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Sample records for efficient isotopic labeling

  1. Efficient and selective isotopic labeling of hemes to facilitate the study of multiheme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, Bruno M.; Tien, Ming; Rivera, Mario; Shi, Liang; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2012-04-02

    Specific isotopic labeling of hemes provides a unique opportunity to characterize the structure and function of heme-proteins. Unfortunately, present day methods do not allow efficient labeling in high yields of multiheme cytochromes c, which are of great biotechnological interest. Here, a method for production of recombinant multiheme cytochromes c in Escherichia coli with isotopically labeled hemes is reported. A small tetraheme cytochrome of 12 kDa from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to demonstrate the method, achieving a production of 4 mg of pure protein per liter. This method achieves, in a single step, efficient expression and incorporation of hemes isotopically labeled in specific atom positions adequate for spectroscopic characterization of these complex heme proteins. It is, furthermore, of general application to heme proteins opening new possibilities in the characterization of this important class of proteins.

  2. Efficient isotopic tryptophan labeling of membrane proteins by an indole controlled process conduct.

    PubMed

    Berger, Christian; Berndt, Sandra; Pichert, Annelie; Theisgen, Stephan; Huster, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    A protocol for the efficient isotopic labeling of large G protein-coupled receptors with tryptophan in Escherichia coli as expression host was developed that sufficiently suppressed the naturally occurring L-tryptophan indole lyase, which cleaves tryptophan into indole, pyruvate, and ammonia resulting in scrambling of the isotopic label in the protein. Indole produced by the tryptophanase is naturally used as messenger for cell-cell communication. Detailed analysis of different process conducts led to the optimal expression strategy, which mimicked cell-cell communication by the addition of indole during expression. Discrete concentrations of indole and (15) N2 -L-tryptophan at dedicated time points in the fermentation drastically increased the isotopic labeling efficiency. Isotope scrambling was only observed in glutamine, asparagine, and arginine side chains but not in the backbone. This strategy allows producing specifically tryptophan labeled membrane proteins at high concentrations avoiding the disadvantages of the often low yields of auxotrophic E. coli strains. In the fermentation process carried out according to this protocol, we produced ∼15 mg of tryptophan labeled neuropeptide Y receptor type 2 per liter medium.

  3. Highly efficient residue-selective labeling with isotope-labeled Ile, Leu, and Val using a new auxotrophic E. coli strain.

    PubMed

    Miyanoiri, Yohei; Ishida, Yojiro; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Inouye, Masayori; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2016-06-01

    We recently developed a practical protocol for preparing proteins bearing stereo-selectively (13)C-methyl labeled leucines and valines, instead of the commonly used (13)C-methyl labeled precursors for these amino acids, by E. coli cellular expression. Using this protocol, proteins with any combinations of isotope-labeled or unlabeled Leu and Val residues were prepared, including some that could not be prepared by the precursor methods. However, there is still room for improvement in the labeling efficiencies for Val residues, using the methods with labeled precursors or Val itself. This is due to the fact that the biosynthesis of Val could not be sufficiently suppressed, even by the addition of large amounts of Val or its precursors. In this study, we completely solved this problem by using a mutant strain derived from E. coli BL21(DE3), in which the metabolic pathways depending on two enzymes, dihydroxy acid dehydratase and β-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, are completely aborted by deleting the ilvD and leuB genes, which respectively encode these enzymes. The ΔilvD E. coli mutant terminates the conversion from α,β-dihydroxyisovalerate to α-ketoisovalerate, and the conversion from α,β-dihydroxy-α-methylvalerate to α-keto-β-methylvalerate, which produce the preceding precursors for Val and Ile, respectively. By the further deletion of the leuB gene, the conversion from Val to Leu was also fully terminated. Taking advantage of the double-deletion mutant, ΔilvDΔleuB E. coli BL21(DE3), an efficient and residue-selective labeling method with various isotope-labeled Ile, Leu, and Val residues was established.

  4. An economic approach to efficient isotope labeling in insect cells using homemade 15N-, 13C- and 2H-labeled yeast extracts.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Christian; Isogai, Shin; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Heterologous expression of proteins in insect cells is frequently used for crystallographic structural studies due to the high yields even for challenging proteins requiring the eukaryotic protein processing capabilities of the host. However for NMR studies, the need for isotope labeling poses extreme challenges in eukaryotic hosts. Here, we describe a robust method to achieve uniform protein (15)N and (13)C labeling of up to 90 % in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The approach is based on the production of labeled yeast extract, which is subsequently supplemented to insect cell growth media. The method also allows deuteration at levels of >60 % without decrease in expression yield. The economic implementation of the labeling procedures into a standard structural biology laboratory environment is described in a step-by-step protocol. Applications are demonstrated for a variety of NMR experiments using the Abelson kinase domain, GFP, and the beta-1 adrenergic receptor as examples. Deuterated expression of the latter provides spectra of very high quality of a eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptor.

  5. Stable isotope labeling methods for DNA.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Frank H T; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Heus, Hans A

    2016-08-01

    NMR is a powerful method for studying proteins and nucleic acids in solution. The study of nucleic acids by NMR is far more challenging than for proteins, which is mainly due to the limited number of building blocks and unfavorable spectral properties. For NMR studies of DNA molecules, (site specific) isotope enrichment is required to facilitate specific NMR experiments and applications. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of isotope-labeling strategies for obtaining stable isotope labeled DNA as well as specifically stable isotope labeled building blocks required for enzymatic DNA synthesis. PMID:27573183

  6. Simple, rapid method for the preparation of isotopically labeled formaldehyde

    DOEpatents

    Hooker, Jacob Matthew; Schonberger, Matthias; Schieferstein, Hanno; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-10-04

    Isotopically labeled formaldehyde (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O) is prepared from labeled methyl iodide (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.3I) by reaction with an oxygen nucleophile having a pendant leaving group. The mild and efficient reaction conditions result in good yields of *C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O with little or no *C isotopic dilution. The simple, efficient production of .sup.11CH.sub.2O is described. The use of the .sup.11CH.sub.2O for the formation of positron emission tomography tracer compounds is described. The reaction can be incorporated into automated equipment available to radiochemistry laboratories. The isotopically labeled formaldehyde can be used in a variety of reactions to provide radiotracer compounds for imaging studies as well as for scintillation counting and autoradiography.

  7. Effective isotope labeling of proteins in a mammalian expression system.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Mallika; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Isotope labeling of biologically interesting proteins is a prerequisite for structural and dynamics studies by NMR spectroscopy. Many of these proteins require mammalian cofactors, chaperons, or posttranslational modifications such as myristoylation, glypiation, disulfide bond formation, or N- or O-linked glycosylation; and mammalian cells have the necessary machinery to produce them in their functional forms. Here, we describe recent advances in mammalian expression, including an efficient adenoviral vector-based system, for the production of isotopically labeled proteins. This system enables expression of mammalian proteins and their complexes, including proteins that require posttranslational modifications. We describe a roadmap to produce isotopically labeled (15)N and (13)C posttranslationally modified proteins, such as the outer domain of HIV-1 gp120, which has four disulfide bonds and 15 potential sites of N-linked glycosylation. These methods should allow NMR spectroscopic analysis of the structure and function of posttranslationally modified and secreted, cytoplasmic, or membrane-bound proteins.

  8. Stereospecific Multiple Isotopic Labeling of Benzyl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Isotopically labeled enzymatic substrates and biological metabolites are useful for many mechanistic analyses, particularly the study of kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects, determining the stereospecificity of enzymes, and resolving metabolic pathways. Here we present the 1-pot synthesis, purification, and kinetic analysis of 7R-[2H]-phenyl-[14C]-benzyl alcohol. The procedure involves a chemoenzymatic synthesis that couples formate dehydrogenase to alcohol dehydrogenase with a catalytic amount of nicotinamide cofactor. The reaction goes to completion overnight, and the measurement of a competitive kinetic isotope effect on the enzymatic oxidation of the purified product identified no 1H contamination. This measurement is very sensitive to such isotopic contamination and verified the high level of isotopic and enantiomeric purity yielded by the new synthetic procedure. PMID:24327376

  9. An Efficient Synthetic Strategy for Obtaining 4-Methoxy Carbon Isotope Labeled Combretastatin A-4 Phosphate and Other Z-Combretastatins1

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, George R.; Minardi, Mathew D.; Hogan, Fiona; Price, Pat M.

