Science.gov

Sample records for effective potential calculation

  1. Use of Relativistic Effective Core Potentials in the Calculation of Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Kim, Yong-Ki

    1999-01-01

    Based on the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model, the advantage of using relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) in the calculation of total ionization cross sections of heavy atoms or molecules containing heavy atoms is discussed. Numerical examples for Ar, Kr, Xe, and WF6 are presented.

  2. Exchange-only optimized effective potential calculation of excited state spectra for He and Be atoms.

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Muller, Richard Partain

    2006-02-01

    The optimized effective potential (OEP) method allows orbital-dependent functionals to be used in density functional theory (DFT), which, in particular, allows exact exchange formulations of the exchange energy to be used in DFT calculations. Because the exact exchange is inherently self-interaction correcting, the resulting OEP calculations have been found to yield superior band-gaps for condensed-phase systems. Here we apply these methods to the isolated atoms He and Be, and compare to high quality experiments and calculations to demonstrate that the orbital energies accurately reproduce the excited state spectrum for these species. These results suggest that coupling the exchange-only OEP calculations with proper (orbital-dependent or other) correlation functions might allow quantitative accuracy from DFT calculations.

  3. Temperature dependent effective potential method for accurate free energy calculations of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, Olle; Steneteg, Peter; Abrikosov, I. A.; Simak, S. I.

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a thorough and accurate method of determining anharmonic free energies, the temperature dependent effective potential technique (TDEP). It is based on ab initio molecular dynamics followed by a mapping onto a model Hamiltonian that describes the lattice dynamics. The formalism and the numerical aspects of the technique are described in detail. A number of practical examples are given, and results are presented, which confirm the usefulness of TDEP within ab initio and classical molecular dynamics frameworks. In particular, we examine from first principles the behavior of force constants upon the dynamical stabilization of the body centered phase of Zr, and show that they become more localized. We also calculate the phase diagram for 4He modeled with the Aziz potential and obtain results which are in favorable agreement both with respect to experiment and established techniques.

  4. Accuracy of Effective Core Potentials and Basis Sets for Density Functional Calculations, Including Relativistic Effects, As Illustrated by Calculations on Arsenic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuefei; Truhlar, Donald G

    2011-09-13

    For molecules containing the fourth-period element arsenic, we test (i, ii) the accuracy of all-electron (AE) basis sets from the def2-xZVP and ma-xZVP series (where xZ is S, TZ, or QZ), (iii) the accuracy of the 6-311G series of AE basis sets with additional polarization and diffuse functions, and (iv) the performance of effective core potentials (ECPs). The first set of tests involves basis-set convergence studies with eleven density functionals for five cases: equilibrium dissociation energy (De) of As2, vertical ionization potential (VIP) of As2, IP of As, acid dissociation of H3AsO4, and De of FeAs. A second set of tests involves the same kinds of basis-set convergence studies for the VIP and De values of As3 and As4 clusters. Both relativistic and nonrelativistic calculations are considered, including in each case both AE calculations and calculations with ECPs. Convergence and accuracy are assessed by comparing to relativistic AE calculations with the cc-pV5Z-DK or ma-cc-pV5Z-DK basis and to nonrelativistic AE calculations with the cc-pV5Z or ma-cc-pV5Z basis. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the abilities of ECPs with both their recommended basis sets and other basis sets to reproduce the results of all-electron relativistic calculations. The performance of the def2 and ma series basis sets is consistent with their sizes, and quadruple-ζ basis sets are the best. The def2-TZVP basis set performs better than most of the 6-311G series basis sets, which are the most commonly used basis sets in the previous studies of arsenic compounds. However, relativistic def2-TZVP calculations are not recommended. The large-core ECPs, which are the only available ECPs for arsenic in the popular Gaussian program, have average errors of 9-12 kcal/mol for the arsenic systems studied; therefore, these ECPs are not recommended. The triple-ζ small-core relativistic ECP (RECP) basis set cc-pVTZ-PP is found to have performance better than that of the def2-TZVP

  5. Properties of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms calculated using an accurate effective core potential

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Robin; Christ, Kevin V.; Greene, Chris H.

    2004-04-01

    The first three electronically excited states in the alkaline-earth-metal atoms magnesium, calcium, and strontium comprise the (nsnp){sup 3}P{sub J}{sup o}(J=0,1,2) fine-structure manifold. All three states are metastable and are of interest for optical atomic clocks as well as for cold-collision physics. An efficient technique--based on a physically motivated potential that models the presence of the ionic core--is employed to solve the Schroedinger equation for the two-electron valence shell. In this way, radiative lifetimes, laser-induced clock shifts, and long-range interaction parameters are calculated for metastable Mg, Ca, and Sr.

  6. Relativistic ab initio model potential calculations including spin-orbit effects through the Wood-Boring Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijo, Luis

    1995-05-01

    Presented in this paper, is a practical implementation of the use of the Wood-Boring Hamiltonian [Phys. Rev. B 18, 2701 (1978)] in atomic and molecular ab initio core model potential calculations (AIMP), as a means to include spin-orbit relativistic effects, in addition to the mass-velocity and Darwin operators, which were already included in the spin-free version of the relativistic AIMP method. Calculations on the neutral and singly ionized atoms of the halogen elements and sixth-row p-elements Tl-Rn are presented, as well as on the one or two lowest lying states of the diatomic molecules HX, HX+, (X=F, Cl, Br, I, At) TlH, PbH, BiH, and PoH. The calculated spin-orbit splittings and bonding properties show a stable, good quality, of the size of what can be expected from an effective potential method.

  7. Calculate and Plot Complex Potential

    1998-05-05

    SOLUPLOT is a program designed to calculate and plot complex potential, pH diagrams and log oxygen activity, pH diagrams for aqueous chemical syatems, considering speciation of ligands, from free energy and thermodynamic activity data. These diagrams, commonly referred to as Eh-pH and ao2-pH diagrams, respectively, define areas of predominance in Eh-pH diagrams or ao2-pH space for chemical species of a chemical system at equilibrium. Over an area of predominance, one predominant species is at greatermore » activity than the other species of the system considered. The diagram axes, pH (a measure of hydrogen ion activity) and either Eh or log ao2 (measures of a tendency toward either oxidation or reduction) , are paremeters commonly applied in describing the chemistry of aqueous systems.« less

  8. Molecular wave function and effective adiabatic potentials calculated by extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Ide, Yoshihiro; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2015-12-31

    We first calculate the ground-state molecular wave function of 1D model H{sub 2} molecule by solving the coupled equations of motion formulated in the extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method by the imaginary time propagation. From the comparisons with the results obtained by the Born-Huang (BH) expansion method as well as with the exact wave function, we observe that the memory size required in the extended MCTDHF method is about two orders of magnitude smaller than in the BH expansion method to achieve the same accuracy for the total energy. Second, in order to provide a theoretical means to understand dynamical behavior of the wave function, we propose to define effective adiabatic potential functions and compare them with the conventional adiabatic electronic potentials, although the notion of the adiabatic potentials is not used in the extended MCTDHF approach. From the comparison, we conclude that by calculating the effective potentials we may be able to predict the energy differences among electronic states even for a time-dependent system, e.g., time-dependent excitation energies, which would be difficult to be estimated within the BH expansion approach.

  9. Towards a spectroscopically accurate set of potentials for heavy hydride laser cooling candidates: Effective core potential calculations of BaH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Keith; McLaughlin, Brendan M.; Lane, Ian C.

    2016-04-01

    BaH (and its isotopomers) is an attractive molecular candidate for laser cooling to ultracold temperatures and a potential precursor for the production of ultracold gases of hydrogen and deuterium. The theoretical challenge is to simulate the laser cooling cycle as reliably as possible and this paper addresses the generation of a highly accurate ab initio 2Σ+ potential for such studies. The performance of various basis sets within the multi-reference configuration-interaction (MRCI) approximation with the Davidson correction is tested and taken to the Complete Basis Set (CBS) limit. It is shown that the calculated molecular constants using a 46 electron effective core-potential and even-tempered augmented polarized core-valence basis sets (aug-pCVnZ-PP, n = 4 and 5) but only including three active electrons in the MRCI calculation are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. The predicted dissociation energy De for the X2Σ+ state (extrapolated to the CBS limit) is 16 895.12 cm-1 (2.094 eV), which agrees within 0.1% of a revised experimental value of <16 910.6 cm-1, while the calculated re is within 0.03 pm of the experimental result.

  10. Development and testing of a compact basis set for use in effective core potential calculations on rhodium complexes.

    PubMed

    Roscioni, Otello M; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M

    2012-10-01

    We present a set of effective core potential (ECP) basis sets for rhodium atoms which are of reasonable size for use in electronic structure calculations. In these ECP basis sets, the Los Alamos ECP is used to simulate the effect of the core electrons while an optimized set of Gaussian functions, which includes polarization and diffuse functions, is used to describe the valence electrons. These basis sets were optimized to reproduce the ionization energy and electron affinity of atomic rhodium. They were also tested by computing the electronic ground state geometry and harmonic frequencies of [Rh(CO)(2) μ-Cl](2) , Rh(CO)(2) ClPy, and RhCO (neutral and its positive, and negative ions) as well as the enthalpy of the reaction of [Rh(CO)(2) μ-Cl](2) with pyridine (Py) to give Rh(CO)(2) ClPy, at different levels of theory. Good agreement with experimental values was obtained. Although the number of basis functions used in our ECP basis sets is smaller than those of other ECP basis sets of comparable quality, we show that the newly developed ECP basis sets provide the flexibility and precision required to reproduce a wide range of chemical and physical properties of rhodium compounds. Therefore, we recommend the use of these compact yet accurate ECP basis sets for electronic structure calculations on molecules involving rhodium atoms.

  11. Model potential calculations of lithium transitions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, T. C.; Dalgarno, A.

    1972-01-01

    Semi-empirical potentials are constructed that have eigenvalues close in magnitude to the binding energies of the valence electron in lithium. The potentials include the long range polarization force between the electron and the core. The corresponding eigenfunctions are used to calculate dynamic polarizabilities, discrete oscillator strengths, photoionization cross sections and radiative recombination coefficients. A consistent application of the theory imposes a modification on the transition operator, but its effects are small for lithium. The method presented can be regarded as a numerical generalization of the widely used Coulomb approximation.

  12. Recommended improvements to the DS02 dosimetry system's calculation of organ doses and their potential advantages for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation.

    PubMed

    Cullings, Harry M

    2012-03-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) uses a dosimetry system to calculate radiation doses received by the Japanese atomic bomb survivors based on their reported location and shielding at the time of exposure. The current system, DS02, completed in 2003, calculates detailed doses to 15 particular organs of the body from neutrons and gamma rays, using new source terms and transport calculations as well as some other improvements in the calculation of terrain and structural shielding, but continues to use methods from an older system, DS86, to account for body self-shielding. Although recent developments in models of the human body from medical imaging, along with contemporary computer speed and software, allow for improvement of the calculated organ doses, before undertaking changes to the organ dose calculations, it is important to evaluate the improvements that can be made and their potential contribution to RERF's research. The analysis provided here suggests that the most important improvements can be made by providing calculations for more organs or tissues and by providing a larger series of age- and sex-specific models of the human body from birth to adulthood, as well as fetal models. PMID:22262817

  13. Calculating the potential to emit particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Vaart, D.R. van der

    1996-09-01

    As the implementation of the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act, and Title V in particular, continues, questions regarding the calculation of a facility`s potential to emit continue to surface. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has provided limited guidance decisions, although many are still being made during Title V implementation. This paper discusses what is meant by PM-10 and the validity of using sieve analysis in estimating particulate emissions. Title V of the Clean Air Amendments of 1990, and the accompanying regulations in 40 CFR Part 70, defines a major source subject to Title V by calculating its potential emissions of all regulated pollutants, both criteria and hazardous air pollutants. For PM, the threshold emission rate is 100 tons per year (tpy) for applicability to Title V. Much discussion has ensued regarding a definition of PM for the purpose of determining a facility`s potential to emit. Recently, EPA provided guidance which indicated that only PM-10 should be considered for making this determination although many states regulate larger particles through their state implementation plan (SIP) as a surrogate for PM-10.

  14. On calculating the potential vorticity flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-03-15

    We discuss and compare different approaches to calculating the dynamics of anisotropic flow structure formation in quasi two-dimensional turbulence based on potential vorticity (PV) transport in real space. The general structure of the PV flux in the relaxation processes is deduced non-perturbatively. The transport coefficients of the PV flux are then systematically calculated using perturbation theory. We develop two non-perturbative relaxation models: the first is a mean field theory for the dynamics of minimum enstrophy relaxation based on the requirement that the mean flux of PV dissipates total potential enstrophy but conserves total fluid kinetic energy. The results show that the structure of PV flux has the form of a sum of a positive definite hyper-viscous and a negative or positive viscous flux of PV. Turbulence spreading is shown to be related to PV mixing via the link of turbulence energy flux to PV flux. In the relaxed state, the ratio of the PV gradient to zonal flow velocity is homogenized. This homogenized quantity sets a constraint on the amplitudes of PV and zonal flow in the relaxed state. The second relaxation model is derived from symmetry principles alone. The form of PV flux contains a nonlinear convective term in addition to viscous and hyper-viscous terms. For both cases, the transport coefficients are calculated using perturbation theory. For a broad turbulence spectrum, a modulational calculation of the PV flux gives both a negative viscosity and a positive hyper-viscosity. For a narrow turbulence spectrum, the result of a parametric instability analysis shows that PV transport is also convective. In both relaxation and perturbative analyses, it is shown that turbulent PV transport is sensitive to flow structure, and the transport coefficients are nonlinear functions of flow shear.

  15. Rotational excitation of symmetric top molecules by collisions with atoms: Close coupling, coupled states, and effective potential calculations for NH3-He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1976-01-01

    The formalism for describing rotational excitation in collisions between symmetric top rigid rotors and spherical atoms is presented both within the accurate quantum close coupling framework and also the coupled states approximation of McGuire and Kouri and the effective potential approximation of Rabitz. Calculations are reported for thermal energy NH3-He collisions, treating NH3 as a rigid rotor and employing a uniform electron gas (Gordon-Kim) approximation for the intermolecular potential. Coupled states are found to be in nearly quantitative agreement with close coupling results while the effective potential method is found to be at least qualitatively correct. Modifications necessary to treat the inversion motion in NH3 are discussed.

  16. Two-component relativistic density-functional calculations of the dimers of the halogens from bromine through element 117 using effective core potential and all-electron methods.

    PubMed

    Mitin, Alexander V; van Wüllen, Christoph

    2006-02-14

    A two-component quasirelativistic Hamiltonian based on spin-dependent effective core potentials is used to calculate ionization energies and electron affinities of the heavy halogen atom bromine through the superheavy element 117 (eka-astatine) as well as spectroscopic constants of the homonuclear dimers of these atoms. We describe a two-component Hartree-Fock and density-functional program that treats spin-orbit coupling self-consistently within the orbital optimization procedure. A comparison with results from high-order Douglas-Kroll calculations--for the superheavy systems also with zeroth-order regular approximation and four-component Dirac results--demonstrates the validity of the pseudopotential approximation. The density-functional (but not the Hartree-Fock) results show very satisfactory agreement with theoretical coupled cluster as well as experimental data where available, such that the theoretical results can serve as an estimate for the hitherto unknown properties of astatine, element 117, and their dimers. PMID:16483205

  17. Calculations of 21 Λ-S and 42 Ω states of BC molecule: Potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wei; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-01-15

    The potential energy curves (PECs) were calculated for the 42 Ω states generated from the 21 Λ-S states (X(4)Σ(-), A(4)Π, B(4)Σ(-), a(2)Π, b(2)Σ(-), c(2)Δ, d(2)Σ(+), e(2)Π, 3(2)Π, 4(2)Π, 5(2)Π, 2(2)Σ(-), 3(2)Σ(-), 2(2)Σ(+), 3(2)Σ(+), 2(2)Δ, 3(2)Δ, 1(4)Σ(+), 2(4)Π, 1(4)Δ and 1(2)Φ), which originated from the lowest two dissociation channels, B((2)Pu)+C((3)Pg) and B((2)Pu)+C((1)Dg), of the BC molecule. The PECs were calculated for internuclear separations from 0.08 to 1.10 nm using the CASSCF method, which was followed by the icMRCI approach with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. Of these 21 Λ-S states, the e(2)Π, 2(2)Δ, 2(2)Σ(-), 4(2)Π, 1(2)Φ and 3(2)Δ possess the double wells. The A(4)Π, a(2)Π, c(2)Δ, 2(4)Π, 4(2)Π, 5(2)Π, 1(4)Δ and 1(2)Φ states are inverted with the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect taken into account. The first well of e(2)Π state and the second well of 4(2)Π and 2(2)Δ states do not have any vibrational states whether with or without the SOC effect included. All the Λ-S and Ω states involved in this paper are bound states. Scalar relativistic correction was included by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of an aug-cc-pV5Z basis set. Core-valence correlation correction was included at the level of an aug-cc-pCV5Z basis set. The SOC effect was accounted for by the state interaction method with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian and the all-electron cc-pCV5Z basis set. The PECs of all the states were extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters were obtained. The vibrational properties of several Λ-S and Ω states with the relatively shallow wells were evaluated. The SOC effect on the spectroscopic parameters is not obvious for almost all the states. The spectroscopic properties reported in this paper can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  18. Calculations of 21 Λ-S and 42 Ω states of BC molecule: Potential energy curves, spectroscopic parameters and spin-orbit coupling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Wei; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2016-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) were calculated for the 42 Ω states generated from the 21 Λ-S states (X4Σ-, A4Π, B4Σ-, a2Π, b2Σ-, c2Δ, d2Σ+, e2Π, 32Π, 42Π, 52Π, 22Σ-, 32Σ-, 22Σ+, 32Σ+, 22Δ, 32Δ, 14Σ+, 24Π, 14Δ and 12Φ), which originated from the lowest two dissociation channels, B(2Pu) + C(3Pg) and B(2Pu) + C(1Dg), of the BC molecule. The PECs were calculated for internuclear separations from 0.08 to 1.10 nm using the CASSCF method, which was followed by the icMRCI approach with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. Of these 21 Λ-S states, the e2Π, 22Δ, 22Σ-, 42Π, 12Φ and 32Δ possess the double wells. The A4Π, a2Π, c2Δ, 24Π, 42Π, 52Π, 14Δ and 12Φ states are inverted with the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect taken into account. The first well of e2Π state and the second well of 42Π and 22Δ states do not have any vibrational states whether with or without the SOC effect included. All the Λ-S and Ω states involved in this paper are bound states. Scalar relativistic correction was included by the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of an aug-cc-pV5Z basis set. Core-valence correlation correction was included at the level of an aug-cc-pCV5Z basis set. The SOC effect was accounted for by the state interaction method with the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian and the all-electron cc-pCV5Z basis set. The PECs of all the states were extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The spectroscopic parameters were obtained. The vibrational properties of several Λ-S and Ω states with the relatively shallow wells were evaluated. The SOC effect on the spectroscopic parameters is not obvious for almost all the states. The spectroscopic properties reported in this paper can be expected to be reliably predicted ones.

  19. Accurate ionization potential of semiconductors from efficient density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lin-Hui

    2016-07-01

    Despite its huge successes in total-energy-related applications, the Kohn-Sham scheme of density functional theory cannot get reliable single-particle excitation energies for solids. In particular, it has not been able to calculate the ionization potential (IP), one of the most important material parameters, for semiconductors. We illustrate that an approximate exact-exchange optimized effective potential (EXX-OEP), the Becke-Johnson exchange, can be used to largely solve this long-standing problem. For a group of 17 semiconductors, we have obtained the IPs to an accuracy similar to that of the much more sophisticated G W approximation (GWA), with the computational cost of only local-density approximation/generalized gradient approximation. The EXX-OEP, therefore, is likely as useful for solids as for finite systems. For solid surfaces, the asymptotic behavior of the vx c has effects similar to those of finite systems which, when neglected, typically cause the semiconductor IPs to be underestimated. This may partially explain why standard GWA systematically underestimates the IPs and why using the same GWA procedures has not been able to get an accurate IP and band gap at the same time.

  20. Comparison of the Effective Fragment Potential Method with Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory in the Calculation of Intermolecular Energies for Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Samuel Y S; Izgorodina, Ekaterina I

    2016-06-14

    The effective fragment potential (EFP) method that decomposes the interaction energy as a sum of the five fundamental forces-electrostatic, exchange-repulsion, polarization, dispersion, and charge transfer-was applied to a large test set of ionic liquid ion pairs and compared against the state-of-the-art method, Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT). The ion pairs include imidazolium and pyrrolidinium cations combined with anions that are routinely used in the field of ionic liquids. The aug-cc-pVDZ, aug-cc-pVTZ, and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets were used for EFP, while SAPT2+3/aug-cc-pVDZ provided the benchmark energies. Differences between the two methods were found to be large, and strongly dependent on the anion type. For the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, which produced the least errors, average relative errors were between 2.3% and 18.4% for pyrrolidinium ion pairs and between 2.1% and 27.7% for imidazolium ion pairs for each individual energetic component (excluding charge transfer), as well as the total interaction energy. Charge transfer gave the largest relative errors: 56% and 63% on average for pyrrolidinium- and imidazolium-based ion pairs, respectively. Scaling of the EFP components against SAPT2+3 showed improvement for polarization (induction) and dispersion terms, thus indicating potential for the development of cost-effective alternatives for intermolecular induction and dispersion potentials for ionic liquids.

  1. Calculating Standard Reduction Potentials of [4Fe–4S] Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, Bradley S.; Niu, Shuqiang; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2013-03-15

    The oxidation–reduction potentials of electron transfer proteins determine the driving forces for their electron transfer reactions. Although the type of redox site determines the intrinsic energy required to add or remove an electron, the electrostatic interaction energy between the redox site and its surrounding environment can greatly shift the redox potentials. Here, a method for calculating the reduction potential versus the standard hydrogen electrode, E°, of a metalloprotein using a combinatio of density functional theory and continuum electrostatics is presented. This work focuses on the methodology for the continuum electrostatics calculations, including various factors that may affect the accuracy. The calculations are demonstrated using crystal structures of six homologous HiPIPs, which give E° that are in excellent agreement with experimental results.

  2. New approach to calculating the potential energy of colliding nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kurmanov, R. S.; Kosenko, G. I.

    2014-12-15

    The differential method proposed by the present authors earlier for the reduction of volume integrals in calculating the potential energy of a compound nucleus is generalized to the case of two interacting nuclei. The Coulomb interaction energy is obtained for the cases of a sharp and a diffuse boundary of nuclei, while the nuclear interaction energy is found only for nuclei with a sharp boundary, the finiteness of the nuclear-force range being taken into account. The present method of calculations permits reducing the time it takes to compute the potential energy at least by two orders of magnitude.

  3. Chemical potential calculations in dense liquids using metadynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, C.; Giberti, F.; Parrinello, M.

    2016-07-01

    The calculation of chemical potential has traditionally been a challenge in atomistic simulations. One of the most used approaches is Widom's insertion method in which the chemical potential is calculated by periodically attempting to insert an extra particle in the system. In dense systems this method fails since the insertion probability is very low. In this paper we show that in a homogeneous fluid the insertion probability can be increased using metadynamics. We test our method on a supercooled high density binary Lennard-Jones fluid. We find that we can obtain efficiently converged results even when Widom's method fails.

  4. Computer programs for calculating potential flow in propulsion system inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockman, N. O.; Button, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    In the course of designing inlets, particularly for VTOL and STOL propulsion systems, a calculational procedure utilizing three computer programs evolved. The chief program is the Douglas axisymmetric potential flow program called EOD which calculates the incompressible potential flow about arbitrary axisymmetric bodies. The other two programs, original with Lewis, are called SCIRCL AND COMBYN. Program SCIRCL generates input for EOD from various specified analytic shapes for the inlet components. Program COMBYN takes basic solutions output by EOD and combines them into solutions of interest, and applies a compressibility correction.

  5. Calculation of interaction-induced spectra using complex absorbing potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Magnus; Antipov, Sergey V.

    2010-10-29

    A complex absorbing potential method is implemented for calculation of collision-induced spectra. The scheme provides a way to avoid the integration of the Schroedinger equation to very large separations of the collisional pair. The method is tested by reproducing a previously computed absorption spectrum for H-He at two different temperatures.

  6. Numerical Green's functions in optical potential calculations for positron scattering from argon and neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartschat, K.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    An optical potential method was applied to the calculation of positron scattering from the noble gases in order to determine the effect of open excitation channels on the shape of differential scattering cross sections.

  7. Off disk-center potential field calculations using vector magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gary, G. Allen

    1989-01-01

    A potential field calculation for off disk-center vector magnetograms that uses all the three components of the measured field is investigated. There is neither any need for interpolation of grid points between the image plane and the heliographic plane nor for an extension or a truncation to a heliographic rectangle. Hence, the method provides the maximum information content from the photospheric field as well as the most consistent potential field independent of the viewing angle. The introduction of polarimetric noise produces a less tolerant extrapolation procedure than using the line-of-sight extrapolation, but the resultant standard deviation is still small enough for the practical utility of this method.

  8. Lambda-Nucleon Potential Calculated from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nemura, Hidekatsu

    2011-10-21

    We present our studies of Lambda-Nucleon ({Lambda}N) interaction by using lattice QCD. The equal-time Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) amplitude of the lowest energy scattering state of a proton-{Lambda} system is calculated from lattice QCD. In this report, two different types of gauge configurations are employed: (i) Quenched QCD configurations at {beta} = 5.7 (a = 0.1416(9) fm) on a 32{sup 3}x48 lattice, whose spatial volume is (4.5 fm){sup 3}.(ii)2+1 flavor full QCD configurations generated by the PACS-CS collaboration at {beta} = 1.9 (a = 0.0907(13) fm) on a 32{sup 3}x64 lattice, whose spatial volume is (2.90 fm){sup 3}. The spin-singlet central potential is calculated from the NBS wave function for the spin J = 0 state, whereas the spin-triplet central potential as well as the tensor potential are deduced simultaneously from the NBS wave function for the spin J = 1 state by dividing it into the S-wave and the D-wave components.

  9. Calculations in support of a potential definition of large release

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Davis, R.E.; Mubayi, V.

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated a hierarchy of safety goals with the qualitative safety goals as Level I of the hierarchy, backed up by the quantitative health objectives as Level II and the large release guideline as Level III. The large release guideline has been stated in qualitative terms as a magnitude of release of the core inventory whose frequency should not exceed 10{sup -6} per reactor year. However, the Commission did not provide a quantitative specification of a large release. This report describes various specifications of a large release and focuses, in particular, on an examination of releases which have a potential to lead to one prompt fatality in the mean. The basic information required to set up the calculations was derived from the simplified source terms which were obtained from approximations of the NUREG-1150 source terms. Since the calculation of consequences is affected by a large number of assumptions, a generic site with a (conservatively determined) population density and meteorology was specified. At this site, various emergency responses (including no response) were assumed based on information derived from earlier studies. For each of the emergency response assumptions, a set of calculations were performed with the simplified source terms; these included adjustments to the source terms, such as the timing of the release, the core inventory, and the release fractions of different radionuclides, to arrive at a result of one mean prompt fatality in each case. Each of the source terms, so defined, has the potential to be a candidate for a large release. The calculations show that there are many possible candidate source terms for a large release depending on the characteristics which are felt to be important.

  10. Proliferation Potential of Accelerator-Drive Systems: Feasibility Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Riendeau, C.D.; Moses, D.L.; Olson, A.P.

    1998-11-01

    Accelerator-driven systems for fissile materials production have been proposed and studied since the early 1950s. Recent advances in beam power levels for small accelerators have raised the possibility that such use could be feasible for a potential proliferator. The objective of this study is to review the state of technology development for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources and subcritical reactors. Energy and power requirements were calculated for a proton accelerator-driven neutron spallation source and subcritical reactors to produce a significant amount of fissile material--plutonium.

  11. A Molecular Full-Potential LMTO Calculation for Copper Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Radhika Prosad; Banerjea, Amitava; Mookerjee, Abhijit; Bhattacharyya, A. K.

    We study the electronic properties of small (10-20 atoms) copper clusters using the newly-developed molecular full-potential linearized muffin-tin orbital two-centre-fit (TCF) method of Methfessel and van Schilfgaarde. The geometric structures of the clusters had earlier been determined by us through simulated annealing using the Equivalent Crystal Theory to compute total energies. We report the variation of the binding energy, as obtained from the TCF calculations, with cluster size and compare these to the binding energies determined, for the same structures, from the ECT. We also show the variation of the HOMO-LUMO gap with cluster size, and the pseudo-density of states for select cluster sizes.

  12. Electronic structure calculations toward new potentially AChE inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, A. A. N.; Martins, J. B. L.; Gargano, R.; dos Santos, M. L.; Romeiro, L. A. S.

    2007-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was the use of natural non-isoprenoid phenolic lipid of cashew nut shell liquid from Anacardium occidentale as lead material for generating new potentially candidates of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Therefore, we studied the electronic structure of 15 molecules derivatives from the cardanol using the following groups: methyl, acetyl, N, N-dimethylcarbamoyl, N, N-dimethylamine, N, N-diethylamine, piperidine, pyrrolidine, and N-benzylamine. The calculations were performed at RHF level using 6-31G, 6-31G(d), 6-31+G(d) and 6-311G(d,p) basis functions. Among the proposed compounds we found that the structures with substitution by acetyl, N, N-dimethylcarbamoyl, N, N-dimethylamine, and pyrrolidine groups were better correlated to rivastigmine indicating possible activity.

  13. Calculation of the Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities for Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiqiang; Krieger, J. B.; Iafrate, G. J.; Savin, A.

    1998-03-01

    The method employing the self-interaction-corrected correlation energy functional obtained from the homogeneous electron gas with a gap is extended to atoms and ions with non-zero spin polarization. As in the case for atoms and ions with ζ=3D0, the error in the calculated Ec is significantly smaller than in the LSD approximation with zero gap for atoms and ions with Z<=18. Comparison of the resulting ionization potentials and electron affinities with experimental values will also be presented. Finally, we will discuss the possibility of obtaining saturation for Ec for the He, Li, N, O, F and Ne isoelectronic series, but a divergent Ec for the Be, B and C isoelectronic series, in the large Z limit.

  14. Effective Interactions for Nuclear Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoracci, Angelo

    Experimental interest in nuclei far from stability, especially due to proposed advancements in rare isotope facilities, has stimulated improvements in theoretical predictions of exotic isotopes. However, standard techniques developed for nuclear structure calculations, Configuration Interaction theory and Energy Density Functional methods, lack either the generality or the accuracy necessary for reliable calculations away from stability. Hybrid methods, which combine Configuration Interaction theory and Energy Density Functional methods in order to exploit their beneficial properties, are currently under investigation for improved theoretical capabilities. A new technique to produce nuclear Hamiltonians has been developed, implementing renormalization group methods, many-body perturbative techniques, and Energy Density Functional methods. Connection to the underlying physics is a primary focus, limiting the number of free parameters necessary in the procedure. The main benefit of this approach is the improvement in the quality of effective interactions outside of standard model spaces. In the Hybrid Renormalization Procedure developed in this dissertation, Skyrme energy density functionals provide a realistic single particle basis that accounts for the long tail of loosely bound orbits, especially significant for valence orbits of exotic isotopes. A microscopic nucleon-nucleon potential is softened with renormalization group techniques to eliminate the hard core of the nuclear interaction. Many-body perturbative techniques, in the form of Rayleigh-Schrodinger theory, implement the realistic basis to convert the low-momentum interaction into a model space of interest. The basis is an important ingredient in the renormalization and greatly affects the results obtained with the Hybrid Renormalization Procedure, specifically through the single particle energies derived from Skyrme functionals. A comparison of the standard harmonic oscillator basis and the realistic

  15. Separable Potentials for (d,p) Reaction Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elster, Ch.; Hlophe, L.; Eremenko, V.; Nunes, F. M.; Thompson, I. J.; Arbanas, G.; Escher, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    An important ingredient for applications of nuclear physics to e.g. astrophysics or nuclear energy are the cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not possible, indirect methods like (d,p) reactions must be used instead. Those (d,p) reactions may be viewed as effective three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. An additional challenge posed by (d,p) reactions involving heavier nuclei is the treatment of the Coulomb force. To avoid numerical complications in dealing with the screening of the Coulomb force, recently a new approach using the Coulomb distorted basis in momentum space was suggested. In order to implement this suggestion, one needs to derive a separable representation of neutron- and proton-nucleus optical potentials and compute their matrix elements in this basis.

  16. Bonn potential and shell-model calculations for N=126 isotones

    SciTech Connect

    Coraggio, L.; Covello, A.; Gargano, A.; Itaco, N.; Kuo, T. T. S.

    1999-12-01

    We have performed shell-model calculations for the N=126 isotones {sup 210}Po, {sup 211}At, and {sup 212}Rn using a realistic effective interaction derived from the Bonn-A nucleon-nucleon potential by means of a G-matrix folded-diagram method. The calculated binding energies, energy spectra, and electromagnetic properties show remarkably good agreement with the experimental data. The results of this paper complement those of our previous study on neutron hole Pb isotopes, confirming that realistic effective interactions are now able to reproduce with quantitative accuracy the spectroscopic properties of complex nuclei. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  17. NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS (NESHAP) SUBPART H RADIONUCLIDES POTENTIAL TO EMIT CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    EARLEY JN

    2008-07-23

    This document provides an update of the status of stacks on the Hanford Site and the potential radionuclide emissions, i.e., emissions that could occur with no control devices in place. This review shows the calculations that determined whether the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) received by the maximum public receptor as a result of potential emissions from any one of these stacks would exceed 0.1 millirem/year. Such stacks require continuous monitoring of the effluent, or other monitoring, to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative code (WAC) 246-247-035(1)(a)(ii) and WAC 246-247-075(1), -(2), and -(6). This revised update reviews the potential-to-emit (PTE) calculations of 31 stacks for Fluor Hanford, Inc. Of those 31 stacks, 11 have the potential to cause a TEDE greater than 0.1 mrem/year.

  18. Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Restraining Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiyao; Deng, Yuqing; Roux, Benoît

    2006-01-01

    The absolute (standard) binding free energy of eight FK506-related ligands to FKBP12 is calculated using free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations with explicit solvent. A number of features are implemented to improve the accuracy and enhance the convergence of the calculations. First, the absolute binding free energy is decomposed into sequential steps during which the ligand-surrounding interactions as well as various biasing potentials restraining the translation, orientation, and conformation of the ligand are turned “on” and “off.” Second, sampling of the ligand conformation is enforced by a restraining potential based on the root mean-square deviation relative to the bound state conformation. The effect of all the restraining potentials is rigorously unbiased, and it is shown explicitly that the final results are independent of all artificial restraints. Third, the repulsive and dispersive free energy contribution arising from the Lennard-Jones interactions of the ligand with its surrounding (protein and solvent) is calculated using the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen separation. This separation also improves convergence of the FEP/MD calculations. Fourth, to decrease the computational cost, only a small number of atoms in the vicinity of the binding site are simulated explicitly, while all the influence of the remaining atoms is incorporated implicitly using the generalized solvent boundary potential (GSBP) method. With GSBP, the size of the simulated FKBP12/ligand systems is significantly reduced, from ∼25,000 to 2500. The computations are very efficient and the statistical error is small (∼1 kcal/mol). The calculated binding free energies are generally in good agreement with available experimental data and previous calculations (within ∼2 kcal/mol). The present results indicate that a strategy based on FEP/MD simulations of a reduced GSBP atomic model sampled with conformational, translational, and orientational restraining

  19. Nitroborazines as potential high energy materials: density functional theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Janning, Jay D; Ball, David W

    2010-05-01

    As part of a search for new high energy density materials, we used density functional theoretical calculations to determine the thermochemical properties of various nitro-substituted borazine molecules. Optimized geometries, vibrational frequencies and spectra, and enthalpies of formation and combustion were determined for nitroborazine, dinitroborazine, trinitroborazine, and methyltrinitroborazine with substituents on either the boron atoms or the nitrogen atoms of the parent borazine ring. Our results indicate that the specific enthalpy of combustion ranged from 4 to 11 kJ g(-1), with increasing substitution of nitro groups lowering the energy of combustion per unit mass.

  20. Potential Energy Calculations for Collinear Cluster Tripartition Fission Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unzhakova, A. V.; Pashkevich, V. V.; Pyatkov, Y. V.

    2014-09-01

    Strutinsky shell correction calculations were performed to describe the recent experimental results on collinear ternary fission. Collinear Cluster Tripartion fission events were studied experimentally in neutron induced fission of 235U, where the missing mass in the detected binary decay was suggested to characterize fission event as a collinear tripartition; and in spontaneous fission of 252Cf, where the direct detection of the three fission fragments has been used to confirm the existence of the Collinear Cluster Tripartition channel with a probability of 4.7×10-3 relative to the binary fission events.

  1. Comparison of Electron Elastic-Scattering Cross Sections Calculated from Two Commonly Used Atomic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, A.; Salvat, F.; Powell, C. J.

    2004-06-01

    We have analyzed differential cross sections (DCSs) for the elastic scattering of electrons by neutral atoms that have been derived from two commonly used atomic potentials: the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac (TFD) potential and the Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) potential. DCSs from the latter potential are believed to be more accurate. We compared DCSs for six atoms (H, Al, Ni, Ag, Au, and Cm) at four energies (100, 500, 1000, and 10 000 eV) from two databases issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology in which DCSs had been obtained from the TFD and DHF potentials. While the DCSs from the two potentials had similar shapes and magnitudes, there can be pronounced deviations (up to 70%) for small scattering angles for Al, Ag, Au, and Cm. In addition, there were differences of up to 400% at scattering angles for which there were deep minima in the DCSs; at other angles, the differences were typically less than 20%. The DCS differences decreased with increasing electron energy. DCSs calculated from the two potentials were compared with measured DCSs for six atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Hg) at energies between 50 eV and 3 keV. For Ar, the atom for which experimental data are available over the largest energy range there is good agreement between the measured DCSs and those calculated from the TFD and DHF potentials at 2 and 3 keV, but the experimental DCSs agree better with the DCSs from the DHF potential at lower energies. A similar trend is found for the other atoms. At energies less than about 1 keV, there are increasing differences between the measured DCSs and the DCSs calculated from the DHF potential. These differences were attributed to the neglect of absorption and polarizability effects in the calculations. We compare transport cross sections for H, Al, Ni, Ag, Au, and Cm obtained from the DCSs for each potential. For energies between 200 eV and 1 keV, the largest differences are about 20% (for H, Au, and Cm); at higher energies, the differences are

  2. Potential theoretic methods for far field sound radiation calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Stenger, Edward J.; Scott, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    In the area of computational acoustics, procedures which accurately predict the far-field sound radiation are much sought after. A systematic development of such procedures are found in a sequence of papers by Atassi. The method presented here is an alternate approach to predicting far field sound based on simple layer potential theoretic methods. The main advantages of this method are: it requires only a simple free space Green's function, it can accommodate arbitrary shapes of Kirchoff surfaces, and is readily extendable to three-dimensional problems. Moreover, the procedure presented here, though tested for unsteady lifting airfoil problems, can easily be adapted to other areas of interest, such as jet noise radiation problems. Results are presented for lifting airfoil problems and comparisons are made with the results reported by Atassi. Direct comparisons are also made for the flat plate case.

  3. Soil temperature effect in calculating attenuation and retardation factors.

    PubMed

    Paraiba, Lourival Costa; Spadotto, Claudio Aparecido

    2002-09-01

    The effect of annual variation of daily average soil temperature, at different depths, in calculating pesticides ranking indexes retardation factor and attenuation factor is presented. The retardation factor and attenuation factor are two site-specific pesticide numbers, frequently used as screening indicator indexes for pesticide groundwater contamination potential. Generally, in the calculation of these two factors are not included the soil temperature effect on the parameters involved in its calculation. It is well known that the soil temperature affects the pesticide degradation rate, water-air partition coefficient and water-soil partition coefficient. These three parameters are components of the retardation factor and attenuation factor and contribute to determine the pesticide behavior in the environment. The Arrhenius equation, van't Hoff equation and Clausius-Clapeyron equation are used in this work for estimating the soil temperature effect on the pesticide degradation rate, water-air partition coefficient and soil-water partition coefficient, respectively. These dependence relationships, between results of calculating attenuation and retardation factors and the soil temperature at different depths, can aid to understand the potential pesticide groundwater contamination on different weather conditions. Numerical results will be presented with pesticides atrazine and lindane in a soil profile with 20 degrees C constant temperature, minimum and maximum surface temperatures varying and spreading in the soil profile between -5 and 30 degrees C and between 15 and 45 degrees C.

  4. Calculations supporting evaluation of potential environmental standards for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Duguid, J.O.; Andrews, R.W.; Brandstetter, E.; Dale, T.F.; Reeves, M.

    1994-04-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992, Section 801 (US Congress, 1992) provides for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to contract the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to conduct a study and provide findings and recommendations on reasonable standards for the disposal of high-level wastes at the Yucca Mountain site. The NAS study is to provide findings and recommendations which include, among other things, whether a health-based standard based on dose to individual members of the public from releases to the accessible environment will provide a reasonable standard for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The EPA, based upon and consistent with the findings and recommendations of the NAS, is required to promulgate standards for protection of the public from releases from radioactive materials stored or disposed of in a repository at the Yucca Mountain site. This document presents a number of different ``simple`` analyses of undisturbed repository performance that are intended to provide input to those responsible for setting appropriate environmental standards for a potential repository at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. Each of the processes included in the analyses has been simplified to capture the primary significance of that process in containing or isolating the waste from the biosphere. In these simplified analyses, the complex waste package interactions were approximated by a simple waste package ``failure`` distribution which is defined by the initiation and rate of waste package ``failures``. Similarly, releases from the waste package and the engineered barrier system are controlled by the very near field environment and the presence and rate of advective and diffusive release processes. Release was approximated by either a simple alteration-controlled release for the high solubility radionuclides and either a diffusive or advective-controlled release for the solubility-limited radionuclides.

  5. Accurate potential energy curve of the LiH{sup +} molecule calculated with explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Wei-Cheng; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-03-28

    Very accurate calculations of the ground-state potential energy curve (PEC) of the LiH{sup +} ion performed with all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions with shifted centers are presented. The variational method is employed. The calculations involve optimization of nonlinear exponential parameters of the Gaussians performed with the aid of the analytical first derivatives of the energy determined with respect to the parameters. The diagonal adiabatic correction is also calculated for each PEC point. The PEC is then used to calculate the vibrational energies of the system. In that calculation, the non-adiabatic effects are accounted for by using an effective vibrational mass obtained by the minimization of the difference between the vibrational energies obtained from the calculations where the Born-Oppenheimer approximation was not assumed and the results of the present calculations.

  6. Effective potential and quadratic divergences

    SciTech Connect

    Einhorn, M.B. ); Jones, D.R.T. )

    1992-12-01

    We use the effective potential to give a simple derivation of Veltman's formula for the quadratic divergence in the Higgs self-energy. We also comment on the effect of going beyond the one-loop approximation.

  7. New calculations in Dirac gaugino models: operators, expansions, and effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Linda M.; Goodman, Jessica

    2015-07-01

    In this work we calculate important one loop SUSY-breaking parameters in models with Dirac gauginos, which are implied by the existence of heavy messenger fields. We find that these SUSY-breaking effects are all related by a small number of parameters, thus the general theory is tightly predictive. In order to make the most accurate analyses of one loop effects, we introduce calculations using an expansion in SUSY breaking messenger mass, rather than relying on postulating the forms of effective operators. We use this expansion to calculate one loop contributions to gaugino masses, non-holomorphic SM adjoint masses, new A-like and B-like terms, and linear terms. We also test the Higgs potential in such models, and calculate one loop contributions to the Higgs mass in certain limits of R-symmetric models, finding a very large contribution in many regions of the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.], where Higgs fields couple to standard model adjoint fields.

  8. Calculation of Water Drop Trajectories to and About Arbitrary Three-Dimensional Bodies in Potential Airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norment, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations can be performed for any atmospheric conditions and for all water drop sizes, from the smallest cloud droplet to large raindrops. Any subsonic, external, non-lifting flow can be accommodated; flow into, but not through, inlets also can be simulated. Experimental water drop drag relations are used in the water drop equations of motion and effects of gravity settling are included. Seven codes are described: (1) a code used to debug and plot body surface description data; (2) a code that processes the body surface data to yield the potential flow field; (3) a code that computes flow velocities at arrays of points in space; (4) a code that computes water drop trajectories from an array of points in space; (5) a code that computes water drop trajectories and fluxes to arbitrary target points; (6) a code that computes water drop trajectories tangent to the body; and (7) a code that produces stereo pair plots which include both the body and trajectories. Code descriptions include operating instructions, card inputs and printouts for example problems, and listing of the FORTRAN codes. Accuracy of the calculations is discussed, and trajectory calculation results are compared with prior calculations and with experimental data.

  9. On the consistent definition of spin-orbit effects calculated by relativistic effective core potentials with one-electron spin-orbit operators: Comparison of spin-orbit effects for Tl, TlH, TlH3, PbH2, and PbH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Young-Kyu; Bae, Cheolbeom; Lee, Yoon Sup

    1999-05-01

    The spin-orbit effects for Tl, TlH, TlH3, PbH2, and PbH4 are evaluated by two-component calculations using several relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) with one-electron spin-orbit operators. The used RECPs are shape-consistent RECPs derived by Wildman et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9975 (1997)] and three sets of energy-consistent (or adjusted) RECPs published by Schwerdtfeger et al. [Phys. Scr. 36, 453 (1987); J. Chem. Phys. 90, 762 (1989)], Küchle et al. [Mol. Phys. 74, 1245 (1991)], and Leininger et al. [Chem. Phys. 217, 19 (1997)]. The shape-consistent RECP results are in very good agreement with the Küchle et al. energy-consistent RECP results for all the molecules studied here and all-electron results for TlH. The RECPs of Schwerdtfeger et al. and Leininger et al. seem to provide qualitatively different spin-orbit effects. If one defines spin-free RECP as the potential average of the corresponding two-component RECP, all RECPs give very similar spin-orbit effects for all the cases. Most of the discrepancies of molecular spin-orbit effects among various RECPs reported in the literature may originate from different definitions of RECPs with or without a spin-orbit term and not from the inherent difference in spin-orbit operators.

  10. Interface effects on calculated defect levels for oxide defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Arthur; Barnaby, Hugh; Schultz, Peter; Pineda, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has had impressive recent success predicting defect levels in insulators and semiconductors [Schultz and von Lillienfeld, 2009]. Such success requires care in accounting for long-range electrostatic effects. Recently, Komsa and Pasquarello have started to address this problem in systems with interfaces. We report a multiscale technique for calculating electrostatic energies for charged defects in oxide of the metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) system, but where account is taken of substrate doping density, oxide thickness, and gate bias. We use device modeling to calculate electric fields for a point charge a fixed distance from the interface, and used the field to numerically calculate the long-range electrostatic interactions. We find, for example, that defect levels in the oxide do depend on both the magnitude and the polarity the substrate doping density. Furthermore, below 20 Å, oxide thickness also has significant effects. So, transferring results directly from bulk calculations leads to inaccuracies up to 0.5 eV- half of the silicon band gap. We will present trends in defect levels as a function of device parameters. We show that these results explain previous experimental results, and we comment on their potential impact on models for NBTI. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under co.

  11. The ozone depletion potentials on halocarbons: Their dependence of calculation assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karol, Igor L.; Kiselev, Andrey A.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) is widely used in the evaluation of numerous halocarbons and of their replacement effects on ozone, but the methods, assumptions and conditions used in ODP calculations have not been analyzed adequately. In this paper a model study of effects on ozone of the instantaneous releases of various amounts of CH3CCl3 and of CHF2Cl (HCFC-22) for several compositions of the background atmosphere are presented, aimed at understanding connections of ODP values with the assumptions used in their calculations. To facilitate the ODP computation in numerous versions for the long time periods after their releases, the above rather short-lived gases and the one-dimensional radiative photochemical model of the global annually averaged atmospheric layer up to 50 km height are used. The variation of released gas global mass from 1 Mt to 1 Gt leads to ODP value increase with its stabilization close to the upper bound of this range in the contemporary atmosphere. The same variations are analyzed for conditions of the CFC-free atmosphere of 1960's and for the anthropogenically loaded atmosphere in the 21st century according to the known IPCC 'business as usual' scenario. Recommendations for proper ways of ODP calculations are proposed for practically important cases.

  12. Tunable redox potential of nonmetal doped monolayer MoS2: First principle calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, S.; Li, C.; Zhao, Y. F.; Gong, Y. Y.; Niu, L. Y.; Liu, X. J.

    2016-10-01

    Doping is an effective method to alter the electronic behavior of materials by forming new chemical bonds and bringing bond relaxation. With this aid of first principle calculations, the crystal configuration and electronic properties of monolayer MoS2 have been modulated by the nonmetal (NM) dopants (H, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, Cl, As, Se, Br, Te and I), and the thermodynamic stability depending on the preparation conditions (Mo-rich and S-rich conditions) were discussed. Results shown that, the NM dopants substituted preferentially for S under Mo-rich condition, the electronic distribution around the dopants and the nearby Mo atoms are changed by the new formed Mo-NM bonds and bands relaxation. Compared to pristine monolayer MoS2, the NM ions with odd chemical valences enhance the oxidation potential and reduce the reduction potential of specimens, but the NM ions with even chemical valences have the opposite effects on the redox potentials. Compared to the NM ions with even chemical valences, the lone pair electrons in NM ions with odd chemical valences can extra interact with the Mo ions and reduces the ECBM and EVBM values of specimens. It offers a simple way to design various monolayer MoS2 based catalysts in order to catalyze different materials by chose the reasonable dopants for stronger oxidation or reduction potential.

  13. An accurate potential energy curve for helium based on ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, A. R.; Aziz, R. A.

    1997-07-01

    Korona, Williams, Bukowski, Jeziorski, and Szalewicz [J. Chem. Phys. 106, 1 (1997)] constructed a completely ab initio potential for He2 by fitting their calculations using infinite order symmetry adapted perturbation theory at intermediate range, existing Green's function Monte Carlo calculations at short range and accurate dispersion coefficients at long range to a modified Tang-Toennies potential form. The potential with retardation added to the dipole-dipole dispersion is found to predict accurately a large set of microscopic and macroscopic experimental data. The potential with a significantly larger well depth than other recent potentials is judged to be the most accurate characterization of the helium interaction yet proposed.

  14. Sample size calculations for clinical trials targeting tauopathies: A new potential disease target

    PubMed Central

    Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Machulda, Mary M.; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Weigand, Stephen D.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Spychalla, Anthony J.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Disease-modifying therapies are being developed to target tau pathology, and should, therefore, be tested in primary tauopathies. We propose that progressive apraxia of speech should be considered one such target group. In this study, we investigate potential neuroimaging and clinical outcome measures for progressive apraxia of speech and determine sample size estimates for clinical trials. We prospectively recruited 24 patients with progressive apraxia of speech who underwent two serial MRI with an interval of approximately two years. Detailed speech and language assessments included the Apraxia of Speech Rating Scale (ASRS) and Motor Speech Disorders (MSD) severity scale. Rates of ventricular expansion and rates of whole brain, striatal and midbrain atrophy were calculated. Atrophy rates across 38 cortical regions were also calculated and the regions that best differentiated patients from controls were selected. Sample size estimates required to power placebo-controlled treatment trials were calculated. The smallest sample size estimates were obtained with rates of atrophy of the precentral gyrus and supplementary motor area, with both measures requiring less than 50 subjects per arm to detect a 25% treatment effect with 80% power. These measures outperformed the other regional and global MRI measures and the clinical scales. Regional rates of cortical atrophy therefore provide the best outcome measures in progressive apraxia of speech. The small sample size estimates demonstrate feasibility for including progressive apraxia of speech in future clinical treatment trials targeting tau. PMID:26076744

  15. Quantum-Mechanical Calculation of Ionization-Potential Lowering in Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Thiele, Robert; Jurek, Zoltan; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin

    2014-07-01

    The charged environment within a dense plasma leads to the phenomenon of ionization-potential depression (IPD) for ions embedded in the plasma. Accurate predictions of the IPD effect are of crucial importance for modeling atomic processes occurring within dense plasmas. Several theoretical models have been developed to describe the IPD effect, with frequently discrepant predictions. Only recently, first experiments on IPD in Al plasma have been performed with an x-ray free-electron laser, where their results were found to be in disagreement with the widely used IPD model by Stewart and Pyatt. Another experiment on Al, at the Orion laser, showed disagreement with the model by Ecker and Kröll. This controversy shows a strong need for a rigorous and consistent theoretical approach to calculate the IPD effect. Here, we propose such an approach: a two-step Hartree-Fock-Slater model. With this parameter-free model, we can accurately and efficiently describe the experimental Al data and validate the accuracy of standard IPD models. Our model can be a useful tool for calculating atomic properties within dense plasmas with wide-ranging applications to studies on warm dense matter, shock experiments, planetary science, inertial confinement fusion, and nonequilibrium plasmas created with x-ray free-electron lasers.

  16. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 72 - Calculation of Potential Electric Output Capacity

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calculation of Potential Electric Output Capacity D Appendix D to Part 72 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Pt. 72, App. D Appendix D to Part 72—Calculation...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 72 - Calculation of Potential Electric Output Capacity

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculation of Potential Electric Output Capacity D Appendix D to Part 72 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Pt. 72, App. D Appendix D to Part 72—Calculation...

  18. Crystal-field calculations for transition-metal ions by application of an opposing potential

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Fei; Aberg, Daniel

    2016-02-16

    We propose a fully ab initio method, the opposing crystal potential (OCP), to calculate the crystal-field parameters of transition-metal impurities in insulator hosts. Through constrained density functional calculations, OCP obtains the constraining Lagrange multipliers, which act as a cancellation potential against the crystal field and lead to spherical d-electron distribution. Furthermore, the method is applied to several insulators doped with Mn4+ and Mn2+ ions and shown to be in good agreement with experiment.

  19. Effective knowledge-based potentials.

    PubMed

    Ferrada, Evandro; Melo, Francisco

    2009-07-01

    Empirical or knowledge-based potentials have many applications in structural biology such as the prediction of protein structure, protein-protein, and protein-ligand interactions and in the evaluation of stability for mutant proteins, the assessment of errors in experimentally solved structures, and the design of new proteins. Here, we describe a simple procedure to derive and use pairwise distance-dependent potentials that rely on the definition of effective atomic interactions, which attempt to capture interactions that are more likely to be physically relevant. Based on a difficult benchmark test composed of proteins with different secondary structure composition and representing many different folds, we show that the use of effective atomic interactions significantly improves the performance of potentials at discriminating between native and near-native conformations. We also found that, in agreement with previous reports, the potentials derived from the observed effective atomic interactions in native protein structures contain a larger amount of mutual information. A detailed analysis of the effective energy functions shows that atom connectivity effects, which mostly arise when deriving the potential by the incorporation of those indirect atomic interactions occurring beyond the first atomic shell, are clearly filtered out. The shape of the energy functions for direct atomic interactions representing hydrogen bonding and disulfide and salt bridges formation is almost unaffected when effective interactions are taken into account. On the contrary, the shape of the energy functions for indirect atom interactions (i.e., those describing the interaction between two atoms bound to a direct interacting pair) is clearly different when effective interactions are considered. Effective energy functions for indirect interacting atom pairs are not influenced by the shape or the energy minimum observed for the corresponding direct interacting atom pair. Our results

  20. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  1. Calculated cancer risks for conventional and "potentially reduced exposure product" cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Pankow, James F; Watanabe, Karen H; Toccalino, Patricia L; Luo, Wentai; Austin, Donald F

    2007-03-01

    Toxicant deliveries (by machine smoking) are compiled and associated cancer risks are calculated for 13 carcinogens from 26 brands of conventional cigarettes categorized as "regular" (R), "light" (Lt), or "ultralight" (ULt), and for a reference cigarette. Eight "potentially reduced exposure product" (PREP) cigarettes are also considered. Because agency-to-agency differences exist in the cancer slope factor (CSF) values adopted for some carcinogens, two CSF sets were used in the calculations: set I [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-accepted values plus California EPA-accepted values as needed to fill data gaps] and set II (vice versa). The potential effects of human smoking patterns on cigarette deliveries are considered. Acetaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, and acrylonitrile are associated with the largest calculated cancer risks for all 26 brands of conventional cigarettes. The calculated risks are proportional to the smoking dose z (pack-years). Using CSF set I and z = 1 pack-year (7,300 cigarettes), the calculated brand-average incremental lifetime cancer risk ILCR(1)(acetaldehyde) values are R, 6 x 10(-5); Lt, 5 x 10(-5); and ULt, 3 x 10(-5) (cf. typical U.S. EPA risk benchmark of 10(-6)). These values are similar, especially given the tendency of smokers to "compensate" when smoking Lt and ULt cigarettes. ILCR(1)(subSigma-lung) is the brand-average per pack-year subtotal risk for the measured human lung carcinogens. Using CSF set I, the ILCR(1)(subSigma-lung) values for R, Lt, and ULt cigarettes account for

  2. Two-loop Feynman-gauge calculation of the meson nonsinglet evolution potential

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    Recently, three independent determinations of the two-loop meson nonsinglet evolution potential have been completed. Two of them are an explicit light-cone-gauge calculation while the third is a less direct evaluation based on conformal symmetry. However, all three calculations disagree in the C/sub F/ /sup 2/ term. In this paper I present the results of a Feynman-gauge evaluation of Gegenbauer matrix elements (V/sub 2/)/sub mj/ of the C/sub F/ /sup 2/ part of the two-loop meson nonsinglet evolution potential. The results confirm one of the light-cone-gauge calculations.

  3. Calculating Second-Order Effects in MOSFET's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, Reuben; Zoutendyk, John A.; Coss, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of mathematical models includes second-order effects in n-channel, enhancement-mode, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's). When dimensions of circuit elements relatively large, effects neglected safely. However, as very-large-scale integration of microelectronic circuits leads to MOSFET's shorter or narrower than 2 micrometer, effects become significant in design and operation. Such computer programs as widely-used "Simulation Program With Integrated Circuit Emphasis, Version 2" (SPICE 2) include many of these effects. In second-order models of n-channel, enhancement-mode MOSFET, first-order gate-depletion region diminished by triangular-cross-section deletions on end and augmented by circular-wedge-cross-section bulges on sides.

  4. Analysis of the quasi-static approximation for calculating potentials generated by neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossetti, Chad A.; Birdno, Merrill J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-03-01

    In models of electrical stimulation of the nervous system, the electric potential is typically calculated using the quasi-static approximation. The quasi-static approximation allows Maxwell's equations to be simplified by ignoring capacitive, inductive and wave propagation contributions to the potential. While this simplification has been validated for bioelectric sources, its application to rapid stimulation pulses, which contain more high-frequency power, may not be appropriate. We compared the potentials calculated using the quasi-static approximation with those calculated from the exact solution to the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation. The mean absolute errors between the two potential calculations were limited to 5-13% for pulse widths commonly used for neural stimulation (25 µs-1 ms). We also quantified the excitation properties of extracellular point source stimulation of a myelinated nerve fiber model using potentials calculated from each method. Deviations between the strength-duration curves for potentials calculated using the quasi-static (σ = 0.105 S m-1) and Helmholtz approaches ranged from 3 to 16%, with the minimal error occurring for 100 µs pulses. Differences in the threshold-distance curves for the two calculations ranged from 0 to 9%, for the same value of quasi-static conductivity. A sensitivity analysis of the material parameters revealed that the potential was much more strongly dependent on the conductivity than on the permittivity. These results indicate that for commonly used stimulus pulse parameters, the exact solution for the potential can be approximated by quasi-static simplifications only for appropriate values of conductivity.

