a synchrotron. Another concerns polarized beams in an electron storage ring. In both areas, numerical techniques have been very useful.

  5. Surface aggregation patterns of LDL receptors near coated pits III: potential effects of combined retrograde membrane flow-diffusion and a polarized-insertion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although the process of endocytosis of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) macromolecule and its receptor have been the subject of intense experimental research and modeling, there are still conflicting hypotheses and even conflicting data regarding the way receptors are transported to coated pits, the manner by which receptors are inserted before they aggregate in coated pits, and the display of receptors on the cell surface. At first it was considered that LDL receptors in human fibroblasts are inserted at random locations and then transported by diffusion toward coated pits. But experiments have not ruled out the possibility that the true rate of accumulation of LDL receptors in coated pits might be faster than predicted on the basis of pure diffusion and uniform reinsertion over the entire cell surface. It has been claimed that recycled LDL receptors are inserted preferentially in regions where coated pits form, with display occurring predominantly as groups of loosely associated units. Another mechanism that has been proposed by experimental cell biologists which might affect the accumulation of receptors in coated pits is a retrograde membrane flow. This is essentially linked to a polarized receptor insertion mode and also to the capping phenomenon, characterized by the formation of large patches of proteins that passively flow away from the regions of membrane exocytosis. In this contribution we calculate the mean travel time of LDL receptors to coated pits as determined by the ratio of flow strength to diffusion-coefficient, as well as by polarized-receptor insertion. We also project the resulting display of unbound receptors on the cell membrane. We found forms of polarized insertion that could potentially reduce the mean capture time of LDL receptors by coated pits which is controlled by diffusion and uniform insertion. Our results show that, in spite of its efficiency as a possible device for enhancement of the rate of receptor trapping, polarized

  6. Surface aggregation patterns of LDL receptors near coated pits III: potential effects of combined retrograde membrane flow-diffusion and a polarized-insertion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Echavarria-Heras, Héctor; Leal-Ramirez, Cecilia; Castillo, Oscar

    2014-05-22

    Although the process of endocytosis of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) macromolecule and its receptor have been the subject of intense experimental research and modeling, there are still conflicting hypotheses and even conflicting data regarding the way receptors are transported to coated pits, the manner by which receptors are inserted before they aggregate in coated pits, and the display of receptors on the cell surface. At first it was considered that LDL receptors in human fibroblasts are inserted at random locations and then transported by diffusion toward coated pits. But experiments have not ruled out the possibility that the true rate of accumulation of LDL receptors in coated pits might be faster than predicted on the basis of pure diffusion and uniform reinsertion over the entire cell surface. It has been claimed that recycled LDL receptors are inserted preferentially in regions where coated pits form, with display occurring predominantly as groups of loosely associated units. Another mechanism that has been proposed by experimental cell biologists which might affect the accumulation of receptors in coated pits is a retrograde membrane flow. This is essentially linked to a polarized receptor insertion mode and also to the capping phenomenon, characterized by the formation of large patches of proteins that passively flow away from the regions of membrane exocytosis. In this contribution we calculate the mean travel time of LDL receptors to coated pits as determined by the ratio of flow strength to diffusion-coefficient, as well as by polarized-receptor insertion. We also project the resulting display of unbound receptors on the cell membrane. We found forms of polarized insertion that could potentially reduce the mean capture time of LDL receptors by coated pits which is controlled by diffusion and uniform insertion. Our results show that, in spite of its efficiency as a possible device for enhancement of the rate of receptor trapping, polarized

  7. Spin-polarized transport in helical membranes due to spin–orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guo-Hua; Wang, Yong-Long; Jiang, Hua; Lai, Meng-Yun; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2017-04-01

    Spin-dependent electron transmission through a helical membrane, taking account of linear spin–orbit interaction, has been investigated by numerically solving the Schrödinger equation in cylindrical coordinates. It is shown that the spin precession is affected by the magnitude of geometric parameters and chirality of the membrane. This effect is also explained analytically using perturbation theory in the weak coupling regime. In the strong coupling regime, the current spin polarization is evident when the number of the open modes in leads is larger than that of the open channels in the membrane. Moreover, we find that the chirality of the helical membrane can determine the orientation of current spin polarization. Therefore, one may get totally opposite spin currents from helical membranes rolled in different directions.

  8. Hydrophilic Mineral Coating of Membrane Substrate for Reducing Internal Concentration Polarization (ICP) in Forward Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Li, Jingguo; Zhou, Zhengzhong; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang

    2016-01-01

    Internal concentration polarization (ICP) is a major issue in forward osmosis (FO) as it can significantly reduce the water flux in FO operations. It is known that a hydrophilic substrate and a smaller membrane structure parameter (S) are effective against ICP. This paper reports the development of a thin film composite (TFC) FO membrane with a hydrophilic mineral (CaCO3)-coated polyethersulfone (PES)-based substrate. The CaCO3 coating was applied continuously and uniformly on the membrane pore surfaces throughout the TFC substrate. Due to the intrinsic hydrophilicity of the CaCO3 coating, the substrate hydrophilicity was significantly increased and the membrane S parameter was reduced to as low as the current best of cellulose-based membranes but without the mechanical fragility of the latter. As a result, the ICP of the TFC-FO membrane could be significantly reduced to yield a remarkable increase in water flux without the loss of membrane selectivity.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of membrane polarity in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Campo, C; Mason, A; Maouyo, D; Olsen, O; Yoo, D; Welling, P A

    2005-01-01

    Exciting discoveries in the last decade have cast light onto the fundamental mechanisms that underlie polarized trafficking in epithelial cells. It is now clear that epithelial cell membrane asymmetry is achieved by a combination of intracellular sorting operations, vectorial delivery mechanisms and plasmalemma-specific fusion and retention processes. Several well-defined signals that specify polarized segregation, sorting, or retention processes have, now, been described in a number of proteins. The intracellular machineries that decode and act on these signals are beginning to be described. In addition, the nature of the molecules that associate with intracellular trafficking vesicles to coordinate polarized delivery, tethering, docking, and fusion are also becoming understood. Combined with direct visualization of polarized sorting processes with new technologies in live-cell fluorescent microscopy, new and surprising insights into these once-elusive trafficking processes are emerging. Here we provide a review of these recent advances within an historically relevant context.

  10. Fluorescence and polarization imaging of membrane dynamics in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M.; Weber, P.; Bruns, T.; Strauss, W. S. L.; Schneckenburger, H.

    2009-02-01

    Methods of wide field fluorescence microscopy for measuring membrane dynamics in living cells are described. These methods are based on laser pulse excitation of the membrane marker 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylamino naphthalene (laurdan) whose emission spectra, fluorescence decay kinetics and anisotropies are sensitive to membrane stiffness and fluidity. Plasma membranes are selected by illumination with an evanescent electromagnetic field and distinguished from intracellular membranes assessed by whole cell illumination. While fluorescence spectra of laurdan appeared red-shifted with decreasing membrane stiffness, fluorescence anisotropy and rotational relaxation times were reduced with increasing membrane fluidity. Membrane stiffness was found to increase with decreasing temperature and increasing amounts of cholesterol. In addition, membrane stiffness of the plasma membrane was always higher than that of intracellular membranes. These effects may have some influence on pathogenesis of certain diseases, uptake of pharmaceutical agents or cell aging. Present experiments are limited to fluorescence microscopy with total internal reflection (TIR) or epi-illumination, but corresponding methods can also be used for screening of larger cell collectives, e.g. in microtiter plates.

  11. Gamma-radiation-induced grafting of binary mixture of methacrylic acid and 4-vinyl pyridine onto Teflon-FEP film as an effective polar membrane for separation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Inderjeet; Rattan, Sunita; Chauhan, Sandeep; Gupta, Nitika

    2010-05-01

    Ionic bifunctional membranes have been synthesized by grafting binary mixture of methacrylic acid (MAAc) and 4-vinyl pyridine (4-VP) onto Teflon-FEP film by pre-irradiation method. Optimum conditions pertaining to maximum percentage of grafting were evaluated as a function of different reaction parameters. Maximum percentage of grafting of binary mixture (MAAc-co-4-VP) (71.29%) was obtained at an optimum total dose of 54.48 kGy and the total concentration was 9.49 mol/L ([4-VP] = 0.07 mol/L and [MAAc ] = 9.42 mol/L) in 5 ml of water. The effect of alcohols as additives to the reaction medium on percent grafting of the binary mixture has also been studied. The membranes were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Swelling studies of the membranes were performed in different solvents such as water, benzene, carbon tetrachloride and dimethyl formamide (DMF). Maximum swelling was observed in DMF with minimum swelling in benzene. Metal ion (Cu 2+, Ni 2+ and Fe 2+) uptake studies show better affinity for Fe 2+ ions. Conductance measurements in different aqueous salt solution showed that these membranes have affinity for Na +/K + ions and Cl - ions and hence can be used in desalination/separation processes for the separation of both type of cationic and anionic ions.

  12. Rotation of plasma membrane proteins measured by polarized fluorescence depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisas, B. George; Rahman, Noorul A.; Yoshida, Thomas M.; Roess, Deborah A.

    1990-05-01

    We have implemented a new laser microscopic method, polarized fluorescence depletion (PFD), for measuring the rotational dynamics of functional membrane proteins on individual, microscopically selected cells under physiological conditions. This method combines the long lifetimes of triplet-state probes with the sensitivity of fluorescence detection to measure macromolecular rotational correlation times from 10 microsec to > 1 ms. As examples, the rotational correlation time of Fc receptors (FcR) on the surface of 2H3 rat basophilic leukemia cells is 79.9 4.4 microsec at 4°C when labeled with eosin conjugates of IgE. This value is consistent with the known 100 kDa receptor size. When labeled with intact F4 anti-FcR monoclonal antibody, the rotational correlation time for FcER is increased about 2-fold to 170.8 +/- 6.5 microsec, consistent with receptor dimer formation on the plasma membrane and with the ability of this antibody to form FcER dimers on 2H3 cell surfaces. We have also examined the rotational diffusion of the luteinizing hormone receptor on plasma membranes of small ovine luteal cells. Luteinizing hormone receptors (LHR), when occupied by ovine luteinizing hormone (oLH), have a rotational correlation time of 20.5 +/- 0.1 microsec at 4°C. When occupied by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), LHR have a rotational correlation time of 46.2 +/- 0.4 microsec suggesting that binding of hCG triggers additional LHR interactions with plasma membrane proteins. Together these studies suggest the utility of PFD measurements in assessing molecular size and molecular association of membrane proteins on individual cells. Relative advantages of time- and frequency-domain implementations of PFD are also discussed.

  13. Truncated brush border myosin I affects membrane traffic in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Durrbach, A; Raposo, G; Tenza, D; Louvard, D; Coudrier, E

    2000-05-01

    We investigate, in this study, the potential involvement of an acto-myosin-driven mechanism in endocytosis of polarized cells. We observed that depolymerization of actin filaments using latrunculin A decreases the rate of transferrin recycling to the basolateral plasma membrane of Caco-2 cells, and increases its delivery to the apical plasma membrane. To analyze whether a myosin was involved in endocytosis, we produced, in this polarized cell line, truncated, non-functional, brush border, myosin I proteins (BBMI) that we have previously demonstrated to have a dominant negative effect on endocytosis of unpolarized cells. These non-functional proteins affect the rate of transferrin recycling and the rate of transepithelial transport of dipeptidyl-peptidase IV from the basolateral plasma membrane to the apical plasma membrane. They modify the distribution of internalized endocytic tracers in apical multivesicular endosomes that are accessible to fluid phase tracers internalized from apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains. Altogether, these observations suggest that an acto-myosin-driven mechanism is involved in the trafficking of basolaterally internalized molecules to the apical plasma membrane.

  14. Hydrophilic Mineral Coating of Membrane Substrate for Reducing Internal Concentration Polarization (ICP) in Forward Osmosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Li, Jingguo; Zhou, Zhengzhong; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang

    2016-01-01

    Internal concentration polarization (ICP) is a major issue in forward osmosis (FO) as it can significantly reduce the water flux in FO operations. It is known that a hydrophilic substrate and a smaller membrane structure parameter (S) are effective against ICP. This paper reports the development of a thin film composite (TFC) FO membrane with a hydrophilic mineral (CaCO3)-coated polyethersulfone (PES)-based substrate. The CaCO3 coating was applied continuously and uniformly on the membrane pore surfaces throughout the TFC substrate. Due to the intrinsic hydrophilicity of the CaCO3 coating, the substrate hydrophilicity was significantly increased and the membrane S parameter was reduced to as low as the current best of cellulose-based membranes but without the mechanical fragility of the latter. As a result, the ICP of the TFC-FO membrane could be significantly reduced to yield a remarkable increase in water flux without the loss of membrane selectivity. PMID:26796675

  15. Chimera proteins with affinity for membranes and microtubule tips polarize in the membrane of fission yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Recouvreux, Pierre; Sokolowski, Thomas R; Grammoustianou, Aristea; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Dogterom, Marileen

    2016-02-16

    Cell polarity refers to a functional spatial organization of proteins that is crucial for the control of essential cellular processes such as growth and division. To establish polarity, cells rely on elaborate regulation networks that control the distribution of proteins at the cell membrane. In fission yeast cells, a microtubule-dependent network has been identified that polarizes the distribution of signaling proteins that restricts growth to cell ends and targets the cytokinetic machinery to the middle of the cell. Although many molecular components have been shown to play a role in this network, it remains unknown which molecular functionalities are minimally required to establish a polarized protein distribution in this system. Here we show that a membrane-binding protein fragment, which distributes homogeneously in wild-type fission yeast cells, can be made to concentrate at cell ends by attaching it to a cytoplasmic microtubule end-binding protein. This concentration results in a polarized pattern of chimera proteins with a spatial extension that is very reminiscent of natural polarity patterns in fission yeast. However, chimera levels fluctuate in response to microtubule dynamics, and disruption of microtubules leads to disappearance of the pattern. Numerical simulations confirm that the combined functionality of membrane anchoring and microtubule tip affinity is in principle sufficient to create polarized patterns. Our chimera protein may thus represent a simple molecular functionality that is able to polarize the membrane, onto which additional layers of molecular complexity may be built to provide the temporal robustness that is typical of natural polarity patterns.

  16. Polarization Effects at a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-11-01

    For Muon Colliders, Polarization will be a useful tool if high polarization is achievable with little luminosity loss. Formulation and effects of beam polarization and luminosity including polarization effects in Higgs resonance studies are discussed for improving precision measurements and Higgs resonance ''discovery'' capability e.g. at the First Muon Collider (FMC).

  17. Growth and membrane polarization in Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2 grown in randomized microgravity in a high aspect ratio vessel.

    PubMed

    England, L S; Gorzelak, M; Trevors, J T

    2003-12-05

    Growth and membrane polarization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2 cells grown under randomized microgravity (RMG) and 1xg were measured in a high aspect ratio vessel (HARV) and also in batch cultures mixed at 12 and 150 rpm in Erlenmeyer shake flasks. Membrane polarization was measured using the fluorescent probe, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). No differences were observed in the growth curves or membrane polarization values (about 0.300) under all three culture conditions. However, the net effect of RMG at the single cell level may be still unknown. It may be possible that RMG effects are species-dependent or bacterial cells with a small mass and volume may be near the threshold where RMG exerts a minimal effect.

  18. Fit of fluxes of sunscreens and other compounds from propylene glycol:water (30:70) through human skin and silicone membrane to the Roberts-Sloan equation: the effect of polar vehicle (or water) solubility.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Kenneth B; Devarajan-Ketha, Hemamalini; Synovec, Jennifer; Majumdar, Susruta

    2013-01-01

    It would be useful to develop a surrogate for animal skin, which could be use to predict flux through human skin. The fluxes (and physicochemical properties) of sunscreens and other compounds from propylene glycol (PG):water (AQ), 30:70, through human skin have previously been reported. We measured the fluxes of several of those sunscreens and other compounds from PG:AQ, 30:70, through silicone membrane and fit both sets of data to the Roberts-Sloan (RS) equation to determine any similarities. For both sets of data, the fluxes were directly dependent on their solubilities in a lipid solvent [octanol (OCT), in this case] and in a polar solvent (PG:AQ, 30:70, or AQ in this case) and inversely on their molecular weights. The fit of the experimental (EXP) fluxes through human skin in vivo to RS was excellent: r² = 0.92 if the vehicle (VEH) PG:AQ, 30:70 was the polar solvent (RS¹) or r² = 0.97 if water was the polar solvent (RS²). The fit of the EXP fluxes through silicone membrane to RS was good: r² = 0.80 if the VEH PG:AQ, 30:70, was the polar solvent (RS¹) or r² = 0.81 if water was the polar solvent (RS²). The correlations between their EXP fluxes through human skin in vivo and their EXP fluxes through silicone membrane were good (r² = 0.85). In addition, the correlation between EXP fluxes from PG:AQ, 30:70, through human skin in vivo and their fluxes calculated from the coefficients of the fit of solubilities, molecular weights and fluxes from water through silicone membranes from a previous n = 22 database to RS was even better (r² = 0.94). These results suggest that flux through human skin can be calculated from flux through a silicone membrane.

  19. Internal Concentration Polarization in Asymmetric Membrane in Forward Osmosis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelha, Gabriela; Gadelha, Hermes; Hankins, Nick

    2013-11-01

    There has been a re-emerging interest in the study of the osmotic-driving desalination process known as Forward Osmosis (FO), due to its potential for significantly lower energy demand. However, the employed asymmetric semi-permeable membranes are notorious for the formation of unstirred boundary layers. These boundary layers may be dilutive or concentrative, causing an undesired decline on the osmotic flux. To date, although several models have been proposed in the literature to describe various applications in membrane separation processes, the fundamental theoretical basis has remained unchanged. Here, we detail an alternative formulation for the solute concentration profile and the water flux decline in terms of the osmotic Peclet number and the dimensionless solute permeability. Our analysis shows that the osmotic potential efficiency and the resulting water flux are inversely related, preventing any simultaneous optimization of the system, i.e. the larger the water flux is, the less osmotically efficient it becomes. We equally investigated the effect of distinct flat-sheet membrane configurations on the water flux. In this case, when the active layer faces the solution of low concentration (feed solution), under normal operations conditions, the water flux can be 60% lower than its counter configuration, when the active layer faces the solution of high concentration (draw solution). Finally, we contrast the theoretical formulation with experiments using inorganic ions and micelle as draw solutions.

  20. Membrane order parameters for interdigitated lipid bilayers measured via polarized total-internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ngo, An T; Jakubek, Zygmunt J; Lu, Zhengfang; Joós, Béla; Morris, Catherine E; Johnston, Linda J

    2014-11-01

    Incorporating ethanol in lipid membranes leads to changes in bilayer structure, including the formation of an interdigitated phase. We have used polarized total-internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy (pTIRFM) to measure the order parameter for Texas Red DHPE incorporated in the ethanol-induced interdigitated phase (LβI) formed from ternary lipid mixtures comprising dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and egg sphingomyelin or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. These lipid mixtures have 3 co-existing phases in the presence of ethanol: liquid-ordered, liquid-disordered and LβI. pTIRFM using Texas Red DHPE shows a reversal in fluorescence contrast between the LβI phase and the surrounding disordered phase with changes in the polarization angle. The contrast reversal is due to changes in the orientation of the dye, and provides a rapid method to identify the LβI phase. The measured order parameters for the LβI phase are consistent with a highly ordered membrane environment, similar to a gel phase. An acyl-chain labeled BODIPY-FL-PC was also tested for pTIRFM studies of ethanol-treated bilayers; however, this probe is less useful since the order parameters of the interdigitated phase are consistent with orientations that are close to random, either due to local membrane disorder or to a mixture of extended and looping conformations in which the fluorophore is localized in the polar headgroup region of the bilayer. In summary, we demonstrate that order parameter measurements via pTIRFM using Texas Red-DHPE can rapidly identify the interdigitated phase in supported bilayers. We anticipate that this technique will aid further research in the effects of alcohols and other additives on membranes.

  1. Temperature dependence of spectral induced polarization data: experimental results and membrane polarization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairlein, Katharina; Bücker, Matthias; Hördt, Andreas; Hinze, Björn

    2016-04-01

    Spectral induced polarization measurements are affected by temperature variations due to a variety of temperature-dependent parameters that control the complex electrical conductivity. Most important is the influence of the ion mobility, which increases with increasing temperature. It is responsible for the increase of the conductivity of the fluid in the pores with temperature and influences the electrical double layer on the mineral surface. This work is based on laboratory measurements of 13 sandstone samples from different sources with different geological and petrophysical characteristics. We measured the complex impedance in a frequency range from 0.01 to 100 Hz and a temperature range from 0 to 40 °C. The main observation is a decrease of the characteristic time (defined by the inverse of the frequency, at which the phase shift is maximum) with increasing temperature. The strength of this decrease differs from one sample to another. The temperature dependence of the phase shift magnitude cannot easily be generalized, as it depends on the particular sample. The experimental findings suggest that neglecting the influence of temperature on complex conductivity may lead to significant errors when estimating hydraulic conductivity from relaxation time. We also simulate the temperature dependence with a theoretical model of membrane polarization and review some of the model properties, with an emphasis on the temperature dependence of the parameters. The model reproduces several features characterizing the measured data, including the temperature dependence of the characteristic times. Computed tomography and microscope images of the pore structure of three samples also allow us to associate differences in the geometrical parameters used in the modelling with pore scale parameters of the actual samples.

  2. ECUT: Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies program biocatalysis research activity. Potential membrane applications to biocatalyzed processes: Assessment of concentration polarization and membrane fouling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Separation and purification of the products of biocatalyzed fermentation processes, such as ethanol or butanol, consumes most of the process energy required. Since membrane systems require substantially less energy for separation than most alternatives (e.g., distillation) they have been suggested for separation or concentration of fermentation products. This report is a review of the effects of concentration polarization and membrane fouling for the principal membrane processes: microfiltration, ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, and electrodialysis including a discussion of potential problems relevant to separation of fermentation products. It was concluded that advanced membrane systems may result in significantly decreased energy consumption. However, because of the need to separate large amounts of water from much smaller amounts of product that may be more volatile than wate, it is not clear that membrane separations will necessarily be more efficient than alternative processes.

  3. REDUCTION OF CONCENTRATION POLARIZATION IN PERVAPORATION USING VIBRATING MEMBRANE MODULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A vibrating membrane module currently marketed for filtration applications was evaluated for the separation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous solutions by pervaporation. Preliminary screening experiments with three VOCs, four silicone membranes, and in the presenc...

  4. Membrane effects of lysozyme amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Kastorna, Anna; Trusova, Valeriya; Gorbenko, Galyna; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2012-04-01

    The influence of mature lysozyme fibrils on the structural and physical properties of model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixtures with cardiolipin (CL) (10 mol%) and cholesterol (Chol) (30 mol%) was studied using fluorescent probes DPH, pyrene, Laurdan and MBA. Analysis of pyrene fluorescence spectra along with the measurements of DPH fluorescence anisotropy revealed that the structure of hydrocarbon chains region of lipid bilayer is not affected by the fibrillar aggregates of lysozyme. In contrast, probing the membrane effects by Laurdan and MBA showed the rise of both the generalized polarization of Laurdan and the MBA fluorescence anisotropy, suggesting that amyloid protein induces reduction of bilayer hydration and increase of lipid packing in the interfacial region of model membranes.

  5. Electrodeposition of microparticles on polarized ion exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Verbich, S.V.; Ponomarev, M.I.; Grebenyuk, V.D.; Dukhin, S.S.

    1986-11-01

    The use of ion exchange membranes to extract microparticles from an aqueous solution is considered. The efficiency of removing negatively charged aerosil particles depends substantially on the nature of the membrane located at the anode. It has been established that besides an increase in the electric field intensity the principal factor ensuring an increase in the efficiency of purifying a solution by electrodeposition of microparticles on a membrane surface is a reduction in the flowrate relative to the membrane surface.

  6. Effects of double-layer polarization on ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Hainsworth, A H; Hladky, S B

    1987-01-01

    It has been proposed that changes in ionic strength will alter the shape of current-voltage relations for ion transport across a lipid membrane. To investigate this effect, we measured currents across glyceryl monooleate membranes at applied potentials between 10 and 300 mV using either gramicidin and 1 mM NaCl or valinomycin and 1 mM KCl. A bridge circuit with an integrator as null detector was used to separate the capacitative and ionic components of the current. The changes in the current-voltage relations when ionic strength is varied between 1 and 100 mM are compared with predictions of Gouy-Chapman theory for the effects of these variations on polarization of the electrical diffuse double-layer. Double-layer polarization accounts adequately for the changes observed using membranes made permeable by either gramicidin or valinomycin. PMID:2432953

  7. Effects of double-layer polarization on ion transport.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, A H; Hladky, S B

    1987-01-01

    It has been proposed that changes in ionic strength will alter the shape of current-voltage relations for ion transport across a lipid membrane. To investigate this effect, we measured currents across glyceryl monooleate membranes at applied potentials between 10 and 300 mV using either gramicidin and 1 mM NaCl or valinomycin and 1 mM KCl. A bridge circuit with an integrator as null detector was used to separate the capacitative and ionic components of the current. The changes in the current-voltage relations when ionic strength is varied between 1 and 100 mM are compared with predictions of Gouy-Chapman theory for the effects of these variations on polarization of the electrical diffuse double-layer. Double-layer polarization accounts adequately for the changes observed using membranes made permeable by either gramicidin or valinomycin.

  8. Monitoring the organization and dynamics of bovine hippocampal membranes utilizing Laurdan generalized polarization.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumi; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2005-08-01

    Organization and dynamics of cellular membranes in the nervous system are crucial for the function of neuronal membrane receptors. The lipid composition of neuronal cells is unique and has been correlated with the increased complexity in the organization of the nervous system during evolution. Previous work from our laboratory has established bovine hippocampal membranes as a convenient natural source for studying neuronal receptors such as the G-protein coupled serotonin1A receptor. In this paper, we have explored the organization and dynamics of bovine hippocampal membranes using the amphiphilic environment-sensitive fluorescent probe Laurdan. Our results show that the emission spectra of Laurdan display an additional red shifted peak as a function of increasing temperature in native as well as cholesterol-depleted membranes and liposomes made from lipid extracts of the native membrane. Interestingly, wavelength dependence of Laurdan generalized polarization (GP) in native membranes indicates the presence of an ordered gel-like phase at low temperatures, whereas characteristics of the liquid-ordered phase are observed at high temperatures. Similar experiments performed using cholesterol-depleted membranes show fluidization of the membrane with increasing cholesterol depletion. In addition, results from fluorescence polarization of DPH indicate that the hippocampal membrane is fairly ordered even at physiological temperature. The temperature dependence of Laurdan excitation GP provides a measure of the apparent thermal transition temperature and extent of cooperativity in these membranes. Analysis of time-resolved fluorescence measurements of Laurdan shows reduction in mean fluorescence lifetime with increasing temperature due to change in environmental polarity. These results constitute novel information on the dynamics of hippocampal membranes and its modulation by cholesterol depletion monitored using Laurdan fluorescence.

  9. Polarization effects in recoil-induced resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazebnyi, D. B.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the field polarization on the amplitude of recoil-induced resonances (RIRs) is considered for laser-cooled free atoms and for atoms in a working magneto-optical trap (MOT). For all closed dipole transitions, explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the polarization dependence of the resonance amplitudes within a perturbation theory. Optimal polarization conditions are found for the observation of resonances.

  10. Fluorescence generalized polarization of cell membranes: a two-photon scanning microscopy approach.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, W; So, P T; French, T; Gratton, E

    1996-01-01

    We use the lipophilic fluorescence probe Laurdan to study cell membranes. The generalized polarization (GP) of Laurdan-labeled cells contains useful information about membrane fluidity and polarity. A high GP is usually associated with low fluidity, low polarity, or high cholesterol content of the membranes, and a low GP is the opposite. We have combined the GP method and two-photon fluorescence microscopy to provide an alternative approach to study cell membranes. Using two-photon excitation in a conventional microscope offers great advantages for studying biological samples. These advantages include efficient background rejection, low photodamage, and improved depth discrimination. We performed GP measurements on mouse fibroblast cells and observed that both intensity and GP images are not spatially uniform. We tested for possible GP artifacts arising from cellular autofluorescence and lifetime quenching, using a procedure for background fluorescence subtraction and by direct lifetime measurements in the microscope. GP measured in a single cell displays a broad distribution, and the GP of 40 different cells grown on the same cover glass is also statistically distributed. The correlations between intensity and GP images were analyzed, and no monotonic dependence between the two was found. By digitally separating high and low GP values, we found that high GP values often associate with the regions of the plasma membrane and low GP values link with the nuclear membranes. Our results also show local GP variations within the plasma and nuclear membranes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:8789081

  11. Gradients of phosphatidylserine contribute to plasma membrane charge localization and cell polarity in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Armin; Minc, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Surface charges at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane may contribute to regulate the surface recruitment of key signaling factors. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an abundant charged lipid that may regulate charge distribution in different cell types. Here we characterize the subcellular distribution and function of PS in the rod-shaped, polarized fission yeast. We find that PS preferably accumulates at cell tips and defines a gradient of negative charges along the cell surface. This polarization depends on actin-mediated endocytosis and contributes to the subcellular partitioning of charged polarity-regulating Rho GTPases like Rho1 or Cdc42 in a protein charge–dependent manner. Cells depleted of PS have altered cell dimensions and fail to properly regulate growth from the second end, suggesting a role for PS and membrane charge in polarized cell growth. PMID:27852900

  12. Effects of climate change on polar bears.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Øystein; Aars, Jon; Born, Erik W

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we review the effects on polar bears of global warming that have already been observed, and try to evaluate what may happen to the polar bears in the future. Many researchers have predicted a wide range of impacts of climate change on polar bear demography and conditions. A predicted major reduction in sea ice habitat will reduce the availability of ice associated seals, the main prey of polar bears, and a loss and fragmentation of polar bear habitat will ultimately lead to large future reductions in most subpopulations. It is likely that polar bears will be lost from many areas where they are common today and also that the total population will change into a few more distinctly isolated populations.

  13. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan K.; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected 1H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins.

  14. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected (1)H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins.

  15. Lgl1 activation of rab10 promotes axonal membrane trafficking underlying neuronal polarization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Liu, Yang; Xu, Xiao-Hui; Deng, Cai-Yun; Wu, Kong-Yan; Zhu, Ji; Fu, Xiu-Qing; He, Miao; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2011-09-13

    Directed membrane trafficking is believed to be crucial for axon development during neuronal morphogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we report a role of Lgl1, the mammalian homolog of Drosophila tumor suppressor Lethal giant larvae, in controlling membrane trafficking underlying axonal growth. We find that Lgl1 is associated with plasmalemmal precursor vesicles and enriched in developing axons. Lgl1 upregulation promoted axonal growth, whereas downregulation attenuated it as well as directional membrane insertion. Interestingly, Lgl1 interacted with and activated Rab10, a small GTPase that mediates membrane protein trafficking, by releasing GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) from Rab10. Furthermore, Rab10 lies downstream of Lgl1 in axon development and directional membrane insertion. Finally, both Lgl1 and Rab10 are required for neocortical neuronal polarization in vivo. Thus, the Lgl1 regulation of Rab10 stimulates the trafficking of membrane precursor vesicles, whose fusion with the plasmalemma is crucial for axonal growth.

  16. Electrokinetic effects near a membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, David

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the electrostatic and electrokinetic contribution to the elastic moduli of a cell or artificial membrane placed in an electrolyte and driven by a DC electric field. The field drives ion currents across the membrane, through specific channels, pumps or natural pores. In steady state, charges accumulate in the Debye layers close to the membrane, modifying the membrane elastic moduli. We first study a model of a membrane of zero thickness, later generalizing this treatment to allow for a finite thickness and finite dielectric constant. Our results clarify and extend the results presented in [D. Lacoste, M. Cosentino Lagomarsino, and J. F. Joanny, Europhys. Lett., 77, 18006 (2007)], by providing a physical explanation for a destabilizing term proportional to kps^3 in the fluctuation spectrum, which we relate to a nonlinear (E^2) electro-kinetic effect called induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO). Recent studies of ICEO have focused on electrodes and polarizable particles, where an applied bulk field is perturbed by capacitive charging of the double layer and drives flow along the field axis toward surface protrusions; we predict similar ICEO flows around driven membranes, due to curvature-induced tangential fields within a non-equilibrium double layer, which hydrodynamically enhance protrusions.

  17. Molecular motors are differentially distributed on Golgi membranes from polarized epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Microtubules (MT) are required for the efficient transport of membranes from the trans-Golgi and for transcytosis of vesicles from the basolateral membrane to the apical cytoplasm in polarized epithelia. MTs in these cells are primarily oriented with their plus ends basally near the Golgi and their minus-ends in the apical cytoplasm. Here we report that isolated Golgi and Golgi-enriched membranes from intestinal epithelial cells possess the actin based motor myosin-I, the MT minus- end-directed motor cytoplasmic dynein and its in vitro motility activator dynactin (p150/Glued). The Golgi can be separated into stacks, possessing features of the Golgi cisternae, and small membranes enriched in the trans-Golgi network marker TGN 38/41. Whereas myosin-I is present on all membranes in the Golgi fraction, dynein is present only on the small membrane fraction. Dynein, like myosin-I, is associated with membranes as a cytoplasmic peripheral membrane protein. Dynein and myosin-I coassociate with membranes that bind to MTs and cross-link actin filaments and MTs in a nucleotide-dependent manner. We propose that cytoplasmic dynein moves Golgi membranes along MTs to the cell cortex where myosin-I provides local delivery through the actin- rich cytoskeleton to the apical membrane. PMID:8045931

  18. Ischemia induces partial loss of surface membrane polarity and accumulation of putative calcium ionophores.

    PubMed Central

    Molitoris, B A; Wilson, P D; Schrier, R W; Simon, F R

    1985-01-01

    To determine if ischemia induces alterations in renal proximal tubule surface membranes, brush border (BBM) and basolateral membranes (BLM) were isolated simultaneously from the same cortical homogenate after 50 min of renal pedicle clamping. Ischemia caused a selective decrease in the specific activity of BBM marker enzymes leucine aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase, but did not effect enrichment (15 times). Neither specific activity nor enrichment (10 times) of BLM NaK-ATPase was altered by ischemia. Contamination of BBM by intracellular organelles was also unchanged, but there was an increase in the specific activity (41.1 vs. 60.0, P less than 0.01) and enrichment (2.3 vs. 4.3, P less than 0.01) of NaK-ATPase in the ischemic BBM fraction. Ischemia increased BLM lysophosphatidylcholine (1.3 vs. 2.5%, P less than 0.05) and phosphatidic acid (0.4 vs. 1.3%, P less than 0.05). Ischemia also decreased BBM sphingomyelin (38.5 vs. 29.6%, P less than 0.01) and phosphatidylserine (16.1 vs. 11.4%, P less than 0.01), and increased phosphatidylcholine (17.2 vs. 29.7%, P less than 0.01), phosphatidylinositol (1.8 vs. 4.6%, P less than 0.01), and lysophosphatidylcholine (1.0 vs. 1.8%, P less than 0.05). The large changes in BBM phospholipids did not result from new phospholipid synthesis, since the specific activity (32P dpm/nmol Pi) of prelabeled individual and total phospholipids was unaltered by ischemia. We next evaluated if these changes were due to inability of ischemic cells to maintain surface membrane polarity. Cytochemical evaluation showed that while NaK-ATPase could be detected only in control BLM, specific deposits of reaction product were present in the BBM of ischemic kidneys. Furthermore, using continuous sucrose gradients, the enzymatic profile of ischemic BBM NaK-ATPase shifted away from ischemic BLM NaK-ATPase and toward the BBM enzymatic marker leucine aminopeptidase. Taken together, these data suggest that NaK-ATPase activity determined enzymatically

  19. DETERMINATION OF POLAR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN WATER BY MEMBRANE PERMEATE AND TRAP GC-MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel approach is presented combining semipermeable membranes with the accepted purge and trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology to produce a method of selectively extracting polar, volatile organic compounds from water, particularly those compounds not am...

  20. The young and happy marriage of membrane traffic and cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Barry J; Perez, Franck; Vaccari, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The ESF–EMBO meeting on ‘Cell Polarity and Membrane Traffic' took place in Poland in April 2012. It brought together scientists from two once separate fields and highlighted their emerging interdependence. The wealth of scientific insights and discoveries presented laid a path for future research. PMID:22777496

  1. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein-protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of 6-fold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement affect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces. PMID:25828256

  2. Psychological effects of polar expeditions.

    PubMed

    Palinkas, Lawrence A; Suedfeld, Peter

    2008-01-12

    Polar expeditions include treks and stays at summer camps or year-round research stations. People on such expeditions generally undergo psychological changes resulting from exposure to long periods of isolation and confinement, and the extreme physical environment. Symptoms include disturbed sleep, impaired cognitive ability, negative affect, and interpersonal tension and conflict. Seasonal occurrence of these symptoms suggests the existence of three overlapping syndromes: the winter-over syndrome, the polar T3 syndrome, and subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder. About 5% of people on expeditions meet DSM-IV or ICD criteria for psychiatric disorders. However, they also experience positive or so-called salutogenic outcomes resulting from successfully coping with stress and enhanced self-sufficiency, improved health, and personal growth. Prevention of pathogenic psychological outcomes is best accomplished by psychological and psychiatric screening procedures to select out unsuitable candidates, and by providing access to psychological support, including telephone counselling. Promotion of salutogenic experiences is best accomplished by screening for suitable personality traits, and training participants in individual coping strategies, group interaction, and team leadership.

  3. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S , we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d ≪√{S } but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d ≫√{S } , whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ , which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ . Moreover, σ scales as d for d ≪√{S } but saturates at √{kBT S /κ } for d ≫√{S } . In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions.

  4. Monitoring changes in membrane polarity, membrane integrity, and intracellular ion concentrations in Streptococcus pneumoniae using fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Emily A; Marks, Laura R; Roche-Håkansson, Hazeline; Håkansson, Anders P

    2014-02-17

    Membrane depolarization and ion fluxes are events that have been studied extensively in biological systems due to their ability to profoundly impact cellular functions, including energetics and signal transductions. While both fluorescent and electrophysiological methods, including electrode usage and patch-clamping, have been well developed for measuring these events in eukaryotic cells, methodology for measuring similar events in microorganisms have proven more challenging to develop given their small size in combination with the more complex outer surface of bacteria shielding the membrane. During our studies of death-initiation in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), we wanted to elucidate the role of membrane events, including changes in polarity, integrity, and intracellular ion concentrations. Searching the literature, we found that very few studies exist. Other investigators had monitored radioisotope uptake or equilibrium to measure ion fluxes and membrane potential and a limited number of studies, mostly in Gram-negative organisms, had seen some success using carbocyanine or oxonol fluorescent dyes to measure membrane potential, or loading bacteria with cell-permeant acetoxymethyl (AM) ester versions of ion-sensitive fluorescent indicator dyes. We therefore established and optimized protocols for measuring membrane potential, rupture, and ion-transport in the Gram-positive organism S. pneumoniae. We developed protocols using the bis-oxonol dye DiBAC4(3) and the cell-impermeant dye propidium iodide to measure membrane depolarization and rupture, respectively, as well as methods to optimally load the pneumococci with the AM esters of the ratiometric dyes Fura-2, PBFI, and BCECF to detect changes in intracellular concentrations of Ca(2+), K(+), and H(+), respectively, using a fluorescence-detection plate reader. These protocols are the first of their kind for the pneumococcus and the majority of these dyes have not been used in any other bacterial

  5. Monitoring Changes in Membrane Polarity, Membrane Integrity, and Intracellular Ion Concentrations in Streptococcus pneumoniae Using Fluorescent Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Roche-Håkansson, Hazeline; Håkansson, Anders P.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane depolarization and ion fluxes are events that have been studied extensively in biological systems due to their ability to profoundly impact cellular functions, including energetics and signal transductions. While both fluorescent and electrophysiological methods, including electrode usage and patch-clamping, have been well developed for measuring these events in eukaryotic cells, methodology for measuring similar events in microorganisms have proven more challenging to develop given their small size in combination with the more complex outer surface of bacteria shielding the membrane. During our studies of death-initiation in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), we wanted to elucidate the role of membrane events, including changes in polarity, integrity, and intracellular ion concentrations. Searching the literature, we found that very few studies exist. Other investigators had monitored radioisotope uptake or equilibrium to measure ion fluxes and membrane potential and a limited number of studies, mostly in Gram-negative organisms, had seen some success using carbocyanine or oxonol fluorescent dyes to measure membrane potential, or loading bacteria with cell-permeant acetoxymethyl (AM) ester versions of ion-sensitive fluorescent indicator dyes. We therefore established and optimized protocols for measuring membrane potential, rupture, and ion-transport in the Gram-positive organism S. pneumoniae. We developed protocols using the bis-oxonol dye DiBAC4(3) and the cell-impermeant dye propidium iodide to measure membrane depolarization and rupture, respectively, as well as methods to optimally load the pneumococci with the AM esters of the ratiometric dyes Fura-2, PBFI, and BCECF to detect changes in intracellular concentrations of Ca2+, K+, and H+, respectively, using a fluorescence-detection plate reader. These protocols are the first of their kind for the pneumococcus and the majority of these dyes have not been used in any other bacterial species

  6. The "mirror" estimate: an intuitive predictor of membrane polarization during extracellular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Joucla, Sébastien; Yvert, Blaise

    2009-05-06

    Achieving controlled extracellular microstimulation of the central nervous system requires understanding the membrane response of a neuron to an applied electric field. The "activating function" has been proposed as an intuitive predictor of membrane polarization during stimulation, but subsequent literature raised several limitations of this estimate. In this study, we show that, depending on the space constant lambda, the steady-state solution to the passive cable equation is theoretically well approximated by either the activating function when lambda is small, or the "mirror" image of the extracellular potential when lambda is large. Using simulations, we then explore the respective domain of both estimates as a function of lambda, stimulus duration, fiber length, and electrode-fiber distance. For realistic lambda (>50-100 microm), the mirror estimate is the best predictor for either long electrode-fiber distances or short distances (<20-30 microm) when stimulus durations exceed a few tens of microseconds. For intermediate distances, the mirror estimate is all the more valid that the stimulus duration is long and the fiber is short. We also illustrate that this estimate correctly predicts the steady-state membrane polarization of complex central nervous system arborizations. In conclusion, the mirror estimate can often be preferred to the activating function to intuitively predict membrane polarization during extracellular stimulation.

  7. Analysis of Exocyst Subunit EXO70 Family Reveals Distinct Membrane Polar Domains in Tobacco Pollen Tubes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Šantrůček, Jiří; Vukašinović, Nemanja

    2017-01-01

    The vesicle-tethering complex exocyst is one of the crucial cell polarity regulators. The EXO70 subunit is required for the targeting of the complex and is represented by many isoforms in angiosperm plant cells. This diversity could be partly responsible for the establishment and maintenance of membrane domains with different composition. To address this hypothesis, we employed the growing pollen tube, a well-established cell polarity model system, and performed large-scale expression, localization, and functional analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) EXO70 isoforms. Various isoforms localized to different regions of the pollen tube plasma membrane, apical vesicle-rich inverted cone region, nucleus, and cytoplasm. The overexpression of major pollen-expressed EXO70 isoforms resulted in growth arrest and characteristic phenotypic deviations of tip swelling and apical invaginations. NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 occupied two distinct and mutually exclusive plasma membrane domains. Both isoforms partly colocalized with the exocyst subunit NtSEC3a at the plasma membrane, possibly forming different exocyst complex subpopulations. NtEXO70A1a localized to the small area previously characterized as the site of exocytosis in the tobacco pollen tube, while NtEXO70B1 surprisingly colocalized with the zone of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Both NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 colocalized to different degrees with markers for the anionic signaling phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidic acid. In contrast, members of the EXO70 C class, which are specifically expressed in tip-growing cells, exhibited exocytosis-related functional effects in pollen tubes despite the absence of apparent plasma membrane localization. Taken together, our data support the existence of multiple membrane-trafficking domains regulated by different EXO70-containing exocyst complexes within a single cell. PMID:28082718

  8. The "Polar Light Sign" is a useful tool to detect discrete membranous supravalvular mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Christine; Haas, Nikolaus A; Habash, Sheeraz; Hanslik, Andreas; Kececioglu, Deniz; Sandica, Eugen; Laser, Kai-Thorsten

    2015-02-01

    Mitral valve stenosis caused by a discrete supravalvular membrane is a rare congenital malformation haemodynamically leading to significant mitral valve stenosis. When the supravalvular mitral stenosis consists of a discrete supravalvular membrane adherent to the mitral valve, it is usually not clearly detectable by routine echocardiography. We report about the typical echocardiographic finding in three young patients with this rare form of a discrete membranous supravalvular stenosis caused by a membrane adherent to the mitral valve. These cases present a typical echocardiographic feature in colour Doppler generated by the pathognomonic supramitral flow acceleration. Whereas typical supravalvular mitral stenosis caused by cor triatriatum or a clearly visible supravalvular ring is easily detectable by echocardiography, a discrete supravalvular membrane adjacent to the mitral valve leaflets resembling valvular mitral stenosis is difficult to differentiate by routine echocardiography. In our opinion, this colour phenomenon does resemble the visual impression of polar lights in the northern hemisphere; owing to its typical appearance, it may therefore be named as "Polar Light Sign". This phenomenon may help to detect this anatomical entity by echocardiography in time and therefore improve the prognosis for repair.

  9. Beyond polarity: functional membrane domains in astrocytes and Müller cells.

    PubMed

    Derouiche, Amin; Pannicke, Thomas; Haseleu, Julia; Blaess, Sandra; Grosche, Jens; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Various ependymoglial cells display varying degrees of process specialization, in particular processes contacting mesenchymal borders (pia, blood vessels, vitreous body), or those lining the ventricular surface. Within the neuropil, glial morphology, cellular contacts, and interaction partners are complex. It appears that glial processes contacting neurons, specific parts of neurons, or mesenchymal or ventricular borders are characterized by specialized membranes. We propose a concept of membrane domains in addition to the existing concept of ependymoglial polarity. Such membrane domains are equipped with certain membrane-bound proteins, enabling them to function in their specific environment. This review focuses on Müller cells and astrocytes and discusses exemplary the localization of established glial markers in membrane domains. We distinguish three functional glial membrane domains based on their typical molecular arrangement. The domain of the endfoot specifically displays the complex of dystrophin-associated proteins, aquaporin 4 and the potassium channel Kir4.1. We show that the domain of microvilli and the peripheral glial process in the Müller cell share the presence of ezrin, as do peripheral astrocyte processes. As a third domain, the Müller cell has peripheral glial processes related to a specific subtype of synapse. Although many details remain to be studied, the idea of glial membrane domains may permit new insights into glial function and pathology.

  10. The effect of polar caps on obliquity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, B. L.

    1993-01-01

    Rubincam has shown that the Martian obliquity is dependent on the seasonal polar caps. In particular, Rubincam analytically derived this dependence and showed that the change in obliquity is directly proportional to the seasonal polar cap mass. Rubincam concludes that seasonal friction does not appear to have changed Mars' climate significantly. Using a computer model for the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, Haberle et al. have made a convincing case for the possibility of huge polar caps, about 10 times the mass of the current polar caps, that exist for a significant fraction of the planet's history. Since Rubincam showed that the effect of seasonal friction on obliquity is directly proportional to polar cap mass, a scenario with a ten-fold increase in polar cap mass over a significant fraction of the planet's history would result in a secular increase in Mars' obliquity of perhaps 10 degrees. Hence, the Rubincam conclusion of an insignificant contribution to Mars' climate by seasonal friction may be incorrect. Furthermore, if seasonal friction is an important consideration in the obliquity of Mars, this would significantly alter the predictions of past obliquity.

  11. Organization of an actin filament-membrane complex. Filament polarity and membrane attachment in the microvilli of intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The association of actin filaments with membranes is now recognized as an important parameter in the motility of nonmuscle cells. We have investigated the organization of one of the most extensive and highly ordered actin filament-membrane complexes in nature, the brush border of intestinal epithelial cells. Through the analysis of isolated, demembranated brush borders decorated with the myosin subfragment, S1, we have determined that all the microvillar actin filaments have the same polarity. The S1 arrowhead complexes point away from the site of attachment of actin filaments at the apical tip of the microvillar membrane. In addition to the end-on attachment of actin filaments at the tip of the microvillus, these filaments are also connected to the plasma membrane all along their lengths by periodic (33 nm) cross bridges. These bridges were best observed in isolated brush borders incubated in high concentrations of Mg++. Their visibility is attributed to the induction of actin paracrystals in the filament bundles of the microvilli. Finally, we present evidence for the presence of myosinlike filaments in the terminal web region of the brush border. A model for the functional organization of actin and myosin in the brush border is presented. PMID:1202021

  12. Optical polarizer based on the mechanical effect of light.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hao; Kong, Cui; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2016-09-15

    Based on the recent experimental progress in chip-scale silicon photonics, a nontrivial polarizing effect arising from the mechanical effect of light is present in an optomechanical crystal, which enables a new nanophotonic polarizer with excellent functionality. Unlike previously reported optical polarizers, the polarizer proposed here can be adjusted rapidly by tuning polarization and intensity of the control field and may enable on-chip optical control of polarization management with remarkable applications, due to the improvement of nanofabrication techniques.

  13. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Membrane Interactions: Effects of Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxue; St Clair, Johnna R; London, Erwin; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2017-01-17

    Amyloid formation by islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) contributes to β-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Perturbation of the β-cell membrane may contribute to IAPP-induced toxicity. We examine the effects of lipid composition, salt, and buffer on IAPP amyloid formation and on the ability of IAPP to induce leakage of model membranes. Even low levels of anionic lipids promote amyloid formation and membrane permeabilization. Increasing the percentage of the anionic lipids, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (POPS) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho(1'-rac-glycerol), enhances the rate of amyloid formation and increases the level of membrane permeabilization. The choice of zwitterionic lipid has no noticeable effect on membrane-catalyzed amyloid formation but in most cases affects leakage, which tends to decrease in the following order: 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine > 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine > sphingomyelin. Uncharged lipids that increase the level of membrane order weaken the ability of IAPP to induce leakage. Leakage is due predominately to pore formation rather than complete disruption of the vesicles under the conditions used in these studies. Cholesterol at or below physiological levels significantly reduces the rate of vesicle-catalyzed IAPP amyloid formation and decreases the susceptibility to IAPP-induced leakage. The effects of cholesterol on amyloid formation are masked by 25 mol % POPS. Overall, there is a strong inverse correlation between the time to form amyloid and the extent of vesicle leakage. NaCl reduces the rate of membrane-catalyzed amyloid formation by anionic vesicles, but accelerates amyloid formation in solution. The implications for IAPP membrane interactions are discussed, as is the possibility that the loss of phosphatidylserine asymmetry enhances IAPP amyloid formation and membrane damage in vivo via a positive feedback loop.

  14. Polarization Analysis Equipment in SANS-J-II: Study of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane for Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yohei; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Putra, Ananda; Koizumi, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yoshifumi; Oku, Takayuki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi

    In small angle neutron scattering spectrometer, SANS-J-II at Japan Research Reactor No. 3 (JRR-3), a polarization analysis setup has been equipped, which is composed of transmission-type supermirror polarizer, radial-bender-type supermirror analyzer, π flipper, and solenoids for generating guide magnetic field. This setup was applied to the structural study of polymer electrolyte membrane, Nafion under water-swollen state. The sample is known to exhibit several characteristic peaks at wide angle region, which is related to water transporting channels. By use of polarization analysis technique, the coherent and incoherent contributions were successfully separated. Consequently, we obtained reliable information about decaying power law of ionic cluster peak and the shape of the broad peak, relating to ordering with short distance (5.6 Å).

  15. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    PubMed Central

    Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Duan, Yong; Wang, Junmei

    2014-01-01

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component—polarization energy—and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. PMID:21828594

  16. Effects of small halocarbon molecules on reverse osmosis membrane performance

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.C.; Glater, J.; Neethling, J.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The reverse osmosis (RO) membrane industry has long been concerned with problems of performance decline due to fouling. Colloidal and biological fouling have been discussed to some extent in the literature but little is known about the effect of small organic molecules on membrane performance. The work reported in this paper involved controlled laboratory experiments with three small halocarbons and three different types of commercial RO membranes. The compounds used were CHCl{sub 3}, CHBr{sub 3} and CCl{sub 4}. The first two represent typical small and large THM's. Carbon tetrachloride was selected as a non-polar model compound. Membranes representing three different polymer systems were provided by E. I. du Pont Inc.

  17. The polarizing effect of arousal on negotiation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ashley D; Curhan, Jared R

    2013-10-01

    In this research, we examined the impact of physiological arousal on negotiation outcomes. Conventional wisdom and the prescriptive literature suggest that arousal should be minimized given its negative effect on negotiations, whereas prior research on misattribution of arousal suggests that arousal might polarize outcomes, either negatively or positively. In two experiments, we manipulated arousal and measured its effect on subjective and objective negotiation outcomes. Our results support the polarization effect. When participants had negative prior attitudes toward negotiation, arousal had a detrimental effect on outcomes, whereas when participants had positive prior attitudes toward negotiation, arousal had a beneficial effect on outcomes. These effects occurred because of the construal of arousal as negative or positive affect, respectively. Our findings have important implications not only for negotiation, but also for research on misattribution of arousal, which previously has focused on the target of evaluation, in contrast to the current research, which focused on the critical role of the perceiver.

  18. One-step extraction of polar drugs from plasma by parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction.

    PubMed

    Pilařová, Veronika; Sultani, Mumtaz; Ask, Kristine Skoglund; Nováková, Lucie; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2017-02-01

    The new microextraction technique named parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction (PALME) was introduced as an alternative approach to liquid-liquid extraction of charged analytes from aqueous samples. The concept is based on extraction of analytes across a supported liquid membrane sustained in the pores of a thin polymeric membrane, a well-known extraction principle also used in hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME). However, the new PALME technique offers a more user-friendly setup in which the supported liquid membrane is incorporated in a 96 well plate system. Thus, high-throughput is achievable, in addition to the green chemistry offered by using PALME. The consumption of organic solvent is minimized to 3-5μL per sample. With a sample volume of 250μL and acceptor solution volume of 50μL, a maximal enrichment factor of five is achievable. Based on these parameters, a new method for extraction of polar basic drugs was developed in the present work. The basic drugs hydralazine, ephedrine, metaraminol, salbutamol, and cimetidine were used as model analytes, and were extracted from alkalized human plasma into an aqueous solution via the supported liquid membrane. The extraction was promoted by a carrier dissolved in the membrane, creating a temporary ion-pair complex between the hydrophilic drug and the carrier. As the model analytes were extracted directly into an aqueous solution, there was no need for evaporation of the extract before injection into LC-MS. Hence, the sample preparation is performed in one step. With optimized conditions, the extraction recoveries were in the range 50-89% from human plasma after 45min extraction. The data from the method evaluation were satisfactory and in line with current guidelines, and revealed an extraction method with substantial potential for high throughput bioanalysis of polar basic drugs.

  19. Polarization effects in cutaneous autofluorescent spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Jeliazkova, Al.; Genova, Ts.; Pavlova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    Used polarized light for fluorescence excitation one could obtain response related to the anisotropy features of extracellular matrix. The fluorophore anisotropy is attenuated during lesions' growth and level of such decrease could be correlated with the stage of tumor development. Our preliminary investigations are based on in vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from healthy volunteers skin on different ages and from different anatomical places using linear polarizer and analyzer for excitation and emission light detected. Measurements were made using spectrofluorimeter FluoroLog 3 (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) with fiber-optic probe in steady-state regime using excitation in the region of 280-440 nm. Three different situations were evaluated and corresponding excitation-emission matrices were developed - with parallel and perpendicular positions for linear polarizer and analyzer, and without polarization of excitation and fluorescence light detected from a forearm skin surface. The fluorescence spectra obtained reveal differences in spectral intensity, related to general attenuation, due to filtering effects of used polarizer/analyzer couple. Significant spectral shape changes were observed for the complex autofluorescence signal detected, which correlated with collagen and protein cross-links fluorescence, that could be addressed to the tissue extracellular matrix and general condition of the skin investigated, due to morphological destruction during lesions' growth. A correlation between volunteers' age and the fluorescence spectra detected was observed during our measurements. Our next step is to increase developed initial database and to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescent polarization effects and found if they are significantly altered from normal skin to cancerous state of the tissue, this way to develop a non-invasive diagnostic tool for dermatological practice.

  20. Effect of membrane tension on the physical properties of DOPC lipid bilayer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, A. Srinivas; Warshaviak, Dora Toledo; Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a dioleoylphosphocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer were performed to explore its mechanosensitivity. Variations in the bilayer properties, such as area per lipid, volume, thickness, hydration depth (HD), hydration thickness (HT), lateral diffusion coefficient, and changes in lipid structural order were computed in the membrane tension range 0 to 15 dyn/cm. We determined that an increase in membrane tension results in a decrease in the bilayer thickness and HD of ∼5% and ∼5.7% respectively, whereas area per lipid, volume, and HT/HD increased by 6.8%, 2.4%, and 5% respectively. The changes in lipid conformation and orientation were characterized using orientational (S2) and deuterium (SCD) order parameters. Upon increase of membrane tension both order parameters indicated an increase in lipid disorder by 10– 20%, mostly in the tail end region of the hydrophobic chains. The effect of membrane tension on lipid lateral diffusion in the DOPC bilayer was analyzed on three different time scales corresponding to inertial motion, anomalous diffusion and normal diffusion. The results showed that lateral diffusion of lipid molecules is anomalous in nature due to the non-exponential distribution of waiting times. The anomalous and normal diffusion coefficients increased by 20% and 52% when the membrane tension changed from 0 to 15 dyn/cm, respectively. In conclusion, our studies showed that membrane tension causes relatively significant changes in the area per lipid, volume, polarity, membrane thickness, and fluidity of the membrane suggesting multiple mechanisms by which mechanical perturbation of the membrane could trigger mechanosensitive response in cells. PMID:22588133

  1. Reaction Fields in the Environment of Fluorescent Probes: Polarity Profiles in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent probes in biological systems are sensitive to environmental polarity by virtue of their response to the reaction field created by polarization of the dielectric medium. Classically, fluorophore solvatochromism is analyzed in terms of the Lippert equation and later variants, all of which rely upon the original reaction field of Onsager. A recent survey of the solvent dependence of EPR spin-label probes, which are responsive solely to the reaction field in the ground state without the complication of excited states, shows that the reaction field of Block and Walker performs best in describing the polarity dependence. In this model, the step-function transition to the bulk dielectric medium used by Onsager is replaced by a graded transition. Analysis of the Stokes shifts for representative fluorescent membrane probes, such as PRODAN, DANSYL, and anthroyl fatty acid, reveals that, of several different reaction fields (including that of Onsager), the Block-Walker model best describes the dependence on solvent dielectric constant and refractive index for the different probes simultaneously. This is after full allowance is made for all contributions involving polarizability of the fluorophore, a point that is frequently neglected or treated incorrectly in studies using biological fluorescent probes. By using the full range of polar and apolar solvents, it is then possible to establish a common reference for the polarity dependence of different fluorophores and to relate this also to the polarity dependence of biologically relevant spin-label EPR probes. An important application is calibration of the transmembrane polarity profile recorded by fluorescent probes in terms of the high-resolution profile obtained from site-specifically spin-labeled lipid chains. PMID:19348740

  2. Reaction fields in the environment of fluorescent probes: polarity profiles in membranes.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Derek

    2009-04-08

    Fluorescent probes in biological systems are sensitive to environmental polarity by virtue of their response to the reaction field created by polarization of the dielectric medium. Classically, fluorophore solvatochromism is analyzed in terms of the Lippert equation and later variants, all of which rely upon the original reaction field of Onsager. A recent survey of the solvent dependence of EPR spin-label probes, which are responsive solely to the reaction field in the ground state without the complication of excited states, shows that the reaction field of Block and Walker performs best in describing the polarity dependence. In this model, the step-function transition to the bulk dielectric medium used by Onsager is replaced by a graded transition. Analysis of the Stokes shifts for representative fluorescent membrane probes, such as PRODAN, DANSYL, and anthroyl fatty acid, reveals that, of several different reaction fields (including that of Onsager), the Block-Walker model best describes the dependence on solvent dielectric constant and refractive index for the different probes simultaneously. This is after full allowance is made for all contributions involving polarizability of the fluorophore, a point that is frequently neglected or treated incorrectly in studies using biological fluorescent probes. By using the full range of polar and apolar solvents, it is then possible to establish a common reference for the polarity dependence of different fluorophores and to relate this also to the polarity dependence of biologically relevant spin-label EPR probes. An important application is calibration of the transmembrane polarity profile recorded by fluorescent probes in terms of the high-resolution profile obtained from site-specifically spin-labeled lipid chains.