    2010-01-01

    Human cancer and other clinical trials under development employing combretastatin A-4 phosphate (1b, CA4P) should benefit from the availability of a [11C]-labeled derivative for position emission tomography (PET). In order to obtain a suitable precursor for addition of a [11C]methyl group at the penultimate step, several new synthetic pathways to CA4P were evaluated. Geometrical isomerization (Z to E) proved to be a challenge, but it was overcome by development of a new CA4P synthesis suitable for 4-methoxy isotope labeling. PMID:20028026

  10. Gluconeogenesis from labeled carbon: estimating isotope dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, J.K.

    1986-03-01

    To estimate the rate of gluconeogenesis from steady-state incorporation of labeled 3-carbon precursors into glucose, isotope dilution must be considered so that the rate of labeling of glucose can be quantitatively converted to the rate of gluconeogenesis. An expression for the value of this isotope dilution can be derived using mathematical techniques and a model of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The present investigation employs a more complex model than that used in previous studies. This model includes the following pathways that may affect the correction for isotope dilution: 1) flux of 3-carbon precursor to the oxaloacetate pool via acetyl-CoA and the TCA cycle; 2) flux of 4- or 5-carbon compounds into the TCA cycle; 3) reversible flux between oxaloacetate (OAA) and pyruvate and between OAA and fumarate; 4) incomplete equilibrium between OAA pools; and 5) isotope dilution of 3-carbon tracers between the experimentally measured pool and the precursor for the TCA-cycle OAA pool. Experimental tests are outlined which investigators can use to determine whether these pathways are significant in a specific steady-state system. The study indicated that flux through these five pathways can significantly affect the correction for isotope dilution. To correct for the effects of these pathways an alternative method for calculating isotope dilution is proposed using citrate to relate the specific activities of acetyl-CoA and OAA.

  11. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  12. Weaving a two-dimensional fishing net from titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe₃O₄ nanocrystals for highly efficient capture and isotope labeling of phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueqin; Li, Siyuan; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Min, Qianhao; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-03-19

    Qualitative and quantitative characterization of phosphopeptides by means of mass spectrometry (MS) is the main goal of MS-based phosphoproteomics, but suffers from their low abundance in the large haystack of various biological molecules. Herein, we introduce two-dimensional (2D) metal oxides to tackle this biological separation issue. A nanocomposite composed of titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe₃O₄ nanocrystals (Fe₃O₄-TiNbNS) is constructed via a facile cation-exchange approach, and adopted for the capture and isotope labeling of phosphopeptides. In this nanoarchitecture, the 2D titanoniobate nanosheets offer enlarged surface area and a spacious microenvironment for capturing phosphopeptides, while the Fe₃O₄ nanocrystals not only incorporate a magnetic response into the composite but, more importantly, also disrupt the restacking process between the titanoniobate nanosheets and thus preserve a greater specific surface for binding phosphopeptides. Owing to the extended active surface, abundant Lewis acid sites and excellent magnetic controllability, Fe₃O₄-TiNbNS demonstrates superior sensitivity, selectivity and capacity over homogeneous bulk metal oxides, layered oxides, and even restacked nanosheets in phosphopeptide enrichment, and further allows in situ isotope labeling to quantify aberrantly-regulated phosphopeptides from sera of leukemia patients. This composite nanosheet greatly contributes to the MS analysis of phosphopeptides and gives inspiration in the pursuit of 2D structured materials for separation of other biological molecules of interests. PMID:25757497

  13. Weaving a two-dimensional fishing net from titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe₃O₄ nanocrystals for highly efficient capture and isotope labeling of phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueqin; Li, Siyuan; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Min, Qianhao; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-03-19

    Qualitative and quantitative characterization of phosphopeptides by means of mass spectrometry (MS) is the main goal of MS-based phosphoproteomics, but suffers from their low abundance in the large haystack of various biological molecules. Herein, we introduce two-dimensional (2D) metal oxides to tackle this biological separation issue. A nanocomposite composed of titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe₃O₄ nanocrystals (Fe₃O₄-TiNbNS) is constructed via a facile cation-exchange approach, and adopted for the capture and isotope labeling of phosphopeptides. In this nanoarchitecture, the 2D titanoniobate nanosheets offer enlarged surface area and a spacious microenvironment for capturing phosphopeptides, while the Fe₃O₄ nanocrystals not only incorporate a magnetic response into the composite but, more importantly, also disrupt the restacking process between the titanoniobate nanosheets and thus preserve a greater specific surface for binding phosphopeptides. Owing to the extended active surface, abundant Lewis acid sites and excellent magnetic controllability, Fe₃O₄-TiNbNS demonstrates superior sensitivity, selectivity and capacity over homogeneous bulk metal oxides, layered oxides, and even restacked nanosheets in phosphopeptide enrichment, and further allows in situ isotope labeling to quantify aberrantly-regulated phosphopeptides from sera of leukemia patients. This composite nanosheet greatly contributes to the MS analysis of phosphopeptides and gives inspiration in the pursuit of 2D structured materials for separation of other biological molecules of interests.

  14. Weaving a two-dimensional fishing net from titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe3O4 nanocrystals for highly efficient capture and isotope labeling of phosphopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueqin; Li, Siyuan; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Min, Qianhao; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-03-01

    Qualitative and quantitative characterization of phosphopeptides by means of mass spectrometry (MS) is the main goal of MS-based phosphoproteomics, but suffers from their low abundance in the large haystack of various biological molecules. Herein, we introduce two-dimensional (2D) metal oxides to tackle this biological separation issue. A nanocomposite composed of titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe3O4 nanocrystals (Fe3O4-TiNbNS) is constructed via a facile cation-exchange approach, and adopted for the capture and isotope labeling of phosphopeptides. In this nanoarchitecture, the 2D titanoniobate nanosheets offer enlarged surface area and a spacious microenvironment for capturing phosphopeptides, while the Fe3O4 nanocrystals not only incorporate a magnetic response into the composite but, more importantly, also disrupt the restacking process between the titanoniobate nanosheets and thus preserve a greater specific surface for binding phosphopeptides. Owing to the extended active surface, abundant Lewis acid sites and excellent magnetic controllability, Fe3O4-TiNbNS demonstrates superior sensitivity, selectivity and capacity over homogeneous bulk metal oxides, layered oxides, and even restacked nanosheets in phosphopeptide enrichment, and further allows in situ isotope labeling to quantify aberrantly-regulated phosphopeptides from sera of leukemia patients. This composite nanosheet greatly contributes to the MS analysis of phosphopeptides and gives inspiration in the pursuit of 2D structured materials for separation of other biological molecules of interests.Qualitative and quantitative characterization of phosphopeptides by means of mass spectrometry (MS) is the main goal of MS-based phosphoproteomics, but suffers from their low abundance in the large haystack of various biological molecules. Herein, we introduce two-dimensional (2D) metal oxides to tackle this biological separation issue. A nanocomposite composed of titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe3

  15. Weaving a two-dimensional fishing net from titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe3O4 nanocrystals for highly efficient capture and isotope labeling of phosphopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueqin; Li, Siyuan; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Min, Qianhao; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-03-01

    Qualitative and quantitative characterization of phosphopeptides by means of mass spectrometry (MS) is the main goal of MS-based phosphoproteomics, but suffers from their low abundance in the large haystack of various biological molecules. Herein, we introduce two-dimensional (2D) metal oxides to tackle this biological separation issue. A nanocomposite composed of titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe3O4 nanocrystals (Fe3O4-TiNbNS) is constructed via a facile cation-exchange approach, and adopted for the capture and isotope labeling of phosphopeptides. In this nanoarchitecture, the 2D titanoniobate nanosheets offer enlarged surface area and a spacious microenvironment for capturing phosphopeptides, while the Fe3O4 nanocrystals not only incorporate a magnetic response into the composite but, more importantly, also disrupt the restacking process between the titanoniobate nanosheets and thus preserve a greater specific surface for binding phosphopeptides. Owing to the extended active surface, abundant Lewis acid sites and excellent magnetic controllability, Fe3O4-TiNbNS demonstrates superior sensitivity, selectivity and capacity over homogeneous bulk metal oxides, layered oxides, and even restacked nanosheets in phosphopeptide enrichment, and further allows in situ isotope labeling to quantify aberrantly-regulated phosphopeptides from sera of leukemia patients. This composite nanosheet greatly contributes to the MS analysis of phosphopeptides and gives inspiration in the pursuit of 2D structured materials for separation of other biological molecules of interests.Qualitative and quantitative characterization of phosphopeptides by means of mass spectrometry (MS) is the main goal of MS-based phosphoproteomics, but suffers from their low abundance in the large haystack of various biological molecules. Herein, we introduce two-dimensional (2D) metal oxides to tackle this biological separation issue. A nanocomposite composed of titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe3