  5. Large magnetocrystalline anisotropy in bilayer transition metal phases from first-principles full-potential calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, P.; Kjekshus, A.; Fjellvåg, H.; James, P.; Nordström, L.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O.

    2001-04-01

    The computational framework of this study is based on the local-spin-density approximation with first-principles full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital calculations including orbital polarization (OP) correction. We have studied the magnetic anisotropy for a series of bilayer CuAu(I)-type materials such as FeX, MnX (X=Ni,Pd,Pt), CoPt, NiPt, MnHg, and MnRh in a ferromagnetic state using experimental structural parameters to understand the microscopic origin of magnetic-anisotropy energy (MAE) in magnetic multilayers. Except for MnRh and MnHg, all these phases show perpendicular magnetization. We have analyzed our results in terms of angular momentum-, spin- and site-projected density of states, magnetic-angular-momentum-projected density of states, orbital-moment density of states, and total density of states. The orbital-moment number of states and the orbital-moment anisotropy for FeX (X=Ni,Pd,Pt) are calculated as a function of band filling to study its effect on MAE. The total and site-projected spin and orbital moments for all these systems are calculated with and without OP when the magnetization is along or perpendicular to the plane. The results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical results. Our calculations show that OP always enhances the orbital moment in these phases and brings them closer to experimental values. The changes in MAE are analyzed in terms of exchange splitting, spin-orbit splitting, and tetragonal distortion/crystal-field splitting. The calculated MAE is found to be in good agreement with experimental values when the OP correction is included. Some of the materials considered here show large magnetic anisotropy of the order of meV. In particular we found that MnPt will have a very large MAE if it could be stabilized in a ferromagnetic configuration. Our analysis indicates that apart from large spin-orbit interaction and exchange interaction from at least one of the constituents, a large crystal-field splitting

  6. Gaussian effective potential: Quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. M.

    1984-10-01

    We advertise the virtues of the Gaussian effective potential (GEP) as a guide to the behavior of quantum field theories. Much superior to the usual one-loop effective potential, the GEP is a natural extension of intuitive notions familiar from quantum mechanics. A variety of quantum-mechanical examples are studied here, with an eye to field-theoretic analogies. Quantum restoration of symmetry, dynamical mass generation, and "quantum-mechanical resuscitation" are among the phenomena discussed. We suggest how the GEP could become the basis of a systematic approximation procedure. A companion paper will deal with scalar field theory.

  7. Transonic flow analysis for rotors. Part 2: Three-dimensional, unsteady, full-potential calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, I. C.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for calculating the three-dimensional unsteady, transonic flow past a helicopter rotor blade of arbitrary geometry. The method solves the full-potential equations in a blade-fixed frame of reference by a time-marching implicit scheme. At the far-field, a set of first-order radiation conditions is imposed, thus minimizing the reflection of outgoing wavelets from computational boundaries. Computed results are presented to highlight radial flow effects in three dimensions, to compare surface pressure distributions to quasi-steady predictions, and to predict the flow field on a swept-tip blade. The results agree well with experimental data for both straight- and swept-tip blade geometries.

  8. The strategy for numerical solving of PIES without explicit calculation of singular integrals in 2D potential problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szerszeń, Krzysztof; Zieniuk, Eugeniusz

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a strategy for numerical solving of parametric integral equation system (PIES) for 2D potential problems without explicit calculation of singular integrals. The values of these integrals will be expressed indirectly in terms of easy to compute non-singular integrals. The effectiveness of the proposed strategy is investigated with the example of potential problem modeled by the Laplace equation. The strategy simplifies the structure of the program with good the accuracy of the obtained solutions.

  9. PSOLV: a code for calculating the potentials and densities in MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, J.A.

    1983-08-17

    Code PSOLV solves for potential and densities at the cardinal points of MFTF-B. The code is equipped to handle both the throttle-coil and the axicell geometries. For the throttle-coil case, the potential at point MXO is input, while the potentials and densities at points MAI, b, and A are calculated. For the axicell case, the code must additionally solve for the potentials and densities at points X and MXO. PSOLV is intended primarily for use as a subroutine in TREQ, a code being developed by Rensink that calculates the densities and potentials at the cardinal points of MFTF-B as a function of time. TREQ is to be used for modeling start-up behavior.

  10. Interpolation effects in tabulated interatomic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, M.; Whalen, S. M.; Elliott, R. S.; Tadmor, E. B.

    2015-10-01

    Empirical interatomic potentials are widely used in atomistic simulations due to their ability to compute the total energy and interatomic forces quickly relative to more accurate quantum calculations. The functional forms in these potentials are sometimes stored in a tabulated format, as a collection of data points (argument-value pairs), and a suitable interpolation (often spline-based) is used to obtain the function value at an arbitrary point. We explore the effect of these interpolations on the potential predictions by calculating the quasi-harmonic thermal expansion and finite-temperature elastic constant of a one-dimensional chain compared with molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that some predictions are affected by the choice of interpolation regardless of the number of tabulated data points. Our results clearly indicate that the interpolation must be considered part of the potential definition, especially for lattice dynamics properties that depend on higher-order derivatives of the potential. This is facilitated by the Knowledgebase of Interatomic Models (KIM) project, in which both the tabulated data (‘parameterized model’) and the code that interpolates them to compute energy and forces (‘model driver’) are stored and given unique citeable identifiers. We have developed cubic and quintic spline model drivers for pair functional type models (EAM, FS, EMT) and uploaded them to the OpenKIM repository (https://openkim.org).

  11. 17 CFR 230.459 - Calculation of effective date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calculation of effective date. 230.459 Section 230.459 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 Filings; Fees; Effective Date § 230.459 Calculation...

  12. Calculation of the polarization potential for e-N2 collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onda, K.; Temkin, A.

    1983-01-01

    A polarization potential V(pol) for e-N2 collisions is calculated by the generalization of the static part of the method of polarized orbitals to molecular targets. Partial differential equations (PDE) are derived for polarized orbitals, which are functions of the distance (r) from the molecular center and angle (theta) from the molecular axis. The equations are solved with the use of the noniterative PDE technique. From the polarized orbitals a polarization potential can be constructed whose r and theta dependence is found to be significantly different from the well-known phenomenological one. The two potentials are further compared by carrying out limited hybrid-theory scattering calculations. Only those scattering results based on the calculated V(pol) are in satisfactory accord with experiment.

  13. Effect of grid system on finite element calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. D.; Yen, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed parametric studies of the effect of grid system on finite element calculation for potential flows were made. These studies led to the formulation of a design criteria for optimum mesh system and the development of two methods to generate the optimum mesh system. The guidelines for optimum mesh system are: (1) the mesh structure should be regular; (2) the element should be as regular and equilateral as possible; (3) the distribution of size of element should be consistent with that of flow variables to insure maximum uniformity in error distribution; (4) for non-Dirichlet boundary conditions, smaller boundary elements or higher order interpolation functions should be used; and (5) the mesh should accommodate the boundary geometry as accurately as possible. The results of the parametric studies are presented.

  14. Calculation of screened Coulomb potential matrices and its application to He bound and resonant states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Li Guang; Ho, Yew Kam

    2014-07-01

    We present two analytical methods, Taylor expansion and Gegenbauer expansion, to efficiently and accurately calculate the two-electron screened Coulomb potential matrix elements with Slater-type configuration-interaction basis functions. The former permits great advantages in fast computation of the potential matrices at small screening parameters and the latter allows accurate calculation of the matrices at all screening parameters. The bound and resonant states of a He atom embedded in the screening environment are calculated by employing the variational and complex-scaling methods, respectively, and the results are compared with other theoretical predictions. The expectation values of some physical quantities for He ground state are compared with the recent calculation of Ancarani and Rodriguez [Phys. Rev. A 89, 012507 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.012507] and extended to stronger screening environment. The energies and widths for the doubly excited resonant states are in good agreement with previous calculations, while the interelectronic angle arccos show significant discrepancies with the Feshbach projection calculation of Ordóñez-Lasso et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 012702 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.012702]. The expectation values of are also calculated for the resonant states investigated here. We conclude that the present methods in the framework of complex scaling enable us to get reliable energy, width, and other physical quantities of the resonant states in a variety of screening conditions.

  15. Potential energy curves of Li+2 from all-electron EA-EOM-CCSD calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musiał, Monika; Medrek, Magdalena; Kucharski, Stanisław A.

    2015-10-01

    The electron attachment (EA) equation-of-motion coupled-cluster theory provides description of the states obtained by the attachment of an electron to the reference system. If the reference is assumed to be a doubly ionised cation, then the EA results relate to the singly ionised ion. In the current work, the above scheme is applied to the calculations of the potential energy curves (PECs) of the Li+2 cation adopting the doubly ionised Li2 +2 structure as the reference system. The advantage of such computational strategy relies on the fact that the closed-shell Li2 +2 reference dissociates into closed-shell fragments (Li2 +2 ⇒ Li+ + Li+), hence the RHF (restricted Hartree-Fock) function can be used as the reference in the whole range of interatomic distances. This scheme offers the first principle method without any model or effective potential parameters for the description of the bond-breaking processes. In this study, the PECs and selected spectroscopic constants for 18 electronic states of the Li+2 ion were computed and compared with experimental and other theoretical results. †In honour of Professor Sourav Pal on the occasion of an anniversary in his private and scientific life.

  16. A finite volume method for calculating transonic potential flow around wings from the pressure minimum integral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, A.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of the pressure minimum integral in the calculation of three-dimensional potential flow around wings makes it possible to use non-rectangular mesh networks for distributing the three-dimensional potential into discrete points. The method is comparatively easily expanded to the treatment of realistic airplane configurations. Shock-pressure affected pressure distributions on any wings are determined with accuracy using this method.

  17. Effect of EMP fields on cell membrane potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1993-06-01

    A simple model is presented for cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Using calculated values of internal electric field strength induced during EMP exposure, the model predicts that cell membrane potentials of about 100 mV may be induced for time frames on the order of 10 ns. Possible biological effects of these potentials including electroporation area discussed.

  18. Fully Relativistic Full-Potential Calculations of Magnetic Moments in Uranium Monochalcogenides with the Dirac Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugo Suzuki,; Hidehisa Ohta,

    2010-07-01

    We study the orbital, spin, and total magnetic moments in uranium monochalcogenides, UX where X=S, Se, and Te, using the fully relativistic full-potential calculations based on the spin density functional theory. In particular, the orbital magnetic moments are calculated with the Dirac current. We employ two methods which adopt distinctly different basis sets; one is the fully relativistic full-potential linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals (FFLCAO) method and the other is the fully relativistic full-potential mixed-basis (FFMB) method. Showing that the orbital magnetic moments calculated using the FFLCAO method and those calculated using the FFMB method agree very well with each other, we demonstrate that, in contrast to the conventional method, the method with the Dirac current enables us to calculate the orbital magnetic moments even if the basis set includes basis functions with no definite angular momenta, e.g., the plane waves in the FFMB method. Furthermore, it is found that the orbital magnetic moments obtained in this work are larger by nearly 0.4 μB than those obtained using the conventional method. This is crucial because the resultant differences in the total magnetic moments are about 30%. We compare the results of this work with those of previous theoretical and experimental studies.

  19. Calculation of the bidimensional electric potential in a polycrystalline semiconductor Schottky junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrik, M.; Croitoru, N.

    1986-09-01

    In a Schottky p-type polycrystalline junction, two kinds of space-charge layers exist, one due to junction and the other due to the grain boundaries (GB). In such a case, the potential V( x, y) is a solution of a two-dimensional Poisson equation, where x is the distance from the junction and y from the GB. A case is considered where the crystallites are columnar, all the grains are identical, and the doping concentration is N Acm-3. We assume that the GB introduces energy states (i.e. traps) which are equivalent with another effective doping NBcm-3. The existence of a junction perpendicular to the GB causes the width of the GB space charge to decrease. The interaction between the two space charges is expressed by a parameter γ = ( WB0 - WB(0)/ WJ, where W B0 and WB(0) are the widths of the GB space charge without, and with, a Schottky junction, respectively, and W J is the width of the space charge of the junction. The Poisson equation is solved and the potential is V(x,y)= {qN A}/{2ɛ}x 2+ {N B}/{N A}y 2-γ {N B}/{N A}xy- 2W j-γ {N B}/{N A}W 0Bx- {N B}/{N A}[W B(0)+W 0B]y . The term- γqNB xy/2 ɛ appears due to the interaction of both space charges. The electric field, the GB energy barrier and the capacitance are calculated from the potential and are x and y dependent. An equivalent circuit for the distribution of space charges is obtained and could be used in the interpretation of experimental results.

  20. Self-consistent calculation of hyperfine fields and adiabatic potential of impurities in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Junjiro; Akai, Hisazumi; Akai, Masako

    1984-01-01

    Hyperfine fields of impurities of the atomic number Z=1 56 at the substitutional site and those of light impurities of Z=1 9 at the interstitial sites in ferromagnetic iron are calculated by the KKR method adapted to the system containing a single impurity atom. The potential of the impurity atom is determined self-consistently by use of the local spin density functional formalism. The results for nonmagnetic sp valence impurities agree with those of the previous nonself-consistent calculation by Katayama-Yoshida, Terakura and Kanamori except for a few cases, confirming their theory of the systematic variation of hyperfine fields. The calculation for magnetic impurities of transition elements is presented for the first time in this paper. The calculations mentioned so far assume that impurities are situated at the center of each site. For the purpose of discussing the stability of the impurity positions, the change of the adiabatic potential due to displacements from the center is calculated by carrying out similar self-consistent calculations for off-center impurity positions. It is concluded that positive muon and some light impurities including boron will be displaced from the center when trapped in a vacancy.

  1. Calculating solar photovoltaic potential on residential rooftops in Kailua Kona, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carl, Caroline

    As carbon based fossil fuels become increasingly scarce, renewable energy sources are coming to the forefront of policy discussions around the globe. As a result, the State of Hawaii has implemented aggressive goals to achieve energy independence by 2030. Renewable electricity generation using solar photovoltaic technologies plays an important role in these efforts. This study utilizes geographic information systems (GIS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data with statistical analysis to identify how much solar photovoltaic potential exists for residential rooftops in the town of Kailua Kona on Hawaii Island. This study helps to quantify the magnitude of possible solar photovoltaic (PV) potential for Solar World SW260 monocrystalline panels on residential rooftops within the study area. Three main areas were addressed in the execution of this research: (1) modeling solar radiation, (2) estimating available rooftop area, and (3) calculating PV potential from incoming solar radiation. High resolution LiDAR data and Esri's solar modeling tools and were utilized to calculate incoming solar radiation on a sample set of digitized rooftops. Photovoltaic potential for the sample set was then calculated with the equations developed by Suri et al. (2005). Sample set rooftops were analyzed using a statistical model to identify the correlation between rooftop area and lot size. Least squares multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify the influence of slope, elevation, rooftop area, and lot size on the modeled PV potential values. The equations built from these statistical analyses of the sample set were applied to the entire study region to calculate total rooftop area and PV potential. The total study area statistical analysis findings estimate photovoltaic electric energy generation potential for rooftops is approximately 190,000,000 kWh annually. This is approximately 17 percent of the total electricity the utility provided to the entire island in

  2. A consistent calculation of the chemical potential for dense simple fluids.

    PubMed

    Bomont, Jean-Marc

    2006-05-28

    A general method to calculate the excess chemical potential betamuex, that is based on the Kirkwood coupling parameter's dependence of the correlation functions, is presented. The expression for the one particle bridge function B(1)r is derived for simple fluids with spherical interactions. Only the knowledge of the bridge function B(2)r is required. The accuracy of our approach is illustrated for a dense hard sphere fluid. As far as B(2)r is considered as exact, B(1)r is found to be, at high densities, the normalized bridge function -B(2)rB(2)(r=0). This expression ensures a consistent calculation of the excess chemical potential by satisfying implicitly the Gibbs-Duhem constraint. Only the pressure-consistency condition is necessary to calculate the structural and thermodynamic properties of the fluid.

  3. Improved computer programs for calculating potential flow in propulsion system inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockman, N. O.; Farrell, C. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Computer programs to calculate the incompressible potential flow corrected for compressibility in axisymmetric inlets at arbitrary operating conditions are presented. Included are a statement of the problem to be solved, a description of each of the programs and sufficient documentation, including a test case, to enable a user to run the programs.

  4. The Inversion Potential of Ammonia: An Intrinsic Reaction Coordinate Calculation for Student Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Arthur M.; Ramachandran, B. R.; Glendening, Eric D.

    2007-01-01

    A report is presented to describe how students can be empowered to construct the full, double minimum inversion potential for ammonia by performing intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations. This work can be associated with the third year physical chemistry lecture laboratory or an upper level course in computational chemistry.

  5. A web-based calculator for estimating the profit potential of grain segregation by protein concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By ignoring spatial variability in grain quality, conventional harvesting systems may increase the likelihood that growers will not capture price premiums for high quality grain found within fields. The Grain Segregation Profit Calculator was developed to demonstrate the profit potential of segregat...

  6. Computer programs for calculating two-dimensional potential flow through deflected nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, J. D.; Stockman, N. O.

    1979-01-01

    Computer programs to calculate the incompressible potential flow, corrected for compressibility, in two-dimensional nozzles at arbitrary operating conditions are presented. A statement of the problem to be solved, a description of each of the computer programs, and sufficient documentation, including a test case, to enable a user to run the program are included.

  7. Computer programs for calculating two-dimensional potential flow in and about propulsion system inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, J. D.; Stockman, N. O.; Farrell, C. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Incompressible potential flow calculations are presented that were corrected for compressibility in two-dimensional inlets at arbitrary operating conditions. Included are a statement of the problem to be solved, a description of each of the computer programs, and sufficient documentation, including a test case, to enable a user to run the program.

  8. The Effect of Calculator Use on College Students' Mathematical Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Robert W.; Farreras, Ingrid G.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment tested the effect that calculator use had on 200 randomly assigned college students' mathematical performance. The purposes of the current experiment were twofold: to measure the level of mathematical preparation of current college students, and to test whether calculators improve mathematical performance in such students as it…

  9. A study of potential numerical pitfalls in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoux, Vincent; Ozell, Benoît; Bonenfant, Éric; Després, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of numerical errors caused by the floating point representation of real numbers in a GPU-based Monte Carlo code used for dose calculation in radiation oncology, and to identify situations where this type of error arises. The program used as a benchmark was bGPUMCD. Three tests were performed on the code, which was divided into three functional components: energy accumulation, particle tracking and physical interactions. First, the impact of single-precision calculations was assessed for each functional component. Second, a GPU-specific compilation option that reduces execution time as well as precision was examined. Third, a specific function used for tracking and potentially more sensitive to precision errors was tested by comparing it to a very high-precision implementation. Numerical errors were found in two components of the program. Because of the energy accumulation process, a few voxels surrounding a radiation source end up with a lower computed dose than they should. The tracking system contained a series of operations that abnormally amplify rounding errors in some situations. This resulted in some rare instances (less than 0.1%) of computed distances that are exceedingly far from what they should have been. Most errors detected had no significant effects on the result of a simulation due to its random nature, either because they cancel each other out or because they only affect a small fraction of particles. The results of this work can be extended to other types of GPU-based programs and be used as guidelines to avoid numerical errors on the GPU computing platform.

  10. Calculation of transient potential rise on the wind turbine struck by lightning.

    PubMed

    Xiaoqing, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    A circuit model is proposed in this paper for calculating the transient potential rise on the wind turbine struck by lightning. The model integrates the blade, sliding contact site, and tower and grounding system of the wind turbine into an equivalent circuit. The lightning current path from the attachment point to the ground can be fully described by the equivalent circuit. The transient potential responses are obtained in the different positions on the wind turbine by solving the circuit equations. In order to check the validity of the model, the laboratory measurement is made with a reduced-scale wind turbine. The measured potential waveform is compared with the calculated one and a better agreement is shown between them. The practical applicability of the model is also examined by a numerical example of a 2 MW Chinese-built wind turbine. PMID:25254231

  11. Calculation of Transient Potential Rise on the Wind Turbine Struck by Lightning

    PubMed Central

    Xiaoqing, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    A circuit model is proposed in this paper for calculating the transient potential rise on the wind turbine struck by lightning. The model integrates the blade, sliding contact site, and tower and grounding system of the wind turbine into an equivalent circuit. The lightning current path from the attachment point to the ground can be fully described by the equivalent circuit. The transient potential responses are obtained in the different positions on the wind turbine by solving the circuit equations. In order to check the validity of the model, the laboratory measurement is made with a reduced-scale wind turbine. The measured potential waveform is compared with the calculated one and a better agreement is shown between them. The practical applicability of the model is also examined by a numerical example of a 2 MW Chinese-built wind turbine. PMID:25254231

  12. Calculation of transient potential rise on the wind turbine struck by lightning.

    PubMed

    Xiaoqing, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    A circuit model is proposed in this paper for calculating the transient potential rise on the wind turbine struck by lightning. The model integrates the blade, sliding contact site, and tower and grounding system of the wind turbine into an equivalent circuit. The lightning current path from the attachment point to the ground can be fully described by the equivalent circuit. The transient potential responses are obtained in the different positions on the wind turbine by solving the circuit equations. In order to check the validity of the model, the laboratory measurement is made with a reduced-scale wind turbine. The measured potential waveform is compared with the calculated one and a better agreement is shown between them. The practical applicability of the model is also examined by a numerical example of a 2 MW Chinese-built wind turbine.

  13. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various transition-metal surfaces and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system with parameters obtained from the excited-state potential energy surface and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics in both the DIET and DIMET regimes and reproduce the power-law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong.

  14. Link atom bond length effect in ONIOM excited state calculations.

    PubMed

    Caricato, Marco; Vreven, Thom; Trucks, Gary W; Frisch, Michael J

    2010-08-01

    We investigate how the choice of the link atom bond length affects an electronic transition energy calculation with the so-called our own N-layer integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics (ONIOM) hybrid method. This follows our previous paper [M. Caricato et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 134105 (2009)], where we showed that ONIOM is able to accurately approximate electronic transition energies computed at a high level of theory such as the equation of motion coupled cluster singles and doubles (EOM-CCSD) method. In this study we show that the same guidelines used in ONIOM ground state calculations can also be followed in excited state calculations, and that the link atom bond length has little effect on the ONIOM energy when a sensible model system is chosen. We also suggest further guidelines for excited state calculations which can help in checking the effectiveness of the definition of the model system and controlling the noise in the calculation.

  15. Full dimension Rb2He ground triplet potential energy surface and quantum scattering calculations.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Grégoire; Viel, Alexandra; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional potential energy surface for the lowest triplet state of the Rb(2)He complex. A global analytic fit is provided as in the supplementary material [see supplementary material at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4709433 for the corresponding Fortran code]. This surface is used to perform quantum scattering calculations of (4)He and (3)He colliding with (87)Rb(2) in the partial wave J = 0 at low and ultralow energies. For the heavier helium isotope, the computed vibrational relaxation probabilities show a broad and strong shape resonance for a collisional energy of 0.15 K and a narrow Feshbach resonance at about 17 K for all initial Rb(2) vibrational states studied. The broad resonance corresponds to an efficient relaxation mechanism that does not occur when (3)He is the colliding partner. The Feshbach resonance observed at higher collisional energy is robust with respect to the isotopic substitution. However, its effect on the vibrational relaxation mechanism is faint for both isotopes. PMID:22583230

  16. Volume 1: Calculating potential to emit releases and doses for FEMP's and NOCs

    SciTech Connect

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-07-27

    The purpose of this document is to provide Hanford Site facilities a handbook for estimating potential emissions and the subsequent offsite doses. General guidelines and information are provided to assist personnel in estimating emissions for use with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) and regulatory notices of construction (NOCs), per 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H, and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247 requirements. This document replaces Unit Dose Calculation Methods and Summary of Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan Determinations (WHC-EP-0498). Meteorological data from 1983 through 1996, 13-year data set, was used to develop the unit dose factors provided by this document, with the exception of two meteorological stations. Meteorological stations 23 and 24, located at Gable Mountain and the 100-F Area, only have data from 1986 through 1996, 10-year data set. The scope of this document includes the following: Estimating emissions and resulting effective dose equivalents (EDE) to a facility's nearest offsite receptor (NOR) for use with NOCs under 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H, requirements Estimating emissions and resulting EDEs to a facility's or emission unit's NOR for use with NOCs under the WAC Chapter 246-247 requirements Estimating emissions and resulting EDEs to a facility's or emission unit's NOR for use with FEMPs and FEMP determinations under DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 requirements.

  17. Transformation of potential energy surfaces for estimating isotopic shifts in anharmonic vibrational frequency calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Patrick; Oschetzki, Dominik; Rauhut, Guntram; Berger, Robert

    2014-05-14

    A transformation of potential energy surfaces (PES) being represented by multi-mode expansions is introduced, which allows for the calculation of anharmonic vibrational spectra of any isotopologue from a single PES. This simplifies the analysis of infrared spectra due to significant CPU-time savings. An investigation of remaining deviations due to truncations and the so-called multi-level approximation is provided. The importance of vibrational-rotational couplings for small molecules is discussed in detail. In addition, an analysis is proposed, which provides information about the quality of the transformation prior to its execution. Benchmark calculations are provided for a set of small molecules.

  18. A refined quartic potential energy surface and large scale vibrational calculations for S0 thiophosgene.

    PubMed

    Rashev, Svetoslav; Moule, David C

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present a full 6D quartic potential energy surface (PES) for S0 thiophosgene in curvilinear symmetrized bond-angle coordinates. The PES was refined starting from an ab initio field derived from acc-pVTZ basis set with CCSD(T) corrections for electron correlation. In the present calculations we used our variational method that was recently tested on formaldehyde and some of its isotopomers, along with additional improvements. The lower experimentally known vibrational levels for 35Cl2CS were reproduced quite well in the calculations, which can be regarded as a test for the feasibility of the obtained quartic PES. PMID:25615683

  19. Calculation procedures for potential and viscous flow solutions for engine inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.; Stockman, N. O.

    1973-01-01

    The method and basic elements of computer solutions for both potential flow and viscous flow calculations for engine inlets are described. The procedure is applicable to subsonic conventional (CTOL), short-haul (STOL), and vertical takeoff (VTOL) aircraft engine nacelles operating in a compressible viscous flow. The calculated results compare well with measured surface pressure distributions for a number of model inlets. The paper discusses the uses of the program in both the design and analysis of engine inlets, with several examples given for VTOL lift fans, acoustic splitters, and for STOL engine nacelles. Several test support applications are also given.

  20. Complex-scaling of screened Coulomb potentials for resonance calculations utilizing the modified Bessel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Li-Guang; Ho, Yew Kam

    2014-05-01

    The screened Coulomb potential (SCP) has been extensively used in atomic physics, nuclear physics, quantum chemistry and plasma physics. However, an accurate calculation for atomic resonances under SCP is still a challenging task for various methods. Within the complex-scaling computational scheme, we have developed a method utilizing the modified Bessel functions to calculate doubly-excited resonances in two-electron atomic systems with configuration interaction-type basis. To test the validity of our method, we have calculated S- and P-wave resonance states of the helium atom with various screening strengths, and have found good agreement with earlier calculations using different methods. Our present method can be applied to calculate high-lying resonances associated with high excitation thresholds of the He+ ion, and with high-angular-momentum states. The derivation and calculation details of our present investigation together with new results of high-angular-momentum states will be presented at the meeting. Supported by NSC of Taiwan.

  1. Shear-deformation-potential constant of the conduction-band minima of Si: Pseudopotential calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Fu; Gu, Zong-Quan; Wang, Jian-Qing

    1990-09-01

    We have calculated the value of the shear-deformation-potential constant Ξu of the conduction-band minima of Si and its temperature coefficient dΞu/dT. The value of Ξu is 9.0 eV for an ab initio pseudopotential calculation and 10.8 eV by the empirical-pseudopotential method (EPM), in good agreement with our experiment. The EPM calculations of the temperature dependence of Ξu yield the values of (dΞu/dT)||DW=-0.04 meV/K due to the Debye-Waller contribution, and (dΞu/dT)||TE=-0.04 meV/K for thermal expansion. We suspect and suggest that the existing experimental value of dΞu/dT~=+3 meV/K is unreliable due to large experimental uncertainty.

  2. Classical calculation of the equilibrium constants for true bound dimers using complete potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Buryak, Ilya; Vigasin, Andrey A.

    2015-12-21

    The present paper aims at deriving classical expressions which permit calculation of the equilibrium constant for weakly interacting molecular pairs using a complete multidimensional potential energy surface. The latter is often available nowadays as a result of the more and more sophisticated and accurate ab initio calculations. The water dimer formation is considered as an example. It is shown that even in case of a rather strongly bound dimer the suggested expression permits obtaining quite reliable estimate for the equilibrium constant. The reliability of our obtained water dimer equilibrium constant is briefly discussed by comparison with the available data based on experimental observations, quantum calculations, and the use of RRHO approximation, provided the latter is restricted to formation of true bound states only.

  3. Ionization potential of {sup 9}Be calculated including nuclear motion and relativistic corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Stanke, Monika; Kedziera, Dariusz; Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2007-05-15

    Variational calculations employing explicitly correlated Gaussian functions have been performed for the ground states of {sup 9}Be and {sup 9}Be{sup +} including the nuclear motion [i.e., without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation]. An approach based on the analytical energy gradient calculated with respect to the Gaussian exponential parameters was employed, leading to energies of the two systems noticeably improved over those found in the recent paper of Pachucki and Komasa [Phys. Rev. A 73, 052502 (2006)]. The non-BO wave functions were used to calculate the {alpha}{sup 2} relativistic corrections ({alpha}=e{sup 2}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi})c). With those corrections and the {alpha}{sup 3} and {alpha}{sup 4} corrections taken from Pachucki and Komasa, a new value of the ionization potential (IP) of {sup 9}Be was determined. It agrees very well with the most recent experimental IP.

  4. Classical calculation of the equilibrium constants for true bound dimers using complete potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryak, Ilya; Vigasin, Andrey A.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper aims at deriving classical expressions which permit calculation of the equilibrium constant for weakly interacting molecular pairs using a complete multidimensional potential energy surface. The latter is often available nowadays as a result of the more and more sophisticated and accurate ab initio calculations. The water dimer formation is considered as an example. It is shown that even in case of a rather strongly bound dimer the suggested expression permits obtaining quite reliable estimate for the equilibrium constant. The reliability of our obtained water dimer equilibrium constant is briefly discussed by comparison with the available data based on experimental observations, quantum calculations, and the use of RRHO approximation, provided the latter is restricted to formation of true bound states only.

  5. Classical calculation of the equilibrium constants for true bound dimers using complete potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Buryak, Ilya; Vigasin, Andrey A

    2015-12-21

    The present paper aims at deriving classical expressions which permit calculation of the equilibrium constant for weakly interacting molecular pairs using a complete multidimensional potential energy surface. The latter is often available nowadays as a result of the more and more sophisticated and accurate ab initio calculations. The water dimer formation is considered as an example. It is shown that even in case of a rather strongly bound dimer the suggested expression permits obtaining quite reliable estimate for the equilibrium constant. The reliability of our obtained water dimer equilibrium constant is briefly discussed by comparison with the available data based on experimental observations, quantum calculations, and the use of RRHO approximation, provided the latter is restricted to formation of true bound states only.

  6. Microscopic calculation of {alpha}-decay half-lives with a deformed potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2009-11-15

    A new version of the generalized density-dependent cluster model is presented to describe an {alpha} particle tunneling through a deformed potential barrier. The microscopic deformed potential is numerically constructed in the double-folding model by the multipole expansion method. The decay width is computed using the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions. We perform a systematic calculation on {alpha}-decay half-lives of even-even nuclei ranging from Z=52 to Z=104, including 65 well-deformed ones. The calculated {alpha}-decay half-lives are found to be in good agreement with the experimental values. There also exists good agreement with the available experimental branching ratios for well-deformed systems.

  7. Calculation of high-order virial coefficients for the square-well potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Hainam; Feng, Chao; Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A.; Wheatley, Richard J.

    2016-07-01

    Accurate virial coefficients BN(λ ,ɛ ) (where ɛ is the well depth) for the three-dimensional square-well and square-step potentials are calculated for orders N = 5 - 9 and well widths λ =1.1 -2.0 using a very fast recursive method. The efficiency of the algorithm is enhanced significantly by exploiting permutation symmetry and by storing integrands for reuse during the calculation. For N = 9 the storage requirements become sufficiently large that a parallel algorithm is developed. The methodology is general and is applicable to other discrete potentials. The computed coefficients are precise even near the critical temperature, and thus open up possibilities for analysis of criticality of the system, which is currently not accessible by any other means.

  8. Calculation of high-order virial coefficients for the square-well potential.

    PubMed

    Do, Hainam; Feng, Chao; Schultz, Andrew J; Kofke, David A; Wheatley, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    Accurate virial coefficients B_{N}(λ,ɛ) (where ɛ is the well depth) for the three-dimensional square-well and square-step potentials are calculated for orders N=5-9 and well widths λ=1.1-2.0 using a very fast recursive method. The efficiency of the algorithm is enhanced significantly by exploiting permutation symmetry and by storing integrands for reuse during the calculation. For N=9 the storage requirements become sufficiently large that a parallel algorithm is developed. The methodology is general and is applicable to other discrete potentials. The computed coefficients are precise even near the critical temperature, and thus open up possibilities for analysis of criticality of the system, which is currently not accessible by any other means. PMID:27575230

  9. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-01

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter was carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons has been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. The final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV) and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP3 through IP6.

  10. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-14

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter was carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons has been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. The final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV) and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP{sub 3} through IP{sub 6}.

  11. Taming infrared divergences in the effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias-Miró, J.; Espinosa, J. R.; Konstandin, T.

    2014-08-01

    The Higgs effective potential in the Standard Model (SM), calculated perturbatively, generically suffers from infrared (IR) divergences when the (field-dependent) tree-level mass of the Goldstone bosons goes to zero. Such divergences can affect both the potential and its first derivative and become worse with increasing loop order. In this paper we show that these IR divergences are spurious, we perform a simple resummation of all IR-problematic terms known (up to three loops) and explain how to extend the resummation to cure all such divergences to any order. The method is of general applicability and would work in scenarios other than the SM. Our discussion has some bearing on a scenario recently proposed as a mechanism for gauge mediation of scale breaking in the ultraviolet, in which it is claimed that the low-energy Higgs potential is non-standard. We argue that all non-decoupling effects from the heavy sector can be absorbed in the renormalization of low-energy parameters leading to a SM-like effective theory.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions.

    PubMed

    Gezerlis, A; Tews, I; Epelbaum, E; Gandolfi, S; Hebeler, K; Nogga, A; Schwenk, A

    2013-07-19

    We present the first quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations with chiral effective field theory (EFT) interactions. To achieve this, we remove all sources of nonlocality, which hamper the inclusion in QMC calculations, in nuclear forces to next-to-next-to-leading order. We perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for the neutron matter energy up to saturation density based on local leading-order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order nucleon-nucleon interactions. Our results exhibit a systematic order-by-order convergence in chiral EFT and provide nonperturbative benchmarks with theoretical uncertainties. For the softer interactions, perturbative calculations are in excellent agreement with the AFDMC results. This work paves the way for QMC calculations with systematic chiral EFT interactions for nuclei and nuclear matter, for testing the perturbativeness of different orders, and allows for matching to lattice QCD results by varying the pion mass.

  13. Kinetic isotope effects calculated with the instanton method.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jan; Rommel, Judith B; Kästner, Johannes

    2011-12-01

    The ring-opening reaction of the cyclopropylcarbinyl radical proceeds via heavy-atom tunneling at low temperature. We used instanton theory to calculate tunneling rates and kinetic isotope effects with on-the-fly calculation of energies by density functional theory (B3LYP). The accuracy was verified by explicitly correlated coupled-cluster calculations (UCCSD(T)-F12). At cryogenic temperatures, we found protium/deuterium KIEs up to 13 and inverse KIEs down to 0.2. We also studied an intramolecular tautomerization reaction. A simple and computationally efficient method is proposed to calculate KIEs with the instanton method: the instanton path is assumed to be independent of the atomic masses. This results in surprisingly good estimates of the KIEs for the cyclopropylcarbinyl radical and for the secondary KIEs of the tautomerization. Challenges and capabilities of the instanton method for calculating KIEs are discussed.

  14. Three-body calculations for the K - pp system within potential models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kezerashvili, R. Ya; Tsiklauri, S. M.; Filikhin, I.; Suslov, V. M.; Vlahovic, B.

    2016-06-01

    We present three-body nonrelativistic calculations within the framework of a potential model for the kaonic cluster K - pp using two methods: the method of hyperspherical harmonics in the momentum representation and the method of Faddeev equations in configuration space. To perform numerical calculations, different NN and antikaon-nucleon interactions are applied. The results of the calculations for the ground-state energy for the K - pp system obtained by both methods are in reasonable agreement. Although the ground-state energy is not sensitive to the pp interaction, it shows very strong dependence on the K - p potential. We show that the dominant clustering of the {K}-{pp} system in the configuration Λ (1405) + p allows us to calculate the binding energy to good accuracy within a simple cluster approach for the differential Faddeev equations. The theoretical discrepancies in the binding energy and width for the K - pp system related to the different pp and K - p interactions are addressed.

  15. Three-body calculations for the K ‑ pp system within potential models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kezerashvili, R. Ya; Tsiklauri, S. M.; Filikhin, I.; Suslov, V. M.; Vlahovic, B.

    2016-06-01

    We present three-body nonrelativistic calculations within the framework of a potential model for the kaonic cluster K ‑ pp using two methods: the method of hyperspherical harmonics in the momentum representation and the method of Faddeev equations in configuration space. To perform numerical calculations, different NN and antikaon–nucleon interactions are applied. The results of the calculations for the ground-state energy for the K ‑ pp system obtained by both methods are in reasonable agreement. Although the ground-state energy is not sensitive to the pp interaction, it shows very strong dependence on the K ‑ p potential. We show that the dominant clustering of the {K}-{pp} system in the configuration Λ (1405) + p allows us to calculate the binding energy to good accuracy within a simple cluster approach for the differential Faddeev equations. The theoretical discrepancies in the binding energy and width for the K ‑ pp system related to the different pp and K ‑ p interactions are addressed.

  16. DFT calculations on nitrodiborane compounds as new potential high energy materials.

    PubMed

    Abdelmalik, John; Ball, David W

    2010-05-01

    We have used DFT methods to determine the structures and thermochemistry of several nitro-substituted diborane molecules in an attempt to rate their potential as high energy materials. The properties of nitrodiborane, three isomers of dinitrodiborane, trinitrodiborane, and tetranitrodiborane were calculated using the B3LYP density functional method. Our results indicate that the absolute enthalpy of combustion decreases with increasing nitro content, in contrast with other nitro-substituted systems that have been studied previously.

  17. A terrain-dependent reference atmosphere determination method for available potential energy calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    An iterative technique that determines the reference atmosphere which incorporates the effects of uneven surface topography is presented. This method has been successfully applied in several available potential energy studies. An alternative method due to Taylor is also evaluated. While Taylor presented excellent continuous formulations of the available potential energy that include topography, his method for determining the reference atmosphere distributions failed to provide the accuracy needed to produce reliable available potential energy estimates. Since topography has a significant influence on the general circulation, it is important to employ techniques that incorporate its effects in the determination of available potential energy.

  18. Calculations of {sup 8}He+p elastic cross sections using a microscopic optical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Massen, S. E.

    2009-08-15

    An approach to calculate microscopic optical potential with the real part obtained by a folding procedure and with the imaginary part inherent in the high-energy approximation is applied to study the {sup 8}He+p elastic-scattering data at energies of tens of MeV/nucleon. The neutron and proton density distributions obtained in different models for {sup 8}He are used in the calculations of the differential cross sections. The role of the spin-orbit potential is studied. Comparison of the calculations with the available experimental data on the elastic-scattering differential cross sections at beam energies of 15.7, 26.25, 32, 66, and 73 MeV/nucleon is performed. The problem of the ambiguities of the depths of each component of the optical potential is considered by means of the imposed physical criterion related to the known behavior of the volume integrals as functions of the incident energy. It is shown also that the role of the surface absorption is rather important, in particular for the lowest incident energies (e.g., 15.7 and 26.25 MeV/nucleon)

  19. Calculation of water drop trajectories to and about arbitrary three-dimensional lifting and nonlifting bodies in potential airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norment, H. G.

    1985-01-01

    Subsonic, external flow about nonlifting bodies, lifting bodies or combinations of lifting and nonlifting bodies is calculated by a modified version of the Hess lifting code. Trajectory calculations can be performed for any atmospheric conditions and for all water drop sizes, from the smallest cloud droplet to large raindrops. Experimental water drop drag relations are used in the water drop equations of motion and effects of gravity settling are included. Inlet flow can be accommodated, and high Mach number compressibility effects are corrected for approximately. Seven codes are described: (1) a code used to debug and plot body surface description data; (2) a code that processes the body surface data to yield the potential flow field; (3) a code that computes flow velocities at arrays of points in space; (4) a code that computes water drop trajectories from an array of points in space; (5) a code that computes water drop trajectories and fluxes to arbitrary target points; (6) a code that computes water drop trajectories tangent to the body; and (7) a code that produces stereo pair plots which include both the body and trajectories. Accuracy of the calculations is discussed, and trajectory calculation results are compared with prior calculations and with experimental data.

  20. Quantum Calculations on Salt Bridges with Water: Potentials, Structure, and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Sing; Green, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Salt bridges are electrostatic links between acidic and basic amino acids in a protein; quantum calculations are used here to determine the energetics and other properties of one form of these species, in the presence of water molecules. The acidic groups are carboxylic acids (aspartic and glutamic acids); proteins have two bases with pK above physiological pH: one, arginine, with a guanidinium basic group, the other lysine, which is a primary amine. Only arginine is modeled here, by ethyl guanidinium, while propionic acid is used as a model for either carboxylic acid. The salt bridges are accompanied by 0-12 water molecules; for each of the 13 systems, the energy-bond distance relation, natural bond orbitals (NBO), frequency calculations allowing thermodynamic corrections to room temperature, and dielectric constant dependence, were all calculated. The water molecules were found to arrange themselves in hydrogen bonded rings anchored to the oxygens of the salt bridge components. This was not surprising in itself, but it was found that the rings lead to a periodicity in the energy, and to a 'water addition' rule. The latter shows that the initial rings, with four oxygen atoms, become five member rings when an additional water molecule becomes available, with the additional water filling in at the bond with the lowest Wiberg index, as calculated using NBO. The dielectric constant dependence is the expected hyperbola, and the fit of the energy to the inverse dielectric constant is determined. There is an energy periodicity related to ring formation upon addition of water molecules. When 10 water molecules have been added, all spaces near the salt bridge are filled, completing the first hydration shell, and a second shell starts to form. The potentials associated with salt bridges depend on their hydration, and potentials assigned without regard to local hydration are likely to cause errors as large as or larger than kBT, thus suggesting a serious problem if these

  1. Effective UV radiation from model calculations and measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feister, Uwe; Grewe, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Model calculations have been made to simulate the effect of atmospheric ozone and geographical as well as meteorological parameters on solar UV radiation reaching the ground. Total ozone values as measured by Dobson spectrophotometer and Brewer spectrometer as well as turbidity were used as input to the model calculation. The performance of the model was tested by spectroradiometric measurements of solar global UV radiation at Potsdam. There are small differences that can be explained by the uncertainty of the measurements, by the uncertainty of input data to the model and by the uncertainty of the radiative transfer algorithms of the model itself. Some effects of solar radiation to the biosphere and to air chemistry are discussed. Model calculations and spectroradiometric measurements can be used to study variations of the effective radiation in space in space time. The comparability of action spectra and their uncertainties are also addressed.

  2. Dissociative electron transfer in polychlorinated aromatics. Reduction potentials from convolution analysis and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Romańczyk, Piotr P; Rotko, Grzegorz; Kurek, Stefan S

    2016-08-10

    Formal potentials of the first reduction leading to dechlorination in dimethylformamide were obtained from convolution analysis of voltammetric data and confirmed by quantum chemical calculations for a series of polychlorinated benzenes: hexachlorobenzene (-2.02 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc), pentachloroanisole (-2.14 V), and 2,4-dichlorophenoxy- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acids (-2.35 V and -2.34 V, respectively). The key parameters required to calculate the reduction potential, electron affinity and/or C-Cl bond dissociation energy, were computed at both DFT-D and CCSD(T)-F12 levels. Comparison of the obtained gas-phase energies and redox potentials with experiment enabled us to verify the relative energetics and the performance of various implicit solvent models. Good agreement with the experiment was achieved for redox potentials computed at the DFT-D level, but only for the stepwise mechanism owing to the error compensation. For the concerted electron transfer/C-Cl bond cleavage process, the application of a high level coupled cluster method is required. Quantum chemical calculations have also demonstrated the significant role of the π*ring and σ*C-Cl orbital mixing. It brings about the stabilisation of the non-planar, C2v-symmetric C6Cl6˙(-) radical anion, explains the experimentally observed low energy barrier and the transfer coefficient close to 0.5 for C6Cl5OCH3 in an electron transfer process followed by immediate C-Cl bond cleavage in solution, and an increase in the probability of dechlorination of di- and trichlorophenoxyacetic acids due to substantial population of the vibrational excited states corresponding to the out-of-plane C-Cl bending at ambient temperatures.

  3. Dissociative electron transfer in polychlorinated aromatics. Reduction potentials from convolution analysis and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Romańczyk, Piotr P; Rotko, Grzegorz; Kurek, Stefan S

    2016-08-10

    Formal potentials of the first reduction leading to dechlorination in dimethylformamide were obtained from convolution analysis of voltammetric data and confirmed by quantum chemical calculations for a series of polychlorinated benzenes: hexachlorobenzene (-2.02 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc), pentachloroanisole (-2.14 V), and 2,4-dichlorophenoxy- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acids (-2.35 V and -2.34 V, respectively). The key parameters required to calculate the reduction potential, electron affinity and/or C-Cl bond dissociation energy, were computed at both DFT-D and CCSD(T)-F12 levels. Comparison of the obtained gas-phase energies and redox potentials with experiment enabled us to verify the relative energetics and the performance of various implicit solvent models. Good agreement with the experiment was achieved for redox potentials computed at the DFT-D level, but only for the stepwise mechanism owing to the error compensation. For the concerted electron transfer/C-Cl bond cleavage process, the application of a high level coupled cluster method is required. Quantum chemical calculations have also demonstrated the significant role of the π*ring and σ*C-Cl orbital mixing. It brings about the stabilisation of the non-planar, C2v-symmetric C6Cl6˙(-) radical anion, explains the experimentally observed low energy barrier and the transfer coefficient close to 0.5 for C6Cl5OCH3 in an electron transfer process followed by immediate C-Cl bond cleavage in solution, and an increase in the probability of dechlorination of di- and trichlorophenoxyacetic acids due to substantial population of the vibrational excited states corresponding to the out-of-plane C-Cl bending at ambient temperatures. PMID:27477334

  4. Age difference in numeral recognition and calculation: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Dong; Wang, Suhong; Yang, Yilin; Meng, Ping; Xu, Feng; Yang, Wen; Sheng, Wei; Yang, Yuxia

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the age difference in numeral recognition and calculation in one group of school-aged children (n = 38) and one of undergraduate students (n = 26) using the event-related potential (ERP) methods. Consistent with previous reports, the age difference was significant in behavioral results. Both numeral recognition and calculation elicited a negativity peaking at about 170-280 ms (N2) and a positivity peaking at 200-470 ms (pSW) in raw ERPs, and a difference potential (dN3) between 360 and 450 ms. The difference between the two age groups indicated that more attention resources were devoted to arithmetical tasks in school-aged children, and that school-aged children and undergraduate students appear to use different strategies to solve arithmetical problems. The analysis of frontal negativity suggested that numeral recognition and mental calculation impose greater load on working memory and executive function in schoolchildren than in undergraduate students. The topography data determined that the parietal regions were responsible for arithmetical function in humans, and there was an age-related difference in the area of cerebral activation. PMID:17364561

  5. Theoretical calculations and vibrational potential energy surface of 4-silaspiro(3,3)heptane

    SciTech Connect

    Ocola, Esther J.; Medders, Cross; Laane, Jaan; Meinander, Niklas

    2014-04-28

    Theoretical computations have been carried out on 4-silaspiro(3,3)heptane (SSH) in order to calculate its molecular structure and conformational energies. The molecule has two puckered four-membered rings with dihedral angles of 34.2° and a tilt angle of 9.4° between the two rings. Energy calculations were carried out for different conformations of SSH. These results allowed the generation of a two-dimensional ring-puckering potential energy surface (PES) of the form V = a(x{sub 1}{sup 4} + x{sub 2}{sup 4}) – b(x{sub 1}{sup 2} + x{sub 2}{sup 2}) + cx{sub 1}{sup 2}x{sub 2}{sup 2}, where x{sub 1} and x{sub 2} are the ring-puckering coordinates for the two rings. The presence of sufficiently high potential energy barriers prevents the molecule from undergoing pseudorotation. The quantum states, wave functions, and predicted spectra resulting from the PESs were calculated.

  6. CALCULATING POINT-CHARGE WAKEFIELDS FROM FINITE LENGTH BUNCH WAKE-POTENTIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Podobedov, B.; Stupakov, G.

    2011-03-28

    Starting from analytical properties of high frequency geometric impedance we show how one can accurately calculate short bunch wake-potentials (and even point-charge wakefields) from time domain calculations performed with a much longer bunch. In many practical instances this drastically reduces the need for computer resources, speeds up the calculations, and improves their accuracy. To illustrate this method we give examples for 2D accelerator structures of various complexities. We describe preliminary results of a new method that allows us to accurately obtain longitudinal wakefields of short bunches by adding a long-bunch result from an EM solver and a singular analytical wake model. In the future this work will be generalized to 3D geometries as well. Similarly, the method should be equally applicable to the calculations of transverse wakefields. Periodic structures with a significant number of periods (2 {ge} a{sup 2}/{sigma}L, where L is the period length) have not been considered so far. They have asymptotic wakefields that differ from the examples described above. We believe this method is applicable to such geometries as well, as long as correct asymptotic solutions are used.

  7. Electronic coupling calculations with transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles derived from electrostatic potential fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J.

    2014-12-07

    A transition charge, dipole, and quadrupole from electrostatic potential (TrESP-CDQ) method for electronic coupling calculations is proposed. The TrESP method is based on the classical description of electronic Coulomb interaction between transition densities for individual molecules. In the original TrESP method, only the transition charge interactions were considered as the electronic coupling. In the present study, the TrESP method is extended to include the contributions from the transition dipoles and quadrupoles as well as the transition charges. Hence, the self-consistent transition density is employed in the ESP fitting procedure. To check the accuracy of the present approach, several test calculations are performed to a helium dimer, a methane dimer, and an ethylene dimer. As a result, the TrESP-CDQ method gives a much improved description of the electronic coupling, compared with the original TrESP method. The calculated results also show that the self-consistent treatment to the transition densities contributes significantly to the accuracy of the electronic coupling calculations. Based on the successful description of the electronic coupling, the contributions to the electronic coupling are also analyzed. This analysis clearly shows a negligible contribution of the transition charge interaction to the electronic coupling. Hence, the distribution of the transition density is found to strongly influence the magnitudes of the transition charges, dipoles, and quadrupoles. The present approach is useful for analyzing and understanding the mechanism of excitation-energy transfer.

  8. Calculation of subsonic and supersonic steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces using velocity potential aerodynamic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Yoo, Y. S.

    1976-01-01

    Expressions for calculation of subsonic and supersonic, steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces are derived, using the concept of aerodynamic elements applied to the downwash velocity potential method. Aerodynamic elements can be of arbitrary out of plane polygon shape, although numerical calculations are restricted to rectangular elements, and to the steady state case in the supersonic examples. It is suggested that the use of conforming, in place of rectangular elements, would give better results. Agreement with results for subsonic oscillating T tails is fair, but results do not converge as the number of collocation points is increased. This appears to be due to the form of expression used in the calculations. The methods derived are expected to facilitate automated flutter analysis on the computer. In particular, the aerodynamic element concept is consistent with finite element methods already used for structural analysis. The method is universal for the complete Mach number range, and, finally, the calculations can be arranged so that they do not have to be repeated completely for every reduced frequency.

  9. Modification of a new potential model used for calculation of the second virial coefficient and zero density transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsafar, G. A.; Shokouhi, M.

    A new hard-core potential model was recently used to calculate thermodynamic properties of some model fluids, including equilibrium properties, such as compressibility factor and internal energy. A Lennard-Jones (LJ) like potential has been used to modify the repulsive part of the potential. The modified potential contains five parameters, namely, α, R, ɛ, σ, and σHS. The parameter α is the tail of the attractive branch whose value changes from zero to one. In this work, we have chosen α = 1 to make the potential continuous at separation r = Rσ, where the parameter R is the well width. R lies in the range 1.2 to 2.5, and R = 1.3 was found to be the best value for all real gases studied. The parameter ɛ is the well depth of potential function, and σ is the separation at which the potential function is zero. σHS is the effective hard sphere diameter, which depends on temperature and an additional parameter. Using statistical mechanics along with the Boltzmann factor criterion (BFC) for the effective hard sphere diameter, an analytical expression has been derived for the reduced second virial coefficient in terms of the reduced temperature. Fitting experimental data to expression derived for the second virial coefficient, the potential parameters ɛ and σ are obtained. Since this potential is spherical (depending only on distance), three types of species are chosen, namely Ar and He (monoatomic), N2and O2 (diatomic), and methane (spherical molecule), to show how appropriate this potential model is for them. This model predicts an inversion temperature for the second virial coefficient (temperature at which the second virial coefficient pass through a maximum) at ILM0001, where T1 is the inversion temperature, and TB is the Boyle temperature. The predicted value is better than that of the L-J model (for which ILM0002). The maximum percentage deviation of the second virial coefficient is about 2%, except around the Boyle temperature. Then the transport

  10. Mesh size and code option effects of strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2010-12-10

    Modern Lagrangian hydrodynamics codes include numerical methods which allow calculations to proceed past the point obtainable by a purely Lagrangian scheme. These options can be employed as the user deems necessary to 'complete' a calculation. While one could argue that any calculation is better than none, to truly understand the calculated results and their relationship to physical reality, the user needs to understand how their runtime choices affect the calculated results. One step toward this goal is to understand the effect of each runtime choice on particular pieces of the code physics. This paper will present simulation results for some experiments typically used for strength model validation. Topics to be covered include effect of mesh size, use of various ALE schemes for mesh detangling, and use of anti-hour-glassing schemes. Experiments to be modeled include the lower strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) gas gun driven Taylor impact experiments and the higher strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) HE products driven perturbed plate experiments. The necessary mesh resolution and the effect of the code runtime options are highly dependent on the amount of localization of strain and stress in each experiment. In turn, this localization is dependent on the geometry of the experimental setup and the drive conditions.

  11. Progress Towards the Accurate Calculation of Anharmonic Vibrational States of Fluxional Molecules and Clusters Without a Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Andrew S.; McCoy, Anne B.

    2011-06-01

    The accurate calculation of anharmonic vibrational states of highly fluxional systems is complicated by the need to first obtain the full-dimensional potential energy surface(PES). Although commonly exploited as a way around this problem, grid-based methodologies scale exponentially with system size while reduced dimensional approaches are highly system dependent, both in terms of the details of their application and in terms of their suitability. Moreover, the achievement of converged variational calculations of highly anharmonic systems is complicated by the necessity of using a very large basis and hence the construction and diagonalization of enormous Hamiltonian matrices. We report here our recent efforts to develop an algorithm capable of accurately calculating anharmonic vibrational energies, even for very floppy systems, without first obtaining a PES and using only a handful of basis functions per degree of freedom. More specifically, the potential energy and G-matrix elements are calculated on a set of points obtained from a Monte Carlo sampling of the most important regions of configuration space, allowing for a significant reduction in the number of required sampling points. The Hamiltonian matrix is then constructed using an evolving basis which, with each iteration, captures the effect of building H from an ever-expanding basis despite the fact that the actual dimensionality of H is fixed throughout the calculation. This latter property of the algorithm also greatly reduces the size of basis needed for the calculation relative to more traditional variational approaches. The results obtained from the application of our method to several test systems, including ion water complexes, will be reported along with its observed convergence properties.

  12. Determination of a silane intermolecular force field potential model from an ab initio calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Arvin Huang-Te; Chao, Sheng D.; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2010-12-15

    Intermolecular interaction potentials of the silane dimer in 12 orientations have been calculated by using the Hartree-Fock (HF) self-consistent theory and the second-order Moeller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory. We employed basis sets from Pople's medium-size basis sets [up to 6-311++G(3df, 3pd)] and Dunning's correlation consistent basis sets (up to the triply augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence quadruple-zeta basis set). We found that the minimum energy orientations were the G and H conformers. We have suggested that the Si-H attractions, the central silicon atom size, and electronegativity play essential roles in weakly binding of a silane dimer. The calculated MP2 potential data were employed to parametrize a five-site force field for molecular simulations. The Si-Si, Si-H, and H-H interaction parameters in a pairwise-additive, site-site potential model for silane molecules were regressed from the ab initio energies.

  13. Calculations of the ionization potentials of the halogens by the relativistic Hartree-Rock-Dirac method taking account of superposition of configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Tupitsyn, I.I.

    1988-03-01

    The ionization potentials of the halogen group have been calculated. The calculations were carried out using the relativistic Hartree-Fock method taking into account correlation effects. Comparison of theoretical results with experimental data for the elements F, Cl, Br, and I allows an estimation of the accuracy and reliability of the method. The theoretical values of the ionization potential of astatine obtained here may be of definite interest for the chemistry of astatine.