  3. Treatment of high salinity brines by direct contact membrane distillation: Effect of membrane characteristics and salinity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Guan, Yunshan; Cheng, Fangqin; Liu, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) is one of the attractive technologies for high salinity brine treatment. In this study, four polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes were examined in treating highly concentrated salt solutions. Results showed that non-supported membranes generally have a higher overall mass transfer coefficient but porosity seems to be the most important parameter controlling membrane flux and thermal efficiency. Supported membranes with large thickness had relatively higher thermal efficiency than small thickness. This can be attributed to their reduced heat loss through heat condition. In addition, KCl, NaCl and MgCl2 solutions showed distinct trends over flux decline at high salt concentrations (⩾2.0M). The difference in flux was largely due to the discrepancy in water activities of these solutions (KCl>NaCl>MgCl2). However, the effect of viscosity on permeate flux could not be neglected for MgCl2 at high salt concentrations as the suddenly increased viscosity could lead to serious temperature polarization. This study indicates that membrane distillation is a promising technology for high salinity brine treatment.

  4. Polarization proximity effect in isolator crystal pairs.

    PubMed

    Linzon, Y; Ferrera, M; Razzari, L; Pignolet, A; Morandotti, R

    2008-12-01

    We experimentally study the polarization dynamics (orientation and ellipticity) of near-infrared light transmitted through magneto-optical yttrium iron garnet isolator crystal pairs using a modified balanced detection scheme. When the pair separation is in the submillimeter range, we observed a proximity effect in which the saturation field is reduced by up to 20%. One-dimensional calculations suggest that the proximity effect originates from magnetostatic interactions between the dipole moments of the isolator crystals.

  5. Myosin light chain kinase regulates cell polarization independently of membrane tension or Rho kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sunny S.; Diz-Muñoz, Alba; Weiner, Orion D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells polarize to a single front and rear to achieve rapid actin-based motility, but the mechanisms preventing the formation of multiple fronts are unclear. We developed embryonic zebrafish keratocytes as a model system for investigating establishment of a single axis. We observed that, although keratocytes from 2 d postfertilization (dpf) embryos resembled canonical fan-shaped keratocytes, keratocytes from 4 dpf embryos often formed multiple protrusions despite unchanged membrane tension. Using genomic, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we determined that the multiple-protrusion phenotype was primarily due to increased myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression. MLCK activity influences cell polarity by increasing myosin accumulation in lamellipodia, which locally decreases protrusion lifetime, limiting lamellipodial size and allowing for multiple protrusions to coexist within the context of membrane tension limiting protrusion globally. In contrast, Rho kinase (ROCK) regulates myosin accumulation at the cell rear and does not determine protrusion size. These results suggest a novel MLCK-specific mechanism for controlling cell polarity via regulation of myosin activity in protrusions. PMID:25918227

  6. Membrane effects of ropivacaine compared with those of bupivacaine and mepivacaine.

    PubMed

    Mizogami, Maki; Tsuchiya, Hironori; Harada, Jun

    2002-08-01

    We compared the effects of ropivacaine, bupivacaine and mepivacaine on membrane lipids in an attempt to determine the anaesthetic mechanism of ropivacaine with structure-dependent potency. The membrane effects were determined by measuring anaesthetic-induced changes in the phase transition temperature and the fluorescence polarization of liposomal membranes prepared with cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine. Bupivacaine, ropivacaine and mepivacaine depressed the membrane lipid phase transition and decreased the polarization of liposomal membranes at 0.0625-1.0 mg/mL, indicating that these anaesthetics fluidize membranes at concentrations lower than those in clinical use. Ropivacaine and bupivacaine were effective in fluidizing the membrane core rather than the membrane surface, whereas mepivacaine was a membrane fluidizer acting equally on both regions. In the comparison of membrane fluidization at an equimolar concentration (3.0 mmol/L), ropivacaine was found to be less potent than bupivacaine and more potent than mepivacaine. This membrane-fluidizing potency was also consistent with the hydrophobic properties of these substances evaluated by reversed-phase chromatography. Structure-dependent membrane fluidization associating with hydrophobicity appears to underlie the local anaesthetic effect of ropivacaine as well as those of bupivacaine and mepivacaine.

  7. Different sets of ER-resident J-proteins regulate distinct polar nuclear-membrane fusion events in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Masaya; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Angiosperm female gametophytes contain a central cell with two polar nuclei. In many species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, the polar nuclei fuse during female gametogenesis. We previously showed that BiP, an Hsp70 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), was essential for membrane fusion during female gametogenesis. Hsp70 function requires partner proteins for full activity. J-domain containing proteins (J-proteins) are the major Hsp70 functional partners. A. thaliana ER contains three soluble J-proteins, AtERdj3A, AtERdj3B, and AtP58(IPK). Here, we analyzed mutants of these proteins and determined that double-mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A or AtERdj3B were defective in polar nuclear fusion. Electron microscopy analysis identified that polar nuclei were in close contact, but no membrane fusion occurred in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A. The polar nuclear outer membrane appeared to be connected via the ER remaining at the inner unfused membrane in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3B. These results indicate that ER-resident J-proteins, AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3A and AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3B, function at distinct steps of polar nuclear-membrane fusion. Similar to the bip1 bip2 double mutant female gametophytes, the aterdj3a atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the outer polar nuclear membrane displayed aberrant endosperm proliferation after fertilization with wild-type pollen. However, endosperm proliferated normally after fertilization of the aterdj3b atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the inner membrane. Our results indicate that the polar nuclear fusion defect itself does not cause an endosperm proliferation defect.

  8. The dependence of induced polarization on fluid salinity and pH, studied with an extended model of membrane polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hördt, Andreas; Bairlein, Katharina; Bielefeld, Anja; Bücker, Matthias; Kuhn, Eva; Nordsiek, Sven; Stebner, Hermann

    2016-12-01

    The estimation of hydraulic parameters from spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements is difficult partly because the electrical impedance of sediments depends on several parameters that are not related to the texture. Important parameters that influence the spectral response are fluid salinity and pH. In order to understand the behaviour of SIP spectra from a mechanistic point of view, we carry out simulations with a membrane polarization model. The geometry consists of a sequence of wide and narrow pores with finite radii. The charge distribution at the mineral surface is described by a triple layer model, characterized by the zeta potential and the partition coefficient. We extended an existing model by incorporating known dependencies of the zeta potential and the partition coefficient on fluid salinity and pH. Our simulation results predict a decrease of the maximum phase shift of the complex electrical conductivity with increasing salinity, consistent with experimental observations. For very small pore radii, the phase shift may also show the opposite behaviour and increase with salinity. The imaginary conductivity at 1 Hz increases with increasing salinity, followed by a peak and a decrease at high salinities. The fact that our model predicts a decrease of the imaginary conductivity at high salinities is particularly important, because strong experimental evidence was recently found for such a decrease, which was theoretically unexplained so far. Both the maximum phase shift and the imaginary conductivity at 1 Hz decrease when pH decreases. The reason is that at low pH, the zeta potential and the partition coefficient both decrease, corresponding to a smaller charge density at the mineral surface, resulting in a weaker impact of the electrical double layer. The few existing experimental studies on pH dependence are qualitatively consistent with our simulation results.

  9. Radiation effects on bovine taste bud membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shatzman, A.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1982-11-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced taste loss, the effects of radiation on preparations of enriched bovine taste bud membranes were studied. Taste buds containing circumvallate papilae, and surrounding control epithelial tissues devoid of taste buds, were obtained from steers and given radiation doses of 0-7000 cGy (rad). Tissue fractions were isolated into membrane-enriched and heterogeneous components using differential and sucrose gradient centrifugation of tissue homogenates. The yield of membranes, as measured by protein content in the buoyant membrane-enriched fractions, was reduced in quantity with increasing radiation dose. The relation between radiation dose and membrane quantity in membrane-enriched fractions could be fit by a simple exponential model with taste bud-derived membranes twice as radiosensitive as membranes from control epithelial tissue. Binding of sucrose, sodium, and acetate and fluoride stimulation of adenylate cyclase were nearly identical in both irradiated and nonirradiated intact membranes. Radiation had no effect on fractions of heterogeneous components. While it is not clear what changes are occurring in enriched taste cell membranes, damage to membranes may play an important role in the taste loss observed in patients following radiotherapy.

  10. Assigning membrane binding geometry of cytochrome C by polarized light spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Caesar, Christina E B; Esbjörner, Elin K; Lincoln, Per; Nordén, Bengt

    2009-04-22

    In this work we demonstrate how polarized light absorption spectroscopy (linear dichroism (LD)) analysis of the peptide ultraviolet-visible spectrum of a membrane-associated protein (cytochrome (cyt) c) allows orientation and structure to be assessed with quite high accuracy in a native membrane environment that can be systematically varied with respect to lipid composition. Cyt c binds strongly to negatively charged lipid bilayers with a distinct orientation in which its alpha-helical segments are on average parallel to the membrane surface. Further information is provided by the LD of the pi-pi( *) transitions of the heme porphyrin and transitions of aromatic residues, mainly a single tryptophan. A good correlation with NMR data was found, and combining NMR structural data with LD angular data allowed the whole protein to be docked to the lipid membrane. When the redox state of cyt c was changed, distinct variations in the LD spectrum of the heme Soret band were seen corresponding to changes in electronic transition energies; however, no significant change in the overall protein orientation or structure was observed. Cyt c is known to interact in a specific manner with the doubly negatively charged lipid cardiolipin, and incorporation of this lipid into the membrane at physiologically relevant levels was indeed found to affect the protein orientation and its alpha-helical content. The detail in which cyt c binding is described in this study shows the potential of LD spectroscopy using shear-deformed lipid vesicles as a new methodology for exploring membrane protein structure and orientation.

  11. Selective anchoring in the specific plasma membrane domain: a role in epithelial cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the role of restrictions to lateral mobility in the segregation of proteins to apical and basolateral domains of MDCK epithelial cells. Radioimmunoassay and semiquantitative video analysis of immunofluorescence on frozen sections showed that one apical and three basolateral glycoproteins, defined by monoclonal antibodies and binding of beta-2-microglobulin, were incompletely extracted with 0.5% Triton X-100 in a buffer that preserves the cortical cytoskeleton (Fey, E. G., K. M. Wan, and S. Penman. 1984. J. Cell Biol. 98:1973-1984; Nelson, W. T. and P. J. Veshnock. 1986. J. Cell Biol. 103:1751-1766). The marker proteins were preferentially extracted from the "incorrect" domain (i.e., the apical domain for a basolateral marker), indicating that the cytoskeletal anchoring was most effective on the "correct" domain. The two basolateral markers were unpolarized and almost completely extractable in cells prevented from establishing cell-cell contacts by incubation in low Ca++ medium, while an apical marker was only extracted from the basal surface under the same conditions. Procedures were developed to apply fluorescent probes to either the apical or the basolateral surface of live cells grown on native collagen gels. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of predominantly basolateral antigens showed a large percent of cells (28- 52%) with no recoverable fluorescence on the basal domain but normal fluorescence recovery on the apical surface of most cells (92-100%). Diffusion coefficients in cells with normal fluorescence recovery were in the order of 1.1 x 10(-9) cm2/s in the apical domain and 0.6-0.9 x 10(-9) cm2/s in the basal surface, but the difference was not significant. The data from both techniques indicate (a) the existence of mobile and immobile protein fractions in both plasma membrane domains, and (b) that linkage to a domain specific submembrane cytoskeleton plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial cell surface polarity

  12. Improvement the equation of polarization curve of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at different channel geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaee, I.

    2015-12-01

    The polarization curve of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is an important parameter which is expressed by the change of voltage and current of it that indicates the performance of the cell. The voltage of the cell is a function of temperature that is expressed by the Nernst equation and the equation of voltage losses such as activation loss, ohmic loss and concentration loss. In this study a new correlation for polarization curve is obtained that it in addition to temperature, a new parameter is involved in it that shows the effect of the geometry of cross-section area of channels. For this purpose three PEM fuel cells with different channels geometry of rectangular, elliptical and triangular have constructed. The active area of each cell is 25 cm2 that its weight is 1300 g. The material of the gas diffusion layer is carbon clothes, the membrane is nafion 117 and the catalyst layer is a plane with 0.004 g/cm2 platinum. Also a test bench designed and constructed for testing the cell and a series of experiments are carried out to investigate the influence of the geometry of the cell on performance of the cell. The results show that when the geometry of channel is rectangular the performance of the cell is better than the triangular and elliptical channel.

  13. The Influence of Non Polar and Polar Molecules in Mouse Motile Cells Membranes and Pure Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-Valdez, Francisco J.; Forero-Quintero, Linda S.; Zapata-Morin, Patricio A.; Costas, Miguel; Chavez-Reyes, Arturo; Ruiz-Suárez, Jesús C.

    2013-01-01

    We report an experimental study of mouse sperm motility that shows chief aspects characteristic of neurons: the anesthetic (produced by tetracaine) and excitatory (produced by either caffeine or calcium) effects and their antagonic action. While tetracaine inhibits sperm motility and caffeine has an excitatory action, the combination of these two substances balance the effects, producing a motility quite similar to that of control cells. We also study the effects of these agents (anesthetic and excitatory) on the melting points of pure lipid liposomes constituted by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA). Tetracaine induces a large fluidization of the membrane, shifting the liposomes melting transition temperature to much lower values. The effect of caffeine is null, but its addition to tetracaine-doped liposomes greatly screen the fluidization effect. A high calcium concentration stiffens pure lipid membranes and strongly reduces the effect of tetracaine. Molecular Dynamics Simulations are performed to further understand our experimental findings at the molecular level. We find a strong correlation between the effect of antagonic molecules that could explain how the mechanical properties suitable for normal cell functioning are affected and recovered. PMID:23565149

  14. Plasma Membrane Polarity and Compartmentalization are Established Before Cellularization in the Fly Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Mavrakis, Manos; Rikhy, Richa; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Summary Patterning in the Drosophila embryo requires local activation and dynamics of proteins in the plasma membrane (PM). We used in vivo fluorescence imaging to characterize the organization and diffusional properties of the PM in the early embryonic syncytium. Before cellularization, the PM is polarized into discrete domains having epithelial-like characteristics. One domain resides above individual nuclei and has apical-like characteristics, while the other domain is lateral to nuclei and contains markers associated with basolateral membranes and junctions. Pulse-chase photoconversion experiments show that molecules can diffuse within each domain but do not exchange between PM regions above adjacent nuclei. Drug-induced F-actin depolymerization disrupted both the apicobasal-like polarity and the diffusion barriers within the syncytial PM. These events correlated with perturbations in the spatial pattern of dorsoventral Toll signaling. We propose that epithelial-like properties and an intact F-actin network compartmentalize the PM and shape morphogen gradients in the syncytial embryo. PMID:19154721

  15. Planar cell polarity and tissue design: Shaping the Drosophila wing membrane.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Meagan; Collier, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) describes the orientation of a cell within the plane of an epithelial cell layer. During tissue development, epithelial cells normally align their PCP so that they face in the same direction. This alignment allows cells to move in a common direction, or to generate structures with a common orientation. A classic system for studying the coordination of epithelial PCP is the developing Drosophila wing. The alignment of epithelial PCP during pupal wing development allows the production of an array of cell hairs that point towards the wing tip. Multiple studies have established that the Frizzled (Fz) PCP signaling pathway coordinates wing PCP. Recently, we have found that the same pathway also controls the formation of ridges on the Drosophila wing membrane. However, in contrast to hair polarity, ridge orientation differs between the anterior and posterior wing. How can the Fz PCP pathway generate a different relationship between hair and ridge orientation in different parts of the wing? In this Extra View article, we discuss membrane ridge development drawing upon our recent PLoS Genetics paper and other, published and unpublished, data. We also speculate upon how our findings impact the ongoing debate concerning the interaction of the Fz PCP and Fat/Dachsous pathways in the control of PCP.

  16. Overlimiting current through ion concentration polarization layer: Hydrodynamic convection effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Inhee; Kim, Sung Jae

    2013-11-01

    In this presentation, we experimentally investigated an effect of the hydrodymanic convective flow on an ion transport through nanoporous membrane in a micro/nanofluidic system. The convective motion of ions in an ion concentration polarization zone was controlled by external hydrodynamic inflows adjacent to the nanoporous membrane. The ion depletion region (which is regarded as a high electrical resistance) is spatially confined to a triangular shape with an additional hydrodymanic convective flow, resulting in a significant alternation in classical liming current value. Furthermore, the extreme spatial confinement can completely eliminate the limiting current region at higher flow rate so that one can obtain high current value which turns to be high power efficiency. Therefore, this mechanism would be utilized as minimizing power consumption for various electrochemical membrane systems such as fuel-cell, electro-desalination system and nanofluidic preconcentrator, etc. This work is supported by Basic Science Research Program (2013R1A1A1008125) and Future-based Technology Development Program (Nano Fields) (2009-0082952) through the NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning.

  17. Effects of oligomeric lysozyme on structural state of model membranes.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya

    2011-03-01

    The ability of oligomeric lysozyme to modify the molecular organization of the model bilayer membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixtures with phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or cholesterol (Chol) was assessed using fluorescent probes 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Prodan), 4-dimethylaminochalcone (DMC), pyrene and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). The observed changes in the fluorescence characteristics of polarity-sensitive probes Prodan and DMC, located in interfacial bilayer region, were interpreted due to the partial dehydration of the glycerol backbone, which was under the influence of aggregated protein. Cholesterol was found to prevent the perturbations of membrane polar part by lysozyme aggregates. Analysis of the pyrene excimerization data revealed an oligomer-induced reduction in bilayer free volume, presumably caused by an increased packing density of hydrocarbon chains. This effect proved to be virtually independent of membrane composition. It was demonstrated that membranotropic activity of oligomeric lysozyme markedly exceeds that of monomeric protein. The biological significance of the results obtained is twofold, implicating the general membrane-mediated mechanisms of oligomer toxicity and specific pathways of lysozyme fibrillogenesis in vivo associated with familial nonneuropathic systemic amyloidosis.

  18. RhoA and Membrane Fluidity Mediates the Spatially Polarized Src/FAK Activation in Response to Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Lu, Shaoying; Hu, Ying-li; Liao, Xiaoling; Ouyang, Mingxing; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-01-01

    While Src plays crucial roles in shear stress-induced cellular processes, little is known on the spatiotemporal pattern of high shear stress (HSS)-induced Src activation. HSS (65 dyn/cm2) was applied on bovine aortic endothelial cells to visualize the dynamic Src activation at subcellular levels utilizing a membrane-targeted Src biosensor (Kras-Src) based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). A polarized Src activation was observed with higher activity at the side facing the flow, which was enhanced by a cytochalasin D-mediated disruption of actin filaments but inhibited by a benzyl alcohol-mediated enhancement of membrane fluidity. Further experiments revealed that HSS decreased RhoA activity, with a constitutively active RhoA mutant inhibiting while a negative RhoA mutant enhancing the HSS-induced Src polarity. Cytochalasin D can restore the polarity in cells expressing the active RhoA mutant. Further results indicate that HSS stimulates FAK activation with a spatial polarity similar to Src. The inhibition of Src by PP1, as well as the perturbation of RhoA activity and membrane fluidity, can block this HSS-induced FAK polarity. These results indicate that the HSS-induced Src and subsequently FAK polarity depends on the coordination between intracellular tension distribution regulated by RhoA, its related actin structures and the plasma membrane fluidity. PMID:25387906

  19. [Application of the network thermodynamics to interpretation of membrane transport: evaluation of the resistance coefficients of the polymeric membrane in polarization concentration conditions].

    PubMed

    Slyzak, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The Kedem-Katchalsky equations, derived using symmetric transformation of the Peusner's network transformation, to interpretation of transport through Nephrophan membrane of glucose aqueous solutions in concentration polarization conditions were employed. The values of Rij* (i does not equal j = 1, 2) coefficients were calculated. From these calculations it results that, the values of coefficients R11*, R12* = R21* and R22* are nonlinear dependent as well as on concentration of solutions (C) and configuration of membrane system.

  20. Effects of 3D geometries on cellular gradient sensing and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spill, Fabian; Andasari, Vivi; Mak, Michael; Kamm, Roger D.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-06-01

    During cell migration, cells become polarized, change their shape, and move in response to various internal and external cues. Cell polarization is defined through the spatio-temporal organization of molecules such as PI3K or small GTPases, and is determined by intracellular signaling networks. It results in directional forces through actin polymerization and myosin contractions. Many existing mathematical models of cell polarization are formulated in terms of reaction-diffusion systems of interacting molecules, and are often defined in one or two spatial dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a 3D reaction-diffusion model of interacting molecules in a single cell, and find that cell geometry has an important role affecting the capability of a cell to polarize, or change polarization when an external signal changes direction. Our results suggest a geometrical argument why more roundish cells can repolarize more effectively than cells which are elongated along the direction of the original stimulus, and thus enable roundish cells to turn faster, as has been observed in experiments. On the other hand, elongated cells preferentially polarize along their main axis even when a gradient stimulus appears from another direction. Furthermore, our 3D model can accurately capture the effect of binding and unbinding of important regulators of cell polarization to and from the cell membrane. This spatial separation of membrane and cytosol, not possible to capture in 1D or 2D models, leads to marked differences of our model from comparable lower-dimensional models.

  1. A new fluorescent squaraine probe for the measurement of membrane polarity.

    PubMed

    Ioffe, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P; Domanov, Yegor A; Tatarets, Anatoliy L; Patsenker, Leonid D; Terpetsching, Ewald A; Dyubko, Tatyana S

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the sensitivity of newly synthesized squaraine dye 1 to the changes in lipid bilayer physical properties and compared it with the well-known dye 2. Partitioning of the dye 1 into lipid bilayer was found to be followed by significant increase of its fluorescence intensity and red-shift of emission maximum, while intensity of the dye 2 fluorescence increased only slightly on going from aqueous to lipidic environment. This suggests that dye 1 is more sensitive to the changes in membrane properties as compared to dye 2. Partition coefficients of the dye 1 have been determined for the model membranes composed of zwitterionic phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixtures with positively charged detergent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), anionic phospholipid cardiolipin (CL), and sterol (Chol). The spectral responses of the dye 1 in different liposome media proved to correlate with the increase of bilayer polarity induced by Chol and CL or its decrease caused by CTAB. It was concluded that dye 1 can be used as fluorescent probe for examining membrane-related processes.

  2. Polarization Effects in Optical Coherence Tomography of Various Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Johannes F.; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Park, B. Hyle; Pham, Tuan H.; Chen, Zhongping; Milner, Thomas E.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) was used to obtain spatially resolved ex vivo images of polarization changes in skeletal muscle, bone, skin and brain. Through coherent detection of two orthogonal polarization states of the signal formed by interference of light reflected from the biological sample and a mirror in the reference arm of a Michelson interferometer, the depth resolved change in polarization was measured. Inasmuch as any fibrous structure will influence the polarization of light, PS-OCT is a potentially powerful technique investigating tissue structural properties. In addition, the effects of single polarization state detection on OCT image formation is demonstrated. PMID:25774083

  3. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-08-18

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g.

    ).

  4. Induced-charge electrokinetics, bipolar current, and concentration polarization in a microchannel-Nafion-membrane system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2016-06-01

    The presence of a floating electrode array located within the depletion layer formed due to concentration polarization across a microchannel-membrane interface device may produce not only induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) but also bipolar current resulting from the induced Faradaic reaction. It has been shown that there exists an optimal thickness of a thin dielectric coating that is sufficient to suppress bipolar currents but still enables ICEO vortices that stir the depletion layer, thereby affecting the system's current-voltage response. In addition, the use of alternating-current electro-osmosis by activating electrodes results in further enhancement of the fluid stirring and opens new routes for on-demand spatiotemporal control of the depletion layer length.

  5. EMC and polarized EMC effects in Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Cloet; Wolfgang Bentz; Anthony Thomas

    2006-05-23

    We determine nuclear structure functions and quark distributions for {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 15}N and {sup 27}Al. For the nucleon bound state we solve the covariant quark-diquark equations in a confining Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model, which yields excellent results for the free nucleon structure functions. The nucleus is described using a relativistic shell model, including mean scalar and vector fields that couple to the quarks in the nucleon. The nuclear structure functions are then obtained as a convolution of the structure function of the bound nucleon with the light-cone nucleon distributions. We find that we are readily able to reproduce the EMC effect in finite nuclei and confirm earlier nuclear matter studies that found a large polarized EMC effect.

  6. Flow and fouling in membrane filters: Effects of membrane morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda J.

    2015-11-01

    Membrane filters are widely-used in microfiltration applications. Many types of filter membranes are produced commercially, for different filtration applications, but broadly speaking the requirements are to achieve fine control of separation, with low power consumption. The answer to this problem might seem obvious: select the membrane with the largest pore size and void fraction consistent with the separation requirements. However, membrane fouling (an inevitable consequence of successful filtration) is a complicated process, which depends on many parameters other than membrane pore size and void fraction; and which itself greatly affects the filtration process and membrane functionality. In this work we formulate mathematical models that can (i) account for the membrane internal morphology (internal structure, pore size & shape, etc.); (ii) fouling of membranes with specific morphology; and (iii) make some predictions as to what type of membrane morphology might offer optimum filtration performance.

  7. Trace analysis of polar pharmaceuticals in wastewater by LC-MS-MS: comparison of membrane bioreactor and activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Celiz, Mary Dawn; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià; Aga, Diana S

    2009-01-01

    In order to assess the efficiency of wastewater treatment plants in removing pharmaceuticals from wastewater, sensitive and reliable methods are necessary for trace analysis of these micropollutants in the presence of a highly complex matrix. In this study, conventional activated sludge (CAS) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) treatment systems are compared in eliminating pharmaceuticals in wastewater. The pharmaceuticals investigated include aceclofenac, carbamazepine, diclofenac, enalapril, and trimethoprim. Analysis is performed using a liquid chromatograph with hybrid linear ion-trap mass spectrometer equipped with a polar reversed-phase column to achieve good separation and minimize matrix effects. To pre-concentrate the samples, the use of two types of solid-phase extraction packing materials in tandem assures good recoveries of all the target analytes. In the influent, the concentration of these compounds ranges from 0.09 to 1.4 microg/L. Diclofenac shows resistance to degradation in the CAS but is amenable to degradation in the MBR. Trimethoprim and enalapril are only slightly eliminated in the CAS but are reduced by more than 95% in the MBR. Carbamazepine removal is negligible, while aceclofenac is only 50% reduced in CAS and MBR. In general, these results indicate that MBR has a higher efficiency in removing some polar pharmaceuticals in wastewater.

  8. Effect of membrane polymeric materials on relationship between surface pore size and membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Yuasa, Kotaku; Ishigami, Toru; Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Kamio, Eiji; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Saeki, Daisuke; Ni, Jinren; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of different membrane polymeric materials on the relationship between membrane pore size and development of membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Membranes with different pore sizes were prepared using three different polymeric materials, cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and the development of membrane fouling in each membrane was evaluated by batch filtration tests using a mixed liquor suspension obtained from a laboratory-scale MBR. The results revealed that the optimal membrane pore size to mitigate membrane fouling differed depending on membrane polymeric material. For PVDF membranes, the degree of membrane fouling decreased as membrane pore size increased. In contrast, CAB membranes with smaller pores had less fouling propensity than those with larger ones. Such difference can be attributed to the difference in major membrane foulants in each membrane; in PVDF, they were small colloids or dissolved organics in which proteins are abundant, and in CAB, microbial flocs. The results obtained in this study strongly suggested that optimum operating conditions of MBRs differ depending on the characteristics of the used membrane.

  9. Image dehazing using polarization effects of objects and airlight.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shuai; Xia, XiuShan; Xing, Huo; Chen, ChangWen

    2014-08-11

    The analysis of polarized filtered images has been proven useful in image dehazing. However, the current polarization-based dehazing algorithms are based on the assumption that the polarization is only associated with the airlight. This assumption does not hold up well in practice since both object radiance and airlight contribute to the polarization. In this study, a new polarization hazy imaging model is presented, which considers the joint polarization effects of the airlight and the object radiance in the imaging process. In addition, an effective method to synthesize the optimal polarized-difference (PD) image is introduced. Then, a decorrelation-based scheme is proposed to estimate the degree of polarization for the object from the polarized image input. After that, the haze-free image can be recovered based on the new polarization hazy imaging model. The qualitative and quantitative experimental results verify the effectiveness of this new dehazing scheme. As a by-product, this scheme also provides additional polarization properties of the objects in the image, which can be used in extended applications, such as scene segmentation and object recognition.

  10. Effects of wildfire smoke on atmospheric polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph A.; Pust, Nathan J.; Forbes, Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    A continuously operating all-sky polarization imager recorded the skylight polarization pattern as conditions transitioned from clear and clean to extremely smoky. This transition included a period when a local wildfire plume filled part of the sky with smoke, creating a highly asymmetric distribution of aerosols. Multiple scattering in the smoke plume strongly reduced the degree of polarization in the smoky region of the sky. Once the smoke plume spread out to cover the entire local sky, the degree of polarization was strongly reduced everywhere. However, this example differed from previously observed smoke events because, even though the usual skylight polarization pattern generally persisted throughout the event, this time the smoke-covered sky exhibited a spatially asymmetric profile along the band of maximum polarization. This pattern of reduced polarization toward the horizon is hypothesized to be a result of an optically thick but physically thin smoke layer. The skylight polarization observations are supplemented with optical depth measurements and aerosol size distribution retrievals from a solar radiometer.

  11. Polarization effects in SHG of collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Paul; Cox, Guy C.; Ramshaw, John A. M.; Lukins, Philip B.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.

    2004-06-01

    The polarization dependence of the second harmonic emission of purified in-vitro reconstituted fibrils of collagen has been examined. The results confirmed the quasi-hexagonal crystalline structure within the fibrils. Interesting different polarization behaviours were seen between collagen types I and II, which can be utilized as an experimental technique for differentiation.

  12. Polar and low polar solvents media effect on dipole moments of some diazo Sudan dyes.

    PubMed

    Zakerhamidi, M S; Golghasemi Sorkhabi, Sh; Shamkhali, A N

    2014-06-05

    Absorption and fluorescence spectra of three Sudan dyes (SudanIII, SudanIV and Sudan black B) were recorded in various solvents with different polarity in the range of 300-800nm, at room temperature. The solvatochromic method was used to investigate dipole moments of these dyes in ground and excited states, in different media. The solvatochromic behavior of these substances and their solvent-solute interactions were analyzed via solvent polarity parameters. Obtained results express the effects of solvation on tautomerism and molecular configuration (geometry) of Sudan dyes in solvent media with different polarity. Furthermore, analyze of solvent-solute interactions and value of ground and excited states dipole moments suggests different forms of resonance structures for Sudan dyes in polar and low-polar solvents.

  13. Polarization Effects Aboard the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Jason; Young, Martin; Dubovitsky, Serge; Dorsky, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    For precision displacement measurements, laser metrology is currently one of the most accurate measurements. Often, the measurement is located some distance away from the laser source, and as a result, stringent requirements are placed on the laser delivery system with respect to the state of polarization. Such is the case with the fiber distribution assembly (FDA) that is slated to fly aboard the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) next decade. This system utilizes a concatenated array of couplers, polarizers and lengthy runs of polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber to distribute linearly-polarized light from a single laser to fourteen different optical metrology measurement points throughout the spacecraft. Optical power fluctuations at the point of measurement can be traced back to the polarization extinction ration (PER) of the concatenated components, in conjunction with the rate of change in phase difference of the light along the slow and fast axes of the PM fiber.

  14. Effect of lead on erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, K; Karai, I; Horiguchi, S

    1983-01-01

    The effect of blood lead on erythrocyte membrane proteins was studied in 28 workers from a scrap lead refining factory and in 18 controls working in railway construction. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the polypeptides in the erythrocyte membrane showed that bands 3 and 4.1 had significantly decreased while bands 2.3, 6, and 7 had significantly increased in the lead workers compared with the controls. For the lead workers, the correlation coefficients between blood lead and bands 2.3 and 3 were r = 0.545 (p less than 0.01) and r = -0.51 (p less than 0.01) respectively. These results suggest that the decrease in erythrocyte membrane permeability results from a decrease in the membrane transfer protein responsible for band 3. Images PMID:6830722

  15. Polarization effects due to the mutual influence of trajectory parameters and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, N. R.

    2006-10-01

    In the geometric optics approximation, we comparatively analyze the polarization effects resulting from the influence of polarization on the beam trajectory. We show that the beam trajectory equations describing the optical Magnus effect that are obtained from the canonical Hamilton equations, Fermat principle, and truncated vector wave equations give the same result, coincident with the result in the mode approach. We explain the reasons underlying the previously derived results.

  16. The aPKC/Par3/Par6 Polarity Complex and Membrane Order Are Functionally Interdependent in Epithelia During Vertebrate Organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Siniyeh, Ahmed; Owen, Dylan M; Benzing, Carola; Rinkwitz, Silke; Becker, Thomas S; Majumdar, Arindam; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The differential distribution of lipids between apical and basolateral membranes is necessary for many epithelial cell functions, but how this characteristic membrane organization is integrated within the polarity network during ductal organ development is poorly understood. Here we quantified membrane order in the gut, kidney and liver ductal epithelia in zebrafish larvae at 3-11 days post fertilization (dpf) with Laurdan 2-photon microscopy. We then applied a combination of Laurdan imaging, antisense knock-down and analysis of polarity markers to understand the relationship between membrane order and apical-basal polarity. We found a reciprocal relationship between membrane order and the cell polarity network. Reducing membrane condensation by exogenously added oxysterol or depletion of cholesterol reduced apical targeting of the polarity protein, aPKC. Conversely, using morpholino knock down in zebrafish, we found that membrane order was dependent upon the Crb3 and Par3 polarity protein expression in ductal epithelia. Hence our data suggest that the biophysical property of membrane lipid packing is a regulatory element in apical basal polarity.

  17. Effect of Preparation Methods on Crystallization Behavior and Tensile Strength of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Xiaolong; Wu, Chunrui

    2013-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes were prepared by non solvent induced phase separation (NIPS), melt spinning and the solution-cast method. The effect of preparation methods with different membrane formation mechanisms on crystallization behavior and tensile strength of PVDF membranes was investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to examine the crystal form of the surface layers and the overall membranes, respectively. Spherulite morphologies and thermal behavior of the membranes were studied by polarized light optical microscopy (PLO) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) separately. It was found that the crystallization behavior of PVDF membranes was closely related to the preparation methods. For membranes prepared by the NIPS method, the skin layers had a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase, and the total crystallinity was 60.0% with no spherulite. For melt spinning membranes, the surface layers also showed a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase. The total crystallinity was 48.7% with perfect spherulites. Whereas the crystallization behavior of solution-cast membranes was related to the evaporation temperature and the additive, when the evaporation temperature was 140 °C with a soluble additive in the dope solution, obvious spherulites appeared. The crystalline morphology of PVDF exerted a great influence on the tensile strength of the membranes, which was much higher with perfect spherulites. PMID:24957064

  18. From electroconvective vortices to current hot spots on ion selective membranes subject to concentration polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Karen; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Electroconvective instabilities near ion-selective surfaces have been shown to greatly enhance ion transport and play a significant role in a wide range of applications in electrochemistry. When the driving voltage exceeds a threshold, electroconvection becomes chaotic and leads to intermittent spikes of current density on the ion-selective surface. We present an investigation of this phenomenon by considering a canonical setting consisting of a symmetric binary electrolyte next to a flat, ion-selective membrane subject to an external driving voltage. By tracking individual rolls of vortices, we reveal the common mechanism under which the three-way coupled fluid dynamics, ion transport, and electrostatic effects lead to advective displacement of ion concentration field, sustained vortices and vortex migration, and current hot spots on the membrane.

  19. Polarized expression of the membrane ASP protein derived from HIV-1 antisense transcription in T cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retroviral gene expression generally depends on a full-length transcript that initiates in the 5' LTR, which is either left unspliced or alternatively spliced. We and others have demonstrated the existence of antisense transcription initiating in the 3' LTR in human lymphotropic retroviruses, including HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HIV-1. Such transcripts have been postulated to encode antisense proteins important for the establishment of viral infections. The antisense strand of the HIV-1 proviral DNA contains an ORF termed asp, coding for a highly hydrophobic protein. However, although anti-ASP antibodies have been described to be present in HIV-1-infected patients, its in vivo expression requires further support. The objective of this present study was to clearly demonstrate that ASP is effectively expressed in infected T cells and to provide a better characterization of its subcellular localization. Results We first investigated the subcellular localization of ASP by transfecting Jurkat T cells with vectors expressing ASP tagged with the Flag epitope to its N-terminus. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that ASP localized to the plasma membrane in transfected Jurkat T cells, but with different staining patterns. In addition to an entire distribution to the plasma membrane, ASP showed an asymmetric localization and could also be detected in membrane connections between two cells. We then infected Jurkat T cells with NL4.3 virus coding for ASP tagged with the Flag epitope at its C-terminal end. By this approach, we were capable of showing that ASP is effectively expressed from the HIV-1 3' LTR in infected T cells, with an asymmetric localization of the viral protein at the plasma membrane. Conclusion These results demonstrate for the first time that ASP can be detected when expressed from full-length HIV-1 proviral DNA and that its localization is consistent with Jurkat T cells overexpressing ASP. PMID:21929758

  20. Spectral Induced Polarization of Sandstones: Temperature Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A.; Kruschwitz, S.; Lesmes, D.

    2007-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for a wide range of environmental applications, in particular those focused on hydrogeological investigations. Recent experimental work has demonstrated that the mean relaxation time of electrical impedance spectra measured in sandstones is linked to the grain surface area and strongly correlated to some measure of a dominant pore throat size. Such empirically derived relationships lead to potential models of SIP - hydraulic conductivity, which has immense value for the hydrological community. Furthermore, the links between surface area and electrical response may lead to other, equally exciting, applications, such as in characterizing geochemical reactivity of sediments. However, there is a need to understand the fundamental behavior of SIP in such porous media in order for such models to be applied usefully. In an attempt to address this, we focus here on the influence of temperature on the SIP behavior of a range of sandstones. Classical models of dielectric dispersion in colloids have proposed direct inverse relationships between relaxation time and temperature. Through a series of experimental trials we have studied this behavior: examining the impedance spectra (in the 1 mHz to 1 kHz range) of four different sandstones over a temperature range of 5 to 30 degrees Celsius. Analysis of the spectra with the widely used Pelton Cole-Cole model has confirmed hypothesized effects on a mean relaxation time but revealed that the responses to temperature change is a function of physical properties of the sandstone. In addition, the analysis has illustrated how temperature effects on surface complex conductivity of the sandstones differ as a function of pore fluid and formation factor. The results add to the growing experimental evidence of controls on spectral impedance in porous media and help ascertain generalized petrophysical models for a wide range of applications.

  1. Exclusion of a Proton ATPase from the Apical Membrane Is Associated with Cell Polarity and Tip Growth in Nicotiana tabacum Pollen Tubes[W

    PubMed Central

    Certal, Ana C.; Almeida, Ricardo B.; Carvalho, Lara M.; Wong, Eric; Moreno, Nuno; Michard, Erwan; Carneiro, Jorge; Rodriguéz-Léon, Joaquín; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y.; Feijó, José A.

    2008-01-01

    Polarized growth in pollen tubes results from exocytosis at the tip and is associated with conspicuous polarization of Ca2+, H+, K+, and Cl− -fluxes. Here, we show that cell polarity in Nicotiana tabacum pollen is associated with the exclusion of a novel pollen-specific H+-ATPase, Nt AHA, from the growing apex. Nt AHA colocalizes with extracellular H+ effluxes, which revert to influxes where Nt AHA is absent. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis showed that Nt AHA moves toward the apex of growing pollen tubes, suggesting that the major mechanism of insertion is not through apical exocytosis. Nt AHA mRNA is also excluded from the tip, suggesting a mechanism of polarization acting at the level of translation. Localized applications of the cation ionophore gramicidin A had no effect where Nt AHA was present but acidified the cytosol and induced reorientation of the pollen tube where Nt AHA was absent. Transgenic pollen overexpressing Nt AHA-GFP developed abnormal callose plugs accompanied by abnormal H+ flux profiles. Furthermore, there is no net flux of H+ in defined patches of membrane where callose plugs are to be formed. Taken together, our results suggest that proton dynamics may underlie basic mechanisms of polarity and spatial regulation in growing pollen tubes. PMID:18364468

  2. Model-free methods to study membrane environmental probes: a comparison of the spectral phasor and generalized polarization approaches

    PubMed Central

    Malacrida, Leonel; Gratton, Enrico; Jameson, David M

    2016-01-01

    In this note, we present a discussion of the advantages and scope of model-free analysis methods applied to the popular solvatochromic probe LAURDAN, which is widely used as an environmental probe to study dynamics and structure in membranes. In particular, we compare and contrast the generalized polarization approach with the spectral phasor approach. To illustrate our points we utilize several model membrane systems containing pure lipid phases and, in some cases, cholesterol or surfactants. We demonstrate that the spectral phasor method offers definitive advantages in the case of complex systems. PMID:27182438

  3. Model-free methods to study membrane environmental probes: a comparison of the spectral phasor and generalized polarization approaches.

    PubMed

    Malacrida, Leonel; Gratton, Enrico; Jameson, David M

    2015-12-01

    In this note, we present a discussion of the advantages and scope of model-free analysis methods applied to the popular solvatochromic probe LAURDAN, which is widely used as an environmental probe to study dynamics and structure in membranes. In particular, we compare and contrast the generalized polarization approach with the spectral phasor approach. To illustrate our points we utilize several model membrane systems containing pure lipid phases and, in some cases, cholesterol or surfactants. We demonstrate that the spectral phasor method offers definitive advantages in the case of complex systems.

  4. Effects of laser polarization in the expansion of plasma waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, N.; Grismayer, T.; Cardoso, L.; Geada, J.; Figueira, G.; Dias, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a column of hydrogen plasma generated by an ultra-short (sub-picosecond), moderate intensity (˜1015-16 W.cm-2) laser, radially expands at a higher velocity when using a circularly polarized laser beam instead of a linearly polarized beam. Interferometry shows that after 1 ns there is a clear shock structure formed, that can be approximated to a cylindrical blast wave. The shock velocity was measured for plasmas created with linearly and circularly polarized laser beams, indicating an approximately 20% higher velocity for plasmas generated with a circularly polarized laser beam, thus implying a higher plasma electron temperature. The heating mechanism was determined to be the Above Threshold Ionization effect. The calculated electrum energy spectrum for a circularly polarized laser beam was broader when compared to the one generated by a linearly polarized laser beam, leading to a higher plasma temperature.

  5. Electroviscous Effects in Ceramic Nanofiltration Membranes.

    PubMed

    Farsi, Ali; Boffa, Vittorio; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2015-11-16

    Membrane permeability and salt rejection of a γ-alumina nanofiltration membrane were studied and modeled for different salt solutions. Salt rejection was predicted by using the Donnan-steric pore model, in which the extended Nernst-Planck equation was applied to predict ion transport through the pores. The solvent flux was modeled by using the Hagen-Poiseuille equation by introducing electroviscosity instead of bulk viscosity. γ-Alumina particles were used for ζ-potential measurements. The ζ-potential measurements show that monovalent ions did not adsorb on the γ-alumina surface, whereas divalent ions were highly adsorbed. Thus, for divalent ions, the model was modified, owing to pore shrinkage caused by ion adsorption. The ζ-potential lowered the membrane permeability, especially for membranes with a pore radius lower than 3 nm, a ζ-potential higher than 20 mV, and an ionic strength lower than 0.01 m. The rejection model showed that, for a pore radius lower than 3 nm and for solutions with ionic strengths lower than 0.01 m, there is an optimum ζ-potential for rejection, because of the concurrent effects of electromigration and convection. Hence, the model can be used as a prediction tool to optimize membrane perm-selectivity by designing a specific pore size and surface charge for application at specific ionic strengths and pH levels.

  6. Effect of PolarInteractions on Polymer Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Agapov, Alexander L; Wang, Yangyang; Kunal, Kumar; Robertson, Christopher G; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant experimental and theoretical efforts, a fundamental understanding of how the chemical structure influences various dynamic processes in glass-forming materials and polymers remains a topic of active discussion. The present study analyzes the influence of polar interactions on the temperature dependences of segmental and chain dynamics in polymers. We found that segmental dynamics slow down (the glass transition temperature Tg increases) and have steeper temperature dependence (higher fragility index m) when a polar group is attached directly to the polymer backbone. However, when a polar group is separated from the backbone by a side group, both Tg and m become complex functions of the monomer s polarity and the relative position of the polar group. Our analysis revealed unexpected effect of polar interactions on chain dynamics: chain modes in polar polymers are coupled to the segmental dynamics stronger than in nonpolar polymers with similar fragilities. This results in a steeper temperature dependence of chain dynamics in polar polymers. How the polar interactions affect the coupling of chain and segmental modes remains unclear.

  7. The influenza fusion peptide promotes lipid polar head intrusion through hydrogen bonding with phosphates and N-terminal membrane insertion depth.

    PubMed

    Légaré, Sébastien; Lagüe, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Influenza infection requires fusion between the virus envelope and a host cell endosomal membrane. The influenza hemagglutinin fusion peptide (FP) is essential to viral membrane fusion. It was recently proposed that FPs would fuse membranes by increasing lipid tail protrusion, a membrane fusion transition state. The details of how FPs induce lipid tail protrusion, however, remain to be elucidated. To decipher the molecular mechanism by which FPs promote lipid tail protrusion, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type (WT) FP, fusogenic mutant F9A, and nonfusogenic mutant W14A in model bilayers. This article presents the peptide-lipid interaction responsible for lipid tail protrusion and a related lipid perturbation, polar head intrusion, where polar heads are sunk under the membrane surface. The backbone amides from the four N-terminal peptide residues, deeply inserted in the membrane, promoted both perturbations through H bonding with lipid phosphates. Polar head intrusion correlated with peptides N-terminal insertion depth and activity: the N-termini of WT and F9A were inserted deeper into the membrane than nonfusogenic W14A. Based on these results, we propose that FP-induced polar head intrusion would complement lipid tail protrusion in catalyzing membrane fusion by reducing repulsions between juxtaposed membranes headgroups. The presented model provides a framework for further research on membrane fusion and influenza antivirals.

  8. Effects of beta-pinene on yeast membrane functions.

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, S; Ramirez, J; Peña, A

    1985-01-01

    The effects of beta-pinene on yeast cells were studied. This terpene inhibited respiration with glucose or ethanol as the substrate. The inhibition depended on the ratio of the terpene to the amount of yeast cells; for a fixed concentration of pinene, inhibition decreased as the amount of yeast cells increased. Pinene also inhibited the pumping of protons and K+ transport, but this inhibition was more marked with with ethanol than with glucose as the substrate, indicating the mitochondrial localization of the inhibition. The studies on isolated mitochondria showed a series of effects, starting with the disappearance of the respiratory control and deenergization of the organelles and followed by an inhibition of respiration at higher concentrations of the terpene. The effect on respiration could be localized to the cytochrome b region of the electron transport chain. No effect could be detected on the activity of ATPase. The effects can be ascribed to a localization of pinene on membranes which was also accompanied by a decrease in the fluorescence polarization of diphenyl hexatriene, probably meaning an increase in the fluidity of the membrane, localized preferentially to the mitochondria. PMID:3156123

  9. The effect of bacterial cellulose membrane compared with collagen membrane on guided bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Youn-Mook; Jeong, Sung In; An, Sung-Jun; Kang, Seong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was to evaluate the effects of bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes as a barrier membrane on guided bone regeneration (GBR) in comparison with those of the resorbable collagen membranes. MATERIALS AND METHODS BC membranes were fabricated using biomimetic technology. Surface properties were analyzed, Mechanical properties were measured, in vitro cell proliferation test were performed with NIH3T3 cells and in vivo study were performed with rat calvarial defect and histomorphometric analysis was done. The Mann-Whitney U test and the Wilcoxon signed rank test was used (α<.05). RESULTS BC membrane showed significantly higher mechanical properties such as wet tensile strength than collagen membrane and represented a three-dimensional multilayered structure cross-linked by nano-fibers with 60 % porosity. In vitro study, cell adhesion and proliferation were observed on BC membrane. However, morphology of the cells was found to be less differentiated, and the cell proliferation rate was lower than those of the cells on collagen membrane. In vivo study, the grafted BC membrane did not induce inflammatory response, and maintained adequate space for bone regeneration. An amount of new bone formation in defect region loaded with BC membrane was significantly similar to that of collagen membrane application. CONCLUSION BC membrane has potential to be used as a barrier membrane, and efficacy of the membrane on GBR is comparable to that of collagen membrane. PMID:26816579

  10. Effect of laser polarization on quantum electrodynamical cascading

    SciTech Connect

    Bashmakov, V. F.; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Fedotov, A. M.; Narozhny, N. B.

    2014-01-15

    Development of quantum electrodynamical (QED) cascades in a standing electromagnetic wave for circular and linear polarizations is simulated numerically with a 3D PIC-MC code. It is demonstrated that for the same laser energy the number of particles produced in a circularly polarized field is greater than in a linearly polarized field, though the acquiring mean energy per particle is larger in the latter case. The qualitative model of laser-assisted QED cascades is extended by including the effect of polarization of the field. It turns out that cascade dynamics is notably more complicated in the case of linearly polarized field, where separation into the qualitatively different “electric” and “magnetic” regions (where the electric field is stronger than the magnetic field and vice versa) becomes essential. In the “magnetic” regions, acceleration is suppressed, and moreover the high-energy electrons are even getting cooled by photon emission. The volumes of the “electric” and “magnetic” regions evolve periodically in time and so does the cascade growth rate. In contrast to the linear polarization, the charged particles can be accelerated by circularly polarized wave even in “magnetic region.” The “electric” and “magnetic” regions do not evolve in time, and cascade growth rate almost does not depend on time for circular polarization.

  11. Underwater image recovery considering polarization effects of objects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bingjing; Liu, Tiegen; Hu, Haofeng; Han, Jiahui; Yu, Mingxuan

    2016-05-02

    In underwater imaging scenarios, the scattering media could cause severe image degradation due to the backscatter veiling as well as signal attenuation. In this paper, we consider the polarization effect of the object, and propose a method of retrieving the objects radiance based on estimating the polarized-difference image of the target signal. We show with a real-world experiment that by taking into account the polarized-difference image of the target signal additionally, the quality of the underwater image can be effectively enhanced, which is particularly effective in the cases where both the object radiance and the backscatter contribute to the polarization, such as underwater detection of the artifact objects.

  12. Effects of the cannabinoids on physical properties of brain membranes and phospholipid vesicles: fluorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Hillard, C J; Harris, R A; Bloom, A S

    1985-03-01

    The effects of four cannabinoids on the physical properties of brain synaptic plasma membranes (SPM), lipid extracts of SPM and phospholipid vesicles were evaluated using fluorescence probes. In vitro, the psychoactive cannabinoids, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) and 11-hydroxyl-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-delta 9-THC) at concentrations of 1 and 3 microM decreased polarization of the fluorescence emission of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in SPM. At the same concentrations, cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol, cannabinoids devoid of marijuana-like psychoactivity, had no effect on DPH polarization. The effects of 11-OH-delta 9-THC and CBD on vesicles made from lipids extracted from SPM were identical to their effects on intact SPM. These changes in DPH polarization were not due to changes in fluorescence lifetime and indicate that, at low concentrations, the psychoactive cannabinoids increase the rotational mobility of DPH in the membrane core. In contrast, in SPM-extracted lipids, both 11-OH-delta 9-THC and CBD decreased the mobility of stearic acid with an anthroyloxy label at both the second (2-AS) and twelfth (12-AS) carbon atoms. Studies of DPH polarization in various phosphatidylcholines (PC) demonstrated that the actions of the cannabinoids were dependent on initial bilayer fluidity. 11-OH-delta 9-THC was less effective at decreasing polarization of trimethylammonium DPH (TMA-DPH), a probe of the bilayer surface, than of DPH whereas CBD affected mobility of the two probes equally. Neither CBD nor 11-OH-delta 9-THC altered DPH mobility in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine vesicles. These findings indicate that the psychoactive cannabinoids increase fluidity in the hydrophobic core of brain membranes and support a membrane perturbant hypothesis of the mechanism of delta 9-THC action.

  13. Geometric spin Hall effect of light with inhomogeneous polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xinxing; Yi, Xunong

    2017-01-01

    The spin Hall effect of light originates from spin-orbit interaction of light, which manifests two types of geometric phases. In this paper, we report the observation of a geometric spin Hall effect by generating a light beam with inhomogeneous polarization distribution. Unlike the previously reported geometric spin Hall effect observed in a tilted beam-detector system, which is believed to result from an effective spin-redirection Berry geometric phase, the geometric spin Hall effect demonstrated here is attributed to an effective, spatially varying Pancharatnam-Berry geometric phase generated by the inhomogeneous polarization geometry. Our further experiments show that the geometric spin Hall effect can be tuned by tailoring the polarization geometry of light, demonstrating the spin states of photons can be steered with a great flexibility.

  14. Effect of lipid head group interactions on membrane properties and membrane-induced cationic β-hairpin folding.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Sai J; Xu, Hongcheng; Matysiak, Silvina

    2016-07-21

    Stages in POPS membrane induced SVS-1 folding. One key characteristic of mIFs is the dielectric gradient and subsequently, electrostatic potential that arises from dipolar interactions in the head group region. In this work, we present a coarse-grained (CG) model for anionic and zwitterionic lipids that accounts for dipolar intricacies in the head group region. Prior work on adding dipolar interactions in a coarse grained (CG) model for peptides enabled us to achieve α/β secondary structure content de novo, without any added bias. We have now extended this idea to lipids. To mimic dipolar interactions, two dummy particles with opposite charges are added to CG polar beads. These two dummy charges represent a fluctuating dipole that introduces structural polarization into the head group region. We have used POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and POPS (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine) as our model lipids. We characterize structural, dynamic, and dielectric properties of our CG bilayer, along with the effect of monovalent ions. We observe head group dipoles to play a significant role in membrane dielectric gradient and lipid clustering induced by dipole-dipole interactions in POPS lipids. In addition, we studied membrane-induced peptide folding of a cationic antimicrobial peptide with anticancer activity, SVS-1. We find that membrane-induced peptide folding is driven by both (a) cooperativity in peptide self-interaction and (b) cooperativity in membrane-peptide interaction. In particular, dipolar interactions between the peptide backbone and lipid head groups contribute to stabilizing folded conformations.

  15. [Effect of Membrane Wettability on Membrane Fouling and Chemical Durability of SPG Membranes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Xiao, Tai-min; Zhang, Jing; Cao, Li-ya; Du, Ya-wei; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Lei

    2015-05-01

    Shirasu porous glass (SPG) membranes have been applied for microbubble aeration in aerobic wastewater treatment. In the present study, both hydrophilic and hydrophobic SPG membranes were used in a microbubble-aerated biofilm reactor with online chemical cleaning, and their membrane fouling and chemical durability were determined to be strongly dependent on the membrane wettability. The fouling layer formed on the surface of both membranes was confirmed to be mainly organic fouling, and the hydrophobic membrane showed a relatively stronger resistance to the organic fouling. The severe chemical corrosion of the hydrophilic membrane was observed due to exposure to the alkaline sodium hypochlorite solution used for chemical cleaning, which resulted in significant increases in the median pore diameter and the porosity. On the other hand, the pore structure of the hydrophobic membrane changed slightly when exposed to the alkaline sodium hypochlorite solution, suggesting its strong alkali-resistance due to the non-wetting surface. However, the surface hydrophobic groups of hydrophobic membrane could be oxidized by sodium hypochlorite solution, resulting in more wettable membrane surface. The hydrophobic membrane also showed better performance in the respects of oxygen transfer, contaminant removal and energy-saving. Therefore, the hydrophobic membrane seemed more appropriate to be applied for microbubble aeration in aerobic wastewater treatment process.

  16. Polarization Effects in Group III-Nitride Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qiyuan

    Group III-nitride semiconductors have wide application in optoelectronic devices. Spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization effects have been found to be critical for electric and optical properties of group III-nitrides. In this dissertation, firstly, the crystal orientation dependence of the polarization is calculated and in-plane polarization is revealed. The in-plane polarization is sensitive to the lateral characteristic dimension determined by the microstructure. Specific semi-polar plane growth is suggested for reducing quantum-confined Stark effect. The macroscopic electrostatic field from the polarization discontinuity in the heterostructures is discussed, b ased on that, the band diagram of InGaN/GaN quantum well/barrier and AlGaN/GaN heterojunction is obtained from the self-consistent solution of Schrodinger and Poisson equations. New device design such as triangular quantum well with the quenched polarization field is proposed. Electron holography in the transmission electron microscopy is used to examine the electrostatic potential under polarization effects. The measured potential energy profiles of heterostructure are compared with the band simulation, and evidences of two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in a wurtzite AlGaN/ AlN/ GaN superlattice, as well as quasi two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a zinc-blende AlGaN/GaN are found. The large polarization discontinuity of AlN/GaN is the main source of the 2DHG of wurtzite nitrides, while the impurity introduced during the growth of AlGaN layer provides the donor states that to a great extent balance the free electrons in zinc-blende nitrides. It is also found that the quasi-2DEG concentration in zinc-blende AlGaN/GaN is about one order of magnitude lower than the wurtzite AlGaN/GaN, due to the absence of polarization. Finally, the InAlN/GaN lattice-matched epitaxy, which ideally has a zero piezoelectric polarization and strong spontaneous polarization, is experimentally studied. The breakdown in

  17. Polarization Effects in the Luminescence of Cadmium Selenide Electrodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-29

    UWIS/DC/TR-83/3 Polarization Effects in the Luminescence of Cadmium Selenide Electrodes by Holger H. Streckert, Hal Van Ryswyk, Richard N. Biagioni...the Luminescence of Cadmium Selenide Electrodes______________ S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUT,4OR(e) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER~q) Holger H...Continue an reverse aide if necieemy arid Identify, by block number) Cadmium selenide electrodes, photoluminescence, electroluminescence, polarized

  18. Asymmetric effects on Earth's polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian; Zotov, Leonid

    2013-06-01

    Differential equations ruling the Earth's polar motion are slightly asymmetric with respect to the pole coordinates. This is not only associated with the lack of axial symmetry around the Earth figure axis (triaxiality) but also with the longitude dependency of the pole tide (the main contribution). We propose a consistent handling of both asymmetric contributions, formulating a unique equation in the complex equatorial plane, of which we derive a general solution. Difference with respect to the usual symmetric solution is discussed and found significant in light of the present accuracy of the observed pole coordinates. For the same geophysical excitation, the prograde Chandler wobble is accompanied by a retrograde component up to 2 milliarcseconds (mas), transforming it in a slight elliptic motion. The asymmetric contribution is relatively larger in the geodetic excitation function, for Chandler wobble excitation mixes prograde and retrograde components of comparable level (1 mas).