  16. Stable isotope dimethyl labelling for quantitative proteomics and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jue-Liang; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2016-10-28

    Stable-isotope reductive dimethylation, a cost-effective, simple, robust, reliable and easy-to- multiplex labelling method, is widely applied to quantitative proteomics using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. This review focuses on biological applications of stable-isotope dimethyl labelling for a large-scale comparative analysis of protein expression and post-translational modifications based on its unique properties of the labelling chemistry. Some other applications of the labelling method for sample preparation and mass spectrometry-based protein identification and characterization are also summarized.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. PMID:27644970

  17. Analysis of proteome dynamics in mice by isotopic labeling.

    PubMed

    Price, John C; Ghaemmaghami, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry and in vivo isotopic labeling have enabled proteome-wide analyses of protein turnover in complex organisms. Here, we describe a protocol for analyzing protein turnover rates in mouse tissues by comprehensive (15)N labeling. The procedure involves the complete isotopic labeling of blue green algae (Spirulina platensis) with (15)N and utilizing it as a source of dietary nitrogen for mice. We outline a detailed protocol for in-house production of (15)N-labeled algae, labeling of mice, and analysis of isotope incorporation kinetics by mass spectrometry. The methodology can be adapted to analyze proteome dynamics in most murine tissues and may be particularly useful in the analysis of proteostatic disruptions in mouse models of disease. PMID:24791984

  18. Stereoselective synthesis of stable-isotope-labeled amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III; Lodwig, S.N.

    1994-12-01

    For magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopies to reach their full potential, they must be used in combination with sophisticated site-specific stable isotope labeling of biological macromolecules. Labeled amino acids are required for the study of the structure and function of enzymes and proteins. Because there are 20 common amino acids, each with its own distinguishing chemistry, they remain a synthetic challenge. The Oppolzer chiral auxiliary provides a general tool with which to approach the synthesis of labeled amino acids. By using the Oppolzer auxiliary, amino acids can be constructed from several small molecules, which is ideal for stable isotope labeling. In addition to directing the stereochemistry at the {alpha}-carbon, the camphorsultam can be used for stereo-specific isotope labeling at prochiral centers in amino acids. By using the camphorsultam auxiliary we have the potential to synthesize virtually any isotopomer of all of the common amino acids.

  19. [Progress in stable isotope labeled quantitative proteomics methods].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Shan, Yichu; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative proteomics is an important research field in post-genomics era. There are two strategies for proteome quantification: label-free methods and stable isotope labeling methods which have become the most important strategy for quantitative proteomics at present. In the past few years, a number of quantitative methods have been developed, which support the fast development in biology research. In this work, we discuss the progress in the stable isotope labeling methods for quantitative proteomics including relative and absolute quantitative proteomics, and then give our opinions on the outlook of proteome quantification methods.

  20. Production of stable isotope-labeled acyl-coenzyme A thioesters by yeast stable isotope labeling by essential nutrients in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Nathaniel W; Tombline, Gregory; Worth, Andrew J; Parry, Robert C; Silvers, Jacob A; Gillespie, Kevin P; Basu, Sankha S; Millen, Jonathan; Goldfarb, David S; Blair, Ian A

    2015-04-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters are key metabolites in numerous anabolic and catabolic pathways, including fatty acid biosynthesis and β-oxidation, the Krebs cycle, and cholesterol and isoprenoid biosynthesis. Stable isotope dilution-based methodology is the "gold standard" for quantitative analyses by mass spectrometry. However, chemical synthesis of families of stable isotope-labeled metabolites such as acyl-CoA thioesters is impractical. Previously, we biosynthetically generated a library of stable isotope internal standard analogs of acyl-CoA thioesters by exploiting the essential requirement in mammals and insects for pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) as a metabolic precursor for the CoA backbone. By replacing pantothenic acid in the cell medium with commercially available [(13)C3(15)N1]-pantothenic acid, mammalian cells exclusively incorporated [(13)C3(15)N1]-pantothenate into the biosynthesis of acyl-CoA and acyl-CoA thioesters. We have now developed a much more efficient method for generating stable isotope-labeled CoA and acyl-CoAs from [(13)C3(15)N1]-pantothenate using stable isotope labeling by essential nutrients in cell culture (SILEC) in Pan6-deficient yeast cells. Efficiency and consistency of labeling were also increased, likely due to the stringently defined and reproducible conditions used for yeast culture. The yeast SILEC method greatly enhances the ease of use and accessibility of labeled CoA thioesters and also provides proof of concept for generating other labeled metabolites in yeast mutants.

  1. Selected scientific topics of the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds.

    PubMed

    Atzrodt, Jens; Derdau, Volker

    2013-01-01

    This micro-review describes hot topics and new trends in isotope science discussed at the 11th International Isotope Symposium on the Synthesis and Applications of Isotopes and Isotopically Labeled Compounds from a personal perspective.

  2. Copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization-oxygenation of thiocarbonyl compounds using molecular oxygen: an efficient method for the preparation of oxygen isotopically labeled carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Shibahara, Fumitoshi; Suenami, Aiko; Yoshida, Atsunori; Murai, Toshiaki

    2007-06-21

    A novel copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization reaction of thiocarbonyl compounds, using molecular oxygen as an oxidant and leading to formation of carbonyl compounds, has been developed, and the utility of the process is demonstrated by its application to the preparation of a carbonyl-18O labeled sialic acid derivative. PMID:17844744

  3. Correction of MS data for naturally occurring isotopes in isotope labelling experiments.

    PubMed

    Millard, Pierre; Letisse, Fabien; Sokol, Serguei; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) in combination with isotope labelling experiments is widely used for investigations of metabolism and other biological processes. Quantitative applications-e.g., (13)C metabolic flux analysis-require correction of raw MS data (isotopic clusters) for the contribution of all naturally abundant isotopes. This chapter describes how to perform such correction using the software IsoCor. This flexible, user-friendly software can be used to exploit any isotopic tracer, from well-known ((13)C, (15)N, (18)O, etc.) to unusual ((57)Fe, (77)Se, etc.) isotopes. It also provides options-e.g., correction for the isotopic purity of the tracer-to improve the accuracy of quantitative isotopic studies, and allows automated correction of large datasets that can be collected with modern MS methods.

  4. Synthesis of stable isotope labelled internal standards for drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies.

    PubMed

    Atzrodt, J; Blankenstein, J; Brasseur, D; Calvo-Vicente, S; Denoux, M; Derdau, V; Lavisse, M; Perard, S; Roy, S; Sandvoss, M; Schofield, J; Zimmermann, J

    2012-09-15

    The syntheses of stable isotope labelled internal standards of important CYP-isoform selective probes, like testosterone 1, diclofenac 3, midazolam 5, and dextromethorphan 7, as well as their corresponding hydroxylated metabolites 6β-hydroxytestosterone 2, 4'-hydroxydiclofenac 4, 1'-hydroxymidazolam 6 and dextrorphan 8 are reported. Microwave-enhanced H/D-exchange reactions applying either acid, base, or homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal catalysis, or combinations thereof proved to be highly efficient for direct deuterium labelling of the above mentioned probes. Compared to conventional stepwise synthetic approaches, the combination of H/D exchange and biotransformation provides the potential for considerable time- and cost savings, in particular for the synthesis of the stable isotope labelled internal standards of 4'-hydroxydiclofenac 4 and 1'-hydroxymidazolam 6. PMID:22890009

  5. Synthesis of stable isotope labelled internal standards for drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies.

    PubMed

    Atzrodt, J; Blankenstein, J; Brasseur, D; Calvo-Vicente, S; Denoux, M; Derdau, V; Lavisse, M; Perard, S; Roy, S; Sandvoss, M; Schofield, J; Zimmermann, J

    2012-09-15

    The syntheses of stable isotope labelled internal standards of important CYP-isoform selective probes, like testosterone 1, diclofenac 3, midazolam 5, and dextromethorphan 7, as well as their corresponding hydroxylated metabolites 6β-hydroxytestosterone 2, 4'-hydroxydiclofenac 4, 1'-hydroxymidazolam 6 and dextrorphan 8 are reported. Microwave-enhanced H/D-exchange reactions applying either acid, base, or homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal catalysis, or combinations thereof proved to be highly efficient for direct deuterium labelling of the above mentioned probes. Compared to conventional stepwise synthetic approaches, the combination of H/D exchange and biotransformation provides the potential for considerable time- and cost savings, in particular for the synthesis of the stable isotope labelled internal standards of 4'-hydroxydiclofenac 4 and 1'-hydroxymidazolam 6.