  14. Ab initio calculation of thermodynamic potentials and entropies for superionic water

    DOE PAGES

    French, Martin; Desjarlais, Michael P.; Redmer, Ronald

    2016-02-25

    We construct thermodynamic potentials for two superionic phases of water [with body-centered cubic (bcc) and face-centered cubic (fcc) oxygen lattice] using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics simulations (MD). For this purpose, a generic expression for the free energy of warm dense matter is developed and parametrized with equation of state data from the DFT-MD simulations. A second central aspect is the accurate determination of the entropy, which is done using an approximate two-phase method based on the frequency spectra of the nuclear motion. The boundary between the bcc superionic phase and the ices VII andmore » X calculated with thermodynamic potentials from DFT-MD is consistent with that directly derived from the simulations. As a result, differences in the physical properties of the bcc and fcc superionic phases and their impact on interior modeling of water-rich giant planets are discussed.« less

  15. Ab initio calculation of thermodynamic potentials and entropies for superionic water.

    PubMed

    French, Martin; Desjarlais, Michael P; Redmer, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    We construct thermodynamic potentials for two superionic phases of water [with body-centered cubic (bcc) and face-centered cubic (fcc) oxygen lattice] using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics simulations (MD). For this purpose, a generic expression for the free energy of warm dense matter is developed and parametrized with equation of state data from the DFT-MD simulations. A second central aspect is the accurate determination of the entropy, which is done using an approximate two-phase method based on the frequency spectra of the nuclear motion. The boundary between the bcc superionic phase and the ices VII and X calculated with thermodynamic potentials from DFT-MD is consistent with that directly derived from the simulations. Differences in the physical properties of the bcc and fcc superionic phases and their impact on interior modeling of water-rich giant planets are discussed. PMID:26986321

  16. Ab initio calculation of thermodynamic potentials and entropies for superionic water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Martin; Desjarlais, Michael P.; Redmer, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    We construct thermodynamic potentials for two superionic phases of water [with body-centered cubic (bcc) and face-centered cubic (fcc) oxygen lattice] using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics simulations (MD). For this purpose, a generic expression for the free energy of warm dense matter is developed and parametrized with equation of state data from the DFT-MD simulations. A second central aspect is the accurate determination of the entropy, which is done using an approximate two-phase method based on the frequency spectra of the nuclear motion. The boundary between the bcc superionic phase and the ices VII and X calculated with thermodynamic potentials from DFT-MD is consistent with that directly derived from the simulations. Differences in the physical properties of the bcc and fcc superionic phases and their impact on interior modeling of water-rich giant planets are discussed.

  17. Mie potentials for phase equilibria calculations: application to alkanes and perfluoroalkanes.

    PubMed

    Potoff, Jeffrey J; Bernard-Brunel, Damien A

    2009-11-01

    Transferable united-atom force fields, based on n - 6 Lennard-Jones potentials, are presented for normal alkanes and perfluorocarbons. It is shown that by varying the repulsive exponent the range of the potential can be altered, leading to improved predictions of vapor pressures while also reproducing saturated liquid densities to high accuracy. Histogram-reweighting Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble are used to determine the vapor liquid coexistence curves, vapor pressures, heats of vaporization, and critical points for normal alkanes methane through tetradecane, and perfluorocarbons perfluoromethane through perfluorooctane. For all molecules studied, saturated liquid densities are reproduced to within 1% of experiment. Vapor pressures for normal alkanes and perfluorocarbons were predicted to within 3% and 6% of experiment, respectively. Calculations performed for binary mixture vapor-liquid equilibria for propane + pentane show excellent agreement with experiment, while slight deviations are observed for the ethane + perfluoroethane mixture.

  18. Effect size estimates: current use, calculations, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Catherine O; Morris, Peter E; Richler, Jennifer J

    2012-02-01

    The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (American Psychological Association, 2001, American Psychological Association, 2010) calls for the reporting of effect sizes and their confidence intervals. Estimates of effect size are useful for determining the practical or theoretical importance of an effect, the relative contributions of factors, and the power of an analysis. We surveyed articles published in 2009 and 2010 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, noting the statistical analyses reported and the associated reporting of effect size estimates. Effect sizes were reported for fewer than half of the analyses; no article reported a confidence interval for an effect size. The most often reported analysis was analysis of variance, and almost half of these reports were not accompanied by effect sizes. Partial η2 was the most commonly reported effect size estimate for analysis of variance. For t tests, 2/3 of the articles did not report an associated effect size estimate; Cohen's d was the most often reported. We provide a straightforward guide to understanding, selecting, calculating, and interpreting effect sizes for many types of data and to methods for calculating effect size confidence intervals and power analysis.

  19. Effect size estimates: current use, calculations, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Catherine O; Morris, Peter E; Richler, Jennifer J

    2012-02-01

    The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (American Psychological Association, 2001, American Psychological Association, 2010) calls for the reporting of effect sizes and their confidence intervals. Estimates of effect size are useful for determining the practical or theoretical importance of an effect, the relative contributions of factors, and the power of an analysis. We surveyed articles published in 2009 and 2010 in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, noting the statistical analyses reported and the associated reporting of effect size estimates. Effect sizes were reported for fewer than half of the analyses; no article reported a confidence interval for an effect size. The most often reported analysis was analysis of variance, and almost half of these reports were not accompanied by effect sizes. Partial η2 was the most commonly reported effect size estimate for analysis of variance. For t tests, 2/3 of the articles did not report an associated effect size estimate; Cohen's d was the most often reported. We provide a straightforward guide to understanding, selecting, calculating, and interpreting effect sizes for many types of data and to methods for calculating effect size confidence intervals and power analysis. PMID:21823805

  20. Modeling intermolecular interactions of physisorbed organic molecules using pair potential calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, Ingo; Stadtmueller, Benjamin; Wagner, Christian; Weiss, Christian; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan; Kumpf, Christian

    2011-12-21

    The understanding and control of epitaxial growth of organic thin films is of crucial importance in order to optimize the performance of future electronic devices. In particular, the start of the submonolayer growth plays an important role since it often determines the structure of the first layer and subsequently of the entire molecular film. We have investigated the structure formation of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic dianhydride and copper-phthalocyanine molecules on Au(111) using pair-potential calculations based on van der Waals and electrostatic intermolecular interactions. The results are compared with the fundamental lateral structures known from experiment and an excellent agreement was found for these weakly interacting systems. Furthermore, the calculations are even suitable for chemisorptive adsorption as demonstrated for copper-phthalocyanine/Cu(111), if the influence of charge transfer between substrate and molecules is known and the corresponding charge redistribution in the molecules can be estimated. The calculations are of general applicability for molecular adsorbate systems which are dominated by electrostatic and van der Waals interaction.

  1. Calculated ground state potential surface and excitation energies for the copper trimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.; Laskowski, B. C.

    1986-01-01

    In the context of their relevance to catalysis and to materials science problems, transition metals and transition metal (TM) compounds are currently of considerable interest, and studies have been conducted of the copper trimer, Cu3. The present investigation is concerned with a study of the ground state surface and several groups of excited states in order to improve the understanding of the spectroscopy of Cu3. Differences of the current study from previous investigations are related to an employment of larger basis sets and a more extensive electron correlation. This was done with the objective to obtain a more accurate definition of the ground state surface. Features of the bonding in the copper dimer are considered to obtain a basis for an understanding of the copper trimer. Attention is given to calculational details, the ground state surface, and calculated vertical excitation energies. The results of SCF/SDCI calculations are reported for portions of the ground surface, for two groups of excited states, and for the ionization potential of Cu3.

  2. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    DOE PAGES

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-12

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set (CBS) limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter were carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons have been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. As amore » result, the final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV), and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP3 through IP6.« less

  3. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-12

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set (CBS) limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter were carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons have been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. As a result, the final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV), and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP3 through IP6.

  4. The effect of calculated explosive energy output on blast design

    SciTech Connect

    Katsabanis, P.D.; Workman, L.

    1996-12-31

    The energy output of an explosive is typically calculated using an equation of state and computer applications. Results are reported as weight and bulk strength, either in absolute terms or relative to ANFO. The effect of the equation of state selected and the assumptions regarding the energy calculation are considered and interpreted for the purpose of blast design. It appears that variations in the heat of detonation which result from the selection of the equation of state and parameters associated with it are not sufficient to significantly affect blast patterns, explosive consumption and costs. However variations stemming from the use of available energy associated with a cut-off pressure are significant, suggesting in many cases large pattern expansions. The validity of the various approaches is discussed and blast design results based on the energy calculated by the different approaches are presented and evaluated.

  5. Calculation of turbulence effects in an upward-refracting atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Kenneth E.; di, Xiao; Raspet, Richard

    1990-06-01

    The effect of atmospheric turbulence on sound propagation was investigated for both nonrefractive and refractive atmospheres, using the parabolic equation method of Gilbert and White (1989) in conjunction with a two-dimensional atmospheric turbulence model. The calculations for a nonrefractive atmosphere gave good agreement with experimental data and with Daigle's (1979) theory, while calculations for an upward-refractive atmosphere gave reasonable agreement with the data of Weiner and Keast (1959). It is concluded that, for a receiver deep in a shadow zone and for frequencies greater than a few hundred hertz, the measured sound-pressure level is due almost entirely to the sound scattered into the shadow zone by atmospheric turbulence. Consequently, for upward refraction and frequencies above a few hundred hertz, turbulence must be included in long-range propagation calculations.

  6. Calculation of the ionization state for LTE plasmas using a new relativistic-screened hydrogenic model based on analytical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiano, J. G.; Rodríguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Martel, P.; Mínguez, E.

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the Saha equation is solved using atomic data provided by means of a new relativistic-screened hydrogenic model based on analytical potentials to calculate the ionization state and ion abundance for LTE iron plasmas. The plasma effects on the atomic structure are taken into account by including the classical continuum lowering correction of Stewart and Pyatt. For high density, the Saha equation is modified to consider the degeneration of free electrons using the Fermi Dirac statistics instead of the Maxwellian distribution commonly used. The results are compared with more sophisticated self-consistent codes.

  7. Balanced Basis Sets in the Calculation of Potential Energy Curves for Diatomic Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, V. J.

    "Balanced" basis sets, which describe the internuclear region as well as the nuclear region, are examined in the context of an ab initio selection-extrapolation configuration -interaction method (MRD-CI). The sets are balanced by adding bond functions (BF's), which are s, p and d-type orbitals at the bond mid-point, to atomic-centred molecular basis sets, which have double and triple sets of valence -shell orbitals (DZ and TZ) and one or two sets of polarization functions (PF's). Potential energy curves and spectroscopic constants were calculated for the ground states of the hydrides H _2, OH, NaH, MgH, MH, SiH, PH, SH, HCl, and for the ionized species OH^+ and OH^{++}, and for the A^3Sigma_{u}, w^3Delta_{u} and B^3Pi_{g} excited states of N_2. The basis sets containing bond functions gave curves and constants superior to the DZP and (where calculated) TZPP results, and of quality similar to large basis set calculations in the literature. The single and double ionization potentials of OH, and the term energies of the N_2 excited states had error at the atomic asymptotes for all basis sets. The dissociation energies of the ground states of ten first-row diatomics (C_2, N_2, O_2, F_2, CN, CO, CF, NO, NF, and FO) were studied using balanced basis sets. A correlation was found to exist between the actual bond order of a species, and the number and kinds of orbitals which comprise the optimum BF. For MRD-CI diatomic calculations, the following BF's should be added to a DZP basis set (sp) (for a bond order of 1); 2(sp) (B. O. 1.5); (spd) (B. O. 2); 3(sp) (B. O. 2.5); 2(spd) (B. O. 3). The prescribed BF basis method was tested on the 26 second-row congeners Si _2, P_2, S _2, Cl_2, SiP, SiS, SiCl, PS, PCl, and ClS, and mixed-row congeners SiN, SiO, SiF, PO, PF, SF, SiC, PN, SO, ClF, CP, CS, CCl, NS, NCl, and ClO. An average error of 6% and a maximum error of 10% relative to known experimental D_{e }'s was found: compared to an average error of 18% for TZPP calculations

  8. Hybrid MP2/MP4 potential surfaces in VSCF calculations of IR spectra: applications for organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Knaanie, Roie; Šebek, Jiří; Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Benny Gerber, R

    2014-02-01

    This study introduces an improved hybrid MP2/MP4 ab initio potential for vibrational spectroscopy calculations which is very accurate, yet without high computational demands. The method uses harmonic vibrational calculations with the MP4(SDQ) potential to construct an improved MP2 potential by coordinate scaling. This improved MP2 potential is used for the anharmonic VSCF calculation. The method was tested spectroscopically for four molecules: butane, acetone, ethylene and glycine. Very good agreement with experiment was found. For most of the systems, the more accurate harmonic treatment considerably improved the MP2 anharmonic results. PMID:23838574

  9. Effective Connectivity Reveals Strategy Differences in an Expert Calculator

    PubMed Central

    Minati, Ludovico; Sigala, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical reasoning is a core component of cognition and the study of experts defines the upper limits of human cognitive abilities, which is why we are fascinated by peak performers, such as chess masters and mental calculators. Here, we investigated the neural bases of calendrical skills, i.e. the ability to rapidly identify the weekday of a particular date, in a gifted mental calculator who does not fall in the autistic spectrum, using functional MRI. Graph-based mapping of effective connectivity, but not univariate analysis, revealed distinct anatomical location of “cortical hubs” supporting the processing of well-practiced close dates and less-practiced remote dates: the former engaged predominantly occipital and medial temporal areas, whereas the latter were associated mainly with prefrontal, orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate connectivity. These results point to the effect of extensive practice on the development of expertise and long term working memory, and demonstrate the role of frontal networks in supporting performance on less practiced calculations, which incur additional processing demands. Through the example of calendrical skills, our results demonstrate that the ability to perform complex calculations is initially supported by extensive attentional and strategic resources, which, as expertise develops, are gradually replaced by access to long term working memory for familiar material. PMID:24086291

  10. Evaluation of truncation error and adaptive grid generation for the transonic full potential flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, S.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of truncation error on the numerical solution of transonic flows using the full potential equation are studied. The effects of adapting grid point distributions to various solution aspects including shock waves is also discussed. A conclusion is that a rapid change of grid spacing is damaging to the accuracy of the flow solution. Therefore, in a solution adaptive grid application an optimal grid is obtained as a tradeoff between the amount of grid refinement and the rate of grid stretching.

  11. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  12. Infrared lens thermal effect: equivalent focal shift and calculating model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng-shuo; Shi, Zelin; Feng, Bin; Xu, Bao-shu

    2014-11-01

    It's well-know that the focal shift of infrared lens is the major factor in degeneration of imaging quality when temperature change. In order to figure out the connection between temperature change and focal shift, partial differential equations of thermal effect on light path are obtained by raytrace method, to begin with. The approximately solution of the PDEs show that focal shift is proportional to temperature change. And a formula to compute the proportional factor is given. In order to understand infrared lens thermal effect deeply, we use defocus by image plane shift at constant temperature to equivalently represent thermal effect on infrared lens. So equivalent focal shift (EFS) is defined and its calculating model is proposed at last. In order to verify EFS and its calculating model, Physical experimental platform including a motorized linear stage with built-in controller, blackbody, target, collimator, IR detector, computer and other devices is developed. The experimental results indicate that EFS make the image plane shift at constant temperature have the same influence on infrared lens as thermal effect and its calculating model is correct.

  13. Calculation of Steady-state Evaporation for an Arbitrary Matrix Potential at Ground Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhan, H.

    2014-12-01

    The water loss from soil by evaporation and the amount of ground water available to plants due to the upward movement of water from a water table is an important topic in many disciplines such as soil science, hydrology, and plant physiology. Although water evaporation in actual field setting is a highly complex process, a nearly steady upward flow from a water table to a bare soil surface may be established if the daily evaporative demand is reasonably uniform for a long period of time. While the maximum potential rate of evaporation from the ground surface depends on atmospheric conditions, the actual flux across the soil surface is limited by the ability of the porous medium for transmitting water from the unsaturated zone.The purpose of this study is to calculate the steady-state evaporation for an arbitrary matrix potential at bare soil surface above a shallow water table, while the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is a nonlinear function of water content or matrix potential. The Haverkamp function and the Brooks-Corey function for the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity are used, and the study results are contrast among the solution developed from the two retention equation and HYDRUS simulation.

  14. Biasing Potential Replica Exchange Multi-Site λ-Dynamics for Efficient Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Armacost, Kira A.; Goh, Garrett B.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional free energy calculation methods are well known for their drawbacks in scalability and speed in converging results particularly for calculations with large perturbations. In the present work, we report on the development of biasing potential replica exchange multi-site λ-dynamics (BP-REX MSλD), which is a free energy method that is capable of performing simultaneous alchemical free energy transformations, including perturbations between flexible moieties. BP-REX MSλD and the original MSλD are applied to a series of symmetrical 2,5-benzoquinone derivatives covering a diverse chemical space and range of conformational flexibility. Improved λ-space sampling is observed for the BP-REX MSλD simulations, yielding a 2–5-fold increase in the number of transitions between substituents compared to traditional MSλD. We also demonstrate the efficacy of varying the value of c, the parameter that controls the ruggedness of the landscape mediating the sampling of λ-states, based on the flexibility of the fragment. Finally, we developed a protocol for maximizing the transition frequency between fragments. This protocol reduces the “kinetic barrier” for alchemically transforming fragments by grouping and ordering based on volume. These findings are applied to a challenging test set involving a series of geldanamycin-based inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Even though the perturbations span volume changes by as large as 60 Å3, the values for the free energy change achieve an average unsigned error (AUE) of 1.5 kcal/mol relative to experimental Kd measurements with a reasonable correlation (R = 0.56). Our results suggest that the BP-REX MSλD algorithm is a highly efficient and scalable free energy method, which when utilized will enable routine calculations on the order of hundreds of compounds using only a few simulations. PMID:26579773

  15. Calculating event-triggered average synaptic conductances from the membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Pospischil, Martin; Piwkowska, Zuzanna; Rudolph, Michelle; Bal, Thierry; Destexhe, Alain

    2007-03-01

    The optimal patterns of synaptic conductances for spike generation in central neurons is a subject of considerable interest. Ideally such conductance time courses should be extracted from membrane potential (V(m)) activity, but this is difficult because the nonlinear contribution of conductances to the V(m) renders their estimation from the membrane equation extremely sensitive. We outline here a solution to this problem based on a discretization of the time axis. This procedure can extract the time course of excitatory and inhibitory conductances solely from the analysis of V(m) activity. We test this method by calculating spike-triggered averages of synaptic conductances using numerical simulations of the integrate-and-fire model subject to colored conductance noise. The procedure was also tested successfully in biological cortical neurons using conductance noise injected with dynamic clamp. This method should allow the extraction of synaptic conductances from V(m) recordings in vivo.

  16. Potential Ergogenic Effects of Saffron.

    PubMed

    Meamarbashi, Abbas; Rajabi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Crocus sativus, commonly known as saffron, is a rich source of carotenoids with many health benefits. The muscular strength, pulmonary function, and reaction time are vital to the athlete's performance, and this study aimed to investigate an ergogenic effect of saffron. Twenty-eight nonactive and healthy male university students were randomly assigned into the saffron (n = 14) and control (n = 15) groups. The experimental group received dried saffron stigma (300 mg/day for 10 days) and the control group received a placebo. After one session, familiarization with the tests, anthropometric parameters, visual and audio reaction times, and the maximum isometric and isotonic forces on a leg press machine were measured accordingly, 1 day before and after the supplementation period. This study shows that 10 days of supplementation with saffron significantly increased (10.1%) the isometric force (p < .0001; effect size (EF) = 0.432) and increased 6.1% the isotonic force (p < .0001; effect size = 0.662), as well as effecting faster visual (p < .05; EF = 0.217) and audio (p < .05; EF = 0.214) reaction times. The ergogenic effect of saffron (increase in the forces) may contribute to increase in the muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and positive effect on the motor cortex, both of which may explain faster audio and visual reaction times. Saffron supplementation was also possibly responsible for improvement of muscle blood perfusion and facilitation in the oxygen transport. PMID:26811090

  17. Calculation of real-gas effects on airfoil aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul; Yoon, Seokkwan

    1990-01-01

    The effects of high temperature thermochemical phenomena on the aerodynamic characteristics at hypersonic speeds are calculated for two-dimensional airfoils in air. The calculations are performed on an airfoil similar to that used for the Space Shuttle Orbiter, and ellipses of thickness ratios varying between 5 and 15 percent. For the airfoil, one flight condition is considered. For the ellipses, the calculations are carried out over a range of chord lengths, flight velocities, flight altitudes, and angles of attack. It is shown that the lift and drag coefficients are consistently reduced by the thermochemical phenomena, and that the behavior can be represented by a specific heat ratio value less than 1.4. The center of pressure shifts forward due to the thermochemical phenomena, but its extent is sensitively affected by the geometry and angle of attack and cannot be represented by a fixed specific heat ratio. The calculated results are in qualitative agreement with the data obtained during the entry flights of the Space Shuttle vehicle.

  18. An improved procedure for calculating effective interactions and operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chang Liang

    1998-12-01

    Most modern microscopic nuclear structure calculations for finite nuclei are based on the shell model. As usually implemented, the model involves a number of uncontrolled approximations that destroy the connections with rigorous many-body theory, including those that tell one how to construct the corresponding effective operators. In this thesis, we introduce a new approach for calculating the effective interaction, which is formally exact if evaluated to all orders and preserves both the connections to the effective operators and the important symmetries, such as translational invariance and hermiticity. It is based on the Bloch-Horowitz equation and an expansion in which successive levels of approximation involve an exact summation of ladder diagrams for two-body clusters, three-body clusters and so on, that is, a summation of all diagrams through order (density)0,/ (density)1, etc, in the effective interaction and effective operator. The approach is free of fictitious parameters such as starting energies. The crucial numerical trick is solving the Bloch-Horowitz equation, which requires knowledge of the exact eigenvalue, by a powerful Lanczos Green's function method that allows one to iterate quickly to convergence for each desired eigenvalue and eigenfunction. In other words, the Bloch-Horowitz equation must be solved self- consistently and state-by-state. We use a full N/hbar/Omega multi-configuration basis as the shell- model space. The model spaces are large to avoid the intruder state problems that frustrated early investigators. We derive a possible formulation for the effective interaction and test it by calculating the properties of the simplest nuclei-the deuteron and 3He. The evolution of the effective interaction towards the bare interaction as the included space is enlarged is discussed. The same strategies and numerical tools can be applied to the effective operator, that is, the operator that, when evaluated with model space wave functions, will

  19. On calculation of the electrostatic potential of a phosphatidylinositol phosphate-containing phosphatidylcholine lipid membrane accounting for membrane dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jonathan C; Martinez, Michael; Wade, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Many signaling events require the binding of cytoplasmic proteins to cell membranes by recognition of specific charged lipids, such as phosphoinositol-phosphates. As a model for a protein-membrane binding site, we consider one charged phosphoinositol phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) embedded in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. As the protein-membrane binding is driven by electrostatic interactions, continuum solvent models require an accurate representation of the electrostatic potential of the phosphoinositol phosphate-containing membrane. We computed and analyzed the electrostatic potentials of snapshots taken at regular intervals from molecular dynamics simulations of the bilayer. We observe considerable variation in the electrostatic potential of the bilayer both along a single simulation and between simulations performed with the GAFF or CHARMM c36 force fields. However, we find that the choice of GAFF or CHARMM c36 parameters has little effect on the electrostatic potential of a given configuration of the bilayer with a PtdIns(3)P embedded in it. From our results, we propose a remedian averaging method for calculating the electrostatic potential of a membrane system that is suitable for simulations of protein-membrane binding with a continuum solvent model.

  20. Calculations of multiquark functions in effective models of strong interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarov, R. G.; Rochev, V. E.

    2013-09-15

    In this paper we present our results of the investigation of multiquark equations in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with chiral symmetry of SU(2) group in the mean-field expansion. To formulate the mean-field expansion we have used an iteration scheme of solution of the Schwinger-Dyson equations with the fermion bilocal source. We have considered the equations for Green functions of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model up to third step for this iteration scheme. To calculate the high-order corrections to the mean-field approximation, we propose the method of the Legendre transformation with respect to the bilocal source, which allows effectively to take into account the symmetry constraints related with the chiral Ward identity. We discuss also the problem of calculating the multiquark functions in the mean-field expansion for Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type models with other types of the multifermion sources.

  1. High speed inlet calculations with real gas effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.

    1988-01-01

    A 2-D steady-state Navier-Stokes solver has been upgraded to include the effects of frozen and equilibrium air chemistry for applications to high speed flight vehicles. To provide a computationally economical first order approximation to the high temperature physics, variable thermodynamic data is used for the chemically frozen mode to allow for a variation with temperature of the air specific heats and enthalpy. For calculations involving air in chemical equilibrium, a specially modified version of the NASA Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Code, CEC, is used to compute the chemical composition and resultant thermochemical properties. The upgraded solver is demonstrated by comparing results from calorically perfect (C sub p=constant), thermally perfect (frozen) and equilibrium air calculations for a variety of geometries, and flight Mach numbers.

  2. Calculation of alloying effect on formation enthalpy of TiCu intermetallics from first-principles calculations for designing Ti-Cu-system metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasawa, Naoya; Takigawa, Yorinobu; Uesugi, Tokuteru; Higashi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The effect of alloying on the formation enthalpy of TiCu intermetallics was investigated via first-principles calculations to propose a new design method for Ti-Cu-system metallic glasses. The calculation results showed good agreement with the reported experimental results that Ni, Pd, Sn and Zr improve this system's glass-forming ability. According to the calculation results, a Ti-Zr-Cu-Ga system was designed as a potential new bulk Ti-based metallic glass, and a bulk sample with a 2-mm diameter was fabricated.

  3. Calculation of the transport properties of carbon dioxide. II. Thermal conductivity and thermomagnetic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Steffen; Bich, Eckard; Vogel, Eckhard; Dickinson, Alan S.; Vesovic, Velisa

    2004-05-01

    The transport properties of pure carbon dioxide have been calculated from the intermolecular potential using the classical trajectory method. Results are reported in the dilute-gas limit for thermal conductivity and thermomagnetic coefficients for temperatures ranging from 200 K to 1000 K. Three recent carbon dioxide potential energy hypersurfaces have been investigated. Since thermal conductivity is influenced by vibrational degrees of freedom, not included in the rigid-rotor classical trajectory calculation, a correction for vibration has also been employed. The calculations indicate that the second-order thermal conductivity corrections due to the angular momentum polarization (<2%) and velocity polarization (<1%) are both small. Thermal conductivity values calculated using the potential energy hypersurface by Bukowski et al. (1999) are in good agreement with the available experimental data. They underestimate the best experimental data at room temperature by 1% and in the range up to 470 K by 1%-3%, depending on the data source. Outside this range the calculated values, we believe, may be more reliable than the currently available experimental data. Our results are consistent with measurements of the thermomagnetic effect at 300 K only when the vibrational degrees of freedom are considered fully. This excellent agreement for these properties indicates that particularly the potential surface of Bukowski et al. provides a realistic description of the anisotropy of the surface.

  4. Ground- and excited-state properties of inorganic solids from full-potential density-functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, P.; Vidya, R.; Vajeeston, P.; Kjekshus, A.; Fjellvåg, H.

    2003-12-01

    The development in theoretical condensed-matter science based on density-functional theory (DFT) has reached a level where it is possible, from "parameter-free" quantum mechanical calculations to obtain total energies, forces, vibrational frequencies, magnetic moments, mechanical and optical properties and so forth. The calculation of such properties are important in the analyses of experimental data and they can be predicted with a precision that is sufficient for comparison with experiments. It is almost impossible to do justice to all developments achieved by DFT because of its rapid growth. Hence, it has here been focused on a few advances, primarily from our laboratory. Unusual bonding behaviors in complex materials are conveniently explored using the combination of charge density, charge transfer, and electron-localization function along with crystal-orbital Hamilton-population analyses. It is indicated that the elastic properties of materials can reliably be predicted from DFT calculations if one takes into account the structural relaxations along with gradient corrections in the calculations. Experimental techniques have their limitations in studies of the structural stability and pressure-induced structural transitions in hydride materials whereas the present theoretical approach can be applied to reliably predict properties under extreme pressures. From the spin-polarized, relativistic full-potential calculations one can study novel materials such as ruthenates, quasi-one-dimensional oxides, and spin-, charge-, and orbital-ordering in magnetic perovskite-like oxides. The importance of orbital-polarization correction to the DFT to predict the magnetic anisotropy in transition-metal compounds and magnetic moments in lanthanides and actinides are emphasized. Apart from the full-potential treatment, proper magnetic ordering as well as structural distortions have to be taken into account to predict correctly the insulating behavior of transition-metal oxides

  5. Calculations of the Energetics of Oxidation of Aqueous Nucleosides and the Effects of Prototropic Equilibria.

    PubMed

    Close, David M; Wardman, Peter

    2016-06-16

    Recently the calculated standard reduction potentials of the radical-cations of N-methyl substituted DNA bases have been reported that agree fairly well with the experimental results. However, there are issues reflecting the fact that the experimental results usually relate to the couple E(o)(Nuc(•),H(+)/NucH(+)), whereas the calculated results are for the E(o)(Nuc(•+)/Nuc) couple. To calculate the midpoint reduction potential at pH 7 (Em7), it is important to have accurate acid dissociation constants (pKs) for both ground-state bases and their radicals, and the effects of uncertainty in some of these values (e.g., that of the adenosine radical) must be considered. Calculations of the pKs of the radicals of the nucleic acid bases (as nucleosides) have been performed to explore the effects the various pKs have on calculating the values of Em7 and to see what improvements can be made with the accuracy of the calculations.

  6. Perturbative Calculation of Quasi-Potential in Non-equilibrium Diffusions: A Mean-Field Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Freddy; Gawȩdzki, Krzysztof; Nardini, Cesare

    2016-06-01

    In stochastic systems with weak noise, the logarithm of the stationary distribution becomes proportional to a large deviation rate function called the quasi-potential. The quasi-potential, and its characterization through a variational problem, lies at the core of the Freidlin-Wentzell large deviations theory (Freidlin and Wentzell, Random perturbations of dynamical systems, 2012). In many interacting particle systems, the particle density is described by fluctuating hydrodynamics governed by Macroscopic Fluctuation Theory (Bertini et al., arXiv:1404.6466 , 2014), which formally fits within Freidlin-Wentzell's framework with a weak noise proportional to 1/√{N}, where N is the number of particles. The quasi-potential then appears as a natural generalization of the equilibrium free energy to non-equilibrium particle systems. A key physical and practical issue is to actually compute quasi-potentials from their variational characterization for non-equilibrium systems for which detailed balance does not hold. We discuss how to perform such a computation perturbatively in an external parameter λ , starting from a known quasi-potential for λ =0. In a general setup, explicit iterative formulae for all terms of the power-series expansion of the quasi-potential are given for the first time. The key point is a proof of solvability conditions that assure the existence of the perturbation expansion to all orders. We apply the perturbative approach to diffusive particles interacting through a mean-field potential. For such systems, the variational characterization of the quasi-potential was proven by Dawson and Gartner (Stochastics 20:247-308, 1987; Stochastic differential systems, vol 96, pp 1-10, 1987). Our perturbative analysis provides new explicit results about the quasi-potential and about fluctuations of one-particle observables in a simple example

  7. A comparison of estimated and calculated effective porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Daniel B.; Hsu, Kuo-Chin; Prieksat, Mark A.; Ankeny, Mark D.; Blandford, Neil; Roth, Tracy L.; Kelsey, James A.; Whitworth, Julia R.

    Effective porosity in solute-transport analyses is usually estimated rather than calculated from tracer tests in the field or laboratory. Calculated values of effective porosity in the laboratory on three different textured samples were compared to estimates derived from particle-size distributions and soil-water characteristic curves. The agreement was poor and it seems that no clear relationships exist between effective porosity calculated from laboratory tracer tests and effective porosity estimated from particle-size distributions and soil-water characteristic curves. A field tracer test in a sand-and-gravel aquifer produced a calculated effective porosity of approximately 0.17. By comparison, estimates of effective porosity from textural data, moisture retention, and published values were approximately 50-90% greater than the field calibrated value. Thus, estimation of effective porosity for chemical transport is highly dependent on the chosen transport model and is best obtained by laboratory or field tracer tests. Résumé La porosité effective dans les analyses de transport de soluté est habituellement estimée, plutôt que calculée à partir d'expériences de traçage sur le terrain ou au laboratoire. Les valeurs calculées de la porosité effective au laboratoire sur trois échantillons de textures différentes ont été comparées aux estimations provenant de distributions de taille de particules et de courbes caractéristiques sol-eau. La concordance était plutôt faible et il semble qu'il n'existe aucune relation claire entre la porosité effective calculée à partir des expériences de traçage au laboratoire et la porosité effective estimée à partir des distributions de taille de particules et de courbes caractéristiques sol-eau. Une expérience de traçage de terrain dans un aquifère de sables et de graviers a fourni une porosité effective calculée d'environ 0,17. En comparaison, les estimations de porosité effective de données de

  8. Dynamics study of the OH + NH3 hydrogen abstraction reaction using QCT calculations based on an analytical potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monge-Palacios, M.; Corchado, J. C.; Espinosa-Garcia, J.

    2013-06-01

    To understand the reactivity and mechanism of the OH + NH3 → H2O + NH2 gas-phase reaction, which evolves through wells in the entrance and exit channels, a detailed dynamics study was carried out using quasi-classical trajectory calculations. The calculations were performed on an analytical potential energy surface (PES) recently developed by our group, PES-2012 [Monge-Palacios et al. J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084305 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4792719. Most of the available energy appeared as H2O product vibrational energy (54%), reproducing the only experimental evidence, while only the 21% of this energy appeared as NH2 co-product vibrational energy. Both products appeared with cold and broad rotational distributions. The excitation function (constant collision energy in the range 1.0-14.0 kcal mol-1) increases smoothly with energy, contrasting with the only theoretical information (reduced-dimensional quantum scattering calculations based on a simplified PES), which presented a peak at low collision energies, related to quantized states. Analysis of the individual reactive trajectories showed that different mechanisms operate depending on the collision energy. Thus, while at high energies (Ecoll ≥ 6 kcal mol-1) all trajectories are direct, at low energies about 20%-30% of trajectories are indirect, i.e., with the mediation of a trapping complex, mainly in the product well. Finally, the effect of the zero-point energy constraint on the dynamics properties was analyzed.

  9. Dynamics study of the OH + NH3 hydrogen abstraction reaction using QCT calculations based on an analytical potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Monge-Palacios, M; Corchado, J C; Espinosa-Garcia, J

    2013-06-01

    To understand the reactivity and mechanism of the OH + NH3 → H2O + NH2 gas-phase reaction, which evolves through wells in the entrance and exit channels, a detailed dynamics study was carried out using quasi-classical trajectory calculations. The calculations were performed on an analytical potential energy surface (PES) recently developed by our group, PES-2012 [Monge-Palacios et al. J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084305 (2013)]. Most of the available energy appeared as H2O product vibrational energy (54%), reproducing the only experimental evidence, while only the 21% of this energy appeared as NH2 co-product vibrational energy. Both products appeared with cold and broad rotational distributions. The excitation function (constant collision energy in the range 1.0-14.0 kcal mol(-1)) increases smoothly with energy, contrasting with the only theoretical information (reduced-dimensional quantum scattering calculations based on a simplified PES), which presented a peak at low collision energies, related to quantized states. Analysis of the individual reactive trajectories showed that different mechanisms operate depending on the collision energy. Thus, while at high energies (E(coll) ≥ 6 kcal mol(-1)) all trajectories are direct, at low energies about 20%-30% of trajectories are indirect, i.e., with the mediation of a trapping complex, mainly in the product well. Finally, the effect of the zero-point energy constraint on the dynamics properties was analyzed.

  10. Dose calculation of 142Pr microspheres as a potential treatment for arteriovenous malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Reece, Warren Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM), especially cryptic AVM, can cause highly variable cerebral neurological defects. Injection of 142Pr microspheres into arteries feeding an AVM in order to simulate radio-embolism has been proposed as a novel treatment method. To investigate optimization of radiation dose to the clinically important arterial wall area, preliminary dosimetric studies have been performed. Monte Carlo calculations were performed for simulated arteries filled with microspheres packed by random packing. Arterial radii from 0.05 mm to 3 mm and microsphere radii from 0.01 mm to 0.7 mm were used in the simulation. For constant arterial size, dose varied significantly with microspheres radius. Inter-arterial effect was also simulated using simplified geometry. For the inter-arterial sites, the dose rate was calculated between two arteries of the same size parallel to each other. The dose increased significantly for large arteries (>1 mm radius) filled with large microspheres (>0.3 mm radius). The dose increase between small arteries (<0.3 mm radius) was not as significant as that between large arteries. Overall results indicate that arterial size and microsphere size significantly affect the dose profile. This factor should be taken into account in future clinical applications.

  11. Site-directed mutants of pseudoazurin: explanation of increased redox potentials from X-ray structures and from calculation of redox potential differences.

    PubMed

    Libeu, C A; Kukimoto, M; Nishiyama, M; Horinouchi, S; Adman, E T

    1997-10-28

    In order to understand the origins of differences in redox potentials among cupredoxins (small blue type I copper-containing proteins that reversibly change oxidation state and interact with redox partners), we have determined the structures of the native and two mutants (P80A and P80I) of pseudoazurin from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 in oxidized and reduced forms at resolutions of 2.2 A in the worst case and 1.6 A in the best case. The P80A mutation creates a surface pocket filled by a new water molecule, whereas the P80I mutant excludes this water. Distinct patterns of change occur in response to reduction for all three molecules: the copper position shifts, Met 7 and Pro 35 move, and the relative orientations of residues 81 to 16, 18 to the amide planes of 77 and 86, all change. Systematic changes in the weak electrostatic interactions seen in the structures of different oxidation states can explain the Met 7/Pro 35 structural differences as well as some fluctuating solvent positions. Overall displacement parameters increase reversibly upon reduction. The reduced forms are slightly expanded over the oxidized forms. The geometries of the mutants become more trigonal in their reduced forms, consistent with higher redox potentials (+409 mV for P80A and +450 mV for P80I). Calculations of the differences in redox potentials, using POLARIS, reveal that a water unique to the P80A mutant is required (with correctly oriented hydrogens) to approximate the observed difference in redox potential. The POLARIS calculations suggest that the reduced forms are additionally stabilized through changes in the solvation of the copper center, specifically via the amides of residues 16, 39, 41, 79, and 80 which interact with either Phe 18, Met 86, or Cys 78. The redox potential of P80A is increased largely due to solvation effects, whereas the redox potential of P80I is increased largely due to geometrical effects.

  12. Electron Affinity Calculations for Atoms: Sensitive Probe of Many-Body Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Z.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-electron correlations and core-polarization interactions are crucial for the existence and stability of most negative ions. Therefore, they can be used as a sensitive probe of many-body effects in the calculation of the electron affinities (EAs) of atoms. The importance of relativistic effects in the calculation of the EAs of atoms has recently been assessed to be insignificant up to Z of 85. Here we use the complex angular momentum (CAM) methodology wherein is embedded fully the electron-electron correlations, to investigate core-polarization interactions in low-energy electron elastic scattering from the atoms In, Sn, Eu, Au and At through the calculation of their EAs. For the core-polarization interaction we use the rational function approximation of the Thomas-Fermi potential, which can be analytically continued into the complex plane. The EAs are extracted from the large resonance peaks in the CAM calculated low-energy electron-atom scattering total cross sections and compared with those from measurements and sophisticated theoretical methods. It is concluded that when the electron-electron correlations and core polarization interactions (both major many-body effects) are accounted for adequately the importance of relativity on the calculation of the EAs of atoms can be assessed. Even for the high Z (85) At atom relativistic effects are estimated to contribute a maximum of 3.6% to its EA calculation.

  13. Calculation of deuterium isotope effects in proton transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Steve

    1994-05-01

    Various levels of theory are tested for the purpose of computing the rate constant for proton transfer reactions. Standard transition state theory is applied to a series of molecules with a progressively more bent intramolecular hydrogen bond. The systems all display similar deuterium isotope effects (DIEs); the larger DIE at low temperature is attributed to zero-point vibrational effects. However, when tunneling is incorporated via a microcanonical approach, a dramatically enhanced effect is observed for the most distorted H-bond. The energy barrier for proton transfer between carbon atoms involved in triple bonds is smaller than for carbons with lesser multiplicity. The DIE displays a sensitivity to temperature that is least for the carbon atoms with the greatest multiplicity of bonding. The tunneling obtained by following the minimum energy reaction path along the potential energy surface is similar to that when the potential is approximated by an Eckart barrier. However, significant discrepancies are observed at temperatures below about 250 K.

  14. EOMIP-CCSD(2)*: an efficient method for the calculation of ionization potentials.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-01

    A new approximation within the domain of EOMIP-CC method is proposed. The proposed scheme is based on the perturbative truncation of the similarity transformed effective Hamiltonian matrix. We call it the EOMIP-CCSD(2)* method, which scales as noniterative N(6) and its storage requirement is very less, compared to the conventional EOMIP-CCSD method. The existing EOMIP-CCSD(2) method has a tendency to overestimate the ionization potential (IP) values. On the other hand, our new strategy corrects for the problem of such an overestimation, which is evident from the excellent agreement achieved with the experimental values. Furthermore, not only the ionization potential but also geometry and IR frequencies of problematic double radicals are estimated correctly, and the results are comparable to the CCSD(T) method, obviously at lesser computational cost. The EOMIP-CCSD(2)* method works even for the core ionization and satellite IP, where the earlier EOMIP-CCSD(2) approximation dramatically fails.

  15. Analytical Jacobian Calculation in RT Model Including Polarization Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, Y.; Yoshida, Y.; Ota, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The greenhouse gas observing satellite "GOSAT" launched in January 2009 has been observing global distribution of CO2 and CH4. The TANSO-FTS mounted on GOSAT measures the two polarized components (called "P" and "S") of short wavelength infrared (SWIR) spectrum reflected from the earth's surface. In NIES, column-averaged dry air mole fraction of CO2 and CH4 (XCO2 and XCH4) are retrieved from SWIR spectra. However, the observed polarization information is not effectively utilized in the retrieval process due to the large computational cost of a vector RT model, instead the polarization synthesized spectra and a scalar RT model are used in the operational processing. An optical path length modification due to aerosol scattering is known as the major error source for XCO2 and XCH4 retrieval from SWIR spectra. Because the aerosol scattering changes polarization state of light, more accurate or additional aerosol information is expected by using the observed polarization spectra effectively in the retrieval process, which improves the retrieval accuracy of XCO2 and XCH4. In addition, for information content analysis, sensitivity analysis and error analysis, Jacobian matrix is important onto retrieval algorithm design before analyses for actual observed data. However, in the case of using RT model including polarization effect in retrieval process, the computational cost of Jacobian matrix calculations in maximum a posteriori retrieval is significantly large. Efficient calculation of analytical Jacobian is necessary. As a first step, we are implementing an analytical Jacobian calculation function to the vector RT model "Pstar". RT scheme of Pstar is based on hybrid method comprising the discrete ordinate and matrix operator methods. The reflection/transmission matrices and source vectors are obtained for each vertical layer through the discrete ordinate solution, and the vertically inhomogeneous system is constructed using the matrix operator method. Because the delta

  16. Numerical calculation of steady inviscid full potential compressible flow about wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    The air flow through a propeller-type wind turbine rotor is characterized by three-dimensional rotating cascade effects about the inner portions of the rotor blades and compressibility effects about the tip regions of the blades. In the case of large rotor diameter and/or increased rotor angular speed, the existence of small supersonic zones terminated by weak shocks is possible. An exact nonlinear mathematical model (called a steady Full Potential Equation - FPE) that accounts for the above phenomena has been rederived. An artificially time dependent version of FPE was iteratively solved by a finite volume technique involving an artificial viscosity and a three-level consecutive mesh refinement. The exact boundary conditions were applied by generating a boundary conforming periodic computation mesh.

  17. Study of Ray Effects in Discrete Ordinates Calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Luisa Maria Torres

    Ray effects, an inherent problem in the formulation of the discrete ordinates approximation to the transport equation, is studied in this research. In particular, the effectiveness of using Monte Carlo procedures to generate a first collision source or a second collision source is investigated. Monte Carlo procedures provide a general methodology that can be applied to the discrete ordinates solution of complex problems in either two- or three-dimensional geometries, for which ray effects are likely to occur. The Monte Carlo method, which is intrinsically free from ray effects, performs the transport of the source particle to the first collision site. The Monte Carlo estimated uncollided fluxes or first collided fluxes are used to compute the scattering sources in a format suitable for input into the DORT two-dimensional and the TORT three -dimensional discrete ordinates codes. The computational time and precision requirements of the Monte Carlo calculation are analyzed. Also, three procedures for estimating the second collision source with the modified version of MORSE are investigated. The results show that significant improvements are achieved in the solution of the test problems when using the first collision source and that virtual elimination of ray effects is realized when using the second collision source.

  18. A New Green's Function for the Wake Potential Calculation of the SLAC S-band Constant Gradient Accelerating Section

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A,; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    The behavior of the longitudinal wake fields excited by a very short bunch in the SLAC S-band constant gradient accelerating structures has been studied. Wake potential calculations were performed for a bunch length of 10 microns using the author's code to obtain a numerical solution of Maxwell's equations in the time domain. We have calculated six accelerating sections in the series (60-ft) to find the stationary solution. While analyzing the computational results we have found a new formula for the Green's function. Wake potentials, which are calculated using this Green's function are in amazingly good agreement with numerical results over a wide range of bunch lengths. The Green's function simplifies the wake potential calculations and can be easily incorporated into the tracking codes. This is very useful for beam dynamics studies of the linear accelerators of LCLS and FACET.

  19. A new hydrocarbon empirical potential in angle bending calculation for the molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Tan Ai; Hoe, Yeak Su

    2014-07-10

    Typically, short range potential only depends on neighbouring atoms and its parameters function can be categorized into bond stretching, angle bending and bond rotation potential. In this paper, we present our work called Angle Bending (AB) potential, whereas AB potential is the extension of our previous work namely Bond Stretching (BS) potential. Basically, potential will tend to zero after truncated region, potential in specific region can be represented by different piecewise polynomial. We proposed the AB piecewise potential which is possible to solve a system involving three atoms. AB potential able to handle the potential of covalent bonds for three atoms as well as two atoms cases due to its degeneracy properties. Continuity for the piecewise polynomial has been enforced by coupling with penalty methods. There are still plenty of improvement spaces for this AB potential. The improvement for three atoms AB potential will be studied and further modified into torsional potential which are the ongoing current research.

  20. VORSTAB: A computer program for calculating lateral-directional stability derivatives with vortex flow effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward

    1985-01-01

    A computer program based on the Quasi-Vortex-Lattice Method of Lan is presented for calculating longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of nonplanar wing-body combination. The method is based on the assumption of inviscid subsonic flow. Both attached and vortex-separated flows are treated. For the vortex-separated flow, the calculation is based on the method of suction analogy. The effect of vortex breakdown is accounted for by an empirical method. A summary of the theoretical method, program capabilities, input format, output variables and program job control set-up are described. Three test cases are presented as guides for potential users of the code.

  1. Application of Effective Fragment Potential Methos to the Redox Potential of Green Fluorescent Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debashree; Krylov, Anna I.

    2011-06-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFP) can be considered as a model for flurogenic dyes and are of importance in photovoltaic materials. It exhibits bright green fluorescence when exposed to blue light and has been an extremely powerful tool as non-invasive marker in living cells and extensibly used in molecular and cell biology. The understanding of the underlying electronic structure of these proteins and its chromophore is therefore crucial to the understanding of the mechanism for its optical properties. The chromophore of the GFP is p-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolinone (HBDI) and is embedded in the center of the β barrel of the GFP. Calculating redox potential of this chromophore is a challenging problem, especially in diverse solvents and protein environment. It is possible to carry out high-level accurate ab-initio calculation of ionization potential or electron affinity of the microsolvated chromophore or the bare chromophore. But, it is not possible to extend these calculations to bulk solvents due to the high computational cost. Effective fragment potential (EFP)[1,2] method gives us a convenient tool to understand such systems. In our work, we have benchmarked the ionization energy and electron affinity of the microsolvated GFP chromophore calculated by combined EOM-IP-CCSD/EFP and EOM-EA-CCSD/EFP with the EOM-IP-CCSD and EOM-EA-CCSD calculations of the oxidized and reduced forms. We have carried out similar EFP-EOM-IP-CCSD and EFP-EOM-EA-CCSD calculations of ionization potential and electron affinity of GFP choromophore in bulk solvent generated by ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. [1] M. S. Gordon, L. Slipchenko, H. Li, J. H. Jensen, Annual Reports in Computational Chemistry, Volume 3, 177 (2007). [2] D. Ghosh, D. Kosenkov, V. Vanovschi, C.F. Williams, J.M. Herbert, M.S. Gordon, M.W. Schmidt, L.V. Slipchenko, and A.I. Krylov, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 12739 (2010).

  2. Effects of NMR Spectral Resolution on Protein Structure Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Tikole, Suhas; Jaravine, Victor; Orekhov, Vladislav Yu.; Güntert, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Adequate digital resolution and signal sensitivity are two critical factors for protein structure determinations by solution NMR spectroscopy. The prime objective for obtaining high digital resolution is to resolve peak overlap, especially in NOESY spectra with thousands of signals where the signal analysis needs to be performed on a large scale. Achieving maximum digital resolution is usually limited by the practically available measurement time. We developed a method utilizing non-uniform sampling for balancing digital resolution and signal sensitivity, and performed a large-scale analysis of the effect of the digital resolution on the accuracy of the resulting protein structures. Structure calculations were performed as a function of digital resolution for about 400 proteins with molecular sizes ranging between 5 and 33 kDa. The structural accuracy was assessed by atomic coordinate RMSD values from the reference structures of the proteins. In addition, we monitored also the number of assigned NOESY cross peaks, the average signal sensitivity, and the chemical shift spectral overlap. We show that high resolution is equally important for proteins of every molecular size. The chemical shift spectral overlap depends strongly on the corresponding spectral digital resolution. Thus, knowing the extent of overlap can be a predictor of the resulting structural accuracy. Our results show that for every molecular size a minimal digital resolution, corresponding to the natural linewidth, needs to be achieved for obtaining the highest accuracy possible for the given protein size using state-of-the-art automated NOESY assignment and structure calculation methods. PMID:23874675

  3. Conformational evaluation of DNA-carcinogen adducts using semi-empirical potential energy calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Verna, L.K.

    1992-01-01

    The covalent attachment of an aromatic amine to guanine C8 can produce a conformational change within the DNA molecule. This conformational change is likely to influence the altered DNA's biological capacity. The author used semi-empirical potential energy calculations to evaluate conformational patterns of DNA-aromatic amine adducts using the series: aniline, 4-aminobiphenyl, 2-aminofluorene and 1-aminopyrene. An exhaustive search was made of the conformational space for carcinogen modified two-base sequences. Information was incorporated into single stranded modified trimers. Modified strands were incorporated in duplex trimers. Nine-base modified duplexes were constructed and evaluated. This procedure produced distinctly different patterns for each aromatic amine investigated. It was apparent that the base sequence in which the carcinogen modification was found was crucial to the conformational change produced. At the dimer level, aniline allows both syn and anti guanine orientations at the carcinogen modification site. There were base-base and base-carcinogen stacked states, suggesting a flexible adduct easily able to assume many conformations. 4-Aminobiphenyl attachment resulted in low energy base-carcinogen stacked states, and a guanine torsion predominantly in a low syn orientation. The flexibility of this adduct was greatly reduced from that of the aniline adduct. 2-Aminofluorene adducts assumed more of a conformational mix. The major portion was base-base stacked with modified guanine anti, with a portion with base-carcinogen stacking and guanine syn or low syn. 1-Aminopyrene adducts were inflexible. The majority assumed a base-carcinogen stack with guanine syn. The conformational profiles of large modified pieces provided details of a unique low energy wedge conformation, in which aminofluorene, particularly, was able to fit into the minor groove with very little helix distortion.

  4. Full Dimensional Vibrational Calculations for Methane Using AN Accurate New AB Initio Based Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Moumita; Dawes, Richard; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker; Li, Jun; Guo, Hua; Manzhos, Sergei

    2014-06-01

    New potential energy surfaces for methane were constructed, represented as analytic fits to about 100,000 individual high-level ab initio data. Explicitly-correlated multireference data (MRCI-F12(AE)/CVQZ-F12) were computed using Molpro [1] and fit using multiple strategies. Fits with small to negligible errors were obtained using adaptations of the permutation-invariant-polynomials (PIP) approach [2,3] based on neural-networks (PIP-NN) [4,5] and the interpolative moving least squares (IMLS) fitting method [6] (PIP-IMLS). The PESs were used in full-dimensional vibrational calculations with an exact kinetic energy operator by representing the Hamiltonian in a basis of products of contracted bend and stretch functions and using a symmetry adapted Lanczos method to obtain eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Very close agreement with experiment was produced from the purely ab initio PESs. References 1- H.-J. Werner, P. J. Knowles, G. Knizia, 2012.1 ed. 2012, MOLPRO, a package of ab initio programs. see http://www.molpro.net. 2- Z. Xie and J. M. Bowman, J. Chem. Theory Comput 6, 26, 2010. 3- B. J. Braams and J. M. Bowman, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 28, 577, 2009. 4- J. Li, B. Jiang and Hua Guo, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 204103 (2013). 5- S Manzhos, X Wang, R Dawes and T Carrington, JPC A 110, 5295 (2006). 6- R. Dawes, X-G Wang, A.W. Jasper and T. Carrington Jr., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 134304 (2010).

  5. Accelerating quantum instanton calculations of the kinetic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Karandashev, Konstantin; Vaníček, Jiří

    2015-11-21

    Path integral implementation of the quantum instanton approximation currently belongs among the most accurate methods for computing quantum rate constants and kinetic isotope effects, but its use has been limited due to the rather high computational cost. Here, we demonstrate that the efficiency of quantum instanton calculations of the kinetic isotope effects can be increased by orders of magnitude by combining two approaches: The convergence to the quantum limit is accelerated by employing high-order path integral factorizations of the Boltzmann operator, while the statistical convergence is improved by implementing virial estimators for relevant quantities. After deriving several new virial estimators for the high-order factorization and evaluating the resulting increase in efficiency, using ⋅H{sub α} + H{sub β}H{sub γ} → H{sub α}H{sub β} + ⋅ H{sub γ} reaction as an example, we apply the proposed method to obtain several kinetic isotope effects on CH{sub 4} + ⋅ H ⇌ ⋅ CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2} forward and backward reactions.

  6. Calculating effective diffusivities in the limit of vanishing molecular diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Pavliotis, G.A. Stuart, A.M. Zygalakis, K.C.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper we study the problem of the numerical calculation (by Monte Carlo methods) of the effective diffusivity for a particle moving in a periodic divergent-free velocity field, in the limit of vanishing molecular diffusion. In this limit traditional numerical methods typically fail, since they do not represent accurately the geometry of the underlying deterministic dynamics. We propose a stochastic splitting method that takes into account the volume-preserving property of the equations of motion in the absence of noise, and when inertial effects can be neglected. An extension of the method is then proposed for the cases where the noise has a non-trivial time-correlation structure and when inertial effects cannot be neglected. The method of modified equations is used to explain failings of Euler-based methods. The new stochastic geometric integrators are shown to outperform standard Euler-based integrators. Various asymptotic limits of physical interest are investigated by means of numerical experiments, using the new integrators.

  7. WIND: Computer program for calculation of three dimensional potential compressible flow about wind turbine rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program is presented which numerically solves an exact, full potential equation (FPE) for three dimensional, steady, inviscid flow through an isolated wind turbine rotor. The program automatically generates a three dimensional, boundary conforming grid and iteratively solves the FPE while fully accounting for both the rotating cascade and Coriolis effects. The numerical techniques incorporated involve rotated, type dependent finite differencing, a finite volume method, artificial viscosity in conservative form, and a successive line overrelaxation combined with the sequential grid refinement procedure to accelerate the iterative convergence rate. Consequently, the WIND program is capable of accurately analyzing incompressible and compressible flows, including those that are locally transonic and terminated by weak shocks. The program can also be used to analyze the flow around isolated aircraft propellers and helicopter rotors in hover as long as the total relative Mach number of the oncoming flow is subsonic.

  8. Coupled generator and combustor performance calculations for potential early commercial MHD power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellinger, T. C.; Hnat, J. G.; Marston, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    A parametric study of the performance of the MHD generator and combustor components of potential early commercial open-cycle MHD/steam power plants is presented. Consideration is given to the effects of air heater system concept, MHD combustor type, coal type, thermal input power, oxygen enrichment of the combustion, subsonic and supersonic generator flow and magnetic field strength on coupled generator and combustor performance. The best performance is found to be attained with a 3000 F, indirectly fired air heater, no oxygen enrichment, Illinois no. 6 coal, a two-stage cyclone combustor with 85% slag rejection, a subsonic generator, and a magnetic field configuration yielding a constant transverse electric field of 4 kV/m. Results indicate that optimum net MHD generator power is generally compressor-power-limited rather than electric-stress-limited, with optimum net power a relatively weak function of operating pressure.

  9. Potential Health Effects from Groundwater Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyer, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the growing awareness of potential toxicological effects of synthetic organic chemicals contaminating groundwater. Problems concerning pesticides, chlorination, epidemiologic studies, cancer, nephrotoxicity, and considerations of risk are addressed. Additional research in this area is advocated. (DH)

  10. Calculation of the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects in nanowires using a decoupled finite element analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Geng, Dalong; Wang, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    A simple and effective decoupled finite element analysis method was developed for simulating both the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) and barium titanate (BTO) nanowires (NWs). The piezoelectric potential distribution on a ZnO NW was calculated under three deformation conditions (cantilever, three-point, and four-point bending) and compared to the conventional fully coupled method. The discrepancies of the electric potential maximums from these two methods were found very small, validating the accuracy and effectiveness of the decoupled method. Both ZnO and BTO NWs yielded very similar potential distributions. Comparing the potential distributions induced by the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects, we identified that the middle segment of a four-point bending NW beam is the ideal place for measuring the flexoelectric coefficient, because the uniform parallel plate capacitor-like potential distribution in this region is exclusively induced by the flexoelectric effect. This decoupled method could provide a valuable guideline for experimental measurements of the piezoelectric effects and flexoelectric effects in the nanometer scale.

  11. Dechanneling of Positrons in Disordered Lattices Effect of Anharmonic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Assy, M. K.; El-Ashry, M. Y.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    Dechanneling of positrons due to lattice disorder has been investigated for two stable configurations of the disordered face-centered cubic(fcc) lattices, Dumb-bell configuration (DBC) and Body-centered interstitial (BCI) for channeled positrons with incident energy (10 200) MeV in Cu single crystal in the planar direction (100). The effects of anharmonic terms in the channeling potential have been considered in the calculations. The calculations covered the transition-channeling probability, dechanneling probability, transmission and dechanneling coefficients. It has been found that the transition-channeling probability from the normal into the disordered region occurs only for the transitions n (normal) → n (disordered). Also the dependence of the transmission and dechanneling coefficients on the incident beam position has been studied by using a planar potential function based on shell structure model and compared with the results of a planar potential based on Lindhard's model.

  12. Cardiovascular effects of potential occupational hazards.

    PubMed

    Goldhaber, S Z

    1983-12-01

    Cardiovascular effects of potential occupational hazards have received relatively little attention. The major inhalant occupational exposures of concern are carbon disulfide, nitrates, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide. Occupational exposure to certain trace metals may also be associated with adverse cardiovascular effects. Of concern is potential toxicity from cobalt, antimony, lead, cadmium and arsenic. Potential physical hazards exist in association with noise, heat and radiofrequency radiation. In most instances, the data are suggestive rather than conclusive. Further epidemiologic studies with careful control for potentially complicating factors, such as baseline differences in blood pressure, cigarette smoking habits and age, are needed. In some areas where epidemiologic studies have provided clues, the mechanisms of action of potential occupational hazards require further basic scientific investigation.

  13. An effective algorithm for calculating the Chandrasekhar function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, A.