  19. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase p110δ promotes lumen formation through enhancement of apico-basal polarity and basal membrane organization

    PubMed Central

    Sar, Sokhavuth; Komaiha, Ola Hamze; Moyano, Romina; Rayal, Amel; Samuel, Didier; Shewan, Annette; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Mostov, Keith; Gassama-Diagne, Ama

    2016-01-01

    Signaling triggered by adhesion to the extracellular matrix plays a key role in the spatial orientation of epithelial polarity and formation of lumens in glandular tissues. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling in particular is known to influence the polarization process during epithelial cell morphogenesis. Here, using Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells grown in 3D culture, we show that the p110δ isoform of phosphoinositide 3-kinase colocalizes with focal adhesion proteins at the basal surface of polarized cells. Pharmacological, siRNA- or kinase-dead mediated inhibition of p110δ impair the early stages of lumen formation, resulting in inverted polarized cysts, with no laminin or type IV collagen assembly at cell/extracellular matrix contacts. p110δ also regulates the organization of focal adhesions and membrane localization of dystroglycan. Thus, we uncover a previously unrecognized role for p110δ in epithelial cells in the orientation of the apico-basal axis and lumen formation. PMID:25583025

  20. The effect of dust on the martian polar vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Toigo, A. D.; Waugh, D. W.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of atmospheric dust on the dynamics and stability of the martian polar vortices is examined, through analysis of Mars Climate Sounder observations and MarsWRF general circulation model simulations. We show that regional and global dust storms produce "transient vortex warming" events that partially or fully disrupt the northern winter polar vortex for brief periods. Increased atmospheric dust heating alters the Hadley circulation and shifts the downwelling branch of the circulation poleward, leading to a disruption of the polar vortex for a period of days to weeks. Through our simulations, we find this effect is dependent on the atmospheric heating rate, which can be changed by increasing the amount of dust in the atmosphere or by altering the dust optical properties (e.g., single scattering albedo). Despite this, our simulations show that some level of atmospheric dust is necessary to produce a distinct northern hemisphere winter polar vortex.

  1. Favorable effect of in-situ generated platinum in the membrane on fuel cell membrane durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macauley, Natalia; Wong, Ka Hung; Watson, Mark; Kjeang, Erik

    2015-12-01

    The overall lifetime of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is often determined by the membrane durability. Platinum, which may dissolve from the catalyst layers during fuel cell operation and deposit in the membrane, has been shown to have both positive and negative effects on membrane stability. In the present work, we analyze what specific conditions are required in order to reach a favorable, membrane stabilizing effect with the controlled use of platinum in the membrane. Using accelerated membrane durability testing, field operated membrane samples, and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that a high platinum concentration with specific particle shapes and sizes is essential for enhanced membrane stability. Specifically, star shaped and dendritic particles with high particle density and high surface area are shown to be preferable. These particles contain high levels of Pt(111) and are expected to have high catalytic activity toward peroxide quenching and crossover gas consumption, thereby mitigating chemical membrane degradation. On the other hand, small, dispersed cubic particles are found to have no effect or the opposite, negative effect on membrane stability.

  2. [Changes in the input resistance and membrane potential of a neuron developing a trace effect].

    PubMed

    D'iakonova, T L; Mikhal'tsev, I E

    1983-06-01

    Trace effects in the change of spike activity, input resistance (Rinp) and membrane potential of neurons of the mollusk brain were studied in 36 "silent" brain neurons of Limnaea stagnalis in conditions of 20-min intracellular application of sinusoidal current with the threshold frequency 0.1 Hz. Some neurons revealed the effect of facilitation: the rise of activity with membrane depolarization and an increase of Rinp. Other neurons revealed the fall of activity accompanied by hyperpolarization and a decrease of Rinp. The change of Rinp as a trace effect is at its maximum at the frequency of the current used in the intracellular application. This suggests that the neuronal plasticity in "learning" is just based on the Rinp trace effects. Some of the neurons revealed no change in Rinp, membrane polarization or electrical response to applied stimulation. Possible origin of the above effects is discussed.

  3. Voltammetry of ion transfer across a polarized room-temperature ionic liquid membrane facilitated by valinomycin: theoretical aspects and application.

    PubMed

    Langmaier, Jan; Samec, Zdenek

    2009-08-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is used to investigate the transfer of alkali-metal cations, protons, and ammonium ions facilitated by the complex formation with valinomycin at the interface between an aqueous electrolyte solution and a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) membrane. The membrane is made of a thin (approximately 112 microm) microporous filter impregnated with an RTIL that is composed of tridodecylmethylammonium cations and tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate anions. An extension of the existing theory of voltammetry of ion transfer across polarized liquid membranes makes it possible to evaluate the standard ion-transfer potentials for the hydrophilic cations studied, as well as the stability constants (K(i)) of their 1:1 complexes with valinomycin, as log K(i) = 9.0 (H(+)), 11.1 (Li(+)), 12.8 (Na(+)), 17.2 (K(+)), 15.7 (Rb(+)), 15.1 (Cs(+)), and 14.7 (NH(4)(+)). These data point to the remarkably enhanced stability of the valinomycin complexes within RTIL, and to the enhanced selectivity of valinomycin for K(+) over all other univalent ions studied, compared to the conventional K(+) ion-selective liquid-membrane electrodes. Selective complex formation allows one to resolve voltammetric responses of K(+) and Na(+) in the presence of an excess of Mg(2+) or Ca(2+), which is demonstrated by determination of K(+) and Na(+) in the table and tap water samples.

  4. Interparticle interactions and polarization effects in colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The physics of simple colloidal systems is usually dominated by three independent length scales: the particle size, the average interparticle distance, and the range of the interparticle potential. The dispersed particles typically have characteristic dimensions in the range 5 to 100 nm, often with spherical or cylindrical symmetry. Dispersion densities vary over volume fractions ranging from 0.5 to 10/sup -4/, with the corresponding mean interparticle distances ranging from about 1 to 10 diameters (in spherical systems). The interaction potential may be very short ranged (hard sphere), very long ranged (Coulomb or dipolar), or anywhere in between (screened Coulomb), and the correlations exhibited in the dispersion may be gas-like, liquid-like or crystalline, depending on the range of the potential relative to the interparticle distance. This rich phase behavior is responsible for the remarkable importance of colloidal studies in many areas of condensed matter physics and biophysics, but it poses often intractable problems in developing the statistical mechanical descriptions necessary for an understanding of scattering data from colloids. This paper will review the considerable recent progress in this field, in the context of SANS experiments on colloids in which the potentials are dominated by either screened Coulomb or magnetic dipolar interactions; in the case of magnetic colloids (ferrofluids), the use of polarization analysis will also be discussed. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  5. The antecedents and belief-polarized effects of thought confidence.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsuan-Yi; Lien, Nai-Hwa; Liang, Kuan-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates 2 possible antecedents of thought confidence and explores the effects of confidence induced before or during ad exposure. The results of the experiments indicate that both consumers' dispositional optimism and spokesperson attractiveness have significant effects on consumers' confidence in thoughts that are generated after viewing the advertisement. Higher levels of thought confidence will influence the quality of the thoughts that people generate, lead to either positively or negatively polarized message processing, and therefore induce better or worse advertising effectiveness, depending on the valence of thoughts. The authors posit the belief-polarization hypothesis to explain these findings.

  6. Laser Polarization Effect on Molecular Harmonic and Elliptically Polarized Attosecond Pulse Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Li-Qiang; Li, Wen-Liang; Liu, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Molecular harmonic spectra of {{{H}}}2+ driven by the linearly polarized laser pulses with different polarized angles have been theoretically investigated through solving the two-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation. (i) Below-threshold harmonic spectra show a visible enhanced peak around the 7th harmonic (H7), which produces a red-shift phenomenon as the internuclear distance increased. Theoretical analyses show the red-shift enhanced peak is caused by the laser-induced electron transfer between the ground state and the 1st excited state of {{{H}}}2+. (ii) Due to the two-centre interference phenomenon, the above-threshold harmonic spectra exhibit many maxima and minima. (iii) With the introduction of the polarized angle, the anomalous elliptically polarized harmonics can be found. But, with the introduction of the spatial inhomogeneous effect, not only the ellipticities of the harmonics are equal to a stable value of \\varepsilon ∼ 0.1–0.3, but also the harmonic cutoffs are extended. As a result, four super-bandwidths of 407 eV, 310 eV, 389 eV, and 581 eV can be obtained. Time profiles of the harmonic generations have been shown to explain the harmonic characteristics. Finally, a series of elliptically polarized (\\varepsilon ∼ 0.1–0.3) attosecond X-ray pulses with durations from 18as to 25as can be directly produced through Fourier transformation of the spectral continuum. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11504151, Doctoral Scientific Research Foundation of Liaoning Province under Grant No. 201501123 and Scientific Research Fund of Liaoning Provincial Education Department under Grant No. L2014242

  7. Radiative effects in scattering of polarized leptons by polarized nucleons and light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Akushevich; A. Ilyichev; N. Shumeiko

    2001-07-01

    Recent developments in the field of radiative effects in polarized lepton-nuclear scattering are reviewed. The processes of inclusive, semi-inclusive, diffractive and elastic scattering are considered. The explicit formulae obtained within the covariant approach are discussed. FORTRAN codes POLRAD, RADGEN, HAPRAD, DIFFRAD and MASCARAD created on the basis of the formulae are briefly described. Applications for data analysis of the current experiments on lepton-nuclear scattering at CERN, DESY, SLAC and TJNAF are illustrated by numerical results.

  8. Alterations of erythrocyte membrane organization in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Beaugé, F; Stibler, H; Borg, S

    1987-01-01

    Studies of fluorescence polarization of DPH have shown that erythrocyte membrane "fluidity" and fluidization by ethanol are significantly reduced in alcoholics. By using probes of the polar part of the membrane, ANS and TMA-DPH, in addition to DPH, it was shown in the present study that disturbances also exist in the polar region of the membrane which probably are related to changes in surface glycoconjugates. Furthermore, the acute fluidizing effect of ethanol was correlated with the capacity of the membrane to bind ethanol, which in turn appeared to be linked to the glycans. Chronic ethanol abuse thus causes complex disturbances of membrane organization at different levels of the membrane.

  9. [DOM membrane fouling and effects on rejection behaviors of NF membranes].

    PubMed

    Feng, Gui-Zhen; Dong, Bing-Zhi

    2013-11-01

    This work investigated membrane fouling caused by two kinds of dissolved organic matters (DOMs), i. e., Qingcaosha (QCS) DOM and Taihu lake (TH) DOM, and the effects on the rejection behaviors of two different nanofiltration (NF) membranes, i. e., HL and ESNA1-K, using carbamazepine (CBZ) as a molecular indicator. The results showed that severe membrane fouling occurred in the presence of DOM. And the CBZ removal rate was associated with the properties and characteristics of the organic matters and the membranes. It was found that the hydrophobicity of adhered DOM cake layer was responsible for the flux decline and the influence of CBZ removal. QCS DOM increased the retention of CBZ, while TH DOM decreased the rejection rate of CBZ by both membranes tested. DOMs at medium relative molecular weight (M(r) 1 500-10 000) could adhere closely to NF membranes to form cake layer, thus changed the hydrophobicity of the membranes. DOMs at low molecular weight could enter the membrane pores reducing the M(r), which influenced the CBZ removal and resulted in membrane fouling. The experiment also showed that DOM of TH contained more hydrophobic organic matters than that of QCS, the adhesion free energy and cohesion free energy of which was more negative, and the resulting membrane fouling and membrane flux decline were more severe.

  10. Proton electrolyte membrane properties and direct methanol fuel cell performance. II. Fuel cell performance and membrane properties effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, V. S.; Schirmer, J.; Reissner, R.; Ruffmann, B.; Silva, H.; Mendes, A.; Madeira, L. M.; Nunes, S. P.

    In order to study the relationship between the properties of proton electrolyte membranes (PEMs), obtained through standard characterization methods, and the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) performance, inorganic-organic hybrid membranes, modified via in situ hydrolysis, were used in a membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) for DMFC application. The membranes, the characterization of which was performed in the previous paper of this series, were based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) with a sulfonation degree (SD) of 87% and were loaded with different amounts of zirconium oxide (5.0, 7.5, 10.0, 12.5 wt.%). The standard characterization methods applied were impedance spectroscopy (proton conductivity), water uptake, and pervaporation (permeability to methanol). The MEAs were characterized investigating the DMFC current-voltage polarization curves, constant voltage current (CV, 35 mV), and open-circuit voltage (OCV). The fuel cell ohmic resistance (null phase angle impedance, NPAI) and CO 2 concentration in the cathode outlet were also measured. The characterization results show that the incorporation of the inorganic oxide in the polymer network decreases the DMFC current density for CV experiments, CO 2 concentration in the cathode outlet for both OCV and CV experiments and, finally, the maximum power density output. The opposite effect was verified in terms of the NPAI (ohmic resistance) for both OCV and CV experiments. A good agreement was found between the studied DMFC performance parameters and the characterization results evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, water uptake and pervaporation experiments.

  11. Effects of Batrachotoxin on Membrane Potential and Conductance of Squid Giant Axons

    PubMed Central

    Narahashi, Toshio; Albuquerque, Edson X.; Deguchi, Takehiko

    1971-01-01

    The effects of batrachotoxin (BTX) on the membrane potential and conductances of squid giant axons have been studied by means of intracellular microelectrode recording, internal perfusion, and voltage clamp techniques. BTX (550–1100 nM) caused a marked and irreversible depolarization of the nerve membrane, the membrane potential being eventually reversed in polarity by as much as 15 mv. The depolarization progressed more rapidly with internal application than with external application of BTX to the axon. External application of tetrodotoxin (1000 nM) completely restored the BTX depolarization. Removal or drastic reduction of external sodium caused a hyperpolarization of the BTX-poisoned membrane. However, no change in the resting membrane potential occurred when BTX was applied in the absence of sodium ions in both external and internal phases. These observations demonstrate that BTX specifically increases the resting sodium permeability of the squid axon membrane. Despite such an increase in resting sodium permeability, the BTX-poisoned membrane was still capable of undergoing a large sodium permeability increase of normal magnitude upon depolarizing stimulation provided that the membrane potential was brought back to the original or higher level. The possibility that a single sodium channel is operative for both the resting sodium, permeability and the sodium permeability increase upon stimulation is discussed. PMID:5564762

  12. [Changes in polarization of myometrial cells plasma and internal mitochondrial membranes under calixarenes action as inhibitors of plasma membrane Na+, K+-ATPase].

    PubMed

    Danylovych, H V; Danylovych, Iu V; Kolomiiets', O V; Kosterin, S O; Rodik, R V; Cherenok, S O; Kal'chenko, V I; Chunikhin, O Iu; Horchev, V F; Karakhim, S O

    2012-01-01

    The influence of supramolecular macrocyclic compounds--calix[4]arenes C-97, C-99, C-107, which are ouabainomymetic high affinity inhibitors of Na+, K(+)-ATPase, on the polarization level of plasmic and mitochondrial membranes of rat uterine smooth muscle cells was investigated. The influence of these compounds on the myocytes characteristic size was studied. By using a confocal microscopy and specific for mitochondrial MitoTracker Orange CM-H2TMRos dye it was proved that the potential-sensitive fluorescent probe DiOC6(3) interacts with mitochondria. Artificial potential collapse of plasmic membrane in this case was modeled by myocytes preincubation with ouabain (1 mM). Further experiments performed using the method of flow cytometry with DiOC6(3) have shown that the compounds C-97, C-99 and C-107 at concentration 50-100 nM caused depolarization of the plasma membrane (at the level of 30% relative to control values) in conditions of artificial collapse of mitochondrial potential by myocytes preincubation in the presence of 5 mM of sodium azide. Under artificial sarcolemma depolarization by ouabain, calixarenes C-97, C-99 and C-107 at 100 nM concentrations caused a transient increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, that is 40% of the control level and lasted about 5 minutes. Calixarenes C-99 and C-107 caused a significant increase in fluorescence of myocytes in these conditions, which was confirmed by confocal microscopy too. It was proved by photon correlation spectroscopy method that the C-99 and C-107 caused an increase of characteristic size of myocytes.

  13. Specific ion effects on membrane potential and the permselectivity of ion exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Geise, Geoffrey M; Cassady, Harrison J; Paul, Donald R; Logan, Bruce E; Hickner, Michael A

    2014-10-21

    Membrane potential and permselectivity are critical parameters for a variety of electrochemically-driven separation and energy technologies. An electric potential is developed when a membrane separates electrolyte solutions of different concentrations, and a permselective membrane allows specific species to be transported while restricting the passage of other species. Ion exchange membranes are commonly used in applications that require advanced ionic electrolytes and span technologies such as alkaline batteries to ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis, but membranes are often only characterized in sodium chloride solutions. Our goal in this work was to better understand membrane behaviour in aqueous ammonium bicarbonate, which is of interest for closed-loop energy generation processes. Here we characterized the permselectivity of four commercial ion exchange membranes in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ammonium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, and ammonium bicarbonate. This stepwise approach, using four different ions in aqueous solution, was used to better understand how these specific ions affect ion transport in ion exchange membranes. Characterization of cation and anion exchange membrane permselectivity, using these ions, is discussed from the perspective of the difference in the physical chemistry of the hydrated ions, along with an accompanying re-derivation and examination of the basic equations that describe membrane potential. In general, permselectivity was highest in sodium chloride and lowest in ammonium bicarbonate solutions, and the nature of both the counter- and co-ions appeared to influence measured permselectivity. The counter-ion type influences the binding affinity between counter-ions and polymer fixed charge groups, and higher binding affinity between fixed charge sites and counter-ions within the membrane decreases the effective membrane charge density. As a result permselectivity decreases. The charge density and polarizability

  14. On the curvature effect of thin membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Duo; Jiao, Xiangmin; Conley, Rebecca; Glimm, James

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the curvature effect of a thin, curved elastic interface that separates two subdomains and exerts a pressure due to a curvature effect. This pressure, which we refer to as interface pressure, is similar to the surface tension in fluid mechanics. It is important in some applications, such as the canopy of parachutes, biological membranes of cells, balloons, airbags, etc., as it partially balances a pressure jump between the two sides of an interface. In this paper, we show that the interface pressure is equal to the trace of the matrix product of the curvature tensor and the Cauchy stress tensor in the tangent plane. We derive the theory for interfaces in both 2-D and 3-D, and present numerical discretizations for computing the quality over triangulated surfaces.

  15. Cross-tolerance of human placental plasma membranes of smokers to fluidizing effects of alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, B.V.R.; Horst, M.A.; Naukam, R.J. )

    1991-03-11

    There is cross-tolerance between ethanol and several centrally acting drugs at the membrane level. In order to evaluate cross-tolerance between maternal smoking during pregnancy and alcohol, the authors have prepared plasma membranes of human term placentas from nonsmokers (NS, n=5) and smokers (S, 24 {plus minus} 8 cigarettes/day, n=5) and studied their microviscosities by steady state fluorescence polarization using trans-1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene as a fluorescent probe. These experiments gave the following results: (a) microviscosity was increased by maternal smoking; (b) alcohol decreased microviscosity of the membranes of smokers; (c) exogenous nicotine did not exert any significant effect on the membranes of smokers and nonsmokers. Therefore, the increase in the rigidity of placental plasma membranes is due to chronic smoking, and these membranes are tolerant to the fluidizing effects of alcohol. Cross-tolerance between smoking and ethanol suggests a common hydrophobic locus of the apparent adaptation at the membrane level.

  16. Effect of membrane bioreactor solids retention time on reverse osmosis membrane fouling for wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Farias, Elizabeth L; Howe, Kerry J; Thomson, Bruce M

    2014-02-01

    The effect of the solids retention time (SRT) in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) on the fouling of the membranes in a subsequent reverse osmosis (RO) process used for wastewater reuse was studied experimentally using a pilot-scale treatment system. The MBR-RO pilot system was fed effluent from the primary clarifiers at a large municipal wastewater treatment plant. The SRT in the MBRs was adjusted to approximately 2, 10, and 20 days in three experiments. The normalized specific flux through the MBR and RO membranes was evaluated along with inorganic and organic constituents in the influent and effluent of each process. Increasing the SRT in the MBR led to an increase in the removal of bulk DOC, protein, and carbohydrates, as has been observed in previous studies. Increasing the SRT led to a decrease in the fouling of the MBR membranes, which is consistent with previous studies. However, the opposite trend was observed for fouling of the RO membranes; increasing the SRT of the MBR resulted in increased fouling of the RO membranes. These results indicate that the constituents that foul MBR membranes are not the same as those that foul RO membranes; to be an RO membrane foulant in a MBR-RO system, the constituents must first pass through the MBR membranes without being retained. Thus, an intermediate value of SRT may be best choice of operating conditions in an MBR when the MBR is followed by RO for wastewater reuse.

  17. Nanocarbon-based membrane filtration integrated with electric field driving for effective membrane fouling mitigation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinfei; Zhao, Huimin; Quan, Xie; Liu, Yanming; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Membrane filtration provides an effective solution for removing pollutants from water but is limited by serious membrane fouling. In this work, an effective approach was used to mitigate membrane fouling by integrating membrane filtration with electropolarization using an electroconductive nanocarbon-based membrane. The electropolarized membrane (EM) by alternating square-wave potentials between +1.0 V and -1.0 V with a pulse width of 60 s exhibited a permeate flux 8.1 times as high as that without electropolarization for filtering feed water containing bacteria, which confirms the ability of the EM to achieve biofouling mitigation. Moreover, the permeate flux of EM was 1.5 times as high as that without electropolarization when filtrating natural organic matter (NOM) from water, and demonstrated good performance in organic fouling mitigation with EM. Furthermore, the EM was also effective for complex fouling mitigation in filtering water containing coexisting bacteria and NOM, and presented an increased flux rate 1.9 times as high as that without electropolarization. The superior fouling mitigation performance of EM was attributed to the synergistic effects of electrostatic repulsion, electrochemical oxidation and electrokinetic behaviors. This work opens an effective avenue for membrane fouling mitigation of water-treatment membrane filtration systems.

  18. Sensor development for in situ detection of concentration polarization and fouling of reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrich, Kahlil T.; Goulbourne, Nakhiah C.

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate three polymer electroding techniques in developing a novel in situ sensor for an RO system using the electrical response of a thin film composite sensor. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to measure the sensor response when exposed to sodium chloride solutions with concentrations from 0.1 M to 0.8 M in both single and double bath configurations. An insulated carbon grease sensor was mechanically stable while a composite Direct Assembly Process (DAP) sensor was fragile upon hydration. Scanning electron microscopy results from an impregnation-reduction technique showed gold nanoparticles were deposited most effectively when presoaked in a potassium hydroxide solution and on an uncoated membrane; surface resistances remained too high for sensor implementation. Through thickness carbon grease sensors showed a transient response to changes in concentration, and no meaningful concentration sensitivity was noted for the time scales over which EIS measurements were taken. Surface carbon grease electrodes attached to the polyamide thin film were not sensitive to concentration. The impedance spectra indicated the carbon grease sensor was unable to detect changes in concentration in double bath experiments when implemented with the polyamide surface exposed to salt solutions. DAP sensors lacked a consistent response to changes in concentration too. A reverse double bath experiment with the polysulfone layer exposed to a constant concentration exhibited a transient impedance response similar to through thickness carbon grease sensors in a single bath at constant concentration. These results suggest that the microporous polysulfone layer is responsible for sensor response to concentration.

  19. Effects of ionic strength on membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyuan; Zhang, Meijia; Peng, Wei; He, Yiming; Lin, Hongjun; Chen, Jianrong; Hong, Huachang; Wang, Aijun; Yu, Haiying

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the effects of ionic strength on membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) were investigated. Ionic strength in range of 0.005-0.05mol/L exerted no apparent impacts on the resistance of virgin membrane, fouled membrane and pore clogging. Thermodynamic analysis showed existences of a secondary energy minimum and an energy barrier in the process of the sludge flocs approaching to membrane surface. Increase in ionic strength could significantly reduce the energy barrier. It was revealed that there existed a critical ionic strength above that the energy barrier would disappear, facilitating adhesion of the foulants. Cake resistance was not significantly affected by the ionic strength, but highly depended on SMP in supernatant. The high cake resistance caused by SMP could be explained by the osmotic pressure mechanism. The obtained results provided new insights into membrane fouling in MBRs.

  20. Solvent Polarity Effect on Nonradiative Decay Rate of Thioflavin T.

    PubMed

    Stsiapura, Vitali I; Kurhuzenkau, Siarhei A; Kuzmitsky, Valery A; Bouganov, Oleg V; Tikhomirov, Sergey A

    2016-07-21

    It has been established earlier that fluorescence quantum yield of thioflavin T (ThT)-a probe widely used for amyloid fibrils detection-is viscosity-dependent, and photophysical properties of ThT can be well-described by the fluorescent molecular rotor model, which associates twisted internal charge transfer (TICT) reaction with the main nonradiative decay process in the excited state of the dye. Solutions of ThT in a range of polar solvents were studied using steady-state fluorescence and sub-picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy methods, and we showed that solvent effect on nonradiative transition rate knr cannot be reduced to the dependence on viscosity only and that ∼3 times change of knr can be observed for ThT in aprotic solvents and water, which correlates with solvent polarity. Different behavior was observed in alcohol solutions, particularly in longer n-alcohols, where TICT rate was mainly determined by rotational diffusion of ThT fragments. Quantum-chemical calculations of S0 → S1 transition energy were performed to get insight of polar solvent contribution to the excited-state energy stabilization. Effect of polar solvent on electronic energy levels of ThT was simulated by applying homogeneous electric field according to the Onsager cavity model. Static solvent effect on the excited-state potential energy surface, where charge transfer reaction takes place, was not essential to account for experimentally observed TICT rate differences in water and aprotic solvents. From the other side, nonradiative decay rate of ThT in water, ethylene glycol, and aprotic solvents was found to follow dynamics of polar solvation knr ∼ τS(-1), which can explain dependence of the TICT rate on both polarity and viscosity of the solvents.

  1. Estimating Potential Effects of Hypothetical Oil Spills on Polar Bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Durner, G.M.; McDonald, T.L.; Johnson, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    Much is known about the transport and fate of oil spilled into the sea and its toxicity to exposed wildlife. Previously, however, there has been no way to quantify the probability that wildlife dispersed over the seascape would be exposed to spilled oil. Polar bears, the apical predator of the arctic, are widely dispersed near the continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean, an area also undergoing considerable hydrocarbon exploration and development. We used 15,308 satellite locations from 194 radiocollared polar bears to estimate the probability that polar bears could be exposed to hypothetical oil spills. We used a true 2 dimensional Gausian kernel density estimator, to estimate the number of bears likely to occur in each 1.00 km2 cell of a grid superimposed over near shore areas surrounding 2 oil production facilities: the existing Northstar oil production facility, and the proposed offshore site for the Liberty production facility. We estimated the standard errors of bear numbers per cell with bootstrapping. Simulated oil spill footprints for September and October, the times during which we hypothesized effects of an oil-spill would be worst, were estimated using real wind and current data collected between 1980 and 1996. We used ARC/Info software to calculate overlap (numbers of bears oiled) between simulated oil-spill footprints and polar bear grid-cell values. Numbers of bears potentially oiled by a hypothetical 5912 barrel spill (the largest spill thought probable from a pipeline breach) ranged from 0 to 27 polar bears for September open water conditions, and from 0 to 74 polar bears in October mixed ice conditions. Median numbers oiled by the 5912 barrel hypothetical spill from the Liberty simulation in September and October were 1 and 3 bears, equivalent values for the Northstar simulation were 3 and 11 bears. In October, 75% of trajectories from the 5912 barrel simulated spill at Liberty oiled 9 or fewer bears while 75% of the trajectories affected 20 or

  2. Sensitivity enhancement for membrane proteins reconstituted in parallel and perpendicular oriented bicelles obtained by using repetitive cross-polarization and membrane-incorporated free radicals.

    PubMed

    Koroloff, Sophie N; Tesch, Deanna M; Awosanya, Emmanuel O; Nevzorov, Alexander A

    2017-02-01

    Multidimensional separated local-field and spin-exchange experiments employed by oriented-sample solid-state NMR are essential for structure determination and spectroscopic assignment of membrane proteins reconstituted in macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers. However, these experiments typically require a large number of scans in order to establish interspin correlations. Here we have shown that a combination of optimized repetitive cross polarization (REP-CP) and membrane-embedded free radicals allows one to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio by factors 2.4-3.0 in the case of Pf1 coat protein reconstituted in magnetically aligned bicelles with their normals being either parallel or perpendicular to the main magnetic field. Notably, spectral resolution is not affected at the 2:1 radical-to-protein ratio. Spectroscopic assignment of Pf1 coat protein in the parallel bicelles has been established as an illustration of the method. The proposed methodology will advance applications of oriented-sample NMR technique when applied to samples containing smaller quantities of proteins and three-dimensional experiments.

  3. Effect of physical constraints on the mechanisms of membrane fusion: bolaform lipid vesicles as model systems.

    PubMed Central

    Relini, A; Cassinadri, D; Fan, Q; Gulik, A; Mirghani, Z; De Rosa, M; Gliozzi, A

    1996-01-01

    Bolaform lipid vesicles were used to study the effect of physical constraints on membrane fusion. In these vesicles the membrane is organized in a single monolayer, because of the presence of covalent bonds in its middle plane. Therefore, the formation of fusion intermediates is subject to higher energy barriers and greater geometrical constraints than is usual in bilayer membranes. Bolaform lipids were extracted from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. These lipids can be divided into two classes, the monosubstituted molecules, in which one of the polar heads is glycerol, and the bisubstituted molecules, endowed with two complex polar heads. The fusion process in vesicles composed of different mixtures of monosubstituted/bisubstituted molecules was studied by means of fluorescence techniques. Ca2+ or poly(ethylene glycol) was employed as a fusogenic agent. We found that fusion of such constrained membranes is still possible, provided that molecules able to mediate a structural rearrangement of the membrane are present. This condition is fulfilled by monosubstituted molecules, which are able to partition the glycerol headgroup in the apolar moiety. In addition, the presence of traces (approximately 5%) of the monopolar compound diphytanylglycerol is an important factor for fusion to occur. On the contrary, vesicles formed by bisubstituted molecules are unable to fuse, irrespective of the fusogen employed. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8889155

  4. Effect of some penetration enhancers on epithelial membrane lipid domains: evidence from fluorescence spectroscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Turunen, T M; Urtti, A; Paronen, P; Audus, K L; Rytting, J H

    1994-02-01

    The effect of the penetration enhancers Azone, oleic acid, 1-dodecanol, dodecyl N,N-dimethylaminoacetate (DDAA), and dodecyl N,N-dimethylaminoisopropionate (DDAIP) on epithelial membrane lipids was examined using human buccal cell membranes as a model for epithelial lipid bilayer. Buccal epithelial cells (BEC) were labeled with 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), 1-(4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl)-6- phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH), and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulphonic acid (ANS) fluorophores to characterize enhancer-induced changes in the hydrophobic core, in the superficial polar head region, and on the exterior surface, respectively, with fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence lifetimes. All the enhancers studied were found to decrease the BEC membrane lipid packing order in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner in the deep bilayer region, as shown by a 37-66% decrease in anisotropy. Oleic acid was also found to disrupt membrane lipids strongly in the polar head region, causing at least a 34% decrease in anisotropy values. Azone and DDAA were shown to alter molecular movement on the surface of the bilayers (24 and 19% decrease in anisotropy, respectively). The results suggest that interaction with membrane lipid domains is an important, but not the only, mode of action for the penetration enhancers studied.

  5. Effects of membrane orientation on fouling characteristics of forward osmosis membrane in concentration of microalgae culture.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryo; Rukapan, Weerapong; Komura, Hitomi; Teraoka, Yuta; Noguchi, Mana; Hoek, Eric M V

    2015-12-01

    Application of forward osmosis (FO) membrane to microalgae cultivation processes enables concentration of microalgae and nutrients with low energy consumption. To understand fouling characteristics of FO membrane in concentration of microalgae culture, we studied flux decline, flux recovery by cleaning, and foulants characteristics, in different membrane orientation of active-layer-facing-feed-solution (AL-FS) and active-layer-facing-draw-solution (AL-DS) modes. Batch concentration of Chlorella vulgaris was conducted with a cellulose-triacetate FO membrane. Rapid flux decline and lower flux recovery was observed in AL-DS mode because of inner-membrane fouling including internal pore clogging, adsorption and internal concentration polarization in the support layer. A proportion of polysaccharides in extracellular polymeric substances to soluble microbial products were larger in chemical cleaning effluent than physical one in AL-DS mode, although those were not significantly different in AL-FS mode. Excitation-emission matrix analysis revealed that proteins and humic-like substances were also possible irreversible foulants both in AL-DS and AL-FS modes.

  6. Electromagnetic wave propagation in rain and polarization effects

    PubMed Central

    OKAMURA, Sogo; OGUCHI, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes our study on microwave and millimeter-wave propagation in rain with special emphasis on the effects of polarization. Starting from a recount of our past findings, we will discuss developments with these and how they are connected with subsequent research. PMID:20551593

  7. Full Angular Profile of the Coherent Polarization Opposition Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Luck, Jean-Marc; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    1999-01-01

    We use the rigorous vector theory of weak photon localization for a semi-infinite medium composed of nonabsorbing Rayleigh scatterers to compute the full angular profile of the polarization opposition effect. The latter is caused by coherent backscattering of unpolarized incident light and accompanies the renowned backscattering intensity peak.

  8. Widespread spin polarization effects in photoemission from topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Jozwiak, C.; Chen, Y. L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Analytis, J. G.; Rotundu, C. R.; Schmid, A. K.; Denlinger, J. D.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lee, D.-H.; Fisher, I. R.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Hussain, Z.; Lanzara, A.

    2011-06-22

    High-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) was performed on the three-dimensional topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} using a recently developed high-efficiency spectrometer. The topological surface state's helical spin structure is observed, in agreement with theoretical prediction. Spin textures of both chiralities, at energies above and below the Dirac point, are observed, and the spin structure is found to persist at room temperature. The measurements reveal additional unexpected spin polarization effects, which also originate from the spin-orbit interaction, but are well differentiated from topological physics by contrasting momentum and photon energy and polarization dependencies. These observations demonstrate significant deviations of photoelectron and quasiparticle spin polarizations. Our findings illustrate the inherent complexity of spin-resolved ARPES and demonstrate key considerations for interpreting experimental results.

  9. Synthesis of modified polymer inclusion membranes for photo-electrodeposition of cadmium using polarized electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Asma Yahia; Arous, Omar; Amara, Mourad; Omeiri, Said; Kerdjoudj, Hacène; Trari, Mohamed

    2012-08-15

    In this work, we have developed a novel class of polymeric inclusion membranes (PIMs) for the cations separation. The membrane is made up of cellulose triacetate modified by poly-electrolytes (poly-phosphoric acid, polyvinyl pyrolidone, polyacrylic acid, polyvinyl alcohol and poly-anetholsulfonic acid) using 2-hydroxy-5-dodecylbenzaldehyde incorporated into the polymer as carrier and tris ethyl hexyl phosphate or glycerine as plasticizers. Different PIMs are synthesized and characterized by the Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The influence of the membrane nature is studied using supports with different physical characteristics (porosity, thickness, hydrophobia). As application, the transport of Cd(2+) using PIMs coupled with photo-electrodes is investigated. The photo-catalytic results indicate that the combined system p-CuFeO(2)/membrane/n-WO(3) enhances considerably the electrons transfer toward the delafossite CuFeO(2). The position of the conduction band of CuFeO(2) is looked to be the key issue for the photo electrochemical Cd(2+) reduction.

  10. A micromechanic study of cell polarity and plasma membrane cell body coupling in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, R; Simson, R; Simson, D A; Hohenadl, M; Boulbitch, A; Wallraff, E; Sackmann, E

    2000-01-01

    We used micropipettes to aspirate leading and trailing edges of wild-type and mutant cells of Dictyostelium discoideum. Mutants were lacking either myosin II or talin, or both proteins simultaneously. Talin is a plasma membrane-associated protein important for the coupling between membrane and actin cortex, whereas myosin II is a cytoplasmic motor protein essential for the locomotion of Dictyostelium cells. Aspiration into the pipette occurred above a threshold pressure only. For all cells containing talin this threshold was significantly lower at the leading edge of an advancing cell as compared to its rear end, whereas we found no such difference in cells lacking talin. Wild-type and talin-deficient cells were able to retract from the pipette against an applied suction pressure. In these cells, retraction was preceded by an accumulation of myosin II in the tip of the aspirated cell lobe. Mutants lacking myosin II could not retract, even if the suction pressures were removed after aspiration. We interpreted the initial instability and the subsequent plastic deformation of the cell surface during aspiration in terms of a fracture between the cell plasma membrane and the cell body, which may involve destruction of part of the cortex. Models are presented that characterize the coupling strength between membrane and cell body by a surface energy sigma. We find sigma approximately 0.6(1.6) mJ/m(2) at the leading (trailing) edge of wild-type cells. PMID:10920005

  11. Spatial Congruity Effects Reveal Metaphorical Thinking, not Polarity Correspondence.

    PubMed

    Dolscheid, Sarah; Casasanto, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Spatial congruity effects have often been interpreted as evidence for metaphorical thinking, but an alternative account based on polarity correspondence (a.k.a. markedness) has challenged this view. Here we compared metaphor- and polarity-correspondence-based explanations for spatial congruity effects, using musical pitch as a testbed. In one experiment, English speakers classified high- and low-frequency pitches as "high" and "low," or as "front" and "back," to determine whether space-pitch congruity effects could be elicited by any marked spatial continuum. Although both pairs of terms describe bipolar spatial continuums, we found congruity effects only for high/low judgments, indicating that markedness is not sufficient to produce space-pitch congruity effects. A second experiment confirmed that there were no space-pitch congruity effects for another pair of terms that have clear markedness (big/small), but which do not denote spatial height. By contrast, this experiment showed congruity effects for words that cued an appropriate vertical spatial schema (tall/short), even though these words are not used conventionally in English to describe pitches, ruling out explanations for the observed pattern of results based on verbal polysemy. Together, results suggest that space-pitch congruity effects reveal metaphorical uses of spatial schemas, not polarity correspondence effects.

  12. Spatial Congruity Effects Reveal Metaphorical Thinking, not Polarity Correspondence

    PubMed Central

    Dolscheid, Sarah; Casasanto, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Spatial congruity effects have often been interpreted as evidence for metaphorical thinking, but an alternative account based on polarity correspondence (a.k.a. markedness) has challenged this view. Here we compared metaphor- and polarity-correspondence-based explanations for spatial congruity effects, using musical pitch as a testbed. In one experiment, English speakers classified high- and low-frequency pitches as “high” and “low,” or as “front” and “back,” to determine whether space-pitch congruity effects could be elicited by any marked spatial continuum. Although both pairs of terms describe bipolar spatial continuums, we found congruity effects only for high/low judgments, indicating that markedness is not sufficient to produce space-pitch congruity effects. A second experiment confirmed that there were no space-pitch congruity effects for another pair of terms that have clear markedness (big/small), but which do not denote spatial height. By contrast, this experiment showed congruity effects for words that cued an appropriate vertical spatial schema (tall/short), even though these words are not used conventionally in English to describe pitches, ruling out explanations for the observed pattern of results based on verbal polysemy. Together, results suggest that space-pitch congruity effects reveal metaphorical uses of spatial schemas, not polarity correspondence effects. PMID:26635713

  13. Effect of biogas sparging with different membrane modules on membrane fouling in anaerobic submerged membrane bioreactor (AnSMBR).

    PubMed

    Aslan, Mustafa; Saatçi, Yusuf; Hanay, Özge; Hasar, Halil

    2014-03-01

    This study focused on the effect of biogas sparging and different membrane modules such as cylinder shaped, funnel-shaped, and U-shaped on the membrane fouling behavior in a lab-scale submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnSMBR) which was operated for over 60 days. In order to investigate the membrane fouling behavior, a series of analysis such as SMP, EPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), particle size distribution, and filtration resistances were performed. Although the rapid generation of cake layer took placed in case of the absence of biogas sparging, the membrane module design mostly influenced the membrane resistance when biogas sparging was applied. Total resistance was the highest for U-shaped module. The permeate fluxes with biogas sparging were higher about one half and two times than those without biogas sparging. Cylinder-shaped module had the lowest SMP and EPS concentrations followed by U-shaped and funnel-shaped modules under both cases with and without biogas sparging. The total resistances of all membrane modules without biogas sparging were found to be very high compared the pore blocking resistances (Rp).

  14. Computer simulation of inorganic membrane morphology: 2 -- Effect of infiltration at the membrane support interface

    SciTech Connect

    Randon, J.; Julbe, A.; David, P.; Jaafari, K. . Lab. de Physicochimie des Materiaux); Elmaleh, S. . Groupe de Genie des Procedes)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate, through computer modeling of a ceramic membrane filtration element, that infiltration of a membrane into the ceramic support can have a drastic effect on the porosity at the interface and hence on the hydraulic resistance of the filtration element. A computer model using round spheres has been developed, allowing a realistic picture of the support (infiltrated or not) and of the membrane on top of it. This model allows a determination of the porosity in the support and at the membrane/support interface; it shows the effect of infiltration on the porosity. Experimentally, infiltrated and noninfiltrated TiO[sub 2] membranes have been prepared on tubular ceramic supports and their filtration performances have been compared. The results reveal that in order to increase the permeability of filtration elements, their preparation must limit the size of infiltrated zones.

  15. Effect of membrane character and solution chemistry on microfiltration performance.

    PubMed

    Gray, S R; Ritchie, C B; Tran, T; Bolto, B A; Greenwood, P; Busetti, F; Allpike, B

    2008-02-01

    To help understand and predict the role of natural organic matter (NOM) in the fouling of low-pressure membranes, experiments were carried out with an apparatus that incorporates automatic backwashing and long filtration runs. Three hollow fibre membranes of varying character were included in the study, and the filtration of two different surface waters was compared. The hydrophilic membrane had greater flux recovery after backwashing than the hydrophobic membranes, but the efficiency of backwashing decreased at extended filtration times. NOM concentration of these waters (7.9 and 9.1mg/L) had little effect on the flux of the membranes at extended filtration times, as backwashing of the membrane restored the flux to similar values regardless of the NOM concentration. The solution pH also had little effect at extended filtration times. The backwashing efficiency of the hydrophilic membrane was dramatically different for the two waters, and the presence of colloid NOM alone could not explain these differences. It is proposed that colloidal NOM forms a filter cake on the surface of the membranes and that small molecular weight organics that have an adsorption peak at 220nm but not 254nm were responsible for "gluing" the colloids to the membrane surface. Alum coagulation improved membrane performance in all instances, and this was suggested to be because coagulation reduced the concentration of "glue" that holds the organic colloids to the membrane surface.

  16. Performance of PDMS membranes in pervaporation: effect of silicalite fillers and comparison with SBS membranes.

    PubMed

    Dobrak, A; Figoli, A; Chovau, S; Galiano, F; Simone, S; Vankelecom, I F J; Drioli, E; Van der Bruggen, B

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory-made silicalite filled PDMS membranes were tested by means of concentration and temperature influence on the membrane performance in removal of ethanol from ethanol/water mixtures. This allowed studying the applicability of solution-diffusion model in the transport mechanism description. Experiments were performed by varying the ethanol concentration in the feed and temperature. Two types of fillers were incorporated into the PDMS network: commercial zeolite silicalite (CBV 3002) and laboratory-made colloidal silicalite-1. Obtained results were then compared with data gathered for unfilled PDMS membranes to examine the effect of fillers incorporation. Moreover, the comparison with novel block co-polymer based porous and dense SBS membranes was done. It was found that the solution-diffusion model was a good representation of ethanol transport through both filled and unfilled PDMS membranes, whereas the water flux did not obey this model due to the swelling effects. Incorporation of the fillers increased membrane stability and improved the selectivity. Performance of the SBS membranes characterized by a dense structure was found to be similar to the performance of filled PDMS membranes.

  17. Strain effect on spin polarization in a graphene junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhenzhou; Lu, Ning; Qiu, Xuejun; Wang, Guofei

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the strain effect on the spin-dependent transport in a graphene junction with spin–orbit coupling and a gate voltage. We find that uniaxial strain along the armchair direction breaks the transmission probability symmetry with respect to the incident angle, reduces the spin-flipped transmission probability, and extends the transmission gap as regard to the Fermi energy, while strain along the zig-zag direction has very little effect on transmission probabilities. We analyze the spin polarization as a function of the strain magnitude, direction, voltage, and area width. Selecting the proper strain direction and magnitude for both the Klein tunneling and classical cases, the direction of the spin-polarization vector can be controlled and its magnitude is dramatically enhanced. Strain will expand the non-zero range of the magnitude of the spin-polarization vector with respect to voltage. Increasing the strain area width over a threshold, keeps the magnitude of the spin-polarization vector stable.

  18. Optimization of cross-polarization at low radiofrequency fields for sensitivity enhancement in solid-state NMR of membrane proteins reconstituted in magnetically aligned bicelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroloff, Sophie N.; Nevzorov, Alexander A.

    2015-07-01

    Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) of oriented membrane proteins (MPs) is capable of providing structural and dynamic information at nearly physiological conditions. However, NMR experiments performed on oriented membrane proteins generally suffer from low sensitivity. Moreover, utilization of high-power radiofrequency (RF) irradiations for magnetization transfer may give rise to sample heating, thereby decreasing the efficiency of conventional cross-polarization schemes. Here we have optimized the recently developed repetitive cross-polarization (REP-CP) sequence (Tang et al., 2011) to further increase the magnetization transfer efficiency for membrane proteins reconstituted in magnetically aligned bicelles and compared its performance to single-contact Hartmann-Hahn cross-polarization (CP), CP-MOIST and the adiabatic transfer. It has been found that employing the REP-CP sequence at RF amplitudes of 19 kHz instead of the commonly used higher RF fields (>45 kHz) enhances the efficiency of REP-CP. An additional 30% signal can be obtained as compared to the previously published REP-CP, and 20% when compared to the re-optimized REP-CP at 50 kHz RF fields. Moreover, the 15N signal gain of low-power REP-CP was found to be 40% over the adiabatic CP and up to 80% over CP-MOIST. Thus, the low-power REP-CP sequence surpasses all of the previous CP schemes in addition of having the tremendous advantage of reducing the RF powers by a factor of seven, thereby preserving the liquid-like bicelle sample. By contrast, in purely static (NAL crystal) and semi-rigid systems (Pf1 phage), the adiabatic CP was found to be more effective. Periodic oscillations of the intensity profile (distinct from the transient oscillations) as a function of the CP contact time and B1 RF field strengths were observed during the REP-CP optimization with the oscillations becoming more pronounced with lower RF fields. Many-spin simulations were performed to explain the oscillations and their periodicity.

  19. Polarity correspondence effect between loudness and lateralized response set

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Seah; Cho, Yang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Performance is better when a high pitch tone is associated with an up or right response and a low pitch tone with a down or left response compared to the opposite pairs, which is called the spatial-musical association of response codes effect. The current study examined whether polarity codes are formed in terms of the variation in loudness. In Experiments 1 and 2, in which participants performed a loudness-judgment task and a timbre-judgment task respectively, the correspondence effect was obtained between loudness and response side regardless of whether loudness was relevant to the task or not. In Experiments 3 and 4, in which the identical loudness- and timbre-judgment tasks were conducted while the auditory stimulus was presented only to the left or right ear, the correspondence effect was modulated by the ear to which the stimulus was presented, even though the effect was marginally significant in Experiment 4. The results suggest that loudness produced polarity codes that influenced response selection (Experiments 1 and 2), and additional spatial codes provided by stimulus position modulated the effect, generating the stimulus eccentricity effect (Experiments 3 and 4), which is consistent with the polarity correspondence principle. PMID:26052305

  20. Polarization opposition effect and second-order ray tracing.

    PubMed

    Videen, Gorden

    2002-08-20

    I develop a second-order ray-tracing model of the light scattered by a cloud of randomly oriented facets having sizes much larger than the incident wavelength. My results suggest that both symmetric and asymmetric branches of the polarization opposition effect can be produced by the same mechanism responsible for the photometric opposition effect, i.e., constructive interference of light rays traversing reciprocal paths that is associated with coherent backscattering enhancement. The model provides a greatly simplified representation of the physical phenomena to isolate the two mechanisms that may be responsible for the effect. The shapes and positions of the two branches of the polarization opposition effect calculated with the model are consistent with observation, so the model may provide a rapid technique to characterize the optical and physical properties of a scattering system. I note, however, that the model is a gross simplification containing only two physical mechanisms, Fresnel reflections and coherent interference, and it is possible that it represents a nonphysical description of particles smaller than the wavelength or that other mechanisms contributing to the polarization opposition effect are not included.

  1. Solutocapillary Convection Effects on Polymeric Membrane Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, William B.; Todd, Paul W.; Kinagurthu, Sanjay

    1996-01-01

    Macro voids are undesirable large pores in membranes used for purification. They form when membranes are cast as thin films on a smooth surface by evaporating solvent (acetone) from a polymer solution. There are two un-tested hypotheses explaining the growth of macro voids. One states that diffusion of the non-solvent (water) is solely responsible, while the other states that solutocapillary convection is the primary cause of macro void growth. Solutocapillary convection is flow-caused by a concentration induced surface-tension gradient. Macrovoid growth in the former hypothesis is gravity independent, while in the latter it is opposed by gravity. To distinguish between these two hypotheses, experiments were designed to cast membranes in zero-gravity. A semi-automated apparatus was designed and built for casting membranes during the 20 secs of zero-g time available in parabolic aircraft flight such as NASA's KC-135. The phase changes were monitored optically, and membrane morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These studies appear to be the first quantitative studies of membrane casting in micro-gravity which incorporate real-time data acquisition. Morphological studies of membranes cast at 0, 1, and 1.8 g revealed the presence of numerous, sparse and no macrovoids respectively. These results are consistent with the predictions of the solutocapillary hypothesis of macrovoid growth.

  2. Depot effect of bioactive components in experimental membrane filtrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitev, D.; Peshev, D.; Peev, G.; Peeva, L.

    2017-01-01

    Depot effects were found to be accompanying phenomena of membrane separation processes. Accumulation of target species in the membrane matrix during feasibility tests can hamper proper conclusions or compromise the filtration results. Therefore, we investigated the effects of delayed membrane release of chlorogenic acid and caffeine, considered as key compounds of interest in spent coffee products’ recovery treatment. Permeate fluxes and key components release were studied in course of 24 hours via nanofiltration of pure solvent, both immediately after the mock solution filtration and after idle stay. Conclusions are drawn and recommendations advised for proper analysis of experimental data on membrane screening.

  3. The effect of radial polarization in multiphoton lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Le; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Dong, Xian-Zi; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Considering the axially symmetric polarization and intensity distribution, radially polarized (RP) laser beam has comparatively higher axial component of electric field and smaller size of focal spot compared to linearly polarized (LP) laser. In this study, the effect of radial polarization on multiphoton fabrication has been studied, and polymer spots and lines are chosen as the study objects of 2D micro/nano structures of multiphoton lithography. These structures were fabricated with IP-L, a commercial negative photoresist, by RP fs-pulse laser beam which was tightly focused by an objective lens with high numerical aperture. Multiple experimental conditions, such as fabrication power, exposure time and scanning velocity, were verified in order to observe the structural variation of these polymer structures. On the basis of measurement from images of the scanning electron microscope, the transverse and longitudinal sizes of polymer spots and lines could be analyzed, and the relationship between the aspect ratio (AR) and the above experimental conditions could be acquired. The statistical results agree with our predictions that the RP laser beam can significantly reduce the AR, and the AR in RP laser fabrication has little correlation with conditions besides fabrication power, such as exposure time and scanning velocity.

  4. Biophysical study of resin acid effects on phospholipid membrane structure and properties.

    PubMed

    Jagalski, Vivien; Barker, Robert; Topgaard, Daniel; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Hamberger, Björn; Cárdenas, Marité

    2016-11-01

    Hydrophobic resin acids (RAs) are synthesized by conifer trees as part of their defense mechanisms. One of the functions of RAs in plant defense is suggested to be the perturbation of the cellular membrane. However, there is a vast diversity of chemical structures within this class of molecules, and there are no clear correlations to the molecular mechanisms behind the RA's toxicity. In this study we unravel the molecular interactions of the three closely related RAs dehydroabietic acid, neoabietic acid, and the synthetic analogue dichlorodehydroabietic acid with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) model membranes and the polar lipid extract of soybeans. The complementarity of the biophysical techniques used (NMR, DLS, NR, DSC, Cryo-TEM) allowed correlating changes at the vesicle level with changes at the molecular level and the co-localization of RAs within DPPC monolayer. Effects on DPPC membranes are correlated with the physical chemical properties of the RA and their toxicity.

  5. Membrane effects of N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I: a fluorescent probe study.

    PubMed

    Trusova, Valeriya; Gorbenko, Galyna; Girych, Mykhailo; Adachi, Emi; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Sood, Rohit; Kinnunen, Paavo; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    The binding of monomeric and aggregated variants of 1-83 N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I with substitution mutations G26R, G26R/W@8, G26R/W@50 and G26R/W@72 to the model lipid membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and its mixture with cholesterol has been investigated using fluorescent probes pyrene and Laurdan. Examination of pyrene spectral behavior did not reveal any marked influence of apoA-I mutants on the hydrocarbon region of lipid bilayer. In contrast, probing the membrane effects by Laurdan revealed decrease in the probe generalized polarization in the presence of aggregated proteins. suggesting that oligomeric and fibrillar apoA-I species induce increase in hydration degree and reduction of lipid packing density in the membrane interfacial region. These findings may shed light on molecular details of amyloid cytotoxicity.

  6. Surface expression of influenza virus neuraminidase, an amino-terminally anchored viral membrane glycoprotein, in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L V; Compans, R W; Davis, A R; Bos, T J; Nayak, D P

    1985-01-01

    We have investigated the site of surface expression of the neuraminidase (NA) glycoprotein of influenza A virus, which, in contrast to the hemagglutinin, is bound to membranes by hydrophobic residues near the NH2-terminus. Madin-Darby canine kidney or primary African green monkey kidney cells infected with influenza A/WSN/33 virus and subsequently labeled with monoclonal antibody to the NA and then with a colloidal gold- or ferritin-conjugated second antibody exhibited specific labeling of apical surfaces. Using simian virus 40 late expression vectors, we also studied the surface expression of the complete NA gene (SNC) and a truncated NA gene (SN10) in either primary or a polarized continuous line (MA104) of African green monkey kidney cells. The polypeptides encoded by the cloned NA cDNAs were expressed on the surface of both cell types. Analysis of [3H]mannose-labeled polypeptides from recombinant virus-infected MA104 cells showed that the products of cloned NA cDNA comigrated with glycosylated NA from influenza virus-infected cells. Both the complete and the truncated glycoproteins were found to be preferentially expressed on apical plasma membranes, as detected by immunogold labeling. These results indicate that the NA polypeptide contains structural features capable of directing the transport of the protein to apical cell surfaces and the first 10 amino-terminal residues of the NA polypeptide are not involved in this process. Images PMID:3016520

  7. A non-linear induced polarization effect on transient electromagnetic soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallbauer-Zadorozhnaya, Valeriya Yu.; Santarato, Giovanni; Abu Zeid, Nasser; Bignardi, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    In a TEM survey conducted for characterizing the subsurface for geothermal purposes, a strong induced polarization effect was recorded in all collected data. Surprisingly, anomalous decay curves were obtained in part of the sites, whose shape depended on the repetition frequency of the exciting square waveform, i.e. on current pulse length. The Cole-Cole model, besides being not directly related to physical parameters of rocks, was found inappropriate to model the observed distortion, due to induced polarization, because this model is linear, i.e. it cannot fit any dependence on current pulse. This phenomenon was investigated and explained as due to the presence of membrane polarization linked to constrictivity of (fresh) water-saturated pores. An algorithm for mathematical modeling of TEM data was then developed to fit this behavior. The case history is then discussed: 1D inversion, which accommodates non-linear effects, produced models that agree quite satisfactorily with resistivity and chargeability models obtained by an electrical resistivity tomography carried out for comparison.

  8. Filamentation of arbitrary polarized femtosecond laser pulses in case of high-order Kerr effect.

    PubMed

    Panov, Nikolay A; Makarov, Vladimir A; Fedorov, Vladimir Y; Kosareva, Olga G

    2013-02-15

    We developed a model of femtosecond filamentation which includes high-order Kerr effect and an arbitrary polarization of a laser pulse. We show that a circularly polarized pulse has maximum filament intensity. Also, we show that, independently of the initial pulse polarization, the value of a maximum filament intensity tends to the maximum intensity of either linearly or circularly polarized pulse.

  9. Effect of polarization on superfluidity in low density neutron matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. W.; Kallman, C.-G.; Yang, C.-H.; Chakkalakal, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    The singlet-state quasi-particle interaction in neutron matter is examined on the basis of results of a detailed evaluation of the Landau Fermi-liquid parameters for pure neutron effects, including polarization effects. This means that the interaction induced by exchange of density and spin-density excitations is taken into account. It is shown that polarization actually works to suppress the pairing matrix elements, owing to the spin dependence of the quasi-particle interaction and, ultimately, the balance of attraction, repulsion, and spin dependence in the fundamental two-neutron interaction. Since the isotropic energy gap and the condensation energy in low-density neutron-star matter are extremely sensitive functions of the pairing matrix elements, they will also be suppressed by the polarizability of the neutron medium.

  10. Coherent control of optical polarization effects in metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyedmohammad A.; Plum, Eric; Shi, Jinhui; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of photonic information usually relies on electronics. Aiming to avoid the conversion between photonic and electronic signals, modulation of light with light based on optical nonlinearity has become a major research field and coherent optical effects on the nanoscale are emerging as new means of handling and distributing signals. Here we demonstrate that in slabs of linear material of sub-wavelength thickness optical manifestations of birefringence and optical activity (linear and circular birefringence and dichroism) can be controlled by a wave coherent with the wave probing the polarization effect. We demonstrate this in proof-of-principle experiments for chiral and anisotropic microwave metamaterials, where we show that the large parameter space of polarization characteristics may be accessed at will by coherent control. Such control can be exerted at arbitrarily low intensities, thus arguably allowing for fast handling of electromagnetic signals without facing thermal management and energy challenges. PMID:25755071

  11. Effects of polarization mode dispersion on polarization-entangled photons generated via broadband pumped spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyang-Tag; Hong, Kang-Hee; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-05-01

    An inexpensive and compact frequency multi-mode diode laser enables a compact two-photon polarization entanglement source via the continuous wave broadband pumped spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) process. Entanglement degradation caused by polarization mode dispersion (PMD) is one of the critical issues in optical fiber-based polarization entanglement distribution. We theoretically and experimentally investigate how the initial entanglement is degraded when the two-photon polarization entangled state undergoes PMD. We report an effect of PMD unique to broadband pumped SPDC, equally applicable to pulsed pumping as well as cw broadband pumping, which is that the amount of the entanglement degradation is asymmetrical to the PMD introduced to each quantum channel. We believe that our results have important applications in long-distance distribution of polarization entanglement via optical fiber channels.

  12. Ceramic membranes: The effects of deposition and drying conditions on membrane morphology and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Elizabeth T.