  6. Existing and emerging technologies for measuring stable isotope labelled retinol in biological samples: isotope dilution analysis of body retinol stores.

    PubMed

    Preston, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the recent improvements in instrumentation used for stable isotope tracer measurements in the context of measuring retinol stores, in vivo. Tracer costs, together with concerns that larger tracer doses may perturb the parameter under study, demand that ever more sensitive mass spectrometric techniques are developed. GCMS is the most widely used technique. It has high sensitivity in terms of sample amount and uses high resolution GC, yet its ability to detect low isotope ratios is limited by background noise. LCMSMS may become more accessible for tracer studies. Its ability to measure low level stable isotope tracers may prove superior to GCMS, but it is isotope ratio MS (IRMS) that has been designed specifically for low level stable isotope analysis through accurate analysis of tracer:tracee ratios (the tracee being the unlabelled species). Compound-specific isotope analysis, where GC is interfaced to IRMS, is gaining popularity. Here, individual 13C-labelled compounds are separated by GC, combusted to CO2 and transferred on-line for ratiometric analysis by IRMS at the ppm level. However, commercially-available 13C-labelled retinol tracers are 2 - 4 times more expensive than deuterated tracers. For 2H-labelled compounds, GC-pyrolysis-IRMS has now become more generally available as an operating mode on the same IRMS instrument. Here, individual compounds are separated by GC and pyrolysed to H2 at high temperature for analysis by IRMS. It is predicted that GC-pyrolysis-IRMS will facilitate low level tracer procedures to measure body retinol stores, as has been accomplished in the case of fatty acids and amino acids. Sample size requirements for GC-P-IRMS may exceed those of GCMS, but this paper discusses sample preparation procedures and predicts improvements, particularly in the efficiency of sample introduction.

  7. Site-directed isotope labelling and FTIR spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S; Lee, C P; Coleman, M; Patel, N; Liu, X; Marti, T; Khorana, H G; RajBhandary, U L; Rothschild, K J

    1994-08-01

    Insight into integral membrane proteins function is presently limited by the difficulty of producing three-dimensional crystals. In addition, X-ray structures of proteins normally do not provide information about the protonation state and structural changes of individual residues. We report here the first use of site-directed isotope labelling and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy to detect structural changes at the level of single residues in an integral membrane protein. Two site-directed isotope labeled (SDIL) tyrosine analogues of bacteriorhodopsin were produced which exhibit normal activity. FTIR spectroscopy shows that out of 11 tyrosines, only Tyr 185 is structurally active during the early photocycle and may be part of a proton wire.

  8. Quantifying plant phenotypes with isotopic labeling & metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Doug K

    2016-02-01

    Analyses of metabolic flux using stable isotopes in plants have traditionally been restricted to tissues with presumed homogeneous cell populations and long metabolic steady states such as developing seeds, cell suspensions, or cultured roots and root tips. It is now possible to describe these and other metabolically more dynamic tissues such as leaves in greater detail using novel methods in mass spectrometry, isotope labeling strategies, and transient labeling-based flux analyses. Such studies are necessary for a systems level description of plant function that more closely represents biological reality, and provides insights into the genes that will need to be modified as natural resources become ever more limited and environments change. PMID:26613198

  9. Neutron capture radiography: a technique for isotopic labelling and analytical imaging with a few stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Thellier, Michel; Ripoll, Camille

    2006-06-19

    NCR (neutron capture radiography) may be used successfully for the imaging of one of the stable isotopes of a few chemical elements (especially 6Li and 10B, possibly also 14N, 17O, and others) and for labelling experiments using these stable isotopes. Other physical techniques compete with NCR. However, NCR can remain extremely useful in a certain number of cases, because it is usually more easily done and is less expensive than the other techniques.

  10. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  11. Isotopic Labeling of Red Cabbage Anthocyanins with Atmospheric 13-CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isotopic labeling of plants provides a unique opportunity for understanding metabolic processes. A significant challenge of isotopic labeling during plant growth is that isotopes must be administered without disrupting plant development and at sufficient levels for mass spectral analysis. We describ...

  12. Experimental design principles for isotopically instationary 13C labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Nöh, Katharina; Wiechert, Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is a well-established tool in Metabolic Engineering that found numerous applications in recent years. However, one strong limitation of the current method is the requirement of an-at least approximate-isotopic stationary state at sampling time. This requirement leads to a principle lower limit for the duration of a 13C labeling experiment. A new methodological development is based on repeated sampling during the instationary transient of the 13C labeling dynamics. The statistical and computational treatment of such instationary experiments is a completely new terrain. The computational effort is very high because large differential equations have to be solved and, moreover, the intracellular pool sizes play a significant role. For this reason, the present contribution works out principles and strategies for the experimental design of instationary experiments based on a simple example network. Hereby, the potential of isotopically instationary experiments is investigated in detail. Various statistical results on instationary flux identifiability are presented and possible pitfalls of experimental design are discussed. Finally, a framework for almost optimal experimental design of isotopically instationary experiments is proposed which provides a practical guideline for the analysis of large-scale networks.

  13. Determination of Phytochelatins in Rice by Stable Isotope Labeling Coupled with Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Cai, Wen-Jing; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-07-01

    A highly sensitive method was developed for the detection of phytochelatins (PCs) in rice by stable isotope labeling coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (IL-LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis. A pair of isotope-labeling reagents [ω-bromoacetonylquinolinium bromide (BQB) and BQB-d(7)] were used to label PCs in plant sample and standard PCs, respectively, and then combined prior to LC/MS analysis. The heavy labeled standards were used as the internal standards for quantitation to minimize the matrix and ion suppression effects in MS analysis. In addition, the ionization efficiency of PCs was greatly enhanced through the introduction of a permanent charged moiety of quaternary ammonium of BQB into PCs. The detection sensitivities of PCs upon BQB labeling improved by 14-750-fold, and therefore, PCs can be quantitated using only 5 mg of plant tissue. Furthermore, under cadmium (Cd) stress, we found that the contents of PCs in rice dramatically increased with the increased concentrations and treatment time of Cd. It was worth noting that PC5 was first identified and quantitated in rice tissues under Cd stress in the current study. Taken together, this IL-LC-ESI-MS/MS method demonstrated to be a promising strategy in detection of PCs in plants with high sensitivity and reliability. PMID:26073168

  14. Determination of Phytochelatins in Rice by Stable Isotope Labeling Coupled with Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Cai, Wen-Jing; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-07-01

    A highly sensitive method was developed for the detection of phytochelatins (PCs) in rice by stable isotope labeling coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (IL-LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis. A pair of isotope-labeling reagents [ω-bromoacetonylquinolinium bromide (BQB) and BQB-d(7)] were used to label PCs in plant sample and standard PCs, respectively, and then combined prior to LC/MS analysis. The heavy labeled standards were used as the internal standards for quantitation to minimize the matrix and ion suppression effects in MS analysis. In addition, the ionization efficiency of PCs was greatly enhanced through the introduction of a permanent charged moiety of quaternary ammonium of BQB into PCs. The detection sensitivities of PCs upon BQB labeling improved by 14-750-fold, and therefore, PCs can be quantitated using only 5 mg of plant tissue. Furthermore, under cadmium (Cd) stress, we found that the contents of PCs in rice dramatically increased with the increased concentrations and treatment time of Cd. It was worth noting that PC5 was first identified and quantitated in rice tissues under Cd stress in the current study. Taken together, this IL-LC-ESI-MS/MS method demonstrated to be a promising strategy in detection of PCs in plants with high sensitivity and reliability.