    2012-08-01

    Numerical values of the Chandrasekhar function are needed with high accuracy in evaluations of theoretical models describing electron transport in condensed matter. An algorithm for such calculations should be possibly fast and also accurate, e.g. an accuracy of 10 decimal digits is needed for some applications. Two of the integral representations of the Chandrasekhar function are prospective for constructing such an algorithm, but suitable transformations are needed to obtain a rapidly converging quadrature. A mixed algorithm is proposed in which the Chandrasekhar function is calculated from two algorithms, depending on the value of one of the arguments. Catalogue identifier: AEMC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 567 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4444 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90 Computer: Any computer with a FORTRAN 90 compiler Operating system: Linux, Windows 7, Windows XP RAM: 0.6 Mb Classification: 2.4, 7.2 Nature of problem: An attempt has been made to develop a subroutine that calculates the Chandrasekhar function with high accuracy, of at least 10 decimal places. Simultaneously, this subroutine should be very fast. Both requirements stem from the theory of electron transport in condensed matter. Solution method: Two algorithms were developed, each based on a different integral representation of the Chandrasekhar function. The final algorithm is edited by mixing these two algorithms and by selecting ranges of the argument ω in which performance is the fastest. Restrictions: Two input parameters for the Chandrasekhar function, x and ω (notation used in the code), are restricted to the range: 0⩽x⩽1 and 0⩽ω⩽1

  14. Accurate high level ab initio-based global potential energy surface and dynamics calculations for ground state of CH2(+).

    PubMed

    Li, Y Q; Zhang, P Y; Han, K L

    2015-03-28

    A global many-body expansion potential energy surface is reported for the electronic ground state of CH2 (+) by fitting high level ab initio energies calculated at the multireference configuration interaction level with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. The topographical features of the new global potential energy surface are examined in detail and found to be in good agreement with those calculated directly from the raw ab initio energies, as well as previous calculations available in the literature. In turn, in order to validate the potential energy surface, a test theoretical study of the reaction CH(+)(X(1)Σ(+))+H((2)S)→C(+)((2)P)+H2(X(1)Σg (+)) has been carried out with the method of time dependent wavepacket on the title potential energy surface. The total integral cross sections and the rate coefficients have been calculated; the results determined that the new potential energy surface can both be recommended for dynamics studies of any type and as building blocks for constructing the potential energy surfaces of larger C(+)/H containing systems.

  15. Effects of Fast Simple Numerical Calculation Training on Neural Systems.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nagase, Tomomi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive training, including fast simple numerical calculation (FSNC), has been shown to improve performance on untrained processing speed and executive function tasks in the elderly. However, the effects of FSNC training on cognitive functions in the young and on neural mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the effects of 1-week intensive FSNC training on cognitive function, regional gray matter volume (rGMV), and regional cerebral blood flow at rest (resting rCBF) in healthy young adults. FSNC training was associated with improvements in performance on simple processing speed, speeded executive functioning, and simple and complex arithmetic tasks. FSNC training was associated with a reduction in rGMV and an increase in resting rCBF in the frontopolar areas and a weak but widespread increase in resting rCBF in an anatomical cluster in the posterior region. These results provide direct evidence that FSNC training alone can improve performance on processing speed and executive function tasks as well as plasticity of brain structures and perfusion. Our results also indicate that changes in neural systems in the frontopolar areas may underlie these cognitive improvements.

  16. Effects of Fast Simple Numerical Calculation Training on Neural Systems

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nagase, Tomomi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive training, including fast simple numerical calculation (FSNC), has been shown to improve performance on untrained processing speed and executive function tasks in the elderly. However, the effects of FSNC training on cognitive functions in the young and on neural mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the effects of 1-week intensive FSNC training on cognitive function, regional gray matter volume (rGMV), and regional cerebral blood flow at rest (resting rCBF) in healthy young adults. FSNC training was associated with improvements in performance on simple processing speed, speeded executive functioning, and simple and complex arithmetic tasks. FSNC training was associated with a reduction in rGMV and an increase in resting rCBF in the frontopolar areas and a weak but widespread increase in resting rCBF in an anatomical cluster in the posterior region. These results provide direct evidence that FSNC training alone can improve performance on processing speed and executive function tasks as well as plasticity of brain structures and perfusion. Our results also indicate that changes in neural systems in the frontopolar areas may underlie these cognitive improvements. PMID:26881117

  17. Chern-Simons potential in models of Casimir effect

    SciTech Connect

    Pis'mak, Yury M.; Pis'mak, Daria Yu.

    2014-07-23

    In the model constructed in the framework of the proposed by Symanzik approach for description of interaction of a macroscopic material body with quantum fields the interaction of thin material film with photon field is presented by the Chern-Simons potential. All the effects of this interaction with can by described in the framework of one model. In this way, the Casimir energy for two parallel infinite planes and sphere, the Casimir-Polder potential, and characteristics of other physical phenomena have been calculated for non-ideal conducting material of film. The specific of regularization and renormalization procedures used by calculations and the physical meaning of obtained results are discussed. In the limit of infinite coupling constant one obtains the known results of models with boundary conditions. By finite value of coupling constants the model predicts unusual effects which could be important for micro-mechanics, nano-photonics, constructing of new materials.

  18. Potential Toxic Effects of Nano-Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingsheng; Chen, Hongzheng; Shi, Minmin; Wu, Gang; Fujita, Daisuke; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2013-09-01

    The increasing use of nanomaterials in industrial and consumer products has aroused global concern regarding their potential impact on environment and human health. A number of studies on the effects of nanomaterials in in vitro and in vivo systems have been shown that some nanomaterials are potentially toxic. We address the understanding of the link of physicochemical characteristics of some nano-oxides including SiO2, TiO2, and ZnO to the observed toxic effects. Understanding the contribution of physicochemical characteristics of nanomaterials to toxic effects would allow safety to be built into the design of nanomaterials and their applications, to allow their safe integration into products.

  19. Effective Inflow Conditions for Turbulence Models in Aerodynamic Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2007-01-01

    The selection of inflow values at boundaries far upstream of an aircraft is considered, for one- and two-equation turbulence models. Inflow values are distinguished from the ambient values near the aircraft, which may be much smaller. Ambient values should be selected first, and inflow values that will lead to them after the decay second; this is not always possible, especially for the time scale. The two-equation decay during the approach to the aircraft is shown; often, the time scale has been set too short for this decay to be calculated accurately on typical grids. A simple remedy for both issues is to impose floor values for the turbulence variables, outside the viscous sublayer, and it is argued that overriding the equations in this manner is physically justified. Selecting laminar ambient values is easy, if the boundary layers are to be tripped, but a more common practice is to seek ambient values that will cause immediate transition in boundary layers. This opens up a wide range of values, and selection criteria are discussed. The turbulent Reynolds number, or ratio of eddy viscosity to laminar viscosity has a huge dynamic range that makes it unwieldy; it has been widely mis-used, particularly by codes that set upper limits on it. The value of turbulent kinetic energy in a wind tunnel or the atmosphere is also of dubious value as an input to the model. Concretely, the ambient eddy viscosity must be small enough to preserve potential cores in small geometry features, such as flap gaps. The ambient frequency scale should also be small enough, compared with shear rates in the boundary layer. Specific values are recommended and demonstrated for airfoil flows

  20. Quantum calculations of the IR spectrum of liquid water using ab initio and model potential and dipole moment surfaces and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanchao; Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M.

    2015-05-01

    The calculation and characterization of the IR spectrum of liquid water have remained a challenge for theory. In this paper, we address this challenge using a combination of ab initio approaches, namely, a quantum treatment of IR spectrum using the ab initio WHBB water potential energy surface and a refined ab initio dipole moment surface. The quantum treatment is based on the embedded local monomer method, in which the three intramolecular modes of each embedded H2O monomer are fully coupled and also coupled singly to each of six intermolecular modes. The new dipole moment surface consists of a previous spectroscopically accurate 1-body dipole moment surface and a newly fitted ab initio intrinsic 2-body dipole moment. A detailed analysis of the new dipole moment surface in terms of the coordinate dependence of the effective atomic charges is done along with tests of it for the water dimer and prism hexamer double-harmonic spectra against direct ab initio calculations. The liquid configurations are taken from previous molecular dynamics calculations of Skinner and co-workers, using the TIP4P plus E3B rigid monomer water potential. The IR spectrum of water at 300 K in the range of 0-4000 cm-1 is calculated and compared with experiment, using the ab initio WHBB potential and new ab initio dipole moment, the q-TIP4P/F potential, which has a fixed-charged description of the dipole moment, and the TTM3-F potential and dipole moment surfaces. The newly calculated ab initio spectrum is in very good agreement with experiment throughout the above spectral range, both in band positions and intensities. This contrasts to results with the other potentials and dipole moments, especially the fixed-charge q-TIP4P/F model, which gives unrealistic intensities. The calculated ab initio spectrum is analyzed by examining the contribution of various transitions to each band.

  1. Quantum calculations of the IR spectrum of liquid water using ab initio and model potential and dipole moment surfaces and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hanchao; Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M.

    2015-05-21

    The calculation and characterization of the IR spectrum of liquid water have remained a challenge for theory. In this paper, we address this challenge using a combination of ab initio approaches, namely, a quantum treatment of IR spectrum using the ab initio WHBB water potential energy surface and a refined ab initio dipole moment surface. The quantum treatment is based on the embedded local monomer method, in which the three intramolecular modes of each embedded H{sub 2}O monomer are fully coupled and also coupled singly to each of six intermolecular modes. The new dipole moment surface consists of a previous spectroscopically accurate 1-body dipole moment surface and a newly fitted ab initio intrinsic 2-body dipole moment. A detailed analysis of the new dipole moment surface in terms of the coordinate dependence of the effective atomic charges is done along with tests of it for the water dimer and prism hexamer double-harmonic spectra against direct ab initio calculations. The liquid configurations are taken from previous molecular dynamics calculations of Skinner and co-workers, using the TIP4P plus E3B rigid monomer water potential. The IR spectrum of water at 300 K in the range of 0–4000 cm{sup −1} is calculated and compared with experiment, using the ab initio WHBB potential and new ab initio dipole moment, the q-TIP4P/F potential, which has a fixed-charged description of the dipole moment, and the TTM3-F potential and dipole moment surfaces. The newly calculated ab initio spectrum is in very good agreement with experiment throughout the above spectral range, both in band positions and intensities. This contrasts to results with the other potentials and dipole moments, especially the fixed-charge q-TIP4P/F model, which gives unrealistic intensities. The calculated ab initio spectrum is analyzed by examining the contribution of various transitions to each band.

  2. Calculation of the effective permeability of saturated random porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostvar, S.; Wood, B. D.; Apte, S.; Liburdy, J.

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the effective permeability tensor is an essential part of Darcy-scale representations of flow in porous media. The permeability tensor itself is a property of the medium, and depends only on the microscale geometry of the system. Determining the functional relationships between effective permeability (or conductivity in the general sense) and the structure of the medium is an old problem, with the earliest results for ordered porous media dating the 1920's. In this presentation, we report on the results of (1) detailed theory development, and (2) computations for the effective permeability tensor in fully-saturated random sphere packs, with a focus on the computational results. The theory is developed by volume averaging the Stokes equations, and using developing appropriate closures via potential theory, and has been reported on previously. For the computations, we have adopted an immersed boundary method to fully resolve the pore-scale velocity field. From our results, we compute the hydraulic permeability for both ordered and random media, and we compare these results with existing analytical solutions for the hydraulic conductivity in periodic arrays.

  3. Nonperturbative calculation of phonon effects on spin squeezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dylewsky, D.; Freericks, J. K.; Wall, M. L.; Rey, A. M.; Foss-Feig, M.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models of spins coupled to bosons provide a simple setting for studying a broad range of important phenomena in many-body physics, from virtually mediated interactions to decoherence and thermalization. In many atomic, molecular, and optical systems, such models also underlie the most successful attempts to engineer strong, long-ranged interactions for the purpose of entanglement generation. Especially when the coupling between the spins and bosons is strong, such that it cannot be treated perturbatively, the properties of such models are extremely challenging to calculate theoretically. Here, exact analytical expressions for nonequilibrium spin-spin correlation functions are derived for a specific model of spins coupled to bosons. The spatial structure of the coupling between spins and bosons is completely arbitrary, and thus the solution can be applied to systems in any number of dimensions. The explicit and nonperturbative inclusion of the bosons enables the study of entanglement generation (in the form of spin squeezing) even when the bosons are driven strongly and near resonantly, and thus provides a quantitative view of the breakdown of adiabatic elimination that inevitably occurs as one pushes towards the fastest entanglement generation possible. The solution also helps elucidate the effect of finite temperature on spin squeezing. The model considered is relevant to a variety of atomic, molecular, and optical systems, such as atoms in cavities or trapped ions. As an explicit example, the results are used to quantify phonon effects in trapped ion quantum simulators, which are expected to become increasingly important as these experiments push towards larger numbers of ions.

  4. Electronically Excited States in Poly(p-phenylenevinylene): Vertical Excitations and Torsional Potentials from High-Level Ab Initio Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ab initio second-order algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC(2)) calculations using the resolution of the identity (RI) method have been performed on poly-(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) oligomers with chain lengths up to eight phenyl rings. Vertical excitation energies for the four lowest π–π* excitations and geometry relaxation effects for the lowest excited state (S1) are reported. Extrapolation to infinite chain length shows good agreement with analogous data derived from experiment. Analysis of the bond length alternation (BLA) based on the optimized S1 geometry provides conclusive evidence for the localization of the defect in the center of the oligomer chain. Torsional potentials have been computed for the four excited states investigated and the transition densities divided into fragment contributions have been used to identify excitonic interactions. The present investigation provides benchmark results, which can be used (i) as reference for lower level methods and (ii) give the possibility to parametrize an effective Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian for quantum dynamical simulations of ultrafast exciton transfer dynamics in PPV type systems. PMID:23427902

  5. Confusing Aspects in the Calculation of the Electrostatic Potential of an Infinite Line of Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, J. L.; Campos, I.; Roa-Neri, J. A. E.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we discuss the trick of eliminating infinite potential of reference arguing that it corresponds to a constant of integration, in the problem of determining the electrostatic potential of an infinite line of charge with uniform density, and show how the problem must be tackled properly. The usual procedure is confusing for most…

  6. Calculations of the ionization potentials and electron affinities of bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin via ab initio quantum chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, J.; Friesner, R.A.

    2000-03-23

    Ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA) are calculated for bacteriopheophytin (BPh) and bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) in the photosynthetic reaction center utilizing density functional methods implemented in a parallel version of the JAGUAR electronic structure code. These quantities are studied as a function of basis set size and molecular geometry. The results indicate the necessity of using large basis sets with diffuse functions in order to obtain reliable IP and EA in the gas phase. The relative reduction potentials of BChl and BPh in dimethylformamide solution are also calculated and compared with experimental results. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained when ligand binding of solvent molecules to the central Mg atom of BNhl is incorporated in the calculations.

  7. Surface heterogeneity of C{sub 60} as studied by infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed CO and adsorption potential calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Folman, M.; Fastow, M.; Kozirovski, Y.

    1997-03-05

    In our recent investigation of the IR spectrum of CO physically adsorbed on C{sub 60} films, two well-resolved absorption bands at 2135 and 2128 cm{sup -1} were found, suggesting that the molecule is adsorbed on two different sites. To determine the nature of these adsorption sites, calculations of adsorption potentials and spectral shifts for the CO/C{sub 60} system were performed. The calculations were done for the fcc (100), fcc (111) hcp (001), and hcp (111) surface planes. In the calculations the 6-exponential and the Lennard-Jones potentials were used. A number of adsorption sites were chosen. These included the void space between four, three, and two neighboring C{sub 60} molecules and the center of the hexagon and the pentagon on the C{sub 60} surface. The calculated potentials and spectral shifts clearly indicate that adsorption sites in the voids between the C{sub 60} molecules are energetically preferred over sites on top of single C{sub 60} molecules. Comparison is made between results obtained with the two potentials and with results obtained previously with the two other carbon allotropes: graphite and diamond. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Environmental Perchlorate Exposure: Potential Adverse Thyroid Effects

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will present a general overview of the sources, human studies, and proposed regulatory action regarding environmental perchlorate exposure. Recent findings Some recent studies have reported significant associations between urinary perchlorate concentrations, thyroid dysfunction, and decreased infant IQ in groups who would be particularly susceptible to perchlorate effects. An update regarding the recent proposed regulatory actions and potential costs surrounding amelioration of perchlorate contamination is provided. Summary The potential adverse thyroidal effects of environmental perchlorate exposure remain controversial, and further research is needed to further define its relationship to human health among pregnant and lactating women and their infants. PMID:25106002

  9. Ab initio calculations of the ground and excited states of the ZrN molecule including spin-orbit effects.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Ayman; Abdul-Al, Saleh N

    2015-06-15

    The electronic structures with spin-orbit effects of the zirconium nitride ZrN molecule are investigated by the methods of multireference single and double configuration interaction. The potential energy curves are calculated along with the spectroscopic constants for the lowest-lying 34 spin-orbit states Ω in ZrN. A good agreement is displayed by comparing the calculated spectroscopic constants with those available experimentally. The permanent dipole moments are calculated along with the vibrational energies. New results are obtained in this work for 29 spin-orbit states and their spectroscopic constants calculated. PMID:25899865

  10. Full-dimensional vibrational calculations for H5O2+ using an ab initio potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Anne B.; Huang, Xinchuan; Carter, Stuart; Landeweer, Marc Y.; Bowman, Joel M.

    2005-02-01

    We report quantum diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) and variational calculations in full dimensionality for selected vibrational states of H5O2+ using a new ab initio potential energy surface [X. Huang, B. Braams, and J. M. Bowman, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 044308 (2005)]. The energy and properties of the zero-point state are focused on in the rigorous DMC calculations. OH-stretch fundamentals are also calculated using "fixed-node" DMC calculations and variationally using two versions of the code MULTIMODE. These results are compared with infrared multiphoton dissociation measurements of Yeh et al. [L. I. Yeh, M. Okumura, J. D. Myers, J. M. Price, and Y. T. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 91, 7319 (1989)]. Some preliminary results for the energies of several modes of the shared hydrogen are also reported.

  11. On the calculation of the absolute grand potential of confined smectic-A phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Cheng; Baus, Marc; Ryckaert, Jean-Paul

    2015-09-01

    We determine the absolute grand potential Λ along a confined smectic-A branch of a calamitic liquid crystal system enclosed in a slit pore of transverse area A and width L, using the rod-rod Gay-Berne potential and a rod-wall potential favouring perpendicular orientation at the walls. For a confined phase with an integer number of smectic layers sandwiched between the opposite walls, we obtain the excess properties (excess grand potential Λexc, solvation force fs and adsorption Γ) with respect to the bulk phase at the same μ (chemical potential) and T (temperature) state point. While usual thermodynamic integration methods are used along the confined smectic branch to estimate the grand potential difference as μ is varied at fixed L, T, the absolute grand potential at one reference state point is obtained via the evaluation of the absolute Helmholtz free energy in the (N, L, A, T) canonical ensemble. It proceeds via a sequence of free energy difference estimations involving successively the cost of localising rods on layers and the switching on of a one-dimensional harmonic field to keep layers integrity coupled to the elimination of inter-layers and wall interactions. The absolute free energy of the resulting set of fully independent layers of interacting rods is finally estimated via the existing procedures. This work opens the way to the computer simulation study of phase transitions implying confined layered phases.

  12. Effects of nonlinear aerodynamics and static aeroelasticity on mission performance calculations for a fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.; Tatum, Kenneth E.; Foss, Willard E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    During conceptual design studies of advanced aircraft, the usual practice is to use linear theory to calculate the aerodynamic characteristics of candidate rigid (nonflexible) geometric external shapes. Recent developments and improvements in computational methods, especially computational fluid dynamics (CFD), provide significantly improved capability to generate detailed analysis data for the use of all disciplines involved in the evaluation of a proposed aircraft design. A multidisciplinary application of such analysis methods to calculate the effects of nonlinear aerodynamics and static aeroelasticity on the mission performance of a fighter aircraft concept is described. The aircraft configuration selected for study was defined in a previous study using linear aerodynamics and rigid geometry. The results from the previous study are used as a basis of comparison for the data generated herein. Aerodynamic characteristics are calculated using two different nonlinear theories, potential flow and rotational (Euler) flow. The aerodynamic calculations are performed in an iterative procedure with an equivalent plate structural analysis method to obtain lift and drag data for a flexible (nonrigid) aircraft. These static aeroelastic data are then used in calculating the combat and mission performance characteristics of the aircraft.

  13. Scoping Calculations for Potential Groundwater Impacts from Operation of the APT Facility at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Thibault, J.J.

    1999-10-07

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential travel times and paths of the postulated activated groundwater beneath the facility and to examine the fate and transport of this activated groundwater.

  14. The Role of Molecular Dynamics Potential of Mean Force Calculations in the Investigation of Enzyme Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Pan, L; Lightstone, F C; Merz, K M

    2016-01-01

    The potential of mean force simulations, widely applied in Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, are useful tools to examine the free energy variation as a function of one or more specific reaction coordinate(s) for a given system. Implementation of the potential of mean force in the simulations of biological processes, such as enzyme catalysis, can help overcome the difficulties of sampling specific regions on the energy landscape and provide useful insights to understand the catalytic mechanism. The potential of mean force simulations usually require many, possibly parallelizable, short simulations instead of a few extremely long simulations and, therefore, are fairly manageable for most research facilities. In this chapter, we provide detailed protocols for applying the potential of mean force simulations to investigate enzymatic mechanisms for several different enzyme systems. PMID:27498632

  15. Moire pattern interlayer potentials in van der Waals materials from high level ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jeil; Leconte, Nicolas; Lebegue, Sebastien; Gould, Timothy

    Stacking-dependent interlayer interactions are important for understanding the structural and electronic properties in incommensurable two dimensional material assemblies where long-range moiré patterns arise due to small lattice constant mismatch or twist angles. We study the stacking-dependent interlayer coupling energies between graphene (G) and hexagonal boron nitride (BN) single layers for different possible combinations such as G/G, G/BN and BN/BN using high-level EXX+RPA ab initio calculations. The total energies differ substantially when compared with conventional LDA, but for stacking-dependent total energy differences we find that the dominance of short-range covalent-type binding over the longer-ranged van der Waals tails near equilibrium geometries renders the LDA as a reasonable starting point for ab initio calculation based analyses for the systems we have studied. Our calculations are useful input for study of strains originated by interlayer interactions in incommensurable 2D van der Waals crystals.

  16. The potential, limitations, and challenges of divide and conquer quantum electronic structure calculations on energetic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Jon R.; Magyar, Rudolph J.

    2012-02-01

    High explosives are an important class of energetic materials used in many weapons applications. Even with modern computers, the simulation of the dynamic chemical reactions and energy release is exceedingly challenging. While the scale of the detonation process may be macroscopic, the dynamic bond breaking responsible for the explosive release of energy is fundamentally quantum mechanical. Thus, any method that does not adequately describe bonding is destined to lack predictive capability on some level. Performing quantum mechanics calculations on systems with more than dozens of atoms is a gargantuan task, and severe approximation schemes must be employed in practical calculations. We have developed and tested a divide and conquer (DnC) scheme to obtain total energies, forces, and harmonic frequencies within semi-empirical quantum mechanics. The method is intended as an approximate but faster solution to the full problem and is possible due to the sparsity of the density matrix in many applications. The resulting total energy calculation scales linearly as the number of subsystems, and the method provides a path-forward to quantum mechanical simulations of millions of atoms.

  17. Electric potential calculation in molecular simulation of electric double layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Olmsted, David L.; Asta, Mark; Laird, Brian B.

    2016-11-01

    For the molecular simulation of electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs), a number of methods have been proposed and implemented to determine the one-dimensional electric potential profile between the two electrodes at a fixed potential difference. In this work, we compare several of these methods for a model LiClO4-acetonitrile/graphite EDLC simulated using both the traditional fixed-charged method (FCM), in which a fixed charge is assigned a priori to the electrode atoms, or the recently developed constant potential method (CPM) (2007 J. Chem. Phys. 126 084704), where the electrode charges are allowed to fluctuate to keep the potential fixed. Based on an analysis of the full three-dimensional electric potential field, we suggest a method for determining the averaged one-dimensional electric potential profile that can be applied to both the FCM and CPM simulations. Compared to traditional methods based on numerically solving the one-dimensional Poisson’s equation, this method yields better accuracy and no supplemental assumptions.

  18. Electric potential calculation in molecular simulation of electric double layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenxing; Olmsted, David L; Asta, Mark; Laird, Brian B

    2016-11-23

    For the molecular simulation of electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs), a number of methods have been proposed and implemented to determine the one-dimensional electric potential profile between the two electrodes at a fixed potential difference. In this work, we compare several of these methods for a model LiClO4-acetonitrile/graphite EDLC simulated using both the traditional fixed-charged method (FCM), in which a fixed charge is assigned a priori to the electrode atoms, or the recently developed constant potential method (CPM) (2007 J. Chem. Phys. 126 084704), where the electrode charges are allowed to fluctuate to keep the potential fixed. Based on an analysis of the full three-dimensional electric potential field, we suggest a method for determining the averaged one-dimensional electric potential profile that can be applied to both the FCM and CPM simulations. Compared to traditional methods based on numerically solving the one-dimensional Poisson's equation, this method yields better accuracy and no supplemental assumptions.

  19. Electric potential calculation in molecular simulation of electric double layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenxing; Olmsted, David L; Asta, Mark; Laird, Brian B

    2016-11-23

    For the molecular simulation of electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs), a number of methods have been proposed and implemented to determine the one-dimensional electric potential profile between the two electrodes at a fixed potential difference. In this work, we compare several of these methods for a model LiClO4-acetonitrile/graphite EDLC simulated using both the traditional fixed-charged method (FCM), in which a fixed charge is assigned a priori to the electrode atoms, or the recently developed constant potential method (CPM) (2007 J. Chem. Phys. 126 084704), where the electrode charges are allowed to fluctuate to keep the potential fixed. Based on an analysis of the full three-dimensional electric potential field, we suggest a method for determining the averaged one-dimensional electric potential profile that can be applied to both the FCM and CPM simulations. Compared to traditional methods based on numerically solving the one-dimensional Poisson's equation, this method yields better accuracy and no supplemental assumptions. PMID:27624573

  20. Insights into structure and redox potential of lignin peroxidase from QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ludovic; Crawford, Luke; Mutengwa, Archford; Götze, Jan P; Bühl, Michael

    2016-02-28

    Redox potentials are computed for the active form (compound I) of lignin peroxidase (LiP) using a suitable QM/MM methodology (B3LYP/SDD/6-311G**//BP86/SVP:CHARMM). Allowing for dynamic conformational averaging, a potential of 0.67(33) V relative to ferrocenium/ferrocene is obtained for the active form with its oxoiron(iv) core. The computed redox potential is very sensitive to the charge distribution around the active site: protonation of titratable residues close to the metal center increases the redox potential, thereby rationalising the known pH dependence of LiP activity. A simple MM-charge deletion scheme is used to identify residues that are critical for the redox potential. Two mutant proteins are studied through homology modelling, E40Q and D183N, which are predicted to have an increased redox potential by 140 mV and 190 mV, respectively, relative to the wild type. These mutant proteins are thus promising targets for synthesis and further exploration toward a rational design of biocatalytic systems for oxidative degradation of lignin.

  1. Effective potential in density matrix functional theory.

    PubMed

    Nagy, A; Amovilli, C

    2004-10-01

    In the previous paper it was shown that in the ground state the diagonal of the spin independent second-order density matrix n can be determined by solving a single auxiliary equation of a two-particle problem. Thus the problem of an arbitrary system with even electrons can be reduced to a two-particle problem. The effective potential of the two-particle equation contains a term v(p) of completely kinetic origin. Virial theorem and hierarchy of equations are derived for v(p) and simple approximations are proposed. A relationship between the effective potential u(p) of the shape function equation and the potential v(p) is established.

  2. Effective potential in density matrix functional theory.

    PubMed

    Nagy, A; Amovilli, C

    2004-10-01

    In the previous paper it was shown that in the ground state the diagonal of the spin independent second-order density matrix n can be determined by solving a single auxiliary equation of a two-particle problem. Thus the problem of an arbitrary system with even electrons can be reduced to a two-particle problem. The effective potential of the two-particle equation contains a term v(p) of completely kinetic origin. Virial theorem and hierarchy of equations are derived for v(p) and simple approximations are proposed. A relationship between the effective potential u(p) of the shape function equation and the potential v(p) is established. PMID:15473719

  3. Screening Method for calculating Global Warming Potential through computational and experimental investigations of radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevington, C. B.; Betowski, D.; Ottinger, D.; Sheppard, M.; Elrod, M. J.; Offenberg, J.; Hetfield, C.; Libelo, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    The universe of chemical substances in commerce that may have significant atmospheric impacts such as global warming potential, ozone depletion potential, and ozone creation potential is not well defined. Staff from the U.S. E.P.A. have developed a screening method and evaluated chemicals using criteria indicative of potential atmospheric impact. Screening criteria included physical chemical properties such as boiling point and vapor pressure as well as structural characteristics such as molecular weight and number of halogen atoms. Preliminary results show that there are over 1,000 chemicals with a 100-year time horizon Global Warming Potential (GWP) of greater than 1 and over 700 chemicals with a GWP of greater than 10, relative to a value of 1 for CO2. The primary goal of this scoping project is to calculate the GWP for each of these chemicals. GWP is calculated using three primary inputs: molecular weight, atmospheric lifetime, and radiative forcing. Where available, experimentally derived radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime values have been identified and are utilized. Surprisingly, measured values were only available for approximately 20% of chemicals. Where measured data were not available, values were estimated in various ways. Besides calculating these values, characterizing the accuracy and efficacy of these various estimation methods, is also of interest. Radiative efficiency was calculated using quantum mechanical ab initio methods, utilizing Gaussian software. In addition, a preliminary Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) building on the work of Bera et al's "Design strategies to minimize the radiative efficiency of global warming molecules" (2010) was used to estimate radiative forcing for over 800 fluorinated chemicals. For atmospheric lifetime, QSARs were used to estimate OH rate constants and atmospheric lifetime values. Recognizing the limitations and uncertainty introduced by using QSARs for atmospheric lifetime estimation

  4. Electrode contamination effects of retarding potential analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, H. K.; Oyama, K.-I.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The electrode contamination in electrostatic analyzers such as Langmuir probes and retarding potential analyzers (RPA) is a serious problem for space measurements. The contamination layer acts as extra capacitance and resistance and leads to distortion in the measured I-V curve, which leads to erroneous measurement results. There are two main effects of the contamination layer: one is the impedance effect and the other is the charge attachment and accumulation due to the capacitance. The impedance effect can be reduced or eliminated by choosing the proper sweeping frequency. However, for RPA the charge accumulation effect becomes serious because the capacitance of the contamination layer is much larger than that of the Langmuir probe of similar dimension. The charge accumulation on the retarding potential grid causes the effective potential, that ions experience, to be changed from the applied voltage. Then, the number of ions that can pass through the retarding potential grid to reach the collector and, thus, the measured ion current are changed. This effect causes the measured ion drift velocity and ion temperature to be changed from the actual values. The error caused by the RPA electrode contamination is expected to be significant for sounding rocket measurements with low rocket velocity (1-2 km/s) and low ion temperature of 200-300 K in the height range of 100-300 km. In this paper we discuss the effects associated with the RPA contaminated electrodes based on theoretical analysis and experiments performed in a space plasma operation chamber. Finally, the development of a contamination-free RPA for sounding rocket missions is presented.

  5. Calculation of the thermoneutral potential of NiCd and NiH2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Albert H.

    1994-01-01

    The thermoneutral potential of a nickel cadmium or nickel hydrogen cell is the potential at which the cell charge or discharge process puts out zero heat, and thus is the potential corresponding to the enthalpy change of the charge/discharge reaction, delta H. A relatively straightforward method for obtaining the thermoneutral potential E(sub tn), is based on the measured potential and temperature derivative of the cell reactions, which are related to the free energy change delta G, and entropy change delta S, respectively. Particularly in the nickel hydrogen cell, the pressure of hydrogen can often vary over an order of magnitude or more during the course of a charge or discharge. In a nickel cadmium cell, although significant changes in oxygen pressure can occur during charge or discharge, since oxygen does not enter into the charge/discharge reaction, these pressure changes are related to the heat generated from oxygen evolution and recombination. However, the entropy changes due to changes in hydrogen pressure relative to the 1 atm standard state must be included to apply this method to the nickel hydrogen cell.

  6. Potential effects on health of global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, A. . Whittington Hospital); Parry, M. . Environmental Change Unit)

    1993-12-01

    Prediction of the impacts of global climate change on health is complicated by a number of factors. These include: the difficulty in predicting regional changes in climate, the capacity for adaptation to climate change, the interactions between the effects of global climate change and a number of other key determinants of health, including population growth and poverty, and the availability of adequate preventive and curative facilities for diseases that may be effected by climate change. Nevertheless, it is of importance to consider the potential health impacts of global climate change for a number of reasons. It is also important to monitor diseases which could be effected by climate change in order to detect changes in incidence as early as possible and study possible interactions with other factors. It seems likely that the possible impacts on health of climate change will be a major determinant of the degree to which policies aimed at reducing global warming are followed, as perceptions of the effect of climate change to human health and well-being are particularly likely to influence public opinion. The potential health impacts of climate change can be divided into direct (primary) and indirect (secondary and tertiary) effects. Primary effects are those related to the effect of temperature on human well-being and disease. Secondary effects include the impacts on health of changes in food production, availability of water and of sea level rise. A tertiary level of impacts can also be hypothesized.

  7. Calculating broad neutron resonances in a cut-off Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Á.; Noszály, Cs.; Salamon, P.; Vertse, T.

    2015-07-01

    In a cut-off Woods-Saxon (CWS) potential with realistic depth S -matrix poles being far from the imaginary wave number axis form a sequence where the distances of the consecutive resonances are inversely proportional with the cut-off radius value, which is an unphysical parameter. Other poles lying closer to the imaginary wave number axis might have trajectories with irregular shapes as the depth of the potential increases. Poles being close repel each other, and their repulsion is responsible for the changes of the directions of the corresponding trajectories. The repulsion might cause that certain resonances become antibound and later resonances again when they collide on the imaginary axis. The interaction is extremely sensitive to the cut-off radius value, which is an apparent handicap of the CWS potential.

  8. Microscopic calculation of interacting boson model parameters by potential-energy surface mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, I.; Frauendorf, S.

    2011-06-15

    A coherent state technique is used to generate an interacting boson model (IBM) Hamiltonian energy surface which is adjusted to match a mean-field energy surface. This technique allows the calculation of IBM Hamiltonian parameters, prediction of properties of low-lying collective states, as well as the generation of probability distributions of various shapes in the ground state of transitional nuclei, the last two of which are of astrophysical interest. The results for krypton, molybdenum, palladium, cadmium, gadolinium, dysprosium, and erbium nuclei are compared with experiment.

  9. Quantum Chemical Calculations of the Cl- + CH3I → CH3Cl + I- Potential Energy Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiaxu; Lourderaj, Upakarasamy; Addepalli, Srirangam V.; De Jong, Wibe A.; Hase, William L.

    2008-12-30

    Electronic structure theory calculations, using MP2 theory and the DFT functionals OPBE, OLYP, HCTH407, BhandH, and B97-1, were performed to characterize the structures, vibrational frequencies, and energies for stationary points on the Cl- + CH3I → ClCH3 + I- potential energy surface. The aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets, with an effective core potential (ECP) for iodine, were employed. Single-point CCSD(T) calculations were performed to obtain the complete basis set (CBS) limit for the reaction energies. DFT was found to give significantly longer halide ion/carbon atom bond lengths for the ion-dipole complexes and central barrier transition state, than MP2. BhandH, with either the aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets, gives good agreement with the experimental structures for both CH3I and CH3Cl. The frequencies of CH3I and CH3Cl, obtained with the different level of theory and basis sets, are in excellent agreement with experiment. The major difference between the MP2 and DFT frequencies is for the imaginary frequency of the central barrier. Using the aug-cc-pVTZ basis the MP2 value for this frequency ranges from 1.26 - 1.59 times larger than those for the DFT functional. Thus, the MP2 and DFT theories have different PES shapes in the vicinity of the [Cl--CH3--I]- central barrier. The CCSD(T)/CBS energies are in good agreement with experiments for the complexation energies and reaction exothermicity, with a small 1 kcal/mol difference for the latter. The CCSD(T)/CBS central barrier height is lower than values deduced by using statistical theoretical models to fit the Cl- + CH3I → ClCH3 + I- experimental rate constant, which is consistent with the expected non-statistical dynamics for the reaction. The BhandH energies are in overall best agreement with the CCSD(T) values, with a largest difference of only 0.7 kcal/mol.

  10. Calculation of relativistic effects in sub Coulomb heavy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hencken, Kai; Trautmann, Dirk

    1991-06-01

    Relativistic corrections for the elastic scattering of heavy ions in the sub Coulomb regime are given. The case of two identical particles is treated especially. The deviation from the Rutherford (Mott) cross section is calculated by using the Todorov equation and the Darwin Hamiltonian, resp. It is shown, that both approches lead to the same results for small kinetic energies. Furthermore we discuss the applicability of the WKB method for calculating the phase shifts and the possibility of using a classical perturbative approach in the case of nonidentical particles.

  11. Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

    2011-12-01

    We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

  12. Rapidly calculated density functional theory (DFT) relaxed Iso-potential Phi Si Maps: Beta-cellobiose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New cellobiose Phi-H/Si-H maps are rapidly generated using a mixed basis set DFT method, found to achieve a high level of confidence while reducing computer resources dramatically. Relaxed iso-potential maps are made for different conformational states of cellobiose, showing how glycosidic bond dihe...

  13. Dynamic polarization potential effects on vector analyzing powers of 6Li- 28Si elastic scattering from non-monotonic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, A. K.; Roy, P. K.; Hossain, S.; Abdullah, M. N. A.; Tariq, A. S. B.; Uddin, M. A.; Reichstein, I.; Malik, F. B.

    2010-08-01

    Experimental cross section (CS) and vector analyzing power (VAP) data of the 6Li-28Si elastic scattering at 22.8 MeV are analyzed in the coupled-channels (CC) and coupled discretized continuum channels (CDCC) methods. Non-monotonic (NM) 6Li and α potentials of microscopic origin are employed, respectively, in the CC calculations and to generate folding potentials for the CDCC calculations. The study demonstrates that the use of central NM potentials can generate an appropriate dynamic polarization potential (DPP) required to describe both the CS and VAP data without the necessity of renormalization. This also produces an effective spin-orbit (SO) potential to account for the iT11 data without the requirement of an additional static SO potential at the incident energy considered.

  14. On Effective Potential in Tortoise Coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjali, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we study the field dynamics in Tortoise coordinate where the equation of motion of a scalar can be written as Schrodinger-like form. We obtain a general form for effective potential by finding the Schrodinger equation for scalar and spinor fields and study its global behavior in some black hole backgrounds in three dimension such as BTZ black holes, new type black holes and black holes with no horizon. Especially, we study the asymptotic behavior of potential at infinity, horizons and origin and find that its asymptotic in BTZ and new type solution is completely different from that of vanishing horizon solution. In fact, potential for vanishing horizon goes to a fixed quantity at infinity, while in BTZ and new type black hole we have an infinite barrier.

  15. Potential health effects of space radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.

    1993-01-01

    Crewmembers on missions to the Moon or Mars will be exposed to radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays, and possibly solar particle events. The potential health hazards due to these space radiations must be considered carefully to ensure the success of space exploration. Because there is no human radioepidemiological data for acute and late effects of high-LET (Linear-Energy-Transfer) radiation, the biological risks of energetic charged particles have to be estimated from experimental results on animals and cultured cells. Experimental data obtained to date indicate that charged particle radiation can be much more effective than photons in causing chromosome aberrations, cell killing, mutation, and tumor induction. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) varies with biological endpoints and depends on the LET of heavy ions. Most lesions induced by low-LET radiation can be repaired in mammalian cells. Energetic heavy ions, however, can produce large complex DNA damages, which may lead to large deletions and are irreparable. For high-LET radiation, therefore, there are less or no dose rate effects. Physical shielding may not be effective in minimizing the biological effects on energetic heavy ions, since fragments of the primary particles can be effective in causing biological effects. At present the uncertainty of biological effects of heavy particles is still very large. With further understanding of the biological effects of space radiation, the career doses can be kept at acceptable levels so that the space radiation environment need not be a barrier to the exploitation of the promise of space.

  16. JCZS: An Intermolecular Potential Database for Performing Accurate Detonation and Expansion Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; McGee, B.C.

    1998-11-03

    Exponential-13,6 (EXP-13,6) potential pammeters for 750 gases composed of 48 elements were determined and assembled in a database, referred to as the JCZS database, for use with the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler equation of state (JCZ3-EOS)~l) The EXP- 13,6 force constants were obtained by using literature values of Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential functions, by using corresponding states (CS) theory, by matching pure liquid shock Hugoniot data, and by using molecular volume to determine the approach radii with the well depth estimated from high-pressure isen- tropes. The JCZS database was used to accurately predict detonation velocity, pressure, and temperature for 50 dif- 3 Accurate predictions were also ferent explosives with initial densities ranging from 0.25 glcm3 to 1.97 g/cm . obtained for pure liquid shock Hugoniots, static properties of nitrogen, and gas detonations at high initial pressures.

  17. Testing ion-neutral interaction potentials using calculated ion transport coefficients.

    PubMed

    Hogan, M J

    2006-10-28

    Several commonly measured ion transport coefficients were investigated in order to determine their sensitivity for testing and comparing proposed ion-neutral interaction potentials. A variety of positive ions, negative ions, neutrals, and temperatures were included in order to draw as general a conclusion as possible. All transport coefficients considered were found to be sufficiently sensitive to be used to clearly distinguish between less and more accurate interaction potentials. It was also found that the longitudinal diffusion coefficient is the most sensitive test, followed by both the transverse diffusion coefficient and the ratio of the longitudinal diffusion coefficient to mobility, followed by the ratio of the transverse diffusion coefficient to mobility and that the mobility is the least sensitive test. When presently achievable levels of experimental error were also taken into account, however, there was no significant difference in the sensitivities. PMID:17092091

  18. Calculated potential surfaces for the reactions: O + N2 yields NO + N and N + O2 yields NO + O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Jaffe, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    Complete Active Space SCF/Contracted CI (CASSCF/CCI) calculations, using large Gaussian basis sets, are presented for selected portions of the potential surfaces for the reactions in the Zeldovich mechanism for the conversion of N2 to NO. The N + O2 reaction is exoergic by 32 kcal/mole and is computed to have an early barrier of 10.2 kcal/mole for the (sup 2)A(sup prime) surface and 18.0 kcal/mole for the (sup 4)A(sup prime) surface. The O + N2 reaction is endoergic by 75 kcal/mole. The (sup 3)A(sup double prime) surface is calculated to have a late barrier of 0.5 kcal/mole, while the (sup 3)A(sup prime) surface is calculated to have a late barrier of 14.4 kcal/mole.

  19. Ab initio projected-unrestricted Hartree-Fock calculation of some potential energy curves for carbonyl fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, D. A.; Schug, J. C.; Phillips, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Some potential energy curves for CF2O were calculated using projected-unrestricted Hartree-Fock (PUHF) theory. The calculations employed a contracted (4s 3p) Gaussian-type atomic orbital basis set. Bound states were found for the X-tilde 1A1 and 1,3A2 states while the 1,3B1 and 1,3B2 states were repulsive in the valence representation. The merits of the PUHF treatment for excited states are discussed. The results are discussed in terms of available experimental information and previous calculations with particular emphasis on the question of the photolysis channels open in the solar spectral region.

  20. Using corresponding state theory to obtain intermolecular potentials to calculate pure liquid shock Hugoniots

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1997-12-01

    Determination of product species, equations-of-state (EOS) and thermochemical properties of high explosives and pyrotechnics remains a major unsolved problem. Although, empirical EOS models may be calibrated to replicate detonation conditions within experimental variability (5--10%), different states, e.g. expansion, may produce significant discrepancy with data if the basic form of the EOS model is incorrect. A more physically realistic EOS model based on intermolecular potentials, such as the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler (JCZ3) EOS, is needed to predict detonation states as well as expanded states. Predictive capability for any EOS requires a large species data base composed of a wide variety of elements. Unfortunately, only 20 species have known JCZ3 molecular force constants. Of these 20 species, only 10 have been adequately compared to experimental data such as molecular scattering or shock Hugoniot data. Since data in the strongly repulsive region of the molecular potential is limited, alternative methods must be found to deduce force constants for a larger number of species. The objective of the present study is to determine JCZ3 product species force constants by using a corresponding states theory. Intermolecular potential parameters were obtained for a variety of gas species using a simple corresponding states technique with critical volume and critical temperature. A more complex, four parameter corresponding state method with shape and polarity corrections was also used to obtain intermolecular potential parameters. Both corresponding state methods were used to predict shock Hugoniot data obtained from pure liquids. The simple corresponding state method is shown to give adequate agreement with shock Hugoniot data.

  1. Potential human health effects of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Adverse human health effects, namely acute and chronic respiratory effects, can occur from the pre-deposition phase of the acid rain phenomenon due to inhalation of acidic particles and gases. State-of-the-art methodology to evaluate these effects is just now being applied to this question. The major post-deposition effect of the acid rain phenomenon is to acidify water, increasing solubility and subsequent human exposure to mercury, lead, cadmium, and aluminum. Acidification increases bioconversion of mercury to methylmercury, a highly toxic compound, which accumulates in fish, increasing the risk to toxicity in people who eat fish. Increase in water and soil content of lead and cadmium increases human exposure to these metals which become additive to other sources presently under regulatory control. The potential adverse health effects of increased human exposure to aluminum is not known at the present time. Deficiencies in the identification of the contribution of pre-deposition of air pollutants and post-deposition mobilization of toxic metals to the recognized potential health effects of the involved toxic substances is due to the fact that scientists have not addressed these specific questions. 113 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Theory of finite size effects for electronic quantum Monte Carlo calculations of liquids and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzmann, Markus; Clay, Raymond C.; Morales, Miguel A.; Tubman, Norm M.; Ceperley, David M.; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    Concentrating on zero temperature quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electronic systems, we give a general description of the theory of finite size extrapolations of energies to the thermodynamic limit based on one- and two-body correlation functions. We introduce effective procedures, such as using the potential and wave function split up into long and short range functions to simplify the method, and we discuss how to treat backflow wave functions. Then we explicitly test the accuracy of our method to correct finite size errors on example hydrogen and helium many-body systems and show that the finite size bias can be drastically reduced for even small systems.

  3. The Stark effect in linear potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinett, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the Stark effect (the second-order shifts in the energy spectrum due to an external constant force) for two one-dimensional model quantum mechanical systems described by linear potentials, the so-called quantum bouncer (defined by V(z) = Fz for z > 0 and V(z) = ∞ for z < 0) and the symmetric linear potential (given by V(z) = F|z|). We show how straightforward use of the most obvious properties of the Airy function solutions and simple Taylor expansions gives closed form results for the Stark shifts in both systems. These exact results are then compared to other approximation techniques, such as perturbation theory and WKB methods. These expressions add to the small number of closed-form descriptions available for the Stark effect in model quantum mechanical systems.

  4. An evaluation of calculation parameters in the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo codes and their effect on surface dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2012-07-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has proven invaluable for radiation transport simulations to accurately determine radiation doses and is widely considered a reliable computational measure that can substitute a physical experiment where direct measurements are not possible or feasible. In the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc MC codes, there are several user-specified parameters and customized transport algorithms, which may affect the calculation results. In order to fully utilize the MC methods available in these codes, it is essential to understand all these options and to use them appropriately. In this study, the effects of the electron transport algorithms in EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, which are often a trade-off between calculation accuracy and efficiency, were investigated in the buildup region of a homogeneous water phantom and also in a heterogeneous phantom using the DOSRZnrc user code. The algorithms and parameters investigated include: boundary crossing algorithm (BCA), skin depth, electron step algorithm (ESA), global electron cutoff energy (ECUT) and electron production cutoff energy (AE). The variations in calculated buildup doses were found to be larger than 10% for different user-specified transport parameters. We found that using BCA = EXACT gave the best results in terms of accuracy and efficiency in calculating buildup doses using DOSRZnrc. In addition, using the ESA = PRESTA-I option was found to be the best way of reducing the total calculation time without losing accuracy in the results at high energies (few keV ∼ MeV). We also found that although choosing a higher ECUT/AE value in the beam modelling can dramatically improve computation efficiency, there is a significant trade-off in surface dose uncertainty. Our study demonstrates that a careful choice of user-specified transport parameters is required when conducting similar MC calculations.

  5. The Stark Effect in Linear Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinett, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the Stark effect (the second-order shifts in the energy spectrum due to an external constant force) for two one-dimensional model quantum mechanical systems described by linear potentials, the so-called quantum bouncer (defined by V(z) = Fz for z greater than 0 and V(z) = [infinity] for z less than 0) and the symmetric linear potential…

  6. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces and the Calculation of Accurate Vibrational Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Martin, Jan M. L.; Taylor, Peter R.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Due to advances in quantum mechanical methods over the last few years, it is now possible to determine ab initio potential energy surfaces in which fundamental vibrational frequencies are accurate to within plus or minus 8 cm(exp -1) on average, and molecular bond distances are accurate to within plus or minus 0.001-0.003 Angstroms, depending on the nature of the bond. That is, the potential energy surfaces have not been scaled or empirically adjusted in any way, showing that theoretical methods have progressed to the point of being useful in analyzing spectra that are not from a tightly controlled laboratory environment, such as vibrational spectra from the interstellar medium. Some recent examples demonstrating this accuracy will be presented and discussed. These include the HNO, CH4, C2H4, and ClCN molecules. The HNO molecule is interesting due to the very large H-N anharmonicity, while ClCN has a very large Fermi resonance. The ab initio studies for the CH4 and C2H4 molecules present the first accurate full quartic force fields of any kind (i.e., whether theoretical or empirical) for a five-atom and six-atom system, respectively.

  7. Large impurity effects in rubrene crystals: First-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetseris, L.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2008-01-01

    Carrier mobilities of rubrene films are among the highest values reported for any organic semiconductor. Here, we probe with first-principles calculations the sensitivity of rubrene crystals on impurities. We find that isolated oxygen impurities create distinct peaks in the electronic density of states consistent with observations of defect levels in rubrene and that increased O content changes the position and shape of rubrene energy bands significantly. We also establish a dual role of hydrogen as individual H species and H impurity pairs create and annihilate deep carrier traps, respectively. The results are relevant to the performance and reliability of rubrene-based devices.

  8. Effective medium approximation for effective propagation constant calculation in a dense random medium. [electromagnetic wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The effective medium approximation (EMA) formalism developed for scalar wave calculations in solid state physics is generalized to electromagnetic wave scattering in a dense random medium. Results are applied to compute the effective propagation constant in a dense medium involving discrete spherical scatterers. When compared with a common quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), it is found that EMA accounts for backward scattering and the effect of correlation among three scatterers which are not available in QCA. It is also found that there is not much difference in the calculated normalized phase velocity between the use of these two approximations. However, there is a significant difference in the computed effective loss tangent in a nonabsorptive random medium. The computed effective loss tangent using EMA and measurements from a snow medium are compared, showing good agreement.

  9. Calculating Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes Using Noncentral Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Deborah

    This paper provides a brief review of the concepts of confidence intervals, effect sizes, and central and noncentral distributions. The use of confidence intervals around effect sizes is discussed. A demonstration of the Exploratory Software for Confidence Intervals (G. Cuming and S. Finch, 2001; ESCI) is given to illustrate effect size confidence…

  10. Garlic: a review of potential therapeutic effects

    PubMed Central

    Bayan, Leyla; Koulivand, Peir Hossain; Gorji, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Throughout history, many different cultures have recognized the potential use of garlic for prevention and treatment of different diseases. Recent studies support the effects of garlic and its extracts in a wide range of applications. These studies raised the possibility of revival of garlic therapeutic values in different diseases. Different compounds in garlic are thought to reduce the risk for cardiovascular diseases, have anti-tumor and anti-microbial effects, and show benefit on high blood glucose concentration. However, the exact mechanism of all ingredients and their long-term effects are not fully understood. Further studies are needed to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of action of garlic as well as its efficacy and safety in treatment of various diseases. PMID:25050296

  11. Pre- and post- scission particle emission in 3D Langevin calculations with various macroscopic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, K.; Nadtochy, P. N.; Schmitt, C.; Wasiak, P.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bonnet, E.; Chbihi, A.; Frankland, J.; Gruyer, D.; Wieleczko, J.-P.

    2013-12-01

    The fission dynamics described by solving differential equations of the Langevin type in three dimensional space of the deformation parameters is very sensitive on the choice of the macroscopic components such as potential energy models. The mass or charge distribution or total kinetic energy has been already shown to be different when one uses the Finite Range Liquid Drop Model or Lublin - Strasbourg Drop model. Also the shape-dependent congruence or shape-dependent Wigner energy and A0 terms are important especially for the fission of medium mass nuclei. We would like to make step forward and answer the question about the varying of the post-scission multiplicity by including different PES. Up to now there are only few experimental data for the medium mass nuclei where the pre- and post- scission emission has been estimated and isotopic distributions have been shown. The isotopic distributions of the fission products for light compound nucleus such as 111 In with two beam energies (Ebeam = 10.6 AMeV and 5.9 AMeV) and two heavy systems: 229Np with Ebeam = 7.4 AMeV and 260 No (Ebeam = 6 AMeV and 7.5 AMeV) have been studied theoretically. The agreement with the experimental data is discussed.

  12. Predicting Reduction Rates of Energetic Nitroaromatic Compounds Using Calculated One-Electron Reduction Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra; Bylaska, Eric J.; Johnston, Hayley; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2015-02-11

    The evaluation of new energetic nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) for use in green munitions formulations requires models that can predict their environmental fate. The susceptibility of energetic NACs to nitro reduction might be predicted from correlations between rate constants (k) for this reaction and one-electron reduction potentials (E1NAC) / 0.059 V, but the mechanistic implications of such correlations are inconsistent with evidence from other methods. To address this inconsistency, we have reevaluated existing kinetic data using a (non-linear) free-energy relationship (FER) based on the Marcus theory of outer-sphere electron transfer. For most reductants, the results are inconsistent with rate limitation by an initial, outer-sphere electron transfer, suggesting that the strong correlation between k and E1NAC is justified only as an empirical model. This empirical correlation was used to calibrate a new quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) using previously reported values of k for non-energetic NAC reduction by Fe(II) porphyrin and newly reported values of E1NAC determined using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level with the COSMO solvation model. The QSAR was then validated for energetic NACs using newly measured kinetic data for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The data show close agreement with the QSAR, supporting its applicability to energetic NACs.

  13. Predicting Reduction Rates of Energetic Nitroaromatic Compounds Using Calculated One-Electron Reduction Potentials

    DOE PAGES

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra; Bylaska, Eric J.; Johnston, Hayley; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2015-02-11

    The evaluation of new energetic nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) for use in green munitions formulations requires models that can predict their environmental fate. The susceptibility of energetic NACs to nitro reduction might be predicted from correlations between rate constants (k) for this reaction and one-electron reduction potentials (E1NAC) / 0.059 V, but the mechanistic implications of such correlations are inconsistent with evidence from other methods. To address this inconsistency, we have reevaluated existing kinetic data using a (non-linear) free-energy relationship (FER) based on the Marcus theory of outer-sphere electron transfer. For most reductants, the results are inconsistent with rate limitation bymore » an initial, outer-sphere electron transfer, suggesting that the strong correlation between k and E1NAC is justified only as an empirical model. This empirical correlation was used to calibrate a new quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) using previously reported values of k for non-energetic NAC reduction by Fe(II) porphyrin and newly reported values of E1NAC determined using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level with the COSMO solvation model. The QSAR was then validated for energetic NACs using newly measured kinetic data for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The data show close agreement with the QSAR, supporting its applicability to energetic NACs.« less

  14. Global Pattern of Potential Evaporation Calculated from the Penman-Monteith Equation Using Satellite and Assimilated Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1997-01-01

    Potential evaporation (E(0)) has been found to be useful in many practical applications and in research for setting a reference level for actual evaporation. All previous estimates of regional or global E(0) are based upon empirical formulae using climatologic meteorologic measurements at isolated stations (i.e., point data). However, the Penman-Monteith equation provides a physically based approach for computing E(0), and by comparing 20 different methods of estimating E(0), Jensen et al. (1990) showed that the Penman-Monteith equation provides the most accurate estimate of monthly E(0) from well-watered grass or alfalfa. In the present study, monthly total E(0) for 24 months (January 1987 to December 1988) was calculated from the Penman-Monteith equation, with prescribed albedo of 0.23 and surface resistance of 70 s/m, which are considered to be representative of actively growing well-watered grass covering the ground. These calculations have been done using spatially representative data derived from satellite observations and data assimilation results. Satellite observations were used to obtain solar radiation, fractional cloud cover, air temperature, and vapor pressure, while four-dimensional data assimilation results were used to calculate the aerodynamic resistance. Meteorologic data derived from satellite observations were compared with the surface measurements to provide a measure of accuracy. The accuracy of the calculated E(0) values was assessed by comparing with lysimeter observations for evaporation from well-watered grass at 35 widely distributed locations, while recognizing that the period of present calculations was not concurrent with the lysimeter measurements and the spatial scales of these measurements and calculations are vastly different. These comparisons suggest that the error in the calculated E(0) values may not be exceeded, on average, 20% for any month or location, but are more likely to be about 15%. These uncertainties are difficult to

  15. Model calculations of tropospheric ozone production potential following observed convective events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Luke, Winston T.; Mcnamara, Donna P.

    1990-01-01

    The profiles of CO, NO, O3, water vapor, and temperature, observed in 1985 during and after a series of convective events over rural areas of the south-central United States, were used to model the nonurban ozone production rates and to evaluate the effects of convective clouds on the tropospheric trace-gas chemistry. A comparison of trace-gas profiles measured in and around a large cumulonimbus during its dissipation showed that ozone production in the upper troposphere may be increased fourfold by convection relative to undisturbed air. The convective enhancement of O3 production for the entire tropospheric comlumn was found to be about 50 percent.

  16. Accurate and Efficient Calculation of van der Waals Interactions Within Density Functional Theory by Local Atomic Potential Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y. Y.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, K.; Zhang, S. B.

    2008-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) in the commonly used local density or generalized gradient approximation fails to describe van der Waals (vdW) interactions that are vital to organic, biological, and other molecular systems. Here, we propose a simple, efficient, yet accurate local atomic potential (LAP) approach, named DFT+LAP, for including vdW interactions in the framework of DFT. The LAPs for H, C, N, and O are generated by fitting the DFT+LAP potential energy curves of small molecule dimers to those obtained from coupled cluster calculations with single, double, and perturbatively treated triple excitations, CCSD(T). Excellent transferability of the LAPs is demonstrated by remarkable agreement with the JSCH-2005 benchmark database [P. Jurecka et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)], which provides the interaction energies of CCSD(T) quality for 165 vdW and hydrogen-bonded complexes. For over 100 vdW dominant complexes in this database, our DFT+LAP calculations give a mean absolute deviation from the benchmark results less than 0.5 kcal/mol. The DFT+LAP approach involves no extra computational cost other than standard DFT calculations and no modification of existing DFT codes, which enables straightforward quantum simulations, such as ab initio molecular dynamics, on biomolecular systems, as well as on other organic systems.

  17. Communication: MULTIMODE calculations of low-lying vibrational states of NO3 using an adiabatic potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homayoon, Zahra; Bowman, Joel M.