    Sol-gel methods for fabricating ceramic membranes on porous supports include dip coating, evaporative drying, and sintering. The ceramic membranes of interest in the present research were prepared from aqueous sols of silica, titania, or iron oxide nano-particles which were deposited on porous alumina supports. Physisorption measurements indicate that the diameters of the pores in the resulting membranes are 20 A or smaller. Defect formation during fabrication is particularly problematic for ceramic membranes with pore diameters in the nanometer range. Solutions to these problems would greatly enhance the commercial potential of nano-filtration membranes for gas-phase separations. Cracks are debilitating defects which originate during the drying and firing phases of fabrication. As water evaporates during drying, the sol-gel film is subjected to large capillary forces. Unchecked, these tensile forces result in catastrophic cracking across the membrane. A novel technique called internal deposition can be employed to deposit the sol particles within the pores of the support rather than on its surface. Internal deposition obstructs the propagation of cracks, thereby reducing the impact of crack-type defects. A patent for demonstration of proof of concept of the internal deposition technique has been received. Experimental difficulties associated with the nonuniform morphology of the tubular alumina support hindered further development of the internal deposition protocol. The final phase of the research incorporated a support containing uniform capillaries (Anotec(TM) disks). Two-level factorial experiments were conducted to determine the effects of various deposition and drying conditions (viz., speed and method of deposition, surface charge, humidity, and drying rate) on membrane performance. Membrane performance was characterized in terms of the permeabilities of nitrogen and helium in the resulting membranes. The permeability and pressure data were incorporated in

  13. Understanding the solvent polarity effects on surfactant-capped nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Leekumjorn, Sukit; Gullapalli, Sravani; Wong, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the molecular interactions between suspended nanoparticles (NPs) and the suspending solvent fluid may provide a useful avenue to create and to study exotic NP ensembles. This study focused on using a coarse-grained computational model to investigate the molecular interactions between oleate-capped NPs in various solvents, and to relate the results to experimental features of solvent-suspended, oleate-capped CdSe quantum dots (QDs). The QDs were modeled as a closed-shell fullerene molecule with an oleate-like ligand attached to each vertex. Solvent polarity was found to correlate to the simulation and experimental results more strongly than either dielectric constant or dipole moment. Computational results showed that the nonpolar solvents of hexane, toluene, and benzene (polarity index E(T)(N) < 0.120) kept NPs in suspension and solvated the oleate chains such that the oleate layer swelled to full extension. In contrast, as the most polar solvent tested (E(T)(N) = 1.000), water caused NPs to aggregate and precipitate. It partially solvated the oleate chains and compressed the layer to 86% of full extension. For solvents of intermediate polarity like ethanol, acetone, and chloroform, the oleate layer swelled with decreasing polarity index values, with rapid swelling occurring close to E(T)(N) = 0.307 (~50:50 vol % chloroform/acetone) below which QDs were colloidally stable. This study represents the first attempt to delineate the solvent effect on surfactant-coated NP hydrodynamic size, colloidal stability, and aggregation behavior.

  14. Effects of Spin-Labels on Membrane Burial Depth of MARCKS-ED Residues.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yifei; Klauda, Jeffery B; Im, Wonpil

    2016-10-18

    Site-directed spin-labeling electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy is a useful tool to obtain information about the environment of specific residues. One of its applications is to investigate membrane protein topology based on the accessibility of the spin label, with the assumption that the position of the spin label in the membrane is close to that of the native residue. This assumption is valid in proteins with well-ordered structures, but could be problematic in small peptides because the labeling may cause a perturbation that is large enough to change local interactions between the peptide and the membrane. To quantitatively characterize such effects, we have simulated the association of a 25-amino-acid peptide, MARCKS-ED, to membranes with and without spin labels. Our simulations show that the depths of spin labels are ∼6-17 Å deeper than the unlabeled charged and polar residues in the wild-type. When the hydrophobic residue Phe is labeled, however, the spin-label depth is close to that of the native residue as well as the experimental value. Our study suggests that one should be cautious in interpretation of spin label data when charged and polar residues in small peptides are labeled.

  15. Solid effect in magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Corzilius, Björn; Smith, Albert A.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    For over five decades, the solid effect (SE) has been heavily utilized as a mechanism for performing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). Nevertheless, it has not found widespread application in contemporary, high magnetic field DNP experiments because SE enhancements display an \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\omega _0 ^{ - 2}\\end{equation*} \\end{document}ω0−2 field dependence. In particular, for nominally forbidden zero and double quantum SE transitions to be partially allowed, it is necessary for mixing of adjacent nuclear spin states to occur, and this leads to the observed field dependence. However, recently we have improved our instrumentation and report here an enhancement of ɛ = 91 obtained with the organic radical trityl (OX063) in magic angle spinning experiments performed at 5 T and 80 K. This is a factor of 6-7 higher than previous values in the literature under similar conditions. Because the solid effect depends strongly on the microwave field strength, we attribute this large enhancement to larger microwave field strengths inside the sample volume, achieved with more efficient coupling of the gyrotron to the sample chamber. In addition, we develop a theoretical model to explain the dependence of the buildup rate of enhanced nuclear polarization and the steady-state enhancement on the microwave power. Buildup times and enhancements were measured as a function of 1H concentration for both trityl and Gd-DOTA. Comparison of the results indicates that for trityl the initial polarization step is the slower, rate-determining step. However, for Gd-DOTA the spread of nuclear polarization via homonuclear 1H spin diffusion is rate-limiting. Finally, we discuss the applicability of the solid effect at fields > 5 T and the requirements

  16. Effect of 8-alkylberberine homologues on erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yang; Ye, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Bao-Shun; Li, Xue-Gang

    2011-05-01

    8-alkylberberine homologues (Ber-C8-n, where n indicates carbon atom number of gaseous normal alkyl at 8 position, n = 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, or 16) were synthesized and their effects on the hemolysis of rabbit erythrocyte, the fluidity of membrane and the fluorescence of membrane protein were investigated by fluorescence analysis technique. Ber-C8-n with mediate length alkyl (4 < n < 10) exhibited obvious hemolysis effect on rabbit erythrocyte when their concentration exceed 1.25 x10(-4) mol/L, and Ber-C8-8 displayed the highest hemolysis effect among all tested homologues. All of Ber-C8-n influenced the fluidity of erythrocyte membrane to different extents, which exhibited an obvious dose-effect relationship. The effect of Ber-C8-n on fluidity increased as the length of alkyl chain was elongated and decreased gradually when the alkyl carbon atoms exceeded 8. The fluorescence of erythrocyte membrane protein was quenched by Ber-C8-n, which showed a similar changing tendency on membrane fluidity. Experiments in vitro suggested that disturbing effects of Ber-C8-n on the conformation and function of membrane protein leaded to the changes of membrane fluidity and stability, and then the membrane was broken down.

  17. Hydrodynamic effects of air sparging on hollow fiber membranes in a bubble column reactor.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lijun; Law, Adrian Wing-Keung; Fane, Anthony G

    2013-07-01

    Air sparging is now a standard approach to reduce concentration polarization and fouling of membrane modules in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). The hydrodynamic shear stresses, bubble-induced turbulence and cross flows scour the membrane surfaces and help reduce the deposit of foulants onto the membrane surface. However, the detailed quantitative knowledge on the effect of air sparging remains lacking in the literature due to the complex hydrodynamics generated by the gas-liquid flows. To date, there is no valid model that describes the relationship between the membrane fouling performance and the flow hydrodynamics. The present study aims to examine the impact of hydrodynamics induced by air sparging on the membrane fouling mitigation in a quantitative manner. A modelled hollow fiber module was placed in a cylindrical bubble column reactor at different axial heights with the trans-membrane pressure (TMP) monitored under constant flux conditions. The configuration of bubble column without the membrane module immersed was identical to that studied by Gan et al. (2011) using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA), to ensure a good quantitative understanding of turbulent flow conditions along the column height. The experimental results showed that the meandering flow regime which exhibits high flow instability at the 0.3 m is more beneficial to fouling alleviation compared with the steady flow circulation regime at the 0.6 m. The filtration tests also confirmed the existence of an optimal superficial air velocity beyond which a further increase is of no significant benefit on the membrane fouling reduction. In addition, the alternate aeration provided by two air stones mounted at the opposite end of the diameter of the bubble column was also studied to investigate the associated flow dynamics and its influence on the membrane filtration performance. It was found that with a proper switching interval and membrane module orientation, the membrane fouling can be effectively

  18. Effects of polarization of polar semiconductor on electrical properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene)/ZnO heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Hiroaki; Yoshimura, Takeshi Fujimura, Norifumi

    2015-06-21

    The electrical properties of heterostructures composed of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) and ZnO with different crystallographic polarities, i.e., O- and Zn-polar ZnO, were investigated. Distinct differences in the capacitance-voltage and polarization-voltage characteristics between the P(VDF-TrFE)/O- and Zn-polar ZnO were obtained in the depletion regions of ZnO. The band configurations were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using a synchrotron radiation beam to analyze the differences in the electrical properties of the P(VDF-TrFE)/O- and Zn-polar ZnO. The XPS spectra indicated that the valence band maximum of P(VDF-TrFE) is 2.9 and 2.7 eV higher than Zn- and O-polar ZnO, respectively. Thus, both structures have staggered band configurations with large valence band offsets, and the spontaneous polarization of ZnO is less effective on the band lineup. The electrical properties of the P(VDF-TrFE)/ZnO heterostructures are modulated through carrier generation because of the polarization-mediated interface charges and the staggered band alignments of the P(VDF-TrFE)/ZnO with a large valence band offset.

  19. Effects of filtration modes on membrane fouling behavior and treatment in submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Tahir; Khan, Sher Jamal; Lee, Chung-Hak

    2014-11-01

    Relaxation or backwashing is obligatory for effective operation of membrane module and intermittent aeration is helpful for nutrients removal. This study was performed to investigate effects of different filtration modes on membrane fouling behavior and treatment in membrane bioreactor (MBR) operated at three modes i.e., 12, 10 and 8min filtration and 3, 2, and 2min relaxation corresponding to 6, 5 and 4cycles/hour, respectively. Various parameters including trans-membrane pressure, specific cake resistance, specific oxygen uptake rate, nutrients removal and sludge dewaterability were examined to optimize the filtration mode. TMP profiles showed that MBR(8+2) with 8min filtration and 2min relaxation reduced the fouling rate and depicted long filtration time in MBR treating synthetic wastewater. MBR(12+3) was more efficient in organic and nutrients removal while denitrification rate was high in MBR(8+2).

  20. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  1. Free and membrane-bound calcium in microgravity and microgravity effects at the membrane level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    The changes of [Ca^2+]_i controlled is known to play a key regulatory role in numerous cellular processes especially associated with membranes. Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated an increase in calcium level in root cells of pea seedlings grown aboard orbital station ``Salyut 6'' /1/. These results: 1) indicate that observed Ca^2+-binding sites of membranes also consist in proteins and phospholipids; 2) suggest that such effects of space flight in membrane Ca-binding might be due to the enhancement of Ca^2+ influx through membranes. In model presented, I propose that Ca^2+-activated channels in plasma membrane in response to microgravity allow the movement of Ca^2+ into the root cells, causing a rise in cytoplasmic free Ca^2+ levels. The latter, in its turn, may induce the inhibition of a Ca^2+ efflux by Ca^2+-activated ATPases and through a Ca^2+/H^+ antiport. It is possible that increased cytosolic levels of Ca^2+ ions have stimulated hydrolysis and turnover of phosphatidylinositols, with a consequent elevation of cytosolic [Ca^2+]_i. Plant cell can response to such a Ca^2+ rise by an enhancement of membranous Ca^2+-binding activities to rescue thus a cell from an abundance of a cytotoxin. A Ca^2+-induced phase separation of membranous lipids assists to appear the structure nonstable zones with high energy level at the boundary of microdomains which are rich by some phospholipid components; there is mixing of molecules of the membranes contacted in these zones, the first stage of membranous fusion, which was found in plants exposed to microgravity. These results support the hypothesis that a target for microgravity effect is the flux mechanism of Ca^2+ to plant cell.

  2. Free and membrane-bound calcium in microgravity and microgravity effects at the membrane level.

    PubMed

    Belyavskaya, N A

    1996-01-01

    The changes of [Ca2+]i controlled is known to play a key regulatory role in numerous cellular processes especially associated with membranes. Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated an increase in calcium level in root cells of pea seedlings grown aboard orbital station "Salyut 6". These results: 1) indicate that observed Ca(2+)-binding sites of membranes also consist in proteins and phospholipids; 2) suggest that such effects of space flight in membrane Ca-binding might be due to the enhancement of Ca2+ influx through membranes. In model presented, I propose that Ca(2+)-activated channels in plasma membrane in response to microgravity allow the movement of Ca2+ into the root cells, causing a rise in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ levels. The latter, in its turn, may induce the inhibition of a Ca2+ efflux by Ca(2+)-activated ATPases and through a Ca2+/H+ antiport. It is possible that increased cytosolic levels of Ca2+ ions have stimulated hydrolysis and turnover of phosphatidylinositols, with a consequent elevation of cytosolic [Ca2+]i. Plant cell can response to such a Ca2+ rise by an enhancement of membranous Ca(2+)-binding activities to rescue thus a cell from an abundance of a cytotoxin. A Ca(2+)-induced phase separation of membranous lipids assists to appear the structure nonstable zones with high energy level at the boundary of microdomains which are rich by some phospholipid components; there is mixing of molecules of the membranes contacted in these zones, the first stage of membranous fusion, which was found in plants exposed to microgravity. These results support the hypothesis that a target for microgravity effect is the flux mechanism of Ca2+ to plant cell.

  3. Effects of grain growth on the interstellar polarization curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshchinnikov, Nikolai V.; Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-01

    We apply the time evolution of grain size distributions through accretion and coagulation found in our previous work to the modelling of the wavelength dependence of interstellar linear polarization. We focus in particular on the parameters of the Serkowski curve K and λmax , characterizing the width and maximum wavelength of this curve, respectively. We use aligned silicate and non-aligned carbonaceous spheroidal particles with different aspect ratios a/b. The imperfect alignment of grains with sizes larger than a cut-off size rV, cut is considered. We find that the evolutionary effects on the polarization curve are negligible in the original model with commonly used material parameters (hydrogen number density nH = 103 cm-3, gas temperature Tgas = 10 K and sticking probability for accretion Sacc = 0.3). Therefore, we apply the tuned model, where the coagulation threshold of silicate is removed. In this model, λmax displaces to longer wavelengths and the polarization curve becomes wider (K reduces) on time-scales ˜(30-50)(nH/103cm-3)-1 Myr. The tuned models at T ≲ 30 (n_H/10^3 cm^{-3})^{-1} Myr and different values of the parameters rV, cut can also explain the observed trend between K and λmax . It is significant that the evolutionary effect appears in the perpendicular direction to the effect of rV, cut on the K - λmax diagram. Very narrow polarization curves can be reproduced if we change the type of particles (prolate/oblate) and/or vary a/b.

  4. A Degenerate Cohort of Yeast Membrane Trafficking DUBs Mediates Cell Polarity and Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Beckley, Janel R.; Chen, Jun-Song; Yang, Yanling; Peng, Junmin; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2015-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), cysteine or metallo- proteases that cleave ubiquitin chains or protein conjugates, are present in nearly every cellular compartment, with overlapping protein domain structure, localization, and functions. We discovered a cohort of DUBs that are involved in membrane trafficking (ubp4, ubp5, ubp9, ubp15, and sst2) and found that loss of all five of these DUBs but not loss of any combination of four, significantly impacted cell viability in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (1). Here, we delineate the collective and individual functions and activities of these five conserved DUBs using comparative proteomics, biochemistry, and microscopy. We find these five DUBs are degenerate rather than redundant at the levels of cell morphology, substrate selectivity, ubiquitin chain specificity, and cell viability under stress. These studies reveal the complexity of interplay among these enzymes, providing a foundation for understanding DUB biology and providing another example of how cells utilize degeneracy to improve survival. PMID:26412298

  5. Effect of hydration on the structure of caveolae membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Sciubba, Fabio; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-04-13

    In situ energy dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to investigate the effect of hydration on the structure of caveolae membranes. The structure of caveolae membrane was found to be strongly dependent on hydration. At low hydration two lamellar phases with distinct repeat spacings were found to coexist with segregated cholesterol crystallites. Upon hydration, the lamellar phases did swell, while diffraction peak of cholesterol crystals disappeared suggesting that cholesterol molecules redistributed homogeneously within the caveolae membrane. At full hydration, unbinding of caveolae membrane occurred. Upon dehydration the system returned to the bound state, demonstrating that the unbinding transition is fully reversible.

  6. Effects of electrolytes on ion transport in Chitosan membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupiasih, N. N.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, charged polymer membranes are widely used for water purification applications involving control of water and ion transport, such as reverse osmosis and electrodialysis. In this study, we have explored the effects of electrolyte solutions on ion transport properties of chitosan synthetic membranes via concentration gradient driven transport. Also, the water uptake of those membranes, before (control) as well used membranes have studied. The membrane used was chitosan membrane 2%. The electrolyte solutions used were HCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2 and AlCl3, with various concentrations of 0.1 mM, 1 mM, 10 mM, 100 mM and 1000 mM. Ion transport experiments were carried out in a cell membrane model which composed of two compartments and the potential difference of membrane was measured using Ag/AgCl calomel electrodes. Those measurements were conducted at ambient temperature 28.8 °C. The results showed that the current density (J) increased with increased in concentration gradient of solution. The current density was higher in electrolyte solution which has higher molar conductivity than those of a solution with a small molar conductivity. Meanwhile the current density was smaller in electrolyte solution which has larger Stokes radii than those of a solution with small Stokes radii. Except membrane which has been used in HCl solution, the water uptakes of the used membranes were greater than the control membrane. These results can develop and validate a common framework to interpret data of concentration gradient driven transport in chitosan synthetic membranes and to use it to design of membranes with improved performance.

  7. [Effect of decimeter polarized electromagnetic radiation on germinating capacity of seeds].

    PubMed

    Polevik, N D

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a polarization structure of electromagnetic radiation on the germinating capacity of seeds of such weeds as Green foxtail (Setaria viridis) and Green amaranth (Amaranthus retroflexus) has been studied. Seeds have been exposed to impulse electromagnetic radiation in a frequency of 896 MHz with linear, elliptical right-handed and elliptical left-handed polarizations at different power flux density levels. It is determined that the effect of the right-handed polarized electromagnetic radiation increases and the influence of the left-handed polarized one reduces the germinating capacity of seeds compared to the effect of the linearly polarized electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the seeds have an amplitude polarization selectivity as evinced by the major effect of the right-handed polarized radiation on seeds. An electrodynamic model as the right-handed elliptically polarized antenna with the given quantity of the ellipticity of polarization is suggested to use in description of this selectivity.

  8. Normal and tumor-derived myoepithelial cells differ in their ability to interact with luminal breast epithelial cells for polarity and basement membrane deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Villadsen, Rene; Rank, Fritz; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2001-10-04

    The signals that determine the correct polarity of breast epithelial structures in vivo are not understood. We have shown previously that luminal epithelial cells can be polarized when cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane gel. We reasoned that such cues in vivo may be given by myoepithelial cells. Accordingly, we used an assay where luminal epithelial cells are incorrectly polarized to test this hypothesis. We show that culturing human primary luminal epithelial cells within collagen-I gels leads to formation of structures with no lumina and with reverse polarity as judged by dual stainings for sialomucin, epithelial specific antigen or occludin. No basement membrane is deposited, and {beta}4-integrin staining is negative. Addition of purified human myoepithelial cells isolated from normal glands corrects the inverse polarity, and leads to formation of double-layered acini with central lumina. Among the laminins present in the human breast basement membrane (laminin-1, -5 and -10/11), laminin-1 was unique in its ability to substitute for myoepithelial cells in polarity reversal. Myoepithelial cells were purified also from four different breast cancer sources including a biphasic cell line. Three out of four samples either totally lacked the ability to interact with luminal epithelial cells, or conveyed only correction of polarity in a fraction of acini. This behavior was directly related to the ability of the tumor myoepithelial cells to produce {alpha}-1 chain of laminin. In vivo, breast carcinomas were either negative for laminin-1 (7/12 biopsies) or showed a focal, fragmented deposition of a less intensely stained basement membrane (5/12 biopsies). Dual staining with myoepithelial markers revealed that tumorassociated myoepithelial cells were either negative or weakly positive for expression of laminin-1, establishing a strong correlation between loss of laminin-1 and breast cancer. We conclude that the double-layered breast acinus may be

  9. Effects of polarization-charge shielding in microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M. S.; Lin, S. M.; Chiang, W. Y.; Barnett, L. R.; Chu, K. R.

    2015-08-15

    Heating of dielectric objects by radio frequency (RF) and microwaves has long been a method widely employed in scientific research and industrial applications. However, RF and microwave heating are often susceptible to an excessive temperature spread due to uneven energy deposition. The current study elucidates an important physical reason for this difficulty and proposes an effective remedy. Non-spherical samples are placed in an anechoic chamber, where it is irradiated by a traveling microwave wave with 99% intensity uniformity. Polarization charges induced on the samples tend to partially cancel the incident electric field and hence reduce the heating rate. The polarization-charge shielded heating rate is shown to be highly dependent on the sample's shape and its orientation relative to the wave electric field. For samples with a relatively high permittivity, the resultant uneven heating can become a major cause for the excessive temperature spread. It is also demonstrated that a circularly polarized wave, with its rapidly rotating electric field, can effectively even out the heating rate and hence the temperature spread.

  10. Character of the opposition effect and negative polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, Carle M.; Shkuratov, Yu. G.; Stankevich, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Photometric and polarimetric properties at small phase angles were measured for silicates with controlled surface properties in order to distinguish properties that are associated with surface reflection from those that are associated with multiple scattering from internal grain boundaries. These data provide insight into the causes and conditions of photometric properties observed at small phase angles for dark bodies of the solar system. Obsidian was chosen to represent a silicate dielectric with no internal scattering boundaries. Because obsidian is free of internal scatterers, light reflected from both the rough and smooth obsidian samples is almost entirely single and multiple Fresnel reflections form surface facets with no body component. Surface structure alone cannot produce an opposition effect. Comparison of the obsidian and basalt results indicates that for an opposition effect to occur, surface texture must be both rough and contain internal scattering interfaces. Although the negative polarization observed for the obsidian samples indicates single and multiple reflections are part of negative polarization, the longer inversion angle of the multigrain inversion samples implies that internal reflections must also contribute a significant negative polarization component.

  11. Vector Diffraction and Polarization Effects in an Optical Disk System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Hung; Li, Lifeng; Mansuripur, M.

    1998-10-01

    The track pitch of current optical disks is comparable with the wavelength of the laser source. In this domain of the pitch-to-wavelength ratio, the complex-diffraction amplitudes are different for different incident polarization states, and the validity of the scalar diffraction theory is questionable. Furthermore, the use of multilayer coatings and high-numerical-aperture beams in modern optical disk technology inevitably entails the excitation of surface waves, which can disturb the baseball pattern significantly. To describe the interaction of a focused beam with a grooved multilayer system fully, it is necessary to have a rigorous vector theory. We use a rigorous vector theory to model the diffraction of light at the optical disk. We present the simulation and the experimental results and demonstrate the ability of this approach to predict or model accurately all essential features of beam disk interaction, including the polarization effects and the excitation of surface waves.

  12. Nonselective and polarization effects in time-resolved optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhechev, D.; Steflekova, V.

    2016-02-01

    Three interfering effects in optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy are identified in a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) - OG detector. The laser beam is found to generate two nonselective processes, namely photoelectron emission (PE) from the cathode surface with a sub-breakdown bias applied, and nonresonant space ionization. The convolution of these galvanic contributions was determined experimentally as an instrumental function and a deconvolution procedure to determine the actual OG signal was developed. Specific plasma conductance is detected dependent on the polarization of the laser beam irradiating. Linearly/circularly polarized light beam is found to induce OG signals differ in amplitude (and their shape parameters in the time-resolved OG signals (TROGS)). The phenomena coherence and specific conductance are found to be in causal relationship. The additional conductance due to coherent states of atoms manifests itself as an intrinsic instrumental property of OG detector.

  13. Scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect with longitudinally polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, B. E.; Lee, W.-T.; Motrunich, O. I.; Werner, S. A.

    1999-12-01

    In the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect, a charged particle (electron) interacts with the scalar electrostatic potential U in the field-free (i.e., force-free) region inside an electrostatic cylinder (Faraday cage). Using a perfect single-crystal neutron interferometer we have performed a ''dual'' scalar Aharonov-Bohm experiment by subjecting polarized thermal neutrons to a pulsed magnetic field. The pulsed magnetic field was spatially uniform, precluding any force on the neutrons. Aligning the direction of the pulsed magnetic field to the neutron magnetic moment also rules out any classical torque acting to change the neutron polarization. The observed phase shift is purely quantum mechanical in origin. A detailed description of the experiment, performed at the University of Missouri Research Reactor, and its interpretation is given in this paper. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  14. The effects of vacuum polarization on thermonuclear reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Added to the pure Coulomb potential, the contribution from vacuum polarization increases the barrier, reducing the wave function (u) for reacting nuclei within the range of nuclear forces. The cross section and reaction rate are then reduced accordingly by a factor proportional to u squared. The effect is treated by evaluating the vacuum polarization potential as a small correction to the Coulomb term, then computing u in a WKB formulation. The calculation is done analytically employing the small r power-series expansion for the Uehling potential to express the final result in terms of convenient parameters. At a temperature of 1.4 x 10 to the 7th K the (negative) correction is 1.3 percent for the fundamental fusion process p + p yields d + e(+) + nu.

  15. Effect of EMP fields on cell membrane potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1993-06-01

    A simple model is presented for cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Using calculated values of internal electric field strength induced during EMP exposure, the model predicts that cell membrane potentials of about 100 mV may be induced for time frames on the order of 10 ns. Possible biological effects of these potentials including electroporation area discussed.

  16. Effect of polarization entanglement in photon-photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätzel, Dennis; Wilkens, Martin; Menzel, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    It is found that the differential cross section of photon-photon scattering is a function of the degree of polarization entanglement of the two-photon state. A reduced general expression for the differential cross section of photon-photon scattering is derived by applying simple symmetry arguments. An explicit expression is obtained for the example of photon-photon scattering due to virtual electron-positron pairs in quantum electrodynamics. It is shown how the effect in this explicit example can be explained as an effect of quantum interference and that it fits with the idea of distance-dependent forces.

  17. Chromatic polarization effects of swept waveforms in FDML lasers and fiber spools.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Wolfgang; Palte, Gesa; Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Pfeiffer, Tom; Huber, Robert

    2012-04-23

    We present detailed investigations of chromatic polarization effects, caused by fiber spools used in FDML lasers and buffering spools for rapidly wavelength swept lasers. We introduce a novel wavelength swept FDML laser source, specially tailored for polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) which switches between two different linear polarization states separated by 45°, i.e. 90° on the Poincaré sphere. The polarization maintaining laser cavity itself generates a stable linear polarization state and uses an external buffering technique in order to provide alternating polarization states for successive wavelength sweeps. The design of the setup is based on a comprehensive analysis of the polarization output from FDML lasers, using a novel 150 MHz polarization analyzer. We investigate the fiber polarization properties related to swept source OCT for different fiber delay topologies and analyze the polarization state of different FDML laser sources.

  18. Ionospheric Superstorms: Polarization Terminator Effects in the Atlantic Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    A combination of the stormtime penetration electric fields, the effect of the reduced magnetic field strength in the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly, and the geographic distortion of the magnetic field in the Atlantic sector contribute to the characteristics of the low-latitude polarization electric fields at the sunset terminator. This combination of effects leads to a strong localized enhancement of TEC at low-mid latitudes in the American sector during ionospheric superstorms. At dusk, the low-latitude polarization electric field effects begin on magnetic field lines when the E region at either end goes into darkness. We define the polarization terminator (PT) to be the locus of points at a given altitude for which the E-region shadow height at either end of the magnetic field line equals 100 km. Electric fields associated with the charge build-up in the conductivity-gradient region due to the effects of winds or penetration electric fields are directed perpendicular to the PT and increase in magnitude as the PT is approached from the dayside. The particular configuration of the magnetic field in the Atlantic sector creates a preferred longitude/Universal Time sector (western atlantic/ 21 UT) for the build-up of enhanced TEC on field lines inside the dusk plasmapause. The electric fields associated with the PT sweep up the plasmas of the equatorial anomaly crests and redistribute it into the mid-latitude SAPS channels, forming the high total content storm enhanced density (SED) plumes observed during strong storms in the American sector. This effect is most pronounced for northern hemisphere summer conditions, as experienced during the July 15/16, 2000 superstorm.

  19. Ionospheric Superstorms: Polarization Terminator Effects in the Atlantic Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, John

    A combination of the stormtime penetration electric fields, the effect of the reduced magnetic field strength in the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly, and the geographic distortion of the magnetic field in the Atlantic sector contribute to the characteristics of the low-latitude polarization electric fields at the sunset terminator. This combination of effects leads to a strong localized enhancement of TEC at low-mid latitudes in the American sector during ionospheric superstorms. At dusk, the low-latitude polarization electric field effects begin on magnetic field lines when the E region at either end goes into darkness. We define the polarization terminator (PT) to be the locus of points at a given altitude for which the E-region shadow height at either end of the magnetic field line equals 100 km. Electric fields associated with the charge build-up in the conductivity-gradient region due to the effects of winds or penetration electric fields are directed perpendicular to the PT and increase in magnitude as the PT is approached from the dayside. The particular configuration of the magnetic field in the Atlantic sector creates a preferred longitude/Universal Time sector (western Atlantic/ 21 UT) for the build-up of enhanced TEC on field lines inside the dusk plasmapause. The electric fields associated with the PT sweep up the plasmas of the equatorial anomaly crests and redistribute it into the mid-latitude SAPS channels, forming the high total content storm enhanced density (SED) plumes observed during strong storms in the American sector. This effect is most pronounced for northern hemisphere summer conditions, as experienced during the July 15/16, 2000 superstorm.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation study of the effect of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether hydroxylation on membrane thermostability.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Carme; Fietz, Susanne; Rosell-Melé, Antoni; Daura, Xavier; Costenaro, Lionel

    2017-02-16

    Archaeal tetraether membrane lipids span the whole membrane width and present two C40 isoprenoid chains bound by two glycerol groups (or one glycerol and calditol). These lipids confer stability and maintain the membrane fluidity in mesophile to extremophile environments, making them very attractive for biotechnological applications. The isoprenoid lipid composition in archaeal membranes varies with temperature, which has placed these lipids in the focus of paleo-climatological studies for over a decade. Non-hydroxylated isoprenoid archaeal lipids are typically used as paleo-thermometry proxies, but recently identified hydroxylated (OH) derivatives have also been proposed as temperature proxies. The relative abundance of hydroxylated lipids increases at lower temperatures, but the physiological function of the OH moiety remains unknown. Here we present molecular dynamics simulations of membranes formed by the acyclic glycerol-dialkyl-glycerol-tetraether caldarchaeol (GDGT-0), the most widespread archaeal core lipid, and its mono-hydroxylated variant (OH-GDGT-0) to better understand the physico-chemical properties conferred to the membrane by this additional moiety. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the additional OH group forms hydrogen bonds mainly with the sugar moieties of neighbouring lipids and with water molecules, effectively increasing the size of the polar headgroups. The hydroxylation also introduces local disorder that propagates along the entire alkyl chains, resulting in a slightly more fluid membrane. These changes would help to maintain trans-membrane transport in cold environments, explaining why the relative abundance of hydroxylated Archaea lipids increases at lower temperatures. The in silico approach aids to understand the underlying physiological mechanisms behind the hydroxylated lipid based paleo-thermometer recently proposed.

  1. Search for Polarization Effects in the Antiproton Production Process

    DOE PAGES

    Grzonka, D.; Kilian, K.; Ritman, J.; ...

    2015-01-01

    For the production of a polarized antiproton beam, various methods have been suggested including the possibility that antiprotons may be produced polarized which will be checked experimentally. The polarization of antiprotons produced under typical conditions for antiproton beam preparation will be measured at the CERN/PS. If the production process creates some polarization, a polarized antiproton beam could be prepared by a rather simple modification of the antiproton beam facility. The detection setup and the expected experimental conditions are described.

  2. Effect of astigmatism on states of polarization of aberrant stochastic electromagnetic beams in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Chen, Yanru; Zhao, Qi; Zhou, Muchun

    2009-10-01

    The effect of astigmatism on states of polarization of aberrant stochastic electromagnetic beams in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Using the Gaussian-Schell model source with astigmatism, the analytical formula for the degree of polarization, the orientation angle, and the degree of polarization ellipse are derived. Analytical results show that different strengths of astigmatism have different effects on states of polarization on propagation. It is also shown that when the astigmatic coefficient of sources is large enough, states of polarization are hardly affected by atmospheric turbulence and the free-space diffraction phenomenon. The sufficient conditions for propagating with invariant polarization are derived and discussed.

  3. Compensation of Beam Line Polarizing Effects at UE112 of BESSY II

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrdt, J.; Follath, R.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Scheer, M.

    2010-06-23

    Reflections in synchrotron radiation beam lines tend to change the state of polarization of the radiation. This effect is more pronounced for steep angle of incidence, i.e. at low photon energy (say below 100 eV) beam lines. The APPLE II undulator UE112 at BESSY has all four magnetic rows shiftable and thus generates any state of polarization. To provide any intended polarization state at the sample we perform polarization measurements based on simple and fast linear polarization analysis that together with calculations of the undulator radiation predicts undulator settings that cancel beam line polarization effects.

  4. Fungicidal effect of isoquercitrin via inducing membrane disturbance.

    PubMed

    Yun, JiEun; Lee, Heejeong; Ko, Hae Ju; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Dong Gun

    2015-02-01

    Isoquercitrin is a flavonoid isolated from Aster yomena, which has been used as a traditional medicinal herb. In the present study, we investigated the antifungal activity and the underlying mechanism of isoquercitrin. Isoquercitrin had a potent effect in the susceptibility test against pathogenic fungi and almost no hemolysis. Propidium iodide and potassium release assays were conducted in Candida albicans, and these studies confirmed that isoquercitrin induced membrane damage, thereby, increasing permeability. Membrane potential was analyzed using 3,3'-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide [DiSC3(5)], and the transition of membrane potential was indicated by an increased fluorescence intensity. To further analyze these results using model membranes, giant unilamellar vesicles and large unilamellar vesicles that encapsulated calcein were prepared and the detection of calcein leakage from liposomes indicated that membrane was disturbed. We further verified membrane disturbance by observing the disordered status of the lipid bilayer with 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence. Moreover, changes in size and granularity of the cell were revealed in flow cytometric analysis. All these results suggested the membrane disturbance and the degree of disturbance was estimated to be within a range of 2.3 nm to 3.3 nm by fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran analysis. Taken together, isoquercitrin exerts its fungicidal effect by disturbing the membrane of cells.

  5. Effect of Membrane Permeability on Survival of Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Francesco; Martin-Malo, Alejandro; Hannedouche, Thierry; Loureiro, Alfredo; Papadimitriou, Menelaos; Wizemann, Volker; Jacobson, Stefan H.; Czekalski, Stanislaw; Ronco, Claudio; Vanholder, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    The effect of high-flux hemodialysis membranes on patient survival has not been unequivocally determined. In this prospective, randomized clinical trial, we enrolled 738 incident hemodialysis patients, stratified them by serum albumin ≤4 and >4 g/dl, and assigned them to either low-flux or high-flux membranes. We followed patients for 3 to 7.5 yr. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed no significant difference between high-flux and low-flux membranes, and a Cox proportional hazards model concurred. Patients with serum albumin ≤4 g/dl had significantly higher survival rates in the high-flux group compared with the low-flux group (P = 0.032). In addition, a secondary analysis revealed that high-flux membranes may significantly improve survival of patients with diabetes. Among those with serum albumin ≤4 g/dl, slightly different effects among patients with and without diabetes suggested a potential interaction between diabetes status and low serum albumin in the reduction of risk conferred by high-flux membranes. In summary, we did not detect a significant survival benefit with either high-flux or low-flux membranes in the population overall, but the use of high-flux membranes conferred a significant survival benefit among patients with serum albumin ≤4 g/dl. The apparent survival benefit among patients who have diabetes and are treated with high-flux membranes requires confirmation given the post hoc nature of our analysis. PMID:19092122

  6. Effects of polarization induced by non-weak electric fields on the excitability of elongated neurons with active dendrites.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Robert I; Barreto, Ernest; Sander, Evelyn; So, Paul

    2016-02-01

    An externally-applied electric field can polarize a neuron, especially a neuron with elongated dendrites, and thus modify its excitability. Here we use a computational model to examine, predict, and explain these effects. We use a two-compartment Pinsky-Rinzel model neuron polarized by an electric potential difference imposed between its compartments, and we apply an injected ramp current. We vary three model parameters: the magnitude of the applied potential difference, the extracellular potassium concentration, and the rate of current injection. A study of the Time-To-First-Spike (TTFS) as a function of polarization leads to the identification of three regions of polarization strength that have different effects. In the weak region, the TTFS increases linearly with polarization. In the intermediate region, the TTFS increases either sub- or super-linearly, depending on the current injection rate and the extracellular potassium concentration. In the strong region, the TTFS decreases. Our results in the weak and strong region are consistent with experimental observations, and in the intermediate region, we predict novel effects that depend on experimentally-accessible parameters. We find that active channels in the dendrite play a key role in these effects. Our qualitative results were found to be robust over a wide range of inter-compartment conductances and the ratio of somatic to dendritic membrane areas. In addition, we discuss preliminary results where synaptic inputs replace the ramp injection protocol. The insights and conclusions were found to extend from our polarized PR model to a polarized PR model with I h dendritic currents. Finally, we discuss the degree to which our results may be generalized.

  7. Effects of spatial variation in membrane diffusibility and solubility on the lateral transport of membrane components.

    PubMed Central

    Eisinger, J; Halperin, B I

    1986-01-01

    There exist many examples of membrane components (e.g. receptors) accumulating in special domains of cell membranes. We analyze how certain variations in lateral diffusibility and solubility of the membrane would increase the efficiency of transport to these regions. A theorem is derived to show that the mean-time-of capture, tc, for particles diffusing to a trap from an annular region surrounding it, is intermediate to the tc values that correspond to the minimum and maximum diffusion coefficients that obtain in this region. An analytical solution for tc as a function of the gradient of diffusivity surrounding a trap is derived for circular geometry. Since local diffusion coefficients can be increased dramatically by reducing the concentration of intra-membrane particles and/or allowing them to form aggregates, such mechanisms could greatly enhance the diffusion-limited transport of particular membrane components to a trap (e.g. coated pit). If the trap is surrounded by an annular region in which the probe particles' partition function is increased, say, by the local segregation of certain phospholipids, tc is shown to vary inversely with the logarithm of the relative partition function. We provide some conjectural examples to illustrate the magnitude of the effects which heterogeneities in diffusibility and solubility may have in biological membranes. PMID:3756302

  8. Sphingolipids Containing Very-Long-Chain Fatty Acids Define a Secretory Pathway for Specific Polar Plasma Membrane Protein Targeting in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Jonathan E.; Molino, Diana; Gissot, Lionel; Bellec, Yannick; Hématy, Kian; Marion, Jessica; Belcram, Katia; Palauqui, Jean-Christophe; Satiat-JeuneMaître, Béatrice; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a class of structural membrane lipids involved in membrane trafficking and cell polarity. Functional analysis of the ceramide synthase family in Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrates the existence of two activities selective for the length of the acyl chains. Very-long-acyl-chain (C > 18 carbons) but not long-chain sphingolipids are essential for plant development. Reduction of very-long-chain fatty acid sphingolipid levels leads in particular to auxin-dependent inhibition of lateral root emergence that is associated with selective aggregation of the plasma membrane auxin carriers AUX1 and PIN1 in the cytosol. Defective targeting of polar auxin carriers is characterized by specific aggregation of Rab-A2a– and Rab-A1e–labeled early endosomes along the secretory pathway. These aggregates correlate with the accumulation of membrane structures and vesicle fragmentation in the cytosol. In conclusion, sphingolipids with very long acyl chains define a trafficking pathway with specific endomembrane compartments and polar auxin transport protein cargoes. PMID:21666002

  9. Selected SNARE proteins are essential for the polarized membrane insertion of igf-1 receptor and the regulation of initial axonal outgrowth in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Diego; Plonka, Florentyna Bustos; Oksdath, Mariana; Guil, Alvaro Nieto; Sosa, Lucas J; Quiroga, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of polarity necessitates initial axonal outgrowth and, therefore, the addition of new membrane to the axon’s plasmalemma. Axolemmal expansion occurs by exocytosis of plasmalemmal precursor vesicles (PPVs) primarily at the neuronal growth cone. Little is known about the SNAREs family proteins involved in the regulation of PPV fusion with the neuronal plasmalemma at early stages of differentiation. We show here that five SNARE proteins (VAMP2, VAMP4, VAMP7, Syntaxin6 and SNAP23) were expressed by hippocampal pyramidal neurons before polarization. Expression silencing of three of these proteins (VAMP4, Syntaxin6 and SNAP23) repressed axonal outgrowth and the establishment of neuronal polarity, by inhibiting IGF-1 receptor exocytotic polarized insertion, necessary for neuronal polarization. In addition, stimulation with IGF-1 triggered the association of VAMP4, Syntaxin6 and SNAP23 to vesicular structures carrying the IGF-1 receptor and overexpression of a negative dominant form of Syntaxin6 significantly inhibited exocytosis of IGF-1 receptor containing vesicles at the neuronal growth cone. Taken together, our results indicated that VAMP4, Syntaxin6 and SNAP23 functions are essential for regulation of PPV exocytosis and the polarized insertion of IGF-1 receptor and, therefore, required for initial axonal elongation and the establishment of neuronal polarity. PMID:27462422

  10. Divergences in the response to ultraviolet radiation between polar and non-polar ciliated protozoa: UV radiation effects in Euplotes.

    PubMed

    Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Cervia, Davide; Vallesi, Adriana

    2012-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has detrimental effects on marine ecosystems, in particular in the polar regions where stratospheric ozone reduction causes higher levels of solar radiation. We analyzed two polar species of Euplotes, Euplotes focardii and Euplotes nobilii, for the sensitivity to UV radiation in comparison with two akin species from mid-latitude and tropical waters. Results showed that they face UV radiation much more efficiently than the non-polar species by adopting alternative strategies that most likely reflect different times of colonization of the polar waters. While E. focardii, which is endemic to the Antarctic, survives for longer exposed to UV radiation, E. nobilii, which inhabits both the Antarctic and Arctic, recovers faster from UV-induced damage.

  11. 3-D effects of polarization switching on interdigitated electroded ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisani, David M.; Lynch, C. S.

    2011-04-01

    Interdigitated electrodes are used to obtain an in-plane d33 coupling from patch actuators. Existing design tools do not take into consideration the three dimensional effects of polarization reorientation. This work presents a 3-D finite element code that utilizes a micromechancial constitutive law with full ferroelectric switching. The code is used to explore the design of interdigitated electrode devices. The results point to several parameters that are important to the design of these devices. These include electrode spacing, electrode width, specimen thickness, and specimen depth.

  12. Effects of dimethyl sulfoxide on lipid membrane electroporation.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M Laura; Reigada, Ramon

    2014-08-07

    Pores can be generated in lipid membranes by the application of an external electric field or by the addition of particular chemicals such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Molecular dynamics (MD) has been shown to be a useful tool for unveiling many aspects of pore formation in lipid membranes in both situations. By means of MD simulations, we address the formation of electropores in cholesterol-containing lipid bilayers under the influence of DMSO. We show how a combination of physical and chemical mechanisms leads to more favorable conditions for generating membrane pores and, in particular, how the addition of DMSO to the medium significantly reduces the minimum electric field required to electroporate a lipid membrane. The strong alteration of membrane transversal properties and the energetic stabilization of the hydrophobic pore stage by DMSO provide the physicochemical mechanisms that explain this effect.

  13. Phosphocreatine interacts with phospholipids, affects membrane properties and exerts membrane-protective effects.

    PubMed

    Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Epand, Raquel F; Meiler, Flurina; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Neumann, Dietbert; Widmer, Hans R; Meier, Beat H; Epand, Richard M; Saks, Valdur; Wallimann, Theo; Schlattner, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A broad spectrum of beneficial effects has been ascribed to creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and their cyclic analogues cyclo-(cCr) and phospho-cyclocreatine (PcCr). Cr is widely used as nutritional supplement in sports and increasingly also as adjuvant treatment for pathologies such as myopathies and a plethora of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, Cr and its cyclic analogues have been proposed for anti-cancer treatment. The mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects are still controversial and far from being understood. The reversible conversion of Cr and ATP into PCr and ADP by creatine kinase, generating highly diffusible PCr energy reserves, is certainly an important element. However, some protective effects of Cr and analogues cannot be satisfactorily explained solely by effects on the cellular energy state. Here we used mainly liposome model systems to provide evidence for interaction of PCr and PcCr with different zwitterionic phospholipids by applying four independent, complementary biochemical and biophysical assays: (i) chemical binding assay, (ii) surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), (iii) solid-state (31)P-NMR, and (iv) differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SPR revealed low affinity PCr/phospholipid interaction that additionally induced changes in liposome shape as indicated by NMR and SPR. Additionally, DSC revealed evidence for membrane packing effects by PCr, as seen by altered lipid phase transition. Finally, PCr efficiently protected against membrane permeabilization in two different model systems: liposome-permeabilization by the membrane-active peptide melittin, and erythrocyte hemolysis by the oxidative drug doxorubicin, hypoosmotic stress or the mild detergent saponin. These findings suggest a new molecular basis for non-energy related functions of PCr and its cyclic analogue. PCr/phospholipid interaction and alteration of membrane structure may not only protect cellular membranes against various insults, but could

  14. Nonequilibrium hysteresis and Wien effect water dissociation at a bipolar membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, D. T.; Craster, R. V.; Matar, O. K.; Cheng, L.-J.; Chang, H.-C.

    2012-11-01

    As in electrochemical cyclic voltammetry, time-periodic reverse voltage bias across a bipolar membrane is shown to exhibit hysteresis due to transient effects. This is due to the incomplete depletion of mobile ions, at the junction between the membranes, within two adjoining polarized layers; the layer thickness depends on the applied voltage and the surface charge densities. Experiments show that the hysteresis consists of an Ohmic linear rise in the total current with respect to the voltage, followed by a decay of the current. A limiting current is established for a long period when all the mobile ions are depleted from the polarized layer. If the resulting high field within the two polarized layers is sufficiently large, water dissociation occurs to produce proton and hydroxyl traveling wave fronts which contribute to another large jump in the current. We use numerical simulation and asymptotic analysis to interpret the experimental results and to estimate the amplitude of the transient hysteresis and the water-dissociation current.

  15. Effect of silica fouling on the removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products by nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Li; Chiou, Jheng-Hong; Lee, Chung-Hsiang

    2014-07-30

    In this study, one reverse osmosis (XLE) and two nanofiltration (NF90 and NF270) membranes were fouled by silica to evaluate its effect on the flux decline as well as the removal of six pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) including carbamazapine (CBZ), triclosan (TRI), ibuprofen (IBU), sulfadiazine (DIA), sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sulfamethazine (SMZ) from pH 3 to 10. The membranes were characterized by physicochemical properties including hydrophobicity, surface morphology and PPCPs adsorption with or without the presence of silica fouling to validate the rejection mechanisms of PPCPs. The fouling mechanisms were investigated using the modified Hermia model. It was found that all membranes with silica fouling showed more severe permeate flux decline at low pHs (3 and 5) than at high pHs (8 and 10) by the decomposition of nonionized silica particles to form a dense gel layer on membrane surfaces, which was hard to be removed by backwash. Silica fouling rendered the membrane surface considerably more hydrophilic, and only IBU, TRI and SMZ were adsorbed on membranes. Silica fouling on tight membranes (NF90 and XLE) can promote rejection of most PPCPs because the dense fouling layer could supply membrane with synergistic steric hindrance to reduce the transportation of PPCPs across membrane surface, implying that size exclusion is the dominating mechanism. While for loose NF270, electrostatic repulsion dominates by enhanced rejection of PPCPs as pH increased. Although fouling layer could provide extra steric hindrance for NF270, its effect was overwhelmed by the accompanied cake-enhanced concentration polarization phenomenon (CEOP). CEOP impeded back diffusion of PPCPs into the feed solution, trapped and accumulated PPCPs on membrane surface so as to increase their diffusion across membrane. At all pH levels, intermediate blocking and gel layer formation was the major fouling mechanism for tight and loose membrane, respectively.

  16. Differential Effect of Plant Lipids on Membrane Organization

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, Kevin; Mongrand, Sébastien; Beney, Laurent; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The high diversity of the plant lipid mixture raises the question of their respective involvement in the definition of membrane organization. This is particularly the case for plant plasma membrane, which is enriched in specific lipids, such as free and conjugated forms of phytosterols and typical phytosphingolipids, such as glycosylinositolphosphoceramides. This question was here addressed extensively by characterizing the order level of membrane from vesicles prepared using various plant lipid mixtures and labeled with an environment-sensitive probe. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments showed that among major phytosterols, campesterol exhibits a stronger ability than β-sitosterol and stigmasterol to order model membranes. Multispectral confocal microscopy, allowing spatial analysis of membrane organization, demonstrated accordingly the strong ability of campesterol to promote ordered domain formation and to organize their spatial distribution at the membrane surface. Conjugated sterol forms, alone and in synergy with free sterols, exhibit a striking ability to order membrane. Plant sphingolipids, particularly glycosylinositolphosphoceramides, enhanced the sterol-induced ordering effect, emphasizing the formation and increasing the size of sterol-dependent ordered domains. Altogether, our results support a differential involvement of free and conjugated phytosterols in the formation of ordered domains and suggest that the diversity of plant lipids, allowing various local combinations of lipid species, could be a major contributor to membrane organization in particular through the formation of sphingolipid-sterol interacting domains. PMID:25575593

  17. Icehouse Effect: A Polar Autumn and Winter Cooling Trend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetzel, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    The icehouse effect is a hypothesized polar climate trend toward cooling (or lack of warming) in response to greenhouse warming of adjacent lower latitudes. When greenhouse warmed air from lower latitudes moves over ice and snow, it generates a stronger, more stable, cappino, inversion than in a parallel case without greenhouse warming. Because the degree of decoupling between vertically adjacent air masses is directly dependent on the strength of the inversion, the capping inversion acts somewhat analogously to the walls and roof of the icehouse of generations past. What is inside the icehouse, namely the cold polar atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) air, is preserved by the "insulation" or decoupling, provided by the warm air aloft. Observations over the Arctic Ocean have shown an unexpected lack of any detectable surface warming trend over the past 40 years. This finding strongly contradicts climate model predictions that polar regions should show the strongest effect of greenhouse warming. It also stands in contrast to the consensus reached by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), that human caused greenhouse warming is now detectable globally. One might ask: Are these Arctic observations wrong? Or, if right, is there a plausible physical explanation for them? The published observations mentioned above used about 50,000 soundings over the Arctic Ocean. Here I present a novel analysis of ALL available Arctic rawinsonde data north of 65N--a total of more than 1.1 million soundings. The analysis confirms the previously published result: There is indeed a slight climate-cooling trend in the vast majority of the data. Importantly, there are also select conditions (very strong and very weak stability of the ABL) which show a consistent, strong Arctic warming trend. It is the juxtaposition of these warming and cooling trends which defines a unique "icehouse signature" for which an explanation can be sought.

  18. Polarized delivery of viral glycoproteins to the apical and basolateral plasma membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells infected with temperature-sensitive viruses

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The intracellular route followed by viral envelope glycoproteins in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was studied by using temperature-sensitive mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and influenza, in which, at the nonpermissive temperature (39.5 degrees C), the newly synthesized glycoproteins (G proteins) and hemagglutinin (HA), respectively, are not transported out of the endoplasmic reticulum. After infection with VSV and incubation at 39.5 degrees C for 4-5 h, synchronous transfer of G protein to the plasma membrane was initiated by shifting to the permissive temperature (32.5 degrees C). Immunoelectron microscopy showed that under these conditions the protein moved to the Golgi apparatus and from there directly to a region of the lateral plasma membrane near this organelle. G protein then seemed to diffuse progressively to basal regions of the cell surface and, only after it had accumulated in the basolateral domain, it began to appear on the apical surface near the intercellular junctions. The results of these experiments indicate that the VSV G protein must be sorted before its arrival at the cell surface, and suggest that passage to the apical domain occurs only late in infection when tight junctions are no longer an effective barrier. In complementary experiments, using the temperature-sensitive mutant of influenza, cultures were first shifted from the nonpermissive temperature (39.5 degrees C) to 18.5 degrees C, to allow entrance of the glycoprotein into the Golgi apparatus (see Matlin, K.S., and K. Simons, 1983, Cell, 34:233-243). Under these conditions HA accumulated in Golgi stacks and vesicles but did not reach the plasma membrane. When the temperature was subsequently shifted to 32.5 degrees C, HA rapidly appeared in discrete regions of the apical surface near, and often directly above, the Golgi elements, and later diffused throughout this surface. To ensure that the anti-HA antibodies had access to lateral domains, monolayers were

  19. Photoelectric response of polarization sensitive bacteriorhodopsin films.

    PubMed

    Li, Qun; Stuart, Jeffrey A; Birge, Robert R; Xu, Jian; Stickrath, Andrew; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2004-03-15

    Polarization sensitivity is introduced into oriented bacteriorhodopsin (BR) films through a photochemical bleaching process, which chemically modifies the structure of the purple membrane by breaking the intrinsic symmetry of the membrane-bound BR trimers. The resulting photovoltage generated in an indium-tin oxide (ITO)/BR/ITO detector is found to be anisotropic with respect to cross-polarized probe beams. A model, based on the polarization dependent photoselection of the BR molecules qualitatively explains the photochemical bleaching process and the observed anisotropic response. The effect reported here can be used to construct a polarization sensitive BR-based bio-photoreceiver.

  20. Potentiodynamic polarization effect on phase and microstructure of SAC305 solder in hydrochloric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaini, Nurwahida Binti Mohd; Nazeri, Muhammad Firdaus Bin Mohd

    2016-07-01

    The corrosion analysis of SAC305 lead free solder was investigated in Hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Potentiodynamic polarization was used to polarize the SAC305. The effect of polarization on the phase and microstructure were compared to as-prepared SAC305 solder. Potentiodynamic polarization introduces mixed corrosion products on the surface of SAC305 solder. The XRD analysis confirms that the mixed corrosion products emerged on the surface after polarization by formation of SnO and SnO2 of which confirmed that dissolution of Sn was dominant during polarization. Microstructure analysis reveal the presence of gap and porosities produced limits the protection offered by the passivation film.

  1. Effects of irregularity anisotropy on Faraday polarization fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Nghiem, S. V.; Yoo, C.

    1989-01-01

    The previous model (Lee et al., 1982) of the Faraday polarization fluctuations (FPF) is extended after taking into account the anisotropic nature of the commonly observed, rodlike and sheetlike ionospheric irregularities. Striking effects of irregularity anisotropy are found in the longitudinal radio propagation. However, if the wave propagation angle is not small (say, greater than 5 deg), the effects of irregularity anisotropy on FPF introduced by rodlike irregularities weaken significantly, while those caused by sheetlike irregularities remain prominent. Therefore, under the same ionospheric propagation conditions, sheetlike ionospheric irregularities are more effective than rodlike ionospheric irregularities in causing the FPF of radio waves. It is expected that intense FPF of VHF radio signals can be observed not only near the equatorial anomaly but also in the auroral region.

  2. Study of the effect of temperature on Pt dissolution in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells via accelerated stress tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanushkodi, S. R.; Kundu, S.; Fowler, M. W.; Pritzker, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) at higher cell temperatures accelerates Pt dissolution in the catalyst layer. In this study, a Pt dissolution accelerated stress testing protocol involving the application of a potentiostatic square-wave with 3 s at 0.6 V followed by 3 s at 1.0 V was developed to test fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The use of this Pt dissolution protocol at three different temperatures (40 °C, 60 °C and 80 °C) was investigated for the same membrane electrode assembly composition. Impedance analysis of the membrane electrode assemblies showed an increase in polarization resistance during the course of the accelerated stress testing. Polarization analysis and electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) loss measurements revealed evidence of increased cathode catalyst layer (CCL) degradation due to Pt dissolution and deposition in the membrane as the cell temperature was raised. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images confirmed the formation of Pt bands in the membrane. A diagnostic expression was developed to estimate kinetic losses due to oxygen reduction using the effective platinum surface area (EPSA) estimated from cyclic voltammograms. The results indicated that performance degradation occurred mainly due to Pt loss.

  3. Molecular dynamics and partitioning of di-tert-butyl nitroxide in stratum corneum membranes: effect of terpenes.

    PubMed

    Camargos, Heverton Silva; Silva, Adolfo Henrique Moraes; Anjos, Jorge Luiz Vieira; Alonso, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    In this work, we have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the small spin label di-tert-butyl nitroxide (DTBN), which partitions the aqueous and hydrocarbon phases, to study the interaction of the terpenes alpha-terpineol, 1,8-cineole, L(-)-carvone and (+)-limonene with the uppermost skin layer, the stratum corneum, and the membrane models of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC). The EPR spectra indicated that the terpenes increase both the partition coefficient and the rotational correlation time of the spin labels in the stratum corneum membranes, whereas similar effects were observed in the DMPC and DPPC bilayers only at temperatures below the liquid-crystalline phase. The EPR parameter associated to probe polarity inside the membranes showed thermotropically induced changes, suggesting relocations of spin probe, which were dependent on the membrane phases. While the DMPC and DPPC bilayers showed abrupt changes in the partitioning and rotational correlation time parameters in the phase transitions, the SC membranes were characterized by slight changes in the total range of measured temperatures, presenting the greatest changes or membranes reorganizations in the temperature range of approximately 50 to approximately 74 degrees C. The results suggest that terpenes act as spacers, weakening the hydrogen-bonded network at the polar interface and thus fluidizing the stratum corneum lipids.

  4. Effects of diclofenac on EPC liposome membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Helena; Lúcio, Marlene; Lima, José L F C; Matos, Carla; Reis, Salette

    2005-07-01

    In this work the interaction of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), diclofenac, with egg yolk phosphatidylcoline (EPC) liposomes, used as cell-membrane models, was quantified by determination of the partition coefficient. The liposome/aqueous phase partition coefficient was determined by derivative spectrophotometry, fluorescence quenching, and measurement of zeta-potential. Theoretical models based on simple partition of the diclofenac between two different media, were used to fit the experimental data, enabling the determination of K(p). The three techniques used yielded similar results. The effects of the interaction on the membrane's characteristics were further evaluated, either by studying membrane potential changes or by effects on membrane fluidity. The liposome membrane potential and the size and size-homogeneity of liposomes were measured by light scattering. The effects of diclofenac on the internal viscosity or fluidity of the membrane were determined by use of spectroscopic probes-a series of n-(9-anthroyloxy) fatty acids in which the carboxyl terminal group is located at the interfacial region of the membrane and the fluorescent anthracene group is attached at different positions along the fatty acid chain. The location of the diclofenac on the membrane was also evaluated, by fluorescence quenching using the same series of fluorescent probes. Because the fluorescent anthracene group is attached at different positions along the fatty acid chain, it is possible to label at a graded series of depths in the bilayer. The interactions between the drug and the probe are a means of predicting the location of the drug on the membrane.

  5. Effects of UV radiation on marine ectotherms in polar regions.

    PubMed

    Dahms, Hans-U; Dobretsov, Sergey; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2011-05-01

    Ozone-related increase in solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) during the last decades provided an important ecological stressor, particularly for polar ecosystems since these are less adapted to such changes. All life forms appear to be susceptible to UVR to a highly variable extent that depends on individual species and their environment. Differences in sensitivity between organisms may relate to efficiency differences of their protection mechanisms and repair systems. UVR impacts are masked by large seasonal and geographic differences even in confined areas like the polar regions. UVR has effects and responses on various integration levels: from genetics, physiology, biology, populations, communities, to functional changes as in food webs with consequences on material and energy circulations through ecosystems. Even at current levels, solar UV-B affects consumer organisms, such as ectotherms (invertebrates and fish), particularly through impediments on critical phases of their development (early life history stages such as gametes, zygotes and larvae). Despite the overall negative implications of UVR, effect sizes vary widely in, e.g., molecular damage, cell and tissue damage, survival, growth, behavior, histology, and at the level of populations, communities and ecosystems.

  6. Electrostatically Shielded Quantum Confined Stark Effect Inside Polar Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The effect of electrostatic shielding of the polarization fields in nanostructures at high carrier densities is studied. A simplified analytical model, employing screened, exponentially decaying polarization potentials, localized at the edges of a QW, is introduced for the ES-shielded quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE). Wave function trapping within the Debye-length edge-potential causes blue shifting of energy levels and gradual elimination of the QCSE red-shifting with increasing carrier density. The increase in the e−h wave function overlap and the decrease of the radiative emission time are, however, delayed until the “edge-localization” energy exceeds the peak-voltage of the charged layer. Then the wave function center shifts to the middle of the QW, and behavior becomes similar to that of an unbiased square QW. Our theoretical estimates of the radiative emission time show a complete elimination of the QCSE at doping densities ≥1020 cm−3, in quantitative agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:20596407

  7. Polarization effects in femtosecond laser induced amorphization of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Feng; Li, Hong-Jin; Huang, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Wen-Zhong; Pan, Huai-Hai; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Jing; Li, Yang-Bo; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate monocrystalline silicon wafer. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of ablation surface indicates horizontally polarized laser beam shows an enhancement in amorphization efficiency by a factor of 1.6-1.7 over the circularly polarized laser ablation. This demonstrates that one can tune the amorphization efficiency through the polarization of irradiation laser.