  15. Reconciling Estimates of Cell Proliferation from Stable Isotope Labeling Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Drylewicz, Julia; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Kelly, Elizabeth; Reljic, Rajko; Tesselaar, Kiki; de Boer, Rob J.; Macallan, Derek C.; Borghans, José A. M.; Asquith, Becca

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling is the state of the art technique for in vivo quantification of lymphocyte kinetics in humans. It has been central to a number of seminal studies, particularly in the context of HIV-1 and leukemia. However, there is a significant discrepancy between lymphocyte proliferation rates estimated in different studies. Notably, deuterated 2H2-glucose (D2-glucose) labeling studies consistently yield higher estimates of proliferation than deuterated water (D2O) labeling studies. This hampers our understanding of immune function and undermines our confidence in this important technique. Whether these differences are caused by fundamental biochemical differences between the two compounds and/or by methodological differences in the studies is unknown. D2-glucose and D2O labeling experiments have never been performed by the same group under the same experimental conditions; consequently a direct comparison of these two techniques has not been possible. We sought to address this problem. We performed both in vitro and murine in vivo labeling experiments using identical protocols with both D2-glucose and D2O. This showed that intrinsic differences between the two compounds do not cause differences in the proliferation rate estimates, but that estimates made using D2-glucose in vivo were susceptible to difficulties in normalization due to highly variable blood glucose enrichment. Analysis of three published human studies made using D2-glucose and D2O confirmed this problem, particularly in the case of short term D2-glucose labeling. Correcting for these inaccuracies in normalization decreased proliferation rate estimates made using D2-glucose and slightly increased estimates made using D2O; thus bringing the estimates from the two methods significantly closer and highlighting the importance of reliable normalization when using this technique. PMID:26437372

  16. Reconciling Estimates of Cell Proliferation from Stable Isotope Labeling Experiments.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Raya; Westera, Liset; Drylewicz, Julia; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Kelly, Elizabeth; Reljic, Rajko; Tesselaar, Kiki; de Boer, Rob J; Macallan, Derek C; Borghans, José A M; Asquith, Becca

    2015-10-01

    Stable isotope labeling is the state of the art technique for in vivo quantification of lymphocyte kinetics in humans. It has been central to a number of seminal studies, particularly in the context of HIV-1 and leukemia. However, there is a significant discrepancy between lymphocyte proliferation rates estimated in different studies. Notably, deuterated (2)H2-glucose (D2-glucose) labeling studies consistently yield higher estimates of proliferation than deuterated water (D2O) labeling studies. This hampers our understanding of immune function and undermines our confidence in this important technique. Whether these differences are caused by fundamental biochemical differences between the two compounds and/or by methodological differences in the studies is unknown. D2-glucose and D2O labeling experiments have never been performed by the same group under the same experimental conditions; consequently a direct comparison of these two techniques has not been possible. We sought to address this problem. We performed both in vitro and murine in vivo labeling experiments using identical protocols with both D2-glucose and D2O. This showed that intrinsic differences between the two compounds do not cause differences in the proliferation rate estimates, but that estimates made using D2-glucose in vivo were susceptible to difficulties in normalization due to highly variable blood glucose enrichment. Analysis of three published human studies made using D2-glucose and D2O confirmed this problem, particularly in the case of short term D2-glucose labeling. Correcting for these inaccuracies in normalization decreased proliferation rate estimates made using D2-glucose and slightly increased estimates made using D2O; thus bringing the estimates from the two methods significantly closer and highlighting the importance of reliable normalization when using this technique. PMID:26437372

  17. Production of isotopically-labeled standards from a uniformly labeled precursor for quantitative volatile metabolomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cortés, Pilar; Brenna, J. Thomas; Sacks, Gavin L.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal accuracy and precision in small molecule profiling by mass spectrometry generally requires isotopically labeled standards chemically representative of all compounds of interest. However, preparation of mixed standards from commercially available pure compounds is often prohibitively expensive and time consuming, and many labeled compounds are not available in pure form. We used a single prototype uniformly labeled [U-13C]-compound to generate [U-13C]-volatile standards for use in subsequent experimental profiling studies. [U-13C]-α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3, ALA) was thermally oxidized to produce labeled lipid degradation volatiles which were subsequently characterized qualitatively and quantitatively. Twenty-five [U-13C]-labeled volatiles were identified by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-TOF-MS) by comparison of spectra with unlabeled volatiles. Using 250 μL starting sample, labeled volatiles were quantified by a reverse isotope dilution procedure. Using the [U-13C]-labeled standards, limits of detection comparable to or better than previous HS-SPME reports were achieved, 0.010–1.04 ng/g. The performance of the [U-13C]-volatile standards was evaluated using a commodity soybean oil (CSO) oxidized at 60°C from 0 to 15 d. Relative responses of n-decane, an unlabeled internal standard otherwise absent from the mixture, and [U-13C]-oxidation products changed by up to 8-fold as the CSO matrix was oxidized, demonstrating that reliance on a single standard in volatile profiling studies yields inaccurate results due to changing matrix effects. The [U-13C]-standard mixture was used to quantify 25 volatiles in oxidized CSO and low-ALA soybean oil with an average relative standard deviation of 8.5%. Extension of this approach to other labeled substrates, e.g., [U-13C]-sugars and amino acids, for profiling studies should be feasible and can dramatically improve quantitative results compared to

  18. Design and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber for uniform or differential, metabolic and structural, plant isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Soong, Jennifer L; Reuss, Dan; Pinney, Colin; Boyack, Ty; Haddix, Michelle L; Stewart, Catherine E; Cotrufo, M Francesca

    2014-01-16

    Tracing rare stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as (13)C with (15)N, (18)O or (2)H has the potential to reveal even more information about complex stoichiometric relationships during biogeochemical transformations. Isotope labeled plant material has been used in various studies of litter decomposition and soil organic matter formation(1-4). From these and other studies, however, it has become apparent that structural components of plant material behave differently than metabolic components (i.e. leachable low molecular weight compounds) in terms of microbial utilization and long-term carbon storage(5-7). The ability to study structural and metabolic components separately provides a powerful new tool for advancing the forefront of ecosystem biogeochemical studies. Here we describe a method for producing (13)C and (15)N labeled plant material that is either uniformly labeled throughout the plant or differentially labeled in structural and metabolic plant components. Here, we present the construction and operation of a continuous (13)C and (15)N labeling chamber that can be modified to meet various research needs. Uniformly labeled plant material is produced by continuous labeling from seedling to harvest, while differential labeling is achieved by removing the growing plants from the chamber weeks prior to harvest. Representative results from growing Andropogon gerardii Kaw demonstrate the system's ability to efficiently label plant material at the targeted levels. Through this method we have produced plant material with a 4.4 atom%(13)C and 6.7 atom%(15)N uniform plant label, or material that is differentially labeled by up to 1.29 atom%(13)C and 0.56 atom%(15)N in its metabolic and structural components (hot water extractable and hot water

  19. Design and Operation of a Continuous 13C and 15N Labeling Chamber for Uniform or Differential, Metabolic and Structural, Plant Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Jennifer L; Reuss, Dan; Pinney, Colin; Boyack, Ty; Haddix, Michelle L; Stewart, Catherine E; Cotrufo, M. Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Tracing rare stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as 13C with 15N, 18O or 2H has the potential to reveal even more information about complex stoichiometric relationships during biogeochemical transformations. Isotope labeled plant material has been used in various studies of litter decomposition and soil organic matter formation1-4. From these and other studies, however, it has become apparent that structural components of plant material behave differently than metabolic components (i.e. leachable low molecular weight compounds) in terms of microbial utilization and long-term carbon storage5-7. The ability to study structural and metabolic components separately provides a powerful new tool for advancing the forefront of ecosystem biogeochemical studies. Here we describe a method for producing 13C and 15N labeled plant material that is either uniformly labeled throughout the plant or differentially labeled in structural and metabolic plant components. Here, we present the construction and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber that can be modified to meet various research needs. Uniformly labeled plant material is produced by continuous labeling from seedling to harvest, while differential labeling is achieved by removing the growing plants from the chamber weeks prior to harvest. Representative results from growing Andropogon gerardii Kaw demonstrate the system's ability to efficiently label plant material at the targeted levels. Through this method we have produced plant material with a 4.4 atom%13C and 6.7 atom%15N uniform plant label, or material that is differentially labeled by up to 1.29 atom%13C and 0.56 atom%15N in its metabolic and structural components (hot water extractable and hot water residual components

  20. Metabolomics relative quantitation with mass spectrometry using chemical derivatization and isotope labeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    O'Maille, Grace; Go, Eden P.; Hoang, Linh; Want, Elizabeth J.; Smith, Colin; O'Maille, Paul; NordstrÖm, Anders; Morita, Hirotoshi; Qin, Chuan; Uritboonthai, Wilasinee; et al

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive detection and quantitation of metabolites from a biological source constitute the major challenges of current metabolomics research. Two chemical derivatization methodologies, butylation and amination, were applied to human serum for ionization enhancement of a broad spectrum of metabolite classes, including steroids and amino acids. LC-ESI-MS analysis of the derivatized serum samples provided a significant signal elevation across the total ion chromatogram to over a 100-fold increase in ionization efficiency. It was also demonstrated that derivatization combined with isotopically labeled reagents facilitated the relative quantitation of derivatized metabolites from individual as well as pooled samples.