    2014-10-01

    A semi-global, permutationally invariant potential energy surface for NO3 is constructed from a subset of roughly 5000 Multi-State CASPT2 calculations (MS-CAS(17e,13o)PT2/aug-cc-pVTZ) reported by Morokuma and co-workers [H. Xiao, S. Maeda, and K. Morokuma, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2600 (2012)]. The PES, with empirical adjustments to modify the energies of two fundamentals and a hot-band transition, is used in full-dimensional vibrational self-consistent field/virtual state configuration interaction calculations using the code MULTIMODE. Vibrational energies and assignments are given for the fundamentals and low-lying combination states, including two that have been the focus of some controversy. Energies of a number of overtone and combinations are shown to be in good agreement with experiment and previous calculations using a model vibronic Hamiltonian [C. S. Simmons, T. Ichino, and J. F. Stanton, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 1946 (2012)]. Notably, the fundamental v3 is calculated to be at 1099 cm-1 in accord with the prediction from the vibronic analysis, although roughly 30 cm-1 higher. The state at 1493 cm-1 is assigned as v3 + v4, which is also in agreement with the vibronic analysis and some experiments. Vibrational energies for 15NO3 are also presented and these are also in good agreement with experiment.

  18. Calculation of activities of ions in molten salts with potential application to the pyroprocessing of nuclear waste.

    PubMed

    Salanne, Mathieu; Simon, Christian; Turq, Pierre; Madden, Paul A

    2008-01-31

    The ability to separate fission products by electrodeposition from molten salts depends, in part, on differences between the interactions of the different fission product cations with the ions present in the molten salt "solvent". These differences may be expressed as ratios of activity coefficients, which depend on the identity of the solvent and other factors. Here, we demonstrate the ability to calculate these activity coefficient ratios using molecular dynamics simulations with sufficient precision to guide the choice of suitable solvent systems in practical applications. We use polarizable ion interaction potentials which have previously been shown to give excellent agreement with structural, transport, and spectroscopic information of the molten salts, and the activity coefficients calculated in this work agree well with experimental data. The activity coefficients are shown to vary systematically with cation size for a set of trivalent cations.

  19. Quantum Tunneling in Testosterone 6β-Hydroxylation by Cytochrome P450: Reaction Dynamics Calculations Employing Multiconfiguration Molecular-Mechanical Potential Energy Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Hai

    2009-05-01

    Testosterone hydroxylation is a prototypical reaction of human cytochrome P450 3A4, which metabolizes about 50% of oral drugs on the market. Reaction dynamics calculations were carried out for the testosterone 6β-hydrogen abstraction and the 6β-d1-testosterone 6β-duterium abstraction employing a model that consists of the substrate and the active oxidant compound I. The calculations were performed at the level of canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling and were based on a semiglobal full-dimensional potential energy surface generated by the multiconfiguration molecular mechanics technique. The tunneling coefficients were found to be around 3, indicating substantial contributions by quantum tunneling. However, the tunneling made only modest contributions to the kinetic isotope effects. The kinetic isotope effects were computed to be about 2 in the doublet spin state and about 5 in the quartet spin state.

  20. An analytical model for the calculation of the change in transmembrane potential produced by an ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse.

    PubMed

    Hart, Francis X; Easterly, Clay E

    2004-05-01

    The electric field pulse shape and change in transmembrane potential produced at various points within a sphere by an intense, ultrawideband pulse are calculated in a four stage, analytical procedure. Spheres of two sizes are used to represent the head of a human and the head of a rat. In the first stage, the pulse is decomposed into its Fourier components. In the second stage, Mie scattering analysis (MSA) is performed for a particular point in the sphere on each of the Fourier components, and the resulting electric field pulse shape is obtained for that point. In the third stage, the long wavelength approximation (LWA) is used to obtain the change in transmembrane potential in a cell at that point. In the final stage, an energy analysis is performed. These calculations are performed at 45 points within each sphere. Large electric fields and transmembrane potential changes on the order of a millivolt are produced within the brain, but on a time scale on the order of nanoseconds. The pulse shape within the brain differs considerably from that of the incident pulse. Comparison of the results for spheres of different sizes indicates that scaling of such pulses across species is complicated. PMID:15114634

  1. Using the charge-stabilization technique in the double ionization potential equation-of-motion calculations with dianion references.

    PubMed

    Kuś, Tomasz; Krylov, Anna I

    2011-08-28

    The charge-stabilization method is applied to double ionization potential equation-of-motion (EOM-DIP) calculations to stabilize unstable dianion reference functions. The auto-ionizing character of the dianionic reference states spoils the numeric performance of EOM-DIP limiting applications of this method. We demonstrate that reliable excitation energies can be computed by EOM-DIP using a stabilized resonance wave function instead of the lowest energy solution corresponding to the neutral + free electron(s) state of the system. The details of charge-stabilization procedure are discussed and illustrated by examples. The choice of optimal stabilizing Coulomb potential, which is strong enough to stabilize the dianion reference, yet, minimally perturbs the target states of the neutral, is the crux of the approach. Two algorithms of choosing optimal parameters of the stabilization potential are presented. One is based on the orbital energies, and another--on the basis set dependence of the total Hartree-Fock energy of the reference. Our benchmark calculations of the singlet-triplet energy gaps in several diradicals show a remarkable improvement of the EOM-DIP accuracy in problematic cases. Overall, the excitation energies in diradicals computed using the stabilized EOM-DIP are within 0.2 eV from the reference EOM spin-flip values.

  2. An effective field theory calculation of the ϱ parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Andrew; Georgi, Howard; Grinstein, Benjamin

    1984-01-01

    The effective field theory formalism is reviewed. A general algorithm for constructing an effective lagrangian involving only light particles out of a renormalizable theory of light and heavy particles is stated. Strong interaction corrections are easily integrated into the formalism. As an example of its use, corrections Δϱ to the weak interactions ϱ parameter due to heavy particles are studied and the Einhorn-Jones-Veltman conjecture on the positivity of Δϱ is revisited.

  3. An improved fast multipole method for electrostatic potential calculations in a class of coarse-grained molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poursina, Mohammad; Anderson, Kurt S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm to approximate the long-range electrostatic potential field in the Cartesian coordinates applicable to 3D coarse-grained simulations of biopolymers. In such models, coarse-grained clusters are formed via treating groups of atoms as rigid and/or flexible bodies connected together via kinematic joints. Therefore, multibody dynamic techniques are used to form and solve the equations of motion of such coarse-grained systems. In this article, the approximations for the potential fields due to the interaction between a highly negatively/positively charged pseudo-atom and charged particles, as well as the interaction between clusters of charged particles, are presented. These approximations are expressed in terms of physical and geometrical properties of the bodies such as the entire charge, the location of the center of charge, and the pseudo-inertia tensor about the center of charge of the clusters. Further, a novel substructuring scheme is introduced to implement the presented far-field potential evaluations in a binary tree framework as opposed to the existing quadtree and octree strategies of implementing fast multipole method. Using the presented Lagrangian grids, the electrostatic potential is recursively calculated via sweeping two passes: assembly and disassembly. In the assembly pass, adjacent charged bodies are combined together to form new clusters. Then, the potential field of each cluster due to its interaction with faraway resulting clusters is recursively calculated in the disassembly pass. The method is highly compatible with multibody dynamic schemes to model coarse-grained biopolymers. Since the proposed method takes advantage of constant physical and geometrical properties of rigid clusters, improvement in the overall computational cost is observed comparing to the tradition application of fast multipole method.

  4. Load effects calculation according to EN 1991-2 Load Model 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavchev, V.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, fast calculation method for determination the effects of EN 1991-2 LM1 is presented. The influence lines method was used for calculation. Both bending moments and shear forces at typical section can be easy calculated by using one table.

  5. Probing calculated O 2 + potential curves with an XUV-IR pump-probe experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coerlin, Philipp; Fischer, Andreas; Schoenwald, Michael; Sperl, Alexander; Mizuno, Tomoya; Pfeifer, Thomas; Moshammer, Robert; Thumm, Uwe

    2015-05-01

    We study dissociative photo-ionization of O2 in a kinematically complete XUV-IR pump-probe experiment, preparing a vibrational wave packet in the potential of the binding O2+(a4Πu)state by ionization with a single XUV photon. After a variable time-delay the wave packet is promoted to the repulsive O2+(f4Πg)state by a weak IR probe pulse. Comparing the results of a coupled-channel simulation with the experimental kinetic-energy-release and quantum-beat spectra, we are able to discriminate between the adiabatic O2+potential-energy curves (PECs) calculated by. The overall agreement between simulated and experimental results is good; however, not all features of the experimental spectra could be reproduced using these PECs. Using a Morse potential adjusted to the experimental data instead, most features of the experimental spectra are well reproduced by our simulation. This optimized Morse potential is remarkably similar to the theoretically predicted PECs, demonstrating the sensitivity of our experimental method to small changes in the shape of the binding potential. Supported by the DoE, NSF, and Alexander von Humboldt foundation.

  6. Numerical calculation of thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Suguo; Wang, Guoyu

    2012-11-01

    A key design issue related to the turbopump of the rocket engine is that cavitation occurs in cryogenic fluids when the fluid pressure is lower than the vapor pressure at a local thermodynamic state. Cavitation in cryogenic fluids generates substantial thermal effects and strong variations in fluid properties, which in turn alter the cavity characteristics. To date, fewer investigate the thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluids clearly by the numerical methods due to the difficulty of the heat transfer in the phase change process. In order to study the thermal effect on cavitation in cryogenic fluid, computations are conducted around a 2D quarter caliber hydrofoil in liquid nitrogen and hydrogen respectively by implementing modified Merkle cavitation model, which accounts for the energy balance and variable thermodynamic properties of the fluid. The numerical results show that with the thermal effect, the vapour content in constant location decreases, the cavity becomes more porous and the interface becomes less distinct which shows increased spreading while getting shorter in length. In the cavity region, the temperature around the cavity depresses due to absorb the evaporation latent heat and the saturation pressure drops. When the vapour volume fraction is higher, the temperature depression and pressure depression becomes larger. It is also observed that a slight temperature rise is found above the reference fluid temperature at the cavity rear end attributed to the release of latent heat during the condensation process. When the fluid is operating close to its critical temperature, thermal effects on cavitation are more obviously in both the liquid nitrogen and hydrogen. The thermal effect on cavitation in liquid hydrogen is more distinctly compared with that in liquid nitrogen due to the density ratio, vapour pressure and other variable properties of the fluid. The investigation provides aid for the design of the cryogenic pump of the liquid rocket.

  7. Assessing the effect of electron density in photon dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2006-02-15

    Photon dose calculation algorithms (such as the pencil beam and collapsed cone, CC) model the attenuation of a primary photon beam in media other than water, by using pathlength scaling based on the relative mass density of the media to water. In this study, we assess if differences in the electron density between the water and media, with different atomic composition, can influence the accuracy of conventional photon dose calculations algorithms. A comparison is performed between an electron-density scaling method and the standard mass-density scaling method for (i) tissues present in the human body (such as bone, muscle, etc.), and for (ii) water-equivalent plastics, used in radiotherapy dosimetry and quality assurance. We demonstrate that the important material property that should be taken into account by photon dose algorithms is the electron density, and not the mass density. The mass-density scaling method is shown to overestimate, relative to electron-density predictions, the primary photon fluence for tissues in the human body and water-equivalent plastics, where 6%-7% and 10% differences were observed respectively for bone and air. However, in the case of patients, differences are expected to be smaller due to the large complexity of a treatment plan and of the patient anatomy and atomic composition and of the smaller thickness of bone/air that incident photon beams of a treatment plan may have to traverse. Differences have also been observed for conventional dose algorithms, such as CC, where an overestimate of the lung dose occurs, when irradiating lung tumors. The incorrect lung dose can be attributed to the incorrect modeling of the photon beam attenuation through the rib cage (thickness of 2-3 cm in bone upstream of the lung tumor) and through the lung and the oversimplified modeling of electron transport in convolution algorithms. In the present study, the overestimation of the primary photon fluence, using the mass-density scaling method, was shown

  8. Gyroid Optical Metamaterials: Calculating the Effective Permittivity of Multidomain Samples

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Gold gyroid optical metamaterials are known to possess a reduced plasma frequency and linear dichroism imparted by their intricate subwavelength single gyroid morphology. The anisotropic optical properties are, however, only evident when a large individual gyroid domain is investigated. Multidomain gyroid metamaterials, fabricated using a polyisoprene-b-polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock terpolymer and consisting of multiple small gyroid domains with random orientation and handedness, instead exhibit isotropic optical properties. Comparing three effective medium models, we here show that the specular reflectance spectra of such multidomain gyroid optical metamaterials can be accurately modeled over a broad range of incident angles by a Bruggeman effective medium consisting of a random wire array. This model accurately reproduces previously published results tracking the variation in normal incidence reflectance spectra of gold gyroid optical metamaterials as a function of host refractive index and volume fill fraction of gold. The effective permittivity derived from this theory confirms the change in sign of the real part of the permittivity in the visible spectral region (so, that gold gyroid metamaterials exhibit both dielectric and metallic behavior at optical wavelengths). That a Bruggeman effective medium can accurately model the experimental reflectance spectra implies that small multidomain gold gyroid optical metamaterials behave both qualitatively and quantitatively as an amorphous composite of gold and air (i.e., nanoporous gold) and that coherent electromagnetic contributions arising from the subwavelength gyroid symmetry are not dominant. PMID:27785456

  9. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  10. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, Thomas Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Palczynski, Karol Dzubiella, Joachim

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  11. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  12. Thermodynamic calculation and interatomic potential to predict the favored composition region for the Cu-Zr-Al metallic glass formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y Y; Wang, T L; Li, J H; Dai, Y; Liu, B X

    2011-03-01

    For the Cu-Zr-Al system, the glass forming compositions were firstly calculated based on the extended Miedema's model, suggesting that the amorphous phase could be thermodynamically favored over a large composition region. An n-body potential was then constructed under the smoothed and long-range second-moment-approximation of tight-binding formulism. Applying the constructed Cu-Zr-Al potential, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted using solid solution models to compare relative stability of crystalline solid solution versus its disordered counterpart. Simulations reveal that the physical origin of metallic glass formation is crystalline lattice collapsing while solute concentration exceeding the critical value, thus predicting a hexagonal composition region, within which the Cu-Zr-Al ternary metallic glass formation is energetically favored. The molecular dynamics simulations predicted composition region is defined as the quantitative glass-forming-ability or glass-forming-region of the Cu-Zr-Al system. PMID:21229150

  13. Efficient calculation of the quasi-static electrical potential on a tetrahedral mesh and its implementation in STEPS

    PubMed Central

    Hepburn, Iain; Cannon, Robert; De Schutter, Erik

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel method for calculating the quasi-static electrical potential on tetrahedral meshes, which we call E-Field. The E-Field method is implemented in STEPS, which performs stochastic spatial reaction-diffusion computations in tetrahedral-based cellular geometry reconstructions. This provides a level of integration between electrical excitability and spatial molecular dynamics in realistic cellular morphology not previously achievable. Deterministic solutions are also possible. By performing the Rallpack tests we demonstrate the accuracy of the E-Field method. Efficient node ordering is an important practical consideration, and we find that a breadth-first search provides the best solutions, although principal axis ordering suffices for some geometries. We discuss potential applications and possible future directions, and predict that the E-Field implementation in STEPS will play an important role in the future of multiscale neural simulations. PMID:24194715

  14. Calculation of tip clearance effects in a transonic compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.

    1996-01-01

    The flow through the tip clearance region of a transonic compressor rotor (NASA rotor 37) was computed and compared to aerodynamic probe and laser anemometer data. Tip clearance effects were modeled both by gridding the clearance gap and by using a simple periodicity model across the ungridded gap. The simple model was run with both the full gap height, and with half the gap height to simulate a vena-contracta effect. Comparisons between computed and measured performance maps and downstream profiles were used to validate the models and to assess the effects of gap height on the simple clearance model. Recommendations were made concerning the use of the simple clearance model. Detailed comparisons were made between the gridded clearance gap solution and the laser anemometer data near the tip at two operating points. The computer results agreed fairly well with the data but overpredicted the extent of the casing separation and underpredicted the wake decay rate. The computations were then used to describe the interaction of the tip vortex, the passage shock, and the casing boundary layer.

  15. Calculation of Tip Clearance Effects in a Transonic Compressor Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.

    1998-01-01

    The flow through the tip clearance region of a transonic compressor rotor (NASA rotor 37) was computed and compared to aerodynamic probe and laser anemometer data. Tip clearance effects were modeled both by gridding the clearance gap and by using a simple periodicity model across the ungridded gap. The simple model was run with both the full gap height, and with half the gap height to simulate a vena-contracta effect. Comparisons between computed and measured performance maps and downstream profiles were used to validate the models and to assess the effects of gap height on the simple clearance model. Recommendations were made concern- ing the use of the simple clearance model Detailed comparisons were made between the gridded clearance gap solution and the laser anemometer data near the tip at two operating points. The computed results agreed fairly well with the data but overpredicted the extent of the casing separation and underpredicted the wake decay rate. The computations were then used to describe the interaction of the tip vortex, the passage shock, and the casing boundary layer.

  16. Deoxynivalenol: toxicology and potential effects on humans.

    PubMed

    Pestka, James J; Smolinski, Alexa T

    2005-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereal-based foods worldwide. At the molecular level, DON disrupts normal cell function by inhibiting protein synthesis via binding to the ribosome and by activating critical cellular kinases involved in signal transduction related to proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Relative to toxicity, there are marked species differences, with the pig being most sensitive to DON, followed by rodent > dog > cat > poultry > ruminants. The physiologic parameter that is most sensitive to low-level DON exposure is the emetic response, with as little as 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg body weight (bw) inducing vomiting in swine and dogs. Chinese epidemiological studies suggest that DON may also produce emetic effects in humans. With respect to chronic effects, growth (anorexia and decreased nutritional efficiency), immune function, (enhancement and suppression), and reproduction (reduced litter size) are also adversely affected by DON in animals, whereas incidence of neoplasia is not affected. When hazard evaluations were conducted using existing chronic toxicity data and standard safety factors employed for anthropogenic additives/contaminants in foods, tolerable daily intakes (TDIs) ranging from 1 to 5 microg/kg bw have been generated. Given that critical data gaps still exist regarding the potential health effects of DON, additional research is needed to improve capacity for assessing adverse health effects of this mycotoxin. Critical areas for future DON research include molecular mechanisms underlying toxicity, sensitivity of human cells/tissues relative to other species, emetic effects in primates, epidemiological association with gastroenteritis and chronic disease in humans, and surveillance in cereal crops worldwide.

  17. Potential effects of raising Medicare's eligibility age.

    PubMed

    Waidmann, T A

    1998-01-01

    Recent fiscal pressures on Medicare and an already enacted increase in Social Security's normal retirement age have generated discussion of raising Medicare's age of entitlement. This DataWatch examines potential impacts of raising Medicare's eligibility age to sixty-seven on public-sector health spending and individual insurance coverage. The proposed increase would affect a substantial fraction of beneficiaries without having a commensurate effect on expenditures, even in the long run. It is estimated that if the eligibility age were sixty-seven, upwards of 500,000 persons ages sixty-five and sixty-six would be left without any insurance, and even more would not be able to afford coverage with benefits similar to those of Medicare. PMID:9558794

  18. Analysing collimator structure effects in head-scatter calculations for IMRT class fields using scatter raytracing.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, S A; Sarfaraz, M; Holmes, T; Yu, C X; Li, X A

    2001-07-01

    The frequent blocking of the irradiated volume in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) makes the head-scatter fraction of the incident photon fluence more significant than that in conventional therapy with open fields. On the other hand. certain collimator configurations block scatter photons directed to a given observation point while allowing primary photons to be transmitted. The 'anomalous blocking' makes the primary field a poor indicator of the scatter fluence. Since large MU-to-cGy ratios in IMRT can magnify head-scatter uncertainties, it becomes necessary to accurately model both the effective scatter source and the collimator structure that limits the scatter reaching the irradiated volume. First we obtain a dual-source model, using a Taylor series expansion to derive the effective scatter source distribution from the data measured for the Elekta SL20 linac equipped with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Then, using a raytracing algorithm, we calculate the transmission of scatter rays from the effective scatter source plane to points in the patient plane. The method can account for the anomalous blocking of scatter by the MLC leaves and the backup diaphragms. For a variety of collimator settings tested, the calculations agree with measurements to an accuracy of 0.002psi10 x 10, where psi10 x 10 is the total (primary + scatter) photon fluence of an open 10 x 10 cm2 field for the same MU delivered. Although the significance of collimator structure in IMRT depends strongly on fields shapes employed for the delivery, potential cumulative errors on the order of a few per cent can be avoided in fluence calculations if the proposed method is used. PMID:11474941

  19. Density functional theory calculations of the redox potentials of actinide(VI)/actinide(V) couple in water.

    PubMed

    Steele, Helen M; Guillaumont, Dominique; Moisy, Philippe

    2013-05-30

    The measured redox potential of an actinide at an electrode surface involves the transfer of a single electron from the electrode surface on to the actinide center. Before electron transfer takes place, the complexing ligands and molecules of solvation need to become structurally arranged such that the electron transfer is at its most favorable. Following the electron transfer, there is further rearrangement to obtain the minimum energy structure for the reduced state. As such, there are three parts to the total energy cycle required to take the complex from its ground state oxidized form to its ground state reduced form. The first part of the energy comes from the structural rearrangement and solvation energies of the actinide species before the electron transfer or charge transfer process; the second part, the energy of the electron transfer; the third part, the energy required to reorganize the ligands and molecules of solvation around the reduced species. The time resolution of electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry is inadequate to determine to what extent bond and solvation rearrangement occurs before or after electron transfer; only for a couple to be classed as reversible is it fast in terms of the experimental time. Consequently, the partitioning of the energy theoretically is of importance to obtain good experimental agreement. Here we investigate the magnitude of the instantaneous charge transfer through calculating the fast one electron reduction energies of AnO2(H2O)n(2+), where An = U, Np, and Pu, for n = 4-6, in solution without inclusion of the structural optimization energy of the reduced form. These calculations have been performed using a number of DFT functionals, including the recently developed functionals of Zhao and Truhlar. The results obtained for calculated electron affinities in the aqueous phase for the AnO2(H2O)5(2+/+) couples are within 0.04 V of accepted experimental redox potentials, nearly an order of magnitude

  20. Spectroscopic and electronic structure calculation of a potential antibacterial agent incorporating pyrido-dipyrimidine-dione moiety using first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatma, Shaheen; Bishnoi, Abha; Singh, Vineeta; Al-Omary, Fatmah A. M.; El-Emam, Ali A.; Pathak, Shilendra; Srivastava, Ruchi; Prasad, Onkar; Sinha, Leena

    2016-04-01

    Quantum chemical calculations of geometrical structure, energy and vibrational wavenumbers of a novel functionalized pyrido-pyrimidine compound (a prospective antibacterial agent), chemically known as 6-Methyl,13,14,15-Trihydro-14-(4-Nitrophenyl)pyrido[1,2-a:1‧,2‧-a‧] pyrido[2″,3″-d:6″,5″-d‧]dipyrimidine-13,15-dione (C24H16N6O4), were carried out, using B3LYP/6311++G(d,p) method. Comprehensive interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of the compound under study is based on potential energy distribution. A good coherence between experimental and theoretical wavenumbers shows the preciseness of the assignments. NLO properties like the dipole moment, polarizability, first static hyperpolarizability and molecular electrostatic potential surface have been calculated to get a better cognizance of the properties of the title compound. Molecular docking results reveal that the title compound exhibit inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus aureus.

  1. Two-electron R-matrix approach to calculations of potential-energy curves of long-range Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarana, Michal; Čurík, Roman

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a computational method developed for study of long-range molecular Rydberg states of such systems that can be approximated by two electrons in a model potential of the atomic cores. The method is based on a two-electron R-matrix approach inside a sphere centered on one of the atoms. The wave function is then connected to a Coulomb region outside the sphere via a multichannel version of the Coulomb Green's function. This approach is applied to a study of Rydberg states of Rb2 for internuclear separations R from 40 to 320 bohrs and energies corresponding to n from 7 to 30. We report bound states associated with the low-lying 3Po resonance and with the virtual state of the rubidium atom that turn into ion-pair-like bound states in the Coulomb potential of the atomic Rydberg core. The results are compared with previous calculations based on single-electron models employing a zero-range contact-potential and short-range modele potential. Czech Science Foundation (Project No. P208/14-15989P).

  2. Calculation of the effective dose from natural radioactivity in soil using MCNP code.

    PubMed

    Krstic, D; Nikezic, D

    2010-01-01

    Effective dose delivered by photon emitted from natural radioactivity in soil was calculated in this work. Calculations have been done for the most common natural radionuclides in soil (238)U, (232)Th series and (40)K. A ORNL human phantoms and the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP-4B were employed to calculate the energy deposited in all organs. The effective dose was calculated according to ICRP 74 recommendations. Conversion factors of effective dose per air kerma were determined. Results obtained here were compared with other authors. PMID:20045343

  3. Including outer scale effects in zonal adaptive optics calculations.

    PubMed

    Ellerbroek, B L

    1997-12-20

    Mellin transform techniques are applied to evaluate the covariance of the integrated turbulence-induced phase distortions along a pair of ray paths through the atmosphere from two points in a telescope aperture to a pair of sources at finite or infinite range. The derivation is for the case of a finite outer scale and a von Karman turbulence spectrum. The Taylor hypothesis is assumed if the two phase distortions are evaluated at two different times and amplitude scintillation effects are neglected. The resulting formula for the covariance is a power series in one variable for the case of a fixed atmospheric wind velocity profile and a power series in two variables for a fixed wind-speed profile with a random and uniformly distributed wind direction. These formulas are computationally efficient and can be easily integrated into computer codes for the numerical evaluation of adaptive optics system performance. Sample numerical results are presented to illustrate the effect of a finite outer scale on the performance of natural and laser guide star adaptive optics systems for an 8-m astronomical telescope. A hypothetical outer scale of 10 m significantly reduces the magnitude of tilt anisoplanatism, thereby improving the performance of a laser guide star adaptive optics system if the auxiliary natural star used for full-aperture tip/tilt sensing is offset from the science field. The reduction in higher-order anisoplanatism that is due to a 10-m outer scale is smaller, and the off-axis performance of a natural guide star adaptive optics system is not significantly improved.

  4. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Calculation of Annual Committed Effective Dose

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...—Calculation of Annual Committed Effective Dose I. Equivalent Dose The calculation of the committed effective dose (CED) begins with the determination of the equivalent dose, HT, to a tissue or organ, T, listed in... is the radiation weighting factor which is given in Table B.1 below. The unit of equivalent dose...

  5. 30 CFR 254.44 - Calculating response equipment effective daily recovery capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recovery capacities. 254.44 Section 254.44 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION... Calculating response equipment effective daily recovery capacities. (a) You are required by § 254.26(d)(1) to calculate the effective daily recovery capacity of the response equipment identified in your response...

  6. Effective Semi-empirical Interaction Potential for Dusty Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Omarbakiyeva, Y. A.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.

    2008-09-07

    The Poisson equation was numerically solved on the basis of the experimental correlation functions of dusty particles. Calculations were performed with real parameters of dusty plasma. Reconstructed potential has oscillated character; the minimums coincide to maximums of correlation functions.

  7. Band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids using accurate Kohn-Sham potentials with self-interaction correction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Krieger, J.B. ); Norman, M.R. ); Iafrate, G.J. )

    1991-11-15

    The optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method and a method developed recently by Krieger, Li, and Iafrate (KLI) are applied to the band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids employing the self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The resulting band gaps from both calculations are found to be in fair agreement with the experimental values. The discrepancies are typically within a few percent with results that are nearly the same as those of previously published orbital-dependent multipotential SIC calculations, whereas the LSD results underestimate the band gaps by as much as 40%. As in the LSD---and it is believed to be the case even for the exact Kohn-Sham potential---both the OEP and KLI predict valence-band widths which are narrower than those of experiment. In all cases, the KLI method yields essentially the same results as the OEP.

  8. Calculation of Rotation-Vibration Energy Levels of the Water Molecule with Near-Experimental Accuracy Based on an ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, Oleg L.; Ovsyannikov, Roman I.; Kyuberis, Aleksandra A.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Zobov, Nikolai F.

    2013-10-01

    A recently computed, high-accuracy ab initio Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential energy surface (PES) for the water molecule is combined with relativistic, adiabatic, quantum electrodynamics, and, crucially, nonadiabatic corrections. Calculations of ro-vibrational levels are presented for several water isotopologues and shown to have unprecedented accuracy. A purely ab initio calculation reproduces some 200 known band origins associated with seven isotopologues of water with a standard deviation (σ) of about 0.35 cm-1. Introducing three semiempirical scaling parameters, two affecting the BO PES and one controlling nonadiabatic effects, reduces σ below 0.1 cm-1. Introducing one further rotational nonadiabatic parameter gives σ better than 0.1 cm-1 for all observed ro-vibrational energy levels up to J = 25. We conjecture that the energy levels of closed-shell molecules with roughly the same number of electrons as water, such as NH3, CH4, and H3O+, could be calculated to this accuracy using an analogous procedure. This means that near-ab initio calculations are capable of predicting transition frequencies with an accuracy only about a factor of 5 worse than high resolution experiments.

  9. Using First-Principles Calculations to Investigate the Effect of Oxidation on Graphene Spectroscopic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Sun, Hongjuan; Peng, Tongjiang; Ji, Guangfu

    2015-02-01

    Molecular vibrational spectroscopy is an important method to study the atomic structure of graphene oxide. To investigate the effect of oxidation on the structural and spectroscopic properties of graphene, pseudo-potential density functional theory calculations were applied. Several models were considered, covering the most relevant functional groups that have been postulated to decorate the surface of graphene layer on carbon materials. Different arrangements of these units produced a range of vibrational spectra. The results suggested the possibility of creating and tuning graphene's spectroscopic properties by varying the oxidation levels and the relative position of epoxy and hydroxyl functional groups on the surface. Spectra characteristics for local structures from this work shed light on the structural and vibrational properties of graphene oxide, which could be very helpful for experimental groups to further understand the structure of graphene oxide and reduce graphene oxide.

  10. Probing calculated O2+ potential-energy curves with an XUV-IR pump-probe experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cörlin, Philipp; Fischer, Andreas; Schönwald, Michael; Sperl, Alexander; Mizuno, Tomoya; Thumm, Uwe; Pfeifer, Thomas; Moshammer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    We study dissociative photoionization of molecular oxygen in a kinematically complete XUV-IR pump-probe experiment. Detecting charged fragments and photoelectrons in coincidence using a reaction microscope, we observe a pump-probe delay-dependent yield of very low energetic O+ ions which oscillates with a period of 40 fs . This feature is caused by a time-dependent vibrational wave packet in the potential of the binding O2+(a Π4u) state, which is probed by resonant absorption of a single infrared photon to the weakly repulsive O2+(f Π4g) state. By quantitative comparison of the experimental kinetic-energy-release (KER) and quantum-beat (QB) spectra with the results of a coupled-channel simulation, we are able to discriminate between the calculated adiabatic O2+ potential-energy curves (PECs) of Marian et al. [Marian, Marian, Peyerimhoff, Hess, Buenker, and Seger, Mol. Phys. 46, 779 (1982), 10.1080/00268978200101591] and Magrakvelidze et al. [Magrakvelidze, Aikens, and Thumm, Phys. Rev. A 86, 023402 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.023402]. In general, we find a good agreement between experimental and simulated KER and QB spectra. However, we could not reproduce all features of the experimental data with these PECs. In contrast, adjusting a Morse potential to the experimental data, most features of the experimental spectra are well reproduced by our simulation. By comparing this Morse potential to theoretically predicted PECs, we demonstrate the sensitivity of our experimental method to small changes in the shape of the binding potential.

  11. Effective Potential Energies and Transport Cross Sections for Atom-Molecule Interactions of Nitrogen and Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The potential energy surfaces for H2-N and N2-N interactions are calculated by accurate ab initio methods and applied to determine transport data. The results confirm that an effective potential energy for accurately determining transport properties can be calculated using a single orientation. A simple method is developed to determine the dispersion coefficients of effective potential energies Effective potential energies required for O2-O collisions are determ=ined. The H2-N, N2-N, O2-H, and O2-O collision integrals are calculated and tabulated for a large range of temperatures. The theoretical values of the N2-N and O2-O diffusion coefficients compare well with measured data available at room temperature.

  12. Landauer's blow-torch effect in systems with entropic potential.

    PubMed

    Das, Moupriya; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-11-01

    We consider local heating of a part of a two-dimensional bilobal enclosure of a varying cross section confining a system of overdamped Brownian particles. Since varying cross section in higher dimension results in an entropic potential in lower dimension, local heating alters the relative stability of the entropic states. We show that this blow-torch effect modifies the entropic potential in a significant way so that the resultant effective entropic potential carries both the features of variation of width of the confinement and variation of temperature along the direction of transport. The reduced probability distribution along the direction of transport calculated by full numerical simulations in two dimensions agrees well with our analytical findings. The extent of population transfer in the steady state quantified in terms of the integrated probability of residence of the particles in either of the two lobes exhibits interesting variation with the mean position of the heated region. Our study reveals that heating around two particular zones of a given lobe maximizes population transfer to the other. PMID:26651672

  13. Landauer's blow-torch effect in systems with entropic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Moupriya; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-11-01

    We consider local heating of a part of a two-dimensional bilobal enclosure of a varying cross section confining a system of overdamped Brownian particles. Since varying cross section in higher dimension results in an entropic potential in lower dimension, local heating alters the relative stability of the entropic states. We show that this blow-torch effect modifies the entropic potential in a significant way so that the resultant effective entropic potential carries both the features of variation of width of the confinement and variation of temperature along the direction of transport. The reduced probability distribution along the direction of transport calculated by full numerical simulations in two dimensions agrees well with our analytical findings. The extent of population transfer in the steady state quantified in terms of the integrated probability of residence of the particles in either of the two lobes exhibits interesting variation with the mean position of the heated region. Our study reveals that heating around two particular zones of a given lobe maximizes population transfer to the other.

  14. Calculation of total effective dose equivalent and collective dose in the event of a LOCA in Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Raisali, G; Davilu, H; Haghighishad, A; Khodadadi, R; Sabet, M

    2006-01-01

    In this research, total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and collective dose (CD) are calculated for the most adverse potential accident in Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant from the viewpoint of radionuclides release to the environment. Calculations are performed using a Gaussian diffusion model and a slightly modified version of AIREM computer code to adopt for conditions in Bushehr. The results are comparable with the final safety analysis report which used DOZAM code. Results of our calculations show no excessive dose in populated regions. Maximum TEDE is determined to be in the WSW direction. CD in the area around the nuclear power plant by a distance of 30 km (138 man Sv) is far below the accepted limits. Thyroid equivalent dose is also calculated for the WSW direction (maximum 25.6 mSv) and is below the limits at various distances from the reactor stack.

  15. Why can water cages adsorb aqueous methane? A potential of mean force calculation on hydrate nucleation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guang-Jun; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yi-Gang; Wu, Chang-Hua

    2009-11-28

    By performing constrained molecular dynamics simulations in the methane-water system, we successfully calculated the potential of mean force (PMF) between a dodecahedral water cage (DWC) and dissolved methane for the first time. As a function of the distance between DWC and methane, this is characterized by a deep well at approximately 6.2 A and a shallow well at approximately 10.2 A, separated by a potential barrier at approximately 8.8 A. We investigated how the guest molecule, cage rigidity and the cage orientation affected the PMF. The most important finding is that the DWC itself strongly adsorbs methane and the adsorption interaction is independent of the guests. Moreover, the activation energy of the DWC adsorbing methane is comparable to that of hydrogen bonds, despite differing by a factor of approximately 10% when considering different water-methane interaction potentials. We explain that the cage-methane adsorption interaction is a special case of the hydrophobic interaction between methane molecules. The strong net attraction in the DWC shell with radii between 6.2 and 8.8 A may act as the inherent driving force that controls hydrate formation. A cage adsorption hypothesis for hydrate nucleation is thus proposed and discussed. PMID:19890529

  16. Why can water cages adsorb aqueous methane? A potential of mean force calculation on hydrate nucleation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guang-Jun; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yi-Gang; Wu, Chang-Hua

    2009-11-28

    By performing constrained molecular dynamics simulations in the methane-water system, we successfully calculated the potential of mean force (PMF) between a dodecahedral water cage (DWC) and dissolved methane for the first time. As a function of the distance between DWC and methane, this is characterized by a deep well at approximately 6.2 A and a shallow well at approximately 10.2 A, separated by a potential barrier at approximately 8.8 A. We investigated how the guest molecule, cage rigidity and the cage orientation affected the PMF. The most important finding is that the DWC itself strongly adsorbs methane and the adsorption interaction is independent of the guests. Moreover, the activation energy of the DWC adsorbing methane is comparable to that of hydrogen bonds, despite differing by a factor of approximately 10% when considering different water-methane interaction potentials. We explain that the cage-methane adsorption interaction is a special case of the hydrophobic interaction between methane molecules. The strong net attraction in the DWC shell with radii between 6.2 and 8.8 A may act as the inherent driving force that controls hydrate formation. A cage adsorption hypothesis for hydrate nucleation is thus proposed and discussed.

  17. The Potential Cardiotoxic Effects of Exercise.

    PubMed

    La Gerche, André

    2016-04-01

    The emerging controversy related to the potential cardiotoxic effects of high doses of intense exercise need to be considered among the much stronger evidence that supports the pleomorphic benefits of exercise as a whole. However, there is fairly compelling evidence to support the association between long-term sport practice and an increased prevalence of atrial fibrillation and the fact that this relates to a chronic altered atrial substrate. This article was designed to challenge the reader with speculative science that suggests that exercise might promote permanent structural changes in the myocardium which can, in some individuals, predispose to arrhythmias. In terms of long-term health outcomes, it would seem that these small risks are outweighed by the many other benefits of exercise, including a likely decrease in atherosclerotic vascular events, although some recent results have brought into question whether the protective benefits of exercise on vascular events also extends to high-intensity exercise training. Above all else, in this article we sought to highlight current controversies to stimulate research on the many unanswered questions. In particular, there is a lack of adequately powered prospective studies from which we can measure health outcomes and their relationship to exercise-induced cardiac remodelling. PMID:26922291

  18. Dose Calculations for [131I] Meta-Iodobenzylguanidine-Induced Bystander Effects

    PubMed Central

    Gow, M. D.; Seymour, C. B.; Boyd, M.; Mairs, R. J.; Prestiwch, W. V.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is a potentially useful treatment for some cancers and may be potentiated by bystander effects. However, without estimation of absorbed dose, it is difficult to compare the effects with conventional external radiation treatment. Methods: Using the Vynckier – Wambersie dose point kernel, a model for dose rate evaluation was created allowing for calculation of absorbed dose values to two cell lines transfected with the noradrenaline transporter (NAT) gene and treated with [131I]MIBG. Results: The mean doses required to decrease surviving fractions of UVW/NAT and EJ138/NAT cells, which received medium from [131I]MIBG-treated cells, to 25 – 30% were 1.6 and 1.7 Gy respectively. The maximum mean dose rates achieved during [131I]MIBG treatment were 0.09 – 0.75 Gy/h for UVW/NAT and 0.07 – 0.78 Gy/h for EJ138/NAT. These were significantly lower than the external beam gamma radiation dose rate of 15 Gy/h. In the case of control lines which were incapable of [131I]MIBG uptake the mean absorbed doses following radiopharmaceutical were 0.03 – 0.23 Gy for UVW and 0.03 – 0.32 Gy for EJ138. Conclusion: [131I]MIBG treatment for ICCM production elicited a bystander dose-response profile similar to that generated by external beam gamma irradiation but with significantly greater cell death. PMID:24659931

  19. Effects of (18)O isotopic substitution on the rotational spectra and potential splitting in the OH-OH2 complex: improved measurements for (16)OH-(16)OH2 and (18)OH-(18)OH2, new measurements for the mixed isotopic forms, and ab initio calculations of the (2)A'-(2)A" energy separation.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Carolyn S; Sedo, Galen; Dahlke, Erin; Wu, Shenghai; Grumstrup, Erik M; Leopold, Kenneth R; Marshall, Mark D; Leung, Helen O; Truhlar, Donald G

    2008-09-14

    Rotational spectra have been observed for (16)OH-(16)OH(2), (16)OH-(18)OH(2), (18)OH-(16)OH(2), and (18)OH-(18)OH(2) with complete resolution of the nuclear magnetic hyperfine structure from the OH and water protons. Transition frequencies have been analyzed for each isotopic form using the model of Marshall and Lester [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 3019 (2004)], which accounts for partial quenching of the OH orbital angular momentum and the decoupling of the electronic spin from the OH molecular axis. The analysis accounts for both the ground ((2)A(')) and first electronically excited ((2)A(")) states of the system, which correspond roughly to occupancy by the odd electron in the p(y) and p(x) orbitals, respectively (where p(y) is in the mirror plane of the complex and p(x) is perpendicular to p(y) and the OH bond axis). The spectroscopic measurements yield a parameter, rho, which is equal to the vibrationally averaged (2)A(')-(2)A(") energy separation that would be obtained if spin-orbit coupling and rotation were absent. For the parent species, rho = -146.560 27(9) cm(-1). (18)O substitution on the water increases /rho/ by 0.105 29(10) cm(-1), while substitution on the OH decreases /rho/ by 0.068 64(11) cm(-1). In the OH-OH(2) complex, the observed value of rho implies an energy spacing between the rotationless levels of the (2)A(') and (2)A(") states of 203.76 cm(-1). Ab initio calculations have been performed with quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitations (QCISD), as well as multireference configuration interaction (MRCI), both with and without the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. The MRCI calculations with spin-orbit coupling perform the best, giving a value of 171 cm(-1) for the (2)A(')-(2)A(") energy spacing at the equilibrium geometry. Calculations along the large-amplitude bending coordinates of the OH and OH(2) moieties within the complex are presented and are shown to be consistent with a vibrational averaging effect as the main

  20. Second-Order Perturbation Theory for Fractional Occupation Systems: Applications to Ionization Potential and Electron Affinity Calculations.

    PubMed

    Su, Neil Qiang; Xu, Xin

    2016-05-10

    Recently, we have developed an integration approach for the calculations of ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) of molecular systems at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) (Su, N. Q.; Xu, X. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4677, 2015), where the full MP2 energy gradient with respect to the orbital occupation numbers was derived but only at integer occupations. The theory is completed here to cover the fractional occupation systems, such that Slater's transition state concept can be used to have accurate predictions of IPs and EAs. Antisymmetrized Goldstone diagrams have been employed for interpretations and better understanding of the derived equations, where two additional rules were introduced in the present work specifically for hole or particle lines with fractional occupation numbers.

  1. Calculation of state energy of (2 n+1)-fold wells using the spectral properties of supersymmetry shape-invariant potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakkoli, Marjan

    2013-02-01

    Shape invariance is an important factor of many exactly solvable quantum mechanics. Several examples of shape-invariant `discrete quantum mechanical systems' are introduced and discussed in some detail. We present the spectral properties of supersymmetric shape-invariant potentials (SIP). Here we are interested in some time-independent integrable systems which are exactly solvable owing to the existence of supersymmetric shape-invariant symmetry. In 1981 Witten proposed (0+1)-dimensional limit of supersymmetry (SUSY) quantum field theory, where the supercharges of SUSY quantum mechanics generate transformation between two orthogonal eigenstates of a given Hamiltonian wit degenerate eigenvaluesfor the non-SIP as very few lower eigenvalues can be known analytically, which are small to calculate spectral fluctuation.

  2. Calculations of H2O microwave line broadening in collisions with He atoms - Sensitivity to potential energy surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon; Defrees, D. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical computations of broadening parameters are reported for three microwave lines of H2O in a bath of He atoms. The potential-energy surfaces employed are corrected for basis-set superposition error, and their reliability is checked by repeating the calculations with a different basis set for orbital expansion. The results are presented in extensive tables and discussed in detail. The corrections applied are shown to have a significant impact on the accuracy of the room-temperature broadenings determined: 8.9 sq A for the 22.2-GHz line, 11.8 sq A for the 183,3-GHz line, and 10.0 sq A for the 380.2-GHz line, in good agreement with published experimental data. The importance of collisional broadening for the atmospheric transmission of radiation and for remote-sensing applications is indicated.

  3. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Model Potential Calculations of Oscillator Strength Spectra of Rydberg Li Atoms in External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui-Yan; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2009-08-01

    By combining the B-spline basis set with model potential (B-spline + MP), we present oscillator strength spectra of Rydberg Li atoms in external fields. The photoabsorption spectra are analyzed. Over the narrow energy ranges considered in this paper, the structure of the spectra can be independent of the initial state chosen for a given atom. Our results are in good agreement with previous high-precision experimental data and theoretical calculations, where the R-matrix approach together with multichannel quantum defect theory (R-matrix+MQDT) was used. It is suggested that the present methods can be applied to deal with the oscillator strength spectra of Rydberg atoms in crossed electric and magnetic fields.

  4. Second-Order Perturbation Theory for Fractional Occupation Systems: Applications to Ionization Potential and Electron Affinity Calculations.

    PubMed

    Su, Neil Qiang; Xu, Xin

    2016-05-10

    Recently, we have developed an integration approach for the calculations of ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) of molecular systems at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) (Su, N. Q.; Xu, X. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4677, 2015), where the full MP2 energy gradient with respect to the orbital occupation numbers was derived but only at integer occupations. The theory is completed here to cover the fractional occupation systems, such that Slater's transition state concept can be used to have accurate predictions of IPs and EAs. Antisymmetrized Goldstone diagrams have been employed for interpretations and better understanding of the derived equations, where two additional rules were introduced in the present work specifically for hole or particle lines with fractional occupation numbers. PMID:27010405

  5. Computer program for calculating full potential transonic, quasi-three-dimensional flow through a rotating turbomachinery blade row

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    A fast, reliable computer code is described for calculating the flow field about a cascade of arbitrary two dimensional airfoils. The method approximates the three dimensional flow in a turbomachinery blade row by correcting for stream tube convergence and radius change in the throughflow direction. A fully conservative solution of the full potential equation is combined with the finite volume technique on a body-fitted periodic mesh, with an artificial density imposed in the transonic region to insure stability and the capture of shock waves. The instructions required to set up and use the code are included. The name of the code is QSONIC. A numerical example is also given to illustrate the output of the program.

  6. The calculation of electron chemical potential and ion charge state and their influence on plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zongqian; Wang, Kun; Li, Yao; Shi, Yuanjie; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli

    2014-03-15

    The electron chemical potential and ion charge state (average ion charge and ion distribution) are important parameters in calculating plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire. In this paper, the calculating method of electron chemical potential and ion charge state is discussed at first. For the calculation of electron chemical potential, the ideal free electron gas model and Thomas-Fermi model are compared and analyzed in terms of the coupling constant of plasma. The Thomas-Fermi ionization model, which is used to calculate ion charge state, is compared with the method based on Saha equation. Furthermore, the influence of electron degenerated energy levels and ion excited states in Saha equation on the ion charge state is also analyzed. Then the influence of different calculating methods of electron chemical potential and ion charge state on plasma conductivity is discussed by applying them in the Lee-More conductivity model.

  7. Anharmonic Rovibrational Calculations of Singlet Cyclic C4 Using a New Ab Initio Potential and a Quartic Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Huang, Xinchuan; Bowman, Joel M.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    We report a CCSD(T)/cc-pCV5Z quartic force field (QFF) and a semi-global CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pVTZ potential energy surface (PES) for singlet, cyclic C4. Vibrational fundamentals, combinations and overtones are obtained using vibrational second-order perturbation theory (VPT2) and the vibrational configurationinteraction (VCI) approach. Agreement is within 10 cm(exp -1) between the VCI calculated fundamentals on the QFF and PES using the MULTIMODE (MM) program, and VPT2 and VCI results agree for the fundamentals. The agreement between VPT2- QFF and MM-QFF results is also good for the C4 combinations and overtones. The J = 1 and J = 2 rovibrational energies are reported from both VCI (MM) on the PES and VPT2 on the QFF calculations. The spectroscopic constants of (12)C4 and two C(sub 2v)-symmetry, single (13)C-substituted isotopologues are presented, which may help identification of cyclic C4 in future experimental analyses or astronomical observations.

  8. Potential of mean force calculation of the free energy of adsorption of Type I winter flounder antifreeze protein on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Keith; Alan Salter, E.; Wesley Edmunds, R.; Wierzbicki, Andrzej

    2010-04-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that inhibit ice growth without changing the melting point of ice. In this work, we study the detailed molecular mechanism of interactions between the hydrophobic side of the winter flounder (WF) AFP and two mutants, AAAA and SSSS, in which threonine residues are substituted by serines and alanines, respectively. Umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations of the separation of the proteins from the (2 0 1) surface in an explicit water box is carried out to calculate the potential of mean force free energies of adsorption using AMBER10i. We estimate wild-type WF's free energy of adsorption to ice to be about -12.0 kcal/mol. Gas-phase pseudopotential plane-wave calculations of methane adsorption onto select surfaces of ice are also carried out under periodic boundary conditions to address the possible enthalpic role of WF's methyl groups in binding. The contributions of hydrophobic residues to the free energy of adsorption are discussed.

  9. Ab initio calculations, potential representation and vibrational dynamics of He2Br2 van der Waals complex.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Alvaro; Prosmiti, Rita; Villarreal, Pablo; Delgado-Barrio, Gerardo

    2005-01-22

    An intermolecular potential energy surface for He(2)Br(2) complex in the ground state is calculated at the levels of fourth-order (MP4) Moller-Plesset and coupled-cluster [CCSD(T)] approximations, using large-core pseudopotential for Br atoms and the aug-cc-pV5Z basis set for He. The surface is characterized by three minima and the minimum energy pathways through them. The global minimum corresponds to a linear He-Br(2)-He configuration, while the two other ones to "police-nightstick" and tetrahedral structures. The corresponding well depths are -90.39/-89.18, -81.23/-80.78 and -74.40/-74.02 cm(-1), respectively, at MP4/CCSD(T) levels of theory. It is found that results obtained by summing three-body parametrized HeBr(2) interactions and the He-He interaction are in very good accord with the corresponding MP4/CSSD(T) configuration energies of the He(2)Br(2). Variational calculations using a sum of three-body interactions are presented to study the bound states of the vdW He(2)Br(2) complex. The binding energy D(0) and the corresponding vibrationally averaged structure are determined for different isomers of the cluster and their comparison with the available experimental data is discussed.

  10. Anharmonic rovibrational calculations of singlet cyclic C4 using a new ab initio potential and a quartic force field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Huang, Xinchuan; Bowman, Joel M; Lee, Timothy J

    2013-12-14

    We report a CCSD(T)/cc-pCV5Z quartic force field (QFF) and a semi-global CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pVTZ potential energy surface (PES) for singlet, cyclic C4. Vibrational fundamentals, combinations, and overtones are obtained using vibrational second-order perturbation theory (VPT2) and the vibrational configuration-interaction (VCI) approach. Agreement is within 10 cm(-1) between the VCI calculated fundamentals on the QFF and PES using the MULTIMODE (MM) program, and VPT2 and VCI results agree for the fundamentals. The agreement between VPT2-QFF and MM-QFF results is also good for the C4 combinations and overtones. The J = 1 and J = 2 rovibrational energies are reported from both VCI (MM) on the PES and VPT2 on the QFF calculations. The spectroscopic constants of (12)C4 and two C2v-symmetry, single (13)C-substituted isotopologues are presented, which may help identification of cyclic C4 in future experimental analyses or astronomical observations. PMID:24329063

  11. Collisional excitation of CH(X²Π) by He: new ab initio potential energy surfaces and scattering calculations.

    PubMed

    Marinakis, Sarantos; Dean, Indigo Lily; Kłos, Jacek; Lique, François

    2015-09-01

    We present a new set of potential energy surfaces (PESs) for the CH(X(2)Π)-He van der Waals system. Ab initio calculations of the CH-He PES were carried out using the open-shell single- and double-excitation coupled cluster approach with non-iterative perturbational treatment of triple excitations [RCCSD(T)]. The augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence quadruple-zeta (aug-cc-pVQZ) basis set was employed augmented by mid-bond functions. Integral cross sections for the rotational excitation in CH-He collisions were calculated using the new PES and compared with available experimental results. The newly constructed PES reproduces the available experimental results for CH(X(2)Π, v = 0)-He collisions better than any previously available PES. Differential cross sections (DCS) are presented for the first time for this system and discussed within the context of rotational rainbows. Finally, our work provides the first rate thermal coefficients for this system that are crucially needed for astrochemical modelling and future anticipated experiments in CH(X(2)Π)-He collisions. PMID:26220835

  12. Liquid drops on a surface: using density functional theory to calculate the binding potential and drop profiles and comparing with results from mesoscopic modelling.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adam P; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J

    2015-02-21

    The contribution to the free energy for a film of liquid of thickness h on a solid surface due to the interactions between the solid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces is given by the binding potential, g(h). The precise form of g(h) determines whether or not the liquid wets the surface. Note that differentiating g(h) gives the Derjaguin or disjoining pressure. We develop a microscopic density functional theory (DFT) based method for calculating g(h), allowing us to relate the form of g(h) to the nature of the molecular interactions in the system. We present results based on using a simple lattice gas model, to demonstrate the procedure. In order to describe the static and dynamic behaviour of non-uniform liquid films and drops on surfaces, a mesoscopic free energy based on g(h) is often used. We calculate such equilibrium film height profiles and also directly calculate using DFT the corresponding density profiles for liquid drops on surfaces. Comparing quantities such as the contact angle and also the shape of the drops, we find good agreement between the two methods. We also study in detail the effect on g(h) of truncating the range of the dispersion forces, both those between the fluid molecules and those between the fluid and wall. We find that truncating can have a significant effect on g(h) and the associated wetting behaviour of the fluid.

  13. Measurement effects on the calculation of in-flight thrust for an F404 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conners, Timothy R.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed that investigates parameter measurement effects on calculated in-flight thrust for the General Electric F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engine which powered the X-29A forward-swept wing research aircraft. Net-thrust uncertainty and influence coefficients were calculated and are presented. Six flight conditions were analyzed at five engine power settings each. Results were obtained using the mass flow-temperature and area-pressure thrust calculation methods, both based on the commonly used gas generator technique. Thrust uncertainty was determined using a common procedure based on the use of measurement uncertainty and influence coefficients. The effects of data nonlinearity on the uncertainty calculation procedure were studied and results are presented. The advantages and disadvantages of using this particular uncertainty procedure are discussed. A brief description of the thrust-calculation technique along with the uncertainty calculation procedure is included.

  14. An Effective Method to Accurately Calculate the Phase Space Factors for β - β - Decay

    DOE PAGES

    Neacsu, Andrei; Horoi, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Accurate calculations of the electron phase space factors are necessary for reliable predictions of double-beta decay rates and for the analysis of the associated electron angular and energy distributions. We present an effective method to calculate these phase space factors that takes into account the distorted Coulomb field of the daughter nucleus, yet it allows one to easily calculate the phase space factors with good accuracy relative to the most exact methods available in the recent literature.

  15. Calculation of Dilational and Uniaxial Shear Potentials of Ge by a State-Independent Many-Body Projection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Nam; Ryu, Jai; Choi, Sang

    1998-07-01

    Utilizing state-independent projection operators, we present a new optical conductivity formula for cyclotron transition in the system of electrons interacting anisotropically with phonons. The line-shape factor appearing in the conductivity tensor contains the many body effects for electrons and phonons. Applying this formula, we determine the two deformation potentials (dilation potential Ξd and uniaxial shear potential Ξu) of Ge in the quantum limit. By fitting the present theoretical values with the experimental data of Murase, Enjouji and Otsuka [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 29 (1970) 1248] and Kobori, Ohyama and Otsuka [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 59 (1990) 2141], we obtain Ξu=17.0±0.6 eV and Ξd=-10.88±0.47 eV.

  16. Calculation of 29Si NMR shifts of silicate complexes with carbohydrates, amino acids, and muhicarboxylic acids: potential role in biological silica utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Nita

    2004-01-01

    The existence of ether or ester-like complexes of silicate with organic compounds has long been debated in the literature on biological utilization of silicon. Comparison of theoretically calculated 29Si NMR chemical shifts for such complexes with experimentally measured values in biological systems could provide a diagnostic tool for identifying which, if any of these molecules exist under physiological conditions. Results are presented here for ab initio molecular orbital calculations of 29Si NMR shifts and formation energies of silicate complexes with polyalcohols, sugar-acids, pyranose sugars, amino acids and multicarboxylic acids. The effects of functional group and molecular structure including ligand size, denticity, ring size, silicon polymerization and coordination number on calculated 29Si shifts were considered. The potential role of such compounds in biological silica utilization pathways is discussed. 29Si NMR shifts and energies were calculated at the HF/6-311+G(2d,p)//HF/6-31G* level. The main result is that only five-membered rings containing penta- and hexa-coordinated Si can explain experimentally observed resonances at ˜ -101 and -141 ppm. Further, the heptet observed in 1H- 29Si coupled spectra can only be explained by structures where Si bonds to oxygens atoms in H-C-O-Si linkages with six symmetrically equivalent H atoms. While compounds containing quadra-coordinated silicon may exist in intracellular silicon storage pools within diatoms, calculated reaction energies suggest that the organism has no thermodynamic advantage in taking up extracellular organ-silicate compounds, instead of silicic acid, from the ambient aqueous environment. Hyper-coordinated complexes are deemed unlikely for transport and storage, though they may exist as transient reactive intermediates or activated complexes during enzymatically- catalyzed silica polymerization, as known previously from sol-gel silica synthesis studies.

  17. 30 CFR 254.44 - Calculating response equipment effective daily recovery capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recovered. You must use this calculated rate to determine if you have sufficient recovery capacity to... recovery capacities. 254.44 Section 254.44 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... equipment effective daily recovery capacities. (a) You are required by § 254.26(d)(1) to calculate...

  18. 30 CFR 254.44 - Calculating response equipment effective daily recovery capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recovered. You must use this calculated rate to determine if you have sufficient recovery capacity to... recovery capacities. 254.44 Section 254.44 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... equipment effective daily recovery capacities. (a) You are required by § 254.26(d)(1) to calculate...

  19. 30 CFR 254.44 - Calculating response equipment effective daily recovery capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must use this calculated rate to determine if you have sufficient recovery capacity to respond to your... recovery capacities. 254.44 Section 254.44 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... recovery capacities. (a) You are required by § 254.26(d)(1) to calculate the effective daily...

  20. Incorporation of solvation effects into the fragment molecular orbital calculations with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Okiyama, Yoshio; Nakano, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2010-11-01

    We developed FMO-PB method, which incorporates solvation effects into the Fragment Molecular Orbital calculation with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. This method retains good accuracy in energy calculations with reduced computational time. We calculated the solvation free energies for polyalanines, Alpha-1 peptide, tryptophan cage, and complex of estrogen receptor and 17 β-estradiol to show the applicability of this method for practical systems. From the calculated results, it has been confirmed that the FMO-PB method is useful for large biomolecules in solution. We also discussed the electric charges which are used in solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

  1. Nonadiabatic calculations of ultraviolet absorption cross section of sulfur monoxide: Isotopic effects on the photodissociation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Danielache, Sebastian O.; Tomoya, Suzuki; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Kondorsky, Alexey; Tokue, Ikuo

    2014-01-28

    Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of the main and substituted sulfur monoxide (SO) isotopologues were calculated using R-Matrix expansion technique. Energies, transition dipole moments, and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements were calculated at MRCI/AV6Z level. The calculated absorption cross section of {sup 32}S{sup 16}O was compared with experimental spectrum; the spectral feature and the absolute value of photoabsorption cross sections are in good agreement. Our calculation predicts a long lived photoexcited SO* species which causes large non-mass dependent isotopic effects depending on the excitation energy in the ultraviolet region.