  8. Experimental effects of orbit on polarization loss in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar V.; Bai, M.; Huang, H.; Marusic, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Minty, M.

    2012-05-20

    We are performing several experiments during the RHIC ramp to better understand the impact of orbit errors on the polarization at our current working point. These will be conducted by exciting specified orbit harmonics during the final two large intrinsic resonance crossing in RHIC during the 250 GeV polarized proton ramp. The resultant polarization response will then be measured.

  9. Membrane lipids, EGF receptors, and intracellular signals colocalize and are polarized in epithelial cells moving directionally in a physiological electric field.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Pu, Jin; Forrester, John V; McCaig, Colin D

    2002-06-01

    Directed cell migration is essential for tissue formation, inflammation, and wound healing. Chemotaxis plays a major role in these situations and is underpinned by asymmetric intracellular signaling. Endogenous electric fields (EFs) are common where cell movement occurs, such as in wound healing, and cells respond to electric field gradients by reorienting and migrating directionally (galvanotaxis/electrotaxis). We show that a physiological EF redistributed both EGF (epidermal growth factor) receptors and detergent-insoluble membrane lipids asymmetrically, leading to cathodal polarization and enhanced activation of the MAP kinase, ERK1/2. This induced leading-edge actin polymerization in directionally migrating mammalian epithelial cells. Inhibiting the EGF receptor-MAP kinase signaling pathway significantly decreased leading edge actin asymmetry and directional migration. We propose a model in which EF-polarized membrane lipid domains and EGF receptors cause asymmetric signaling through MAP kinase, which drives directional cell migration. A comparison is made with the mechanisms underpinning chemotaxis.

  10. Cholesterol effect on the dipole potential of lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Starke-Peterkovic, Thomas; Turner, Nigel; Vitha, Mark F; Waller, Mark P; Hibbs, David E; Clarke, Ronald J

    2006-06-01

    The effect of cholesterol removal by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin on the dipole potential, psi(d), of membrane vesicles composed of natural membrane lipids extracted from the kidney and brain of eight vertebrate species was investigated using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent probe di-8-ANEPPS. Cyclodextrin treatment reduced cholesterol levels by on average 80% and this was associated with an average reduction in psi(d) of 50 mV. Measurements of the effect of a range of cholesterol derivatives on the psi(d) of DMPC lipid vesicles showed that the magnitude of the effect correlated with the component of the sterol's dipole moment perpendicular to the membrane surface. The changes in psi(d) observed could not be accounted for solely by the electric field originating from the sterols' dipole moments. Additional factors must arise from sterol-induced changes in lipid packing, which changes the density of dipoles in the membrane, and changes in water penetration into the membrane, which changes the effective dielectric constant of the interfacial region. In DMPC membranes, the cholesterol-induced change in psi(d) was biphasic, i.e., a maximum in psi(d) was observed at approximately 35-45 mol %, after which psi(d) started to decrease. We suggest that this could be associated with a maximum in the strength of DMPC-cholesterol intermolecular forces at this composition.

  11. Long-range effects in electron scattering by polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2016-11-01

    We review long-range effects in electron collisions with polar molecules, starting with elastic scattering. We then go to rotationally and vibrationally inelastic processes and dissociative electron attachment. The last two are strongly affected by vibrational Feshbach resonances which have been observed and described theoretically in many systems from simple diatomic molecules to more complex polyatomics, biologically relevant molecules, and van der Waals clusters. We then review environmental effects which include electron interaction with molecules adsorbed on surfaces and molecules in cluster environments. We concentrate on physics rather than on listing results of ab initio calculations. With increasing complexity of targets and processes model approaches become more relevant. We demonstrate their success in the theoretical description of electron attachment to polyatomic molecules and to molecules in complex environments.

  12. Effect of membrane length, membrane resistance, and filtration conditions on the fractionation of milk proteins by microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Piry, A; Heino, A; Kühnl, W; Grein, T; Ripperger, S; Kulozik, U

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the fractionation of casein micelles and the whey protein β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) of skim milk by crossflow microfiltration (0.1 μm) for the first time by a novel approach as a function of membrane length and membrane resistance. A special module was constructed with 4 sections and used to assess the effects of membrane length by measuring flux and β-LG permeation (or transmission) as a function of transmembrane pressure and membrane length. Depending on the position, the membranes were partly controlled by a deposit layer. A maximum for β-LG mass flow through the various membrane sections was found, depending on the position along the membrane. To study the effect of convective flow toward the membrane, membranes with 4 different intrinsic permeation resistances were assessed in terms of the permeation and fouling effects along the flow channel. From these findings, we derived a ratio between transmembrane pressure and membrane resistance, which was useful in reducing the effect of deposit formation and, thus, to optimize the protein permeation. In addition, the fouling effect was investigated in terms of reversible and irreversible fouling and, in addition, by differentiation between pressure-induced fouling and adsorption-induced (pressure-independent) fouling, again as a function of membrane length.

  13. Polarized cells, polar actions.

    PubMed

    Maddock, J R; Alley, M R; Shapiro, L

    1993-11-01

    The recognition of polar bacterial organization is just emerging. The examples of polar localization given here are from a variety of bacterial species and concern a disparate array of cellular functions. A number of well-characterized instances of polar localization of bacterial proteins, including the chemoreceptor complex in both C. crescentus and E. coli, the maltose-binding protein in E. coli, the B. japonicum surface attachment proteins, and the actin tail of L. monocytogenes within a mammalian cell, involve proteins or protein complexes that facilitate bacterial interaction with the environment, either the extracellular milieux or that within a plant or mammalian host. The significance of this observation remains unclear. Polarity in bacteria poses many problems, including the necessity for a mechanism for asymmetrically distributing proteins as well as a mechanism by which polar localization is maintained. Large structures, such as a flagellum, are anchored at the pole by means of the basal body that traverses the peptidoglycan wall. But for proteins and small complexes, whether in the periplasm or the membrane, one must invoke a mechanism that prevents the diffusion of these proteins away from the cell pole. Perhaps the periplasmic proteins are retained at the pole by the presence of the periseptal annulus (35). The constraining features for membrane components are not known. For large aggregates, such as the clusters of MCP, CheA, and CheW complexes, perhaps the size of the aggregate alone prevents displacement. In most cases of cellular asymmetry, bacteria are able to discriminate between the new pole and the old pole and to utilize this information for localization specificity. The maturation of new pole to old pole appears to be a common theme as well. Given numerous examples reported thus far, we propose that bacterial polarity displays specific rules and is a more general phenomenon than has been previously recognized.

  14. Vacuum polarization corrections to low energy quark effective couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Ademar; Braghin, Fabio L.

    2014-07-01

    In this work corrections to low energy punctual effective quark couplings up to the eighth order are calculated by considering vacuum polarization effects with the scalar quark-antiquark condensate. The departing point is a QCD-based Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. By separating the quark field into two components, one that condenses and another one for interacting quarks, the former is integrated out with the help of usual auxiliary fields and an effective action in terms of interacting quark fields is found. The scalar auxiliary field reduces to the quark-antiquark condensate in the vacuum and the determinant is expanded in powers of the quark-antiquark bilinears generating chiral invariant effective 2N-quark interactions (N =2,3…). The corresponding coupling constants and effective masses are estimated, and the general trend is that for increasing the effective gluon mass the values of the effective coupling constants decrease. All the values are in good agreement with phenomenological fits.

  15. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Influences PIN Polarization by Controlling Clathrin-Mediated Membrane Trafficking in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Ischebeck, Till; Werner, Stephanie; Krishnamoorthy, Praveen; Lerche, Jennifer; Meijón, Mónica; Stenzel, Irene; Löfke, Christian; Wiessner, Theresa; Im, Yang Ju; Perera, Imara Y.; Iven, Tim; Feussner, Ivo; Busch, Wolfgang; Boss, Wendy F.; Teichmann, Thomas; Hause, Bettina; Persson, Staffan; Heilmann, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    The functions of the minor phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] during vegetative plant growth remain obscure. Here, we targeted two related phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases (PI4P 5-kinases) PIP5K1 and PIP5K2, which are expressed ubiquitously in Arabidopsis thaliana. A pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant with reduced PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels showed dwarf stature and phenotypes suggesting defects in auxin distribution. The roots of the pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant had normal auxin levels but reduced auxin transport and altered distribution. Fluorescence-tagged auxin efflux carriers PIN-FORMED (PIN1)–green fluorescent protein (GFP) and PIN2-GFP displayed abnormal, partially apolar distribution. Furthermore, fewer brefeldin A–induced endosomal bodies decorated by PIN1-GFP or PIN2-GFP formed in pip5k1 pip5k2 mutants. Inducible overexpressor lines for PIP5K1 or PIP5K2 also exhibited phenotypes indicating misregulation of auxin-dependent processes, and immunolocalization showed reduced membrane association of PIN1 and PIN2. PIN cycling and polarization require clathrin-mediated endocytosis and labeled clathrin light chain also displayed altered localization patterns in the pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant, consistent with a role for PtdIns(4,5)P2 in the regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Further biochemical tests on subcellular fractions enriched for clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) indicated that pip5k1 and pip5k2 mutants have reduced CCV-associated PI4P 5-kinase activity. Together, the data indicate an important role for PtdIns(4,5)P2 in the control of clathrin dynamics and in auxin distribution in Arabidopsis. PMID:24326589

  16. Structural and functional polarity of canalicular and basolateral plasma membrane vesicles isolated in high yield from rat liver

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A method has been developed for routine high yield separation of canalicular (cLPM) from basolateral (blLPM) liver plasma membrane vesicles of rat liver. Using a combination of rate zonal floatation (TZ- 28 zonal rotor, Sorvall) and high speed centrifugation through discontinuous sucrose gradients, 9-16 mg of cLPM and 15-28 mg of blLPM protein can be isolated in 1 d. cLPM are free of the basolateral markers Na+/K+-ATPase and glucagon-stimulatable adenylate cyclase activities, but are highly enriched with respect to homogenate in the "canalicular marker" enzyme activities leucylnaphthylamidase (48-fold), gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase (60-fold), 5'-nucleotidase (64-fold), alkaline phosphatase (71-fold), Mg++-ATPase (83-fold), and alkaline phosphodiesterase I (116-fold). In contrast, blLPM are 34-fold enriched in Na+/K+-ATPase activity, exhibit considerable glucagon-stimulatable adenylate cyclase activity, and demonstrate a 4- to 15-fold increase over homogenate in the various "canalicular markers." cLPM have a twofold higher content of sialic acids, cholesterol; and sphingomyelin compared with blLPM. At least three canalicular-(130,000, 100,000, and 58,000 mol wt) and several basolateral-specific protein bands have been detected after SDS PAGE of the two LPM subfractions. Specifically, the immunoglobin A-binding secretory component is restricted to blLPM as demonstrated by immunochemical techniques. These data indicate virtually complete separation of basolateral from canalicular LPM and demonstrate multiple functional and compositional polarity between the two surface domains of hepatocytes. PMID:6699096

  17. Effect of combined motor and spatial cues on mathematical reasoning: a polarity correspondence account.

    PubMed

    Verselder, Hélène; Freddi, Sébastien; Dru, Vincent

    2016-08-27

    We examined whether combined motor or spatial polarities could influence accuracy in two mathematical operations. Four experiments were conducted and showed that, when two corresponding polarities were activated, accuracy in multiplicative operations was greater than when non-corresponding polarities were activated, whereas no effect was found for additive operations. These results were established with motor cues (Left/Right and Arm Extension/Flexion, as behavioral approach-avoidance tendencies) and perceptual spatial cues (Left/Right and DOWN/UP cues). A polarity correspondence effect was established and proposed for multiplication. A combination of polarities was associated with a corresponding combination of numerical digits, assessed with mathematical operations, such as multiplication.

  18. Lattice polarity detection of InN by circular photogalvanic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Wang, X. Q.; He, X. W.; Yin, C. M.; Xu, F. J.; Shen, B.; Chen, Y. H.; Wang, Z. G.; Ishitani, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2009-07-20

    We report an effective and nondestructive method based on circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) to detect the lattice polarity of InN. Because of the lattice inversion between In- and N-polar InN, the energy band spin splitting is opposite for InN films with different polarities. Consequently under light irradiation with the same helicity, CPGE photocurrents in In- and N-polar layers will have opposite directions, thus the polarity can be detected. This method is demonstrated by our CPGE measurements in both n- and p-type InN films.

  19. Lattice polarity detection of InN by circular photogalvanic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Wang, X. Q.; He, X. W.; Yin, C. M.; Xu, F. J.; Shen, B.; Chen, Y. H.; Wang, Z. G.; Ishitani, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2009-07-01

    We report an effective and nondestructive method based on circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) to detect the lattice polarity of InN. Because of the lattice inversion between In- and N-polar InN, the energy band spin splitting is opposite for InN films with different polarities. Consequently under light irradiation with the same helicity, CPGE photocurrents in In- and N-polar layers will have opposite directions, thus the polarity can be detected. This method is demonstrated by our CPGE measurements in both n- and p-type InN films.

  20. Electro-hydrodynamic effects on lipid membranes in giant vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staykova, Margarita; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2009-11-01

    Electric fields are widely applied for cell manipulation in numerous micron-scale systems. Here, we show for the first time that alternating electric fields may cause pronounced flows in the membrane of giant lipid vesicles as well as in the surrounding fluid media.^ The lipid vesicles are not only biomimetic model for the cell membrane but also have many potential biotechnological applications, e.g. as drug-delivery systems and micro-reactors. The reported effects should be considered in electric micro-manipulation procedures on cells and vesicles. They might be useful for applications in microfluidic technologies, for lipid mixing, trapping and displacement, as will be demonstrated. We also believe that our method for visualization of the lipid flows by fluorescently labeled intra-membrane domains will be helpful for studies on membrane behavior in vesicles subjected to shear or mechanical stresses.

  1. Real-time monitoring on the adsorption process of salicylic acid onto chitosan membrane using dielectric spectroscopy: macroscale concentration polarization and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhong; Gao, Weidong; Zhao, Kongshuang; Yang, Gang; Zhu, Zhonghe; Cui, Rongjing

    2013-03-28

    The adsorption process of salicylic acid (SA) onto chitosan membrane is monitored in real time by the dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS) method. A unique dielectric relaxation, which is related to the macroscale concentration polarization layers (CPLs) in the SA solution caused by the adsorption, is observed. By modeling the measured systems composed of the membrane, the CPLs, and the SA solution, the dielectric spectra are analyzed systematically on the basis of the interfacial polarization theory. The parameters about the constituent phases, i.e., the dielectric constant εm and the conductivity κm of the chitosan membrane, the conductivity distribution (κ1 to κ2), and the thickness dCPL of the CPL, are obtained. The time-dependent εm and κm give insight into the microstate of the chitosan membrane during the adsorption. Furthermore, the time evolution of the conductivity gradient of the CPL, Δκ/dCPL, is combined to interpret the adsorption mechanism. It is suggested that the noninvasive dielectric monitoring may be applied to many adsorption and release processes.

  2. Polarity effects on the electronic states of N- and Al-polar aluminum nitride surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Soo; Tang, Yingjie; Davis, Robert; Nemanich, Robert

    2006-03-01

    N- and Al-polar (0001) wurtzite AlN films were grown on C- and Si-polar 6H-SiC substrates, respectively. The polarity was confirmed by KOH chemical etching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. The surfaces were cleaned in situ by annealing to ˜1100^oC in a flux of ammonia, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and UV photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) were employed to measure the electronic states at the surfaces. The results indicated a similar electron affinity for both surfaces which appears to approach a value of zero. Furthermore, it was determined that the Fermi energy (Ec-Ef) was 2.4 eV below the conduction band for N-face AlN and 3.0 eV for Al-face AlN. The 0.6eV difference in the Fermi energy indicates a difference in band bending near the surface which is discussed in terms of the built-in field induced by the polarization bound surface charges.

  3. Cost-effective usage of membrane oxygenators in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in infants.

    PubMed

    Özyüksel, A; Ersoy, C; Akçevin, A; Türkoğlu, H; Çiçek, A E; Kahraman, A; Kayhan, B; Cantürk, E

    2015-04-01

    Although the poly-methylpentene (PMP) oxygenators have significant advantages in ECMO implementation, their usage may be limited in some situations, which may be related to economic constraints. In this report, we aimed to emphasize our cost-effective usage of a membrane oxygenator at the ECMO setup. We implemented ECMO with eight Capiox® FX05 or Baby RX05 hollow-fiber membrane oxygenators in five neonatal patients. The average ECMO duration was 121 hours (ranging from 41 to 272 hours). Following the termination of the ECMO, the system was broken down into its components for macroscopic analysis. Neither gross blood clots nor plasma leakage were observed in any of the components. The integration of a centrifugal pump and a separate hollow-fiber oxygenator may provide a cost-effective ECMO implementation setup with no adverse effects which may be an encouraging alternative for the low cost usage of ECMO in neonates.

  4. Induced spin polarization effect in graphene by ferromagnetic nanocontact

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Sumit; Saha, Shyamal K.

    2015-03-07

    Chemically synthesized graphene contains large number of defects which act as localized spin moments at the defect sites. Cobalt nanosheets of variable thickness are grown on graphene surface to investigate spin/magnetotransport through graphene sheets containing large number of localized spins. Negative magnetoresistance (MR) is observed over the entire temperature range (5–300 K) for thin cobalt sheets, while a cross-over from negative to positive MR with increasing temperature is noticed for thicker cobalt sheets. The observed MR results are explained on the basis of recently reported spin polarization effect in graphene due to the presence of ferromagnetic atoms on the surface considering a spin valve like Co/graphene/Co nanostructures.

  5. Ultrafiltration membrane for effective removal of chromium ions from potable water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthumareeswaran, M. R.; Alhoshan, Mansour; Agarwal, Gopal Prasad

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to investigate the efficacy of indigenously developed polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based ultrafiltration (UF) membrane for chromium ions removal from potable water. The hydrolyzed PAN membranes effectively rejected chromium anions in the feed ranging from 250 ppb to 400 ppm and a rejection of ≥90% was achieved for pH ≥ 7 at low chromate concentration (≤25 ppm) in feed. The rejection mechanism of chromium ions was strongly dependent on Donnan exclusion principle, while size exclusion principle for UF did not play a major role on ions rejection. Feed pH played a vital role in changing porosity of membrane, which influenced the retention behavior of chromate ions. Cross-flow velocity, pressure did not play significant role for ions rejection at low feed concentration. However, at higher feed concentration (≥400 ppm), concentration polarization became important and it reduced the chromate rejection to 32% at low cross flow and high pressure. Donnan steric-partitioning pore and dielectric exclusion model (DSPM-DE) was applied to evaluate the chromate ions transport through PAN UF membrane as a function of flux by using optimized model parameters and the simulated data matched well with experimental results.

  6. Ultrafiltration membrane for effective removal of chromium ions from potable water

    PubMed Central

    Muthumareeswaran, M. R.; Alhoshan, Mansour; Agarwal, Gopal Prasad

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to investigate the efficacy of indigenously developed polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based ultrafiltration (UF) membrane for chromium ions removal from potable water. The hydrolyzed PAN membranes effectively rejected chromium anions in the feed ranging from 250 ppb to 400 ppm and a rejection of ≥90% was achieved for pH ≥ 7 at low chromate concentration (≤25 ppm) in feed. The rejection mechanism of chromium ions was strongly dependent on Donnan exclusion principle, while size exclusion principle for UF did not play a major role on ions rejection. Feed pH played a vital role in changing porosity of membrane, which influenced the retention behavior of chromate ions. Cross-flow velocity, pressure did not play significant role for ions rejection at low feed concentration. However, at higher feed concentration (≥400 ppm), concentration polarization became important and it reduced the chromate rejection to 32% at low cross flow and high pressure. Donnan steric-partitioning pore and dielectric exclusion model (DSPM-DE) was applied to evaluate the chromate ions transport through PAN UF membrane as a function of flux by using optimized model parameters and the simulated data matched well with experimental results. PMID:28134266

  7. Heat sink effects in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle External Tank is fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process. In VPPA welding, a noble gas, usually argon, is directed through an arc to emerge from the torch as a hot plasma jet. This jet is surrounded by a shielding gas, usually helium, to protect the weld from contamination with air. The high velocity, hot plasma jet completely penetrates the workpiece (resembling a line heat source) when operated in the 'keyhole' mode. The metal melts on touching the side of the jet, as the torch travels in the perpendicular direction to the direction of the jet, and melted metal moves around the plasma jet in the keyhole forming a puddle which solidifies behind the jet. Heat sink effects are observed when there are irregularities in the workpiece configuration, especially, if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, i.e., in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of this research is to study the effect of irregularities in workpiece configuration and fixture differences (heat sink effects) on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld. Experiments were performed on different workpiece geometries and compared to approximate models.

  8. Building hospital TQM teams: effective polarity analysis and maximization.

    PubMed

    Hurst, J B

    1996-09-01

    Building and maintaining teams require careful attention to and maximization of such polar opposites (¿polarities¿) as individual and team, directive and participatory leadership, task and process, and stability and change. Analyzing systematic elements of any polarity and listing blocks, supports, and flexible ways to maximize it will prevent the negative consequences that occur when treating a polarity like a solvable problem. Flexible, well-timed shifts from pole to pole result in the maximization of upside and minimization of downside consequences.

  9. How-to-Do-It: Demonstrating the Effects of Stress on Cellular Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vodopich, Darrell S.; Moore, Randy

    1989-01-01

    Describes two simple procedures allowing students to experiment with living membranes and to relate their results to fundamental membrane structure. Provides instructions for determining the effects of temperature and organic solvent stress on cellular membranes, and spectrophotometric analysis. (RT)

  10. Effect of gas diffusion layer and membrane properties in an annular proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaee, I.; Ghazikhani, M.; Esfahani, M. Nasr

    2012-01-01

    A complete three-dimensional and single phase computational dynamics model for annular proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is used to investigate the effect of changing gas diffusion layer and membrane properties on the performances, current density and gas concentration. The proposed model is a full cell model, which includes all the parts of the PEM fuel cell, flow channels, gas diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane. Coupled transport and electrochemical kinetics equations are solved in a single domain; therefore no interfacial boundary condition is required at the internal boundaries between cell components. This computational fluid dynamics code is used as the direct problem solver, which is used to simulate the two-dimensional mass, momentum and species transport phenomena as well as the electron- and proton-transfer process taking place in a PEMFC that cannot be investigated experimentally. The results show that by increasing the thickness and decreasing the porosity of GDL the performance of the cell enhances that it is different with planner PEM fuel cell. Also the results show that by decreasing the thickness of the membrane the performance of the cell increases.

  11. Photoelectric Effects in Lipid Bilayer Membranes. A Pedagogical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Jay S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides information appropriate for introductory lectures on photoelectric effects in membranes. Describes the apparatus and supplies required for laboratory exercises. Outlines typical laboratory exercises. Identifies the chromophores known to induce photoelectric effects. Concludes that this topic can provide useful subjects for undergraduate…

  12. Effect of polarization circularity on light propagation in an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugin, A. V.; Zel'Dovich, B. Ia.; Kundikova, N. D.; Liberman, V. S.

    1991-02-01

    Reference is made to an earlier study (Zeldovich and Liberman, 1990) in which the effect of polarization circularity on the twisting of an initially plane beam trajectory has been predicted theoretically. Here, the rotation of the speckle pattern in a multimode optical fiber due to the reversal of the sign of circular polarization of the propagating light is demonstrated experimentally. The effect discussed here is the opposite of the well-known effect of polarization plane rotation described by Rytov (1938).

  13. The Effect of Acute Microgravity on Mechanically-Induced Membrane Damage and Membrane-Membrane Fusion Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark, S. F.; Vanderburg, Charles R.; Feedback, Daniel L.

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". This response is characterized by both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  14. The effect of acute microgravity on mechanically-induced membrane damage and membrane-membrane fusion events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. S.; Vanderburg, C. R.; Feeback, D. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". Both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion characterize this response. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  15. [Effect of different organic fraction on membrane flux declines].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian-Jiao; Dong, Bing-Zhi

    2009-02-15

    Organic matter in the tap water was isolated into strongly hydrophobic acids, weakly hydrophobic acids, charged hydrophilic and neutral hydrophilic by DAX-8, XAD-4 and IRA-958 synthetic resins. Filtration tests using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), polyethersulphone (PES) and cellulose acetate (CA) membranes were conducted to investigate the contribution of different organic fractions to membrane fouling. The results show that in filtration of raw water, flux declines with PES, PVDF and CA membrane are 67%, 59% and 19% of the initial flux, indicating that the more hydrophobic membrane resulted in more severe fouling. For the effect of different fractions on flux, flux decline with neutral hydrophilic is 41%-75% of the initial flux, whereas weakly hydrophobic acids is 6%-33%, suggesting that neutral hydrophilic has a great impact on filtration flux. Among three membranes tested, CA membrane shows the lowest flux decline compared with other membranes in spite of rejection of as high as 14.69% of neutral hydrophilic, suggesting that the extent of flux decline may not be associated with the total amount of NOM removed. The mechanism of fouling was discussed and found that the neutral hydrophilic fraction with greater than 3 x 10(4) of molecular weight caused a significant flux decline, through blocking the pore for the MF or UF having greater relative molecular mass cut-off (MWCO), but resulted in a little impact on flux with the UF having lower MWCO, through forming cake layer on the surface of membrane due to not entering the inside of pore.

  16. Permeability-Selectivity Analysis of Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Membranes: Effect of Pore Size and Shape Distribution and Membrane Stretching.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Usama; Arif, Abul Fazal Muhammad; Bashmal, Salem

    2016-08-06

    We present a modeling approach to determine the permeability-selectivity tradeoff for microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes with a distribution of pore sizes and pore shapes. Using the formulated permeability-selectivity model, the effect of pore aspect ratio and pore size distribution on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of the membrane is analyzed. A finite element model is developed to study the effect of membrane stretching on the distribution of pore sizes and shapes in the stretched membrane. The effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of membranes is also analyzed. The results show that increasing pore aspect ratio improves membrane performance while increasing the width of pore size distribution deteriorates the performance. It was also found that the effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff is greatly affected by the uniformity of pore distribution in the membrane. Stretching showed a positive shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve of membranes with well-dispersed pores while in the case of pore clustering, a negative shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve was observed.

  17. Permeability-Selectivity Analysis of Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Membranes: Effect of Pore Size and Shape Distribution and Membrane Stretching

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Usama; Arif, Abul Fazal Muhammad; Bashmal, Salem

    2016-01-01

    We present a modeling approach to determine the permeability-selectivity tradeoff for microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes with a distribution of pore sizes and pore shapes. Using the formulated permeability-selectivity model, the effect of pore aspect ratio and pore size distribution on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of the membrane is analyzed. A finite element model is developed to study the effect of membrane stretching on the distribution of pore sizes and shapes in the stretched membrane. The effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of membranes is also analyzed. The results show that increasing pore aspect ratio improves membrane performance while increasing the width of pore size distribution deteriorates the performance. It was also found that the effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff is greatly affected by the uniformity of pore distribution in the membrane. Stretching showed a positive shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve of membranes with well-dispersed pores while in the case of pore clustering, a negative shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve was observed. PMID:27509528

  18. Polarization of a probe laser beam due to nonlinear QED effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Soroush; Kalantari, Seyed Zafarollah; Xue, She-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear QED interactions induce different polarization properties on a given probe beam. We consider the polarization effects caused by the photon-photon interaction in laser experiments, when a laser beam propagates through a constant magnetic field or collides with another laser beam. We solve the quantum Boltzmann equation within the framework of the Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian for both time-dependent and constant background field to explore the time evolution of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and V describing polarization. Assuming an initially linearly polarized probe laser beam, we also calculate the induced ellipticity and rotation of the polarization plane.

  19. THE X-RAY POLARIZATION SIGNATURE OF QUIESCENT MAGNETARS: EFFECT OF MAGNETOSPHERIC SCATTERING AND VACUUM POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Rodrigo; Davis, Shane W.

    2011-04-01

    In the magnetar model, the quiescent non-thermal soft X-ray emission from anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters is thought to arise from resonant Comptonization of thermal photons by charges moving in a twisted magnetosphere. Robust inference of physical quantities from observations is difficult, because the process depends strongly on geometry, and current understanding of the magnetosphere is not very deep. The polarization of soft X-ray photons is an independent source of information, and its magnetospheric imprint remains only partially explored. In this paper, we calculate how resonant cyclotron scattering would modify the observed polarization signal relative to the surface emission, using a multidimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code that accounts for the gradual coupling of polarization eigenmodes as photons leave the magnetosphere. We employ a globally twisted, self-similar, force-free magnetosphere with a power-law momentum distribution, assume a blackbody spectrum for the seed photons, account for general relativistic light deflection close to the star, and assume that vacuum polarization dominates the dielectric properties of the magnetosphere. The latter is a good approximation if the pair multiplicity is not much larger than unity. Phase-averaged polarimetry is able to provide a clear signature of the magnetospheric reprocessing of thermal photons and to constrain mechanisms generating the thermal emission. Phase-resolved polarimetry, in addition, can characterize the spatial extent and magnitude of the magnetospheric twist angle at {approx}100 stellar radii, and discern between uni- or bidirectional particle energy distributions, almost independently of every other parameter in the system. We discuss prospects for detectability with the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism (GEMS) mission.

  20. Quantifying Airborne Induced Polarization effects in helicopter time domain electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macnae, James

    2016-12-01

    This paper derives the Airborne Induced Polarization (AIP) response of an airborne electromagnetic (AEM) system to a horizontal, thin sheet conductor. A vertical component double-dipole approximates helicopter systems with towed concentric horizontal transmitter and receiver loops in frequency- or time-domain. In time domain, the AIP effect typically shows up as late-time negative data with amplitude 4 to 5 orders of magnitude smaller than the early-time peak of the positive AEM responses. Because of limited bandwidth from the short sample time after the decay of inductive responses, accurate extraction of intrinsic AIP parameters other than a minimum chargeability is almost impossible. Modelling further suggests that AIP effects in double-dipole AEM systems can only be reliably detected from polarizable material in the top few tens of metres. A titanium mineral exploration case history from the Lac Brûlé area, Quebec, Canada illustrates strong spatial coherence of AIP minimum chargeability estimates and their independence from other effects such as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility.

  1. Effect of surface and membrane potentials on IAA (indoleactic acid) uptake and binding by zucchini membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, K.A.; Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-08-01

    The polar transport of the endogenous hormone controlling extension growth of plant cells, indoleacetic acid (IAA), is thought to depend on transmembrane pH and electrical gradients resulting in part from the action of proton ATPases in the plasma membrane. Elements of this transport process are permeation of the membrane by the undissociated lipophilic indoleacetic acid (IAAH) from the acidic apoplast, followed by dissociation of the weak acid and accumulation of the IAA anion (IAA/sup -/) in the alkaline cytoplasm; a saturable symport of IAA/sup -/ with one or more protons; a carrier-mediated efflux of IAA/sup -/ down a considerable electrochemical gradient. The efflux is greater from the basal than the apical end of cells and is thought to be responsible for the overall polarity of the process. This step is also the site of action of napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and herbicides that inhibit polar transport but stimulate net accumulation of auxin by tissues and cells. We are using membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin. In particular, we are interested in determining the involvement of the transmembrane pH (pH/sub o/ < pH/sub i/) and voltage gradients (K/sup +/ diffusion potential, (K/sup +/)/sub in/ > (K/sup +/)/sub out/) in IAA uptake. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Millimeter microwave effect on ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Ziskin, M C

    1995-01-01

    The effects of millimeter microwaves in the frequency range of 54-76 GHz on capacitance and conductance of lipid bilayer membranes (BLM) were studied. Some of the membranes were modified by gramicidin A and amphotericin B or by tetraphenylboron anions (TPhB-). The millimeter microwaves were pulse-modulated (PW) at repetition rates ranging from 1 to 100 pps, PW at 1000 pps, or unmodulated continuous waves (CW). The maximum output power at the waveguide outlet was 20 mW. It was found that CW irradiation decreased the unmodified BLM capacitance by 1.2% +/- 0.5%. At the same time, membrane current induced by TPhB- transport increased by 5% +/- 1%. The changes in conductance of ionic channels formed by gramicidin A and amphotericin B were small (0.6% +/- 0.4%). No "resonance-like" effects of mm-wave irradiation on membrane capacitance, ionic channel currents, or TPhB- transport were detected. All changes in membrane capacitance and currents were independent of the modulation employed and were equivalent to heating by approximately 1.1 degrees C.

  3. Temperature effect on transport performance by inorganic nanofiltration membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuru, Toshinori; Izumi, Shuhei; Yoshioka, Tomohisa; Asaeda, Masashi

    2000-03-01

    The effect of temperature on nanofiltration performance was examined using three inorganic membranes with a molecular-weight cutoff of approximately 200, 600, and 2,000, respectively. The inorganic porous membranes were prepared from silica-zirconia colloidal sols and used in nanofiltration experiments for neutral solutes over a temperature range of 20 to 60 C. The rejection of solutes decreased with an increase in temperature for the membranes, while the permeate volume flux increased. Three transport coefficients--reflection coefficient, solute permeability, and water permeability--were obtained using the Spiegler-Kedem equation, which accounts for the contribution of convection and diffusion to solute flux. As a result, the reflection coefficient corresponding to the fraction of solutes reflected by the membrane in convective flow was almost constant, irrespective of experimental temperature. The dependency was larger for larger solutes and membranes with smaller pore diameters. Therefore, the hindered diffusion of solutes through micropores was indicative of an activated process. Moreover, pure water permeability, after correction for the temperature effect on viscosity, also increased with experimental temperature.

  4. Spin polarization induced by an electric field in the presence of weak localization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerci, Daniele; Borge, Juan; Raimondi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the spin polarization (Edelstein or inverse spin galvanic effect) and the spin Hall current induced by an applied electric field by including the weak localization corrections for a two-dimensional electron gas. We show that the weak localization effects yield logarithmic corrections to both the spin polarization conductivity relating the spin polarization and the electric field and to the spin Hall angle relating the spin and charge currents. The renormalization of both the spin polarization conductivity and the spin Hall angle combine to produce a zero correction to the total spin Hall conductivity as required by an exact identity. Suggestions for the experimental observation of the effect are given.

  5. Reprint of : Spin polarization induced by an electric field in the presence of weak localization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerci, Daniele; Borge, Juan; Raimondi, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    We evaluate the spin polarization (Edelstein or inverse spin galvanic effect) and the spin Hall current induced by an applied electric field by including the weak localization corrections for a two-dimensional electron gas. We show that the weak localization effects yield logarithmic corrections to both the spin polarization conductivity relating the spin polarization and the electric field and to the spin Hall angle relating the spin and charge currents. The renormalization of both the spin polarization conductivity and the spin Hall angle combine to produce a zero correction to the total spin Hall conductivity as required by an exact identity. Suggestions for the experimental observation of the effect are given.

  6. Observation of in plane magnetization reversal using polarization dependent magneto-optic Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohldag, H.; Weber, N. B.; Hillebrecht, F. U.; Kisker, E.

    2002-02-01

    We present an experimental setup for in plane two axis magnetometry using the polarization dependent magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE). A conventional setup to measure longitudinal MOKE with crossed polarizers is extended by a Faraday cell to compensate for the rotation of the polarization vector caused by a magnetized sample. The shape of the hysteresis loops measured on thin FeNi alloy films depends strongly on the angle between the optical axis of the analyzer and the plane of incidence. We derive expressions for the compensation angle which allow for extraction of vectorial magnetic information from loops detected with oblique polarization. For a small deviation from pure s or p polarization the transverse magnetization is found to be proportional to the difference between the loop obtained with oblique polarization and the one obtained with pure s or p polarization. Thus the complete in plane reversal process split up into longitudinal and transverse components can be observed.

  7. The Martian polar cap - Radiative effects of ozone, clouds, and airborne dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1990-01-01

    The solar and thermal flux striking the polar cap of Mars is computed for various ozone, dust, and cloud abundances and for three solar zenith angles. Ozone does not significantly affect the total energy budget of the polar cap. Hence the observed hemispherical asymmetry in ozone abundance causes only an insignificant hemispherical asymmetry in the polar caps. Vertical optical depths of dust and cloud ranging from zero to 1 cause little change in the total flux absorbed by the polar cap near its edge but increase the absorbed flux significantly as one travels poleward. Hemispherical asymmetries in dust abundance, cloud cover, and surface pressure combine to cause a significant hemispherical asymmetry in the total flux absorbed by the residual polar caps, which helps to explain the dichotomy in the residual polar caps on Mars. Other processes which affect the energy budget of the polar cap are proposed and reviewed, particularly with respect to their interaction with the radiative effects of clouds and dust.

  8. Effect of Pulse Polarity on Thresholds and on Non-monotonic Loudness Growth in Cochlear Implant Users.

    PubMed

    Macherey, Olivier; Carlyon, Robert P; Chatron, Jacques; Roman, Stéphane

    2017-01-30

    Most cochlear implants (CIs) activate their electrodes non-simultaneously in order to eliminate electrical field interactions. However, the membrane of auditory nerve fibers needs time to return to its resting state, causing the probability of firing to a pulse to be affected by previous pulses. Here, we provide new evidence on the effect of pulse polarity and current level on these interactions. In experiment 1, detection thresholds and most comfortable levels (MCLs) were measured in CI users for 100-Hz pulse trains consisting of two consecutive biphasic pulses of the same or of opposite polarity. All combinations of polarities were studied: anodic-cathodic-anodic-cathodic (ACAC), CACA, ACCA, and CAAC. Thresholds were lower when the adjacent phases of the two pulses had the same polarity (ACCA and CAAC) than when they were different (ACAC and CACA). Some subjects showed a lower threshold for ACCA than for CAAC while others showed the opposite trend demonstrating that polarity sensitivity at threshold is genuine and subject- or electrode-dependent. In contrast, anodic (CAAC) pulses always showed a lower MCL than cathodic (ACCA) pulses, confirming previous reports. In experiments 2 and 3, the subjects compared the loudness of several pulse trains differing in current level separately for ACCA and CAAC. For 40 % of the electrodes tested, loudness grew non-monotonically as a function of current level for ACCA but never for CAAC. This finding may relate to a conduction block of the action potentials along the fibers induced by a strong hyperpolarization of their central processes. Further analysis showed that the electrodes showing a lower threshold for ACCA than for CAAC were more likely to yield a non-monotonic loudness growth. It is proposed that polarity sensitivity at threshold reflects the local neural health and that anodic asymmetric pulses should preferably be used to convey sound information while avoiding abnormal loudness percepts.

  9. FRET reveals the organization of different receptor-ligand complexes (polymeric IgA-R and Transferrin-R) in endocytic membranes of polarized MDCK cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallrabe, Horst K.; Barroso, Margarida

    2004-06-01

    FRET-based assay has been used to determine the organization of transferrin-receptor bound to holo-transferrin in basolateral endocytic membranes and compare it to the previously characterized clustered organization of polymeric IgA-receptor (pIgA-R) bound to pIgA-R ligand in apical endocytic membranes. In polarized MDCK-PTR cells, we have internalized holo-transferrin from the basolateral plasma membrane - labeled with donor and acceptor fluorophores. Transferrin-receptor-holo-transferrin complexes were imaged in the basolateral endocytic compartment using FRET confocal laser scanning microscopy in fixed and live MDCK polarized cells. A two-parameter FRET assay demonstrates whether complexes are randomly distributed or clustered: Acceptor's positive impact on E% signifies random distribution; E% being independent of acceptor fluorescence levels indicates clusters. A second parameter for clustering is E% being negatively dependent on D:A ratios. Our results indicating a clustered organization of transferrin-receptor-holo transferrin complexes fit the well-known homodimeric structure of transferrin-receptor.

  10. Physicochemical characterization of solute retention in solvent resistant nanofiltration: the effect of solute size, polarity, dipole moment, and solubility parameter.

    PubMed

    Darvishmanesh, Siavash; Vanneste, Johan; Tocci, Elena; Jansen, Johannes Carolus; Jansen, John; Tasselli, Franco; Tasseli, Franco; Degrève, Jan; Drioli, Enrico; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2011-12-15

    Growing interest in nanofiltration for solvent purification requires a fundamental understanding of the physicochemical mechanisms of solute retention in organic solvent nanofiltration. In this study, the retention of a similar series of azo dyes with approximately similar molar mass (around 350 Da) by four nanofiltration membranes was studied. The membranes used are commercially available polymeric nanofiltration membranes with molecular weight cutoff between 150 and 300 Da (DuraMem150, StarMem122, NF270 and Desal-Dk). In order to correlate the retention with the size of the molecules, which is assumed to be one of the main factors that determines the retention, use was made of different parameters for the molecular size: molar mass, the Stokes diameter, the equivalent molar diameter, and the cavity surface in methanol and ethanol. All parameters were calculated by using molecular dynamics simulations. For each size parameter, the correlation with retention in nanofiltration experiments was calculated. For the StarMem122 membrane, zero retentions were observed due to the swelling of the membrane and pore size enlargement in methanol and ethanol. For the three other membranes, a fairly good correlation of the retention with the size could only be observed if the size difference between compounds is sufficiently large. Two other factors were studied by using molecular dynamics, i.e., the polarity of the molecule and the electron density of the molecule. The importance of these factors depends on the structure of the molecule as well as the functional groups of the polymer. A very good correlation has been observed for retention of dyes versus their dipole moment. Finally, the effect of solubility parameters of dyes on their retention did not show any significant effect.

  11. Polarization effects in reconfigurable liquid crystal phase holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarčević, Miloš; Manolis, Ilias G.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Crossland, William A.

    2005-01-01

    An improved configuration for achieving true polarization insensitive reconfigurable phase holograms for optical switches using homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal devices is presented. Previous experimental results have been analyzed and explained using numerical modeling of the nematic liquid crystal orientation and associated optical modulation. Twisting of the liquid crystal optical axis from the optimal 45° orientation from the quarter waveplate is shown to degrade the polarization insensitive performance. The alternative direction of surface alignment perpendicular to the long pixel edge eliminates the twist of the director during switching. True polarization insensitivity is predicted with our model for this mode of operation.

  12. Superamphiphobic nanofibrous membranes for effective filtration of fine particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Zhu, Zhigao; Sheng, Junlu; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2014-08-15

    The worldwide demands are rising for an energy-efficient and cost-effective approach that can provide advanced nanofibrous membranes with high filtration performance and superior antifouling properties. Here we report a novel synthesized fluorinated polyurethane (FPU) modified nanofibrous membrane optimized to achieve oil and non-oil aerosol particle filtration. By employing the FPU incorporation, the polyacrylonitrile/polyurethane (PAN/PU) composite membranes were endowed with superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 154° and superoleophobicity with an oil contact angle of 151°. Morphology, surface wettability, porous structure, and filtration performance could be manipulated by tuning the solution composition as well as the hierarchical structure. Furthermore, the as-prepared membranes can capture, for the first time, a range of different oil aerosol particles in a single-unit operation, with >99.9% filtration efficiency, by using the combined contribution of fiber diameter and surface roughness acting on the objective particles. Exemplified here by the construction of superamphiphobic nanofibrous membrane, numerous applications of this medium includes high efficiency particulate air filters, ultra-low penetration air filters, and respiratory protection equipment.

  13. Effects of Extracellular Calcium on Cell Membrane Resealing during Sonoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun; Cui, Jianmin; Deng, Cheri X.

    2006-05-01

    Sonoporation has been exploited as a novel strategy for intracellular drug and gene delivery. In sonoporation, ultrasound application generates transient pores or openings in the cell membrane that allow entry of extracellular agents normally not permeable to the cell membrane. In order to improve the sonoporation outcome, we seek to obtain improved understanding of the sonoporation mechanism and investigate the factors affecting sonoporation process. We established a voltage clamp technique for real time measurement of sonoporation at single cell level using Xenopus oocytes as a model system. As both cell survival and intracellular delivery efficiency of drug or genes depend on the sonoporation dynamic process, and Calcium plays important roles in cellular processes, we focus on studying of the effect of extracellular Calcium concentration on the formation, extension, and resealing of membrane pores in sonoporation. We obtained experimental results demonstrating that the cell membrane reseals in the order of seconds in the presence of physiological level of extracellular [Ca]. We measured the resealing as function of extracellular [Ca] (0-1.8mM) and observed that the resealing rate decreases as extracellular [Ca] decreases from normal physiological level. No resealing was demonstrated when 1mM EGTA was added in the extracellular medium to chelate the [Ca] extracellularly. Our experimental findings suggest that extracellular Calcium plays an important role in controlling membrane resealing in sonoporation and thus the sonoporation outcome such as cell survival and delivery efficiency.

  14. The quintuple-shape memory effect in electrospun nanofiber membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Lu, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-08-01

    Shape memory fibrous membranes (SMFMs) are an emerging class of active polymers, which are capable of switching from a temporary shape to their permanent shape upon appropriate stimulation. Quintuple-shape memory membranes based on the thermoplastic polymer Nafion, with a stable fibrous structure, are achieved via electrospinning technology, and possess a broad transition temperature. The recovery of multiple temporary shapes of electrospun membranes can be triggered by heat in a single triple-, quadruple-, quintuple-shape memory cycle, respectively. The fiber morphology and nanometer size provide unprecedented design flexibility for the adjustable morphing effect. SMFMs enable complex deformations at need, having a wide potential application field including smart textiles, artificial intelligence robots, bio-medical engineering, aerospace technologies, etc in the future.

  15. Effects of turbid media optical properties on object visibility in subsurface polarization imaging.

    PubMed

    Nothdurft, Ralph E; Yao, Gang

    2006-08-01

    We studied the effectiveness of using polarized illumination and detection to enhance the visibility of targets buried in highly scattering media. The effects of background optical properties including scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient, and anisotropy on image visibility were examined. Both linearly and circularly polarized light were used in the imaging. Three different types of target were investigated: scattering, absorption, and reflection. The experimental results indicate that target visibility improvement achieved by a specific polarization method depends on both the background optical properties and the target type. By analyzing all polarization images, it is possible to reveal certain information about target or the scattering background.

  16. Polarity effects in the x-ray photoemission of ZnO and other wurtzite semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. W.; Zemlyanov, D. Y.; Waterhouse, G. I. N.; Metson, J. B.; Veal, T. D.; McConville, C. F.; Durbin, S. M.

    2011-03-01

    Significant polarity-related effects were observed in the near-surface atomic composition and valence band electronic structure of ZnO single crystals, investigated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy using both Al Kα (1486.6 eV) and synchrotron radiation (150 to 1486 eV). In particular, photoemission from the lowest binding energy valence band states was found to be significantly more intense on the Zn-polar face compared to the O-polar face. This is a consistent effect that can be used as a simple, nondestructive indicator of crystallographic polarity in ZnO and other wurtzite semiconductors.

  17. Atmospheric effects on earth rotation and polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salstein, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The variability in the earth's rotation rate not due to known solid body tides is dominated on time scales of about four years and less by variations in global atmospheric angular momentum (M) as derived from the zonal wind distribution. Among features seen in the length of day record produced by atmospheric forcing are the strong seasonal cycle, quasi-periodic fluctuations around 40-50 days, and an interannual signal forced by a strong Pacific warming event known as the El Nino. Momentum variations associated with these time scales arise in different latitudinal regions. Furthermore, winds in the stratosphere make a particularly important contribution to seasonal variability. Other related topics discussed here are: (1) comparisons of the M series from wind fields produced at different weather centers; (2) the torques that dynamically link the atmosphere and earth; and (3) longer-term nonatmospheric effects that can be seen upon removal of the atmospheric signal.an interestigapplication for climatological purposes is the use of the historical earth rotation series as a proxy for atmospheric wind variability prior to the era of upper-air data. Lastly, results pertaining to the role of atmospheric pressure systems in exciting rapid polar motion are presented.

  18. Solvent effects on the polar network of ionic liquid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardes, Carlos E. S.; Shimizu, Karina; Canongia Lopes, José N.

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to probe mixtures of ionic liquids (ILs) with common molecular solvents. Four types of systems were considered: (i) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide plus benzene, hexafluorobenzene or 1,2-difluorobenzene mixtures; (ii) choline-based ILs plus ether mixtures (iii) choline-based ILs plus n-alkanol mixtures; and (iv) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate aqueous mixtures. The results produced a wealth of structural and aggregation information that highlight the resilience of the polar network of the ILs (formed by clusters of alternating ions and counter-ions) to the addition of different types of molecular solvent. The analysis of the MD data also shows that the intricate balance between different types of interaction (electrostatic, van der Waals, H-bond-like) between the different species present in the mixtures has a profound effect on the morphology of the mixtures at a mesoscopic scale. In the case of the IL aqueous solutions, the present results suggest an alternative interpretation for very recently published x-ray and neutron diffraction data on similar systems.

  19. Elliptical polarization effects in a chromatically addressed Faraday current sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. D.; Aspey, R. A.; Kong, M. G.; Gibson, J. R.; Jones, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    Optical polarization processes in a parallel-sided glass element used in a Faraday rotation current sensor have been considered. In such sensors the path length necessary to produce sufficient rotation of the plane of polarization is produced by a multiplicity of reflections within the glass element. It is shown that such reflections induce ellipticity of polarization and that this affects the current-sensing performance of the sensor. Two reflection cases, corresponding to total internal reflections at a glass-air interface and reflections by aluminium-coated surfaces, are considered. The latter are shown to produce higher optical attenuation but a lower degree of elliptical polarization. The implications of the induced elliptical polarization in relation to chromatically modulated polychromatic light are considered. It is shown that the resolution of the Faraday sensing is improved by minimizing the ellipticity of the polarization with the aluminium-coated reflections. However a greater dynamic range and signal strength may be achievable with the total internal reflection element.

  20. Effects of Atmospheric Dust on Residual South Polar Cap Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonrv, B. P.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Hansen, G. B.; James, P. B.; Wolff, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The Martian polar caps have been studied from the time of Herschel. Neither polar cap normally disappears in summer. The Residual North Polar Cap (portion that remains through summer) is composed of a mixture of water ice and dust, and its interannual stability is due to its low sublimation rate at the summer temperatures in the North Polar Region. The Residual South Polar Cap (RSPC) is more enigmatic, surviving the relatively hot perihelic summer season despite being composed of much more volatile CO2. It is able to do so because of its unusually high albedo, which is larger than that of other bright regions in the seasonal cap (e.g. Mountains of Mitchel). The proximity of the albedo of the RSPC to the critical albedo for stability raises the question of whether the RSPC exists in every Martian year. The ground based record is somewhat ambivalent. Douglass and Lowell reported that RSPC suddenly vanished at Ls=297deg in 1894 and did not reappear until Ls=0deg [1], and Kuiper reported that it disappeared in 1956 [2]; but both observations were questioned by contemporaries, who tended to attribute them to obscuring dust. Barker [3] reported a large amount of water vapor over the south polar cap in 1969 that could be attributed to exposure of near surface water ice during partial removal of the CO2 in the RSPC in 1969.

  1. Enabling the Intestinal Absorption of Highly Polar Anti-Viral Agents: Ion-Pair Facilitated Membrane Permeation of Zanamivir Heptyl Ester and Guanidino Oseltamivir

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jonathan M.; Dahan, Arik; Gupta, Deepak; Varghese, Sheeba; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2012-01-01

    Anti-viral drugs often suffer from poor intestinal permeability, preventing their delivery via the oral route. The goal of this work was to enhance the intestinal absorption of the low-permeability anti-viral agents zanamivr heptyl ester (ZHE) and guanidino oseltamivir (GO) utilizing an ion-pairing approach, as a critical step toward making them oral drugs. The counterion 1-hydroxy-2-napthoic acid (HNAP) was utilized to enhance the lipophilicity and permeability of the highly polar drugs. HNAP substantially increased the log P of the drugs by up to 3.7 log units. Binding constants (K11aq) of 388 M−1 for ZHE-HNAP and 2.91 M−1 for GO.-HNAP were obtained by applying a quasi-equilibrium transport model to double-reciprocal plots of apparent octanol-buffer distribution coefficients versus HNAP concentration. HNAP enhanced the apparent permeability (Papp) of both compounds across Caco-2 cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner, as substantial Papp (0.8 – 3.0 × 10−6 cm/s) was observed in the presence of 6–24 mM HNAP, whereas no detectable transport was observed without counterion. Consistent with a quasi-equilibrium transport model, a linear relationship with slope near 1 was obtained from a log-log plot of Caco-2 Papp versus HNAP concentration, supporting the ion-pair mechanism behind the permeability enhancement. In the rat jejunal perfusion assay, the addition of HNAP failed to increase the effective permeability (Peff) of GO. However, the rat jejunal permeability of ZHE was significantly enhanced by the addition of HNAP in a concentration-dependent manner, from essentially zero without HNAP to 4.0 × 10−5 cm/s with 10 mM HNAP, matching the Peff of the high-permeability standard metoprolol. The success of ZHE-HNAP was explained by its >100-fold stronger K11aq versus GO-HNAP, making ZHE-HNAP less prone to dissociation and ion-exchange with competing endogenous anions and able to remain intact during membrane permeation. Overall, this work

  2. Optically Induced Nuclear Spin Polarization in the Quantum Hall Regime: The Effect of Electron Spin Polarization through Exciton and Trion Excitations.

    PubMed

    Akiba, K; Kanasugi, S; Yuge, T; Nagase, K; Hirayama, Y

    2015-07-10

    We study nuclear spin polarization in the quantum Hall regime through the optically pumped electron spin polarization in the lowest Landau level. The nuclear spin polarization is measured as a nuclear magnetic field B(N) by means of the sensitive resistive detection. We find the dependence of B(N) on the filling factor nonmonotonic. The comprehensive measurements of B(N) with the help of the circularly polarized photoluminescence measurements indicate the participation of the photoexcited complexes, i.e., the exciton and trion (charged exciton), in nuclear spin polarization. On the basis of a novel estimation method of the equilibrium electron spin polarization, we analyze the experimental data and conclude that the filling factor dependence of B(N) is understood by the effect of electron spin polarization through excitons and trions.

  3. Water-quality data from semipermeable-membrane devices and polar organic chemical integrative samplers deployed in the McKenzie River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Alvarez, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Two types of passive samplers—the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS)—are being used to collect data from the McKenzie River, Oregon. The McKenzie River is the source of drinking water for the City of Eugene, Oregon, and passive-sampler data are part of an ongoing monitoring effort designed to help understand and protect the drinking water source. Data from the passive samplers are reported here. This data report is dynamic and will be appended with additional data as they become available.

  4. Effectiveness Factors and Conversion in a Biocatalytic Membrane Reactor.

    PubMed

    Godongwana, Buntu

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions of the effectiveness factor of a biocatalytic membrane reactor, and its asymptote as the Thiele modulus becomes large, are presented. The evaluation of the effectiveness factor is based on the solution of the governing equations for solute transport in the two regions of the reactor, i.e. the lumen and the matrix (with the biofilm immobilized in the matrix). The lumen solution accounts for both axial diffusion and radial convective flow, while the matrix solution is based on Robin-type boundary conditions. The effectiveness factor is shown to be a function of the Thiele modulus, the partition coefficient, the Sherwood number, the Peclet number, and membrane thickness. Three regions of Thiele moduli are defined in the effectiveness factor graphs. These correspond with reaction rate limited, internal-diffusion limited, and external mass transfer limited solute transport. Radial convective flows were shown to only improve the effectiveness factor in the region of internal diffusion limitation. The assumption of first order kinetics is shown to be applicable only in the Thiele modulus regions of internal and external mass transfer limitation. An iteration scheme is also presented for estimating the effectiveness factor when the solute fractional conversion is known. The model is validated with experimental data from a membrane gradostat reactor immobilised with Phanerochaete chrysosporium for the production of lignin and manganese peroxidases. The developed model and experimental data allow for the determination of the Thiele modulus at which the effectiveness factor and fractional conversion are optimal.

  5. Effectiveness Factors and Conversion in a Biocatalytic Membrane Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Godongwana, Buntu

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions of the effectiveness factor of a biocatalytic membrane reactor, and its asymptote as the Thiele modulus becomes large, are presented. The evaluation of the effectiveness factor is based on the solution of the governing equations for solute transport in the two regions of the reactor, i.e. the lumen and the matrix (with the biofilm immobilized in the matrix). The lumen solution accounts for both axial diffusion and radial convective flow, while the matrix solution is based on Robin-type boundary conditions. The effectiveness factor is shown to be a function of the Thiele modulus, the partition coefficient, the Sherwood number, the Peclet number, and membrane thickness. Three regions of Thiele moduli are defined in the effectiveness factor graphs. These correspond with reaction rate limited, internal-diffusion limited, and external mass transfer limited solute transport. Radial convective flows were shown to only improve the effectiveness factor in the region of internal diffusion limitation. The assumption of first order kinetics is shown to be applicable only in the Thiele modulus regions of internal and external mass transfer limitation. An iteration scheme is also presented for estimating the effectiveness factor when the solute fractional conversion is known. The model is validated with experimental data from a membrane gradostat reactor immobilised with Phanerochaete chrysosporium for the production of lignin and manganese peroxidases. The developed model and experimental data allow for the determination of the Thiele modulus at which the effectiveness factor and fractional conversion are optimal. PMID:27104954

  6. Scanning force microscopy study of phase segregation in fuel cell membrane materials as a function of solvent polarity and relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Marilyn Emily; Kim, Yu S; Hjelm, Rex P

    2010-01-01

    Scanning force microscopy (SFM) phase imaging provides a powerful method for directly studying and comparing phase segregation in fuel cell membrane materials due to different preparation and under different temperature and hwnidity exposures. In this work, we explored two parameters that can influence phase segregation: the properties of the solvents used in casting membrane films and how these solvents alter phase segregation after exposure to boiling water as a function of time. SFM was used under ambient conditions to image phase segregation in Nafion samples prepared using five different solvents. Samples were then subjected to water vapor maintained at 100C for periods ranging from 30 minutes to three hours and re-imaged using the same phase imaging conditions. SFM shows what appears to be an increase in phase segregation as a function of solvent polarity that changes as a function of water exposure.

  7. The photoelectric effect from CsI by polarized soft X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Ping S.; Church, Eric D.; Hanany, Shaul; Liu, Yee; Fleischman, Judith; Kaaret, Philip; Novick, Robert; Manzo, Giuseppe

    1991-01-01

    Studies of the polarization dependence of the photoelectric effect produced by soft X-rays from CsI indicate that the geometrical effects in these experiments can often mimic the polarization signature. This paper presents a detailed calculation of these geometrical effects that are produced when the X-ray beam is not precisely aligned on a rotatable plane photocathode. The experimentally observed geometrical effects were used to precisely determine the realignment of the incident beam of polarized X-rays on a rotatable photocathode. The results allow determinations of the true polarization dependence of the photoemission from CsI. It is shown that the photoelectric effect in CsI depends on the polarization state of the X-rays.

  8. An all-in-one electro-membrane extraction: development of an electro-membrane extraction method for the simultaneous extraction of acidic and basic drugs with a wide range of polarities.

    PubMed

    Koruni, Mohammad Hossein; Tabani, Hadi; Gharari, Hossein; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2014-09-26

    Efficient and simultaneous extraction of a series of basic and acidic compounds with a large polarity range using only a single run of electro-membrane extraction (EME) has been a challenge. To overcome this difficulty, in this work, a new EME setup was developed for the determination of basic and acidic model drugs with different polarities using two auxiliary electrodes (one as the cathode and the other as the anode) and their circumferential hollow fibers impregnated with organic solvent compositions different from those of main hollow fibers, coupled with capillary electrophoresis (CE). Satisfactory analytical figures of merit including limits of quantification (15-45 ng mL(-1)), good preconcentration factors (66-132) and recoveries (33-66%) were obtained by the proposed EME-CE/UV (detection at 214 nm) procedure. Finally, the applicability of this method was evaluated by the extraction and determination of the drugs in urine samples from drug-using suspects.