  1. Optimal isotope labelling for NMR protein structure determinations.

    PubMed

    Kainosho, Masatsune; Torizawa, Takuya; Iwashita, Yuki; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Mei Ono, Akira; Güntert, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy can determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins in solution. However, its potential has been limited by the difficulty of interpreting NMR spectra in the presence of broadened and overlapping resonance lines and low signal-to-noise ratios. Here we present stereo-array isotope labelling (SAIL), a technique that can overcome many of these problems by applying a complete stereospecific and regiospecific pattern of stable isotopes that is optimal with regard to the quality and information content of the resulting NMR spectra. SAIL uses exclusively chemically and enzymatically synthesized amino acids for cell-free protein expression. We demonstrate for the 17-kDa protein calmodulin and the 41-kDa maltodextrin-binding protein that SAIL offers sharpened lines, spectral simplification without loss of information, and the ability to rapidly collect the structural restraints required to solve a high-quality solution structure for proteins twice as large as commonly solved by NMR. It thus makes a large class of proteins newly accessible to detailed solution structure determination.

  2. General statistical framework for quantitative proteomics by stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Pedro; Trevisan-Herraz, Marco; Bonzon-Kulichenko, Elena; Núñez, Estefanía; Martínez-Acedo, Pablo; Pérez-Hernández, Daniel; Jorge, Inmaculada; Mesa, Raquel; Calvo, Enrique; Carrascal, Montserrat; Hernáez, María Luisa; García, Fernando; Bárcena, José Antonio; Ashman, Keith; Abian, Joaquín; Gil, Concha; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Vázquez, Jesús

    2014-03-01

    The combination of stable isotope labeling (SIL) with mass spectrometry (MS) allows comparison of the abundance of thousands of proteins in complex mixtures. However, interpretation of the large data sets generated by these techniques remains a challenge because appropriate statistical standards are lacking. Here, we present a generally applicable model that accurately explains the behavior of data obtained using current SIL approaches, including (18)O, iTRAQ, and SILAC labeling, and different MS instruments. The model decomposes the total technical variance into the spectral, peptide, and protein variance components, and its general validity was demonstrated by confronting 48 experimental distributions against 18 different null hypotheses. In addition to its general applicability, the performance of the algorithm was at least similar than that of other existing methods. The model also provides a general framework to integrate quantitative and error information fully, allowing a comparative analysis of the results obtained from different SIL experiments. The model was applied to the global analysis of protein alterations induced by low H₂O₂ concentrations in yeast, demonstrating the increased statistical power that may be achieved by rigorous data integration. Our results highlight the importance of establishing an adequate and validated statistical framework for the analysis of high-throughput data.

  3. Using phylogenetic probes for quantification of stable isotope labeling and microbial community analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, Eoin L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Karaoz, Ulas; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-12-09

    Herein is described methods for a high-sensitivity means to measure the incorporation of stable isotope labeled substrates into RNA following stable isotope probing experiments (SIP). RNA is hybridized to a set of probes such as phylogenetic microarrays and isotope incorporation is quantified such as by secondary ion mass spectrometer imaging (NanoSIMS).

  4. Stable isotope labeling of mammals (SILAM) for in vivo quantitative proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rauniyar, Navin; McClatchy, Daniel B; Yates, John R

    2013-06-15

    Metabolic labeling of rodent proteins with ¹⁵N, a heavy stable isotope of nitrogen, provides an efficient way for relative quantitation of differentially expressed proteins. Here we describe a protocol for metabolic labeling of rats with an ¹⁵N-enriched spirulina diet. As a case study, we also demonstrate the application of ¹⁵N-enriched tissue as a common internal standard in quantitative analysis of differentially expressed proteins in neurodevelopment in rats at two different time points, postnatal day 1 and 45. We briefly discuss the bioinformatics tools, ProLucid and Census, which can easily be used in a sequential manner to identify and quantitate relative protein levels on a proteomic scale. PMID:23523555

  5. Isotope labeling of eukaryotic membrane proteins in yeast for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Emami, Sanaz; Munro, Rachel; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is a rapidly developing technique for exploring structure and dynamics of membrane proteins, but its progress is hampered by its low sensitivity. Despite the latest technological advances, routine ssNMR experiments still require several milligrams of isotopically labeled protein. While production of bacterial membrane proteins on this scale is usually feasible, obtaining such quantities of eukaryotic membrane proteins is often impossible or extremely costly. We have demonstrated that, by using isotopic labeling in yeast Pichia pastoris, one can inexpensively produce milligram quantities of doubly labeled functional samples, which yield multidimensional ssNMR spectra of high resolution suitable for detailed structural investigation. This was achieved by combining protocols of economical isotope labeling of soluble proteins previously used for solution NMR with protocols of expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins successfully employed for other methods. We review two cases of such isotope labeling, of fungal rhodopsin from Leptosphaeria maculans and human aquaporin-1. PMID:26577733

  6. Isotope labeling of eukaryotic membrane proteins in yeast for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Emami, Sanaz; Munro, Rachel; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is a rapidly developing technique for exploring structure and dynamics of membrane proteins, but its progress is hampered by its low sensitivity. Despite the latest technological advances, routine ssNMR experiments still require several milligrams of isotopically labeled protein. While production of bacterial membrane proteins on this scale is usually feasible, obtaining such quantities of eukaryotic membrane proteins is often impossible or extremely costly. We have demonstrated that, by using isotopic labeling in yeast Pichia pastoris, one can inexpensively produce milligram quantities of doubly labeled functional samples, which yield multidimensional ssNMR spectra of high resolution suitable for detailed structural investigation. This was achieved by combining protocols of economical isotope labeling of soluble proteins previously used for solution NMR with protocols of expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins successfully employed for other methods. We review two cases of such isotope labeling, of fungal rhodopsin from Leptosphaeria maculans and human aquaporin-1.

  7. Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric investigations of the hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labelled methane

    SciTech Connect

    Jewett, J.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-24

    Suitable analytical methods must be tested and developed for monitoring the individual process steps within the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor and for tritium accountability. The utility of laser-Raman spectroscopy accompanied by mass spectrometry with an Omegatron was investigated using the analysis of all hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labeled methanes as an example. The Omegatron is useful for analyzing all hydrogen isotopes mixed with the stable helium isotopes. The application of this mass spectrometer were demonstrated by analyzing mixtures of deuterated methanes. In addition, it was employed to study the radiochemical Witzbach exchange reaction between tritium and methanes. A laser-Raman spectrometer was designed for analysis of tritium-containing gases and was built from individual components. A tritium-compatible, metal-sealed Raman cuvette having windows with good optical properties and additional means for measuring the stray light was first used successfully in this work. The Raman spectra of the hydrogen isotopes were acquired in the pure rotation mode and in the rotation-vibration mode and were used for on. The deuterated methanes were measured by Raman spectroscopy, the wavenumbers determined were assigned to the corresponding vibrations, and the wavenumbers for the rotational fine-structure were summarized in tables. The fundamental Vibrations of the deuterated methanes produced Witzbach reactions were detected and assigned. The fundamental vibrations of the molecules were obtained with Raman spectroscopy for the first time in this work. The @-Raman spectrometer assembled is well suited for the analysis of tritium- containing gases and is practical in combination with mass spectrometry using an Omegatron, for studying gases used in fusion.