  2. Renormalization effects on the MSSM from a calculable model of a strongly coupled hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Masato; Okada, Nobuchika

    2011-10-01

    We investigate possible renormalization effects on the low-energy mass spectrum of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), using a calculable model of strongly coupled hidden sector. We model the hidden sector by N=2 supersymmetric quantum chromodynamics with gauge group SU(2)xU(1) and N{sub f}=2 matter hypermultiplets, perturbed by a Fayet-Iliopoulos term which breaks the supersymmetry down to N=0 on a metastable vacuum. In the hidden sector the Kaehler potential is renormalized. Upon identifying a hidden sector modulus with the renormalization scale, and extrapolating to the strongly coupled regime using the Seiberg-Witten solution, the contribution from the hidden sector to the MSSM renormalization group flows is computed. For concreteness, we consider a model in which the renormalization effects are communicated to the MSSM sector via gauge mediation. In contrast to the perturbative toy examples of hidden sector renormalization studied in the literature, we find that our strongly coupled model exhibits rather intricate effects on the MSSM soft scalar mass spectrum, depending on how the hidden sector fields are coupled to the messenger fields. This model provides a concrete example in which the low-energy spectrum of MSSM particles that are expected to be accessible in collider experiments is obtained using strongly coupled hidden sector dynamics.

  3. The Potential Cost-Effectiveness of Amblyopia Screening Programs

    PubMed Central

    Rein, David B.; Wittenborn, John S.; Zhang, Xinzhi; Song, Michael; Saaddine, Jinan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background To estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of amblyopia screening at preschool and kindergarten, we compared the costs and benefits of 3 amblyopia screening scenarios to no screening and to each other: (1) acuity/stereopsis (A/S) screening at kindergarten, (2) A/S screening at preschool and kindergarten, and (3) photoscreening at preschool and A/S screening at kindergarten. Methods We programmed a probabilistic microsimulation model of amblyopia natural history and response to treatment with screening costs and outcomes estimated from 2 state programs. We calculated the probability that no screening and each of the 3 interventions were most cost-effective per incremental quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained and case avoided. Results Assuming a minimal 0.01 utility loss from monocular vision loss, no screening was most cost-effective with a willingness to pay (WTP) of less than $16,000 per QALY gained. A/S screening at kindergarten alone was most cost-effective between a WTP of $17,000 and $21,000. A/S screening at preschool and kindergarten was most cost-effective between a WTP of $22,000 and $75,000, and photoscreening at preschool and A/S screening at kindergarten was most cost-effective at a WTP greater than $75,000. Cost-effectiveness substantially improved when assuming a greater utility loss. All scenarios were cost-effective when assuming a WTP of $10,500 per case of amblyopia cured. Conclusions All 3 screening interventions evaluated are likely to be considered cost-effective relative to many other potential public health programs. The choice of screening option depends on budgetary resources and the value placed on monocular vision loss prevention by funding agencies. PMID:21877675

  4. On the biologically effective dose (BED)—using convolution for calculating the effects of repair: II. Numerical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Johan; Nilsson, Per; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2013-03-01

    We have previously shown analytically that the biologically effective dose (BED), including effects of repair during irradiation and of incomplete repair between fractions, can be formulated using a convolution between the absorbed dose rate function and the function describing repair. In this work, a discrete formalism is derived along with its implementation via the fast Fourier transform. The implementation takes the intrinsic periodicity of the discrete Fourier transform into consideration, as well as possible inconsistencies that may arise due to discretization and truncation of the functions describing the absorbed dose rate and repair. Numerically and analytically calculated BED values are compared for various situations in external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy and radionuclide therapy, including the use of different repair models. The numerical method is shown to be accurate and versatile since it can be applied to any kind of absorbed dose rate function and allows for the incorporation of different repair models. Typical accuracies for clinically realistic examples are in the order of 10-3% to 10-5%. The method has thus the potential of being a useful tool for the calculation of BED, also in situations with complicated irradiation patterns or repair functions.

  5. Prebiotic Atmospheric Chemistry on Titan: Formation Kinetics via Ab Initio Calculations for Potential Energy Surface (PES) Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Dayana; Mebel, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    It has been recently shown that Titan provides a unique perspective in our solar system: its atmosphere is comparable to a model of prebiotic Earth's. Provided the organic cationic and anionic molecular species identified by the Cassini spacecraft, this research characterizes reaction pathways for the reactions of methyl derivatives of the cyclopropenyl cation, the methyl cation with methyl- and dimethyl-acetylene, and reactions of resonance structures of protonated acrylonitrile with CH2NH. Isomerization and dissociation reactions involving methyl-cyclopropenyl cations, the perinaphthenyl cation and anion, and cations of pyrimidine and purine precursors of nucleobases will be examined to locate reaction pathways, intermediates, transition states, and products of the reactions. Gaussian '09 software is used for ab initio calculations to map out the PES. Geometry optimizations and vibrational frequency computations are preformed via the double-hybrid density functional B2PLYP-D3. Single-point energies are refined by use of the explicitly-correlated coupled-cluster CCSD(T)-F12 method. Rate constants are calculated using microcanonical RRKM theory, and pressure effects evaluated used the Master Equation approach; these allow for prediction of absolute rate constants and product branching ratios at different pressures and temperatures.

  6. An improved potential energy surface and multi-temperature quasiclassical trajectory calculations of N2 + N2 dissociation reactions.

    PubMed

    Bender, Jason D; Valentini, Paolo; Nompelis, Ioannis; Paukku, Yuliya; Varga, Zoltan; Truhlar, Donald G; Schwartzentruber, Thomas; Candler, Graham V

    2015-08-01

    Accurate modeling of high-temperature hypersonic flows in the atmosphere requires consideration of collision-induced dissociation of molecular species and energy transfer between the translational and internal modes of the gas molecules. Here, we describe a study of the N2 + N2⟶N2 + 2N and N2 + N2⟶4N nitrogen dissociation reactions using the quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) method. The simulations used a new potential energy surface for the N4 system; the surface is an improved version of one that was presented previously. In the QCT calculations, initial conditions were determined based on a two-temperature model that approximately separates the translational-rotational temperature from the vibrational temperature of the N2 diatoms. Five values from 8000 K to 30,000 K were considered for each of the two temperatures. Over 2.4 × 10(9) trajectories were calculated. We present results for ensemble-averaged dissociation rate constants as functions of the translational-rotational temperature T and the vibrational temperature T(v). The rate constant depends more strongly on T when T(v) is low, and it depends more strongly on T(v) when T is low. Quasibound reactant states contribute significantly to the rate constants, as do exchange processes at higher temperatures. We discuss two sets of runs in detail: an equilibrium test set in which T = T(v) and a nonequilibrium test set in which T(v) < T. In the equilibrium test set, high-v and moderately-low-j molecules contribute most significantly to the overall dissociation rate, and this state specificity becomes stronger as the temperature decreases. Dissociating trajectories tend to result in a major loss of vibrational energy and a minor loss of rotational energy. In the nonequilibrium test set, as T(v) decreases while T is fixed, higher-j molecules contribute more significantly to the dissociation rate, dissociating trajectories tend to result in a greater rotational energy loss, and the dissociation probability

  7. Effects of electron emission on sheath potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, Ansel; Khrabrov, Alexander; Kaganovich, Igor; Schamis, Hanna

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the potential profile of a sheath under the influence of surface electron emission. The plasma and sheath profiles are simulated using the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) particle-in-cell code. Using one dimensional models we corroborate the analytical relationship between sheath potential and plasma electron and emitted electron temperatures derived earlier. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  8. Gaussian effective potential for the standard model SU(2)xU(1) electroweak theory

    SciTech Connect

    Siringo, Fabio; Marotta, Luca

    2008-07-01

    The Gaussian effective potential is derived for the non-Abelian SU(2)xU(1) gauge theory of electroweak interactions. At variance with naive derivations, the Gaussian effective potential is proven to be a genuine variational tool in any gauge. The role of ghosts is discussed and the unitarity gauge is shown to be the only choice which allows calculability without insertion of further approximations. The full non-Abelian calculation confirms the existence of a light Higgs boson in the nonperturbative strong coupling regime of the Higgs sector.

  9. Charge-correlation effects in calculations of atomic short-range order in metallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinski, F. J.; Staunton, J. B.; Johnson, D. D.

    1998-06-01

    The ``local'' chemical environment that surrounds an atom directly influences its electronic charge density. These atomic charge correlations play an important role in describing the Coulomb and total energies for random substitutional alloys. Although the electronic structure may be well represented by a single-site theory, such as the coherent potential approximation, the electrostatic energy is not as well represented when these charge correlations are ignored. For metals, including the average effect from the charge correlation coming from only the nearest-neighbor shell has been shown to be sufficient to determine accurately the energy of formation. In this paper, we incorporate such charge correlations into the concentration-wave approach for calculating the atomic short-range order in random (substitutional) alloys. We present changes within the formalism, and apply the resulting equations to equiatomic nickel platinum. By including these effects, we obtain significantly better agreement with experimental data. In fact, particular to NiPt, a consequence of the charge correlation is a screening which cancels much of the electrostatic contribution to the energy and thus to the atomic short-range order, resulting in agreement with a picture originally outlined using only ``band-energy'' contributions.

  10. Effects of tropospheric aerosols on radiative flux calculations at UV and visible wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A.S.; Grant, K.E.

    1994-08-01

    The surface fluxes in the wavelength range 175 to 735nm have been calculated for an atmosphere which contains a uniformly mixed aerosol layer of thickness 1km at the earth`s surface. Two different aerosol types were considered, a rural aerosol, and an urban aerosol. The visibility range for the aerosol layers was 95 to 15 km. Surface flux ratios (15km/95km) were in agreement with previously published results for the rural aerosol layer to within about 2%. The surface flux ratios vary from 7 to 14% for the rural aerosol layer and from 13 to 23% for the urban aerosol layer over the wavelength range. A tropospheric radiative forcing of about 1.3% of the total tropospheric flux was determined for the 95km to 15km visibility change in the rural aerosol layer, indicating the potential of tropospheric feedback effects on the surface flux changes. This effect was found to be negligible for the urban aerosol layer. Stratospheric layer heating rate changes due to visibility changes in either the rural or urban aerosol layer were found to be negligible.

  11. A rate equation approach to gain saturation effects in laser mode calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Lila F.

    1990-01-01

    Space exploration and research require large amounts of power. Solar pumped laser systems have been shown to have the potential for meeting the performance requirements necessary for power transmission in space. The successful design of laser systems for these applications will depend, in part, on having a clear understanding of the development of the dynamical processes in the laser cavity and on the effects that changes in physical and design parameters have on laser performance. In particular, it is necessary to know the amplitude and phase distributions of the laser beam at the output aperture when steady state operation is achieved in order to determine the far-field power distribution. The output from the laser will depend on the active medium, the optical environment of the active material and on the gain distribution in the active region as laser action builds up and reaches steady state. An important component in the design process will be a realistic model of the active laser cavity. A computer model of the laser cavity, based on Huygens' principle was developed. The code calculates the amplitude and phase of an optical wave reflected back and forth between the mirrors of a laser cavity. The original code assumes a gain distribution which does not change with the buildup of oscillations in the cavity. A step in the direction of realism is the inclusion of a saturable gain medium in the cavity. The objective is to incorporate saturation effects into the existing computer model.

  12. An illustration of the effect of various sources of uncertainty on DNA likelihood ratio calculations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D; Bright, J-A; Buckleton, J; Curran, J

    2014-07-01

    A typical assessment of the strength of forensic DNA evidence is based on a population genetic model and estimated allele frequencies determined from a population database. Some experts provide a confidence or credible interval which takes into account the sampling variation inherent in deriving these estimates from only a sample of a total population. This interval is given in conjunction with the statistic of interest, be it a likelihood ratio (LR), match probability, or cumulative probability of inclusion. Bayesian methods of addressing database sampling variation produce a distribution for the statistic from which the bound(s) of the desired interval can be determined. Population database sampling uncertainty represents only one of the sources of uncertainty that affects estimation of the strength of DNA evidence. There are other uncertainties which can potentially have a much larger effect on the statistic such as, those inherent in the value of Fst, the weights given to genotype combinations in a continuous interpretation model, and the composition of the relevant population. In this paper we model the effect of each of these sources of uncertainty on a likelihood ratio (LR) calculation and demonstrate how changes in the distribution of these parameters affect the reported value. In addition, we illustrate the impact the different approaches of accounting for sampling uncertainties has on the LR for a four person mixture.

  13. Calculation of rotation-vibration energy levels of the ammonia molecule based on an ab initio potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, Oleg L.; Ovsyannikov, Roman I.; Kyuberis, Aleksandra A.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yachmenev, Andrey; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Zobov, Nikolai F.

    2016-09-01

    An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for gas-phase ammonia NH3 has been computed using the methodology pioneered for water (Polyansky et al., 2013). Multireference configuration interaction calculations are performed at about 50 000 points using the aug-cc-pCVQZ and aug-cc-pCV5Z basis sets and basis set extrapolation. Relativistic and adiabatic surfaces are also computed. The points are fitted to a suitable analytical form, producing the most accurate ab initio PES for this molecule available. The rotation-vibration energy levels are computed using nuclear motion program TROVE in both linearised and curvilinear coordinates. Better convergence is obtained using curvilinear coordinates. Our results are used to assign the visible spectrum of 14NH3 recorded by Coy and Lehmann (1986). Rotation-vibration energy levels for the isotopologues NH2D, NHD2, ND3 and 15NH3 are also given. An ab initio value for the dissociation energy D0 of 14NH3 is also presented.

  14. Performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing unit and many integrated core for hartree potential calculations on a numerical grid.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunghwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung; Kim, Jaewook; Kim, Woo Youn

    2016-09-15

    We investigated the performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing units (GPUs) and many integrated core (MIC) with 20 CPU cores (20×CPU). As a practical example toward large scale electronic structure calculations using grid-based methods, we evaluated the Hartree potentials of silver nanoparticles with various sizes (3.1, 3.7, 4.9, 6.1, and 6.9 nm) via a direct integral method supported by the sinc basis set. The so-called work stealing scheduler was used for efficient heterogeneous computing via the balanced dynamic distribution of workloads between all processors on a given architecture without any prior information on their individual performances. 20×CPU + 1GPU was up to ∼1.5 and ∼3.1 times faster than 1GPU and 20×CPU, respectively. 20×CPU + 2GPU was ∼4.3 times faster than 20×CPU. The performance enhancement by CPU + MIC was considerably lower than expected because of the large initialization overhead of MIC, although its theoretical performance is similar with that of CPU + GPU. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27431905

  15. Performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing unit and many integrated core for hartree potential calculations on a numerical grid.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunghwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyoung; Kim, Jaewook; Kim, Woo Youn

    2016-09-15

    We investigated the performance of heterogeneous computing with graphics processing units (GPUs) and many integrated core (MIC) with 20 CPU cores (20×CPU). As a practical example toward large scale electronic structure calculations using grid-based methods, we evaluated the Hartree potentials of silver nanoparticles with various sizes (3.1, 3.7, 4.9, 6.1, and 6.9 nm) via a direct integral method supported by the sinc basis set. The so-called work stealing scheduler was used for efficient heterogeneous computing via the balanced dynamic distribution of workloads between all processors on a given architecture without any prior information on their individual performances. 20×CPU + 1GPU was up to ∼1.5 and ∼3.1 times faster than 1GPU and 20×CPU, respectively. 20×CPU + 2GPU was ∼4.3 times faster than 20×CPU. The performance enhancement by CPU + MIC was considerably lower than expected because of the large initialization overhead of MIC, although its theoretical performance is similar with that of CPU + GPU. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Gas-phase reaction between calcium monocation and fluoromethane: Analysis of the potential energy hypersurface and kinetics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Varela-Alvarez, Adrian; Sordo, Jose A.; Rayon, V. M.; Redondo, P.; Barrientos, C.

    2009-10-14

    The gas-phase reaction between calcium monocation and fluoromethane: Ca{sup +}+CH{sub 3}F{yields}CaF{sup +}+CH{sub 3} was theoretically analyzed. The potential energy hypersurface was explored by using density functional theory methodology with different functionals and Pople's, Dunning's, Ahlrichs', and Stuttgart-Dresden basis sets. Kinetics calculations (energy and total angular momentum resolved microcanonical variational/conventional theory) were accomplished. The theoretically predicted range for the global kinetic rate constant values at 295 K (7.2x10{sup -11}-5.9x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}) agrees reasonably well with the experimental value at the same temperature [(2.6{+-}0.8)x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}]. Explicit consideration of a two transition state model, where the formation of a weakly bounded prereactive complex is preceded by an outer transition state (entrance channel) and followed by an inner transition state connecting with a second intermediate that finally leads to products, is mandatory. Experimental observations on the correlation, or lack of correlation, between reaction rate constants and second ionization energies of the metal might well be rationalized in terms of this two transition state model.

  17. Can effective teaching and learning strategies help student nurses to retain drug calculation skills?

    PubMed

    Wright, Kerri

    2008-10-01

    Student nurses need to develop and retain drug calculation skills in order accurately to calculate drug dosages in clinical practice. If student nurses are to qualify and be fit to practise accurate drug calculation skills, then educational strategies need to not only show that the skills of student nurses have improved but that these skills have been retained over a period of time. A quasi-experimental approach was used to test the effectiveness of a range of strategies in improving retention of drug calculation skills. The results from an IV additive drug calculation test were used to compare the drug calculation skills of student nurses between two groups of students who had received different approaches to teaching drug calculation skills. The sample group received specific teaching and learning strategies in relation to drug calculation skills and the second group received only lectures on drug calculation skills. All test results for students were anonymous. The results from the test for both groups were statistically analysed using the Mann Whitney test to ascertain whether the range of strategies improved the results for the IV additive test. The results were further analysed and compared to ascertain the types and numbers of errors made in each of the sample groups. The results showed that there is a highly significant difference between the two samples using a two-tailed test (U=39.5, p<0.001). The strategies implemented therefore did make a difference to the retention of drug calculation skills in the students in the intervention group. Further research is required into the retention of drug calculation skills by students and nurses, but there does appears to be evidence to suggest that sound teaching and learning strategies do result in better retention of drug calculation skills.

  18. [Potentially beneficial effects of climate changes].

    PubMed

    Hitz, Mette Friberg; Jensen, Jens Erik Beck

    2009-10-26

    Climate changes have many unbeneficial effects on human health, but may also have beneficial effects. An increased mean temperature reduces the incidence of death due to hypothermia and cardiovascular disease and may increase exercise frequency. As the ozone layer decreases, the synthesis of vitamin D in the organism will also increase. An increased level of plasma vitamin D has beneficial effects on bone- and muscle health, seems to reduce cancer incidence and mortality and reduces the prevalence of autoimmune- and cardiovascular disease.

  19. Quantum Calculations on Hydrogen Bonds in Certain Water Clusters Show Cooperative Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Znamenskiy, Vasiliy S.; Green, Michael E.

    2007-01-09

    Water molecules in clefts and small clusters are in a significantly different environment than those in bulk water. We have carried out ab initio calculations that demonstrate this in a series of clusters, showing that cooperative effects must be taken into account in the treatment of hydrogen bonds and water clusters in such bounded systems. Hydrogen bonds between water molecules in simulations are treated most frequently by using point-charge water potentials, such as TIP3P or SPC, sometimes with a polarizable extension. These produce excellent results in bulk water, for which they are calibrated. Clefts are different from bulk; it is necessary to look at smaller systems and investigate the effect of limited numbers of neighbors. We start with a study of isolated clusters of water with varying numbers of neighbors of a hydrogen-bonded pair of water molecules. The cluster as a whole is in a vacuum. The clusters are defined so as to provide the possible arrangements of nearest neighbors of a central hydrogen-bonded pair of water molecules. We then scan the length and angles of the central hydrogen bond of the clusters, using density functional theory, for each possible arrangement of donor and acceptor hydrogen bonds on the central hydrogen-bonding pair; the potential of interaction of two water molecules varies with the number of donor and acceptor neighbors. This also involves changes in charge on the water molecules as a function of bond length and changes in energy and length as a function of the number of neighboring donor and acceptor molecules. The energy varies by approximately 6 kBT near room temperature from the highest to the lowest energy when bond length alone is varied, enough to seriously affect simulations.

  20. Quantum Calculations on Hydrogen Bonds in Certain Water Clusters Show Cooperative Effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Znamenskiy, Vasiliy S.; Green, Michael E.

    2006-12-08

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Water molecules in clefts and small clusters are in a significantly different environment than those in bulk water. We have carried out ab initio calculations that demonstrate this in a series of clusters, showing that cooperative effects must be taken into account in the treatment of hydrogen bonds and water clusters in such bounded systems. Hydrogen bonds between water molecules in simulations are treated most frequently by using point-charge water potentials, such as TIP3P or SPC, sometimes with a polarizable extension. These produce excellent results in bulk water, for which they are calibrated. Clefts are different from bulk; it is necessary to look at smaller systems and investigate the effect of limited numbers of neighbors. We start with a study of isolated clusters of water with varying numbers of neighbors of a hydrogen-bonded pair of water molecules. The cluster as a whole is in a vacuum. The clusters are defined so as to provide the possible arrangements of nearest neighbors of a central hydrogen-bonded pair of water molecules. We then scan the length and angles of the central hydrogen bond of the clusters, using density functional theory, for each possible arrangement of donor and acceptor hydrogen bonds on the central hydrogen-bonding pair; the potential of interaction of two water molecules varies with the number of donor and acceptor neighbors. This also involves changes in charge on the water molecules as a function of bond length and changes in energy and length as a function of the number of neighboring donor and acceptor molecules. The energy varies by approximately 6 kBT near room temperature from the highest to the lowest energy when bond length alone is

  1. An isotopic mass effect on the intermolecular potential

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Michael F.; Currier, Robert Patrick; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-09-28

    The impact of isotopic variation on the electronic energy and intermolecular potentials is often suppressed when calculating isotopologue thermodynamics. Intramolecular potential energy surfaces for distinct isotopologues are in fact equivalent under the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, which is sometimes used to imply that the intermolecular interactions are independent of isotopic mass. In this paper, the intermolecular dipole–dipole interaction between hetero-nuclear diatomic molecules is considered. It is shown that the intermolecular potential contains mass-dependent terms even though each nucleus moves on a Born–Oppenheimer surface. Finally, the analysis suggests that mass dependent variations in intermolecular potentials should be included in comprehensive descriptions of isotopologue thermodynamics.

  2. Effective method of calculating the wave drag of solids of revolution in the transonic range

    SciTech Connect

    Naida, M.A.; Fonarev, A.S.

    1995-11-01

    The determination of integral aerohydrodynamic characteristics is one of the principal objectives in the solution of aerodynamic problems. Here, we describe an effective new algorithm for calculating the wave drag of solids of revolution in a transonic flow of an ideal gas. The calculations are performed within the framework of the theory of small perturbations. In the numerical study of problems concerning flow about bodies, the necessary aerodynamic coefficients are usually calculated by integrating the distribution of pressure over the surface of the body. However, it should be noted that the accuracy of this approach may be affected by errors made in the numerical calculation - particularly in the nose and tail regions. CAlculations have shown that these errors are negligible in the determination of the lift and moment coefficients and that the traditional method is acceptable for both steady and unsteady problems.

  3. Fit Point-Wise AB Initio Calculation Potential Energies to a Multi-Dimension Long-Range Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yu; Li, Hui; Le Roy, Robert J.

    2016-06-01

    A potential energy surface (PES) is a fundamental tool and source of understanding for theoretical spectroscopy and for dynamical simulations. Making correct assignments for high-resolution rovibrational spectra of floppy polyatomic and van der Waals molecules often relies heavily on predictions generated from a high quality ab initio potential energy surface. Moreover, having an effective analytic model to represent such surfaces can be as important as the ab initio results themselves. For the one-dimensional potentials of diatomic molecules, the most successful such model to date is arguably the ``Morse/Long-Range'' (MLR) function developed by R. J. Le Roy and coworkers. It is very flexible, is everywhere differentiable to all orders. It incorporates correct predicted long-range behaviour, extrapolates sensibly at both large and small distances, and two of its defining parameters are always the physically meaningful well depth {D}_e and equilibrium distance r_e. Extensions of this model, called the Multi-Dimension Morse/Long-Range (MD-MLR) function, linear molecule-linear molecule systems and atom-non-linear molecule system. have been applied successfully to atom-plus-linear molecule, linear molecule-linear molecule and atom-non-linear molecule systems. However, there are several technical challenges faced in modelling the interactions of general molecule-molecule systems, such as the absence of radial minima for some relative alignments, difficulties in fitting short-range potential energies, and challenges in determining relative-orientation dependent long-range coefficients. This talk will illustrate some of these challenges and describe our ongoing work in addressing them. Mol. Phys. 105, 663 (2007); J. Chem. Phys. 131, 204309 (2009); Mol. Phys. 109, 435 (2011). Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10, 4128 (2008); J. Chem. Phys. 130, 144305 (2009) J. Chem. Phys. 132, 214309 (2010) J. Chem. Phys. 140, 214309 (2010)

  4. Calculation of the structure, potential energy surface, vibrational dynamics, and electric dipole properties for the Xe:HI van der Waals complex.

    PubMed

    Preller, M; Grunenberg, J; Bulychev, V P; Bulanin, M O

    2011-05-01

    We report the structure and spectroscopic characteristics for the Xe:HI van der Waals binary isomers determined from variational solutions of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) vibrational Schrödinger equations. The solutions are based on a potential energy surface computed at the coupled-cluster level of theory including single and double excitations and a non-iterative perturbation treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. The dipole moment surface was calculated using quadratic configuration interaction (QCISD). The global potential minimum is shown to be located at the anti-hydrogen-bonded Xe-IH isomer, 21 cm(-1) below the secondary local minimum associated with the hydrogen-bonded Xe-HI isomeric form. The dissociation energy from the global minimum is 245.9 cm(-1). 3D Schrödinger equations are solved for the rotational quantum numbers J = k = 0, 1, and 2, without invoking an adiabatic separation of high- and low-frequency degrees of freedom. The vibrational ground state resides in the Xe-HI potential well, while the first excited state, 8.59 cm(-1) above the ground, occupies the Xe-IH well. We find that intra-complex dynamics exhibits a sudden transformation upon increase of the r(HI) bond length, accompanied by abrupt changes in the geometric and dipole parameters. A similar chaotic behavior is predicted to occur for Xe:DI at a shorter r(DI) bond length, which implies stronger coupling between low- and high-frequency motions in the heavier complex. Our calculations confirm a strong enhancement for the r(HI) stretch fundamental and a significant weakening for the first overtone vibrational transitions in Xe:HI, as compared to those in the free HI molecule. A qualitative explanation of this, earlier experimentally detected effect is suggested.

  5. Calculation of the structure, potential energy surface, vibrational dynamics, and electric dipole properties for the Xe:HI van der Waals complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preller, M.; Grunenberg, J.; Bulychev, V. P.; Bulanin, M. O.

    2011-05-01

    We report the structure and spectroscopic characteristics for the Xe:HI van der Waals binary isomers determined from variational solutions of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) vibrational Schrödinger equations. The solutions are based on a potential energy surface computed at the coupled-cluster level of theory including single and double excitations and a non-iterative perturbation treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. The dipole moment surface was calculated using quadratic configuration interaction (QCISD). The global potential minimum is shown to be located at the anti-hydrogen-bonded Xe-IH isomer, 21 cm-1 below the secondary local minimum associated with the hydrogen-bonded Xe-HI isomeric form. The dissociation energy from the global minimum is 245.9 cm-1. 3D Schrödinger equations are solved for the rotational quantum numbers J = k = 0, 1, and 2, without invoking an adiabatic separation of high- and low-frequency degrees of freedom. The vibrational ground state resides in the Xe-HI potential well, while the first excited state, 8.59 cm-1 above the ground, occupies the Xe-IH well. We find that intra-complex dynamics exhibits a sudden transformation upon increase of the r(HI) bond length, accompanied by abrupt changes in the geometric and dipole parameters. A similar chaotic behavior is predicted to occur for Xe:DI at a shorter r(DI) bond length, which implies stronger coupling between low- and high-frequency motions in the heavier complex. Our calculations confirm a strong enhancement for the r(HI) stretch fundamental and a significant weakening for the first overtone vibrational transitions in Xe:HI, as compared to those in the free HI molecule. A qualitative explanation of this, earlier experimentally detected effect is suggested.

  6. Calculation of the structure, potential energy surface, vibrational dynamics, and electric dipole properties for the Xe:HI van der Waals complex.

    PubMed

    Preller, M; Grunenberg, J; Bulychev, V P; Bulanin, M O

    2011-05-01

    We report the structure and spectroscopic characteristics for the Xe:HI van der Waals binary isomers determined from variational solutions of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) vibrational Schrödinger equations. The solutions are based on a potential energy surface computed at the coupled-cluster level of theory including single and double excitations and a non-iterative perturbation treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. The dipole moment surface was calculated using quadratic configuration interaction (QCISD). The global potential minimum is shown to be located at the anti-hydrogen-bonded Xe-IH isomer, 21 cm(-1) below the secondary local minimum associated with the hydrogen-bonded Xe-HI isomeric form. The dissociation energy from the global minimum is 245.9 cm(-1). 3D Schrödinger equations are solved for the rotational quantum numbers J = k = 0, 1, and 2, without invoking an adiabatic separation of high- and low-frequency degrees of freedom. The vibrational ground state resides in the Xe-HI potential well, while the first excited state, 8.59 cm(-1) above the ground, occupies the Xe-IH well. We find that intra-complex dynamics exhibits a sudden transformation upon increase of the r(HI) bond length, accompanied by abrupt changes in the geometric and dipole parameters. A similar chaotic behavior is predicted to occur for Xe:DI at a shorter r(DI) bond length, which implies stronger coupling between low- and high-frequency motions in the heavier complex. Our calculations confirm a strong enhancement for the r(HI) stretch fundamental and a significant weakening for the first overtone vibrational transitions in Xe:HI, as compared to those in the free HI molecule. A qualitative explanation of this, earlier experimentally detected effect is suggested. PMID:21548682

  7. Full potential unsteady computations including aeroelastic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, Vijaya; Ide, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    A unified formulation is presented based on the full potential framework coupled with an appropriate structural model to compute steady and unsteady flows over rigid and flexible configurations across the Mach number range. The unsteady form of the full potential equation in conservation form is solved using an implicit scheme maintaining time accuracy through internal Newton iterations. A flux biasing procedure based on the unsteady sonic reference conditions is implemented to compute hyperbolic regions with moving sonic and shock surfaces. The wake behind a trailing edge is modeled using a mathematical cut across which the pressure is satisfied to be continuous by solving an appropriate vorticity convection equation. An aeroelastic model based on the generalized modal deflection approach interacts with the nonlinear aerodynamics and includes both static as well as dynamic structural analyses capability. Results are presented for rigid and flexible configurations at different Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to supersonic conditions. The dynamic response of a flexible wing below and above its flutter point is demonstrated.

  8. Accounting for strong localized heterogeneities and local transport effect in core calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggieri, J.M.; Doriath, J.Y.; Finck, P.J.; Boyer, R.

    1996-09-01

    Two methods based on the variational nodal transport method have been developed to account for localized heterogeneities and local transport effects in full core calculations. A local mesh refinement technique relies on using the projected partial ingoing surface currents produced during coarse-mesh iterations as boundary conditions for fine-mesh calculations embedded within the coarse-mesh calculations. The outgoing fine-mesh partial currents are averaged to serve in the coarse-mesh iterations. Then, a mixed transport-diffusion method using two levels of angular approximations for the surface partial currents depending on the node considered has been implemented to account for local transport effects in full core diffusion calculations. These methods have been tested for a model of the Superphenix complementary shutdown rods.

  9. Calculation of the biological effective dose for piecewise defined dose-rate fits

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Sgouros, George

    2009-03-15

    An algorithmic solution to the biological effective dose (BED) calculation from the Lea-Catcheside formula for a piecewise defined function is presented. Data from patients treated for metastatic thyroid cancer were used to illustrate the solution. The Lea-Catcheside formula for the G-factor of the BED is integrated numerically using a large number of small trapezoidal fits to each integral. The algorithmically calculated BED is compatible with an analytic calculation for a similarly valued exponentially fitted dose-rate plot and is the only resolution for piecewise defined dose-rate functions.

  10. Ab initio spin-orbit CI calculations of the potential curves and radiative lifetimes of low-lying states of lead monofluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kalyan K.; Petsalakis, Ioannis D.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Alekseyev, Aleksey B.; Buenker, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of the lead monofluoride molecule is studied by means of ab initio configuration interaction (CI) calculations including the spin-orbit interaction. Potential-energy curves are generated for a large number of electronic states, of which only the X12Π1/2 ground and X22Π3/2 and A 2Σ+ excited states have been observed experimentally. Two different methods are compared for the inclusion of spin-orbit effects in the theoretical treatment, a contracted CI which employs a basis of large-scale Λ-S eigenfunctions to form a rather small matrix representation of the full relativistic Hamiltonian (two-step approach), and a more computationally laborious technique which involves solution of a secular equation of order 250 000 S2 eigenfunctions of different spin and spatial symmetry to achieve a potentially more evenly balanced description of both relativistic and electron correlation effects (one-step approach). In the present application, it is found that both methods achieve quite good agreement with measured spectroscopic constants for the X1, X2, and A states. The simpler of these methods is also employed to predict the radiative lifetimes of the latter two states. The key A 2Σ+-X 2Π transition moment in these calculations is found to vary strongly with internuclear distance and to vanish in the neighborhood of the respective equilibrium distances of both participating states. The computed lifetime for the A, v'=0 state of 16 μs overestimates the corresponding measured value by a factor of three, but those of higher vibrational states are found to decrease rather sharply with increasing v', suggesting that only a slight displacement of the theoretical A-X transition moment curve is needed to explain the above discrepancy.

  11. Renormalized effective actions in radially symmetric backgrounds: Exact calculations versus approximation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Hur, Jin; Lee, Choonkyu; Min, Hyunsoo

    2008-02-15

    Our previously developed calculational method (the partial-wave cutoff method) is employed to evaluate explicitly scalar one-loop effective actions in a class of radially symmetric background gauge fields. Our method proves to be particularly effective when it is used in conjunction with a systematic WKB series for the large partial-wave contribution to the effective action. By comparing these numerically exact calculations against the predictions based on the large-mass expansion and derivative expansion, we discuss the validity ranges of the latter approximation methods.

  12. The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.

    SciTech Connect

    Drover, Damion, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a

  13. Calculation of the volume effect at an electron phase transition in pure cerium and praseodymium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, S. A.; Koval', Yu. N.; Ponomarev, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    The experimental values of the volume effect at an electronic phase transition in several rare-earth metals are discussed. Specifically, volume changes at phase transitions in cerium and praseodymium are calculated using a semiphenomenological relationship derived in terms of the Falikov-Ramirez-Kimball model. A number of factors influencing the amount of the volume effect at electronic phase transitions are analyzed.

  14. Estimation of Nuclear Reaction Effects in Proton-Tissue-Dose Calculations.

    1983-01-14

    Version 00 REPC reviews calculational methods for the estimation of dose from external proton exposure of arbitrary convex bodies and presents the necessary information for the estimation of dose in soft tissue. The effects of nuclear reactions, especially in relation to the dose equivalent, are retained. REPC subroutines can be used to convert existing computer programs which neglect nuclear reaction effects to include them.

  15. Radiative Convective Transfer Calculations for Effective Stellar Fluxes of Habitable and Life Supporting Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Wolfgang; Eggl, Siegfried; Neubauer, David; Leitner, Johannes; Firneis, Maria; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2014-05-01

    Recent fields of interest in exoplanetary research include studies of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars outside of our Solar System. Habitable Zones (HZs) are currently defined by calculating the inner and the outer limits of the mean distance between exoplanets and their central stars based on effective solar fluxes that allow for maintaining liquid water on the planet's surface. Kasting et al. (1993), Selsis et al. (2007), and recently Kopparapu et al. (2013) provided stellar flux limits for such scenarios. We compute effective solar fluxes for Earth-like planets using Earth-like and other atmospheric scenarios including atmospheres with high level and low level clouds. Furthermore we provide habitability limits for solvents other than water, i.e. limits for the so called Life Supporting Zone, introduced by Leitner et al. (2010). The Life Supporting Zone (LSZ) encompasses many habitable zones based on a variety of liquid solvents. Solvents like ammonia and sulfuric acid have been identified for instance by Leitner et al (2012) as possibly life supporting. Assuming planets on circular orbits, the extent of the individual HZ is then calculated via the following equation, d(i,o) = [L/Lsun*1/S(i,o)]**0.5 au, where L is the star's luminosity, and d(i,o) and S(i,o) are the distances to the central star for the inner and the outer edge and effective insolation for inner and the outer edge of the HZ, respectively. After generating S(i,o) values for a selection of solvents, we provide the means to determine LSZ boundaries for main sequence stars. Effective flux calculations are done using a one dimensional radiative convective model (Neubauer et al. 2011) based on a modified version of the open source radiative transfer software Streamer (Key and Schweiger, 1998). Modifications include convective adjustments, additional gases for absorption and the use of an offline cloud model, which allow us to observe the influence of clouds on effective stellar fluxes

  16. Extension of the Effective Fragment Potential Method to Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Gurunathan, Pradeep Kumar; Acharya, Atanu; Ghosh, Debashree; Kosenkov, Dmytro; Kaliman, Ilya; Shao, Yihan; Krylov, Anna I; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2016-07-14

    The effective fragment potential (EFP) approach, which can be described as a nonempirical polarizable force field, affords an accurate first-principles treatment of noncovalent interactions in extended systems. EFP can also describe the effect of the environment on the electronic properties (e.g., electronic excitation energies and ionization and electron-attachment energies) of a subsystem via the QM/EFP (quantum mechanics/EFP) polarizable embedding scheme. The original formulation of the method assumes that the system can be separated, without breaking covalent bonds, into closed-shell fragments, such as solvent and solute molecules. Here, we present an extension of the EFP method to macromolecules (mEFP). Several schemes for breaking a large molecule into small fragments described by EFP are presented and benchmarked. We focus on the electronic properties of molecules embedded into a protein environment and consider ionization, electron-attachment, and excitation energies (single-point calculations only). The model systems include chromophores of green and red fluorescent proteins surrounded by several nearby amino acid residues and phenolate bound to the T4 lysozyme. All mEFP schemes show robust performance and accurately reproduce the reference full QM calculations. For further applications of mEFP, we recommend either the scheme in which the peptide is cut along the Cα-C bond, giving rise to one fragment per amino acid, or the scheme with two cuts per amino acid, along the Cα-C and Cα-N bonds. While using these fragmentation schemes, the errors in solvatochromic shifts in electronic energy differences (excitation, ionization, electron detachment, or electron-attachment) do not exceed 0.1 eV. The largest error of QM/mEFP against QM/EFP (no fragmentation of the EFP part) is 0.06 eV (in most cases, the errors are 0.01-0.02 eV). The errors in the QM/molecular mechanics calculations with standard point charges can be as large as 0.3 eV.

  17. Extension of the Effective Fragment Potential Method to Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Gurunathan, Pradeep Kumar; Acharya, Atanu; Ghosh, Debashree; Kosenkov, Dmytro; Kaliman, Ilya; Shao, Yihan; Krylov, Anna I; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2016-07-14

    The effective fragment potential (EFP) approach, which can be described as a nonempirical polarizable force field, affords an accurate first-principles treatment of noncovalent interactions in extended systems. EFP can also describe the effect of the environment on the electronic properties (e.g., electronic excitation energies and ionization and electron-attachment energies) of a subsystem via the QM/EFP (quantum mechanics/EFP) polarizable embedding scheme. The original formulation of the method assumes that the system can be separated, without breaking covalent bonds, into closed-shell fragments, such as solvent and solute molecules. Here, we present an extension of the EFP method to macromolecules (mEFP). Several schemes for breaking a large molecule into small fragments described by EFP are presented and benchmarked. We focus on the electronic properties of molecules embedded into a protein environment and consider ionization, electron-attachment, and excitation energies (single-point calculations only). The model systems include chromophores of green and red fluorescent proteins surrounded by several nearby amino acid residues and phenolate bound to the T4 lysozyme. All mEFP schemes show robust performance and accurately reproduce the reference full QM calculations. For further applications of mEFP, we recommend either the scheme in which the peptide is cut along the Cα-C bond, giving rise to one fragment per amino acid, or the scheme with two cuts per amino acid, along the Cα-C and Cα-N bonds. While using these fragmentation schemes, the errors in solvatochromic shifts in electronic energy differences (excitation, ionization, electron detachment, or electron-attachment) do not exceed 0.1 eV. The largest error of QM/mEFP against QM/EFP (no fragmentation of the EFP part) is 0.06 eV (in most cases, the errors are 0.01-0.02 eV). The errors in the QM/molecular mechanics calculations with standard point charges can be as large as 0.3 eV. PMID:27314461

  18. Local-spin-density calculations for iron: Effect of spin interpolation on ground-state properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, J. M.; Clougherty, D. P.; Albers, R. C.

    1990-08-01

    Scalar-relativistic self-consistent linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) calculations for bcc and fcc Fe have been performed with several different local approximations to the exchange and correlation energy density and potential. Overall, in contrast to the conclusions of previous studies, we find that the local-spin-density approximation to exchange and correlation can provide an adequate description of bulk Fe provided that a proper parametrization of the correlation energy density and potential of the homogeneous electron gas over both spin and density is used. Lattice constants, found from the position of the minimum of the total energy as a function of Wigner-Seitz radius, agree to within 1% (for s,p,d LMTO's only) and within 1-2% (for s,p,d,f LMTO's) of the experimental lattice constants for all forms used for the local correlation. The best agreement, however, was obtained using a local correlation potential derived from the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair form for the spin dependence of the correlation energy density. The calculation performed with this correlation potential was also the only calculation to correctly predict a bcc ferromagnetic ground state.

  19. Real-space electronic structure calculations with full-potential all-electron precision for transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Tomoya; Heide, Marcus; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Baumeister, Paul; Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Blügel, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an efficient computational scheme utilizing the real-space finite-difference formalism and the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method to perform precise first-principles electronic-structure simulations based on the density-functional theory for systems containing transition metals with a modest computational effort. By combining the advantages of the time-saving double-grid technique and the Fourier-filtering procedure for the projectors of pseudopotentials, we can overcome the egg box effect in the computations even for first-row elements and transition metals, which is a problem of the real-space finite-difference formalism. In order to demonstrate the potential power in terms of precision and applicability of the present scheme, we have carried out simulations to examine several bulk properties and structural energy differences between different bulk phases of transition metals and have obtained excellent agreement with the results of other precise first-principles methods such as a plane-wave-based PAW method and an all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FLAPW) method.

  20. Potential effect of ultrasound on carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Bera, Smritilekha; Mondal, Dhananjoy; Martin, Jacob T; Singh, Man

    2015-06-17

    The use of ultrasound has emerged as one of the most useful alternative energy sources for the synthesis of carbohydrate-derived biologically and pharmaceutically potential compounds. Spectacular advances have been made in the field of sonication-assisted organic reactions, which are known for producing superior yields, enhanced reactivity of the reactant, improved stereoselectivity, and shortened reaction times. Orthogonal protection-deprotection reactions and/or modification and manipulation of functional groups in carbohydrates are common synthetic steps in carbohydrate chemistry. These reaction steps can be driven by the ultrasonic energy generated by acoustic cavitation via the formation and subsequent collapse of ultrasound-induced bubbles. The ultrasound-assisted synthesis of differently functionalised monosaccharides is useful in a wide variety of applications of carbohydrate chemistry such as the glycosylation of oligosaccharides, one pot domino reactions, thioglycoside syntheses, azidoglycoside syntheses, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions, and syntheses of natural products. This review article covers ultrasound-mediated reactions on carbohydrates that have been described in the literature since 2000.

  1. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from First-Principles Path Sampling Calculations.

    PubMed

    Varga, Matthew J; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-04-12

    In this study, we develop and test a method to determine the rate of particle transfer and kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic reactions, specifically yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), from first-principles. Transition path sampling (TPS) and normal mode centroid dynamics (CMD) are used to simulate these enzymatic reactions without knowledge of their reaction coordinates and with the inclusion of quantum effects, such as zero-point energy and tunneling, on the transferring particle. Though previous studies have used TPS to calculate reaction rate constants in various model and real systems, it has not been applied to a system as large as YADH. The calculated primary H/D kinetic isotope effect agrees with previously reported experimental results, within experimental error. The kinetic isotope effects calculated with this method correspond to the kinetic isotope effect of the transfer event itself. The results reported here show that the kinetic isotope effects calculated from first-principles, purely for barrier passage, can be used to predict experimental kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic systems.

  2. Scattering and Bound States of Klein-Gordon Particle with Hylleraas Potential Within Effective Mass Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onyeaju, M. C.; Ikot, A. N.; Chukwuocha, E. O.; Obong, H. P.; Zare, S.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-06-01

    Scattering and bound states solution for the one-dimensional Klein-Gordon particle with Hylleraas potential is presented within the frame work of position dependent effective mass formalism. We calculate in detail the reflection and transmission coefficients using the properties of hypergeometric functions and the equation of continuity of the wave functions.

  3. Scattering and Bound States of Klein-Gordon Particle with Hylleraas Potential Within Effective Mass Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onyeaju, M. C.; Ikot, A. N.; Chukwuocha, E. O.; Obong, H. P.; Zare, S.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-09-01

    Scattering and bound states solution for the one-dimensional Klein-Gordon particle with Hylleraas potential is presented within the frame work of position dependent effective mass formalism. We calculate in detail the reflection and transmission coefficients using the properties of hypergeometric functions and the equation of continuity of the wave functions.

  4. The exterior tidal potential acting on a satellite. [satellite orbits/satellite perturbation - gravitation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.

    1975-01-01

    A theory is presented that points out the existence of several long period and 'cross effects' in the coefficients in the expansion of the geopotential and in the motion of satellites. The tidal potential, defined as small periodic variations in the geopotential, was calculated. The influence of these geopotential variations on satellite perturbation is examined. Spherical harmonics were employed.

  5. Calculation of total free energy yield as an alternative approach for predicting the importance of potential chemolithotrophic reactions in geothermal springs.

    PubMed

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; McDonald, Austin I; Hedlund, Brian P

    2012-08-01

    To inform hypotheses regarding the relative importance of chemolithotrophic metabolisms in geothermal environments, we calculated free energy yields of 26 chemical reactions potentially supporting chemolithotrophy in two US Great Basin hot springs, taking into account the effects of changing reactant and product activities on the Gibbs free energy as each reaction progressed. Results ranged from 1.2 × 10(-5) to 3.6 J kg(-1) spring water, or 3.7 × 10(-5) to 11.5 J s(-1) based on measured flow rates, with aerobic oxidation of CH(4) or NH4 + giving the highest average yields. Energy yields calculated without constraining pH were similar to those at constant pH except for reactions where H(+) was consumed, which often had significantly lower yields when pH was unconstrained. In contrast to the commonly used normalization of reaction chemical affinities per mole of electrons transferred, reaction energy yields for a given oxidant varied by several orders of magnitude and were more sensitive to differences in the activities of products and reactants. The high energy yield of aerobic ammonia oxidation is consistent with previous observations of significant ammonia oxidation rates and abundant ammonia-oxidizing archaea in sediments of these springs. This approach offers an additional lens through which to view the thermodynamic landscape of geothermal springs.

  6. Calculation of total free energy yield as an alternative approach for predicting the importance of potential chemolithotrophic reactions in geothermal springs.

    PubMed

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; McDonald, Austin I; Hedlund, Brian P

    2012-08-01

    To inform hypotheses regarding the relative importance of chemolithotrophic metabolisms in geothermal environments, we calculated free energy yields of 26 chemical reactions potentially supporting chemolithotrophy in two US Great Basin hot springs, taking into account the effects of changing reactant and product activities on the Gibbs free energy as each reaction progressed. Results ranged from 1.2 × 10(-5) to 3.6 J kg(-1) spring water, or 3.7 × 10(-5) to 11.5 J s(-1) based on measured flow rates, with aerobic oxidation of CH(4) or NH4 + giving the highest average yields. Energy yields calculated without constraining pH were similar to those at constant pH except for reactions where H(+) was consumed, which often had significantly lower yields when pH was unconstrained. In contrast to the commonly used normalization of reaction chemical affinities per mole of electrons transferred, reaction energy yields for a given oxidant varied by several orders of magnitude and were more sensitive to differences in the activities of products and reactants. The high energy yield of aerobic ammonia oxidation is consistent with previous observations of significant ammonia oxidation rates and abundant ammonia-oxidizing archaea in sediments of these springs. This approach offers an additional lens through which to view the thermodynamic landscape of geothermal springs. PMID:22443686

  7. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts in organic solids: accounting for motional effects.

    PubMed

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Pickard, Chris J

    2009-03-14

    NMR chemical shifts were calculated from first principles for well defined crystalline organic solids. These density functional theory calculations were carried out within the plane-wave pseudopotential framework, in which truly extended systems are implicitly considered. The influence of motional effects was assessed by averaging over vibrational modes or over snapshots taken from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It is observed that the zero-point correction to chemical shifts can be significant, and that thermal effects are particularly noticeable for shielding anisotropies and for a temperature-dependent chemical shift. This study provides insight into the development of highly accurate first principles calculations of chemical shifts in solids, highlighting the role of motional effects on well defined systems.

  8. Two-Dimensional Potentials of Mean Force of Nile Red in Intact and Damaged Model Bilayers. Application to Calculations of Fluorescence Spectra.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Chamberlin, Adam C; Zhekova, Hristina R; Noskov, Sergei Y; Tieleman, D Peter

    2016-01-12

    Fluorescent dyes revolutionized and expanded our understanding of biological membranes. The interpretation of experimental fluorescence data in terms of membrane structure, however, requires detailed information about the molecular environment of the dyes. Nile red is a fluorescent molecule whose excitation and emission maxima depend on the polarity of the solvent. It is mainly used as a probe to study lipid microenvironments, for example in imaging the progression of damage to the myelin sheath in multiple sclerosis. In this study, we determine the position and orientation of Nile red in lipid bilayers by calculating two-dimensional Potential of Mean Force (2D-PMF) profiles in a defect-free 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer and in damaged bilayers containing two mixtures of the oxidized lipid 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and POPC. From 2D-PMF simulations we obtain positions and orientations of Nile Red corresponding to the minimum on the binding free energy surface in three different membrane environments with increasing amounts of water, mimicking damage in biological tissue. Using representative snapshots from the simulations, we use combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) models to calculate the emission spectrum of Nile red as a function of its local solvation environment. The results of QM and QM/MM computations are in qualitative agreement with the experimentally observed shift in fluorescence for the dye moving from aqueous solution to the more hydrophobic environment of the lipid interiors. The range of the conformation dependent values of the computed absorption-emission spectra and the lack of solvent relaxation effects in the QM/MM calculations made it challenging to delineate specific differences between the intact and damaged bilayers.

  9. Calculations of the IR spectra of bend fundamentals of (H2O)n=3,4,5 using the WHBB_2 potential and dipole moment surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M

    2016-09-14

    Stimulated by new experiments from the Havenith group, we report IR spectra of the bend fundamentals of (H2O)n=3,4,5, using anharmonic, coupled-mode VSCF/VCI calculations, done in a subspace of modes consisting of all the monomer bends plus the hydrogen-bonded OH stretches. Double-harmonic spectra are also reported. All calculations employ a faster version of the ab initio WHBB potential and also a more accurate representation of the dipole moment surface, reported previously. Comparisons at the harmonic level are made with previous high-level ab initio calculations, notably those of Howard and Tschumper and also with harmonic frequencies from the semi-empirical TTM3-F potential, which have been reported previously by Howard and Tschumper. The calculations provide energies and intensities of the hydrogen-bonded OH stretches and these are also presented and briefly discussed. PMID:27523256

  10. Solvent effects in time-dependent self-consistent field methods. I. Optical response calculations.

    PubMed

    Bjorgaard, J A; Kuzmenko, V; Velizhanin, K A; Tretiak, S

    2015-01-28

    We implement and examine three excited state solvent models in time-dependent self-consistent field methods using a consistent formalism which unambiguously shows their relationship. These are the linear response, state specific, and vertical excitation solvent models. Their effects on energies calculated with the equivalent of COSMO/CIS/AM1 are given for a set of test molecules with varying excited state charge transfer character. The resulting solvent effects are explained qualitatively using a dipole approximation. It is shown that the fundamental differences between these solvent models are reflected by the character of the calculated excitations. PMID:25637965

  11. Solvent effects in time-dependent self-consistent field methods. I. Optical response calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Kuzmenko, V.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2015-01-22

    In this study, we implement and examine three excited state solvent models in time-dependent self-consistent field methods using a consistent formalism which unambiguously shows their relationship. These are the linear response, state specific, and vertical excitation solvent models. Their effects on energies calculated with the equivalent of COSMO/CIS/AM1 are given for a set of test molecules with varying excited state charge transfer character. The resulting solvent effects are explained qualitatively using a dipole approximation. It is shown that the fundamental differences between these solvent models are reflected by the character of the calculated excitations.

  12. Unfolding and effective bandstructure calculations as discrete real- and reciprocal-space operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boykin, Timothy B.; Ajoy, Arvind; Ilatikhameneh, Hesameddin; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, alloy electronic structure calculations based on supercell Brillouin zone unfolding have become popular. There are a number of formulations of the method which on the surface might appear different. Here we show that a discrete real-space description, based on discrete Fourier transforms, is fully general. Furthermore, such an approach can more easily show the effects of alloy scattering. We present such a method for treating the random alloy problem. This treatment features straightforward mathematics and a transparent physical interpretation of the calculated effective (i.e., approximate) energy bands.

  13. Accurate high level ab initio-based global potential energy surface and dynamics calculations for ground state of CH{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. Q.; Zhang, P. Y.; Han, K. L.

    2015-03-28

    A global many-body expansion potential energy surface is reported for the electronic ground state of CH{sub 2}{sup +} by fitting high level ab initio energies calculated at the multireference configuration interaction level with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. The topographical features of the new global potential energy surface are examined in detail and found to be in good agreement with those calculated directly from the raw ab initio energies, as well as previous calculations available in the literature. In turn, in order to validate the potential energy surface, a test theoretical study of the reaction CH{sup +}(X{sup 1}Σ{sup +})+H({sup 2}S)→C{sup +}({sup 2}P)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) has been carried out with the method of time dependent wavepacket on the title potential energy surface. The total integral cross sections and the rate coefficients have been calculated; the results determined that the new potential energy surface can both be recommended for dynamics studies of any type and as building blocks for constructing the potential energy surfaces of larger C{sup +}/H containing systems.

  14. Ab initio calculations of vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities for global warning potential of CFC substitutes. CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}F (HFC-134a)

    SciTech Connect

    Papasavva, S.; Tai, S.; Esslinger, A.; Illinger, K.H.; Kenny, J.E.

    1995-03-16

    We have investigated the feasibility of using ab initio molecular orbital methods for predicting the global warming potential of the proposed chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) substitute CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}F, HFC-134a. Various levels of theory and basis sets were used to optimize geometry and calculate harmonic vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities for the molecule using the GAUSSIAN 92 software package. In attempting to assess the quality of the computations, we found it necessary to reconsider the vibrational assignments available in the literature. On the basis of the current assignment, we find that for the highest level calculation, MP2/6-31G{sup **}, the calculated harmonic frequencies agree extremely well with the experimentally observed ones at frequencies below 800 cm{sup {minus}1}, with a systematic error toward higher calculated frequencies becoming apparent above 800 cm{sup {minus}1}. At lower levels of theory, the systematic error is apparent at all frequencies. The regularity of the deviation between calculated and observed frequencies makes ab initio calculations of vibrational frequencies much more useful than semiempirical calculations, which tend to show random deviations, as demonstrated with a PM3-UHF calculation in this work. The calculated absolute intensities are in good agreement with the limited experimental measurements previously reported. 23 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Low temperature rate constants for the N + CN → N2 + C reaction: two-dimensional quantum capture calculations on an accurate potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianyi; Guo, Hua; Dawes, Richard

    2012-09-21

    The title reaction is thought to be responsible for the production of molecular nitrogen in interstellar clouds. In this work, we report quantum capture calculations on a new two-dimensional potential energy surface determined by interpolating high-level ab initio data. The low-temperature rate constant calculated using a capture model is quite large and has a positive temperature dependence, in agreement with a recent experiment. The origin of the aforementioned behaviors of the rate constant is analyzed.

  16. Electrostatic potential and Born energy of charged molecules interacting with phospholipid membranes: calculation via 3-D numerical solution of the full Poisson equation.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, J E; Lambrakis, K C

    1991-09-21

    Understanding the physicochemical basis of the interaction of molecules with lipid bilayers is fundamental to membrane biology. In this study, a new, three-dimensional numerical solution of the full Poisson equation including local dielectric variation is developed using finite difference techniques in order to model electrostatic interactions of charged molecules with a non-uniform dielectric. This solution is used to describe the electric field and electrostatic potential profile of a charged molecule interacting with a phospholipid bilayer in a manner consistent with the known composition and structure of the membrane. Furthermore, the Born interaction energy is then calculated by appropriate integration of the electric field over whole space. Numerical computations indicate that the electrostatic potential profile surrounding a charge molecule and its resultant Born interaction energy are a function of molecular position within the membrane and change most significantly within the polar region of the bilayer. The maximum interaction energy is observed when the charge is placed at the center of the hydrophobic core of the membrane and is strongly dependent on the size of the charge and on the thickness of the hydrocarbon core of the bilayer. The numerical results of this continuum model are compared with various analytical approximations for the Born energy including models established for discontinuous slab dielectrics. The calculated energies agree with the well-known Born analytical expression only when the charge is located near the center of a hydrocarbon core of greater than 60 A in thickness. The Born-image model shows excellent agreement with the numerical results only when modified to include an appropriate effective thickness of the low dielectric region. In addition, a newly derived approximation which considers the local mean dielectric provides a simple and continuous solution that also agrees well with the numerical results.

  17. Application of Analytical Model of the Electric Potential Distribution for Calculation of Charged Particle Dynamics in a Near-Wall Layer and Sputtering of the Plasma Facing Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkina, I. E.; Komm, M.; Tsvetkov, I. V.

    2015-08-01

    Simple analytical formulas are derived for calculation of the electric field potential distribution in the magnetic pre-layer and the Debye layer near the plasma facing surfaces. It is shown that the calculated potential profiles are in good agreement with the dependences of the potential distribution on the magnetic field inclination obtained by solving the magnetic hydrodynamic (MHD) equations and modeling using the PIC code SPICE2. Dependences of the angular distribution of ions incident on the surface of plasma facing elements on the magnetic field inclination are obtained. Results of calculations demonstrate that the surface areas, on which the magnetic field is incident at sliding angles, are critical from the viewpoint of the increase of sputtering.