  9. Polarization effects on image quality of optical systems with high numerical apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznesensky, Nikolay B.; Belozubov, Alexander V.

    1999-10-01

    THeoretical investigation of the distribution of light intensity close to the lens focus is discussed, the distribution itself being treated as a sum of unit vector plane waves. Each wave is characterized by a matrix coefficient, a wave vector, a vector of polarization, a matrix of polarization orientation and a Maxwell-Jones' vector. This approach offers to take easily into account polarization effects and aberrations of an optical system in image modeling. Calculations are based on fast Fourier transform.

  10. Effects of hydraulic retention time and bioflocculant addition on membrane fouling in a sponge-submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lijuan; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Du, Bing; Wei, Qin; Tran, Ngoc Han; Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Li, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of activated sludge and membrane fouling were evaluated in a sponge-submerged membrane bioreactor (SSMBR) at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (6.67, 5.33 and 4.00h). At shorter HRT, more obvious membrane fouling was caused by exacerbated cake layer formation and aggravated pore blocking. Activated sludge possessed more extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) due to excessive growth of biomass and lower protein to polysaccharide ratio in soluble microbial products (SMP). The cake layer resistance was aggravated by increased sludge viscosity together with the accumulated EPS and biopolymer clusters (BPC) on membrane surface. However, SMP showed marginal effect on membrane fouling when SSMBRs were operated at all HRTs. The SSMBR with Gemfloc® addition at the optimum HRT of 6.67h demonstrated superior sludge characteristics such as larger floc size, less SMP in mixed liquor with higher protein/polysaccharide ratio, less SMP and BPC in cake layer, thereby further preventing membrane fouling.

  11. Improved understanding of effects of soil saturation on induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunat, David; Slater, Lee; Wehrer, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Induced polarization (IP) is an emerging technology that provides unique information on the physical and chemical properties of the interconnected pores and pore surfaces. While previous studies focused on fluid chemistry and matrix composition, more research into the effects of saturation (θ) and matric potential on IP is needed. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of unsaturated water content dynamics on IP parameters. IP measurements were conducted over a range of moisture contents on a laboratory grade sand, an undisturbed agricultural soil consisting of silty sand. A soil column apparatus was designed that allowed for IP measurements at varying suctions, while also permitting measurements of in situ water tension and θ. Using these measurements we determined the soil hydraulic properties of the undisturbed soil samples and collected and correlated the IP data with observed hydraulic properties, primarily changes in saturation. Similar to previous studies, decreases in θ resulted in a decrease in real conductivity and imaginary conductivity due to the removal of conductive pore fluid and the decrease in specific polarizability as pore fluid is removed. Due to an increase in salinity during the experiment, we observed a complex response of real conductivity during the course of the experiment. Unlike the real conductivity, imaginary conductivity was much less influenced by salinity. While imaginary conductivity exhibits a weaker dependence on saturation compared to real conductivity, its relative insensitivity to salinity may allow for a more robust measure of moisture content in the presence of changing salinities and under transient flow conditions. As changes in pore fluid conductivity are likely to occur in the field simultaneously with water content changes, we argue that, although IP has traditionally been used to discriminate lithology, time-lapse IP measurements may additionally provide a robust indicator of changes in saturation

  12. RISAP Is a TGN-Associated RAC5 Effector Regulating Membrane Traffic during Polar Cell Growth in Tobacco[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Octavian; Cottier, Stephanie; Fahlén, Sara; Montes-Rodriguez, Adriana; Sun, Jia; Eklund, D. Magnus; Klahre, Ulrich; Kost, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    RAC/ROP GTPases coordinate actin dynamics and membrane traffic during polar plant cell expansion. In tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), pollen tube tip growth is controlled by the RAC/ROP GTPase RAC5, which specifically accumulates at the apical plasma membrane. Here, we describe the functional characterization of RISAP, a RAC5 effector identified by yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid screening. RISAP belongs to a family of putative myosin receptors containing a domain of unknown function 593 (DUF593) and binds via its DUF593 to the globular tail domain of a tobacco pollen tube myosin XI. It also interacts with F-actin and is associated with a subapical trans-Golgi network (TGN) compartment, whose cytoplasmic position at the pollen tube tip is maintained by the actin cytoskeleton. In this TGN compartment, apical secretion and endocytic membrane recycling pathways required for tip growth appear to converge. RISAP overexpression interferes with apical membrane traffic and blocks tip growth. RAC5 constitutively binds to the N terminus of RISAP and interacts in an activation-dependent manner with the C-terminal half of this protein. In pollen tubes, interaction between RAC5 and RISAP is detectable at the subapical TGN compartment. We present a model of RISAP regulation and function that integrates all these findings. PMID:25387880

  13. Compensation of non-ideal beam splitter polarization distortion effect in Michelson interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yeng-Cheng; Lo, Yu-Lung; Liao, Chia-Chi

    2016-02-01

    A composite optical structure consisting of two quarter-wave plates and a single half-wave plate is proposed for compensating for the polarization distortion induced by a non-ideal beam splitter in a Michelson interferometer. In the proposed approach, the optimal orientations of the optical components within the polarization compensator are determined using a genetic algorithm (GA) such that the beam splitter can be treated as a free-space medium and modeled using a unit Mueller matrix accordingly. Two implementations of the proposed polarization controller are presented. In the first case, the compensator is placed in the output arm of Michelson interferometer such that the state of polarization of the interfered output light is equal to that of the input light. However, in this configuration, the polarization effects induced by the beam splitter in the two arms of the interferometer structure cannot be separately addressed. Consequently, in the second case, compensator structures are placed in the Michelson interferometer for compensation on both the scanning and reference beams. The practical feasibility of the proposed approach is introduced by considering a Mueller polarization-sensitive (PS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) structure with three polarization controllers in the input, reference and sample arms, respectively. In general, the results presented in this study show that the proposed polarization controller provides an effective and experimentally-straightforward means of compensating for the polarization distortion effects induced by the non-ideal beam splitters in Michelson interferometers and Mueller PS-OCT structures.

  14. Effect of Lanthanide Ions on Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhancement and Liquid State T1 Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jeremy; Fain, Sean B.; Rowland, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    In the dynamic nuclear polarization process, microwave irradiation facilitates exchange of polarization from a radical’s unpaired electron to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperatures, increasing polarization by >10000. Doping samples with Gd3+ ions further increases the achievable solid-state polarization. However, upon dissolution, paramagnetic lanthanide metals can be potent relaxation agents, decreasing liquid-state polarization. Here, the effects of lanthanide metals on the solid and liquid-state magnetic properties of [1-13C]pyruvate are studied. The results show that in addition to gadolinium, holmium not only increases the achievable polarization but also the rate of polarization. Liquid-state relaxation studies found that unlike gadolinium, holmium minimally affects T1. Additionally, results reveal that linear contrast agents dissociate in pyruvic acid, greatly reducing liquid-state T1. While macrocyclic agents do not readily dissociate, they yield lower solid-state polarization. Results indicate that polarization with free lanthanides and subsequent chelation during dissolution produces the highest polarization enhancement while minimizing liquid-state relaxation. PMID:22367680

  15. Correlation of [RuCl3(dppb)(VPy)] cytotoxicity with its effects on the cell membranes: an investigation using Langmuir monolayers as membrane models.

    PubMed

    Sandrino, B; Tominaga, T T; Nobre, T M; Scorsin, L; Wrobel, E C; Fiorin, B C; de Araujo, M P; Caseli, L; Oliveira, O N; Wohnrath, K

    2014-09-11

    One of the major challenges in drug design is to identify compounds with potential toxicity toward target cells, preferably with molecular-level understanding of their mode of action. In this study, the antitumor property of a ruthenium complex, mer-[RuCl3(dppb)(VPy)] (dppb = 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphine)butane and VPy = 4-vinylpyridine) (RuVPy), was analyzed. Results showed that this compound led to a mortality rate of 50% of HEp-2 cell with 120 ± 10 μmol L(-1), indicating its high toxicity. Then, to prove if its mode of action is associated with its interaction with cell membranes, Langmuir monolayers were used as a membrane model. RuVPy had a strong effect on the surface pressure isotherms, especially on the elastic properties of both the zwitterionic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and the negatively charged dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) phospholipids. These data were confirmed by polarization-modulated infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). In addition, interactions between the positive group from RuVPy and the phosphate group from the phospholipids were corroborated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, allowing the determination of the Ru complex orientation at the air-water interface. Although possible contributions from receptors or other cell components cannot be discarded, the results reported here represent evidence for significant effects on the cell membranes which are probably associated with the high toxicity of RuVPy.

  16. Effects of membrane cholesterol manipulation on excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle of the toad

    PubMed Central

    Launikonis, Bradley S; Stephenson, D George

    2001-01-01

    Single mechanically skinned fibres and intact bundles of fibres from the twitch region of the iliofibularis muscle of cane toads were used to investigate the effects of membrane cholesterol manipulation on excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. The cholesterol content of membranes was manipulated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD). In mechanically skinned fibres, depletion of membrane cholesterol with MβCD caused a dose- and time-dependent decrease in transverse tubular (t)-system depolarization-induced force responses (TSDIFRs). TSDIFRs were completely abolished within 2 min in the presence of 10 mm MβCD but were not affected after 2 min in the presence of a 10 mm MβCD-1 mm cholesterol complex. There was a very steep dependence between the change in TSDIFRs and the MβCD : cholesterol ratio at 10 mm MβCD, indicating that the inhibitory effect of MβCD was due to membrane cholesterol depletion and not to a pharmacological effect of the agent. Tetanic responses in bundles of intact fibres were abolished after 3-4 h in the presence of 10 mm MβCD. The duration of TSDIFRs increased markedly soon (< 2 min) after application of 10 mm MβCD and 10 mm MβCD-cholesterol complexes, but the Ca2+ activation properties of the contractile apparatus were minimally affected by 10 mm MβCD. The Ca2+ handling abilities of the sarcoplasmic reticulum appeared to be modified after 10 min exposure to 10 mm MβCD. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the integrity of the t-system was not compromised by either intra- or extracellular application of 10 mm MβCD and that a large [Ca2+] gradient was maintained across the t-system. Membrane cholesterol depletion caused rapid depolarization of the polarized t-system as shown independently by spontaneous TSDIFRs induced by MβCD and by changes in the fluorescence intensity of an anionic potentiometric dye (DiBAC4(3)) in the presence of MβCD. This rapid depolarization of the t-system by cholesterol depletion was not prevented

  17. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.

    1986-08-26

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  18. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.

    1986-01-01

    Polar gases such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia may be separated from nonpolar gases such as methane, nitrogen, hydrogen or carbon dioxide by passing a mixture of polar and nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The use of such membranes as exemplified by polyethylene glycol and silicon rubber composited on polysulfone will permit greater selectivity accompanied by a high flux rate in the separation process.

  19. Effects of Membrane Charge and Order on Membrane Binding of the Retroviral Structural Protein Gag

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Dick, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The retroviral structural protein Gag binds to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane (PM), and many cellular proteins do so as well. We used Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag together with membrane sensors to study the principles governing peripheral protein membrane binding, including electrostatics, specific recognition of phospholipid headgroups, sensitivity to phospholipid acyl chain compositions, preference for membrane order, and protein multimerization. We used an in vitro liposome-pelleting assay to test protein membrane binding properties of Gag, the well-characterized MARCKS peptide, a series of fluorescent electrostatic sensor proteins (mNG-KRn), and the specific phosphatidylserine (PS) binding protein Evectin2. RSV Gag and mNG-KRn bound well to membranes with saturated and unsaturated acyl chains, whereas the MARCKS peptide and Evectin2 preferentially bound to membranes with unsaturated acyl chains. To further discriminate whether the primary driving force for Gag membrane binding is electrostatic interactions or preference for membrane order, we measured protein binding to giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing the same PS concentration in both disordered (Ld) and ordered (Lo) phases. RSV Gag and mNG-KRn membrane association followed membrane charge, independent of membrane order. Consistent with pelleting data, the MARCKS peptide showed preference for the Ld domain. Surprisingly, the PS sensor Evectin2 bound to the PS-rich Ld domain with 10-fold greater affinity than to the PS-rich Lo domain. In summary, we found that RSV Gag shows no preference for membrane order, while proteins with reported membrane-penetrating domains show preference for disordered membranes. IMPORTANCE Retroviral particles assemble on the PM and bud from infected cells. Our understanding of how Gag interacts with the PM and how different membrane properties contribute to overall Gag assembly is incomplete. This study examined how membrane charge and membrane order

  20. Quantum dynamics of an optical cavity coupled to a thin semitransparent membrane: Effect of membrane absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Biancofiore, C.; Karuza, M.; Galassi, M.; Natali, R.; Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.; Di Giuseppe, G.

    2011-09-15

    We study the quantum dynamics of the cavity optomechanical system formed by a Fabry-Perot cavity with a thin vibrating membrane at its center. We determine in particular to what extent optical absorption by the membrane hinders reaching a quantum regime for the cavity-membrane system. We show that even though membrane absorption may significantly lower the cavity finesse and also heat the membrane, one can still simultaneously achieve ground state cooling of a vibrational mode of the membrane and stationary optomechanical entanglement with state-of-the-art apparatuses.

  1. Effects of laser polarization on photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure

    SciTech Connect

    Buica, Gabriela; Nakajima, Takashi

    2005-11-15

    We theoretically investigate the effects of laser polarization on the photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure. We focus on a polarization geometry where the probe and dressing lasers are both linearly polarized and change the relative polarization angle between them. We find that the total ionization yield and the branching ratio into different ionization channels change as a function of the relative polarization angle, and accordingly the photoelectron angular distribution is altered. We present specific results for the 4p{sub 1/2}-6p{sub 1/2} and 4p{sub 3/2}-6p{sub 3/2} systems of the K atom and show that the change of the polarization angle leads to a significant modification of the photoelectron angular distribution.

  2. Effects of Si-doping on structural, electrical, and optical properties of polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiong; Wang, Shuchang; Wang, Yi; Luan, Huakai; Dai, Qian; Wu, Zili; Zhao, Jianguo; Cui, Yiping

    2016-08-01

    The polar (0001)-oriented c-plane and non-polar (11 2 bar 0) -oriented a-plane wurtzite AlGaN epi-layers were successfully grown on polar (0001)-oriented c-plane and semi-polar (1 1 bar 02) -oriented r-plane sapphire substrates, respectively with various Si-doping levels in a low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The morphological, structural, electrical, and optical properties of the polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Hall effect, and Raman spectroscopy. The characterization results show that Si dopants incorporated into the polar and non-polar AlGaN films induced a relaxation of compressive residual strain and a generation of biaxial tensile strain on the surface in consequence of the dislocation climbing. In particular, it was found that the Si-induced compressive strain relaxation in the non-polar AlGaN samples can be promoted by the structural anisotropy as compared with the polar counterparts. The gradually increased relaxation of compressive residual strain in both polar and non-polar AlGaN samples with increasing Si-doping level was attributed to the Si-induced enhancement in the opportunity for the dislocations to interact and annihilate. This implies that the crystal quality for both polar and non-polar AlGaN epi-layers can be remarkably improved by Si-doping.

  3. Optical lattice polarization effects on hyperpolarizability of atomic clock transitions.

    PubMed

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G

    2006-10-27

    The light-induced frequency shift due to hyperpolarizability (i.e., terms of second-order in intensity) is studied for a forbidden optical transition, J = 0 --> J = 0. A simple universal dependence on the field ellipticity is obtained. This result allows minimization of the second-order light shift with respect to the field polarization for optical lattices operating at a magic wavelength (at which the first-order shift vanishes). We show the possibility for the existence of a magic elliptical polarization, for which the second-order frequency shift vanishes. The optimal polarization of the lattice field can be either linear, circular, or magic elliptical. The obtained results could improve the accuracy of lattice-based atomic clocks.

  4. Effect of polarity on Ni/InN interfacial reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kragh-Buetow, K. C.; Weng, X.; Readinger, E. D.; Wraback, M.; Mohney, S. E.

    2013-01-14

    Ni films on (0001) and (0001) InN exhibited different reaction kinetics upon annealing at 673K. Structural and chemical analysis using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry indicated that an interfacial reaction did not occur between the Ni film and the In-polar (0001) InN layer. However, the N-polar face reacted with Ni to form the Ni{sub 3}InN{sub x} ternary phase with an anti-perovskite structure. The difference in reactivity for Ni on In-face and N-face InN indicates that polarity alters the reaction and may also affect interactions between other metals and group III-nitride semiconductors.

  5. Dynamics in polydimethylsiloxane. The effect of solute polarity

    SciTech Connect

    Diachun, N.A.; Marcus, A.H.; Hussey, D.M.; Fayer, M.D. )

    1994-02-09

    The temperature dependent dynamics of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) melts are investigated by measuring orientational relaxation of a dissolved probe molecule, 2-naphthyltriethoxysilane (NTES) using time resolved fluorescence depolarization. The temperature dependent viscosity of PDMS is also reported for two molecular weights. The measurements of nonpolar NTES probe dynamics are compared to previous measurements on the polar probe, N-(triethoxysilylpropyl)dansylamide. The activation energies for the orientational relaxation of the two probes are very different. This is discussed in terms of the influence of the polarity of the solutes on the local structure in the melts. The results have implications for possible modifications of the physical properties of PDMS materials by using solutes or side groups of varying polarity. The synthesis of the NTES probe, which can also be used as a cross-linking reagent for PDMS, is also described. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Effects of Cardiolipin on Membrane Morphology: A Langmuir Monolayer Study

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Minh Dinh; Shin, Kwanwoo

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a complex phospholipid that is specifically found in mitochondria. Owing to the association of the CL levels with mitochondrial physiopathology such as in Parkinson’s disease, we study the molecular effect of CL on membrane organization using model Langmuir monolayer, fluorescence microscopy, and x-ray reflectivity. We find that the liquid-expanded phase in membranes increases with increasing CL concentration, indicating an increase in the elasticity of the mixed membrane. The Gibbs excess free energy of mixing indicates that the binary monolayer composed of CL and DPPC is most thermodynamically stable at ΦCL = 10 mol %, and the stability is enhanced when the surface pressure is increased. Additionally, when ΦCL is small, the expansion of the membrane with increasing CL content was slower at higher surface pressure. These abnormal results are indicative of a folding structure being present before a collapsing structure, which was confirmed by using fluorescence microscopy and was characterized by using x-ray reflectivity with the electron density profile along the membrane’s surface normal. PMID:25902437

  7. Effects of seaweed sterols fucosterol and desmosterol on lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, Ole G; Bagatolli, Luis A; Duelund, Lars; Garvik, Olav; Ipsen, John H; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2017-03-30

    Higher sterols are universally present in large amounts (20-30%) in the plasma membranes of all eukaryotes whereas they are universally absent in prokaryotes. It is remarkable that each kingdom of the eukaryotes has chosen, during the course of evolution, its preferred sterol: cholesterol in animals, ergosterol in fungi and yeast, phytosterols in higher plants, and e.g., fucosterol and desmosterol in algae. The question arises as to which specific properties do sterols impart to membranes and to which extent do these properties differ among the different sterols. Using a range of biophysical techniques, including calorimetry, fluorescence microscopy, vesicle-fluctuation analysis, and atomic force microscopy, we have found that fucosterol and desmosterol, found in red and brown macroalgae (seaweeds), similar to cholesterol support liquid-ordered membrane phases and induce coexistence between liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains in lipid bilayers. Fucosterol and desmosterol induce acyl-chain order in liquid membranes, but less effectively than cholesterol and ergosterol in the order: cholesterol>ergosterol>desmosterol>fucosterol, possibly reflecting the different molecular structure of the sterols at the hydrocarbon tail.

  8. Electric polarization and the photogalvanic effect in solids with a topological band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregoso, Benjamin M.

    2015-03-01

    It is known that solids without inversion symmetry can exhibit photogalvanic effects and intrinsic electric polarization, e.g., ferroelectrics. Understanding the relation between the strength of the induced current and the electric polarization has proven challenging. We report on model calculations with topologically non-trivial band structure aimed at quantifying these contributions. Partial support form Conacyt.

  9. Study of the effect of scattering from turbid water on the polarization of a laser beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, R. G.; Hovanlou, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation method was used to determine the effect of scattering from turbid water on the polarization of a backscattered beam of laser light. The relationship between the polarization and the type and amount of suspended particulates in the water was investigated.

  10. Acyl chain length and charge effect on Tamoxifen-lipid model membrane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilge, Duygu; Kazanci, Nadide; Severcan, Feride

    2013-05-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM), which is an antiestrogenic agent, is widely used during chemotherapy of breast, pancreas, brain and liver cancers. In this study, TAM and model membrane interactions in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) were studied for lipids containing different acyl chain length and different charge status as a function of different TAM (1, 6, 9 and 15 mol%) concentrations. Zwitterionic lipids namely dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids were used to see the acyl chain length effect and anionic dipalmitoyl phosphtidylglycerol (DPPG) lipid was used to see the charge effect. For this purpose Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) techniques have been conducted. For zwitterionic lipid, concentration dependent different action of TAM was observed both in the gel and liquid crystalline phases by significantly increasing the lipid order and decreasing the dynamics for 1 mol% TAM, while decreasing the lipid order and increasing the dynamics of the lipids for higher concentrations (6, 9 and 15 mol%). However, different than neutral lipids, the dynamics and disorder of DPPG liposome increased for all TAM concentrations. The interactions between TAM and head group of multilamellar liposomes was monitored by analyzing the Cdbnd O stretching and PO2- antisymmetric double bond stretching bands. Increasing Tamoxifen concentrations led to a dehydration around these functional groups in the polar part of the lipids. DSC studies showed that for all types of lipids, TAM eliminates the pre-transition, shifts the main phase transition to lower temperatures and broadened the phase transition curve. The results indicate that not the acyl chain length but the charge status of the polar head group induces different effects on lipid membranes order and dynamics.

  11. Effective field theory of dark matter from membrane inflationary paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we have studied the cosmological and particle physics constraints on dark matter relic abundance from effective field theory of inflation from tensor-to-scalar ratio (r), in case of Randall-Sundrum single membrane (RSII) paradigm. Using semi-analytical approach we establish a direct connection between the dark matter relic abundance (ΩDMh2) and primordial gravity waves (r), which establishes a precise connection between inflation and generation of dark matter within the framework of effective field theory in RSII membrane. Further assuming the UV completeness of the effective field theory perfectly holds good in the prescribed framework, we have explicitly shown that the membrane tension, σ ≤ O(10-9) Mp4, bulk mass scale M5 ≤ O(0.04 - 0.05) Mp, and cosmological constant Λ˜5 ≥ - O(10-15) Mp5, in RSII membrane plays the most significant role to establish the connection between dark matter and inflation, using which we have studied the features of various mediator mass scale suppressed effective field theory "relevant operators" induced from the localized s, t and u channel interactions in RSII membrane. Taking a completely model independent approach, we have studied an exhaustive list of tree-level Feynman diagrams for dark matter annihilation within the prescribed setup and to check the consistency of the obtained results, further we apply the constraints as obtained from recently observed Planck 2015 data and Planck + BICEP2 + Keck Array joint data sets. Using all of these derived results we have shown that to satisfy the bound on, ΩDMh2 = 0.1199 ± 0.0027, as from Planck 2015 data, it is possible to put further stringent constraint on r within, 0.01 ≤ r ≤ 0.12, for thermally averaged annihilation cross-section of dark matter, < σv > ≈ O(10-28 - 10-27) cm3 / s, which are very useful to constrain various membrane inflationary models.

  12. Radiation effects on membranes - 1. Cellular permeability and cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, S.; Jayakumar, A.; Trivedi, A.; Kesavan, P.C.; Prasad, R.

    1982-05-01

    The effect of various doses of ..gamma.. radiation (5-60 krad) on the membrane permeability and cell survival of Candida albicans, a pathogenic yeast, was investigated. A reduction in the cell survival and in the accumulation of amino acids (proline, glycine, lysine, and glutamic acid) was observed following irradiation. The rate of oxygen uptake, which is often associated with transport, was also reduced. There was no damage to available sulfhydryl groups following the exposure of cells to various doses of ..gamma.. radiation. The membrane lipid composition of C. albicans cells can be altered by growing them in alkanes of varying chain lengths. The effects of such altered lipid composition on radiosensitivity was examined. It was observed that C. albicans cells with altered lipid content acquire resistance to ..gamma.. radiation.

  13. Effects of Frequency-Dependent Membrane Capacitance on Neural Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Models of excitable cells consider the membrane specific capacitance as a ubiquitous and constant parameter. However, experimental measurements show that the membrane capacitance declines with increasing frequency, i.e., exhibits dispersion. We quantified the effects of frequency-dependent membrane capacitance, c(f), on the excitability of cells and nerve fibers across the frequency range from dc to hundreds of kilohertz. Approach We implemented a model of c(f) using linear circuit elements, and incorporated it into several models of neurons with different channel kinetics: the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model of an unmyelinated axon, the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill (MRG) of a mammalian myelinated axon, and a model of a cortical neuron from prefrontal cortex. We calculated thresholds for excitation and kHz frequency conduction block, the conduction velocity, recovery cycle, strength-distance relationship and firing rate. Main results The impact of c(f) on activation thresholds depended on the stimulation waveform and channel kinetics. We observed no effect using rectangular pulse stimulation, and a reduction for frequencies of 10 kHz and above using sinusoidal signals only for the MRG model. c(f) had minimal impact on the recovery cycle and the strength-distance relationship, whereas the conduction velocity increased by up to 7.9% and 1.7% for myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, respectively. Block thresholds declined moderately when incorporating c(f), the effect was greater at higher frequencies, and the maximum reduction was 11.5%. Finally, c(f) marginally altered the firing pattern of a model of a prefrontal cortex cell, reducing the median interspike interval by less than 2%. Significance This is the first comprehensive analysis of the effects of dispersive capacitance on neural excitability, and as the interest on stimulation with kHz signals gains more attention, it defines the regions over which frequency-dependent membrane capacitance, c(f), should be

  14. Effectiveness of Membrane-Forming Curing Compounds for Curing Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    Type I portland cement designated WES-48, C-I and a graded silica sand from Ottawa, IL, C-109, was used in preparing the mortar for testing. The test...report for the portland cement is shown in Table 1. Membrane-Forming Curing Compounds 6. Nine curing compounds obtained from four manufacturers were...evaluating the effectiveness of cure of portland - cement mortar were investigated that included: water absorptivity at different depths, capillary porosity

  15. Shock Polar Angles and Confinement Effect on Detonation Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiquete, Carlos; Short, Mark; Meyer, Chad; Quirk, James; Bdzil, John

    2016-11-01

    In high explosive (HE) engineering applications, the shape of a detonation front is influenced by the density and impedance of the inert material that surrounds the explosive. Where the detonation shock intersects the material boundary, a number of gasdynamic reflection patterns are possible involving shocks, Prandtl-Meyer fans and material interfaces. To leading-order, these reflection patterns can be predicted through a shock polar analysis. For the commonly used Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) front surface propagation model, the shape and evolution of the detonation wave is determined by the specification of the surface wave angle at the HE charge-confiner interface. Typically, the shock polar analysis is employed to approximate this necessary "edge angle" using specified equations of state for the HE-inert pair and a given phase velocity. For engineering applications, we need to evaluate how accurately a shock polar analysis can predict the DSD model edge-angle. We extend previous on this issue examining reactive flow simulations of detonation propagation in a confined HE compared to the predictions of a shock polar analysis.

  16. Dynamics of a Room Temperature Ionic Liquid in Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes vs the Bulk Liquid: 2D IR and Polarized IR Pump-Probe Experiments.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Yoon; Yamada, Steven A; Fayer, Michael D

    2017-01-11

    Supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) are membranes that have ionic liquids impregnated in their pores. SILMs have been proposed for advanced carbon capture materials. Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and polarization selective IR pump-probe (PSPP) techniques were used to investigate the dynamics of reorientation and spectral diffusion of the linear triatomic anion, SeCN(-), in poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membranes and room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EmimNTf2). The dynamics in the bulk EmimNTf2 were compared to its dynamics in the SILM samples. Two PES membranes, PES200 and PES30, have pores with average sizes, ∼300 nm and ∼100 nm, respectively. Despite the relatively large pore sizes, the measurements reveal that the reorientation of SeCN(-) and the RTIL structural fluctuations are substantially slower in the SILMs than in the bulk liquid. The complete orientational randomization, slows from 136 ps in the bulk to 513 ps in the PES30. 2D IR measurements yield three time scales for structural spectral diffusion (SSD), that is, the time evolution of the liquid structure. The slowest decay constant increases from 140 ps in the bulk to 504 ps in the PES200 and increases further to 1660 ps in the PES30. The results suggest that changes at the interface propagate out and influence the RTIL structural dynamics even more than a hundred nanometers from the polymer surface. The differences between the IL dynamics in the bulk and in the membranes suggest that studies of bulk RTIL properties may be poor guides to their use in SILMs in carbon capture applications.

  17. Effects of photooxidation on membrane integrity in Salix nigra seeds

    PubMed Central

    Roqueiro, Gonzalo; Facorro, Graciela B.; Huarte, Mónica G.; Rubín de Celis, Emilio; García, Fernando; Maldonado, Sara; Maroder, Horacio

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Salix nigra seeds are desiccation-tolerant, as are orthodox seeds, although in contrast to other orthodox seeds they lose viability in a few weeks at room temperature. They also differ in that the chloroplasts of the embryo tissues conserve their chlorophyll and endomembranes. The aim of this paper was to investigate the role of chlorophyll in seed deterioration. Methods Seeds were aged at different light intensities and atmospheric conditions. Mean germination time and normal and total germination were evaluated. The formation of free radicals was assessed using electronic spin resonance spectroscopy, and changes in the fatty acid composition from phospholipids, galactolipids and triglycerides using gas–liquid chromatography. Membrane integrity was studied with electronic spin resonance spin probe techniques, electrolyte leakage and transmission electron microscopy. Key Results Light and oxygen played an important role in free-radical generation, causing a decrease in normal germination and an increase in mean germination time. Both indices were associated with a decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from membrane lipids as phospholipids and galactolipids. The detection of damage in thylakoid membranes and an increase in plasmalemma permeability were consistent with the decrease in both types of lipids. Triglycerides remained unchanged. Light-induced damage began in outermost tissues and spread inwards, decreasing normal germination. Conclusions Salix nigra seeds were very susceptible to photooxidation. The thylakoid membranes appeared to be the first target of the photooxidative process since there were large decreases in galactolipids and both these lipids and the activated chlorophyll are contiguous in the structure of that membrane. Changes in normal germination and mean germination time could be explained by the deteriorative effects of oxidation. PMID:20338949

  18. Preventive effect of selenium on T-2 toxin membrane toxicity.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, S A; Memarbashi, A; Balali, M

    2001-01-01

    T-2 toxin, one of the major toxic trichothecene mycotoxines, has been shown to cause effects such as inhibition of protein synthesis and impairement of mitochondrial function. The use of T-2 toxin as chemical warfare in south east Asia and Iran has been reported . It has been suggested that T-2 toxin may mediate its toxic effect via the cell membrane, but mechanism of action is poorly understood. In cytotoxicity studies, erythrocytes are an excellent model system. In the present study different doses of sodium selenite were injected into male albino mice for 6 days every 48 h. Blood samples were taken from experimental and control groups (normal saline). The red cells were counted in isotonic phosphate buffer containing different doses of T-2 toxin. The mixture was incubated at 37 degrees C for 4 h. The results indicate that selenium is able to prevent erythrocyte membrane damage induced by T-2 toxin. The protective effect of selenium may be due to its membrane stabilizing properties, although inhibition of lipid peroxidation is likely, too.

  19. The effect of polarity and surface states on the Fermi level at III-nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P; Bryan, I; Bryan, Z; Guo, W; Hussey, L; Collazo, R; Sitar, Z

    2014-09-28

    Surface states and their influence on the Fermi level at the surface of GaN and AlN are studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of polarity on surface electronic properties was studied. Accurate modeling of the valence band edge and comparison with XPS data revealed the presence of donor surface states at 1.4 eV and acceptor states at energies > 2.7 eV from the valence band in GaN. Al polar AlN showed acceptor states at energies > 3.3 eV. Density of acceptor surface states was estimated to be between 10(13) and 10(14) eV(-1) cm(-2) in both GaN and AlN. The shift in charge neutrality levels and barrier heights due to polarity and the density of surface states on AlN and GaN were estimated from XPS measurements. Theoretical modeling and comparison with XPS data implied full compensation of spontaneous polarization charge by charged surface states. Barrier height measurements also reveal a dependence on polarity with phi(metal-polar)>phi(non-polar)>phi(nitrogen-polar) suggesting that the N-polar surface is the most suitable for Ohmic contacts. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  20. Crystallographic polarity effect of ZnO on thin film growth of pentacene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tatsuru; Nagata, Takahiro; Hayakawa, Ryoma; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Oh, Seungjun; Hiroshiba, Nobuya; Chikyow, Toyohiro; Fujimura, Norifumi; Wakayama, Yutaka

    2017-04-01

    The spontaneous polarization effect of ZnO on the thin film growth of pentacene, which is a typical π conjunction organic semiconductor, was investigated. Pentacene thin films were grown on polar ZnO surfaces by ultraslow organic film physical vapor deposition to obtain layer-by-layer growth. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that pentacene molecules stand upright on polar ZnO surfaces, and that the films consist of two polymorphs, namely, the thin-film and bulk phases. The thin-film phases of pentacene were observed regardless of the polarity of the ZnO substrate at a thickness of less than six molecular layers. However, pentacene on a Zn-polar ZnO substrate gradually changed to the bulk phase unlike that on an O-polar ZnO substrate. Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements revealed that the surface potential of pentacene becomes more positive with increasing pentacene thickness at less than two molecular layers. The variation in the potential of pentacene on the Zn-polar ZnO substrate was larger than that of pentacene on the O-polar ZnO substrate. These findings indicate that the polarity of the semiconductor can control the growth and electronic state of the inorganic/organic semiconductor interface.

  1. LINE-INTERLOCKING EFFECTS ON POLARIZATION IN SPECTRAL LINES BY RAYLEIGH AND RAMAN SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N.; Stenflo, J. O. E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in

    2013-06-20

    The polarized spectrum of the Sun and stars is formed from the scattering of anisotropic radiation on atoms. Interpretation of this spectrum requires the solution of polarized line transfer in multilevel atomic systems. While sophisticated quantum theories of polarized line formation in multilevel atomic systems exist, they are limited by the approximation of complete frequency redistribution in scattering. The partial frequency redistribution (PRD) in line scattering is a necessary component in modeling the polarized spectra of strong lines. The polarized PRD line scattering theories developed so far confine themselves to a two-level or a two-term atom model. In this paper, we present a heuristic approach to the problem of polarized line formation in multilevel atoms taking into account the effects of PRD and a weak magnetic field. Starting from the unpolarized PRD multilevel atom approach of Hubeny et al., we incorporate the polarization state of the radiation field. However, the lower level polarization is neglected. Two iterative methods of solving the polarized PRD line transfer in multilevel atoms are also presented. Taking the example of a five-level Ca II atom model, we present illustrative results for an isothermal one-dimensional model atmosphere.

  2. Comparative effects of technical toxaphene, 2,5-dichloro-3-biphenylol and octabromodiphenylether on cell viability, [Ca2+]i levels and membrane fluidity in mouse thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Sandal, Suleyman; Yilmaz, Bayram; Chen, Chang-Hwei; Carpenter, David O

    2004-08-01

    Flow cytometric studies of mouse thymocytes show that technical toxaphene (10-20 ppm) and 2,5-dichloro-3-biphenylol (PCB 9-OH) (5-10 ppm) kill cells and cause an increase in intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, whereas commercial octabromodiphenylether (OBDE) has no effect. The cell death is not a result of the rise of [Ca2+]i, since the divalent cation ionophore, ionomycin, causes a large elevation in [Ca2+]i without cell death. We have studied effects of these compounds on membrane fluorescence polarization, a measure of membrane fluidity, using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). We find that toxaphene causes a decrease in membrane fluidity in the concentration range associated with cell death, whereas PCB 9-OH causes an increase in fluidity and OBDE has no effect. These observations suggest that alterations of membrane fluidity of thymocytes, whether it be an increase or decrease, can cause cytotoxicity.

  3. Photonic spin Hall effect in hyperbolic metamaterials for polarization-controlled routing of subwavelength modes.

    PubMed

    Kapitanova, Polina V; Ginzburg, Pavel; Rodríguez-Fortuño, Francisco J; Filonov, Dmitry S; Voroshilov, Pavel M; Belov, Pavel A; Poddubny, Alexander N; Kivshar, Yuri S; Wurtz, Gregory A; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2014-01-01

    The routing of light in a deep subwavelength regime enables a variety of important applications in photonics, quantum information technologies, imaging and biosensing. Here we describe and experimentally demonstrate the selective excitation of spatially confined, subwavelength electromagnetic modes in anisotropic metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion. A localized, circularly polarized emitter placed at the boundary of a hyperbolic metamaterial is shown to excite extraordinary waves propagating in a prescribed direction controlled by the polarization handedness. Thus, a metamaterial slab acts as an extremely broadband, nearly ideal polarization beam splitter for circularly polarized light. We perform a proof of concept experiment with a uniaxial hyperbolic metamaterial at radio-frequencies revealing the directional routing effect and strong subwavelength λ/300 confinement. The proposed concept of metamaterial-based subwavelength interconnection and polarization-controlled signal routing is based on the photonic spin Hall effect and may serve as an ultimate platform for either conventional or quantum electromagnetic signal processing.

  4. Modelization of nanospace interaction involving a ferromagnetic atom: a spin polarization effect study by thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, K S V; Chen, Xu; Gupta, S

    2014-04-01

    Ab initio studies of ferromagnetic atom interacting with carbon nanotubes have been reported in the literature that predict when the interaction is strong, a higher hybridization with confinement effect will result in spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom. The spin polarization effect on the thermal oxidation to form its oxide is modeled here for the ferromagnetic atom and its alloy, as the above studies predict the 4s electrons are polarized in the atom. The four models developed here provide a pathway for distinguishing the type of interaction that exists in the real system. The extent of spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom has been examined by varying the amount of carbon nanotubes in the composites in the thermogravimetric experiments. In this study we report the experimental results on the CoNi alloy which appears to show selective spin polarization. The products of the thermal oxidation has been analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

  5. Singular observation of the polarization-conversion effect for a gammadion-shaped metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chu-En; Yen, Ta-Jen; Yu, Chih-Jen; Hsieh, Cheng-Min; Lee, Min-Han; Chen, Chii-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the polarization-conversion effects of a gammadion-shaped metasurface in transmission and reflection modes are discussed. In our experiment, the polarization-conversion effect of a gammadion-shaped metasurface is investigated because of the contribution of the phase and amplitude anisotropies. According to our experimental and simulated results, the polarization property of the first-order transmitted diffraction is dominated by linear anisotropy and has weak depolarization; the first-order reflected diffraction exhibits both linear and circular anisotropies and has stronger depolarization than the transmission mode. These results are different from previously published research. The Mueller matrix ellipsometer and polar decomposition method will aid in the investigation of the polarization properties of other nanostructures. PMID:26915332

  6. Singular observation of the polarization-conversion effect for a gammadion-shaped metasurface.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chu-En; Yen, Ta-Jen; Yu, Chih-Jen; Hsieh, Cheng-Min; Lee, Min-Han; Chen, Chii-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Wei

    2016-02-26

    In this article, the polarization-conversion effects of a gammadion-shaped metasurface in transmission and reflection modes are discussed. In our experiment, the polarization-conversion effect of a gammadion-shaped metasurface is investigated because of the contribution of the phase and amplitude anisotropies. According to our experimental and simulated results, the polarization property of the first-order transmitted diffraction is dominated by linear anisotropy and has weak depolarization; the first-order reflected diffraction exhibits both linear and circular anisotropies and has stronger depolarization than the transmission mode. These results are different from previously published research. The Mueller matrix ellipsometer and polar decomposition method will aid in the investigation of the polarization properties of other nanostructures.

  7. Effect of laser-radiation polarization on the nonlinear scattering of light in nanodiamond suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Vanyukov, V. V.; Mogileva, T. N.; Puzyr', A. P.; Bondar', V. S.; Svirko, Yu. P.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of laser radiation polarization on the nonlinear scattering of light in aqueous suspensions of detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) in a regime of optical power limiting (OPL) has been studied. It is established that the nonlinear transmission coefficient of DND suspension in the OPL regime in a field of nanosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 532 nm is independent of the polarization of incident radiation. The nonlinear scattering of light observed at an angle of 90° in the plane perpendicular to the plane of polarization of the incident radiation depends on the polarization angle in accordance with a trigonometric law. It is shown that the ratio of the signals of scattered radiation for the vertical and horizontal polarizations exhibits nonmonotonic dependence on the laser-beam power density. The results are explained by the Rayleigh-Mie scattering and a change in the size of scattering centers as a result of the effect of a laser upon the DND suspension.

  8. Magnetic Flux Effect on a Kondo-Induced Electric Polarization in a Triangular Triple Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Mikito; Matsumoto, Masashige; Kusunose, Hiroaki

    2014-08-01

    A magnetic flux effect is studied theoretically on an electric polarization induced by the Kondo effect in a triangular triple-quantum-dot system, where one of the three dots is connected to a metallic lead. This electric polarization exhibits an Aharonov-Bohm oscillation as a function of the magnetic flux penetrating through the triangular loop. The numerical renormalization group analysis reveals how the oscillation pattern depends on the Kondo coupling of a local spin with lead electrons, which is sensitive to the point contact with the lead. It provides an experimental implication that the Kondo effect is the origin of the emergent electric polarization.

  9. The effect of platinum in a Nafion membrane on the durability of the membrane under fuel cell conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D.; Yi, B. L.; Zhang, H. M.; Liu, Meilin

    The effect of platinum on free radical generation and membrane degradation in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells is investigated using three typical cell configurations. Examinations of the fluoride emission rates (FERs) under different testing conditions indicate that platinum deposited in the membrane plays an important role as a catalytic center for the formation of H 2O 2 and HO rad free radicals, leading to PEM degradation. The chemical durability of the membranes is tested in accelerated Fenton tests. It confirms the formation of free radicals in the presence of platinum in the decomposition of H 2O 2 by colorimetric method with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the trapping agent. In addition, structural and morphological changes of the membranes are characterized using FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  10. Effect of solid retention time on membrane fouling in membrane bioreactor: from the perspective of quorum sensing and quorum quenching.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huarong; Xu, Guoren; Qu, Fangshu; Li, Guibai; Liang, Heng

    2016-09-01

    Solid retention time (SRT) is one of the most important operational parameters in membrane bioreactor (MBR), which significantly influences membrane fouling. It is widely recognized that SRT mainly changes biomass characteristics, and then, influences membrane fouling. Effect of SRT on quorum sensing (QS) in MBR, which could also influence fouling by coordinating biofilm formation, has not been reported. In this study, fouling, QS, soluble microbial products (SMP), and extracellular polymer substances (EPS) in MBRs operated under SRTs of 4, 10, and 40 days were investigated. The results showed that as SRT increased, the abundance of quorum quenching (QQ) bacteria increased, the quorum signal degradation activity of activated sludge increased, the concentrations of signal molecules in MBR decreased, the excretion of SMP and EPS decreased, and thus membrane biofouling was alleviated. Therefore, besides altering the biomass physiochemical properties, SRT also changed the balance between QS and QQ in MBR, and in this way, influenced membrane biofouling.

  11. Circumpolar contaminant concentrations in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and potential population-level effects.

    PubMed

    Nuijten, R J M; Hendriks, A J; Jenssen, B M; Schipper, A M

    2016-11-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) currently receive much attention in the context of global climate change. However, there are other stressors that might threaten the viability of polar bear populations as well, such as exposure to anthropogenic pollutants. Lipophilic organic compounds bio-accumulate and bio-magnify in the food chain, leading to high concentrations at the level of top-predators. In Arctic wildlife, including the polar bear, various adverse health effects have been related to internal concentrations of commercially used anthropogenic chemicals like PCB and DDT. The extent to which these individual health effects are associated to population-level effects is, however, unknown. In this study we assembled data on adipose tissue concentrations of ∑PCB, ∑DDT, dieldrin and ∑PBDE in individual polar bears from peer-reviewed scientific literature. Data were available for 14 out of the 19 subpopulations. We found that internal concentrations of these contaminants exceed threshold values for adverse individual health effects in several subpopulations. In an exploratory regression analysis we identified a clear negative correlation between polar bear population density and sub-population specific contaminant concentrations in adipose tissue. The results suggest that adverse health effects of contaminants in individual polar bears may scale up to population-level consequences. Our study highlights the need to consider contaminant exposure along with other threats in polar bear population viability analyses.

  12. Cell polarity proteins and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Xiao, Xiang; Lui, Wing-Yee; Lee, Will M; Mruk, Dolores; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-11-01

    When the cross-section of a seminiferous tubule from an adult rat testes is examined microscopically, Sertoli cells and germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium are notably polarized cells. For instance, Sertoli cell nuclei are found near the basement membrane. On the other hand, tight junction (TJ), basal ectoplasmic specialization (basal ES, a testis-specific actin-rich anchoring junction), gap junction (GJ) and desmosome that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) are also located near the basement membrane. The BTB, in turn, divides the epithelium into the basal and the adluminal (apical) compartments. Within the epithelium, undifferentiated spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes restrictively reside in the basal compartment whereas spermatocytes and post-meiotic spermatids reside in the adluminal compartment. Furthermore, the heads of elongating/elongated spermatids point toward the basement membrane with their elongating tails toward the tubule lumen. However, the involvement of polarity proteins in this unique cellular organization, in particular the underlying molecular mechanism(s) by which polarity proteins confer cellular polarity in the seminiferous epithelium is virtually unknown until recent years. Herein, we discuss latest findings regarding the role of different polarity protein complexes or modules and how these protein complexes are working in concert to modulate Sertoli cell and spermatid polarity. These findings also illustrate polarity proteins exert their effects through the actin-based cytoskeleton mediated by actin binding and regulatory proteins, which in turn modulate adhesion protein complexes at the cell-cell interface since TJ, basal ES and GJ utilize F-actin for attachment. We also propose a hypothetical model which illustrates the antagonistic effects of these polarity proteins. This in turn provides a unique mechanism to modulate junction remodeling in the testis to support germ cell transport across the epithelium in

  13. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on lipid bilayer membranes. I. Influence on membrane thickness and activation volumes of lipophilic ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Benz, R; Conti, F

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of membrane capacitance, Cm, were performed on lipid bilayers of different lipidic composition (diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine PPhPC, dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine DOPE, glycerylmonooleate GMO) and containing n-decane as solvent. In the same membranes, the absorption of the lipophilic ions dipicrylamine (DPA-) and tetraphenylborate (TPhB-), and the kinetics of their translocation between the two membrane faces have been studied. The data were obtained from charge pulse relaxation measurements. Upon increasing pressure the specific capacity Cm increased in a fully reversible and reproducible way reflecting a thinning of the membrane that is attributed to extrusion of n-decane from the black membrane area. High pressure decreased the rate constant, ki, for lipophilic ion translocation. After correcting for changes in the height of the energy barrier for translocation due to membrane thinning the pressure dependence of ki yields an apparent activation volume for translocation of approximately 14 cm3/mol both for DPA- and TPhB-. Changes in lipophilic ion absorption following a step of pressure developed with a rather slow time course due to diffusion limitations in solution. The stationary concentration of membrane absorbed lipophilic ions increased with pressure according to an apparent volume of absorption of about -10 cm3/mol. The relevance of the results for the interpretation of the effects of pressure on nerve membrane physiology is discussed. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3730509

  14. Effect of choline carboxylate ionic liquids on biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Rengstl, Doris; Kraus, Birgit; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D; Kunz, Werner

    2014-11-01

    Choline carboxylates, ChCm, with m=2-10 and choline oleate are known as biocompatible substances, yet their influence on biological membranes is not well-known, and the effect on human skin has not previously been investigated. The short chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m=2, 4, 6 act as hydrotropes, solubilizing hydrophobic compounds in aqueous solution, while the longer chain choline carboxylates ChCm with m=8, 10 and oleate are able to form micelles. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of choline carboxylates was tested using HeLa and SK-MEL-28 cells. The influence of these substances on liposomes prepared from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) was also evaluated to provide insights on membrane interactions. It was observed that the choline carboxylates with a chain length of m>8 distinctly influence the bilayer, while the shorter ones had minimal interaction with the liposomes.

  15. Polarization effects in ionization-excitation of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Andersen, Nils

    2004-05-01

    We present a parameterization of experiments for simultaneous ionization-excitation of helium, leaving the He^+ ion in the excited n=2 states. In addition to the wellknown observables for coherent excitation of an atomic or ionic P-state [1], we explore the additional opportunities provided by the degeneracy of the 2s and 2p states in a purely Coulombic system. Results from model calculations for some of the new observables are presented, together with the corresponding polarized charge clouds. These observables should be measurable using, e.g., the COLTRIMS technique [2]. [1] N. Andersen and K. Bartschat, Polarization, Alignment, and Orientation in Atomic Collisions (Springer, New York 2001) [2] J. Ullrich et al., Rep. Prog. Phys. 66 (2003) 1463

  16. Effects of fermion exchange on the polarization of exciton condensates.

    PubMed

    Combescot, Monique; Combescot, Roland; Alloing, Mathieu; Dubin, François

    2015-03-06

    Exchange interaction is responsible for the stability of elementary boson condensates with respect to momentum fragmentation. This remains true for composite bosons when single fermion exchanges are included but spin degrees of freedom are ignored. Here, we show that their inclusion can produce a spin fragmentation of the dark exciton condensate, i.e., an unpolarized condensate with an equal amount of spin (+2) and (-2) excitons not coupled to light. The composite boson many-body formalism allows us to predict that, for spatially indirect excitons, the condensate polarization switches from unpolarized to fully polarized when the distance between the layers confining electrons and holes increases. Importantly, the threshold distance for this switch lies in a regime fully accessible to experiments.

  17. Surfactant and temperature effects on paraben transport through silicone membranes.

    PubMed

    Waters, Laura J; Dennis, Laura; Bibi, Aisha; Mitchell, John C

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the effects of two surfactants (one anionic and one non-ionic) and controlled modifications in temperature (298-323K) on the permeation of two structurally similar compounds through a silicone membrane using a Franz diffusion cell system. In all cases the presence of an anionic surfactant, namely sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), reduced the permeation of both compounds (methylparaben and ethylparaben) over a period of 24h. The degree of permeation reduction was proportional to the concentration of surfactant with a maximum effect observed, with an average reduction of approximately 50%, at the highest surfactant concentration of 20mM. Differences were seen around the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of SDS implying the effect was partially connected with the favoured formation of micelles. In contrast, the presence of non-ionic surfactant (Brij 35) had no effect on the permeation of methylparaben or ethylparaben at any of the concentrations investigated, both above and below the CMC of the surfactant. From these findings the authors conclude that the specific effects of SDS are a consequence of ionic surfactant-silicone interactions retarding the movement of paraben through the membrane through indirect modifications to the surface of the membrane. As expected, an increase in experimental temperature appeared to enhance the permeation of both model compounds, a finding that is in agreement with previously reported data. Interestingly, in the majority of cases this effect was optimum at the second highest temperature studied (45°C) which suggests that permeation is a temperature-dependent phenomenon.

  18. Investigation of the Effective NN Interaction in the Nuclear Medium Through SILICON-28(POLARIZED Proton, Polarized PROTON')SILICON-28 Polarization Transfer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian

    1996-08-01

    Reaction cross section and spin polarization observables were measured for a number of transitions in ^{28}Si(vec p,vec p^ '){^{28}Si} using the K600 high-resolution spectrometer located at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. This information was used to check and expand on models of the effect of the nuclear medium on the NN interaction, and to examine the distribution of 6^- strength among the excited states of ^{28} Si. The spectrometer's resolution of 50 keV made possible the separation of the excited states needed for this study, and the number of polarization observables available was enhanced by the use of the focal plane polarimeter associated with the spectrometer. Four different experimental results are part of this thesis. Measurements were made of the p+^ {28}Si elastic scattering cross section (dsigma/dOmega) and analyzing power (A_{y}) in order to constrain the wave functions used to describe the projectile-target system. This provided information necessary for a subsequent distorted-wave Born approximation treatment of inelastic scattering transitions. Measurements were made in the angle range from 8^circ to 65^circ, and were well described using complex central and spin-orbit potentials within a Schrodinger-equation framework. A combination of polarization transfer observables (D_{c}) was observed at 19.8^circ and 24.0 ^circ to confirm earlier measurements of the in-medium corrections to the spin-independent, isoscalar central and spin-orbit portions of the effective NN interaction. These checks were performed for a number of low-lying, natural -parity transitions, and showed excellent agreement. To provide information on the spin-orbit and tensor portions of the effective NN interaction (both isoscalar and isovector), a detailed study of the T = 0 and T = 1 6^- states at 11.58 and 14.36 MeV was conducted. Constraints on the transition form factor were taken from electron scattering measurements, and pion scattering confirmed the isospin

  19. Polarization and microstructural effects of ceramic hydroxyapatite electrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yumi; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Nakamura, Miho; Nagai, Akiko; Katayama, Keiichi; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2010-01-01

    To provide bioelectrets with controlled electrical energy, the polarization and relaxation characteristics of hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic electrets were investigated in terms of poling conditions and microstructures. HA electrets were prepared between 250 and 500 °C for 5-120 min under a 5 kV cm-1 dc electrical field. Poling conditions and grain size of HA ceramics significantly influenced the thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) spectra and charge storage (Q). Under a poling field of 5 kV cm-1, varying the poling temperature from 250 to 500 °C drastically shifted the TSDC peak temperature from 250 to 620 °C and increased Q from 0.5 to 45 μC cm-2. The change in the average grain size from 2 to 11 μm increased the Q value from 15 to 60 μC cm-2 with a negligible shift in the TSDC peak position. The measured difference of the TSDC peak shapes and positions, as well as the Q values, was theoretically due to the four polarization states with different activation energies (Edr) of dipole relaxation and the pre-exponential factor of relaxation times (τ0). The dependences on the poling conditions and grain size indicated that the four states were due to the orientation polarization of absorbed water (state 1), the localizations of displaced protons around PO43- and OH- in the grains (states 2 and 3), and the localization of displaced protons in the grain boundaries (state 4).

  20. THE EFFECT OF THE DUST SIZE DISTRIBUTION ON ASTEROID POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Joseph; Hartzell, Christine; Scheeres, Daniel J. E-mail: christine.hartzell@colorado.edu

    2009-12-15

    We have developed a theoretical description of how of an asteroid's polarization-phase curve will be affected by the removal of the dust from the surface due to a size-dependent phenomenon such as radiation pressure-driven escape of levitated particles. We test our calculations against new observations of four small (D {approx} 1 km) near-Earth asteroids (NEAs; (85236), (142348), (162900), and 2006 SZ{sub 217}) obtained with the Dual Beam Imaging Polarimeter on the University of Hawaii's 2.2 m telescope, as well as previous observations of (25143) Itokawa and (433) Eros. We find that the polarization of the light reflected from an asteroid is controlled by the mineralogical and chemical composition of the surface and is independent of dust particle. The relation between the slope of the polarization-phase curve beyond the inversion angle and the albedo of an asteroid is thus independent of the surface regolith size distribution and is valid for both Main Belt and NEAs.

  1. Effect of cathodic polarization on coating doxycycline on titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Geißler, Sebastian; Tiainen, Hanna; Haugen, Håvard J

    2016-06-01

    Cathodic polarization has been reported to enhance the ability of titanium based implant materials to interact with biomolecules by forming titanium hydride at the outermost surface layer. Although this hydride layer has recently been suggested to allow the immobilization of the broad spectrum antibiotic doxycycline on titanium surfaces, the involvement of hydride in binding the biomolecule onto titanium remains poorly understood. To gain better understanding of the influence this immobilization process has on titanium surfaces, mirror-polished commercially pure titanium surfaces were cathodically polarized in the presence of doxycycline and the modified surfaces were thoroughly characterized using atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and angle-resolved X-ray spectroscopy. We demonstrated that no hydride was created during the polarization process. Doxycycline was found to be attached to an oxide layer that was modified during the electrochemical process. A bacterial assay using bioluminescent Staphylococcus epidermidis Xen43 showed the ability of the coating to reduce bacterial colonization and planktonic bacterial growth.

  2. Contrasting solvent polarity effect on the photophysical properties of two newly synthesized aminostyryl dyes in the lower and in the higher solvent polarity regions.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, M; Mohanty, J; Singh, P K; Bhasikuttan, A C; Rajule, R N; Satam, V S; Bendre, S R; Kanetkar, V R; Pal, H

    2010-04-08

    Solvent polarity effect on the photophysical properties of two newly synthesized aminostyryl-thiazoloquinoxaline dyes, one with a flexible diphenylamino group, namely, N,N-diphenyl-4-[2-(thiazolo[4,5-b]quinoxalin-2-yl)vinyl]aniline (TQ1), and the other with a rigid julolidinylamino group, namely, (9-[2-(thiazolo[4,5-b]quinoxalin-2-yl)vinyl]julolidine) (TQ2), have been investigated in different aprotic solvents and solvent mixtures. From the polarity dependent changes in the absorption and fluorescence spectral properties, it is indicated that the fluorescent states of the dyes are of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character. For both the dyes, the photophysical properties like fluorescence quantum yields (Phi(f)), fluorescence lifetimes (tau(f)), radiative rate constants (k(f) = Phi(f)/tau(f)), and nonradiative rate constants (k(nr) = 1/tau(f) - Phi(f)/tau(f)) show clearly contrasting solvent polarity effects in the lower and in the higher solvent polarity region, causing an interesting reversal in the properties below and above an intermediate solvent polarity. It is inferred that the domination of the cis-trans isomerization in the lower solvent polarity region and that of the twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state formation in the higher solvent polarity region are responsible for the observed contrasting solvent polarity effects on the photophysical properties of the two dyes. As both isomerization and TICT state formation causes an enhancement in the nonradiative decay rate of the excited dyes and both the processes become less significant at the intermediate solvent polarity region, the two dyes show their largest Phi(f) and tau(f) values at intermediate solvent polarities. Suitable mechanistic schemes have been proposed and qualitative potential energy diagrams have been presented to explain the observed results with the changes in the polarity of the solvents used.

  3. Integrating Partial Polarization into a Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat Duen

    1999-01-01

    The ferroelectric channel in a Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MFSFET) can partially change its polarization when the gate voltage near the polarization threshold voltage. This causes the MFSFET Drain current to change with repeated pulses of the same gate voltage near the polarization threshold voltage. A previously developed model [11, based on the Fermi-Dirac function, assumed that for a given gate voltage and channel polarization, a sin-le Drain current value would be generated. A study has been done to characterize the effects of partial polarization on the Drain current of a MFSFET. These effects have been described mathematically and these equations have been incorporated into a more comprehensive mathematical model of the MFSFET. The model takes into account the hysteresis nature of the MFSFET and the time dependent decay as well as the effects of partial polarization. This model defines the Drain current based on calculating the degree of polarization from previous gate pulses, the present Gate voltage, and the amount of time since the last Gate volta-e pulse.

  4. Improvement of POCIS ability to quantify pesticides in natural water by reducing polyethylene glycol matrix effects from polyethersulfone membranes.