  8. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  9. Analysis of Hydrogen Isotopic Exchange: Lava Creek Tuff Ash and Isotopically Labeled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. M.; Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Nolan, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Nolan and Bindeman (2013) placed secondarily hydrated ash from the 7.7 ka eruption of Mt. Mazama (δD=-149‰, 2.3wt% H2Ot) in isotopically labeled water (+650 ‰ δD, +56 ‰ δ18O) and observed that the H2Ot and δ18O values remained constant, but the δD values of ash increased with the surrounding water at 20, 40 and 70 °C. We expand on this work by conducting a similar experiment with ash from the 640 ka Lava Creek Tuff (LCT, δD of -128 ‰; 2.1 wt.% H2Ot) eruption of Yellowstone to see if significantly older glass (with a hypothesized gel layer on the surface shielding the interior from alteration) produces the same results. We have experiments running at 70, 24, and 5 °C, and periodically remove ~1.5 mg of glass to measure the δD (‰) and H2Ot (wt.%) of water extracted from the glass on a TC/EA MAT 253 continuous flow system. After 600 hours, the δD of the samples left at 5 and 24 °C remains at -128 ‰, but increased 8‰ for the 70 °C run series. However, there is no measurable change in wt.% of H2Ot, indicating that hydrogen exchange is not dictated by the addition of water. We are measuring and will report further progress of isotope exchange. We also plan to analyze the water in the LCT glass for δ18O (‰) to see if, as is the case for the Mt. Mazama glass, the δ18O (‰) remains constant. We also analyzed Mt. Mazama glass from the Nolan and Bindeman (2013) experiments that have now been sitting in isotopically labeled water at room temperature for ~5 years. The water concentration is still unchanged (2.3 wt.% H2Ot), and the δD of the water in the glass is now -111 ‰, causing an increase of 38 ‰. Our preliminary results show that exchange of hydrogen isotopes of hydrated glass is not limited by the age of the glass, and that the testing of hydrogen isotopes of secondarily hydrated glass, regardless of age, may not be a reliable paleoclimate indicator.

  10. Determination of Multimodal Isotopic Distributions: The Case of a (15)N Labeled Protein Produced into Hairy Roots.

    PubMed

    Trouillard, Romain; Hubert-Roux, Marie; Tognetti, Vincent; Guilhaudis, Laure; Plasson, Carole; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Coquet, Laurent; Guerineau, François; Hardouin, Julie; Ele Ekouna, Jean-Pierre; Cosette, Pascal; Lerouge, Patrice; Boitel-Conti, Michèle; Afonso, Carlos; Ségalas-Milazzo, Isabelle

    2015-06-16

    Isotopic labeling is widely used in various fields like proteomics, metabolomics, fluxomics, as well as in NMR structural studies, but it requires an efficient determination of the isotopic enrichment. Mass spectrometry is the method of choice for such analysis. However, when complex expression systems like hairy roots are used for production, multiple populations of labeled proteins may be obtained. If the isotopic incorporation determination is actually well-known for unimodal distributions, the multimodal distributions have scarcely been investigated. Actually, only a few approaches allow the determination of the different labeled population proportions from multimodal distributions. Furthermore, they cannot be used when the number of the populations and their respective isotope ratios are unknown. The present study implements a new strategy to measure the (15)N labeled populations inside a multimodal distribution knowing only the peptide sequence and peak intensities from mass spectrometry analyses. Noteworthy, it could be applied to other elements, like carbon and hydrogen, and extended to a larger range of biomolecules.

  11. Isotopic labeling affects 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Halloran, B.P.; Bikle, D.D.; Castro, M.E.; Gee, E.

    1989-02-07

    Isotope substitution can change the biochemical properties of vitamin D. To determine the effect of substituting 3H for 1H on the metabolism of 1,25(OH)2D3, we measured the metabolic clearance rate and renal metabolism of unlabeled and 3H-labeled 1,25(OH)2D3. Substitution of 3H for 1H on carbons 26 and 27 (1,25(OH)2(26,27(n)-3H)D3) or on carbons 23 and 24 (1,25(OH)2(23,24(n)-3H)D3) reduced the in vivo metabolic clearance rate of 1,25(OH)2D3 by 36% and 37%, respectively, and reduced the in vitro renal catabolism of 1,25(OH)2D3 by 11% and 54%, respectively. Substitutions of 3H for 1H on carbons 23 and 24 as opposed to carbons 26 and 27 reduced conversion of (3H)1,25(OH)2D3 to (3H)1,24,25(OH)2D3 by 25% and to putative 24-oxo-1,23,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by 1600%. These results indicate that substitution of 3H for 1H on carbons 26 and 27 or on carbons 23 and 24 can reduce the metabolic clearance rate and in vitro metabolism of 1,25(OH)2D3 and quantitatively alter the pattern of metabolic products produced.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of rRNA Modifications Using Stable Isotope Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional RNA modifications that are introduced during the multistep ribosome biogenesis process are essential for protein synthesis. The current lack of a comprehensive method for a fast quantitative analysis of rRNA modifications significantly limits our understanding of how individual modification steps are coordinated during biogenesis inside the cell. Here, an LC-MS approach has been developed and successfully applied for quantitative monitoring of 29 out of 36 modified residues in the 16S and 23S rRNA from Escherichia coli. An isotope labeling strategy is described for efficient identification of ribose and base methylations, and a novel metabolic labeling approach is presented to allow identification of MS-silent pseudouridine modifications. The method was used to measure relative abundances of modified residues in incomplete ribosomal subunits compared to a mature 15N-labeled rRNA standard, and a number of modifications in both 16S and 23S rRNA were present in substoichiometric amounts in the preribosomal particles. The RNA modification levels correlate well with previously obtained profiles for the ribosomal proteins, suggesting that RNA is modified in a schedule comparable to the association of the ribosomal proteins. Importantly, this study establishes an efficient workflow for a global monitoring of ribosomal modifications that will contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms of RNA modifications and their impact on intracellular processes in the future. PMID:24422502

  13. Isotope labelling to study molecular fragmentation during the dielectric barrier discharge wet reforming of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoro-Damas, Antonio M.; Gómez-Ramírez, Ana; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustín R.; Cotrino, José

    2016-09-01

    Isotope labelling is used to study the wet plasma reforming of methane in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor using D2O and CH4 as reactants. Besides the formation of CO and hydrogen as main products, different partitions of H and D atoms are found in the hydrogen (i.e., H2, HD, D2), methane (i.e., CH4, CH3D and CH2D2) and water (D2O, DHO) molecules detected by mass spectrometry as outlet gases of the plasma process. The effect of operating parameters such as applied current, residence time and the addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture is correlated with the H/D distribution in these molecules, the overall reaction yield and the energetic efficiency of the process. The results prove the plasma formation of intermediate excited species that rendering water and methane instead of CO and hydrogen greatly contribute to decrease the overall energy efficiency of the reforming process.

  14. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Hoedt, Esthelle; Zhang, Guoan; Neubert, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is a powerful approach for high-throughput quantitative proteomics. SILAC allows highly accurate protein quantitation through metabolic encoding of whole cell proteomes using stable isotope labeled amino acids. Since its introduction in 2002, SILAC has become increasingly popular. In this chapter we review the methodology and application of SILAC, with an emphasis on three research areas: dynamics of posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and protein turnover. PMID:24952180

  15. Multisubstrate Isotope Labeling and Metagenomic Analysis of Active Soil Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Verastegui, Y.; Cheng, J.; Engel, K.; Kolczynski, D.; Mortimer, S.; Lavigne, J.; Montalibet, J.; Romantsov, T.; Hall, M.; McConkey, B. J.; Rose, D. R.; Tomashek, J. J.; Scott, B. R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soil microbial diversity represents the largest global reservoir of novel microorganisms and enzymes. In this study, we coupled functional metagenomics and DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) using multiple plant-derived carbon substrates and diverse soils to characterize active soil bacterial communities and their glycoside hydrolase genes, which have value for industrial applications. We incubated samples from three disparate Canadian soils (tundra, temperate rainforest, and agricultural) with five native carbon (12C) or stable-isotope-labeled (13C) carbohydrates (glucose, cellobiose, xylose, arabinose, and cellulose). Indicator species analysis revealed high specificity and fidelity for many uncultured and unclassified bacterial taxa in the heavy DNA for all soils and substrates. Among characterized taxa, Actinomycetales (Salinibacterium), Rhizobiales (Devosia), Rhodospirillales (Telmatospirillum), and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium and Asticcacaulis) were bacterial indicator species for the heavy substrates and soils tested. Both Actinomycetales and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium) were associated with metabolism of cellulose, and Alphaproteobacteria were associated with the metabolism of arabinose; members of the order Rhizobiales were strongly associated with the metabolism of xylose. Annotated metagenomic data suggested diverse glycoside hydrolase gene representation within the pooled heavy DNA. By screening 2,876 cloned fragments derived from the 13C-labeled DNA isolated from soils incubated with cellulose, we demonstrate the power of combining DNA-SIP, multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), and functional metagenomics by efficiently isolating multiple clones with activity on carboxymethyl cellulose and fluorogenic proxy substrates for carbohydrate-active enzymes. PMID:25028422