  18. Transuranic Transmutation and Criticality Calculation Sensitivity to Heterogeneous Lattice Effects - 12391

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaras, Sean A.; Knight, Travis W.

    2012-07-01

    Using Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel in traditional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies has been researched at length and has shown to provide the benefit of transmutation and targets the amount and toxicity of high level waste needed to be managed. Advanced MOX concepts using enriched Uranium Dioxide (UO{sub 2}) are required for multiple recycling of plutonium. The use of MOX and ordinary UO{sub 2} fuel in the same assembly as well as unfueled rods and assembly edge effects contrasts with the unit cell computational assumption of a uniform infinite array of rods. While a deterministic method of calculating the Dancoff factor has traditionally been employed in fuel assembly analysis due to the lighter computational and modeling requirements, this research seeks to determine the validity of the uniform, infinite lattice assumption with respect to Dancoff factor and determine the magnitude of the impact of nonuniform lattice effects on fuel assembly criticality calculations as well as transuranic isotope production and transmutation. This research explored the pin-to-pin interaction in a non-uniform lattice of MOX fuel rods and UO{sub 2} fuel rods through the impact of the calculated Dancoff factors from the deterministic method used in SCALE versus the Monte Carlo method used in the code DANCOFF-MC. Using the Monte Carlo method takes into account the non-uniform lattice effects of having neighboring fuel rods with different cross-sectional spectra whereas the Dancoff factor calculated by SCALE assumes a uniform, infinite lattice of one fuel rod type. Differences in eigenvalue calculations as a function of burnup are present between the two methods of Dancoff factor calculation. The percent difference is greatest at low burnup and then becomes smaller throughout the cycle. Differences in the transmutation rate of transuranic isotopes in the MOX fuel are also present between the Dancoff factor calculation methods. The largest difference is in Pu-239, Pu-242, and Am-241

  19. Effective pair potentials using an ab initio variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe; Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2010-01-01

    We used a variational approach adapted to a quantum molecular-dynamics code to determine the best reference potential for warm dense aluminum. This ab initio variational approach was based on the Gibbs-Bogolyubov inequality. We used many-body reference systems interacting through inverse-power-law potentials, among which the Coulomb potential was a particular case defining the classical one-component plasma model. By comparisons with full quantum molecular-dynamics simulations, we found that the Coulomb potential was not always the best reference potential. We calculated the self-diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity and discussed the results obtained using the Chisolm-Wallace relation in the warm dense matter regime.

  20. Channeling potential in single-walled carbon nanotubes: The effect of radial deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Assy, M. K.; Soliman, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of radial deformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), due to one external factor, on the channeling potential. The calculations covered the channeling potential for positrons of 100 MeV move along the z-axis, which is the axis of the radially deformed SWCNTs (6, 0), (8, 0) under external mechanical stress at different values for the induced strain and also for radially deformed SWCNT (5, 5) under external transverse electric field of 1.8 and 2.6 V/Å. The calculations executed according to the continuum model approximation given by Lindhard for the case of an axial channeling in single crystals. The results of the calculations in this work agreed well with previous calculations depending on the equilibrium electron density in perfect carbon nanotubes. It has been found that, for perfect nanotubes, the channeling potential, i.e., the potential at any point (x, y) in a plane normal to the nanotube axis (xy-plane), is a function of the distance from the nanotube center whatever the (x, y) coordinate and hence, it could be expressed in terms of one independent variable. On the other hand, in radially deformed SWCNTs, the channeling potential was found to be a function of two independent variables (x, y) and could be given here by a general formula in terms of fitting parameters for each nanotube with chiral index (n, m). The obtained formula has been used in plotting the contour plot for the channeling potential.

  1. Calculation of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields and Their Effects in MRI of Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Christopher M.; Wang, Zhangwei

    2011-01-01

    Radiofrequency magnetic fields are critical to nuclear excitation and signal reception in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The interactions between these fields and human tissues in anatomical geometries results in a variety of effects regarding image integrity and safety of the human subject. In recent decades numerical methods of calculation have been used increasingly to understand the effects of these interactions and aid in engineering better, faster, and safer equipment and methods. As MRI techniques and technology have evolved through the years, so too have the requirements for meaningful interpretation of calculation results. Here we review the basic physics of RF electromagnetics in MRI and discuss a variety of ways RF field calculations are used in MRI in engineering and safety assurance from simple systems and sequences through advanced methods of development for the future. PMID:21381106

  2. Model for incorporating fuel swelling and clad shrinkage effects in diffusion theory calculations (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Schick, W.C. Jr.; Milani, S.; Duncombe, E.

    1980-03-01

    A model has been devised for incorporating into the thermal feedback procedure of the PDQ few-group diffusion theory computer program the explicit calculation of depletion and temperature dependent fuel-rod shrinkage and swelling at each mesh point. The model determines the effect on reactivity of the change in hydrogen concentration caused by the variation in coolant channel area as the rods contract and expand. The calculation of fuel temperature, and hence of Doppler-broadened cross sections, is improved by correcting the heat transfer coefficient of the fuel-clad gap for the effects of clad creep, fuel densification and swelling, and release of fission-product gases into the gap. An approximate calculation of clad stress is also included in the model.

  3. The effects of calculator-based laboratories on standardized test scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Charlotte Bethany Rains

    Nationwide, the goal of providing a productive science and math education to our youth in today's educational institutions is centering itself around the technology being utilized in these classrooms. In this age of digital technology, educational software and calculator-based laboratories (CBL) have become significant devices in the teaching of science and math for many states across the United States. Among the technology, the Texas Instruments graphing calculator and Vernier Labpro interface, are among some of the calculator-based laboratories becoming increasingly popular among middle and high school science and math teachers in many school districts across this country. In Tennessee, however, it is reported that this type of technology is not regularly utilized at the student level in most high school science classrooms, especially in the area of Physical Science (Vernier, 2006). This research explored the effect of calculator based laboratory instruction on standardized test scores. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of traditional teaching methods versus graphing calculator teaching methods on the state mandated End-of-Course (EOC) Physical Science exam based on ability, gender, and ethnicity. The sample included 187 total tenth and eleventh grade physical science students, 101 of which belonged to a control group and 87 of which belonged to the experimental group. Physical Science End-of-Course scores obtained from the Tennessee Department of Education during the spring of 2005 and the spring of 2006 were used to examine the hypotheses. The findings of this research study suggested the type of teaching method, traditional or calculator based, did not have an effect on standardized test scores. However, the students' ability level, as demonstrated on the End-of-Course test, had a significant effect on End-of-Course test scores. This study focused on a limited population of high school physical science students in the middle Tennessee

  4. Effectiveness of a computer based medication calculation education and testing programme for nurses.

    PubMed

    Sherriff, Karen; Burston, Sarah; Wallis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of an on-line, medication calculation education and testing programme. The outcome measures were medication calculation proficiency and self efficacy. This quasi-experimental study involved the administration of questionnaires before and after nurses completed annual medication calculation testing. The study was conducted in two hospitals in south-east Queensland, Australia, which provide a variety of clinical services including obstetrics, paediatrics, ambulatory, mental health, acute and critical care and community services. Participants were registered nurses (RNs) and enrolled nurses with a medication endorsement (EN(Med)) working as clinicians (n=107). Data pertaining to success rate, number of test attempts, self-efficacy, medication calculation error rates and nurses' satisfaction with the programme were collected. Medication calculation scores at first test attempt showed improvement following one year of access to the programme. Two of the self-efficacy subscales improved over time and nurses reported satisfaction with the online programme. Results of this study may facilitate the continuation and expansion of medication calculation and administration education to improve nursing knowledge, inform practise and directly improve patient safety.

  5. Effect of voxel size when calculating patient specific radionuclide dosimetry estimates using direct Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Kevin J; O'Keefe, Graeme J

    2014-09-01

    The scalable XCAT voxelised phantom was used with the GATE Monte Carlo toolkit to investigate the effect of voxel size on dosimetry estimates of internally distributed radionuclide calculated using direct Monte Carlo simulation. A uniformly distributed Fluorine-18 source was simulated in the Kidneys of the XCAT phantom with the organ self dose (kidney ← kidney) and organ cross dose (liver ← kidney) being calculated for a number of organ and voxel sizes. Patient specific dose factors (DF) from a clinically acquired FDG PET/CT study have also been calculated for kidney self dose and liver ← kidney cross dose. Using the XCAT phantom it was found that significantly small voxel sizes are required to achieve accurate calculation of organ self dose. It has also been used to show that a voxel size of 2 mm or less is suitable for accurate calculations of organ cross dose. To compensate for insufficient voxel sampling a correction factor is proposed. This correction factor is applied to the patient specific dose factors calculated with the native voxel size of the PET/CT study.

  6. Taming the Goldstone contributions to the effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2014-07-01

    The standard perturbative effective potential suffers from two related problems of principle involving the field-dependent Goldstone boson squared mass, G. First, in general G can be negative, and it actually is negative in the Standard Model; this leads to imaginary contributions to the effective potential that are not associated with a physical instability, and therefore spurious. Second, in the limit that G approaches zero, the effective potential minimization condition is logarithmically divergent already at two-loop order, and has increasingly severe power-law singularities at higher loop orders. I resolve both issues by resumming the Goldstone boson contributions to the effective potential. For the resulting resummed effective potential, the minimum value and the minimization condition that gives the vacuum expectation value are obtained in forms that do not involve G at all.

  7. Taming the Goldstone contributions to the effective potential

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2014-07-28

    The standard perturbative effective potential suffers from two related problems of principle involving the field-dependent Goldstone boson squared mass, G. First, in general G can be negative, and it actually is negative in the Standard Model; this leads to imaginary contributions to the effective potential that are not associated with a physical instability, and therefore spurious. Second, in the limit that G approaches zero, the effective potential minimization condition is logarithmically divergent already at two-loop order, and has increasingly severe power-law singularities at higher loop orders. I resolve both issues by resumming the Goldstone boson contributions to the effective potential. For the resulting resummed effective potential, the minimum value and the minimization condition that gives the vacuum expectation value are obtained in forms that do not involve G at all.

  8. Bending of I-beam with the transvers shear effect included - FEM calculated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygorowicz, Magdalena; Lewiński, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    The paper is devoted to three-point bending of an I-beam with include of transvers shear effect. Numerical calculations were conducted independently with the use of the SolidWorks system and the multi-purpose software package ANSYS The results of FEM study conducted with the use of two systems were compared and presented in tables and figures.

  9. Importance of resonance interference effects in multigroup self-shielding calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Stachowski, R.E.; Protsik, R.

    1995-12-31

    The impact of the resonance interference method (RIF) on multigroup neutron cross sections is significant for major isotopes in the fuel, indicating the importance of resonance interference in the computation of gadolinia burnout and plutonium buildup. The self-shielding factor method with the RIF method effectively eliminates shortcomings in multigroup resonance calculations.

  10. The Effect of Calculator-Based Ranger Activities on Students' Graphing Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Oh Nam

    2002-01-01

    Addresses three issues of Calculator-based Ranger (CBR) activities on graphing abilities: (a) the effect of CBR activities on graphing abilities; (b) the extent to which prior knowledge about graphing skills affects graphing ability; and (c) the influence of instructional styles on students' graphing abilities. Indicates that CBR activities are…

  11. Effects of airfoil shape, thickness, camber, and angle of attack on calculated transonic unsteady airloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of airfoil shape, thickness, camber, and mean angle of attack on transonic unsteady airloads were investigated as calculated by the transonic small-disturbance computer code XTRAN2L. Shape effects were investigated by examining the pressure distributions, shock locations, and unsteady airloads for three 10 percent thick airfoils. NACA 0010, NACA 64A010, and parabolic arc. Thickness effects were determined by studying a single airfoil shape with three different thicknesses: NACA 0008, NACA 0010, and NACA 0012. Angle of attack and camber effects were studied by including mean angle of attack or by adding a simple parabolic camber distribution to the originally symmetric airfoils. Comparisons of unsteady airloads for different airfoil configurations show similar results caused by variations in airfoil shape, thickness, camber, or mean angle of attack. Computer costs can be reduced by limiting the number of transonic unsteady aerodynamic calculations for small changes in airfoil geometry or angle of attack.

  12. The effect of molecular dynamics sampling on the calculated observable gas-phase structures.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis S; Otlyotov, Arseniy A; Rybkin, Vladimir V

    2016-07-21

    In this study, we compare the performance of various ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) sampling methods for the calculation of the observable vibrationally-averaged gas-phase structures of benzene, naphthalene and anthracene molecules. Nose-Hoover (NH), canonical and quantum generalized-Langevin-equation (GLE) thermostats as well as the a posteriori quantum correction to the classical trajectories have been tested and compared to the accurate path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), static anharmonic vibrational calculations as well as to the experimental gas electron diffraction data. Classical sampling methods neglecting quantum effects (NH and canonical GLE thermostats) dramatically underestimate vibrational amplitudes for the bonded atom pairs, both C-H and C-C, the resulting radial distribution functions exhibit nonphysically narrow peaks. This deficiency is almost completely removed by taking the quantum effects on the nuclei into account. The quantum GLE thermostat and a posteriori correction to the canonical GLE and NH thermostatted trajectories capture most vibrational quantum effects and closely reproduce computationally expensive PIMD and experimental radial distribution functions. These methods are both computationally feasible and accurate and are therefore recommended for calculations of the observable gas-phase structures. A good performance of the quantum GLE thermostat for the gas-phase calculations is encouraging since its parameters have been originally fitted for the condensed-phase calculations. Very accurate molecular structures can be predicted by combining the equilibrium geometry obtained at a high level of electronic structure theory with vibrational amplitudes and corrections calculated using MD driven by a lower level of electronic structure theory.

  13. The effect of walking speed on local dynamic stability is sensitive to calculation methods.

    PubMed

    Stenum, Jan; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Jensen, Bente R

    2014-11-28

    Local dynamic stability has been assessed by the short-term local divergence exponent (λS), which quantifies the average rate of logarithmic divergence of infinitesimally close trajectories in state space. Both increased and decreased local dynamic stability at faster walking speeds have been reported. This might pertain to methodological differences in calculating λS. Therefore, the aim was to test if different calculation methods would induce different effects of walking speed on local dynamic stability. Ten young healthy participants walked on a treadmill at five speeds (60%, 80%, 100%, 120% and 140% of preferred walking speed) for 3min each, while upper body accelerations in three directions were sampled. From these time-series, λS was calculated by three different methods using: (a) a fixed time interval and expressed as logarithmic divergence per stride-time (λS-a), (b) a fixed number of strides and expressed as logarithmic divergence per time (λS-b) and (c) a fixed number of strides and expressed as logarithmic divergence per stride-time (λS-c). Mean preferred walking speed was 1.16±0.09m/s. There was only a minor effect of walking speed on λS-a. λS-b increased with increasing walking speed indicating decreased local dynamic stability at faster walking speeds, whereas λS-c decreased with increasing walking speed indicating increased local dynamic stability at faster walking speeds. Thus, the effect of walking speed on calculated local dynamic stability was significantly different between methods used to calculate local dynamic stability. Therefore, inferences and comparisons of studies employing λS should be made with careful consideration of the calculation method.

  14. The effect of molecular dynamics sampling on the calculated observable gas-phase structures.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis S; Otlyotov, Arseniy A; Rybkin, Vladimir V

    2016-07-21

    In this study, we compare the performance of various ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) sampling methods for the calculation of the observable vibrationally-averaged gas-phase structures of benzene, naphthalene and anthracene molecules. Nose-Hoover (NH), canonical and quantum generalized-Langevin-equation (GLE) thermostats as well as the a posteriori quantum correction to the classical trajectories have been tested and compared to the accurate path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), static anharmonic vibrational calculations as well as to the experimental gas electron diffraction data. Classical sampling methods neglecting quantum effects (NH and canonical GLE thermostats) dramatically underestimate vibrational amplitudes for the bonded atom pairs, both C-H and C-C, the resulting radial distribution functions exhibit nonphysically narrow peaks. This deficiency is almost completely removed by taking the quantum effects on the nuclei into account. The quantum GLE thermostat and a posteriori correction to the canonical GLE and NH thermostatted trajectories capture most vibrational quantum effects and closely reproduce computationally expensive PIMD and experimental radial distribution functions. These methods are both computationally feasible and accurate and are therefore recommended for calculations of the observable gas-phase structures. A good performance of the quantum GLE thermostat for the gas-phase calculations is encouraging since its parameters have been originally fitted for the condensed-phase calculations. Very accurate molecular structures can be predicted by combining the equilibrium geometry obtained at a high level of electronic structure theory with vibrational amplitudes and corrections calculated using MD driven by a lower level of electronic structure theory. PMID:27331660

  15. Analytical Fractal Model for Calculating Effective Thermal Conductivity of the Fibrous Porous Materials.

    PubMed

    Kan, An-Kang; Cao, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Lai

    2015-04-01

    Accurately predicting the effective thermal conductivity of the fibrous materials is highly desirable but remains to be a challenging work. In this paper, the microstructure of the porous fiber materials is analyzed, approximated and modeled on basis of the statistical self-similarity of fractal theory. A fractal model is presented to accurately calculate the effective thermal conductivity of fibrous porous materials. Taking the two-phase heat transfer effect into account, the existing statistical microscopic geometrical characteristics are analyzed and the Hertzian Contact solution is introduced to calculate the thermal resistance of contact points. Using the fractal method, the impacts of various factors, including the porosity, fiber orientation, fractal diameter and dimension, rarified air pressure, bulk thermal conductivity coefficient, thickness and environment condition, on the effective thermal conductivity, are analyzed. The calculation results show that the fiber orientation angle caused the material effective thermal conductivity to be anisotropic, and normal distribution is introduced into the mathematic function. The effective thermal conductivity of fibrous material increases with the fiber fractal diameter, fractal dimension and rarefied air pressure within the materials, but decreases with the increase of vacancy porosity.

  16. Monte Carlo and deterministic computational methods for the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhaopeng; Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2013-07-01

    The effective delayed neutron fraction β plays an important role in kinetics and static analysis of the reactor physics experiments. It is used as reactivity unit referred to as "dollar". Usually, it is obtained by computer simulation due to the difficulty in measuring it experimentally. In 1965, Keepin proposed a method, widely used in the literature, for the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fraction β. This method requires calculation of the adjoint neutron flux as a weighting function of the phase space inner products and is easy to implement by deterministic codes. With Monte Carlo codes, the solution of the adjoint neutron transport equation is much more difficult because of the continuous-energy treatment of nuclear data. Consequently, alternative methods, which do not require the explicit calculation of the adjoint neutron flux, have been proposed. In 1997, Bretscher introduced the k-ratio method for calculating the effective delayed neutron fraction; this method is based on calculating the multiplication factor of a nuclear reactor core with and without the contribution of delayed neutrons. The multiplication factor set by the delayed neutrons (the delayed multiplication factor) is obtained as the difference between the total and the prompt multiplication factors. Using Monte Carlo calculation Bretscher evaluated the β as the ratio between the delayed and total multiplication factors (therefore the method is often referred to as the k-ratio method). In the present work, the k-ratio method is applied by Monte Carlo (MCNPX) and deterministic (PARTISN) codes. In the latter case, the ENDF/B nuclear data library of the fuel isotopes (235U and 238U) has been processed by the NJOY code with and without the delayed neutron data to prepare multi-group WIMSD neutron libraries for the lattice physics code DRAGON, which was used to generate the PARTISN macroscopic cross sections. In recent years Meulekamp and van der Marck in 2006 and Nauchi and Kameyama

  17. An isotopic mass effect on the intermolecular potential

    DOE PAGES

    Herman, Michael F.; Currier, Robert Patrick; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-09-28

    The impact of isotopic variation on the electronic energy and intermolecular potentials is often suppressed when calculating isotopologue thermodynamics. Intramolecular potential energy surfaces for distinct isotopologues are in fact equivalent under the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, which is sometimes used to imply that the intermolecular interactions are independent of isotopic mass. In this paper, the intermolecular dipole–dipole interaction between hetero-nuclear diatomic molecules is considered. It is shown that the intermolecular potential contains mass-dependent terms even though each nucleus moves on a Born–Oppenheimer surface. Finally, the analysis suggests that mass dependent variations in intermolecular potentials should be included in comprehensive descriptions of isotopologuemore » thermodynamics.« less

  18. Benchmark Quantum Mechanical Calculations of Vibrationally Resolved Cross Sections and Rate Constants on ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces for the F + HD Reaction: Comparisons with Experiments.

    PubMed

    De Fazio, Dario; Cavalli, Simonetta; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2016-07-14

    Quantum scattering calculations within the time-independent approach in an extended interval of energies were performed for the title reaction on four ab initio potential energy surfaces. The calculated integral cross sections, vibrational branching ratios, and rate constants are compared with scattering experiments as well as with chemical kinetics rate data available for this system for both the HF and DF channels. The calculations on the CSZ (J. Chem. Phys. 2015, 142, 024303) and LWAL (J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 127, 174302) surfaces are in close agreement between them and reproduce satisfactorily the experimental measurements. The agreement with the experiments is improved with respect to calculations on the earlier SW (J. Chem. Phys. 1996, 104, 6515) and FXZ (J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 129, 011103) surfaces. The results presented here witness the remarkable progress made by quantum chemistry calculations in describing the interatomic interactions governing the dynamics and kinetics of this reaction. They also suggest that comparison with translationally and rotationally averaged experimental observables is not sufficient to assess the relative accuracy of highly accurate potential energy surfaces. The dynamics and kinetics calculations show that temperatures lower than 50 K or molecular beam energy spread below 1 meV must be reached to discriminate the accuracy of the LWAL and the CSZ surfaces.

  19. A potential energy surface for the process H2 + H2O yielding H + H + H2O - Ab initio calculations and analytical representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive ab initio calculations on the ground state potential energy surface of H2 + H2O were performed using a large contracted Gaussian basis set and a high level of correlation treatment. An analytical representation of the potential energy surface was then obtained which reproduces the calculated energies with an overall root-mean-square error of only 0.64 mEh. The analytic representation explicitly includes all nine internal degrees of freedom and is also well behaved as the H2 dissociates; it thus can be used to study collision-induced dissociation or recombination of H2. The strategy used to minimize the number of energy calculations is discussed, as well as other advantages of the present method for determining the analytical representation.

  20. Effect of tensile strain on the electronic structure of Ge: A first-principles calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Miao; Di, Zengfeng E-mail: shijin.zhao@shu.edu.cn; Hu, Lijuan; Zhao, Shi-Jin E-mail: shijin.zhao@shu.edu.cn

    2014-09-21

    Taking the change of L-point conduction band valley degeneracy under strain into consideration, we investigate the effect of biaxially tensile strain (parallel to the (001), (110), and (111) planes) and uniaxially tensile strain (along the [001], [110], and [111] directions) on the electronic structure of Ge using density functional theory calculations. Our calculation shows that biaxial tension parallel to (001) is the most efficient way to transform Ge into a direct bandgap material among all tensile strains considered. [111]-tension is the best choice among all uniaxial approaches for an indirect- to direct-bandgap transition of Ge. The calculation results, which are further elaborated by bond-orbital approximation, provide a useful guidance on the optical applications of Ge through strain engineering.

  1. An effective method for calculating phase-matching conditions in biaxial crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Guangwen; Wang, Yongcang; Zhang, Meizhi

    2015-08-01

    We present an effective method for calculating phase-matching conditions in biaxial crystals, especially for nonlinear orthorhombic crystals. Exploiting the angle definition introduced by Japanese mathematician Kodaira Kunihiko, we deduce the angular relations in geometry and obtain the expressions of refractive indices depending on angular orientation of wave vector k and optical axis angle. Then, we directly calculate the phase-matching conditions with BIBO crystal in spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) process and gain the optimum phase matching schemes for the type I and type II. On its basis, we discuss the angular gradients of the pump and emission wave refractive index near the exact phase matching direction and compare the SPDC with double-frequency process in geometrical relations of the refractive index ellipsoids. This method based on angle-dependent refractive index can be applied to three-wave interactions. It is convenient to calculate the phase matching parameters without solving the quadratic Fresnel equations.

  2. Electron correlation and relativistic effects in atomic structure calculations of Th+, Th2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. K.; Prasad, Rajendra; Datta, Sambhu N.; Chandra, P.

    2012-10-01

    Relativistic two-component ab initio calculations through second-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) transformation are performed on Th+ and Th2+ ions. Spin-orbit-free calculations are done at SA-CASSCF and MS-CASPT2 levels. Spin-orbit coupled states are studied using effective mean-field operator. Spin-orbit states of Th+, below 23 000 cm-1 are compared with experimental values. Relative separations between various energy levels depend on the amount of electron correlation included in the calculation. For Th2+, spin-orbit energy levels below 20 000 cm-1 agree well with the experimental levels. Transition properties of several spin-orbit states in case of Th2+ ion are predicted.

  3. CALCULATED MOLECULAR STRUCTURES AND POTENTIAL ENERGY FUNCTIONS OF PAHS WITH METHYL CROWDING IN THE BAY REGION AND THEIR METABOLITES: COMPARISON TO EXPERIMENTAL STRUCTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Title: Calculated molecular structures and potential energy functions of P AHs with methyl crowding in the bay region and their metabolites: Comparison to experimental structures.

    Abstract:
    PAHs with methyl group substitution near a bay region represent a cl...

  4. CALCULATED MOLECULAR STRUCTURES AND POTENTIAL ENERGY FUNCTIONS OF PAHS WITH METHYL CROWDING IN THE BAY REGION AND THEIR METABOLITES: COMPARISON TO EXPERIMENTAL STRUCTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calculated molecular structures and potential energy functions ofP AHs with methyl crowding in the bay region and their metabolites: Comparison to experimental structures

    PAHs with methyl group substitution near a bay region represent a class of chemicals associated with ...

  5. The effect of perturbing body segment parameters on calculated joint moments and muscle forces during gait.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; de Groote, Friedl; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-01-22

    This study examined the effect of body segment parameter (BSP) perturbations on joint moments calculated using an inverse dynamics procedure and muscle forces calculated using computed muscle control (CMC) during gait. BSP (i.e. segment mass, center of mass location (com) and inertia tensor) of the left thigh, shank and foot of a scaled musculoskeletal model were perturbed. These perturbations started from their nominal value and were adjusted to ±40% in steps of 10%, for both individual as well as combined perturbations in BSP. For all perturbations, an inverse dynamics procedure calculated the ankle, knee and hip moments based on an identical inverse kinematics solution. Furthermore, the effect of applying a residual reduction algorithm (RRA) was investigated. Muscle excitations and resulting muscle forces were calculated using CMC. The results show only a limited effect of an individual parameter perturbation on the calculated moments, where the largest effect is found when perturbing the shank com (MS(com,shank), the ratio of absolute difference in torque and relative parameter perturbation, is maximally -7.81 N m for hip flexion moment). The additional influence of perturbing two parameters simultaneously is small (MS(mass+com,thigh) is maximally 15.2 N m for hip flexion moment). RRA made small changes to the model to increase the dynamic consistency of the simulation (after RRA MS(com,shank) is maximally 5.01 N m). CMC results show large differences in muscle forces when BSP are perturbed. These result from the underlying forward integration of the dynamic equations. PMID:24332615

  6. The effect of perturbing body segment parameters on calculated joint moments and muscle forces during gait.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; de Groote, Friedl; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-01-22

    This study examined the effect of body segment parameter (BSP) perturbations on joint moments calculated using an inverse dynamics procedure and muscle forces calculated using computed muscle control (CMC) during gait. BSP (i.e. segment mass, center of mass location (com) and inertia tensor) of the left thigh, shank and foot of a scaled musculoskeletal model were perturbed. These perturbations started from their nominal value and were adjusted to ±40% in steps of 10%, for both individual as well as combined perturbations in BSP. For all perturbations, an inverse dynamics procedure calculated the ankle, knee and hip moments based on an identical inverse kinematics solution. Furthermore, the effect of applying a residual reduction algorithm (RRA) was investigated. Muscle excitations and resulting muscle forces were calculated using CMC. The results show only a limited effect of an individual parameter perturbation on the calculated moments, where the largest effect is found when perturbing the shank com (MS(com,shank), the ratio of absolute difference in torque and relative parameter perturbation, is maximally -7.81 N m for hip flexion moment). The additional influence of perturbing two parameters simultaneously is small (MS(mass+com,thigh) is maximally 15.2 N m for hip flexion moment). RRA made small changes to the model to increase the dynamic consistency of the simulation (after RRA MS(com,shank) is maximally 5.01 N m). CMC results show large differences in muscle forces when BSP are perturbed. These result from the underlying forward integration of the dynamic equations.

  7. Size effects in aerosol particle interactions: the van der Waals potential and collision rates

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, W H

    1980-01-01

    Three effects which are explicitly dependent on aerosol particle size are identified and discussed. They are focussed about the particle collision rate and how it relates to the properties of the gas, the particle, and the particle's interaction potential energy which play roles in particle-particle collision rates. By incorporating the conduction electronic free path effect for conductors into the frequency-dependent dielectric constants of silver and graphite, particle size effects in the Lifshitz-van der Waals potentials for identical pairs of 1 nm and 100 nm particles are evaluated. Water and tetradecane particle interaction potentials for the same size particles are also calculated to illustrate size effects due to the retardation of the interaction. These potentials are then used to calculate the enhancement of the particle collision rates above their values in the absence of any potential at various gas pressures. The roles of the interaction potential in collision among identical pairs of particles of differing compositions is also briefly discussed.

  8. Simple and effective calculations about spectral power distributions of outdoor light sources for computer vision.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiandong; Duan, Zhigang; Ren, Weihong; Han, Zhi; Tang, Yandong

    2016-04-01

    The spectral power distributions (SPD) of outdoor light sources are not constant over time and atmospheric conditions, which causes the appearance variation of a scene and common natural illumination phenomena, such as twilight, shadow, and haze/fog. Calculating the SPD of outdoor light sources at different time (or zenith angles) and under different atmospheric conditions is of interest to physically-based vision. In this paper, for computer vision and its applications, we propose a feasible, simple, and effective SPD calculating method based on analyzing the transmittance functions of absorption and scattering along the path of solar radiation through the atmosphere in the visible spectrum. Compared with previous SPD calculation methods, our model has less parameters and is accurate enough to be directly applied in computer vision. It can be applied in computer vision tasks including spectral inverse calculation, lighting conversion, and shadowed image processing. The experimental results of the applications demonstrate that our calculation methods have practical values in computer vision. It establishes a bridge between image and physical environmental information, e.g., time, location, and weather conditions. PMID:27137018

  9. Simple and effective calculations about spectral power distributions of outdoor light sources for computer vision.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiandong; Duan, Zhigang; Ren, Weihong; Han, Zhi; Tang, Yandong

    2016-04-01

    The spectral power distributions (SPD) of outdoor light sources are not constant over time and atmospheric conditions, which causes the appearance variation of a scene and common natural illumination phenomena, such as twilight, shadow, and haze/fog. Calculating the SPD of outdoor light sources at different time (or zenith angles) and under different atmospheric conditions is of interest to physically-based vision. In this paper, for computer vision and its applications, we propose a feasible, simple, and effective SPD calculating method based on analyzing the transmittance functions of absorption and scattering along the path of solar radiation through the atmosphere in the visible spectrum. Compared with previous SPD calculation methods, our model has less parameters and is accurate enough to be directly applied in computer vision. It can be applied in computer vision tasks including spectral inverse calculation, lighting conversion, and shadowed image processing. The experimental results of the applications demonstrate that our calculation methods have practical values in computer vision. It establishes a bridge between image and physical environmental information, e.g., time, location, and weather conditions.

  10. A computational study of barium blockades in the KcsA potassium channel based on multi-ion potential of mean force calculations and free energy perturbation.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Christopher N; Roux, Benoît

    2013-10-01

    Electrophysiological studies have established that the permeation of Ba(2+) ions through the KcsA K(+)-channel is impeded by the presence of K(+) ions in the external solution, while no effect is observed for external Na(+) ions. This Ba(2+) "lock-in" effect suggests that at least one of the external binding sites of the KcsA channel is thermodynamically selective for K(+). We used molecular dynamics simulations to interpret these lock-in experiments in the context of the crystallographic structure of KcsA. Assuming that the Ba(2+) is bound in site S(2) in the dominant blocked state, we examine the conditions that could impede its translocation and cause the observed "lock-in" effect. Although the binding of a K(+) ion to site S(1) when site S(2) is occupied by Ba(2+) is prohibitively high in energy (>10 kcal/mol), binding to site S0 appears to be more plausible (ΔG > 4 kcal/mol). The 2D potential of mean force (PMF) for the simultaneous translocation of Ba(2+) from site S(2) to site S(1) and of a K(+) ion on the extracellular side shows a barrier that is consistent with the concept of external lock-in. The barrier opposing the movement of Ba(2+) is very high when a cation is in site S(0), and considerably smaller when the site is unoccupied. Furthermore, free energy perturbation calculations show that site S(0) is selective for K(+) by 1.8 kcal/mol when S(2) is occupied by Ba(2+). However, the same site S(0) is nonselective when site S(2) is occupied by K(+), which shows that the presence of Ba(2+) affects the selectivity of the pore. A theoretical framework within classical rate theory is presented to incorporate the concentration dependence of the external ions on the lock-in effect.

  11. A computational study of barium blockades in the KcsA potassium channel based on multi-ion potential of mean force calculations and free energy perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies have established that the permeation of Ba2+ ions through the KcsA K+-channel is impeded by the presence of K+ ions in the external solution, while no effect is observed for external Na+ ions. This Ba2+ “lock-in” effect suggests that at least one of the external binding sites of the KcsA channel is thermodynamically selective for K+. We used molecular dynamics simulations to interpret these lock-in experiments in the context of the crystallographic structure of KcsA. Assuming that the Ba2+ is bound in site S2 in the dominant blocked state, we examine the conditions that could impede its translocation and cause the observed “lock-in” effect. Although the binding of a K+ ion to site S1 when site S2 is occupied by Ba2+ is prohibitively high in energy (>10 kcal/mol), binding to site S0 appears to be more plausible (ΔG > 4 kcal/mol). The 2D potential of mean force (PMF) for the simultaneous translocation of Ba2+ from site S2 to site S1 and of a K+ ion on the extracellular side shows a barrier that is consistent with the concept of external lock-in. The barrier opposing the movement of Ba2+ is very high when a cation is in site S0, and considerably smaller when the site is unoccupied. Furthermore, free energy perturbation calculations show that site S0 is selective for K+ by 1.8 kcal/mol when S2 is occupied by Ba2+. However, the same site S0 is nonselective when site S2 is occupied by K+, which shows that the presence of Ba2+ affects the selectivity of the pore. A theoretical framework within classical rate theory is presented to incorporate the concentration dependence of the external ions on the lock-in effect. PMID:24043859

  12. Effects of grid size and aggregation on regional scale landuse scenario calculations using SVAT schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, H.

    2006-09-01

    This paper analyses the effect of spatial input data resolution on the simulated effects of regional scale landuse scenarios using the TOPLATS model. A data set of 25 m resolution of the central German Dill catchment (693 km2) and three different landuse scenarios are used for the investigation. Landuse scenarios in this study are field size scenarios, and depending on a specific target field size (0.5 ha, 1.5 ha and 5.0 ha) landuse is determined by optimising economic outcome of agricultural used areas and forest. After an aggregation of digital elevation model, soil map, current landuse and landuse scenarios to 50 m, 75 m, 100 m, 150 m, 200 m, 300 m, 500 m, 1 km and 2 km, water balances and water flow components for a 20 years time period are calculated for the entire Dill catchment as well as for 3 subcatchments without any recalibration. Additionally water balances based on the three landuse scenarios as well as changes between current conditions and scenarios are calculated. The study reveals that both model performance measures (for current landuse) as well as water balances (for current landuse and landuse scenarios) almost remain constant for most of the aggregation steps for all investigated catchments. Small deviations are detected at the resolution of 50 m to 500 m, while significant differences occur at the resolution of 1 km and 2 km which can be explained by changes in the statistics of the input data. Calculating the scenario effects based on increasing grid sizes yields similar results. However, the change effects react more sensitive to data aggregation than simple water balance calculations. Increasing deviations between simulations based on small grid sizes and simulations using grid sizes of 300 m and more are observed. Summarizing, this study indicates that an aggregation of input data for the calculation of regional water balances using TOPLATS type models does not lead to significant errors up to a resolution of 500 m. Focusing on scenario

  13. CAR 88: A method to calculate subsonic and supersonic, steady and unsteady, potential flow about complex configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounjet, M. H. L.

    1988-10-01

    A description of the method CAR88 for the calculation of steady and time linearized unsteady subsonic and supersonic flow about complex two dimensional and three dimensional configurations is given. The method belongs to the category of the so called panel methods. Results of applications in supersonic flow made to a two dimensional oscillating flat plate, a two dimensional double and single edge airfoil, three dimensional cones, and to single and multiple interfering wing surface are shown.

  14. Bernoulli effect and contact potential difference in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'yanchuk, A.N.; Beloborod'ko, S.I.

    1983-10-01

    An expression is derived for the Bernoulli potential that arises in superconductors with an inhomogeneous current distribution. The expression is valid for arbitrary temperatures and superfluid velocities. In the superconductor--dielectric--superconductor system we consider the Bernoulli effect, which manifests itself in a contact potential difference between the superconductors. The potential difference is determined by the currents flowing through one plate of the contact and can be measured with a voltmeter in the quasi-stationary regime.

  15. The effect of gamma-ray transport on afterheat calculations for accident analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S.; Latkowski, J.F.; Sanz, J.

    2000-05-01

    Radioactive afterheat is an important source term for the release of radionuclides in fusion systems under accident conditions. Heat transfer calculations are used to determine time-temperature histories in regions of interest, but the true source term needs to be the effective afterheat, which considers the transport of penetrating gamma rays. Without consideration of photon transport, accident temperatures may be overestimated in others. The importance of this effect is demonstrated for a simple, one-dimensional problem. The significance of this effect depends strongly on the accident scenario being analyzed.

  16. CFD-CAA Coupled Calculations of a Tandem Cylinder Configuration to Assess Facility Installation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redonnet, Stephane; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical assessment of acoustic installation effects in the tandem cylinder (TC) experiments conducted in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility (QFF), an open-jet, anechoic wind tunnel. Calculations that couple the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) of the TC configuration within the QFF are conducted using the CFD simulation results previously obtained at NASA LaRC. The coupled simulations enable the assessment of installation effects associated with several specific features in the QFF facility that may have impacted the measured acoustic signature during the experiment. The CFD-CAA coupling is based on CFD data along a suitably chosen surface, and employs a technique that was recently improved to account for installed configurations involving acoustic backscatter into the CFD domain. First, a CFD-CAA calculation is conducted for an isolated TC configuration to assess the coupling approach, as well as to generate a reference solution for subsequent assessments of QFF installation effects. Direct comparisons between the CFD-CAA calculations associated with the various installed configurations allow the assessment of the effects of each component (nozzle, collector, etc.) or feature (confined vs. free jet flow, etc.) characterizing the NASA LaRC QFF facility.

  17. Effect of the earth's ellipticity on the lunar tidal potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    The earth's orbital acceleration about the moon is influenced by its ellipticity. In this paper it shown that the ellipticity affects tidal gravity by contributing directly to the lunar tide-generating potential (in addition to effecting the elastic-gravitational response of the solid earth and oceans to this potential).

  18. A Self-Consistent Approach for Calculating the Effective Hydraulic Conductivity of a Bimodal, Heterogeneous Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdniakov, Sergey; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-01-02

    In this paper, we consider an approach for estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 3D medium with a binary distribution of local hydraulic conductivities. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix medium conductivity with spatially distributed sets of inclusions. Estimation of effective conductivity is based on a self-consistent approach introduced by Shvidler (1985). The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated numerically by using a simple system of equations for the main diagonal elements. Verification of the method is done by comparison with theoretical results for special cases and numerical results of Desbarats (1987) and our own numerical modeling. The method was applied to estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 2D and 3D fractured porous medium. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix conductivity and a spatially distributed set of highly conductive fractures. The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated for parallel- and random-oriented sets of fractures. The obtained effective conductivity values coincide with Romm's (1966) and Snow's (1969) theories for infinite fracture length. These values are also physically acceptable for the sparsely-fractured-medium case with low fracture spatial density and finite fracture length. Verification of the effective hydraulic conductivity obtained for a fractured porous medium is done by comparison with our own numerical modeling for a 3D case and with Malkovsky and Pek's (1995) results for a 2D case.

  19. Chemical potential effects on neutrino diffusion in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurek, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    The validity of imposing a zero chemical potential for neutrinos in hydrodynamic calculations of collapsing supernovae is investigated in the diffusion approximation of neutrino transport. A coupled system of equations is solved for neutrino and energy diffusion fluxes as well as lepton diffusion in a collapsing supernovae ambient medium, and the results indicate a substantial growth in the neutrino chemical potential for densities greater than 10 to the 12th power gm/cu cm. The rate of energy transport is shown to be significantly affected by increases in Fermi integrals and chemical-potential gradients accompanied by decreases in temperature, and the extent of neutrino particle/antiparticle reactions is found also to affect energy diffusion rates. It is concluded that the photon-like behavior usually assumed for neutrinos may be incorrect and that an extension of the Sn transport approximation to include lepton characteristics is necessary for a definitive answer to the question of neutrino transport in supernovae.

  20. Magnetoconductance of a hybrid quantum ring: Effects of antidot potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nammee; Park, Dae-Han; Kim, Heesang

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structures and two-terminal magnetoconductance of a hybrid quantum ring are studied. The backscattering due to energy-resonance is considered in the conductance calculation. The hybrid magnetic-electric quantum ring is fabricated by applying an antidot electrostatic potential in the middle of a magnetic quantum dot. Electrons are both magnetically and electrically confined in the plane. The antidot potential repelling electrons from the center of the dot plays a critical role in the energy spectra and magnetoconductance. The angular momentum transition in the energy dispersion and the magnetoconductance behavior are investigated in consideration of the antidot potential variation. Results are shown using a comparison of the results of the conventional magnetic quantum dot.

  1. Effects of surface pressures and streamline metrics on the calculation of laminar heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; Dejarnette, Fred R.; Zoby, Vincent

    1988-01-01

    The effect of streamline geometry and pressure distributions on surface heating rates is examined for slender, spherically blunted cones. The modifications to the approximate aeroheating code include a curve fit of pressures computed by an Euler solution over a range of Mach numbers and cone angles. The streamline geometry is then found using the surface pressures and inviscid surface properties. Previously, streamlines were determined using the inviscid properties at the edge of the boundary layer when accounting for the effects of entropy-layer swallowing. Streamline calculations are now based on inviscid surface conditions rather than boundary-layer edge properties. However, the heating rates are calculated using inviscid properties at the edge of the boundary layer. Resulting heating rates compare favorably with solutions from the viscous-shock-layer equations.

  2. Calculation of the effective thermal conductivity of powders formed by spherical particles in a gaseous atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volchenko, T. S.; Yalovets, A. P.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a method for calculating the effective thermal conductivity of powders formed by spherical particles with a size exceeding 1 μm in a gaseous atmosphere in wide ranges of temperatures and pressures. We take into account the structural factor of the powder medium, adsorption of gas on the surface of solid spheres, the temperature dependences of the thermal conductivities of the powder components, and the formation of melt necks between the spheres after the attainment of the melting point. In the case of complete melting of the spheres, we propose a model for thermal conductivity of the melt with gas inclusions. The results of calculation of the effective thermal conductivity are in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Improving the Effectiveness of Integral Property Calculation in a CSG Solid Modeling System by Exploiting Predictability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Integral property calculation is an important application for solid modeling systems. Algorithms for computing integral properties for various solid representation schemes are fairly well known. It is important to deigners and users of solid modeling systems to understand the behavior of such algorithms. Specifically the trade-off between execution time and accuracy is critical to effective use of integral property calculation. The average behavior of two algorithms for Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) representations is investigated. Experimental results from the PADL-2 solid modeling system show that coarse decompositions can be used to predict execution time and error estimates for finer decompositions. Exploiting this predictability allow effective use of the algorithms in a solid modeling system.

  4. Ab initio path-integral calculations of kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects on base-catalyzed RNA transphosphorylation models.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Xu, Yuqing; York, Darrin M

    2014-06-30

    Detailed understandings of the reaction mechanisms of RNA catalysis in various environments can have profound importance for many applications, ranging from the design of new biotechnologies to the unraveling of the evolutionary origin of life. An integral step in the nucleolytic RNA catalysis is self-cleavage of RNA strands by 2'-O-transphosphorylation. Key to elucidating a reaction mechanism is determining the molecular structure and bonding characteristics of transition state. A direct and powerful probe of transition state is measuring isotope effects on biochemical reactions, particularly if we can reproduce isotope effect values from quantum calculations. This article significantly extends the scope of our previous joint experimental and theoretical work in examining isotope effects on enzymatic and nonenzymatic 2'-O-transphosphorylation reaction models that mimic reactions catalyzed by RNA enzymes (ribozymes), and protein enzymes such as ribonuclease A (RNase A). Native reactions are studied, as well as reactions with thio substitutions representing chemical modifications often used in experiments to probe mechanism. Here, we report and compare results from eight levels of electronic-structure calculations for constructing the potential energy surfaces in kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects (KIE and EIE) computations, including a "gold-standard" coupled-cluster level of theory [CCSD(T)]. In addition to the widely used Bigeleisen equation for estimating KIE and EIE values, internuclear anharmonicity and quantum tunneling effects were also computed using our recently developed ab initio path-integral method, that is, automated integration-free path-integral method. The results of this work establish an important set of benchmarks that serve to guide calculations of KIE and EIE for RNA catalysis.

  5. Ab Initio Path-Integral Calculations of Kinetic and Equilibrium Isotope Effects on Base-Catalyzed RNA Transphosphorylation Models

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Yuqing, Xu; York, Darrin M.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed understandings of the reaction mechanisms of RNA catalysis in various environments can have profound importance for many applications, ranging from the design of new biotechnologies to the unraveling of the evolutionary origin of life. An integral step in the nucleolytic RNA catalysis is self-cleavage of RNA strands by 2′-O-transphosphorylation. Key to elucidating a reaction mechanism is determining the molecular structure and bonding characteristics of transition state. A direct and powerful probe of transition state is measuring isotope effects on biochemical reactions, particularly if we can reproduce isotope effect values from quantum calculations. This paper significantly extends the scope of our previous joint experimental and theoretical work in examining isotope effects on enzymatic and non-enzymatic 2′-O-transphosphorylation reaction models that mimic reactions catalyzed by RNA enzymes (ribozymes), and protein enzymes such as ribonuclease A (RNase A). Native reactions are studied, as well as reactions with thio substitutions representing chemical modifications often used in experiments to probe mechanism. Here, we report and compare results from eight levels of electronic-structure calculations for constructing the potential energy surfaces in kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects (KIE and EIE) computations, including a “gold-standard” coupled-cluster level of theory [CCSD(T)]. In addition to the widely-used Bigeleisen equation for estimating KIE and EIE values, internuclear anharmonicity and quantum tunneling effects were also computed using our recently-developed ab initio path-integral method, i.e., automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method. The results of this work establish an important set of benchmarks that serve to guide calculations of KIE and EIE for RNA catalysis. PMID:24841935

  6. Calculation of wing response to gusts and blast waves with vortex lift effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, D. C.; Lan, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical study of the response of aircraft wings to atmospheric gusts and to nuclear explosions when flying at subsonic speeds is presented. The method is based upon unsteady quasi-vortex-lattice method, unsteady suction analogy, and Pade approximate. The calculated results, showing vortex lag effect, yield reasonable agreement with experimental data for incremental lift on wings in gust penetration and due to nuclear blast waves.

  7. Calculation of wing response to gusts and blast waves with vortex lift effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, D. C.; Lan, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical study of the response of aircraft wings to atmospheric gusts and to nuclear explosions when flying at subsonic speeds is presented. The method is based upon unsteady quasi-vortex lattice method, unsteady suction analogy and Pade approximant. The calculated results, showing vortex lag effect, yield reasonable agreement with experimental data for incremental lift on wings in gust penetration and due to nuclear blast waves.

  8. Model calculations of the relative effects of CFCs and their replacements on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Donald A.; Hales, Charles H.; Filkin, David L.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, N. Dak

    1990-01-01

    Because chlorine has been linked to the destruction of stratospheric ozone, the use of many fully halogenated compounds, such as the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11 and -12, is restricted by international agreement. Hydrohalocarbons are under intensive development as replacements for CFCs. Because they contain hydrogen, these gases are susceptible to tropospheric destruction which significantly shortens their atmospheric lifetimes,. Model calculations show that chlorine-containing hydrohalocarbons have less effect on ozone, by an order of magnitude, than their regulated counterparts.

  9. Calculation of wing response to gusts and blast waves with vortex lift effect

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, D.C.; Lan, C.E.

    1983-04-01

    A numerical study of the response of aircraft wings to atmospheric gusts and to nuclear explosions when flying at subsonic speeds is presented. The method is based upon unsteady quasi-vortex lattice method, unsteady suction analogy and Pade approximant. The calculated results, showing vortex lag effect, yield reasonable agreement with experimental data for incremental lift on wings in gust penetration and due to nuclear blast waves.

  10. Vector near-field calculation of scanning near-field optical microscopy probes using Borgnis potentials as auxiliary functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueen; Fan, Zhaozhong; Tang, Tiantong

    2005-07-01

    A new boundary integral equation method for solving the near field in three-dimensional vector form in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) using Borgnis potentials as auxiliary functions is presented. A boundary integral equation of the electromagnetic fields, expressed by Borgnis potentials, is derived based on Green's theorem. The harmonic expansion in rotationally symmetric SNOM probe--sample systems is studied, and the three-dimensional electromagnetic problem is partly simplified into a two-dimensional one. The boundary conditions of Borgnis potentials both on dielectric boundaries and on perfectly conducting boundaries are derived. Relevant algorithms were studied, and a computer program was written. As an example, a SNOM probe-sample system composed of a round metal-covered probe and a sample with a flat surface has been numerically studied, and the computational results are given. This new method can be used efficiently for other electromagnetic field problems with round subwavelength structures.

  11. The effect of jogging on P300 event related potentials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Nishimoto, K; Akamatu, M; Takahashi, M; Maruyama, A

    1999-03-01

    Physical exercise has beneficial effects not only on cardiovascular system and fat metabolism, may also directly effect the cognitive process. We studied the effect of physical exercise on cognitive processes by measuring the P300 event related-potential (ERP) after jogging. Seven well-trained joggers were enrolled in this study and the P300 potentials using auditory oddball paradigm. ERPs were measured before and after 30 minutes of jogging. The amplitude of the P300 significantly increased after jogging compared to values recorded before jogging. These findings suggest that jogging has the effect of facilitating cognitive processes involved in generation of the P300.

  12. The benzoic acid-water complex: a potential atmospheric nucleation precursor studied using microwave spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Elijah G; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2014-02-14

    The pure rotational, high-resolution spectrum of the benzoic acid-water complex was measured in the range of 4-14 GHz, using a cavity-based molecular beam Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. In all, 40 a-type transitions and 2 b-type transitions were measured for benzoic acid-water, and 12 a-type transitions were measured for benzoic acid-D2O. The equilibrium geometry of benzoic acid-water was determined with ab initio calculations, at the B3LYP, M06-2X, and MP2 levels of theory, with the 6-311++G(2df,2pd) basis set. The experimental rotational spectrum is most consistent with the B3LYP-predicted geometry. Narrow splittings were observed in the b-type transitions, and possible tunnelling motions were investigated using the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Rotation of the water moiety about the lone electron pair hydrogen-bonded to benzoic acid, across a barrier of 7.0 kJ mol(-1), is the most likely cause for the splitting. Wagging of the unbound hydrogen atom of water is barrier-less, and this large amplitude motion results in the absence of c-type transitions. The interaction and spectroscopic dissociation energies calculated using B3LYP and MP2 are in good agreement, but those calculated using M06-2X indicate excess stabilization, possibly due to dispersive interactions being over-estimated. The equilibrium constant of hydration was calculated by statistical thermodynamics, using ab initio results and the experimental rotational constants. This allowed us to estimate the changes in percentage of hydrated benzoic acid with variations in the altitude, region, and season. Using monitoring data from Calgary, Alberta, and the MP2-predicted dissociation energy, a yearly average of 1% of benzoic acid is expected to be present in the form of benzoic acid-water. However, this percentage depends sensitively on the dissociation energy. For example, when using the M06-2X-predicted dissociation energy, we find it increases to 18%.

  13. The Computer Code NOVO for the Calculation of Wake Potentials of the Very Short Ultra-relativistic Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2005-12-01

    The problem of electromagnetic interaction of a beam and accelerator elements is very important for linear colliders, electron-positron factories, and free electron lasers. Precise calculation of wake fields is required for beam dynamics study in these machines. We describe a method which allows computation of wake fields of the very short bunches. Computer code NOVO was developed based on this method. This method is free of unphysical solutions like ''self-acceleration'' of a bunch head, which is common to well known wake field codes. Code NOVO was used for the wake fields study for many accelerator projects all over the world.

  14. The benzoic acid-water complex: a potential atmospheric nucleation precursor studied using microwave spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Elijah G; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2014-02-14

    The pure rotational, high-resolution spectrum of the benzoic acid-water complex was measured in the range of 4-14 GHz, using a cavity-based molecular beam Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. In all, 40 a-type transitions and 2 b-type transitions were measured for benzoic acid-water, and 12 a-type transitions were measured for benzoic acid-D2O. The equilibrium geometry of benzoic acid-water was determined with ab initio calculations, at the B3LYP, M06-2X, and MP2 levels of theory, with the 6-311++G(2df,2pd) basis set. The experimental rotational spectrum is most consistent with the B3LYP-predicted geometry. Narrow splittings were observed in the b-type transitions, and possible tunnelling motions were investigated using the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Rotation of the water moiety about the lone electron pair hydrogen-bonded to benzoic acid, across a barrier of 7.0 kJ mol(-1), is the most likely cause for the splitting. Wagging of the unbound hydrogen atom of water is barrier-less, and this large amplitude motion results in the absence of c-type transitions. The interaction and spectroscopic dissociation energies calculated using B3LYP and MP2 are in good agreement, but those calculated using M06-2X indicate excess stabilization, possibly due to dispersive interactions being over-estimated. The equilibrium constant of hydration was calculated by statistical thermodynamics, using ab initio results and the experimental rotational constants. This allowed us to estimate the changes in percentage of hydrated benzoic acid with variations in the altitude, region, and season. Using monitoring data from Calgary, Alberta, and the MP2-predicted dissociation energy, a yearly average of 1% of benzoic acid is expected to be present in the form of benzoic acid-water. However, this percentage depends sensitively on the dissociation energy. For example, when using the M06-2X-predicted dissociation energy, we find it increases to 18%. PMID:24366483

  15. Evaluation of soil temperature effect on herbicide leaching potential into groundwater in the Brazilian Cerrado.

    PubMed

    Paraíba, Lourival Costa; Cerdeira, Antonio Luiz; da Silva, Enio Fraga; Martins, João Souza; Coutinho, Heitor Luiz da Costa

    2003-12-01

    The effect of annual variations in the daily average soil temperatures, at different depths, on the calculation of pesticide leaching potential indices is presented. This index can be applied to assess the risk of groundwater contamination by a pesticide. It considers the effects of water table depth, daily recharge net rate, pesticide sorption coefficient, and degradation rate of the pesticide in the soil. The leaching potential index is frequently used as a screening indicator in pesticide groundwater contamination studies, and the temperature effect involved in its calculation is usually not considered. It is well known that soil temperature affects pesticide degradation rates, air-water partition coefficient, and water-soil partition coefficient. These three parameters are components of the attenuation and retardation factors, as well as the leaching potential index, and contribute to determine pesticide behavior in the environment. The Arrhenius, van't Hoff, and Clausius-Clapeyron equations were used in this work to estimate the soil temperature effect on pesticide degradation rate, air-water partition coefficient, and water-soil partition coefficient, respectively. The relationship between leaching potential index and soil temperature at different depths is presented and aids in the understanding of how potential pesticide groundwater contamination varies on different climatic conditions. Numerical results will be presented for 31 herbicides known to be used in corn and soybean crops grown on the municipality of São Gabriel do Oeste, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil.

  16. General Pade Effective Potential for Coulomb Problems in Condensed and Soft Matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quyen, B. L.; Mai, D. N.; Hoa, N. M.; Van, T. T. T.; Hoai, N. L.; Viet, N. A.

    2014-09-01

    Effective potentials for finding the ground states and physical configurations have essential meaning in many Coulomb problems of condensed and soft matters. The ordinary n-Pade approximation potentials define as the ratio of Pi(r)/Pi+1(r), where Pi(r) are the polynomials of i-th order of charge separation r, give quite good fit and agreement of calculation results and experimental data for Coulomb problems, where screening effects are not important or exchange photons still are massless. In this work we consider a general Pade effective potential by included a factor of exponential form, which could give more accurate results also for above mentioned cases. This general Pade effective potentials with analytical expressions were useful to perform analytical calculations, estimations and to reduce the amount of computational time for future investigations in condensed and soft matter topics. For example of soft matter problems, we study the case of MS2 virus, the general Pade potential gives much more correct results comparing with ordinary Pade approximation.

  17. Vibrational spectra, theoretical calculations, and two-dimensional potential energy surface for the ring-puckering vibrations of 2,4,7-trioxa[3.3.0]octane.

    PubMed

    Chun, Hye Jin; Meinander, Niklas; Villarreal, John R; Laane, Jaan

    2015-01-15

    2,4,7-Trioxa[3.3.0]octane (247TOO) is an unusual bicyclic molecule which can exist in four different conformational forms which are determined by the directions of the two ring- puckering motions. The vibrational assignments of 247TOO have been made based on its infrared and Raman spectra and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The two ring-puckering motions (in-phase and out-of-phase) were observed in the Raman spectra of the liquid at 249 and 205 cm(-1) and these values correspond well to the DFT values of 247 and 198 cm(-1). Ab initio calculations were utilized to calculate the structures and conformational energies for the four energy minima and the barriers to interconversion and the data was utilized to generate a two-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) for the two ring-puckering motions. The resulting quantum state energies for this PES were then calculated in order to better understand the patterns that are produced when the PES has four energy minima at different energy values. The wave functions corresponding to the different quantum states were also calculated. The NMR spectrum of 247TOO showed the presence of the two lowest energy conformations, consistent with the results of the ab initio calculations. PMID:25514365

  18. Vibrational spectra, theoretical calculations, and two-dimensional potential energy surface for the ring-puckering vibrations of 2,4,7-trioxa[3.3.0]octane.

    PubMed

    Chun, Hye Jin; Meinander, Niklas; Villarreal, John R; Laane, Jaan

    2015-01-15

    2,4,7-Trioxa[3.3.0]octane (247TOO) is an unusual bicyclic molecule which can exist in four different conformational forms which are determined by the directions of the two ring- puckering motions. The vibrational assignments of 247TOO have been made based on its infrared and Raman spectra and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The two ring-puckering motions (in-phase and out-of-phase) were observed in the Raman spectra of the liquid at 249 and 205 cm(-1) and these values correspond well to the DFT values of 247 and 198 cm(-1). Ab initio calculations were utilized to calculate the structures and conformational energies for the four energy minima and the barriers to interconversion and the data was utilized to generate a two-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) for the two ring-puckering motions. The resulting quantum state energies for this PES were then calculated in order to better understand the patterns that are produced when the PES has four energy minima at different energy values. The wave functions corresponding to the different quantum states were also calculated. The NMR spectrum of 247TOO showed the presence of the two lowest energy conformations, consistent with the results of the ab initio calculations.