    PubMed

    Guibal, Robin; Lissalde, Sophie; Charriau, Adeline; Guibaud, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    The presence of polyethylene glycol compounds (PEG) in extracts from polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) was shown by high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PEG compounds, which are released by polyethersulfone (PES) membranes used to build POCIS, can induce matrix effects during quantification of performance reference compounds (PRC, DIA-d5) and target pesticides by mass detection, even after chromatographic separation. Dilution of POCIS extracts can reduce this matrix effect, but dilution may induce a decrease in POCIS performance, primarily for quantification limits. To reduce PEG interference during chromatographic analysis, a simple non-damaging washing protocol for PES membranes is proposed. The method consists of 2 successive baths of washing solution (140 mL per membrane) of ultrapure water (UPW) and methanol (50/50), stirred at 300 rotations per minute (rpm), followed by a final membrane rinse with UPW (140 mL). The signal from PEG compounds was significantly decreased for washed membranes (between 4 and 6 fold lower). After field deployment, total ion current chromatograms of extracts from POCIS built with washed PES membranes did not display a significant PEG fingerprint. This led to improved quantification accuracy for compounds co-eluting with PEG, i.e. PRC (performance and reference compound, DIA-d5) and some pesticides and metabolites. With washed membranes, an accurate quantification of PRC and pesticides sampled by POCIS was indeed possible without a large extract dilution; 10 times instead of the 25 times needed in unwashed conditions. Assuming that the PRC approach corrects for environmental conditions and sampling rates (Rs), a proper PRC (DIA-d5) quantification significantly improved pesticide time weighted average concentration (TWAC) determination in natural water after field deployment.

  5. EFFECT OF ORBIT DISTORTIONS LAND BETATRON TUNE ON THE RHIC POLARIZED BEAM.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO,A.U.; PILAT,F.; PTITSYN,V.

    2001-06-18

    Polarized protons have been stored and accelerated in RHIC from G{sub {gamma}} = 46.5 to 60 during Run2000 with only one Siberian snake installed. We simulated with the spin tracking code Spink the behavior of polarized protons, in particular the effect of closed orbit distortions and betatron tune variation on the spin dynamics. According to simulation results, closed orbit and tune effects will be translated into requirements for the tune and orbit correction systems for the RHIC polarized proton Run2001, when both Siberian snakes will be available.

  6. Full-scale simulation of seawater reverse osmosis desalination processes for boron removal: Effect of membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Park, Pyung-Kyu; Lee, Sangho; Cho, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study is to further develop previously reported mechanistic predictive model that simulates boron removal in full-scale seawater reverse osmosis (RO) desalination processes to take into account the effect of membrane fouling. Decrease of boron removal and reduction in water production rate by membrane fouling due to enhanced concentration polarization were simulated as a decrease in solute mass transfer coefficient in boundary layer on membrane surface. Various design and operating options under fouling condition were examined including single- versus double-pass configurations, different number of RO elements per vessel, use of RO membranes with enhanced boron rejection, and pH adjustment. These options were quantitatively compared by normalizing the performance of the system in terms of E(min), the minimum energy costs per product water. Simulation results suggested that most viable options to enhance boron rejection among those tested in this study include: i) minimizing fouling, ii) exchanging the existing SWRO elements to boron-specific ones, and iii) increasing pH in the second pass. The model developed in this study is expected to help design and optimization of the RO processes to achieve the target boron removal at target water recovery under realistic conditions where membrane fouling occurs during operation.

  7. The effect of spontaneous polarization on two-dimensional elasticity of smectic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dolganov, P. V. Dolganov, V. K.; Cluzeau, P.

    2013-06-15

    The influence of polarity on orientational elasticity and on structures formed in the director field is studied in free-standing smectic films. Periodic stripe patterns and 2{pi}-walls in a magnetic field are investigated. Measurements are performed on a nonpolar racemic mixture, on an optically pure ferroelectric compound, and in mixtures with different concentrations of the chiral isomers of opposite signs. The structure of periodic stripes changes drastically with the polarity of the film. The ratio of the bend K{sub B} and splay K{sub S} elastic constants for smectic films is determined as a function of polarization from the structure of periodic stripe patterns and 2{pi}-walls. We find that the elastic anisotropy K{sub B}/K{sub S} increases essentially with increasing the polarity of the film. Changes of the elasticity and the structure of periodic stripes are explained by polarization charge effects.

  8. Ray Scattering by an Arbitrarily Oriented Spheroid: 2. Transmission and Cross-polarization Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Transmission of an arbitrarily polarized plane wave by an arbitrarily oriented spheroid in the short-wavelength limit is considered in the context of ray theory. The transmitted electric field is added to the diffracted plus reflected ray-theory electric field that was previously derived to obtain an approximation to the far-zone scattered intensity in the forward hemisphere. Two different types of cross-polarization effects are found. These are: (a) a rotation of the polarization state of the transmitted rays from when they are referenced with respect to their entrance into the spheroid to when they are referenced with respect to their exit from it and (b) a rotation of the polarization state of the transmitted rays when they are referenced with respect to the polarization state of the diffracted plus reflected rays.

  9. Polarity effects in the optical properties of hydrothermal ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. W.; Heinhold, R.; Miller, P.; Henseler, M. J. H.; Mendelsberg, R. J.; Durbin, S. M.; Reeves, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Significant polarity-related differences in the near-band-edge photoluminescence from the Zn-polar and O-polar faces of hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals, particularly in the ionized donor bound and free exciton recombination regions, were initially enhanced and then extinguished on annealing in oxygen at 400 °C and 600 °C, respectively. Polarity effects were also observed in the defect band emission with a structured green band associated with deep copper acceptor impurities appearing at lower annealing temperatures on the O-polar face. The loss of hydrogen is implicated in both these behaviors and in a sudden semiconductor-to-insulator transition between 200-300 °C.

  10. Dynamical Piezoelectric and Magnetopiezoelectric Effects in Polar Metals from Berry Phases and Orbital Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varjas, Dániel; Grushin, Adolfo G.; Ilan, Roni; Moore, Joel E.

    2016-12-01

    The polarization of a material and its response to applied electric and magnetic fields are key solid-state properties with a long history in insulators, although a satisfactory theory required new concepts such as Berry-phase gauge fields. In metals, quantities such as static polarization and the magnetoelectric θ term cease to be well defined. In polar metals, there can be analogous dynamical current responses, which we study in a common theoretical framework. We find that current responses to dynamical strain in polar metals depend on both the first and second Chern forms, related to polarization and magnetoelectricity in insulators as well as the orbital magnetization on the Fermi surface. We provide realistic estimates that predict that the latter contribution will dominate, and we investigate the feasibility of experimental detection of this effect.

  11. Measuring X-Ray Polarization in the Presence of Systematic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; ODell, S. L.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a mathematical formalism for determining the 1 and 2 parameter errors in the magnitude and position angle of X ]ray polarization. The formalism includes a treatment of systematic effects, such as background and instrumental bias.

  12. Theoretical investigation of polarization effects in solution: Importance of solvent collective motions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Tateki

    2015-01-22

    Recent theoretical studies on interesting topics related to polarization effects in solutions are presented. As one of interesting topics, ionic liquids (ILs) solvents are focused on. The collective dynamics of electronic polarizability through interionic dynamics and the effect of polarization in ILs, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIm][PF{sub 6}]), are studied with molecular dynamics simulation. Also, the time-dependent polarization effect on the probe betaine dye molecule, pyridinium N-phenoxide, in water is investigated by a time-dependent reference interaction site model self-consistent field (time-dependent RISM-SCF) approach. The importance of considering polarization effects on solution systems related to solvent collective motions is shown.

  13. Theoretical investigation of polarization effects in solution: Importance of solvent collective motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Tateki

    2015-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies on interesting topics related to polarization effects in solutions are presented. As one of interesting topics, ionic liquids (ILs) solvents are focused on. The collective dynamics of electronic polarizability through interionic dynamics and the effect of polarization in ILs, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIm][PF6]), are studied with molecular dynamics simulation. Also, the time-dependent polarization effect on the probe betaine dye molecule, pyridinium N-phenoxide, in water is investigated by a time-dependent reference interaction site model self-consistent field (time-dependent RISM-SCF) approach. The importance of considering polarization effects on solution systems related to solvent collective motions is shown.

  14. Numerical modeling of bi-polar (AC) pulse electroporation of single cell in microchannel to create nanopores on its membrane.

    PubMed

    Movahed, Saeid; Bazargan-Lari, Yousef; Daneshmad, Farhang; Mashhoodi, Mashhood

    2014-12-01

    AC electroporation of a single cell in a microchannel was numerically studied. A 15 μm diameter cell was considered in a microchannel 25 μm in height and the influences of AC electric pulse on its membrane were numerically investigated. The cell was assumed to be suspended between two electroporative electrodes embedded on the walls of a microchannel. An amplitude and a time span of applied electric pulse were chosen to be 80 kV/m and 10 μs, respectively. For different frequency values (50, 100, 200, and 500 kHz), simulations were performed to show how the cell membrane was electroporated and the creation of nanopores. Obtained numerical results show that the most and the largest nanopores are created around poles of cell (nearest points of cell membrane to the electrodes). The numerical simulations also demonstrate that increased frequency will slightly decrease electroporated area of the cell membrane; additionally, growth of the created nanopores will be stabilized. It has also been proven that size and number of the created nanopores will be decreased by moving from the poles to the equator of the cell. There is almost no nanopore created in the vicinity of the equator. Frequency affects the rate of generation of nanopores. In case of AC electroporation, creation of nanopores has two phases that periodically repeat over time. In each period, the pore density sharply increases and then becomes constant. Enhancement of the frequency will result in decrease in time span of the periods. In each period, size of the created nanopores sharply increases and then slightly decreases. However, until the AC electric pulse is present, overall trends of creation and development of nanopores will be ascending. Variation of the size and number of created nanopores can be explained by considering time variation of transmembrane potential (difference of electric potential on two sides of cell membrane) which is clear in the results presented in this study.

  15. Lipid exchange between membranes: effects of membrane surface charge, composition, and curvature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Jiang, Zhongying; Ma, Yuqiang

    2012-09-01

    Intermembrane lipid exchange is critical to membrane functions and pharmaceutical applications. The exchange process is not fully understood and it is explored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitor method in this research. It is found that intermembrane lipid exchange is accelerated with the decrease of vesicle size and the increase of charge and liquid crystalline lipid composition ratio. Vesicle adsorption rate, membrane lateral pressure gradient, and lipid lateral diffusion coefficient are inferred to be critical in deciding the lipid exchange kinetics between membranes. Besides that, the membrane contact situation during lipid exchange is also studied. The maximum total membrane contact area is found to increase with the decrease of vesicle size, charged and liquid crystalline lipid composition ratio. A competition mechanism between the vesicle adsorption rate and the intermembrane lipid exchange rate was proposed to control the maximum total membrane contact area.

  16. Aerosol polarization effects on atmospheric correction and aerosol retrievals in ocean color remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2006-12-10

    The current ocean color data processing system for the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) uses the Rayleigh lookup tables that were generated using the vector radiative transfer theory with inclusion of the polarization effects. The polarization effects, however, are not accounted for in the aerosol lookup tables for the ocean color data processing. I describe a study of the aerosol polarization effects on the atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval algorithms in the ocean color remote sensing. Using an efficient method for the multiple vector radiative transfer computations, aerosol lookup tables that include polarization effects are generated. Simulations have been carried out to evaluate the aerosol polarization effects on the derived ocean color and aerosol products for all possible solar-sensor geometries and the various aerosol optical properties. Furthermore, the new aerosol lookup tables have been implemented in the SeaWiFS data processing system and extensively tested and evaluated with SeaWiFS regional and global measurements. Results show that in open oceans (maritime environment), the aerosol polarization effects on the ocean color and aerosol products are usually negligible, while there are some noticeable effects on the derived products in the coastal regions with nonmaritime aerosols.

  17. Ethanol fermentation integrated with PDMS composite membrane: An effective process.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chaohui; Cai, Di; Hu, Song; Miao, Qi; Wang, Yong; Qin, Peiyong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-01-01

    The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane, prepared in water phase, was investigated in separation ethanol from model ethanol/water mixture and fermentation-pervaporation integrated process. Results showed that the PDMS membrane could effectively separate ethanol from model solution. When integrated with batch ethanol fermentation, the ethanol productivity was enhanced compared with conventional process. Fed-batch and continuous ethanol fermentation with pervaporation were also performed and studied. 396.2-663.7g/m(2)h and 332.4-548.1g/m(2)h of total flux with separation factor of 8.6-11.7 and 8-11.6, were generated in the fed-batch and continuous fermentation with pervaporation scenario, respectively. At the same time, high titre ethanol production of ∼417.2g/L and ∼446.3g/L were also achieved on the permeate side of membrane in the two scenarios, respectively. The integrated process was environmental friendly and energy saving, and has a promising perspective in long-terms operation.

  18. Effect of glucosylceramide on the biophysical properties of fluid membranes.

    PubMed

    Varela, Ana R P; Gonçalves da Silva, Amélia M P S; Fedorov, Alexander; Futerman, Anthony H; Prieto, Manuel; Silva, Liana C

    2013-03-01

    Glucosylceramide (GlcCer), a relevant intermediate in the pathways of glycosphingolipid metabolism, plays key roles in the regulation of cell physiology. The molecular mechanisms by which GlcCer regulates cellular processes are unknown, but might involve changes in membrane biophysical properties and formation of lipid domains. In the present study, fluorescence spectroscopy, confocal microscopy and surface pressure-area (π-A) measurements were used to characterize the effect of GlcCer on the biophysical properties of model membranes. We show that C16:0-GlcCer has a high tendency to segregate into highly ordered gel domains and to increase the order of the fluid phase. Monolayer studies support the aggregation propensity of C16:0-GlcCer. π-A isotherms of single C16:0-GlcCer indicate that bilayer domains, or crystal-like structures, coexist within monolayer domains at the air-water interface. Mixtures with POPC exhibit partial miscibility with expansion of the mean molecular areas relative to the additive behavior of the components. Moreover, C16:0-GlcCer promotes morphological alterations in lipid vesicles leading to formation of flexible tubule-like structures that protrude from the fluid region of the bilayer. These results support the hypothesis that alterations in membrane biophysical properties induced by GlcCer might be involved in its mechanism of action.

  19. Fluorescence study of the membrane effects of aggregated lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Kutsenko, Olga K; Trusova, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P; Lipovaya, Anna S; Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I; Lukyanenko, Lyudmila M; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Vasilev, Aleksey

    2013-11-01

    The last decade has seen unprecedented upsurge of interest in the structural and toxic properties of particular type of protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils, associated with a number of pathological states. In the present study fluorescence spectroscopy technique has been employed to gain further insight into the membrane-related mechanisms of amyloid toxicity. To this end, erythrocyte model system composed of liposomes and hemoglobin was subjected to the action of oligomeric and fibrillar lysozyme. Acrylamide quenching of lysozyme fluorescence showed that solvent accessibility of Trp62 and Trp108 increases upon the protein fibrillization. Resonance energy transfer measurements suggested the possibility of direct complexation between hemoglobin and aggregated lysozyme. Using the novel squaraine dye SQ-1 it was demonstrated that aggregated lysozyme is capable of inhibiting lipid peroxidation processes. Fluorescent probes pyrene, Prodan and diphenylhexatriene were employed to characterize the membrane-modifying properties of hemoglobin and lysozyme. Both oligomeric and fibrillar forms of lysozyme were found to exert condensing influence on lipid bilayer structure, with the membrane effects of fibrils being less amenable to modulation by hemoglobin.

  20. Effect of intrinsic point defects on ferroelectric polarization behavior of SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyukin, Konstantin; Alexandrov, Vitaly

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a variety of intrinsic defects and defect clusters in bulk and thin films of SrTiO3 on ferroelectric polarization and switching mechanisms is investigated by means of density-functional-theory based calculations and the Berry phase approach. Our results show that both the titanium TiSr•• and strontium SrTi'' antisite defects induce ferroelectric polarization in SrTiO3, with the TiSr•• defect causing a more pronounced spontaneous polarization and higher activation barriers of polarization reversal than SrTi''. The presence of oxygen vacancies bound to the antisite defects can either enhance or diminish polarization depending on the configuration of the defect pair, but it always leads to larger activation barriers of polarization switching as compared to the antisite defects with no oxygen vacancies. We also show that the magnitude of spontaneous polarization in SrTiO3 can be tuned by controlling the degree of Sr/Ti nonstroichiometry. Other intrinsic point defects such as Frenkel defect pairs and electron small polarons also contribute to the emergence of ferroelectric polarization in SrTiO3.

  1. Protein expression of Fatty acid transporter 2 is polarized to the trophoblast basal plasma membrane and increased in placentas from overweight/obese women

    PubMed Central

    Lager, Susanne; Ramirez, Vanessa I.; Gaccioli, Francesca; Jang, Brian; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obese and overweight women are more likely to deliver a large infant or an infant with increased adiposity, however the underlying mechanisms are not well established. We tested the hypothesis that placental capacity to transport fatty acid is increased in overweight/obese women. Methods Fifty-seven pregnant women with body mass index (BMI) ranging from 18.4 to 54.3 kg/m2 and with uncomplicated term pregnancies were recruited for collection of blood samples and placental tissue. Maternal and fetal levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) were measured in plasma. The expression and localization of CD36/fatty acid translocase (FAT), fatty acid transport protein (FATP)2, and FATP4 was determined in fixed placental tissue and in isolated syncytiotrophoblast plasma membranes from normal and high BMI mothers. Results Maternal and fetal plasma NEFA levels did not correlate (n=42). FATP2 and FATP4 expressions were approximately four-fold higher in the basal plasma membrane (BPM) compared to the microvillous membrane (P<0.001; n=7) per unit membrane protein. BPM expression of FATP2 correlated with maternal BMI (P<0.01; n=30); there was no association between CD36/FAT or FATP4 expression and maternal BMI. Conclusion The polarization of FATPs to the BPM will facilitate fatty acid transfer across the placenta. In overweight/obese pregnancies, the increased FATP2 expression could contribute to increased fatty acid delivery to the fetus and while we have no direct data we speculate that this could lead accelerated fetal growth or increased fat deposition. PMID:27016784

  2. Asymmetry distributions and mass effects in dijet events at a polarized HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maul, M.; Schäfer, A.; Mirkes, E.; Rädel, G.

    1998-09-01

    The asymmetry distributions for several kinematic variables are considered for finding a systematic way to maximize the signal for the extraction of the polarized gluon density. The relevance of mass effects for the corresponding dijet cross section is discussed and the different approximations for including mass effects are compared. We also compare via the programs Pepsi and Mepjet two different Monte Carlo (MC) approaches for simulating the expected signal in the dijet asymmetry at a polarized HERA.

  3. Chemopreventive effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the membrane lipid composition and fluidity parameters of the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Shailender Singh; Vaiphei, Kim; Nehru, Bimla; Sanyal, Sankar N

    2007-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, celecoxib, and etoricoxib are reported to act as chemopreventive agents in experimental colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) as they are known cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme inhibitors. To determine whether NSAIDs can also effectively modulate the membrane lipid compositions and the fluidity parameters of colonic brush border membrane, rats were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with DMH 30 mg/kg body weight per week for 6 weeks. The animals were simultaneously treated with NSAIDs orally at the dose of aspirin, 60 mg/kg body weight; celecoxib, 6 mg/kg body weight; and etoricoxib, 0.6 mg/kg body weight. The animals were sacrificed after 6 weeks of treatments. Brush border membrane was isolated from proximal and distal portions of the colon. Membrane lipids were extracted and analyzed while the fluidity parameters were assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization technique using the membrane extrinsic fluorophore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). The translational diffusion was measured by using the excimer formation of pyrene incorporated in the membrane. Colonic mucosal changes in DMH alone and DMH+NSAID treated animals were assessed histologically. The results demonstrate that (a) there is a distinct occurrence of premalignant alterations in DMH-induced colon in the form of multiple plaque lesions (MPLs), which were greatly reduced by the NSAIDs used, (b) the membrane lipid changes in DMH-induced colon were completely restored back, (c) the alterations in membrane fluorescence polarization and the fluidity parameters are partially recovered, particularly with etoricoxib, and (d) the pyrene excimer formation process was completely restored. It may be concluded that the NSAIDs, particularly the coxib group of the drugs (COX-2 selective), are effective in chemoprevention in the DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis and membrane alterations.

  4. Theory of topological insulator waveguides: polarization control and the enhancement of the magneto-electric effect

    PubMed Central

    Crosse, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Topological insulators subject to a time-reversal-symmetry-breaking perturbation are predicted to display a magneto-electric effect that causes the electric and magnetic induction fields to mix at the material’s surface. This effect induces polarization rotations of between ≈1–10 mrad per interface in an incident plane-polarized electromagnetic wave normal to a multilayered structure. Here we show, theoretically and numerically, that by using a waveguide geometry with a topological insulator guide layer and magneto-dielectric cladding it is possible to achieve rotations of ≈100 mrad and generate an elliptical polarization with only a three-layered structure. This geometry is beneficial, not only as a way to enhance the magneto-electric effect, rendering it easier to observe, but also as a method for controlling the polarization of electromagnetic radiation. PMID:28220875

  5. Theory of topological insulator waveguides: polarization control and the enhancement of the magneto-electric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosse, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    Topological insulators subject to a time-reversal-symmetry-breaking perturbation are predicted to display a magneto-electric effect that causes the electric and magnetic induction fields to mix at the material’s surface. This effect induces polarization rotations of between ≈1–10 mrad per interface in an incident plane-polarized electromagnetic wave normal to a multilayered structure. Here we show, theoretically and numerically, that by using a waveguide geometry with a topological insulator guide layer and magneto-dielectric cladding it is possible to achieve rotations of ≈100 mrad and generate an elliptical polarization with only a three-layered structure. This geometry is beneficial, not only as a way to enhance the magneto-electric effect, rendering it easier to observe, but also as a method for controlling the polarization of electromagnetic radiation.

  6. Polarization memory effect in optical coherence tomography and dental imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yueli; Otis, Linda; Zhu, Quing

    2011-08-01

    We report the existence of polarization memory effect (PME) in optical coherence tomography and investigate its potential applications in dental imaging. We performed the study in three steps. First, microsphere scattering phantoms of different sizes were imaged in order to validate experimental results with PME theory. Both linearly and circularly polarized light were used to probe the samples. Second, healthy tooth samples were scanned and polarization memory effect was identified in dentin. In this step, specific verification and signal processing were performed to rule out possible image interpretation by birefringence effect. Third, we evaluated dentin demineralization with PME. Results show polarization memory can be useful to characterize this dynamic mineralization process for early caries detection and rehabilitation.

  7. Effect of membrane characteristics on the performance of membrane bioreactors for oily wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Mafirad, S; Mehrnia, M R; Sarrafzadeh, M H

    2011-01-01

    Influence of membrane material and pore size on the performance of a submerged membrane bioreactor (sMBR) for oily wastewater treatment was investigated. The sMBR had a working volume of about 19 L with flat sheet modules at the same hydrodynamic conditions. Five types of micro- and ultra-polymeric membranes containing cellulose acetate (CA), cellulose nitrate (CN), polyamide (PA), polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) and polyethersulfone (PES) were used and their filtration performance in terms of permeability, permeate quality and fouling intensity were evaluated. Characterization of the membranes was done by performing some analysis such as pore size distribution; contact angle and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) microphotograph on all membranes. The quality of permeates from each membrane was identified by measuring chemical oxygen demand (COD). The results showed more irreversible fouling intensity for membranes with larger pore size which can be due to more permeation of bioparticles and colloids inside the pores. Membrane characteristics have a major role in the preliminary time of the filtration before cake layer formation so that the PA with the highest hydrophilicity had the lowest permeability decline by fouling in this period. Also, the PVDF and PES membranes had better performance according to better permeate quality in the preliminary time of the filtration related to smaller pore size and also their better fouling resistance and chemical stability properties. However, all membranes resulted in the same permeability and permeate quality after cake layer formation. An overall efficiency of about 95% in COD removal was obtained for oily wastewater treatment by the membranes used in this study.

  8. Effects of oxygen vacancies on polarization stability of barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Shen, YaoGen; Song, Fan; Ke, FuJiu; Bai, YiLong; Lu, ChunSheng

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen vacancy, a kind of native point defects in ferroelectric ceramics, usually causes an increase of the dielectric loss. Based on experimental observations, it is believed that all of the oxygen vacancies are an unfavorable factor for energy saving. By using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the increase of coercive and saturated electric fields is due to the difficulty to switch local polarization near an oxygen vacancy, and so that a ferroelectric device has to sustain the rising consumption of energy. The simulation results also uncover how oxygen vacancies influence ferroelectric properties.

  9. Effect of poly(ethylene glycol) on phospholipid hydration and polarity of the external phase.

    PubMed

    Arnold, K; Pratsch, L; Gawrisch, K

    1983-02-09

    The hydration properties of phosphatidylcholine (PC)/water dispersions on the addition of poly(ethylene glycol) were studied by means of 2H-NMR. The quadrupole splittings and their temperature dependences correspond to measurements of PC/water dispersions at low water content. It is concluded that the bound water is partly extracted by poly(ethylene glycol) but the binding properties of the water in the inner hydration shell of about five water molecules are not changed. The ability of some phospholipid/water dispersions to undergo phase transitions to nonlamellar structures upon dehydration is discussed. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and egg phosphatidylcholine do not form nonlamellar structures on addition of purified poly(ethylene glycol), as was demonstrated by means of 31P-NMR. Poly(ethylene glycol) decreases the polarity of the aqueous phase and the partition of hydrophobic molecules between the membrane and the external phase is changed. This was demonstrated using the excimer fluorescence of pyrene in a ghost suspension. It is suggested that the changes in polarity and hydration on the addition of poly(ethylene glycol) can contribute to the alterations in the membrane surface observed under conditions of membrane contact and fusion.

  10. The interactions of squalene, alkanes and other mineral oils with model membranes; effects on membrane heterogeneity and function.

    PubMed

    Richens, Joanna L; Lane, Jordan S; Mather, Melissa L; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) offer many favourable facets as an artificial membrane system but the influence of any residual oil that remains in the bilayer following preparation is ill-defined. In this study the fluorescent membrane probes di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (Di-8-ANEPPS) and Fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE) were used to help understand the nature of the phospholipid-oil interaction and to examine any structural and functional consequences of such interactions on membrane bilayer properties. Concentration-dependent modifications of the membrane dipole potential were found to occur in phospholipid vesicles exposed to a variety of different oils. Incorporation of oil into the lipid bilayer was shown to have no significant effect on the movement of fatty acids across the lipid bilayer. Changes in membrane heterogeneity were, however, demonstrated with increased microdomain formation being visible in the bilayer following exposure to mineral oil, pentadecane and squalene. As it is important that artificial systems provide an accurate representation of the membrane environment, careful consideration should be taken prior to the application of DIBs in studies of membrane structure and organisation.

  11. The effect of organic loading on bacterial community composition of membrane biofilms in a submerged polyvinyl chloride membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Xia, Siqing; Li, Jixiang; He, Shuying; Xie, Kang; Wang, Xiaojia; Zhang, Yanhao; Duan, Liang; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2010-09-01

    The effect of organic loading on bacterial community composition of membrane biofilms was investigated using a submerged polyvinyl chloride membrane bioreactor. The low and high loadings were set at 0.33 and 0.52 gCOD/(gVSSd), respectively. The results showed that membrane fouling occurred earlier and faster under the high loading conditions. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed that the similarity of bacterial community in the membrane biofilms between the two loadings was 0.67, higher than that in the mixed liquors (0.52-0.55), which indicated that some specific bacteria were selected preferentially on the membranes. Clone library analysis of the membrane biofilms indicated that Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes under the high loading were 54.72% and 19.81%, respectively. Microarray results further confirmed that the two bacteria were the dominant microorganisms in the high loading biofilm. The severe membrane fouling may be aroused mainly by the enrichment of the two bacteria under the high loading.

  12. Polarized Range-Extended X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oriented Photosystem II Membranes in the S[subscript 1] State

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkar, Yulia; Yano, Junko; Glatzel, Pieter; Messinger, Johannes; Lewis, Azul; Sauer, Kenneth; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-11-13

    Detailed information about the orientation of particular Mn-Mn and Mn-Ca vectors in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of the Photosystem II in the S1 state provide a critical starting point for the analysis of the structural changes in the OEC along the catalytic S{sub i}-state cycle. The method of polarized range-extended EXAFS is an important technical development, that allows: (i) resolution of the 2.7 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} Mn-Mn interactions; (ii) resolution of 3.2 {angstrom} Mn-Mn and 3.4 {angstrom} Mn-Ca; (iii) determination of 2.7 {angstrom}, 2.8 {angstrom}, 3.2 {angstrom} Mn-Mn and 3.4 {angstrom} Mn-Ca vectors orientation relative to the membrane normal.

  13. Effects of polar and nonpolar groups on the solubility of organic compounds in soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Vapor sorption capacities on a high-organic-content peat, a model for soil organic matter (SOM), were determined at room temperature for the following liquids: n-hexane, 1,4-dioxane, nitroethane, acetone, acetonitrile, 1-propanol, ethanol, and methanol. The linear organic vapor sorption is in keeping with the dominance of vapor partition in peat SOM. These data and similar results of carbon tetrachloride (CT), trichloroethylene (TCE), benzene, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME), and water on the same peat from earlier studies are used to evaluate the effect of polarity on the vapor partition in SOM. The extrapolated liquid solubility from the vapor isotherm increases sharply from 3-6 wt % for low-polarity liquids (hexane, CT, and benzene) to 62 wt % for polar methanol and correlates positively with the liquid's component solubility parameters for polar interaction (??P) and hydrogen bonding (??h). The same polarity effect may be expected to influence the relative solubilities of a variety of contaminants in SOM and, therefore, the relative deviations between the SOM-water partition coefficients (Kom) and corresponding octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow) for different classes of compounds. The large solubility disparity in SOM between polar and nonpolar solutes suggests that the accurate prediction of Kom from Kow or Sw (solute water solubility) would be limited to compounds of similar polarity.

  14. Effect of BCD Plasma on a Bacteria Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrin, Navabsafa; Hamid, Ghomi; Maryam, Nikkhah; Soheila, Mohades; Hossein, Dabiri; Saeed, Ghasemi

    2013-07-01

    Abstract Cell membrane rupture is considered to be one of the probable mechanisms for bacterial inactivation using barrier corona discharge (BCD) plasma. In this paper, the effect of the BCD plasma on the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria cell wall was investigated through two analytical methods; Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) assay and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The ATP assay results indicate an increase in the ATP content of samples which were exposed to the BCD plasma. This implies the bacteria cell rupture. Moreover, AFM images confirm a serious damage of the bacteria cell wall under the influence of the bactericidal agents of the plasma.

  15. Magnetic Field Disorder and Faraday Effects on the Polarization of Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamee, Mehdi; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnes, Jamie S.; Carretti, Ettore; Gaensler, B. M.; Haverkorn, Marijke; Poppi, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    We present a polarization catalog of 533 extragalactic radio sources that have a 2.3 GHz total intensity above 420 mJy from the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey, S-PASS, with corresponding 1.4 GHz polarization information from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, NVSS. We studied the selection effects and found that fractional polarization, π, of radio objects at both wavelengths depends on the spectral index, the source magnetic field disorder, the source size, and depolarization. The relationship between depolarization, spectrum, and size shows that depolarization occurs primarily in the source vicinity. The median {π }2.3 of resolved objects in NVSS is approximately two times larger than that of unresolved sources. Sources with little depolarization are ∼2 times more polarized than both highly depolarized and re-polarized sources. This indicates that intrinsic magnetic field disorder is the dominant mechanism responsible for the observed low fractional polarization of radio sources at high frequencies. We predict that number counts from polarization surveys will be similar at 1.4 GHz and at 2.3 GHz, for fixed sensitivity, although ∼10% of all sources may currently be missing because of strong depolarization. Objects with {π }1.4≈ {π }2.3≥slant 4 % typically have simple Faraday structures, so they are most useful for background samples. Almost half of flat-spectrum (α ≥slant -0.5) and ∼25% of steep-spectrum objects are re-polarized. Steep-spectrum, depolarized sources show a weak negative correlation of depolarization with redshift in the range 0 < z < 2.3. Previous non-detections of redshift evolution are likely due the inclusion of re-polarized sources as well.

  16. The Excitable Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Offner, Franklin F.

    1972-01-01

    The model of the excitable membrane assumes common channels for Na+ and K+; the two ion species interact within the pores through their electrostatic forces. The electric field varies across the membrane and with time, as a result of ionic redistribution. Ionic flow is primarily controlled by energy barriers at the two interfaces and by Ca++ adsorption at the external interface. When the membrane is polarized, the high electric field at the external interface acting on the membrane fixed charge keeps the effective channel diameter small, so that only dihydrated ions can cross the interface. The higher energy required to partially dehydrate Na+ accounts for its lower permeability when polarized. Depolarized, the channel entrance can expand, permitting quadrihydrated ions to pass; the large initial Na+ flow is the result of the large concentration ratio across the interface. The effect at the internal interface is symmetric; Na+ crosses with greater difficulty when the membrane is depolarized. Na+ inactivation occurs when the ion distribution within the membrane has assumed its new steady-state value. Calculations based on parameters consistent with physicochemical data agree generally with a wide range of experiments. The model does not obey the two fundamental Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) postulates (independence principle, ion flow proportional to thermodynamic potential). In several instances the model predicts experimental results which are not predicted by the HH equations. ImagesFIGURE 12 PMID:4655662

  17. Selective effect of cell membrane on synaptic neurotransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postila, Pekka A.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed with 13 non-peptidic neurotransmitters (NTs) in three different membrane environments. The results provide compelling evidence that NTs are divided into membrane-binding and membrane-nonbinding molecules. NTs adhere to the postsynaptic membrane surface whenever the ligand-binding sites of their synaptic receptors are buried in the lipid bilayer. In contrast, NTs that have extracellular ligand-binding sites do not have a similar tendency to adhere to the membrane surface. This finding is a seemingly simple yet important addition to the paradigm of neurotransmission, essentially dividing it into membrane-independent and membrane-dependent mechanisms. Moreover, the simulations also indicate that the lipid composition especially in terms of charged lipids can affect the membrane partitioning of NTs. The revised paradigm, highlighting the importance of cell membrane and specific lipids for neurotransmission, should to be of interest to neuroscientists, drug industry and the general public alike.

  18. The Influence of Local Geometric Effects on Mars Polar Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    Using simple, qualitative heat balance models, this paper addresses textures and structures that will result from the evolution of volatile layers by accretion and by ablation. Such phenomena may have global implications that are not apparent when only flat or sloped surfaces are modeled. In general, structures such as mounds or depressions formed out of volatile materials will evolve in shape such that the growth or retreat of any particular surface will be maximized. It can be shown that the local radius of curvature is proportional to the growth or retreat rate. For example, icy surfaces will tend to form facets that face the dominant sun direction. Two such cases are evaluated: a) Features associated with condensation of volatiles, include cold-trapping and redistribution, such as the concentration of frost around the Viking 2 lander [1]. Here I will focus on textures that likely result from the formation of seasonal CO2 deposits. b) Features associated with sublimation of volatiles, such as those described by Ingersoll et. al. [2] result in textured surfaces that affect both the apparent emissivity and albedo. Similar calculations have been performed with respect to the "Swiss cheese" features on the South Polar Cap [3]. Here, I evaluate the likely sublimation rates from optimal ice scarp structures and their implications for the long-term evolution of the polar caps and formation of layered terrain.

  19. Human milk fat globules: polar lipid composition and in situ structural investigations revealing the heterogeneous distribution of proteins and the lateral segregation of sphingomyelin in the biological membrane.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christelle; Ménard, Olivia

    2011-03-01

    Although human milk fat globules (MFG) are of primary importance since they are the exclusive lipid delivery carriers in the gastrointestinal tract of breast-fed infants, they remain the poorly understood aspect of milk. The objectives of this study were to investigate these unique colloidal assemblies and their interfacial properties, i.e. composition and structure of their biological membrane. In mature breast milk, MFG have a mean diameter of 4-5 microm, a surface area of about 2m(2)/g fat and an apparent zeta potential ζ=-6.7 ± 0.5 mV at 37°C. Human MFG contain 3-4mg polar lipids/g fat as quantified by HPLC/ELSD. The main polar lipids are sphingomyelin (SM; 36-45%, w/w), phosphatidylcholine (19-23%, w/w) and phosphatidylethanolamine (10-15%, w/w). In situ structural investigations of human MFG have been performed using light and confocal microscopy with adapted fluorescent probes, i.e. Nile Red, the extrinsic phospholipid Rh-DOPE, Fast Green and the lectin WGA-488. This study revealed a spatial heterogeneity in the human milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), with the lateral segregation of SM in liquid-ordered phase domains of various shapes and sizes surrounded by a liquid-disordered phase composed of the glycerophospholipids in which the proteins are dispersed. The glycocalyx formed by glycoproteins and cytoplasmic remnents have also been characterised around human MFG. A new model for the structure of the human MFGM is proposed and discussed. The unique composition and lateral organisation of the human MFGM components could be of metabolic significance and have health impact for the infants that need to be further explored.

  20. Polarizing Ytterbium-Doped all-Solid Photonic Bandgap Fiber with 1150 micrometers2 Effective Mode Area

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-11

    0704-0188 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) - UU UU UU UU Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Polarizing ytterbium- doped all-solid...photonic bandgap fiber with ~1150µm2 effective mode area We demonstrate an Yb- doped polarizing all-solid photonic bandgap fiber for single-polarization... doped all-solid photonic bandgap fiber with ~1150µm2 effective mode area Report Title We demonstrate an Yb- doped polarizing all-solid photonic bandgap

  1. Effects of dissolved organic matters (DOMs) on membrane fouling in anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactors (AnCMBRs) treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaodi; Koh, Yoong Keat Kelvin; Ng, How Yong

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) have been regarded as a potential solution to achieve energy neutrality in the future wastewater treatment plants. Coupling ceramic membranes into AnMBRs offers great potential as ceramic membranes are resistant to corrosive chemicals such as cleaning reagents and harsh environmental conditions such as high temperature. In this study, ceramic membranes with pore sizes of 80, 200 and 300 nm were individually mounted in three anaerobic ceramic membrane bioreactors (AnCMBRs) treating real domestic wastewater to examine the treatment efficiencies and to elucidate the effects of dissolved organic matters (DOMs) on fouling behaviours. The average overall chemical oxygen demands (COD) removal efficiencies could reach around 86-88%. Although CH4 productions were around 0.3 L/g CODutilised, about 67% of CH4 generated was dissolved in the liquid phase and lost in the permeate. When filtering mixed liquor of similar properties, smaller pore-sized membranes fouled slower in long-term operations due to lower occurrence of pore blockages. However, total organic removal efficiencies could not explain the fouling behaviours. Liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection, fluorescence spectrophotometer and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence and ultra-violet detectors were used to analyse the DOMs in detail. The major foulants were identified to be biopolymers that were produced in microbial activities. One of the main components of biopolymers--proteins--led to different fouling behaviours. It is postulated that the proteins could pass through porous cake layers to create pore blockages in membranes. Hence, concentrations of the DOMs in the soluble fraction of mixed liquor (SML) could not predict membrane fouling because different components in the DOMs might have different interactions with membranes.

  2. Polarization induced resistance switching effect in ferroelectric vinylidene-fluoride/trifluoroethylene copolymer ultrathin films

    SciTech Connect

    Usui, S. Nakajima, T.; Hashizume, Y.; Okamura, S.

    2014-10-20

    We observed a clear polarization reversal-induced resistance switching effect in ferroelectric Vinylidene-fluoride (VDF)/Trifluoroethylene (TrFE) copolymer thin films. Pt and Au were used as the bottom and top electrodes, respectively, and the thickness of the VDF/TrFE copolymer film was adjusted to be 10 nm. The conduction current was 100 times higher in the case of the spontaneous polarization of the VDF/TrFE film towards the Au electrode than that in the case of the opposite direction. This resistance switching was confirmed to be reproducible after 10 successive polarization reversals.

  3. Search for effect of longitudinally polarized protons on optically active amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemmon, R. M.; Conzett, H. E.; Bonner, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of irradiation by longitudinally polarized protons on the differential decomposition of amino acid is investigated in a test of the Vester Ulbricht hypothesis that L-amino acids were produced in preference to the D isomers on the primitive earth due to the effects of parity violation in beta decay. Samples of DL-leucine were irradiated with protons of both positive and negative longitudinal polarization, then analyzed by gas chromatography. Despite advantages of higher polarization, lower velocity and higher ionization density of protons with respect to electrons, proton irradation is found to lead to no detectable asymmetries in DL-leucine degradation, even at 50% gross degradation.

  4. The polarized Debye sheath effect on Kadomtsev-Petviashvili electrostatic structures in strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Alinejad, H.

    2015-04-15

    We give a theoretical investigation on the dynamics of nonlinear electrostatic waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with strong electrostatic interaction between dust grains in the presence of the polarization force (i.e., the force due to the polarized Debye sheath). Adopting a reductive perturbation method, we derived a three-dimensional Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation that describes the evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic localized waves. The energy integral equation is used to study the existence domains of the localized structures. The analysis provides the localized structure existence region, in terms of the effects of strong interaction between the dust particles and polarization force.

  5. Irradiation effect of polarization direction and intensity of semiconductor laser on injured peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo-Xin, Xiong; Lei-lei, Xiong

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the irradiation effect of polarization direction and the intensity of a semiconductor laser on the injured peripheral nerve in rabbits, the model of the injured common peroneal nerve was established, the L5,6 spinal segments of the rabbits were irradiated, a uniform rotating polarizer was placed at the laser output which made the polarization direction and intensity of the output laser change according to the 80 Hz cosine law. The experimental results show that irradiating the spinal segment of injured nerves in rabbits with this changeable semiconductor laser can significantly promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves and the function recovery.

  6. Analysis of the multipactor effect in circular waveguides excited by two orthogonal polarization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, A. M.; Boria, V. E.

    2014-08-15

    Circular waveguides, either employed as resonant cavities or as irises connecting adjacent guides, are widely present in many passive components used in different applications (i.e., particle accelerators and satellite subsystems). In this paper, we present the study of the multipactor effect in circular waveguides considering the coexistence of the two polarizations of the fundamental TE{sub 11} circular waveguide mode. For a better understanding of the problem, only low multipactor orders have been explored as a function of the polarization ellipse eccentricity. Special attention has been paid to the linear and circular polarizations, but other more general configurations have also been explored.

  7. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi

    1986-01-01

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  8. Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, S.

    1986-08-19

    The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

  9. Effects of cholesterol concentration on the interaction of cytarabine with lipid membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Karami, Leila; Jalili, Seifollah

    2015-01-01

    Liposomal cytarabine, DepoCyt, is a chemotherapy agent which is used in cancer treatment. This form of cytarabine has more efficacy and fewer side effects relative to the other forms. Since DepoCyt contains the cytarabine encapsulated within phosphatidylcholine and the sterol molecules, we modeled dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)/cholesterol bilayer membrane as a carrier for cytarabine to study drug-bilayer interactions. For this purpose, we performed a series of united-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for 25 ns to investigate the interactions between cytarabine and cholesterol-containing DOPC lipid bilayers. Only the uncharged form of cytarabine molecule was investigated. In this study, different levels of the cholesterol content (0, 20, and 40%) were used. MD simulations allowed us to determine dynamical and structural properties of the bilayer membrane and to estimate the preferred location and orientation of the cytarabine molecule inside the bilayer membrane. Properties such as membrane thickness, area per lipid, diffusion coefficient, mass density, bilayer packing, order parameters, and intermolecular interactions were examined. The results show that by increasing the cholesterol concentration in the lipid bilayers, the bilayer thickness increases and area per lipid decreases. Moreover, in accordance with the experiments, our calculations show that cholesterol molecules have ordering effect on the hydrocarbon acyl chains. Furthermore, the cytarabine molecule preferentially occupies the polar region of the lipid head groups to form specific interactions (hydrogen bonds). Our results fully support the experimental data. Our finding about drug-bilayer interaction is crucial for the liposomal drug design.

  10. Effects of tricyclic compounds on membrane binding of bivalent cations, activities of acetylcholinesterase and some tissue proteases.

    PubMed

    Molnar, J; Sohar, I; Kovacs, J; Rakonczay, Z; Rausch, H

    1993-01-01

    A tricyclic compound tetrahydroaminoacridine is known to improve the cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease. The possible mechanism of action of acridine and structurally related tricyclic compounds was studied on the bivalent cation content of bacterial membrane, rat brain acetylcholinesterase and some tissue proteases in model experiments. Acridine orange and disubstituted chlorpromazine (CPZ) derivatives lowered Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding and membrane polarization in the simplest biological membrane (E. coli), as revealed by reactor neutron activation analysis. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was inhibited by CPZ, 3,7,8-trihydroxy-CPZ, acridine orange partially saturated desipramine, imipramine, trans-clopenthixol and tetrahydrocannabidiolic at 10(-4) to 10(-5). A metalloproteinase, MMP-7-ase, was inhibited by tetrahydrocannabidiolic acid, 3,7,8-trihydroxy-CPZ, acridine orange but other tissue proteinases, ATN-ase and cathepsin B, were less sensitive to these compounds. (ATN-ase is an acetyltyrosine-p-nitroanilide splitting enzyme, a serine protease). The chelate complex forming ability and electron donor capacity of the compounds may play a role in the biological effects tested. It is assumed that compounds which do not displace bivalent cations in membranes may exert an inhibitory effect on AChE, and that metalloproteinase enzymes may be promising for the treatment of degenerative brain diseases.

  11. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves with polarization force effects in Kappa distribution plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Zhou, Suyun; Luo, Rongxiang; Liu, Sanqiu

    2017-01-01

    The propagation characteristics of dust acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) in dusty plasmas with the effects of polarization force and superthermal ions are studied. First, the polarization force induced by superthermal ions is obtained. It is shown that the superthermality of background ions affect the Debye screening of dust grains as well as the polarization force significantly. Then for small amplitude solitary waves, the KdV equation is obtained by applying the reductive perturbation technique. And for the arbitrary amplitude solitary waves, the Sagdeev potential method is employed and the Sagdeev potential is analyzed. In both case, the effects of the polarization force associated the ions’ superthermality on the characteristic of the DASWs are analyzed.

  12. Evidence for anomalous optical transition radiation linear polarization effects in beam-profile monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Johnson, A. S.; Ruan, J.; Thurman-Keup, R. M.; Yao, C.-Y.; Evtushenko, P.

    2013-10-01

    Investigations of the effects of optical transition radiation (OTR) polarization components on beam profiles are presented. The transverse profiles are examined using the OTR perpendicular and parallel polarization components with respect to the dimension of interest. We observed ˜15% projected profile size reductions with the perpendicularly polarized components on a 65-μm beam image size case at 14 MeV, a 150-μm beam image size at 4.5 GeV, and a 1100-μm beam image size at 7 GeV. These effects are all several times larger than expected (and anomalous in this sense) when compared to the standard OTR point-spread function calculations. We propose the time-averaged induced-current distribution which generates the OTR represents the actual beam size more faithfully with the perpendicular polarization component and recommend its routine use and subsequent deconvolution.

  13. Simulation of sub-wavelength 3D photomask induced polarization effect by RCWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liang; Li, Yanqiu; Liu, Lihui; Wang, Jianfeng

    2012-10-01

    In 45nm technology node and beyond with hyper NA and Off-axis Illumination (OAI) lithography, mask induced polarization effect is remarkable. At this scale, traditional Kirchhoff approximation, in which the masks are considered to be infinitely thin objects, is no longer valid. Rigorous three-dimensional (3D) mask model is required for precise evaluation of mask diffraction. In this paper, a general 3D mask model based on the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) is presented, and the change of polarization state as a function of mask and incident light properties is evaluated. The masks considered are the binary chrome mask and 10% Si-Si3N4 attenuated phase shifting mask. The results show that the mask induced polarization effects depend on the mask and incident light properties, such as mask material, absorber thickness, mask pitch, feature size, the polarization and incident angle of the light.

  14. Combined effect of wavelength and polarization in double-pass retinal images in the human eye.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Juan M; Pérez, Guillermo M

    2010-11-23

    A polychromatic double-pass setup was developed to study the effects of wavelength and polarization on retinal image quality. The results show that the central part of the images was similar for all wavelengths (543, 633 and 780 nm) and polarization states. However, the image tails increased significantly when using infrared light for all the polarization states used. For the set of subjects involved in the study, ocular diattenuation presented individual differences, however significant changes were not found across the different wavelengths. Moreover the Stokes vectors providing the maximum intensity transmittance varied across subjects and corresponded to elliptically polarized light. These non-negligible diattenuation effects might affect the performance of clinical devices which only take into account ocular birefringence.

  15. Comparative study of nuclear effects in polarized electron scattering from 3 He

    DOE PAGES

    Ethier, J. J.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2013-11-01

    We present a detailed analysis of nuclear effects in inclusive electron scattering from polarized 3He nuclei for polarization asymmetries, structure functions and their moments, both in the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions. We compare the results of calculations within the weak binding approximation at finite Q2 with the effective polarization ansatz often used in experimental data analyses, and explore the impact of Δ components in the nuclear wave function and nucleon off-shell corrections on extractions of the free neutron structure. Using the same framework we also make predictions for the Q2 dependence of quasielastic scattering from polarized 3He, data onmore » which can be used to constrain the spin-dependent nuclear smearing functions in 3He.« less

  16. Modeling and analysis of polarization effects in Fourier domain mode-locked lasers.

    PubMed

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-05-15

    We develop a theoretical model for Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers in a non-polarization-maintaining configuration, which is the most widely used type of FDML source. This theoretical approach is applied to analyze a widely wavelength-swept FDML setup, as used for picosecond pulse generation by temporal compression of the sweeps. We demonstrate that good agreement between simulation and experiment can only be obtained by including polarization effects due to fiber bending birefringence, polarization mode dispersion, and cross-phase modulation into the theoretical model. Notably, the polarization dynamics are shown to have a beneficial effect on the instantaneous linewidth, resulting in improved coherence and thus compressibility of the wavelength-swept FDML output.

  17. Polarization effects of unconsolidated sulphide-sand-mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupfer, Sarah; Martin, Tina; Weller, Andreas; Günther, Thomas; Kuhn, Kerstin; Djotsa Nguimeya Ngninjio, Victorien; Noell, Ursula

    2016-12-01

    Due to the increasing demand for some metals the investigation of abandoned mine waste dumps for the potential reuse of ore mining residues becomes more important. This study examines the suitability of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) method to distinguish different ores in the mine dumps and evaluate the deposited amounts. We investigated SIP characteristics of four sulphides: pyrite (FeS 2), chalcopyrite (CuFeS2), galena (PbS) and sphalerite (ZnS). Laboratory measurements on fully saturated synthetic ore-sand-mixtures (FeS 2, PbS, ZnS) with three different grain radii (between 31 μm and 500 μm), three different ore concentrations (0.5 vol.-%, 2 vol.-%, 6 vol.-%) and with different electrical conductivities of the pore fluid (between 25 mS/m and 400 mS/m, sodium chloride) for pyrite- and chalcopyrite-sand mixtures have been carried out. A new four-point sample holder for precise and reproducible measurements of the unconsolidated mineral-sand mixtures has been developed. The measurements were done at constant temperature of 20∘ C within a frequency range from 1 mHz to 45 kHz using a high-accuracy impedance spectrometer. Several trends for the induced polarization signature have been observed. First, the polarization signal increases with higher ore mineral content. Second, both phase amplitude and peak frequency increase with decreasing grain radius. Third, the frequency of the phase maximum is shifted to higher values for increasing fluid conductivity. Fourth, all ores showed similar phase characteristics, solely sphalerite indicated lower phase magnitude. By fitting the IP spectra on basis of a Cole-Cole model, the parameters chargeability (m) and time constant (τ) have been derived. The following relations were confirmed: 1) chargeability rises with increasing ore mineral concentration. 2) The time constant increases with increasing grain radius. Ore-specific quantities are determined by these relations. The results show that conclusions about the

  18. Electronic simulation of the supported liquid membrane in electromembrane extraction systems: Improvement of the extraction by precise periodical reversing of the field polarity.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Hamid Reza; Nojavan, Saeed; Zahedi, Pegah; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny

    2014-09-02

    In order to understand the limitations of electromebrane extraction procedure better, a simple equivalent circuit has been proposed for a supported liquid membrane consisting of a resistor and a low leakage capacitor in series. To verify the equivalent circuit, it was subjected to a simulated periodical polarity changing potential and the resulting time variation of the current was compared with that of a real electromembrane extraction system. The results showed a good agreement between the simulated current patterns and those of the real ones. In order to investigate the impact of various limiting factors, the corresponding values of the equivalent circuit were estimated for a real electromembrane extraction system and were attributed to the physical parameters of the extraction system. A dual charge transfer mechanism was proposed for electromembrane extraction by combining general migration equation and fundamental aspects derived from the simulation. Dual mechanism comprises a current dependent contribution of analyte in total current and could support the possibility of an improvement in performance of an electromembrane extraction by application of an asymmetric polarity changing potential. The optimization of frequency and duty cycle of the asymmetric polarity exchanging potential resulted in a higher recovery (2.17 times greater) in comparison with the conventional electromebrane extraction. The simulation also provided more quantitative approaches toward the investigation of the mechanism of extraction and contribution of different limiting factors in electromembrane extraction. Results showed that the buildup of the double layer is the main limiting factor and the Joule heating has lesser impact on the performance of an electromebrane extraction system.

  19. The effect of vesicle shape, line tension, and lateral tension on membrane-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Jaime B.

    Model membranes allow for the exploration of complex biological phenomena with simple, controllable components. In this thesis we employ model membranes to determine the effect of vesicle properties such as line tension, lateral tension, and shape on membrane-binding proteins. We find that line tension at the boundary between domains in a phase separated vesicle can accumulate model membrane-binding proteins (green fluorescent protein with a histidine tag), and that those proteins can, in turn, alter vesicle shape. These results suggest that domains in biological membranes may enhance the local concentration of membrane-bound proteins and thus alter protein function. We also explore how membrane mechanical and chemical properties alter the function of the N-BAR domain of amphiphysin, a membrane-binding protein implicated in endocytosis. We find that negatively charged lipids are necessary for N-BAR binding to membranes at detectable levels, and that, at least for some lipid species, binding may be cooperative. Measurements of N-BAR binding as a function of vesicle tension reveal that modest membrane tension of around 2 mN/m, corresponding to a strain of around 1%, strongly increases N-BAR binding. We attribute this increase in binding with tension to the insertion of N-BAR's N-terminal amphipathic helix into the membrane which increases the membrane area. We propose that N-BAR, which was previously described as being able to sense membrane curvature, may be sensing strain instead. Measurements of membrane deformation by N-BAR as a function of membrane tension reveal that tension can hinder membrane deformation. Thus, tension may favor N-BAR binding yet suppress membrane deformation/tubulation, which requires work against tension. These results suggest that membrane tension, a parameter that is often not controlled in model membranes but is tightly controlled in biological cells, may be important in regulating protein binding and assembly and, hence, protein

  20. Effect of activated sludge properties and membrane operation conditions on fouling characteristics in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeok; Zhang, Kai; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Oerther, Daniel B; Sorial, George A

    2006-06-01

    Biofouling control is considered to be a major challenge in operating membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for the treatment of wastewater. This study examined the impact of biological, chemical, and physical properties of activated sludge on membrane filtration performance in laboratory-scale MBRs. Sludges with different microbial communities were produced using pseudo-continuous stirred-tank reactors and pseudo-plug flow reactors treating a synthetic paper mill wastewater. Various filtration resistances were used to investigate membrane fouling characteristics, and molecular biology tools targeting 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequences were used to identify predominant bacterial populations in the sludges or attached to the fouled membranes. Filtration experiments using axenic cultures of Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and Gordonia amarae were also performed to better understand the initiation and development of biofouling. The results showed that the tendency of membranes to biofoul depended upon membrane operating conditions as well as the properties of the activated sludge in the MBR systems. Specific bacterial populations, which were not dominant in the activated sludges, were selectively accumulated on the membrane surface leading to the development of irreversible biofouling.

  1. Effect of dust particle polarization on scattering processes in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kodanova, S. K.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Bastykova, N. Kh.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.

    2015-06-15

    Screened interaction potentials in dusty plasmas taking into account the polarization of dust particles have been obtained. On the basis of screened potentials scattering processes for ion-dust particle and dust particle-dust particle pairs have been studied. In particular, the scattering cross section is considered. The scattering processes for which the dust grain polarization is unimportant have been found. The effect of zero angle dust particle-dust particle scattering is predicted.

  2. Effect of Alignment on Polarized Infrared Emission from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thiem

    2017-04-01

    Polarized emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) potentially provides a new way to test the basic physics of the alignment of ultrasmall grains. In this paper, we present a new model of polarized PAH emission that takes into account the effect of PAH alignment with the magnetic field. We first generate a large sample of the grain angular momentum {\\boldsymbol{J}} by simulating the alignment of PAHs due to resonance paramagnetic relaxation that accounts for various interaction processes. We then calculate the polarization level of the PAH emission features for the different phases of the interstellar medium, including the cold neutral medium (CNM), reflection nebulae (RNe), and photodissociation regions. We find that a moderate degree of PAH alignment can significantly enhance the polarization degree of the PAH emission compared to the previous results obtained with randomly oriented angular momentum. In particular, we find that the smallest negatively charged PAHs in RNe can be excited to slightly suprathermal rotation due to enhanced ion collisional excitation, resulting in an increase of the polarization with the ionization fraction. Our results suggest that an RN is the most favorable environment in which to observe polarized PAH emission and to test the alignment physics of nanoparticles. Finally, we present an explicit relationship between the polarization level of PAH emission and the degree of external alignment for the CNM and RNe. The obtained relationship will be particularly useful for testing the alignment physics of PAHs in future observations.

  3. Effects of birefringence on Fizeau interferometry that uses a polarization phase-shifting technique.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunyu; Kang, Dongyel; Burge, James H

    2005-12-10

    Interferometers that use different states of polarization for the reference and the test beams can modulate the relative phase shift by using polarization optics in the imaging system. Thus the interferometer can capture simultaneous images that have a fixed phase shift, which can be used for phase-shifting interferometry. As all measurements are made simultaneously, the interferometer is not sensitive to vibration. Fizeau interferometers of this type have an advantage compared with Twyman-Green-type systems because they are common-path interferometers. However, a polarization Fizeau interferometer is not strictly common path when both wavefronts are transmitted by an optic that suffers from birefringence. The two polarized beams see different phases owing to birefringence; as a result, an error can be introduced in the measurement. We study the effect of birefringence on measurement accuracy when different polarization techniques are used in Fizeau interferometers. We demonstrate that measurement error is reduced dramatically and can be eliminated if the reference and test beams are circularly polarized rather than linearly polarized.

  4. Optically controlled spin-polarization memory effect on Mn delta-doped heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Balanta, M A G; Brasil, M J S P; Iikawa, F; Mendes, Udson C; Brum, J A; Danilov, Yu A; Dorokhin, M V; Vikhrova, O V; Zvonkov, B N

    2016-04-15

    We investigated the dynamics of the interaction between spin-polarized photo-created carriers and Mn ions on InGaAs/GaAs: Mn structures. The carriers are confined in an InGaAs quantum well and the Mn ions come from a Mn delta-layer grown at the GaAs barrier close to the well. Even though the carriers and the Mn ions are spatially separated, the interaction between them is demonstrated by time-resolved spin-polarized photoluminescence measurements. Using a pre-pulse laser excitation with an opposite circular-polarization clearly reduces the polarization degree of the quantum-well emission for samples where a strong magnetic interaction is observed. The results demonstrate that the Mn ions act as a spin-memory that can be optically controlled by the polarization of the photocreated carriers. On the other hand, the spin-polarized Mn ions also affect the spin-polarization of the subsequently created carriers as observed by their spin relaxation time. These effects fade away with increasing time delays between the pulses as well as with increasing temperatures.