  19. Enhanced Spin Hall Effect in Semiconductor Heterostructures with Artificial Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Mikio; Yokoyama, Tomohiro

    2009-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the extrinsic spin Hall effect (SHE) in semiconductor heterostructures, caused by scattering at an artificial potential created by an antidot, STM tip, etc. The potential is electrically tunable. First, we formulate the SHE in terms of phase shifts in the partial wave expansion for a two-dimensional electron gas. The effect is significantly enhanced by resonant scattering when the attractive potential is properly tuned. Second, we examine a three-terminal device including an antidot, which possibly produces a spin current with a polarization of more than 50%.

  20. General methodology to optimize damping functions to account for charge penetration effects in electrostatic calculations using multicentered multipolar expansions.

    PubMed

    Werneck, Araken S; Filho, Tarcísio M Rocha; Dardenne, Laurent E

    2008-01-17

    We developed a methodology to optimize exponential damping functions to account for charge penetration effects when computing molecular electrostatic properties using the multicentered multipolar expansion method (MME). This methodology is based in the optimization of a damping parameter set using a two-step fast local fitting procedure and the ab initio (Hartree-Fock/6-31G** and 6-31G**+) electrostatic potential calculated in a set of concentric grid of points as reference. The principal aspect of the methodology is a first local fitting step which generates a focused initial guess to improve the performance of a simplex method avoiding the use of multiple runs and the choice of initial guesses. Three different strategies for the determination of optimized damping parameters were tested in the following studies: (1) investigation of the error in the calculation of the electrostatic interaction energy for five hydrogen-bonded dimers at standard and nonstandard hydrogen-bonded geometries and at nonequilibrium geometries; (2) calculation of the electrostatic molecular properties (potential and electric field) for eight small molecular systems (methanol, ammonia, water, formamide, dichloromethane, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide, and acetonitrile) and for the 20 amino acids. Our results show that the methodology performs well not only for small molecules but also for relatively larger molecular systems. The analysis of the distinct parameter sets associated with different optimization strategies show that (i) a specific parameter set is more suitable and more general for electrostatic interaction energy calculations, with an average absolute error of 0.46 kcal/mol at hydrogen-bond geometries; (ii) a second parameter set is more suitable for electrostatic potential and electric field calculations at and outside the van der Waals (vdW) envelope, with an average error decrease >72% at the vdW surface. A more general amino acid damping parameter set was constructed from the

  1. Effect of different inertial parameter sets on joint moment calculation during stair ascending and descending.

    PubMed

    Fantozzi, Silvia; Stagni, Rita; Cappello, Angelo; Leardini, Alberto

    2005-07-01

    The reliability of internal joint moment calculation in gait analysis during daily living activities is fundamental for clinical decisions based on joint function. This calculation, obtained by means of the inverse dynamics, depends on several modelling factors, such as assumptions on the segments and on the relevant joints constituting the kinematic chain. In this study, the effect of five different sets of inertial parameters on three-dimensional calculation of lower limb joint moments was investigated during the stair ascending and descending of 10 young subjects. The lower limb was represented as a chain of three rigid segments: foot, shank and thigh. The inertial parameters sets were taken from the literature. The root mean square value over the step cycle of the difference between joint moments calculated at the lower limb with different inertial parameter sets expressed in percentage of their corresponding range was computed. The results showed small differences between ex vivo and in vivo data, between data from different populations and among different modality of inertial parameters acquisition. The root mean square value was negligible at the ankle and increased as moving proximally among the joints: the maximum was 21.8% in the internal/external rotation moment at the hip. In order to achieve accurate estimate of lower limb joint moments other factors should be investigated rather than optimal inertial parameter set. PMID:15990070

  2. Free-energy calculations using classical molecular simulation: application to the determination of the melting point and chemical potential of a flexible RDX model.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Michael S; Lísal, Martin; Brennan, John K

    2016-03-21

    We present an extension of various free-energy methodologies to determine the chemical potential of the solid and liquid phases of a fully-flexible molecule using classical simulation. The methods are applied to the Smith-Bharadwaj atomistic potential representation of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), a well-studied energetic material, to accurately determine the solid and liquid phase Gibbs free energies, and the melting point (Tm). We outline an efficient technique to find the absolute chemical potential and melting point of a fully-flexible molecule using one set of simulations to compute the solid absolute chemical potential and one set of simulations to compute the solid-liquid free energy difference. With this combination, only a handful of simulations are needed, whereby the absolute quantities of the chemical potentials are obtained, for use in other property calculations, such as the characterization of crystal polymorphs or the determination of the entropy. Using the LAMMPS molecular simulator, the Frenkel and Ladd and pseudo-supercritical path techniques are adapted to generate 3rd order fits of the solid and liquid chemical potentials. Results yield the thermodynamic melting point Tm = 488.75 K at 1.0 atm. We also validate these calculations and compare this melting point to one obtained from a typical superheated simulation technique. PMID:26661376

  3. Free-energy calculations using classical molecular simulation: application to the determination of the melting point and chemical potential of a flexible RDX model.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Michael S; Lísal, Martin; Brennan, John K

    2016-03-21

    We present an extension of various free-energy methodologies to determine the chemical potential of the solid and liquid phases of a fully-flexible molecule using classical simulation. The methods are applied to the Smith-Bharadwaj atomistic potential representation of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), a well-studied energetic material, to accurately determine the solid and liquid phase Gibbs free energies, and the melting point (Tm). We outline an efficient technique to find the absolute chemical potential and melting point of a fully-flexible molecule using one set of simulations to compute the solid absolute chemical potential and one set of simulations to compute the solid-liquid free energy difference. With this combination, only a handful of simulations are needed, whereby the absolute quantities of the chemical potentials are obtained, for use in other property calculations, such as the characterization of crystal polymorphs or the determination of the entropy. Using the LAMMPS molecular simulator, the Frenkel and Ladd and pseudo-supercritical path techniques are adapted to generate 3rd order fits of the solid and liquid chemical potentials. Results yield the thermodynamic melting point Tm = 488.75 K at 1.0 atm. We also validate these calculations and compare this melting point to one obtained from a typical superheated simulation technique.

  4. Analytical calculation of intrinsic shielding effectiveness for isotropic and anisotropic materials based on measured electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, M.; John, W.; Weigel, R.

    2014-11-01

    This contribution contains the mechanisms for calculation of magnetic shielding effectiveness from material samples, based on measured electrical parameters. For this, measurement systems for the electrical conductivity of high and low conductive material samples with respect to the direction of current flow are presented and discussed. Also a definition of isotropic and anisotropic materials with electrical circuit diagrams is given. For prediction of shielding effectiveness for isotropic and anisotropic materials, several analytical models are presented. Also adaptions to gain a near field solution are part of this contribution. All analytical models will also be validated with an adequate measurement system.

  5. Temperature effects in first-principles solid state calculations of the chemical shielding tensor made simple

    SciTech Connect

    Monserrat, Bartomeu Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-10-07

    We study the effects of atomic vibrations on the solid-state chemical shielding tensor using first principles density functional theory calculations. At the harmonic level, we use a Monte Carlo method and a perturbative expansion. The Monte Carlo method is accurate but computationally expensive, while the perturbative method is computationally more efficient, but approximate. We find excellent agreement between the two methods for both the isotropic shift and the shielding anisotropy. The effects of zero-point quantum mechanical nuclear motion are important up to relatively high temperatures: at 500 K they still represent about half of the overall vibrational contribution. We also investigate the effects of anharmonic vibrations, finding that their contribution to the zero-point correction to the chemical shielding tensor is small. We exemplify these ideas using magnesium oxide and the molecular crystals L-alanine and β-aspartyl-L-alanine. We therefore propose as the method of choice to incorporate the effects of temperature in solid state chemical shielding tensor calculations using the perturbative expansion within the harmonic approximation. This approach is accurate and requires a computational effort that is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of dynamical or Monte Carlo approaches, so these effects might be routinely accounted for.

  6. Temperature effects in first-principles solid state calculations of the chemical shielding tensor made simple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-10-01

    We study the effects of atomic vibrations on the solid-state chemical shielding tensor using first principles density functional theory calculations. At the harmonic level, we use a Monte Carlo method and a perturbative expansion. The Monte Carlo method is accurate but computationally expensive, while the perturbative method is computationally more efficient, but approximate. We find excellent agreement between the two methods for both the isotropic shift and the shielding anisotropy. The effects of zero-point quantum mechanical nuclear motion are important up to relatively high temperatures: at 500 K they still represent about half of the overall vibrational contribution. We also investigate the effects of anharmonic vibrations, finding that their contribution to the zero-point correction to the chemical shielding tensor is small. We exemplify these ideas using magnesium oxide and the molecular crystals L-alanine and β-aspartyl-L-alanine. We therefore propose as the method of choice to incorporate the effects of temperature in solid state chemical shielding tensor calculations using the perturbative expansion within the harmonic approximation. This approach is accurate and requires a computational effort that is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of dynamical or Monte Carlo approaches, so these effects might be routinely accounted for.

  7. Asymptotic near-nucleus structure of the electron-interaction potential in local effective potential theories

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Zhixin; Sahni, Viraht

    2007-03-15

    In local effective potential theories of electronic structure, the electron correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle, Coulomb repulsion, and correlation-kinetic effects, are all incorporated in the local electron-interaction potential v{sub ee}(r). In previous work, it has been shown that for spherically symmetric or sphericalized systems, the asymptotic near-nucleus expansion of this potential is v{sub ee}(r)=v{sub ee}(0)+{beta}r+O(r{sup 2}), with v{sub ee}(0) being finite. By assuming that the Schroedinger and local effective potential theory wave functions are analytic near the nucleus of atoms, we prove the following via quantal density functional theory (QDFT): (i) Correlations due to the Pauli principle and Coulomb correlations do not contribute to the linear structure; (ii) these Pauli and Coulomb correlations contribute quadratically; (iii) the linear structure is solely due to correlation-kinetic effects, the contributions of these effects being determined analytically. We also derive by application of adiabatic coupling constant perturbation theory via QDFT (iv) the asymptotic near-nucleus expansion of the Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham theory exchange v{sub x}(r) and correlation v{sub c}(r) potentials. These functions also approach the nucleus linearly with the linear term of v{sub x}(r) being solely due to the lowest-order correlation kinetic effects, and the linear term of v{sub c}(r) being due solely to the higher-order correlation kinetic contributions. The above conclusions are equally valid for systems of arbitrary symmetry, provided spherical averages of the properties are employed.

  8. An opportunity cost approach to sample size calculation in cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Gafni, A; Walter, S D; Birch, S; Sendi, P

    2008-01-01

    The inclusion of economic evaluations as part of clinical trials has led to concerns about the adequacy of trial sample size to support such analysis. The analytical tool of cost-effectiveness analysis is the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), which is compared with a threshold value (lambda) as a method to determine the efficiency of a health-care intervention. Accordingly, many of the methods suggested to calculating the sample size requirements for the economic component of clinical trials are based on the properties of the ICER. However, use of the ICER and a threshold value as a basis for determining efficiency has been shown to be inconsistent with the economic concept of opportunity cost. As a result, the validity of the ICER-based approaches to sample size calculations can be challenged. Alternative methods for determining improvements in efficiency have been presented in the literature that does not depend upon ICER values. In this paper, we develop an opportunity cost approach to calculating sample size for economic evaluations alongside clinical trials, and illustrate the approach using a numerical example. We compare the sample size requirement of the opportunity cost method with the ICER threshold method. In general, either method may yield the larger required sample size. However, the opportunity cost approach, although simple to use, has additional data requirements. We believe that the additional data requirements represent a small price to pay for being able to perform an analysis consistent with both concept of opportunity cost and the problem faced by decision makers.

  9. Influence on isotope effect calculations of the method of obtaining force constants from vibrational data

    SciTech Connect

    Goodson, D.Z.; Sarpal, S.K.; Bopp, P.; Wolfsberg, M.

    1982-01-01

    Reduced isotopic partition function ratios (s/sub 2//s/sub 1/)f are employed in the calculation of isotope effects on thermodynamic equilibrium constrants. The quadratic force constants of the molecular force field are needed to evaluate (s/sub 2//s/sub 1/)f. Often these force constants are directly deduced from observed fundamentals in vibrational spectra and the (s/sub 2//s/sub 1/)f values so obtained are labeled (ANHARM). In a theroretically more valid procedure that is more difficult, one corrects observed fundamentals for anharmonicity on the basis of observed overtone and combination bands and then deduces force constants from these observed harmonic frequencies. The (s/sub 2//s/sub 1/)f values obtained from these force constants are labeled (HARM). (HARM) values and (ANHARM) values are evaluated and the isotope effects calculated with these values are discussed. It is concluded that the consistent use of (ANHARM) values in such calculations is a valid procedure.

  10. Estimating Potential Effects of Hypothetical Oil Spills on Polar Bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Durner, G.M.; McDonald, T.L.; Johnson, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    Much is known about the transport and fate of oil spilled into the sea and its toxicity to exposed wildlife. Previously, however, there has been no way to quantify the probability that wildlife dispersed over the seascape would be exposed to spilled oil. Polar bears, the apical predator of the arctic, are widely dispersed near the continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean, an area also undergoing considerable hydrocarbon exploration and development. We used 15,308 satellite locations from 194 radiocollared polar bears to estimate the probability that polar bears could be exposed to hypothetical oil spills. We used a true 2 dimensional Gausian kernel density estimator, to estimate the number of bears likely to occur in each 1.00 km2 cell of a grid superimposed over near shore areas surrounding 2 oil production facilities: the existing Northstar oil production facility, and the proposed offshore site for the Liberty production facility. We estimated the standard errors of bear numbers per cell with bootstrapping. Simulated oil spill footprints for September and October, the times during which we hypothesized effects of an oil-spill would be worst, were estimated using real wind and current data collected between 1980 and 1996. We used ARC/Info software to calculate overlap (numbers of bears oiled) between simulated oil-spill footprints and polar bear grid-cell values. Numbers of bears potentially oiled by a hypothetical 5912 barrel spill (the largest spill thought probable from a pipeline breach) ranged from 0 to 27 polar bears for September open water conditions, and from 0 to 74 polar bears in October mixed ice conditions. Median numbers oiled by the 5912 barrel hypothetical spill from the Liberty simulation in September and October were 1 and 3 bears, equivalent values for the Northstar simulation were 3 and 11 bears. In October, 75% of trajectories from the 5912 barrel simulated spill at Liberty oiled 9 or fewer bears while 75% of the trajectories affected 20 or

  11. A chiral rhenium complex with predicted high parity violation effects: synthesis, stereochemical characterization by VCD spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Nidal; Zrig, Samia; Roisnel, Thierry; Guy, Laure; Bast, Radovan; Saue, Trond; Darquié, Benoît; Crassous, Jeanne

    2013-07-14

    With their rich electronic, vibrational, rotational and hyperfine structure, molecular systems have the potential to play a decisive role in precision tests of fundamental physics. For example, electroweak nuclear interactions should cause small energy differences between the two enantiomers of chiral molecules, a signature of parity symmetry breaking. Enantioenriched oxorhenium(VII) complexes S-(-)- and R-(+)-3 bearing a chiral 2-methyl-1-thio-propanol ligand have been prepared as potential candidates for probing molecular parity violation effects via high resolution laser spectroscopy of the Re=O stretching. Although the rhenium atom is not a stereogenic centre in itself, experimental vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra revealed a surrounding chiral environment, evidenced by the Re=O bond stretching mode signal. The calculated VCD spectrum of the R enantiomer confirmed the position of the sulfur atom cis to the methyl, as observed in the solid-state X-ray crystallographic structure, and showed the presence of two conformers of comparable stability. Relativistic quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the vibrational shift between enantiomers due to parity violation is above the target sensitivity of an ultra-high resolution infrared spectroscopy experiment under active preparation.

  12. Event-Related Potentials and the Stroop Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sahinoglu, Babur; Dogan, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript, the researches on the Event-Related Potentials (ERP) elicited by the standard Stroop effect were reviewed. For the sake of clarity, only the parts of the manuscripts that reported the standard Stroop effect - ERPs relation were taken into consideration. PMID:27026765

  13. Potential hydrologic effects of lignite mining in West Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.L.; Olem, H.

    1982-12-01

    Paper primarily describes possible adverse hydrologic effects of lignite mining in West Tennessee. Potential effects to the land include erosion, subsidence, flooding, and faulty drainage. Possible consequences to surface streams and groundwater include diminishment of quantity, quality, and a change in flow. If enforced, the existing state law provides sufficient remedy for the avoidance of environmental hazards.

  14. Event-Related Potentials and the Stroop Effect.

    PubMed

    Sahinoglu, Babur; Dogan, Gamze

    2016-02-01

    In this manuscript, the researches on the Event-Related Potentials (ERP) elicited by the standard Stroop effect were reviewed. For the sake of clarity, only the parts of the manuscripts that reported the standard Stroop effect - ERPs relation were taken into consideration.

  15. Event-Related Potentials and the Stroop Effect.

    PubMed

    Sahinoglu, Babur; Dogan, Gamze

    2016-02-01

    In this manuscript, the researches on the Event-Related Potentials (ERP) elicited by the standard Stroop effect were reviewed. For the sake of clarity, only the parts of the manuscripts that reported the standard Stroop effect - ERPs relation were taken into consideration. PMID:27026765

  16. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of ground-state tunneling splitting of malonaldehyde using an accurate ab initio potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Braams, Bastiaan J; Bowman, Joel M; Carter, Stuart; Tew, David P

    2008-06-14

    Quantum calculations of the ground vibrational state tunneling splitting of H-atom and D-atom transfer in malonaldehyde are performed on a full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface (PES). The PES is a fit to 11 147 near basis-set-limit frozen-core CCSD(T) electronic energies. This surface properly describes the invariance of the potential with respect to all permutations of identical atoms. The saddle-point barrier for the H-atom transfer on the PES is 4.1 kcalmol, in excellent agreement with the reported ab initio value. Model one-dimensional and "exact" full-dimensional calculations of the splitting for H- and D-atom transfer are done using this PES. The tunneling splittings in full dimensionality are calculated using the unbiased "fixed-node" diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method in Cartesian and saddle-point normal coordinates. The ground-state tunneling splitting is found to be 21.6 cm(-1) in Cartesian coordinates and 22.6 cm(-1) in normal coordinates, with an uncertainty of 2-3 cm(-1). This splitting is also calculated based on a model which makes use of the exact single-well zero-point energy (ZPE) obtained with the MULTIMODE code and DMC ZPE and this calculation gives a tunneling splitting of 21-22 cm(-1). The corresponding computed splittings for the D-atom transfer are 3.0, 3.1, and 2-3 cm(-1). These calculated tunneling splittings agree with each other to within less than the standard uncertainties obtained with the DMC method used, which are between 2 and 3 cm(-1), and agree well with the experimental values of 21.6 and 2.9 cm(-1) for the H and D transfer, respectively.

  17. Calculating intensities using effective Hamiltonians in terms of Coriolis-adapted normal modes.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, S; Krishnan, Mangala Sunder; Carrington, Tucker

    2005-01-15

    The calculation of rovibrational transition energies and intensities is often hampered by the fact that vibrational states are strongly coupled by Coriolis terms. Because it invalidates the use of perturbation theory for the purpose of decoupling these states, the coupling makes it difficult to analyze spectra and to extract information from them. One either ignores the problem and hopes that the effect of the coupling is minimal or one is forced to diagonalize effective rovibrational matrices (rather than diagonalizing effective rotational matrices). In this paper we apply a procedure, based on a quantum mechanical canonical transformation for deriving decoupled effective rotational Hamiltonians. In previous papers we have used this technique to compute energy levels. In this paper we show that it can also be applied to determine intensities. The ideas are applied to the ethylene molecule.

  18. The effective atomic numbers of some biomolecules calculated by two methods: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Manohara, S R; Hanagodimath, S M; Gerward, L

    2009-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers Z(eff) of some fatty acids and amino acids have been calculated by two numerical methods, a direct method and an interpolation method, in the energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. The notion of Z(eff) is given a new meaning by using a modern database of photon interaction cross sections (WinXCom). The results of the two methods are compared and discussed. It is shown that for all biomolecules the direct method gives larger values of Z(eff) than the interpolation method, in particular at low energies (1-100 keV) At medium energies (0.1-5 MeV), Z(eff) for both methods is about constant and equal to the mean atomic number of the material. Wherever possible, the calculated values of Z(eff) are compared with experimental data.

  19. Monte Carlo calculations of the magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayer structures with giant magnetoresistance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Romanovskiy, D. E.

    2016-06-01

    A Monte Carlo study of trilayer and spin-valve magnetic structures with giant magnetoresistance effects is carried out. The anisotropic Heisenberg model is used for description of magnetic properties of ultrathin ferromagnetic films forming these structures. The temperature and magnetic field dependences of magnetic characteristics are considered for ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations of these multilayer structures. The methodology for determination of the magnetoresistance by the Monte Carlo method is introduced; this permits us to calculate the magnetoresistance of multilayer structures for different thicknesses of the ferromagnetic films. The calculated temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance agrees very well with the experimental results measured for the Fe(0 0 1)-Cr(0 0 1) multilayer structure and CFAS-Ag-CFAS-IrMn spin-valve structure based on the half-metallic Heusler alloy Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5.

  20. Effects of inflow distortion profiles on fan tone noise calculated using a 3-D theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations of the fan tone acoustic power and modal structure generated by complex distortions in axial inflow velocity are presented. The model used treats the motor as a rotating three-dimensional cascade and calculates the acoustic field from the distortion-produced dipole distribution on the blades including noncompact source effects. Radial and circumferential distortion shapes are synthesized from Fourier-Bessel components representing individual distortion modes. The relation between individual distortion modes and the generated acoustic modes is examined for particular distortion cases. Comparisons between theoretical and experimental results for distortions produced by wakes from upstream radial rods show that the analysis is a good predictor of acoustic power dependence on disturbance strength.

  1. Monte-Carlo calculations of particle fluences and neutron effective dose rates in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Matthiä, Daniel; Sihver, Lembit; Meier, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Monitoring of radiation exposure of aircrew is a legal requirement for many airlines in the EU and a challenging task in dosimetry. Monte-Carlo simulations of cosmic particles in the atmosphere can contribute to the understanding of the corresponding radiation field. Calculations of secondary neutron fluences in the atmosphere produced by galactic cosmic rays together with the resulting neutron-effective dose rates are shown in this paper and compared with results from the AIR project. The PLANETOCOSMICS package based on GEANT4 and two models for the local interstellar spectra of galactic cosmic rays have been used for the calculations. Furthermore, secondary muon fluences have been computed and are compared with CAPRICE measurements.

  2. Effect of Clouds on the Calculated Vertical Distribution of Shortwave Absorption in the Tropics

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Mather, James H.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Liu, Zheng

    2008-09-23

    High vertical resolution profiles of cloud properties were obtained from cloud radars operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program on the islands of Nauru and Manus in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). Broadband flux calculations using a correlated k-distribution model were performed to estimate the effect of clouds on the total column and vertical distribution of shortwave absorption at these tropical sites. Sensitivity studies were performed to examine the role of precipitable water vapor, cloud vertical location, optical depth, and particle size on the SW column absorption. On average, observed clouds had little impact on the calculated total SW column absorption at the two sites, but a significant impact on the vertical distribution of SW absorption. Differences in the column amount, vertical profiles, and diurnal cycle of SW absorption at the two sites were due primarily to differences in cirrus cloud frequency.

  3. Unambiguous optimization of effective potentials in finite basis sets.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Christoph R

    2011-12-28

    The optimization of effective potentials is of interest in density-functional theory (DFT) in two closely related contexts. First, the evaluation of the functional derivative of orbital-dependent exchange-correlation functionals requires the application of optimized effective potential methods. Second, the optimization of the effective local potential that yields a given electron density is important both for the development of improved approximate functionals and for the practical application of embedding schemes based on DFT. However, in all cases this optimization turns into an ill-posed problem if a finite basis set is introduced for the Kohn-Sham orbitals. So far, this problem has not been solved satisfactorily. Here, a new approach to overcome the ill-posed nature of such finite-basis set methods is presented for the optimization of the effective local potential that yields a given electron density. This new scheme can be applied with orbital basis sets of reasonable size and makes it possible to vary the basis sets for the orbitals and for the potential independently, while providing an unambiguous potential that systematically approaches the numerical reference.

  4. Ab Initio and Improved Empirical Potentials for the Calculation of the Anharmonic Vibrational States and Intramolecular Mode Coupling of N-Methylacetamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregurick, Susan K.; Chaban, Galina M.; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochou (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The second-order Moller-Plesset ab initio electronic structure method is used to compute points for the anharmonic mode-coupled potential energy surface of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in the trans(sub ct) configuration, including all degrees of freedom. The vibrational states and the spectroscopy are directly computed from this potential surface using the Correlation Corrected Vibrational Self-Consistent Field (CC-VSCF) method. The results are compared with CC-VSCF calculations using both the standard and improved empirical Amber-like force fields and available low temperature experimental matrix data. Analysis of our calculated spectroscopic results show that: (1) The excellent agreement between the ab initio CC-VSCF calculated frequencies and the experimental data suggest that the computed anharmonic potentials for N-methylacetamide are of a very high quality; (2) For most transitions, the vibrational frequencies obtained from the ab initio CC-VSCF method are superior to those obtained using the empirical CC-VSCF methods, when compared with experimental data. However, the improved empirical force field yields better agreement with the experimental frequencies as compared with a standard AMBER-type force field; (3) The empirical force field in particular overestimates anharmonic couplings for the amide-2 mode, the methyl asymmetric bending modes, the out-of-plane methyl bending modes, and the methyl distortions; (4) Disagreement between the ab initio and empirical anharmonic couplings is greater than the disagreement between the frequencies, and thus the anharmonic part of the empirical potential seems to be less accurate than the harmonic contribution;and (5) Both the empirical and ab initio CC-VSCF calculations predict a negligible anharmonic coupling between the amide-1 and other internal modes. The implication of this is that the intramolecular energy flow between the amide-1 and the other internal modes may be smaller than anticipated. These results may have

  5. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for H + N2 yields HN2. III - Calculations for the excited state surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1991-01-01

    Additional calculations which characterize potential energy sources (PESs) for the excited 3A-double-prime state, for a bound 2(2A-prime) state, for HN2(+), and for the Rydberg states associated with HN2(+). It is anticipated that these excited state PESs will be important in interpreting and designing experiments to characterize the ground state HN2 species via neutralized ion beam techniques.

  6. Sex-specific tissue weighting factors for effective dose equivalent calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.G.; Reece, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent was defined in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 26 in 1977 and later adopted by the U.S. Nuclear REgulatory Commission. To calculate organ doses and effective dose equivalent for external exposures using Monte Carlo simulations, sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms and sex-specific weighting factors are always employed. This paper presents detailed mathematical derivation of a set of sex-specific tissue weighting factors and the conditions which the weighting factors must satisfy. Results of effective dose equivalent calculations using female and male phantoms exposed to monoenergetic photon beams of 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV are provided and compared with results published by other authors using different sex-specific weighting factors and phantoms. The results indicate that females always receive higher effective dose equivalent than males for the photon energies and geometries considered and that some published data may be wrong due to mistakes in deriving the sex-specific weighting factors. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Effects of boundary conditions on thermomechanical calculations: Spent fuel test - climax

    SciTech Connect

    Butkovich, T.R.

    1982-10-01

    The effects of varying certain boundary conditions on the results of finite-element calculations were studied in relation to the Spent Fuel Test - Climax. The study employed a thermomechanical model with the ADINA structural analysis. Nodal temperature histories were generated with the compatible ADINAT heat flow codes. The boundary conditions studied included: (1) The effect of boundary loading on three progressively larger meshes. (2) Plane strain vs plane stress conditions. (3) The effect of isothermal boundaries on a small mesh and on a significantly larger mesh. The results showed that different mesh sizes had an insignificant effect on isothermal boundaries up to 5 y, while on the smallest and largest mesh, the maximum temperature difference in the mesh was <1{sup 0}C. In the corresponding ADINA calculation, these different mesh sizes produce insignificant changes in the stress field and displacements in the region of interest near the heat sources and excavations. On the other hand, plane stress produces horizontal and vertical stress differences approx. 9% higher than does plane strain.

  8. A Geometric Computational Model for Calculation of Longwall Face Effect on Gate Roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hamid; Ebrahimi Farsangi, Mohammad Ali; Jalalifar, Hossein; Ahmadi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a geometric computational model (GCM) has been developed for calculating the effect of longwall face on the extension of excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) above the gate roadways (main and tail gates), considering the advance longwall mining method. In this model, the stability of gate roadways are investigated based on loading effects due to EDZ and caving zone (CZ) above the longwall face, which can extend the EDZ size. The structure of GCM depends on four important factors: (1) geomechanical properties of hanging wall, (2) dip and thickness of coal seam, (3) CZ characteristics, and (4) pillar width. The investigations demonstrated that the extension of EDZ is a function of pillar width. Considering the effect of pillar width, new mathematical relationships were presented to calculate the face influence coefficient and characteristics of extended EDZ. Furthermore, taking GCM into account, a computational algorithm for stability analysis of gate roadways was suggested. Validation was carried out through instrumentation and monitoring results of a longwall face at Parvade-2 coal mine in Tabas, Iran, demonstrating good agreement between the new model and measured results. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was carried out on the effect of pillar width, bearing capacity of support system and coal seam dip.

  9. Finite-element method for calculation of the effective permittivity of random inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Myroshnychenko, Viktor; Brosseau, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The challenge of designing new solid-state materials from calculations performed with the help of computers applied to models of spatial randomness has attracted an increasing amount of interest in recent years. In particular, dispersions of particles in a host matrix are scientifically and technologically important for a variety of reasons. Herein, we report our development of an efficient computer code to calculate the effective (bulk) permittivity of two-phase disordered composite media consisting of hard circular disks made of a lossless dielectric (permittivity epsilon2) randomly placed in a plane made of a lossless homogeneous dielectric (permittivity epsilon1) at different surface fractions. Specifically, the method is based on (i) a finite-element description of composites in which both the host and the randomly distributed inclusions are isotropic phases, and (ii) an ordinary Monte Carlo sampling. Periodic boundary conditions are employed throughout the simulation and various numbers of disks have been considered in the calculations. From this systematic study, we show how the number of Monte Carlo steps needed to achieve equilibrated distributions of disks increases monotonically with the surface fraction. Furthermore, a detailed study is made of the dependence of the results on a minimum separation distance between disks. Numerical examples are presented to connect the macroscopic property such as the effective permittivity to microstructural characteristics such as the mean coordination number and radial distribution function. In addition, several approximate effective medium theories, exact bounds, exact results for two-dimensional regular arrays, and the exact dilute limit are used to test and validate the finite-element algorithm. Numerical results indicate that the fourth-order bounds provide an excellent estimate of the effective permittivity for a wide range of surface fractions, in accordance with the fact that the bounds become progressively

  10. Parameterised local spin density exchange-correlation energies and potentials for electronic structure calculations I. Zero temperature formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, J. M.; Clougherty, D. P.; McHenry, M. E.; Donovan, M. M.

    1991-09-01

    Commonly used approximate forms for the exchange-correlation energy and potential within the local density approximation are summarised, and FORTRAN code is included for the evaluation of these various forms. Included are the following: Xα, Kohn-Sham-Gaspàr, Hedin-Lundqvist-Wilkins, Janak-Moruzzi-Williams, Von Barth-Hedin, Ceperley-Alder (Perdew-Zunger), and Ceperley-Alder (Vosko-Wilk-Nusair). Both the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair and the Von Barth-Hedin expressions for spin interpolation between paramagnetic and ferromagnetic limits are also provided.

  11. Single-degree-of-freedom-flutter calculations for a wing in subsonic potential flow and comparison with an experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, Harry L

    1952-01-01

    The effect of Mach number and structural damping on single-degree-of-freedom pitching of a wing is presented. Some experimental results are compared with theory and good agreement is found for certain ranges of an inertia parameter.

  12. Pyridine N-oxide/trichloroacetic acid complex in acetonitrile: FTIR spectra, anharmonic calculations and computations of 1-3D potential surfaces of O-H vibrations.

    PubMed

    Pitsevich, G; Malevich, A; Doroshenko, I; Kozlovskaya, E; Pogorelov, V; Sablinskas, V; Balevicius, V

    2014-01-01

    FTIR spectra of pyridine N-oxide and trichloroacetic acid H-bonded complex in acetonitrile were studied at 20 and 50°C. The calculations of equilibrium configurations of the complex and their IR spectra in harmonic- and anharmonic approximations were carried out at the level of B3LYP/cc-pVTZ/PCM. However both approximations turned out to be incompetent determining the frequency of the O-Н stretching vibration. In order to reveal the causes of essential discrepancies between calculated and experimental data one-, two- and three-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PES) of the O-H…O bridge proton motion in the frame of fixed other atoms in the complex were calculated. The frequencies of O-H…O stretching and bending vibrations were calculated by numerical solution of the Schrödinger equation. It is shown that only the approach of proton motion on the 3D PES allows obtaining a good agreement between the calculated and the experimental values of the frequencies of the О-Н stretching vibrations. PMID:24373980

  13. MULTIMODE quantum calculations of vibrational energies and IR spectrum of the NO{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) cluster using accurate potential energy and dipole moment surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Homayoon, Zahra

    2014-09-28

    A new, full (nine)-dimensional potential energy surface and dipole moment surface to describe the NO{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) cluster is reported. The PES is based on fitting of roughly 32 000 CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pVTZ electronic energies. The surface is a linear least-squares fit using a permutationally invariant basis with Morse-type variables. The PES is used in a Diffusion Monte Carlo study of the zero-point energy and wavefunction of the NO{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) and NO{sup +}(D{sub 2}O) complexes. Using the calculated ZPE the dissociation energies of the clusters are reported. Vibrational configuration interaction calculations of NO{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) and NO{sup +}(D{sub 2}O) using the MULTIMODE program are performed. The fundamental, a number of overtone, and combination states of the clusters are reported. The IR spectrum of the NO{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) cluster is calculated using 4, 5, 7, and 8 modes VSCF/CI calculations. The anharmonic, coupled vibrational calculations, and IR spectrum show very good agreement with experiment. Mode coupling of the water “antisymmetric” stretching mode with the low-frequency intermolecular modes results in intensity borrowing.

  14. Functional methods and effective potentials for non-linear composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Yves-Patrick; Barthélémy, Marc; Perrin, Gilles

    2000-03-01

    A formulation of variational principles in terms of functional integrals is proposed for any type of local plastic potentials. The minimization problem is reduced to the computation of a path integral. This integral can be used as a starting point for different approximations. As a first application, it is shown how to compute to second order the weak-disorder perturbative expansion of the effective potentials in random composite. The three-dimensional results of Suquet and Ponte-Castañeda (Suquet, P., Ponte-Castañeda, P., 1993. Small-contrast perturbation expansions for the effective properties of nonlinear composites. C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris) Ser. II 317, 1515-1522) for the plastic dissipation potential with uniform applied tractions are retrieved and extended to any space dimension, taking correlations into account. In addition, the viscoplastic potential is also computed for uniform strain rates.

  15. Adsorbed molecules in external fields: Effect of confining potential.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Ashish; Silotia, Poonam; Maan, Anjali; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-12-01

    We study the rotational excitation of a molecule adsorbed on a surface. As is well known the interaction potential between the surface and the molecule can be modeled in number of ways, depending on the molecular structure and the geometry under which the molecule is being adsorbed by the surface. We explore the effect of change of confining potential on the excitation, which is largely controlled by the static electric fields and continuous wave laser fields. We focus on dipolar molecules and hence we restrict ourselves to the first order interaction in field-molecule interaction potential either through permanent dipole moment or/and the molecular polarizability parameter. It is shown that confining potential shapes, strength of the confinement, strongly affect the excitation. We compare our results for different confining potentials. PMID:27387127

  16. Selective effects of an octopus toxin on action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela; Gage, Peter W.

    1971-01-01

    1. A lethal, water soluble toxin (Maculotoxin, MTX) with a molecular weight less than 540, can be extracted from the salivary glands of an octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa). 2. MTX blocks action potentials in sartorius muscle fibres of toads without affecting the membrane potential. Delayed rectification is not inhibited by the toxin. 3. At low concentrations (10-6-10-5 g/ml.) MTX blocks action potentials only after a certain number have been elicited. The number of action potentials, which can be defined accurately, depends on the concentration of MTX and the concentration of sodium ions in the extracellular solution. 4. The toxin has no post-synaptic effect at the neuromuscular junction and it is concluded that it blocks neuromuscular transmission by inhibiting action potentials in motor nerve terminals. PMID:4330930

  17. Density functional theory based generalized effective fragment potential method

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Kiet A. E-mail: ruth.pachter@wpafb.af.mil; Pachter, Ruth E-mail: ruth.pachter@wpafb.af.mil; Day, Paul N.

    2014-06-28

    We present a generalized Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) based effective fragment potential (EFP2-DFT) method for the treatment of solvent effects. Similar to the original Hartree-Fock (HF) based potential with fitted parameters for water (EFP1) and the generalized HF based potential (EFP2-HF), EFP2-DFT includes electrostatic, exchange-repulsion, polarization, and dispersion potentials, which are generated for a chosen DFT functional for a given isolated molecule. The method does not have fitted parameters, except for implicit parameters within a chosen functional and the dispersion correction to the potential. The electrostatic potential is modeled with a multipolar expansion at each atomic center and bond midpoint using Stone's distributed multipolar analysis. The exchange-repulsion potential between two fragments is composed of the overlap and kinetic energy integrals and the nondiagonal KS matrices in the localized molecular orbital basis. The polarization potential is derived from the static molecular polarizability. The dispersion potential includes the intermolecular D3 dispersion correction of Grimme et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 132, 154104 (2010)]. The potential generated from the CAMB3LYP functional has mean unsigned errors (MUEs) with respect to results from coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples with a complete basis set limit (CCSD(T)/CBS) extrapolation, of 1.7, 2.2, 2.0, and 0.5 kcal/mol, for the S22, water-benzene clusters, water clusters, and n-alkane dimers benchmark sets, respectively. The corresponding EFP2-HF errors for the respective benchmarks are 2.41, 3.1, 1.8, and 2.5 kcal/mol. Thus, the new EFP2-DFT-D3 method with the CAMB3LYP functional provides comparable or improved results at lower computational cost and, therefore, extends the range of applicability of EFP2 to larger system sizes.

  18. Density functional theory based generalized effective fragment potential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kiet A.; Pachter, Ruth; Day, Paul N.

    2014-06-01

    We present a generalized Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) based effective fragment potential (EFP2-DFT) method for the treatment of solvent effects. Similar to the original Hartree-Fock (HF) based potential with fitted parameters for water (EFP1) and the generalized HF based potential (EFP2-HF), EFP2-DFT includes electrostatic, exchange-repulsion, polarization, and dispersion potentials, which are generated for a chosen DFT functional for a given isolated molecule. The method does not have fitted parameters, except for implicit parameters within a chosen functional and the dispersion correction to the potential. The electrostatic potential is modeled with a multipolar expansion at each atomic center and bond midpoint using Stone's distributed multipolar analysis. The exchange-repulsion potential between two fragments is composed of the overlap and kinetic energy integrals and the nondiagonal KS matrices in the localized molecular orbital basis. The polarization potential is derived from the static molecular polarizability. The dispersion potential includes the intermolecular D3 dispersion correction of Grimme et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 132, 154104 (2010)]. The potential generated from the CAMB3LYP functional has mean unsigned errors (MUEs) with respect to results from coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples with a complete basis set limit (CCSD(T)/CBS) extrapolation, of 1.7, 2.2, 2.0, and 0.5 kcal/mol, for the S22, water-benzene clusters, water clusters, and n-alkane dimers benchmark sets, respectively. The corresponding EFP2-HF errors for the respective benchmarks are 2.41, 3.1, 1.8, and 2.5 kcal/mol. Thus, the new EFP2-DFT-D3 method with the CAMB3LYP functional provides comparable or improved results at lower computational cost and, therefore, extends the range of applicability of EFP2 to larger system sizes.

  19. First principles reaction modeling of the electrochemical interface: Consideration and calculation of a tunable surface potential from atomic and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher D.; Wasileski, Sally A.; Filhol, Jean-Sebastien; Neurock, Matthew

    2006-04-01

    A method for calculating and subsequently tuning the electrochemical potential of a half cell using periodic plane-wave density functional theory and a homogenous counter-charge is presented and evaluated by comparison to simulations which explicitly model the countercharge by a plane of ions. The method involves the establishment of two reference potentials, one related to the potential of the free electron in vacuo, and the other related to the potential of H2O species far from the electrode. The surface potential can be specifically adjusted by the explicit introduction of excess or deficit surface charges in the simulation cell and the application of periodic boundary conditions. We demonstrate the absence of field emission from the electrode over the range of realistic electrochemical potentials covered and confirm that the method can explicitly determine reaction energies and adsorption geometries as a function of electrochemical potential. This latter point is most useful as it asserts the viability of this method to model electrochemical and electrocatalytical systems of academic as well as applied interest. We present two case studies. The first examines the changes in the structure of water at the metal interface as a function of potential over Cu(111) . At cathodic potential, we observe the repulsion of H2O from the interface and the rotation of the water dipole toward the interface. The second study follows the initial pathways for the electrocatalytical activation of methanol over Pt(111) and the corresponding potential dependent reaction energetics for these paths. The results demonstrate that changes in the electrochemical potential can significantly alter the reaction energetics as well as the overall reaction selectivity. While the case studies presented herein described equilibrium geometries (i.e., the ideal forms at zero kelvin), the method is also suitable for application to ensembles of thermally activated systems.

  20. Effect of Several Drugs on Gastric Potential Difference in Man

    PubMed Central

    Murray, H. S.; Strottman, M. P.; Cooke, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement of gastric mucosal potential difference was used to study the effect on the gastric mucosal barrier in six volunteer subjects of several drugs known to provoke ulcers. Potential differences were also recorded in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis being treated with long-term aspirin and five patients on long-term prednisone. Unbuffered aspirin and ethanol “broke” the barrier as shown by a rapid fall in potential difference. The effects of aspirin were dose related, with 600 mg causing a greater reduction than 300 mg. The effects of aspirin and ethanol given together were additive and caused the greatest fall in potential difference. Sodium acetylsalicylate did not alter the normal potential difference. Indomethacin, phenylbutazone, and prednisone all failed to cause any change in potential difference. The patients on long-term aspirin and prednisone had readings within the normal range and responded the same as normal subjects to an acute challenge. These studies show that aspirin and ethanol will damage the gastric mucosal barrier but that indomethacin, phenylbutazone, and prednisone do not. PMID:4808815

  1. Enhanced Spin Hall Effect by Single Antidot Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Mikio; Yokoyama, Tomohiro

    2009-03-01

    We theoretically investigate an extrinsic spin Hall effect in semiconductor heterostructures due to the scattering by an artificial potential created by a single antidot, STM tip, etc. The strength of the potential is electrically tunable. First, we formulate the spin Hall effect in terms of phase shifts in the partial wave expansion for two-dimensional electron gas. For scattered electrons in θ direction, we obtain a spin polarization P(θ) perpendicular to the two-dimensional plane [P(-θ)=-P (θ)]. The spin polarization P(θ) is significantly enhanced by an attractive potential when the resonant condition of a partial wave is satisfied by tuning the potential strength. Second, we study the spin Hall effect in a three-terminal device with an antidot at the junction. The conductance and spin polarization are evaluated numerically.ootnotetextM. Yamamoto and B. Kramer, J. Appl. Phys. 103, 123703 (2008), for repulsive potential. We obtain a spin polarization of more than 50% due to the resonant scattering when the attractive potential is properly tuned.

  2. An experience in mesh generation for three-dimensional calculation of potential flow around a rotating propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, W.-H.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop a three-dimensional, finite volume computational code for highly swept, twisted, small aspect ratio propeller blades with supersonic tip speeds, in a way that accounts for cascade effects, hub-induced flow, and nonlinear transonic effects. Attention is presently given to the generation of a computational mesh for such a complex propeller configuration, with the aim of sharing developmental process experience. The problem treated is unique, in that blade chord, blade length, hub length and blade-to-blade distance represent several characteristic length scales among which there is considerable disparity. An ad hoc mesh-generation scheme is accordingly developed.

  3. Applicability of effective pair potentials for active Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Rein, Markus; Speck, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We have performed a case study investigating a recently proposed scheme to obtain an effective pair potential for active Brownian particles (Farage et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 042310 (2015)). Applying this scheme to the Lennard-Jones potential, numerical simulations of active Brownian particles are compared to simulations of passive Brownian particles interacting by the effective pair potential. Analyzing the static pair correlations, our results indicate a limited range of activity parameters (speed and orientational correlation time) for which we obtain quantitative, or even qualitative, agreement. Moreover, we find a qualitatively different behavior for the virial pressure even for small propulsion speeds. Combining these findings we conclude that beyond linear response active particles exhibit genuine non-equilibrium properties that cannot be captured by effective pair interaction alone. PMID:27628695

  4. Effective ion-ion potentials in warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorberger, J.; Gericke, D. O.

    2013-03-01

    The effective ion-ion potential is extracted from first principle simulations and from experimental structure factors for several warm dense matter systems. Results of three different methods are compared for simple elements like hydrogen or beryllium as well as for composite materials like lithium-hydride and hydrogen-helium plasmas. It is shown that iterative techniques based on the pair distribution function are not unique in their solution and direct force-matching from first principle simulations is subject to finite size effects. Moreover, both methods are not able to provide potentials for small distances. These disadvantages can be avoided by using the static structure factor as input, although higher order correlations are only accounted for within the hypernetted chain approximation in this case. Furthermore, we discuss possibilities to use the extracted effective potentials to investigate the dielectric function beyond linear response.

  5. Including Aeroelastic Effects in the Calculation of X-33 Loads and Control Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    Up until now, loads analyses of the X-33 RLV have been done at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using aerodynamic loads derived from CFD and wind tunnel models of a rigid vehicle. Control forces and moments are determined using a rigid vehicle trajectory analysis and the detailed control load distributions for achieving the desired control forces and moments, again on the rigid vehicle, are determined by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works. However, static aeroelastic effects upon the load distributions are not known. The static aeroelastic effects will generally redistribute external loads thereby affecting both the internal structural loads as well as the forces and moments generated by aerodynamic control surfaces. Therefore, predicted structural sizes as well as maneuvering requirements can be altered by consideration of static aeroelastic effects. The objective of the present work is the development of models and solutions for including static aeroelasticity in the calculation of X-33 loads and in the determination of stability and control derivatives.

  6. WHAT IS A MOMENT ARM? CALCULATING MUSCLE EFFECTIVENESS IN BIOMECHANICAL MODELS USING GENERALIZED COORDINATES

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Ajay; Delp, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanics researchers often use multibody models to represent biological systems. However, the mapping from biology to mechanics and back can be problematic. OpenSim is a popular open source tool used for this purpose, mapping between biological specifications and an underlying generalized coordinate multibody system called Simbody. One quantity of interest to biomechanical researchers and clinicians is “muscle moment arm,” a measure of the effectiveness of a muscle at contributing to a particular motion over a range of configurations. OpenSim can automatically calculate these quantities for any muscle once a model has been built. For simple cases, this calculation is the same as the conventional moment arm calculation in mechanical engineering. But a muscle may span several joints (e.g., wrist, neck, back) and may follow a convoluted path over various curved surfaces. A biological joint may require several bodies or even a mechanism to accurately represent in the multibody model (e.g., knee, shoulder). In these situations we need a careful definition of muscle moment arm that is analogous to the mechanical engineering concept, yet generalized to be of use to biomedical researchers. Here we present some biomechanical modeling challenges and how they are resolved in OpenSim and Simbody to yield biologically meaningful muscle moment arms. PMID:25905111

  7. First principles calculation of the effects of solute atom on electromigration resistance of Al interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chun; Jijin, Xu; Yang, Yang; Lu, Hao

    2009-06-01

    Electromigration (EM) resistance of Al could be improved through the addition of a small amount of alloying elements, such as copper and magnesium. In this paper, an Al31X (X = Sc-Zn and Mg) supercell model was constructed to calculate the effects of a solute element on the properties of face central cubic Al, including the heat of formation, diffusion energy and electronic structure, etc, by employing the density functional theory. It is found that the diffusion energy of Al near Ti, V, Cr, Cu, Zn and Mg solutes could be enhanced. Likewise, the value of the density of states of the system at the Fermi level (N(EF)), as well as that of the Al atoms at the specific sites, could also be reduced slightly by the addition of Sc, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mg. These two results indicate that the nearest neighbour Al atoms could be stabilized by Cu, Zn and Mg. Thus they would be beneficial in prolonging the EM lifetime of Al interconnects. Our calculations are in good agreement with the previous calculations and the experimental phenomenon to some extent.

  8. A kernel method for calculating effective radiative forcing in transient climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, E. J. L.; Portmann, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Effective radiative forcing (ERF) is calculated as the flux change at the top of the atmosphere, after allowing fast adjustments, due to a forcing agent such as greenhouse gasses or volcanic events. Accurate estimates of the ERF are necessary in order to understand the drivers of climate change. ERF cannot be observed directly and is difficult to estimate from indirect observations due to the complexity of climate responses to individual forcing factors. We present a new method of calculating ERF using a kernel populated from a time series of a model variable (e.g. global mean surface temperature) in a CO2 step change experiment. The top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative imbalance has the best noise tolerance for retrieving the ERF of the model variables we tested. We compare the kernel method with the energy balance method for estimating ERF in the CMIP5 models. The energy balance method uses the regression between the TOA imbalance and temperature change in a CO2 step change experiment to estimate the climate feedback parameter. It then assumes the feedback parameter is constant to calculate the forcing time series. This method is sensitive to the number of years chosen for the regression and the nonlinearity in the regression leads to a bias. We quantify the sensitivities and biases of these methods and compare their estimates of forcing. The kernel method is more accurate for models in which a linear fit is a poor approximation for the relationship between temperature change and TOA imbalance.

  9. Potential effects of rational prescribing on national health care spending

    PubMed Central

    Littman, Jordan; Halil, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the cost savings that could result from implementation of a rational prescribing model for drug classes that are equivalent in terms of efficacy, toxicity, and convenience. Design The top 10 drug classes based on annual spending were gathered from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. They were reviewed for potential inclusion in the study based on the ability to compare intraclass medications. When equivalence in efficacy, toxicity, and convenience was determined from a literature review, annual prescribing data were gathered from the National Prescription Drug Utilization Information Systems Database. The potential cost savings were then calculated by comparing current market shares with potential future market shares. Setting Canada. Main outcome measures Estimated differences in spending produced by a rational prescribing model. Results Statins, proton pump inhibitors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were determined to have class equivalence for efficacy, toxicity, and convenience. Total current annual spending on these classes is $856 million through public drug programs, and an estimated $1.97 billion nationally. Through rational prescribing, annual savings could reach $222 million for public drug programs, and $521 million nationally. Conclusion Most of the potential savings are derived from deprescribing the newest patent-protected medications in each class. Avoiding prescribing the newest intraclass drug, particularly in the absence of research to support its superiority in relevant clinical outcomes, could lead to considerable savings in health care expenditures and might push the pharmaceutical industry to innovate rather than imitate. PMID:26975917

  10. Methodological aspects in the calculation of parity-violating effects in nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Weijo, Ville; Bast, Radovan; Manninen, Pekka; Saue, Trond; Vaara, Juha

    2007-02-21

    We examine the quantum chemical calculation of parity-violating (PV) electroweak contributions to the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from a methodological point of view. Nuclear magnetic shielding and indirect spin-spin coupling constants are considered and evaluated for three chiral molecules, H2O2, H2S2, and H2Se2. The effects of the choice of a one-particle basis set and the treatment of electron correlation, as well as the effects of special relativity, are studied. All of them are found to be relevant. The basis-set dependence is very pronounced, especially at the electron correlated ab initio levels of theory. Coupled-cluster and density-functional theory (DFT) results for PV contributions differ significantly from the Hartree-Fock data. DFT overestimates the PV effects, particularly with nonhybrid exchange-correlation functionals. Beginning from third-row elements, special relativity is of importance for the PV NMR properties, shown here by comparing perturbational one-component and various four-component calculations. In contrast to what is found for nuclear magnetic shielding, the choice of the model for nuclear charge distribution--point charge or extended (Gaussian)--has a significant impact on the PV contribution to the spin-spin coupling constants. PMID:17328593

  11. A simplified model for calculating atmospheric radionuclide transport and early health effects from nuclear reactor accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Madni, I.K.; Cazzoli, E.G.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1995-11-01

    During certain hypothetical severe accidents in a nuclear power plant, radionuclides could be released to the environment as a plume. Prediction of the atmospheric dispersion and transport of these radionuclides is important for assessment of the risk to the public from such accidents. A simplified PC-based model was developed that predicts time-integrated air concentration of each radionuclide at any location from release as a function of time integrated source strength using the Gaussian plume model. The solution procedure involves direct analytic integration of air concentration equations over time and position, using simplified meteorology. The formulation allows for dry and wet deposition, radioactive decay and daughter buildup, reactor building wake effects, the inversion lid effect, plume rise due to buoyancy or momentum, release duration, and grass height. Based on air and ground concentrations of the radionuclides, the early dose to an individual is calculated via cloudshine, groundshine, and inhalation. The model also calculates early health effects based on the doses. This paper presents aspects of the model that would be of interest to the prediction of environmental flows and their public consequences.

  12. Charging free energy calculations using the Generalized Solvent Boundary Potential (GSBP) and periodic boundary condition: a comparative analysis using ion solvation and oxidation free energy in proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiya; Cui, Qiang

    2013-02-21

    Free energy simulations using a finite sphere boundary condition rather than a periodic boundary condition (PBC) are attractive in the study of very large biomolecular systems. To understand the quantitative impact of various approximations in such simulations, we compare charging free energies in both solution and protein systems calculated in a linear response framework with the Generalized Solvent Boundary Potential (GSBP) and PBC simulations. For simple ions in solution, we find good agreements between GSBP and PBC charging free energies, once the relevant correction terms are taken into consideration. For PBC simulations with the particle-mesh-Ewald for long-range electrostatics, the contribution (ΔG(P-M)) due to the use of a particle rather than molecule based summation scheme in real space is found to be significant, as pointed out by Hünenberger and co-workers. For GSBP, when the inner region is close to be charge neutral, the key correction is the overpolarization of water molecules at the inner/outer dielectric boundary; the magnitude of the correction (ΔG(s-pol)), however, is relatively small. For charging (oxidation) free energy in proteins, the situation is more complex, although good agreement between GSBP and PBC can still be obtained when care is exercised. The smooth dielectric boundary approximation inherent to GSBP tends to make significant errors when the inner region is featured with a high net charge. However, the error can be corrected with Poisson-Boltzmann calculations using snapshots from GSBP simulations in a straightforward and robust manner. Because of the more complex charge and solvent distributions, the magnitudes of ΔG(P-M) and ΔG(s-pol) in protein simulations appear to be different from those derived for solution simulations, leading to uncertainty in directly comparing absolute charging free energies from PBC and GSBP simulations for protein systems. The relative charging/oxidation free energies, however, are robust. With the

  13. Calculations of the neutron skin and its effect in atomic parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. A.; Derevianko, A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2009-03-15

    We perform calculations for the neutron skin of nuclei and its contribution to atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) in many isotopes of Cs, Ba, Sm, Dy, Yb, Tl, Pb, Bi, Fr, and Ra. Three problems are addressed: (i) neutron-skin-induced errors to single-isotope PNC, (ii) the possibility of measuring neutron skin using atomic PNC, and (iii) neutron-skin-induced errors for ratios of PNC effects in different isotopes. In the latter case the correlations in the neutron skin values for different isotopes lead to cancellations of the errors; this makes the isotopic ratio method a competitive tool in a search for new physics beyond the standard model.

  14. Recommended Practice for Pressure Measurements and Calculation of Effective Pumping Speeds During Electric Propulsion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John W.; Walker, Mitchell; Swiatek, Michael W.; Yim, John T.

    2013-01-01

    The electric propulsion community has been implored to establish and implement a set of universally applicable test standards during the research, development, and qualification of electric propulsion systems. Variability between facility-to-facility and more importantly ground-to-flight performance can result in large margins in application or aversion to mission infusion. Performance measurements and life testing under appropriate conditions can be costly and lengthy. Measurement practices must be consistent, accurate, and repeatable. Additionally, the measurements must be universally transportable across facilities throughout the development, qualification, spacecraft integration, and on-orbit performance. A recommended practice for making pressure measurements, pressure diagnostics, and calculating effective pumping speeds with justification is presented.

  15. Systematic study of finite-size effects in quantum Monte Carlo calculations of real metallic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Azadi, Sam Foulkes, W. M. C.

    2015-09-14

    We present a systematic and comprehensive study of finite-size effects in diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations of metals. Several previously introduced schemes for correcting finite-size errors are compared for accuracy and efficiency, and practical improvements are introduced. In particular, we test a simple but efficient method of finite-size correction based on an accurate combination of twist averaging and density functional theory. Our diffusion quantum Monte Carlo results for lithium and aluminum, as examples of metallic systems, demonstrate excellent agreement between all of the approaches considered.

  16. Transverse space charge effect calculation in the Synergia accelerator modeling toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes a transverse space charge effect calculation algorithm, developed in the context of accelerator modeling toolkit Synergia. The introduction to the space charge problem and the Synergia modeling toolkit short description are given. The developed algorithm is explained and the implementation is described in detail. As a result of this work a new space charge solver was developed and integrated into the Synergia toolkit. The solver showed correct results in comparison to existing Synergia solvers and delivered better performance in the regime where it is applicable.

  17. Thermodynamic Calculation Study on Effect of Manganese on Stability of Austenite in High Nitrogen Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingchuan; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    A series of high nitrogen steels were studied by using thermodynamic calculations to investigate the effect of manganese on the stability of austenite. Surprisingly, it was found that the austenite stabilizing ability of manganese was strongly weakened by chromium, but it was strengthened by molybdenum. In addition, with an increase of manganese content, the ferrite stabilizing ability of chromium significantly increased, but that of molybdenum decreased. Therefore, strong interactions exist between manganese and the other alloying elements, which should be the main reason for the difference among different constituent diagrams.

  18. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. DOWKER's Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-06-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so-called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  19. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. Dowker's Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-07-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  20. Path-integral calculation of the second virial coefficient including intramolecular flexibility effects

    SciTech Connect

    Garberoglio, Giovanni; Jankowski, Piotr; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Harvey, Allan H.

    2014-07-28

    We present a path-integral Monte Carlo procedure for the fully quantum calculation of the second molecular virial coefficient accounting for intramolecular flexibility. This method is applied to molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and deuterium (D{sub 2}) in the temperature range 15–2000 K, showing that the effect of molecular flexibility is not negligible. Our results are in good agreement with experimental data, as well as with virials given by recent empirical equations of state, although some discrepancies are observed for H{sub 2} between 100 and 200 K.