  5. Theoretical aspects of dynamic nuclear polarization in the solid state - The solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization has gained high popularity in recent years, due to advances in the experimental aspects of this methodology for increasing the NMR and MRI signals of relevant chemical and biological compounds. The DNP mechanism relies on the microwave (MW) irradiation induced polarization transfer from unpaired electrons to the nuclei in a sample. In this publication we present nuclear polarization enhancements of model systems in the solid state at high magnetic fields. These results were obtained by numerical calculations based on the spin density operator formalism. Here we restrict ourselves to samples with low electron concentrations, where the dipolar electron-electron interactions can be ignored. Thus the DNP enhancement of the polarizations of the nuclei close to the electrons is described by the Solid Effect mechanism. Our numerical results demonstrate the dependence of the polarization enhancement on the MW irradiation power and frequency, the hyperfine and nuclear dipole-dipole spin interactions, and the relaxation parameters of the system. The largest spin system considered in this study contains one electron and eight nuclei. In particular, we discuss the influence of the nuclear concentration and relaxation on the polarization of the core nuclei, which are coupled to an electron, and are responsible for the transfer of polarization to the bulk nuclei in the sample via spin diffusion.

  6. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Polarization Effects on Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in OMEGA Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Beamlet spot images are used to diagnose cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) during OMEGA direct-drive implosions. The spots are, in essence, the end point of beamlets of light originating from different regions of each beam profile and following paths determined by refraction. The intensity of each spot varies because of absorption and CBET along that path. When each beam is linearly polarized, the image is asymmetric in terms of spot intensities. A 3-D CBET postprocessor for hydrodynamics codes is used to model the intensity, wavelength, and polarization of light from each beam. Rotation of polarization caused by CBET is tracked. The model is benchmarked using a 3-D wave-based solver for simplified CBET geometries. For linearly polarized beams in OMEGA implosions, the model predicts that polarization effects will result in asymmetric polarization and unabsorbed light profiles that are different for each beam. An asymmetric beamlet spot image similar to that recorded is predicted by the CBET model for linearly polarized beams. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. Theory of solid effect and cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization with half-integer high-spin metal polarizing agents in rotating solids.

    PubMed

    Corzilius, Björn

    2016-10-21

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a powerful method to enhance sensitivity especially of solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR by up to several orders of magnitude. The increased interest both from a practical as well as theoretical viewpoint has spawned several fields of active research such as the development of new polarizing agents with improved or unique properties and description of the underlying DNP mechanisms such as solid effect (SE) and cross effect (CE). Even though a novel class of unique polarizing agents based on high-spin metal ions such as Gd(iii) and Mn(ii) has already been utilized for MAS DNP a theoretical description of the involved DNP mechanism is still incomplete. Here, we review several aspects of DNP-relevant electron-paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties of the general class of these half-integer high-spin metal ions with isotropic Zeeman interaction but significant zero-field splitting (ZFS). While the SE can be relatively easily described similar to that of a S = 1/2 system and is assumed to be effective only for polarizing agents featuring a narrow central EPR transitions (i.e., mS = -1/2 → +1/2) with respect to the nuclear Larmor frequency, the CE between two high-spin ions requires a more detailed theoretical investigation due to a multitude of possible transitions and matching conditions. This is especially interesting in light of recent understanding of CE being induced by MAS-driven level anti-crossings (LACs) between dipolar-coupled electron spins. We discuss the requirements of such CE-enabling LACs to occur due to anisotropy of ZFS, the expected adiabaticity, and the resulting possibilities of high-spin metal ion pairs to act as polarizing agents for DNP. This theoretical description serves as a framework for a detailed experimental study published directly following this work.

  8. Effects of Bloom-Forming Algae on Fouling of Integrated Membrane Systems in Seawater Desalination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladner, David Allen

    2009-01-01

    Combining low- and high-pressure membranes into an integrated membrane system is an effective treatment strategy for seawater desalination. Low-pressure microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes remove particulate material, colloids, and high-molecular-weight organics leaving a relatively foulant-free salt solution for treatment by…

  9. Relativistic Effects and Polarization in Three High-Energy Pulsar Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyks, J.; Harding, Alice K.; Rudak, B.

    2004-01-01

    We present the influence of the special relativistic effects of aberration and light travel time delay on pulsar high-energy lightcurves and polarization characteristics predicted by three models: the two-pole caustic model, the outer gap model, and the polar cap model. Position angle curves and degree of polarization are calculated for the models and compared with the optical data on the Crab pulsar. The relative positions of peaks in gamma-ray and radio lightcurves are discussed in detail for the models. We find that the two-pole caustic model can reproduce qualitatively the optical polarization characteristics of the Crab pulsar - fast swings of the position angle and minima in polarization degree associated with both peaks. The anticorrelation between the observed flux and the polarization degree (observed in the optical band also for B0656+14) naturally results from the caustic nature of the peaks which are produced in the model due to the superposition of radiation from many different altitudes, ie. polarized at different angles. The two-pole caustic model also provides an acceptable interpretation of the main features in the Crab's radio profile. Neither the outer gap model nor the polar cap model are able to reproduce the optical polarization data on the Crab. Although the outer gap model is very successful in reproducing the relative positions of gamma-ray and radio peaks in pulse profiles, it can reproduce the high-energy lightcurves only when photon emission from regions very close to the light cylinder is included.

  10. Effects of sealing the perforated sinus membrane with a resorbable collagen membrane: a pilot study in humans.

    PubMed

    Proussaefs, Periklis; Lozada, Jaime; Kim, Jay

    2003-01-01

    The effects of repairing the perforated sinus membrane with collagen membrane are unknown. The purpose of this pilot study was to clinically, histologically, and histomorphometrically evaluate the results of repairing the perforated sinus membrane with resorbable collagen membrane. A split-mouth design was followed in the current study. Five subjects requiring bilateral sinus grafting were included in the study, where one site was accidentally perforated during sinus augmentation procedures and the other site was not perforated. The perforated sites were repaired with a resorbable collagen membrane. Dental implants were placed at a second stage and biopsies were harvested from both sinuses. New bone formation was measured for all sites. Implant survival was recorded at second-stage surgery. Nonperforated sites demonstrated significantly more bone formation (34.40%) than perforated sites (12.80%) (P = .016). Implant survival at second-stage surgery was significantly inferior in perforated sites (54.5%) when compared with nonperforated sites (100%) (P = .0146). The study demonstrated that perforation and repair of the Schneiderian membrane can compromise new bone formation and implant survival rate.

  11. Effects of the membrane action of tetralin on the functional and structural properties of artificial and bacterial membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, J; Poolman, B; Konings, W N; de Bont, J A

    1992-01-01

    Tetralin is toxic to bacterial cells at concentrations below 100 mumol/liter. To assess the inhibitory action of tetralin on bacterial membranes, a membrane model system, consisting of proteoliposomes in which beef heart cytochrome c oxidase was reconstituted as the proton motive force-generating mechanism, and several gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria were studied. Because of its hydrophobicity, tetralin partitioned into lipid membranes preferentially (lipid/buffer partition coefficient of tetralin is approximately 1,100). The excessive accumulation of tetralin caused expansion of the membrane and impairment of different membrane functions. Studies with proteoliposomes and intact cells indicated that tetralin makes the membrane permeable for ions (protons) and inhibits the respiratory enzymes, which leads to a partial dissipation of the pH gradient and electrical potential. The effect of tetralin on the components of the proton motive force as well as disruption of protein-lipid interaction(s) could lead to impairment of various metabolic functions and to low growth rates. The data offer an explanation for the difficulty in isolating and cultivating microorganisms in media containing tetralin or other lipophilic compounds. PMID:1314806

  12. Effects of Antimicrobial Peptide Revealed by Simulations: Translocation, Pore Formation, Membrane Corrugation and Euler Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects of the peripheral and transmembrane antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using the coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling. PMID:23579956

  13. Composite membrane, method of preparation and use

    SciTech Connect

    Blume, I.; Pinnau, I.

    1990-10-16

    This paper discusses a membrane for gas separation or pervaporation. The membrane is a composite of a microporous support membrane and an ultrathin permselective membrane, the permselective membrane being made from a polyamide-polyether block copolymer. The membrane is particularly useful in separating polar gases from non-polar gases.

  14. Effects of microbial degradation of biofoulants on microfiltration membrane performance in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Daisuke; Mori, Yoshihiko; Hashimoto, Tomotaka; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2010-11-15

    In membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for wastewater treatment, membrane fouling, particularly biofouling caused by soluble microbial products (SMP), is a nuisance problem causing decreases in permeation flux. In a previous study, we identified primary biofoulants of microfiltration (MF) membranes in SMP as polysaccharides containing uronic acids that undergo inter- and intramolecular ionic cross-linking by polyvalent cations, forming a gelatinous mass that clogs membrane pores. In the present study, we therefore attempted to isolate biofoulant-degrading microorganisms from activated sludge on a polygalacturonic acid-overlaid agar medium and evaluate their efficiency for preventing biofouling of MF membranes. Among the isolates, the fungal strain HO1 identified as Phialemonium curvatum degraded 30% of polysaccharides containing uronic acids into smaller molecules in a SMP solution containing a high concentration of saccharides after 30 days of cultivation. Microfiltration tests using a laboratory-scale submerged MBR indicated that the filtration resistance of this degraded SMP solution was lower than that of the control SMP solution without fungal inoculation. Importantly, accumulation of gelatinous mass on the membrane responsible for biofouling was avoided in the SMP solution augmented with P. curvatum HO1 during the microfiltration test. This is the first report to describe a new method for avoiding biofouling of MBRs by microbial degradation of primary biofoulants.

  15. Valley spin polarization by using the extraordinary Rashba effect on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kazuyuki; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kuzumaki, Takuya; Müller, Beate; Yamamoto, Yuta; Ohtaka, Minoru; Osiecki, Jacek R.; Miyamoto, Koji; Takeichi, Yasuo; Harasawa, Ayumi; Stolwijk, Sebastian D.; Schmidt, Anke B.; Fujii, Jun; Uhrberg, R. I. G.; Donath, Markus; Yeom, Han Woong; Oda, Tatsuki

    2013-06-01

    The addition of the valley degree of freedom to a two-dimensional spin-polarized electronic system provides the opportunity to multiply the functionality of next-generation devices. So far, however, such devices have not been realized due to the difficulty to polarize the valleys, which is an indispensable step to activate this degree of freedom. Here we show the formation of 100% spin-polarized valleys by a simple and easy way using the Rashba effect on a system with C3 symmetry. This polarization, which is much higher than those in ordinary Rashba systems, results in the valleys acting as filters that can suppress the backscattering of spin-charge. The present system is formed on a silicon substrate, and therefore opens a new avenue towards the realization of silicon spintronic devices with high efficiency.

  16. Dynamic nuclear polarization assisted spin diffusion for the solid effect case.

    PubMed

    Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon

    2011-02-21

    The dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process in solids depends on the magnitudes of hyperfine interactions between unpaired electrons and their neighboring (core) nuclei, and on the dipole-dipole interactions between all nuclei in the sample. The polarization enhancement of the bulk nuclei has been typically described in terms of a hyperfine-assisted polarization of a core nucleus by microwave irradiation followed by a dipolar-assisted spin diffusion process in the core-bulk nuclear system. This work presents a theoretical approach for the study of this combined process using a density matrix formalism. In particular, solid effect DNP on a single electron coupled to a nuclear spin system is considered, taking into account the interactions between the spins as well as the main relaxation mechanisms introduced via the electron, nuclear, and cross-relaxation rates. The basic principles of the DNP-assisted spin diffusion mechanism, polarizing the bulk nuclei, are presented, and it is shown that the polarization of the core nuclei and the spin diffusion process should not be treated separately. To emphasize this observation the coherent mechanism driving the pure spin diffusion process is also discussed. In order to demonstrate the effects of the interactions and relaxation mechanisms on the enhancement of the nuclear polarization, model systems of up to ten spins are considered and polarization buildup curves are simulated. A linear chain of spins consisting of a single electron coupled to a core nucleus, which in turn is dipolar coupled to a chain of bulk nuclei, is considered. The interaction and relaxation parameters of this model system were chosen in a way to enable a critical analysis of the polarization enhancement of all nuclei, and are not far from the values of (13)C nuclei in frozen (glassy) organic solutions containing radicals, typically used in DNP at high fields. Results from the simulations are shown, demonstrating the complex dependences of the DNP

  17. Zwitterionic sulfobetaine-grafted poly(vinylidene fluoride) membrane with highly effective blood compatibility via atmospheric plasma-induced surface copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung; Chang, Wan-Ju; Shih, Yu-Ju; Wei, Ta-Chin; Hsiue, Ging-Ho

    2011-04-01

    Development of nonfouling membranes to prevent nonspecific protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is critical for many biomedical applications. It is always a challenge to control the surface graft copolymerization of a highly polar monomer from the highly hydrophobic surface of a fluoropolymer membrane. In this work, the blood compatibility of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes with surface-grafted electrically neutral zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA), from atmospheric plasma-induced surface copolymerization, was studied. The effect of surface composition and graft morphology, electrical neutrality, hydrophilicity and hydration capability on blood compatibility of the membranes were determined. Blood compatibility of the zwitterionic PVDF membranes was systematically evaluated by plasma protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, plasma-clotting time, and blood cell hemolysis. It was found that the nonfouling nature and hydration capability of grafted PSBMA polymers can be effectively controlled by regulating the grafting coverage and charge balance of the PSBMA layer on the PVDF membrane surface. Even a slight charge bias in the grafted zwitterionic PSBMA layer can induce electrostatic interactions between proteins and the membrane surfaces, leading to surface protein adsorption, platelet activation, plasma clotting and blood cell hemolysis. Thus, the optimized PSBMA surface graft layer in overall charge neutrality has a high hydration capability and the best antifouling, anticoagulant, and antihemolytic activities when comes into contact with human blood.

  18. pH-Dependent retention changes during membrane filtration of aluminum-coagulated solutions and the effect of precentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Bérubé, Denis; Dorea, Caetano

    2013-03-19

    During jar tests on alum-based drinking water treatment, dissolved Al determinations on solutions coagulated at pH ≥ 6.5 were not reproducible. These determinations were performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after syringe filtration (0.45 μm polyethersulfone membrane). In order to better define these anomalies, the filtrates were collected in sequential fractions of 7.5 mL. At coagulation pHs of 6.5 and 7.0, retention changes were demonstrated by large filtrate concentration reductions at all temperatures tested (0.1, 5.0, and 17.0 °C). In all cases, the concentrations converged to levels <50 μg/L within the fourth sequential fraction. In comparison, no retention change was observed for jar tests conducted at the same temperatures but in the low range of the minimum solubility domain, at pHs 5.5 and 6.0. The retention changes were also eliminated by precentrifugation (7000 g for 45 min; pH 6.5-7.2). At weaker precentrifugation conditions, as well as by varying membrane surface area or membrane fouling, the filtrate concentrations behaved according to a barrier buildup at the membrane-solution interface by unsettled flocculation residuals. The influence of flocculation time and temperature emphasized the importance of reaction rates, which could be enhanced at the interface by concentration polarization effects. These phenomena have implications on analytical protocols and on filtration in full-scale treatment.

  19. Effects of polarization in low-level laser therapy of spinal cord injury in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Hamblin, Michael R.; Obara, Minoru

    2012-03-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a promising approach to treat the spinal cord injury (SCI). Since nerve fibers have optical anisotropy, propagation of light in the spinal tissue might be affected by its polarization direction. However, the effect of polarization on the efficacy of LLLT has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of polarization on the efficacy of near-infrared LLLT for SCI. Rat spinal cord was injured with a weight-drop device. The lesion site was irradiated with an 808-nm diode laser beam that was transmitted through a polarizing filter immediately after injury and daily for five consecutive days. The laser power at the injured spinal cord surface was 25 mW, and the dosage per day was 9.6 J/cm2 (spot diameter, 2 cm; irradiation duration, 1200 s). Functional recovery was assessed daily by an open-field test. The results showed that the functional scores of the SCI rats that were treated with 808-nm laser irradiation were significantly higher than those of the SCI alone group (Group 1) from day 5 after injury, regardless of the polarization direction. Importantly, as compared to the locomotive function of the SCI rats that were treated with the perpendicularly-polarized laser parallel to the spinal column (Group 2), that of the SCI rats that were irradiated with the linearly aligned polarization (Group 3) was significantly improved from day 10 after injury. In addition, the ATP contents in the injured spinal tissue of Group 3, which were measured immediately after laser irradiation, were moderately higher than those of Group 2. These observations are attributable to the deeper penetration of the parallelpolarized light in the anisotropic spinal tissue, suggesting that polarization direction significantly affects the efficacy of LLLT for SCI.

  20. Exploring the Effects of Cloud Vertical Structure on Cloud Microphysical Retrievals based on Polarized Reflectances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. J.; Zhang, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Ackerman, A. S.; Cornet, C.; Baum, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    A polarized cloud reflectance simulator was developed by coupling an LES cloud model with a polarized radiative transfer model to assess the capabilities of polarimetric cloud retrievals. With future remote sensing campaigns like NASA's Aerosols/Clouds/Ecosystems (ACE) planning to feature advanced polarimetric instruments it is important for the cloud remote sensing community to understand the retrievable information available and the related systematic/methodical limitations. The cloud retrieval simulator we have developed allows us to probe these important questions in a realistically relevant test bed. Our simulator utilizes a polarized adding-doubling radiative transfer model and an LES cloud field from a DHARMA simulation (Ackerman et al. 2004) with cloud properties based on the stratocumulus clouds observed during the DYCOMS-II field campaign. In this study we will focus on how the vertical structure of cloud microphysics can influence polarized cloud effective radius retrievals. Numerous previous studies have explored how retrievals based on total reflectance are affected by cloud vertical structure (Platnick 2000, Chang and Li 2002) but no such studies about the effects of vertical structure on polarized retrievals exist. Unlike the total cloud reflectance, which is predominantly multiply scattered light, the polarized reflectance is primarily the result of singly scattered photons. Thus the polarized reflectance is sensitive to only the uppermost region of the cloud (tau~<1) where photons can scatter once and still escape before being scattered again. This means that retrievals based on polarized reflectance have the potential to reveal behaviors specific to the cloud top. For example cloud top entrainment of dry air, a major influencer on the microphysical development of cloud droplets, can be potentially studied with polarimetric retrievals.

  1. SCATTERING POLARIZATION AND HANLE EFFECT IN STELLAR ATMOSPHERES WITH HORIZONTAL INHOMOGENEITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Manso Sainz, Rafael; Trujillo Bueno, Javier E-mail: jtb@iac.es

    2011-12-10

    Scattering of light from an anisotropic source produces linear polarization in spectral lines and in the continuum. In the outer layers of a stellar atmosphere the anisotropy of the radiation field is typically dominated by the radiation escaping away, but local horizontal fluctuations of the physical conditions may also contribute, distorting the illumination and, hence, the polarization pattern. Additionally, a magnetic field may perturb and modify the line scattering polarization signals through the Hanle effect. Here, we study such symmetry-breaking effects. We develop a method to solve the transfer of polarized radiation in a scattering atmosphere with weak horizontal fluctuations of the opacity and source functions. It comprises linearization (small opacity and Planck function fluctuations are assumed), reduction to a quasi-plane-parallel problem through harmonic analysis, and the problem's numerical solution by generalized standard techniques. We apply this method to study scattering polarization in atmospheres with horizontal fluctuations in the Planck function and opacity. We derive several very general results and constraints from considerations on the symmetries and dimensionality of the problem, and we give explicit solutions of a few illustrative problems of special interest. For example, we show (1) how the amplitudes of the fractional linear polarization signals change when considering increasingly smaller horizontal atmospheric inhomogeneities, (2) that in the presence of such inhomogeneities even a vertical magnetic field may modify the scattering line polarization, and (3) that forward scattering polarization may be produced without the need for an inclined magnetic field. These results are important for understanding the physics of the problem and as benchmarks for multidimensional radiative transfer codes.

  2. Polarization-dependent interfacial coupling modulation of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect in PZT-ZnO heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dan-Feng; Bi, Gui-Feng; Chen, Guang-Yi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Guang-Hou; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-03-01

    Recently, ferroelectric perovskite oxides have drawn much attention due to potential applications in the field of solar energy conversion. However, the power conversion efficiency of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect currently reported is far below the expectable value. One of the crucial problems lies in the two back-to-back Schottky barriers, which are formed at the ferroelectric-electrode interfaces and blocking most of photo-generated carriers to reach the outside circuit. Herein, we develop a new approach to enhance the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect by introducing the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect. Through inserting a semiconductor ZnO layer with spontaneous polarization into the ferroelectric ITO/PZT/Au film, a p-n junction with strong polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect is formed. The power conversion efficiency of the heterostructure is improved by nearly two orders of magnitude and the polarization modulation ratio is increased about four times. It is demonstrated that the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect can give rise to a great change in band structure of the heterostructure, not only producing an aligned internal electric field but also tuning both depletion layer width and potential barrier height at PZT-ZnO interface. This work provides an efficient way in developing highly efficient ferroelectric-based solar cells and novel optoelectronic memory devices.

  3. Polarization-dependent interfacial coupling modulation of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect in PZT-ZnO heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dan-Feng; Bi, Gui-Feng; Chen, Guang-Yi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Guang-Hou; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-03-08

    Recently, ferroelectric perovskite oxides have drawn much attention due to potential applications in the field of solar energy conversion. However, the power conversion efficiency of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect currently reported is far below the expectable value. One of the crucial problems lies in the two back-to-back Schottky barriers, which are formed at the ferroelectric-electrode interfaces and blocking most of photo-generated carriers to reach the outside circuit. Herein, we develop a new approach to enhance the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect by introducing the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect. Through inserting a semiconductor ZnO layer with spontaneous polarization into the ferroelectric ITO/PZT/Au film, a p-n junction with strong polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect is formed. The power conversion efficiency of the heterostructure is improved by nearly two orders of magnitude and the polarization modulation ratio is increased about four times. It is demonstrated that the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect can give rise to a great change in band structure of the heterostructure, not only producing an aligned internal electric field but also tuning both depletion layer width and potential barrier height at PZT-ZnO interface. This work provides an efficient way in developing highly efficient ferroelectric-based solar cells and novel optoelectronic memory devices.

  4. Polarization-dependent interfacial coupling modulation of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect in PZT-ZnO heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dan-Feng; Bi, Gui-Feng; Chen, Guang-Yi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Guang-Hou; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ferroelectric perovskite oxides have drawn much attention due to potential applications in the field of solar energy conversion. However, the power conversion efficiency of ferroelectric photovoltaic effect currently reported is far below the expectable value. One of the crucial problems lies in the two back-to-back Schottky barriers, which are formed at the ferroelectric-electrode interfaces and blocking most of photo-generated carriers to reach the outside circuit. Herein, we develop a new approach to enhance the ferroelectric photovoltaic effect by introducing the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect. Through inserting a semiconductor ZnO layer with spontaneous polarization into the ferroelectric ITO/PZT/Au film, a p-n junction with strong polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect is formed. The power conversion efficiency of the heterostructure is improved by nearly two orders of magnitude and the polarization modulation ratio is increased about four times. It is demonstrated that the polarization-dependent interfacial coupling effect can give rise to a great change in band structure of the heterostructure, not only producing an aligned internal electric field but also tuning both depletion layer width and potential barrier height at PZT-ZnO interface. This work provides an efficient way in developing highly efficient ferroelectric-based solar cells and novel optoelectronic memory devices. PMID:26954833

  5. Toward an effective adsorbent for polar pollutants: formaldehyde adsorption by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Jin; Miyawaki, Jin; Shiratori, Nanako; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Jang, Jyongsik

    2013-09-15

    Due to increasing concerns about environmental pollutants, the development of an effective adsorbent or sensitive sensor has been pursued in recent years. Diverse porous materials have been selected as promising candidates for detecting and removing harmful materials, but the most appropriate pore structure and surface functional groups, both important factors for effective adsorbency, have not yet been fully elucidated. In particular, there is limited information relating to the use of activated carbon materials for effective adsorbent of specific pollutants. Here, the pore structure and surface functionality of polyacrylonitrile-based activated carbon fibers were investigated to develop an efficient adsorbent for polar pollutants. The effect of pore structure and surface functional groups on removal capability was investigated. The activated carbons with higher nitrogen content show a great ability to absorb formaldehyde because of their increased affinity with polar pollutants. In particular, nitrogen functional groups that neighbor oxygen atoms play an important role in maximizing adsorption capability. However, because there is also a similar increase in water affinity in adsorbents with polar functional groups, there is a considerable decrease in adsorption ability under humid conditions because of preferential adsorption of water to adsorbents. Therefore, it can be concluded that pore structures, surface functional groups and the water affinity of any adsorbent should be considered together to develop an effective and practical adsorbent for polar pollutants. These studies can provide vital information for developing porous materials for efficient adsorbents, especially for polar pollutants.

  6. The Effect of Negative Polarity Items on Inference Verification

    PubMed Central

    SZABOLCSI, ANNA; BOTT, LEWIS; McELREE, BRIAN

    2010-01-01

    The scalar approach to negative polarity item (NPI) licensing assumes that NPIs are allowable in contexts in which the introduction of the NPI leads to proposition strengthening (e.g. Kadmon & Landman 1993; Krifka 1995; Lahiri 1997; Chierchia 2006). A straightforward processing prediction from such a theory is that NPIs facilitate inference verification from sets to subsets. Three experiments are reported that test this proposal. In each experiment, participants evaluated whether inferences from sets to subsets were valid. Crucially, we manipulated whether the premises contained an NPI. In Experiment 1, participants completed a metalinguistic reasoning task and Experiments 2 and 3 tested reading times using a self-paced reading task. Contrary to expectations, no facilitation was observed when the NPI was present in the premise compared to when it was absent. In fact, the NPI significantly slowed down reading times in the inference region. Our results therefore favour those scalar theories that predict that the NPI is costly to process (Chierchia 2006), or other, non-scalar theories (Ladusaw 1992; Giannakidou 1998; Szabolcsi 2004; Postal 2005) that likewise predict NPI processing cost but, unlike Chierchia (2006), expect the magnitude of the processing cost to vary with the actual pragmatics of the NPI. PMID:21562618

  7. Effects of climatic changes on anisakid nematodes in polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokicki, Jerzy

    2009-11-01

    Anisakid nematodes are common in Antarctic, sub-Antarctic, and Arctic areas. Current distributional knowledge of anisakids in the polar regions is reviewed. Climatic variables influence the occurrence and abundance of anisakids, directly influencing their free-living larval stages and also indirectly influencing their predominantly invertebrate (but also vertebrate) hosts. As these parasites can also be pathogenic for humans, the paucity of information available is a source of additional hazard. As fish are a major human dietary component in Arctic and Antarctic areas, and are often eaten without heat processing, a high risk of infection by anisakid larvae might be expected. The present level of knowledge, particularly relating to anisakid larval stages present in fishes, is far from satisfactory. Preliminary molecular studies have revealed the presence of species complexes. Contemporary climate warming is modifying the marine environment and may result in an extension of time during which anisakid eggs can persist and hatch, and of the time period during which newly hatched larvae remain viable. As a result there may be an increase in the extent of anisakid distribution. Continued warming will modify the composition of the parasitic nematode fauna of marine animals, due to changes in feeding habits, as the warming of the sea and any localised reduction in salinity (from freshwater runoff) can be expected to bring about changes in the species composition of pelagic and benthic invertebrates.

  8. Relativity mission with two counter-orbiting polar satellites. [nodal dragging effect on earth orbiting satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Patten, R. A.; Everitt, C. W. F.

    1975-01-01

    In 1918, J. Lense and H. Thirring calculated that a moon in orbit around a massive rotating planet would experience a nodal dragging effect due to general relativity. We describe an experiment to measure this effect with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites in polar earth orbit. For a 2 1/2 year experiment, the measurement accuracy should approach 1%. In addition to precision tracking data from existing ground stations, satellite-to-satellite Doppler ranging data are taken at points of passing near the poles. New geophysical information on both earth harmonics and tidal effects is inherent in the polar ranging data.

  9. [Effect of dietary VE on the contents of salivary acid and MDA in RBC membrane].

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Dong, Z; Zhang, Y; Chen, Y

    1997-05-01

    Vitamin E can protect membrane from the damage of lipid peroxidation, Salivary acid is the residual of carbohydrate on the membrane. To evaluate the effect of dietary VE on salivary acid, the contents of MDA and salivary acid of erythrocyte (RBC) membrane of rats were measured. The rats were fed with different amounts of dietary VE and stayed at different temperatures. The results revealed that the content of salivary acid of RBC membrane reduced markly (P < 0.01) and the content of MDA of RBC membrane was stable (P > 0.05) after the rats were exposed to cold for 10 days. High dietary VE intake increased the content of salivary acid of RBC membrane (P < 0.01). There was no correlation between the content of salivary acid and MDA of RBC membrane. It suggested that dietary VE could raise the content of salivary acid in RBC membrane, but it can not be explained by the reduction of LPO.

  10. Do local anesthetics interact preferentially with membrane lipid rafts? Comparative interactivities with raft-like membranes.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-08-01

    Membranous lipid bilayers have been reconsidered as the site of action of local anesthetics (LAs). Recent understanding of biomembranes indicates the existence of lipid raft microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids as potential platforms for channels and receptors. Based on the hypothesis that LAs may interact preferentially with lipid rafts over non-raft membranes, we compared their effects on raft model membranes and cardiolipin-containing biomimetic membranes. Liposomes were prepared with phospholipids, sphingomyelin, cerebroside, and cholesterol to have compositions corresponding to lipid rafts and cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes. After reacting LAs (50-200 microM) with the membrane preparations, their interactivities were determined by measuring fluorescence polarization with 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Although bupivacaine and lidocaine acted on different raft-like liquid-ordered membranes to reduce polarization values, their effects on biomimetic less ordered membranes were much greater. LAs interacted with biomimetic membranes with the potency being R(+)-bupivacaine > racemic bupivacaine > S(-)-bupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > prilocaine, which is consistent with the rank order of pharmacotoxicological potency. However, raft model membranes showed neither structure-dependence nor stereoselectivity. The relevance of membrane lipid rafts to LAs is questionable at least in their effects on raft-like liquid-ordered membranes.

  11. Femtosecond pulsed light polarization induced effects in direct laser writing 3D nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; RekštytÄ--, Sima; Jonavičius, Tomas; Gailevičius, Darius; Mizeikis, Vygantas; Gamaly, Eugene; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate how the coupling between (i) polarization of the writing laser beam, (ii) tight focusing and (iii) heat conduction affects the size, shape and absorption in the laser-affected area and therefore the polymerization process. It is possible to control the sizes of 3D laser-produced structure at the scale of several nanometers. Specifically we were able to tune the aspect ratio of 3D suspended line up to 20% in hybrid SZ2080 resist. The focal spot of tightly focused linearly polarized beam has an elliptical form with the long axis in the field direction. It is shown here that this effect is enhanced by increase in the electronic heat conduction when polarization coincide with temperature gradient along with the absorption. Overlapping of three effects (i- iii) results in the difference of several tens of nanometers between two axes of the focal ellipse. Narrow line appears when polarization and scan direction coincide, while the wide line is produced when these directions are perpendicular to each other. The effect scales with the laser intensity giving a possibility to control the width of the structure on nanometer scale as demonstrated experimentally in this work. These effects are of general nature and can be observed in any laser-matter interaction experiments where plasma produced by using tight focusing of linear-polarized light.

  12. Effects of Very Low Dose Fast Neutrons on Cell Membrane And Secondary Protein Structure in Rat Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nafee, Sherif S.; Shaheen, Salem A.; Al-Hadeethi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on biological cells have been reported in several literatures. Most of them were mainly concerned with doses greater than 0.01 Gy and were also concerned with gamma rays. On the other hand, the studies on very low dose fast neutrons (VLDFN) are rare. In this study, we have investigated the effects of VLDFN on cell membrane and protein secondary structure of rat erythrocytes. Twelve female Wistar rats were irradiated with neutrons of total dose 0.009 Gy (241Am-Be, 0.2 mGy/h) and twelve others were used as control. Blood samples were taken at the 0, 4th, 8th, and 12th days postirradiation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of rat erythrocytes were recorded. Second derivative and curve fitting were used to analysis FTIR spectra. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to classify group spectra. The second derivative and curve fitting of FTIR spectra revealed that the most significant alterations in the cell membrane and protein secondary structure upon neutron irradiation were detected after 4 days postirradiation. The increase in membrane polarity, phospholipids chain length, packing, and unsaturation were noticed from the corresponding measured FTIR area ratios. This may be due to the membrane lipid peroxidation. The observed band shift in the CH2 stretching bands toward the lower frequencies may be associated with the decrease in membrane fluidity. The curve fitting of the amide I revealed an increase in the percentage area of α-helix opposing a decrease in the β-structure protein secondary structure, which may be attributed to protein denaturation. The results provide detailed insights into the VLDFN effects on erythrocytes. VLDFN can cause an oxidative stress to the irradiated erythrocytes, which appears clearly after 4 days postirradiation. PMID:26436416

  13. Effects of Very Low Dose Fast Neutrons on Cell Membrane And Secondary Protein Structure in Rat Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Saeed, A; Raouf, Gehan A; Nafee, Sherif S; Shaheen, Salem A; Al-Hadeethi, Y

    2015-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on biological cells have been reported in several literatures. Most of them were mainly concerned with doses greater than 0.01 Gy and were also concerned with gamma rays. On the other hand, the studies on very low dose fast neutrons (VLDFN) are rare. In this study, we have investigated the effects of VLDFN on cell membrane and protein secondary structure of rat erythrocytes. Twelve female Wistar rats were irradiated with neutrons of total dose 0.009 Gy (241Am-Be, 0.2 mGy/h) and twelve others were used as control. Blood samples were taken at the 0, 4th, 8th, and 12th days postirradiation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of rat erythrocytes were recorded. Second derivative and curve fitting were used to analysis FTIR spectra. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to classify group spectra. The second derivative and curve fitting of FTIR spectra revealed that the most significant alterations in the cell membrane and protein secondary structure upon neutron irradiation were detected after 4 days postirradiation. The increase in membrane polarity, phospholipids chain length, packing, and unsaturation were noticed from the corresponding measured FTIR area ratios. This may be due to the membrane lipid peroxidation. The observed band shift in the CH2 stretching bands toward the lower frequencies may be associated with the decrease in membrane fluidity. The curve fitting of the amide I revealed an increase in the percentage area of α-helix opposing a decrease in the β-structure protein secondary structure, which may be attributed to protein denaturation. The results provide detailed insights into the VLDFN effects on erythrocytes. VLDFN can cause an oxidative stress to the irradiated erythrocytes, which appears clearly after 4 days postirradiation.

  14. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015), 10.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them.

  15. Concentration-dependent effect of melatonin on DSPC membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ipek; Bilge, Duygu; Kazanci, Nadide; Severcan, Feride

    2013-11-01

    The concentration-induced effects of melatonin on distearoyl phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) model membranes were investigated by using two different non-invasive techniques, namely Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). An investigation of the Csbnd H, Cdbnd O and PO2- double bond stretching mode in FTIR spectra and DSC studies reveals that the inclusion of melatonin changes the physical properties of the DSPC multilamellar liposomes (MLVs) by shifting the main phase transition to lower temperatures, abolishing the pretransition, ordering the system in the gel phase and slightly disordering the system in the liquid crystalline phase, increasing the dynamics both in the gel phase and liquid crystalline phases. Melatonin also causes strong hydrogen bonding between Cdbnd O and PO2- groups of lipids and the water molecules around.

  16. Modeling the effect of dynamic surfaces on membrane penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lehn, Reid; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    The development of nanoscale materials for targeted drug delivery is an important current pursuit in materials science. One task of drug carriers is to release therapeutic agents within cells by bypassing the cell membrane to maximize the effectiveness of their payload and minimize bodily exposure. In this work, we use coarse-grained simulations to study nanoparticles (NPs) grafted with hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands that rearrange in response to the amphiphilic lipid bilayer. We demonstrate that this dynamic surface permits the NP to spontaneously penetrate to the bilayer midplane when the surface ligands are near an order-disorder transition. We believe that this work will lead to the design of new drug carriers capable of non-specifically accessing cell interiors based solely on their dynamic surface properties. Our work is motivated by existing nanoscale systems such as micelles, or NPs grafted with highly mobile ligands or polymer brushes.

  17. Thermococcus kodakarensis modulates its polar membrane lipids and elemental composition according to growth stage and phosphate availability

    PubMed Central

    Meador, Travis B.; Gagen, Emma J.; Loscar, Michael E.; Goldhammer, Tobias; Yoshinaga, Marcos Y.; Wendt, Jenny; Thomm, Michael; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2014-01-01

    We observed significant changes in the elemental and intact polar lipid (IPL) composition of the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis (KOD1) in response to growth stage and phosphorus supply. Reducing the amount of organic supplements and phosphate in growth media resulted in significant decreases in cell size and cellular quotas of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P), which coincided with significant increases in cellular IPL quota and IPLs comprising multiple P atoms and hexose moieties. Relatively more cellular P was stored as IPLs in P-limited cells (2–8%) compared to control cells (<0.8%). We also identified a specific IPL biomarker containing a phosphatidyl-N-acetylhexoseamine headgroup that was relatively enriched during rapid cell division. These observations serve as empirical evidence of IPL adaptations in Archaea that will help to interpret the distribution of these biomarkers in natural systems. The reported cell quotas of C, N, and P represent the first such data for a specific archaeon and suggest that thermophiles are C-rich compared to the cell carbon-to-volume relationship reported for planktonic bacteria. PMID:24523718

  18. Effects of membrane cholesterol manipulation on excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle of the toad.

    PubMed

    Launikonis, B S; Stephenson, D G

    2001-07-01

    1. Single mechanically skinned fibres and intact bundles of fibres from the twitch region of the iliofibularis muscle of cane toads were used to investigate the effects of membrane cholesterol manipulation on excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. The cholesterol content of membranes was manipulated with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD). 2. In mechanically skinned fibres, depletion of membrane cholesterol with MbetaCD caused a dose- and time-dependent decrease in transverse tubular (t)-system depolarization-induced force responses (TSDIFRs). TSDIFRs were completely abolished within 2 min in the presence of 10 mM MbetaCD but were not affected after 2 min in the presence of a 10 mM MbetaCD-1 mM cholesterol complex. There was a very steep dependence between the change in TSDIFRs and the MbetaCD : cholesterol ratio at 10 mM MbetaCD, indicating that the inhibitory effect of MbetaCD was due to membrane cholesterol depletion and not to a pharmacological effect of the agent. Tetanic responses in bundles of intact fibres were abolished after 3-4 h in the presence of 10 mM MbetaCD. 3. The duration of TSDIFRs increased markedly soon (< 2 min) after application of 10 mM MbetaCD and 10 mM MbetaCD-cholesterol complexes, but the Ca(2+) activation properties of the contractile apparatus were minimally affected by 10 mM MbetaCD. The Ca(2+) handling abilities of the sarcoplasmic reticulum appeared to be modified after 10 min exposure to 10 mM MbetaCD. 4. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the integrity of the t-system was not compromised by either intra- or extracellular application of 10 mM MbetaCD and that a large [Ca(2+)] gradient was maintained across the t-system. 5. Membrane cholesterol depletion caused rapid depolarization of the polarized t-system as shown independently by spontaneous TSDIFRs induced by MbetaCD and by changes in the fluorescence intensity of an anionic potentiometric dye (DiBAC(4)(3)) in the presence of MbetaCD. This rapid depolarization of

  19. Systematic Effects in Polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometers for Cosmic Microwave Background Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Peter C.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan; Tucker, Gregory S.

    2015-11-01

    The detection of the primordial B-mode polarization signal of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would provide evidence for inflation. Yet as has become increasingly clear, the detection of a such a faint signal requires an instrument with both wide frequency coverage to reject foregrounds and excellent control over instrumental systematic effects. Using a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) for CMB observations meets both of these requirements. In this work, we present an analysis of instrumental systematic effects in polarizing FTSs, using the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) as a worked example. We analytically solve for the most important systematic effects inherent to the FTS—emissive optical components, misaligned optical components, sampling and phase errors, and spin synchronous effects—and demonstrate that residual systematic error terms after corrections will all be at the sub-nK level, well below the predicted 100 nK B-mode signal.

  20. SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS IN POLARIZING FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETERS FOR COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler, Peter C.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan

    2015-11-15

    The detection of the primordial B-mode polarization signal of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would provide evidence for inflation. Yet as has become increasingly clear, the detection of a such a faint signal requires an instrument with both wide frequency coverage to reject foregrounds and excellent control over instrumental systematic effects. Using a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) for CMB observations meets both of these requirements. In this work, we present an analysis of instrumental systematic effects in polarizing FTSs, using the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) as a worked example. We analytically solve for the most important systematic effects inherent to the FTS—emissive optical components, misaligned optical components, sampling and phase errors, and spin synchronous effects—and demonstrate that residual systematic error terms after corrections will all be at the sub-nK level, well below the predicted 100 nK B-mode signal.

  1. The Effects of Plant Virus Infection on Polarization Reflection from Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Daniel J.; Partridge, Julian C.; Roberts, Nicholas W.; Boonham, Neil; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of leaf surface phenotypes due to virus infection has the potential to affect the likelihood of colonisation by insect vectors, or to affect their feeding activities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether viruses that rely on insects for their transmission, and which can be sensitive to the polarization of light, affect the percentage polarization of light reflected from leaves. We also set out to discover whether a correlation exists between the expression of ECERIFERUM (CER) genes involved in cuticular wax synthesis and the polarization of the light reflected from the leaf surfaces. It was found that the aphid-vectored viruses Potato virus Y and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) caused significant reductions in the percentage polarization of light reflected from the abaxial surfaces of leaves of Nicotiana tabacum, whereas the non-insect-vectored viruses Tobacco mosaic virus and Pepino mosaic virus did not induce this effect. In Arabidopsis thaliana, there was little difference in the impacts of CMV and the non-insect-vectored Turnip vein clearing virus on polarization reflection, with both viruses increasing the percentage polarization of light reflected from the abaxial surfaces of leaves. There was a trend towards increased accumulation of CER6 transcripts in N. tabacum and A. thaliana when infected with aphid-vectored viruses. No significant effect of infection on trichome densities was found in A. thaliana, suggesting that alterations to the formation of cuticular waxes may be the more likely phenotypic change on the leaf surface contributing to the changes in polarization reflection. The possible impacts and adaptive significance of these effects with regard to viral transmission by insects are discussed. PMID:27100188

  2. The Effects of Plant Virus Infection on Polarization Reflection from Leaves.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Daniel J; Partridge, Julian C; Roberts, Nicholas W; Boonham, Neil; Foster, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of leaf surface phenotypes due to virus infection has the potential to affect the likelihood of colonisation by insect vectors, or to affect their feeding activities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether viruses that rely on insects for their transmission, and which can be sensitive to the polarization of light, affect the percentage polarization of light reflected from leaves. We also set out to discover whether a correlation exists between the expression of ECERIFERUM (CER) genes involved in cuticular wax synthesis and the polarization of the light reflected from the leaf surfaces. It was found that the aphid-vectored viruses Potato virus Y and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) caused significant reductions in the percentage polarization of light reflected from the abaxial surfaces of leaves of Nicotiana tabacum, whereas the non-insect-vectored viruses Tobacco mosaic virus and Pepino mosaic virus did not induce this effect. In Arabidopsis thaliana, there was little difference in the impacts of CMV and the non-insect-vectored Turnip vein clearing virus on polarization reflection, with both viruses increasing the percentage polarization of light reflected from the abaxial surfaces of leaves. There was a trend towards increased accumulation of CER6 transcripts in N. tabacum and A. thaliana when infected with aphid-vectored viruses. No significant effect of infection on trichome densities was found in A. thaliana, suggesting that alterations to the formation of cuticular waxes may be the more likely phenotypic change on the leaf surface contributing to the changes in polarization reflection. The possible impacts and adaptive significance of these effects with regard to viral transmission by insects are discussed.

  3. Probing for compositeness, discrete time effects and Markov enviromental influences using spin polarization precession.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Carl

    By considering a spin-one particle precession in a magnetic field, we demonstrate that if very refined measurements were made of both the precession frequency and the amplitude of spin polarization, these measurements could be used to probe for compositeness of gauge bosons, discrete time effects and possible Markov environmental effects.

  4. Sunlight penetration through the Martian polar caps - Effects on the thermal and frost budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard L.

    1992-01-01

    An energy balance model of the seasonal polar caps on Mars is modified to include penetration of solar radiation into and through the ice. Penetration of solar radiation has no effect on subsurface temperature or total frost sublimation if seasonal ice overlies a dust surface. An effect is noted for seasonal ice which overlies the residual polar caps. For the case of an exposed water-ice residual polar cap, the temperature at depth is calculated to be up to several degrees warmer, and the calculated lifetime of seasonal CO2 frost is slightly lower when penetration of sunlight is properly treated in the model. For the case of a residual polar cap which is perennially covered by CO2 frost, the calculated lifetime of seasonal CO2 frost is very slightly increased as a result of sunlight penetration through the ice. Hence, penetration of sunlight into the ice helps to stabilize the observed dichotomy in the residual polar caps on Mars, although it is a small effect.

  5. Sunlight penetration through the Martian polar caps: Effects on the thermal and frost budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1992-01-01

    An energy balance model of the seasonal polar caps on Mars is modified to include penetration of solar radiation into and through the ice. Penetration of solar radiation has no effect on subsurface temperature or total frost sublimation if seasonal ice overlies a dust surface. An effect is noted for seasonal ice which overlies the residual polar caps. For the case of an exposed water-ice residual polar cap, the temperature at depth is calculated to be up to several degrees warmer and the calculated lifetime of seasonal CO2 frost is slightly lower when penetration of sunlight is properly treated in the model. For the case of a residual polar cap which is perennially covered by CO2 frost, the calculated lifetime of seasonal CO2 frost is very slightly increased as a result of sunlight penetration through the ice. Hence, penetration of sunlight into the ice helps to stabilize the observed dichotomy in the residual polar caps on Mars, although it is a small effect.

  6. Investigation of the effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on SANS/SAXS profile for short membrane wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victor; Hawa, Takumi

    2013-09-01

    The effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) profile is investigated based on harmonic motions of the surfactant bilayers with bending as well as thickness fluctuation motions. In this study we consider the case in which the wavelength of the bilayer membrane is shorter than the thickness of the membrane. We find that the thickness of the surfactant bilayer membrane, dm, affects both qdip and qpeak of I(q,0) profile, and that the fluctuation amplitude, a, of the membrane changes the peak of I(q,0). A simple formula is derived to estimate the thickness of the bilayer based on the qdip of the profile obtained from the simulation. The resulting estimates of the thickness of the bilayer with harmonic motion showed accuracy within 1%. Moreover, the bilayer thicknesses estimated from the proposed formula show an excellent agreement with the SANS and SAXS experimental results available in the literatures. We also propose a curve fit model, which describes the relationship between the fluctuation amplitude and the normalized qpeak ratio. The present results show the feasibility of the simple formula to estimate the fluctuation amplitude based on the SANS and SAXS profiles.

  7. Investigation of the effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on SANS/SAXS profile for short membrane wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Victor; Hawa, Takumi

    2013-09-28

    The effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) profile is investigated based on harmonic motions of the surfactant bilayers with bending as well as thickness fluctuation motions. In this study we consider the case in which the wavelength of the bilayer membrane is shorter than the thickness of the membrane. We find that the thickness of the surfactant bilayer membrane, d{sub m}, affects both q{sub dip} and q{sub peak} of I(q,0) profile, and that the fluctuation amplitude, a, of the membrane changes the peak of I(q,0). A simple formula is derived to estimate the thickness of the bilayer based on the q{sub dip} of the profile obtained from the simulation. The resulting estimates of the thickness of the bilayer with harmonic motion showed accuracy within 1%. Moreover, the bilayer thicknesses estimated from the proposed formula show an excellent agreement with the SANS and SAXS experimental results available in the literatures. We also propose a curve fit model, which describes the relationship between the fluctuation amplitude and the normalized q{sub peak} ratio. The present results show the feasibility of the simple formula to estimate the fluctuation amplitude based on the SANS and SAXS profiles.

  8. The Effects of Instrumental Elliptical Polarization on Stellar Point Spread Function Fine Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Joseph C.; Kern, Brian D.; Breckinridge, James B.; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    We present procedures and preliminary results from a study on the effects of instrumental polarization on the fine structure of the stellar point spread function (PSF). These effects are important to understand because the the aberration caused by instrumental polarization on an otherwise diffraction-limited will likely have have severe consequences for extreme high contrast imaging systems such as NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission and the proposed NASA Eclipse mission. The report here, describing our efforts to examine these effects, includes two parts: 1) a numerical analysis of the effect of metallic reflection, with some polarization-specific retardation, on a spherical wavefront; 2) an experimental approach for observing this effect, along with some preliminary laboratory results. While the experimental phase of this study requires more fine-tuning to produce meaningful results, the numerical analysis indicates that the inclusion of polarization-specific phase effects (retardation) results in a point spread function (PSF) aberration more severe than the amplitude (reflectivity) effects previously recorded in the literature.

  9. Can conceptual congruency effects between number, time, and space be accounted for by polarity correspondence?

    PubMed

    Santiago, Julio; Lakens, Daniël

    2015-03-01

    Conceptual congruency effects have been interpreted as evidence for the idea that the representations of abstract conceptual dimensions (e.g., power, affective valence, time, number, importance) rest on more concrete dimensions (e.g., space, brightness, weight). However, an alternative theoretical explanation based on the notion of polarity correspondence has recently received empirical support in the domains of valence and morality, which are related to vertical space (e.g., good things are up). In the present study we provide empirical arguments against the applicability of the polarity correspondence account to congruency effects in two conceptual domains related to lateral space: number and time. Following earlier research, we varied the polarity of the response dimension (left-right) by manipulating keyboard eccentricity. In a first experiment we successfully replicated the congruency effect between vertical and lateral space and its interaction with response eccentricity. We then examined whether this modulation of a concrete-concrete congruency effect can be extended to two types of concrete-abstract effects, those between left-right space and number (in both parity and magnitude judgment tasks), and temporal reference. In all three tasks response eccentricity failed to modulate the congruency effects. We conclude that polarity correspondence does not provide an adequate explanation of conceptual congruency effects in the domains of number and time.

  10. Effect of VSR invariant Chern-Simons Lagrangian on photon polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Alekha C.; Verma, Ravindra K.; Jain, Pankaj E-mail: ravindkv@iitk.ac.in

    2015-07-01

    We propose a generalization of the Chern-Simons (CS) Lagrangian which is invariant under the SIM(2) transformations but not under the full Lorentz group. The generalized lagrangian is also invariant under a SIM(2) gauge transformation. We study the effect of such a term on radiation propagating over cosmological distances. We find that the dominant effect of this term is to produce circular polarization as radiation propagates through space. We use the circular polarization data from distant radio sources in order to impose a limit on this term.

  11. Effects of external fields, dimension and polarization on the resonance fluorescence of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseghi, B.; Razavi, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper simultaneous effects of external electric and magnetic fields, dimension and polarization on the resonance fluorescence spectrum and photon statistics of a spherical quantum dot with parabolic confinement are investigated. With special attention to the optical scattering processes resonance fluorescence spectrum and second-order correlation function are calculated and plotted for different external parameters. Our results show the occurrence of resonance fluorescence similar to atomic systems and considerable effects of external fields, quantum confinement and light polarization on the resonance fluorescence spectrum and second-order correlation function in the quantum dot systems. The existence of Mollow triplets and photon antibunching are strongly depend on these external agents.

  12. Effect of VSR invariant Chern-Simons Lagrangian on photon polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Alekha C.; Verma, Ravindra K.; Jain, Pankaj

    2015-07-21

    We propose a generalization of the Chern-Simons (CS) Lagrangian which is invariant under the SIM(2) transformations but not under the full Lorentz group. The generalized lagrangian is also invariant under a SIM(2) gauge transformation. We study the effect of such a term on radiation propagating over cosmological distances. We find that the dominant effect of this term is to produce circular polarization as radiation propagates through space. We use the circular polarization data from distant radio sources in order to impose a limit on this term.

  13. Permeation of protons, potassium ions, and small polar molecules through phospholipid bilayers as a function of membrane thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paula, S.; Volkov, A. G.; Van Hoek, A. N.; Haines, T. H.; Deamer, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for solute permeation of lipid bilayers. Partitioning into the hydrophobic phase of the bilayer, followed by diffusion, is accepted by many for the permeation of water and other small neutral solutes, but transient pores have also been proposed to account for both water and ionic solute permeation. These two mechanisms make distinctively different predictions about the permeability coefficient as a function of bilayer thickness. Whereas the solubility-diffusion mechanism predicts only a modest variation related to bilayer thickness, the pore model predicts an exponential relationship. To test these models, we measured the permeability of phospholipid bilayers to protons, potassium ions, water, urea, and glycerol. Bilayers were prepared as liposomes, and thickness was varied systematically by using unsaturated lipids with chain lengths ranging from 14 to 24 carbon atoms. The permeability coefficient of water and neutral polar solutes displayed a modest dependence on bilayer thickness, with an approximately linear fivefold decrease as the carbon number varied from 14 to 24 atoms. In contrast, the permeability to protons and potassium ions decreased sharply by two orders of magnitude between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, and leveled off, when the chain length was further extended to 24 carbon atoms. The results for water and the neutral permeating solutes are best explained by the solubility-diffusion mechanism. The results for protons and potassium ions in shorter-chain lipids are consistent with the transient pore model, but better fit the theoretical line predicted by the solubility-diffusion model at longer chain lengths.

  14. Polarity effects in the hisG gene of salmonella require a site within the coding sequence.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, M S; Roth, J R

    1988-02-01

    A single site in the middle of the coding sequence of the hisG gene of Salmonella is required for most of the polar effect of mutations in this gene. Nonsense and insertion mutations mapping upstream of this point in the hisG gene all have strong polar effects on expression of downstream genes in the operon; mutations mapping promotor distal to this site have little or no polar effect. Two previously known hisG mutations, mapping in the region of the polarity site, abolish the polarity effect of insertion mutations mapping upstream of this region. New polarity site mutations have been selected which have lost the polar effect of upstream nonsense mutations. All mutations abolishing the function of the site are small deletions; three are identical, 28-bp deletions which have arisen independently. A fourth mutation is a deletion of 16 base pairs internal to the larger deletion. Several point mutations within this 16-bp region have no effect on the function of the polarity site. We believe that a small number of polarity sites of this type are responsible for polarity in all genes. The site in the hisG gene is more easily detected than most because it appears to be the only such site in the hisG gene and because it maps in the center of the coding sequence.

  15. Hepatocyte Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Treyer, Aleksandr; Müsch, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes, like other epithelia, are situated at the interface between the organism’s exterior and the underlying internal milieu and organize the vectorial exchange of macromolecules between these two spaces. To mediate this function, epithelial cells, including hepatocytes, are polarized with distinct luminal domains that are separated by tight junctions from lateral domains engaged in cell-cell adhesion and from basal domains that interact with the underlying extracellular matrix. Despite these universal principles, hepatocytes distinguish themselves from other nonstriated epithelia by their multipolar organization. Each hepatocyte participates in multiple, narrow lumina, the bile canaliculi, and has multiple basal surfaces that face the endothelial lining. Hepatocytes also differ in the mechanism of luminal protein trafficking from other epithelia studied. They lack polarized protein secretion to the luminal domain and target single-spanning and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored bile canalicular membrane proteins via transcytosis from the basolateral domain. We compare this unique hepatic polarity phenotype with that of the more common columnar epithelial organization and review our current knowledge of the signaling mechanisms and the organization of polarized protein trafficking that govern the establishment and maintenance of hepatic polarity. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1, which is activated by the bile acid taurocholate and, in turn, activates adenosine monophosphate kinase-related kinases including AMPK1/2 and Par1 paralogues has emerged as a key determinant of hepatic polarity. We propose that the absence of a hepatocyte basal lamina and differences in cell-cell adhesion signaling that determine the positioning of tight junctions are two crucial determinants for the distinct hepatic and columnar polarity phenotypes. PMID:23720287

  16. Effect of lipid peroxidation on membrane-bound Ca2+-ATPase activity of the intestinal brush-border membranes.

    PubMed

    Ohta, A; Mohri, T; Ohyashiki, T

    1989-09-04

    We have studied lipid peroxidation and Ca2+-ATPase activity of the porcine intestinal brush-border membranes using a oxygen-radical-generating system consisting of dithiothreitol (DTT)/Fe2+ and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH). The rates of lipid peroxidation were measured by formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBAR) and conjugated diene. Incubation of the membranes with DTT/Fe2+ in the absence and presence of t-BuOOH resulted in a slight (about 20%) and a marked (about 50%) inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity, respectively. The degree of inhibition was dependent on the hydroperoxide concentration. Addition of thiourea effectively protected Ca2+-ATPase activity but catalase and superoxide dismutase showed a slight and no effect on protection of the ATPase activity, respectively. Results of kinetic studies on the ATPase activity with varying ATP and Ca2+ concentrations revealed that the decrease in the enzyme activity by treatment with these oxidizing agents is mainly due to decrease of the Vmax value. Modification of SH groups in the membrane proteins by thiol group reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide, monoiodoacetate and monoiodacetamide did not induce the inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity. From these results, it is suggested that inhibition of the ATPase activity of the membranes by treatment with DTT/Fe2+ in the presence and absence of t-BuOOH is dependent on lipid peroxidation and that oxidative modification of SH groups may not be directly involved to the loss of the ATPase activity. In addition, results of the fluorescence anisotropy measurements of pyrene-labeled membranes suggested that change in the Ca2+-ATPase activity is partly related to a decrease in the membrane lipid fluidity.

  17. Polymeric blend nanocomposite membranes for ethanol dehydration-effect of morphology and membrane-solvent interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanocomposite membranes (NCMs) of sodium alginate/poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) blend polymers incorporated with varying concentrations of phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40) (PWA) nanoparticles have been prepared and used in ethanol dehydration by the pervaporation (PV) technique. Effe...

  18. Coherent-backscatter effect - A vector formulation accounting for polarization and absorption effects and small or large scatterers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Previous theoretical work on the coherent-backscatter effect in the context of speckle time autocorrelation has gone beyond the diffusion approximation and the assumption of isotropic (point) scatterers. This paper extends the theory to include the effects of polarization and absorption, and to give the angular line shape. The results are expressions for angular variations valid for small and large scatterers and linear and circular polarizations, in lossless or lossy media. Calculations show that multiple anisotropic scattering results in the preservation of incident polarization. Application to a problem in radar astronomy is considered. It is shown that the unusual radar measurements (high reflectivity and polarization ratios) of Jupiter's icy Galilean satellites can be explained by coherent backscatter from anisotropic (forward) scatterers.

  19. Effects of biradical deuteration on the performance of DNP: Towards better performing polarizing agents

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Reinig, Regina R.; Slowing, Igor I.; ...

    2015-11-20

    We study the effects of the deuteration of biradical polarizing agents on the efficiency of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the cross-effect. To this end, we synthesized a series of bTbK and TOTAPol biradicals with systematically increased deuterium substitution. The deuteration increases the radicals' relaxation time, thus contributing to a higher saturation factor and larger DNP enhancement, and reduces the pool of protons within the so-called spin diffusion barrier. Notably, we report that full or partial deuteration leads to improved DNP enhancement factors in standard samples, but also slows down the build-up of hyperpolarization. Improvements in DNP enhancements factors ofmore » up to 70% and time savings of up to 38% are obtained upon full deuteration. As a result, it is foreseen that this approach may be applied to other DNP polarizing agents thus enabling further sensitivity improvements.« less

  20. Effects of biradical deuteration on the performance of DNP: Towards better performing polarizing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Reinig, Regina R.; Slowing, Igor I.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-11-20

    We study the effects of the deuteration of biradical polarizing agents on the efficiency of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the cross-effect. To this end, we synthesized a series of bTbK and TOTAPol biradicals with systematically increased deuterium substitution. The deuteration increases the radicals' relaxation time, thus contributing to a higher saturation factor and larger DNP enhancement, and reduces the pool of protons within the so-called spin diffusion barrier. Notably, we report that full or partial deuteration leads to improved DNP enhancement factors in standard samples, but also slows down the build-up of hyperpolarization. Improvements in DNP enhancements factors of up to 70% and time savings of up to 38% are obtained upon full deuteration. As a result, it is foreseen that this approach may be applied to other DNP polarizing agents thus enabling further sensitivity improvements.