  16. Kinetic isotope effects significantly influence intracellular metabolite 13C labeling patterns and flux determination

    PubMed Central

    Wasylenko, Thomas M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous mathematical modeling of carbon-labeling experiments allows estimation of fluxes through the pathways of central carbon metabolism, yielding powerful information for basic scientific studies as well as for a wide range of applications. However, the mathematical models that have been developed for flux determination from 13C labeling data have commonly neglected the influence of kinetic isotope effects on the distribution of 13C label in intracellular metabolites, as these effects have often been assumed to be inconsequential. We have used measurements of the 13C isotope effects on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme from the literature to model isotopic fractionation at the pyruvate node and quantify the modeling errors expected to result from the assumption that isotope effects are negligible. We show that under some conditions kinetic isotope effects have a significant impact on the 13C labeling patterns of intracellular metabolites, and the errors associated with neglecting isotope effects in 13C-metabolic flux analysis models can be comparable in size to measurement errors associated with GC–MS. Thus, kinetic isotope effects must be considered in any rigorous assessment of errors in 13C labeling data, goodness-of-fit between model and data, confidence intervals of estimated metabolic fluxes, and statistical significance of differences between estimated metabolic flux distributions. PMID:23828762

  17. Application of stable isotope-labeled compounds in metabolism and in metabolism-mediated toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Mutlib, Abdul E

    2008-09-01

    Stable isotope-labeled compounds have been synthesized and utilized by scientists from various areas of biomedical research during the last several decades. Compounds labeled with stable isotopes, such as deuterium and carbon-13, have been used effectively by drug metabolism scientists and toxicologists to gain better understanding of drugs' disposition and their potential role in target organ toxicities. The combination of stable isotope-labeling techniques with mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which allows rapid acquisition and interpretation of data, has promoted greater use of these stable isotope-labeled compounds in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) studies. Examples of the use of stable isotope-labeled compounds in elucidating structures of metabolites and delineating complex metabolic pathways are presented in this review. The application of labeled compounds in mechanistic toxicity studies will be discussed by providing an example of how strategic placement of a deuterium atom in a drug molecule mitigated specific-specific renal toxicity. Other examples from the literature demonstrating the application of stable isotope-labeled compounds in understanding metabolism-mediated toxicities are presented. Furthermore, an example of how a stable isotope-labeled compound was utilized to better understand some of the gene changes in toxicogenomic studies is discussed. The interpretation of large sets of data produced from toxicogenomics studies can be a challenge. One approach that could be used to simplify interpretation of the data, especially from studies designed to link gene changes with the formation of reactive metabolites thought to be responsible for toxicities, is through the use of stable isotope-labeled compounds. This is a relatively unexplored territory and needs to be further investigated. The employment of analytical techniques, especially mass spectrometry and NMR, used in conjunction

  18. Highly Efficient Quantum Sieving in Porous Graphene-like Carbon Nitride for Light Isotopes Separation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Li, Feng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Light isotopes separation, such as (3)He/(4)He, H2/D2, H2/T2, etc., is crucial for various advanced technologies including isotope labeling, nuclear weapons, cryogenics and power generation. However, their nearly identical chemical properties made the separation challenging. The low productivity of the present isotopes separation approaches hinders the relevant applications. An efficient membrane with high performance for isotopes separation is quite appealing. Based on first-principles calculations, we theoretically demonstrated that highly efficient light isotopes separation, such as (3)He/(4)He, can be reached in a porous graphene-like carbon nitride material via quantum sieving effect. Under moderate tensile strain, the quantum sieving of the carbon nitride membrane can be effectively tuned in a continuous way, leading to a temperature window with high (3)He/(4)He selectivity and permeance acceptable for efficient isotopes harvest in industrial application. This mechanism also holds for separation of other light isotopes, such as H2/D2, H2/T2. Such tunable quantum sieving opens a promising avenue for light isotopes separation for industrial application. PMID:26813491

  19. Highly Efficient Quantum Sieving in Porous Graphene-like Carbon Nitride for Light Isotopes Separation

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Li, Feng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, H2/D2, H2/T2, etc., is crucial for various advanced technologies including isotope labeling, nuclear weapons, cryogenics and power generation. However, their nearly identical chemical properties made the separation challenging. The low productivity of the present isotopes separation approaches hinders the relevant applications. An efficient membrane with high performance for isotopes separation is quite appealing. Based on first-principles calculations, we theoretically demonstrated that highly efficient light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, can be reached in a porous graphene-like carbon nitride material via quantum sieving effect. Under moderate tensile strain, the quantum sieving of the carbon nitride membrane can be effectively tuned in a continuous way, leading to a temperature window with high 3He/4He selectivity and permeance acceptable for efficient isotopes harvest in industrial application. This mechanism also holds for separation of other light isotopes, such as H2/D2, H2/T2. Such tunable quantum sieving opens a promising avenue for light isotopes separation for industrial application. PMID:26813491

  20. Highly Efficient Quantum Sieving in Porous Graphene-like Carbon Nitride for Light Isotopes Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Li, Feng; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhao, Mingwen

    2016-01-01

    Light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, H2/D2, H2/T2, etc., is crucial for various advanced technologies including isotope labeling, nuclear weapons, cryogenics and power generation. However, their nearly identical chemical properties made the separation challenging. The low productivity of the present isotopes separation approaches hinders the relevant applications. An efficient membrane with high performance for isotopes separation is quite appealing. Based on first-principles calculations, we theoretically demonstrated that highly efficient light isotopes separation, such as 3He/4He, can be reached in a porous graphene-like carbon nitride material via quantum sieving effect. Under moderate tensile strain, the quantum sieving of the carbon nitride membrane can be effectively tuned in a continuous way, leading to a temperature window with high 3He/4He selectivity and permeance acceptable for efficient isotopes harvest in industrial application. This mechanism also holds for separation of other light isotopes, such as H2/D2, H2/T2. Such tunable quantum sieving opens a promising avenue for light isotopes separation for industrial application.

  1. Highly enriched multiply-labeled stable isotopic compounds as atmospheric tracers

    DOEpatents

    Goldblatt, M.; McInteer, B.B.

    1974-01-29

    Compounds multiply-labeled with stable isotopes and highly enriched in these isotopes are readily capable of detection in tracer experiments involving high dilutions. Thus, for example, /sup 13/C/sup 18/O/sub 2/ provides a useful tracer for following atmospheric pol lution produced as a result of fossil fuel burning. (Official Gazette)

  2. In vivo uniform (15)N-isotope labelling of plants: using the greenhouse for structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ippel, Johannes H; Pouvreau, Laurice; Kroef, Toos; Gruppen, Harry; Versteeg, Geurt; van den Putten, Peter; Struik, Paul C; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2004-01-01

    Isotope labelling of proteins is important for progress in the field of structural proteomics. It enables the utilisation of the power of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) for the characterisation of the three-dimensional structures and corresponding dynamical features of proteins. The usual approach to obtain isotopically labelled protein molecules is by expressing the corresponding gene in bacterial or yeast host organisms, which grow on isotope-enriched media. This method has several drawbacks. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to fully label a plant with (15)N-isotopes. The advantage of in vivo labelling of higher organisms is that all constituting proteins are labelled and become available as functional, post-translationally modified, correctly folded proteins. A hydroponics set-up was used to create the first example of a uniformly (15)N-labelled (> 98%) plant species, the potato plant (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Elkana). Two plants were grown at low costs using potassium-[(15)N]-nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. At harvest time, a total of 3.6 kg of potato tubers and 1.6 kg of foliage, stolons and roots were collected, all of which were fully (15)N-labelled. Gram quantities of soluble (15)N-labelled proteins (composed mainly of the glycoprotein patatin and Kunitz-type protease inhibitors) were isolated from the tubers. NMR results on the complete proteome of potato sap and on an isolated protease inhibitor illustrate the success of the labelling procedure. The presented method of isotope labelling is easily modified to label other plants. Its envisioned impact in the field of structural proteomics of plants is discussed.

  3. Stable isotope-labeling studies in metabolomics: new insights into structure and dynamics of metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Barrett, Michael P; Breitling, Rainer; Creek, Darren J

    2014-01-01

    The rapid emergence of metabolomics has enabled system-wide measurements of metabolites in various organisms. However, advances in the mechanistic understanding of metabolic networks remain limited, as most metabolomics studies cannot routinely provide accurate metabolite identification, absolute quantification and flux measurement. Stable isotope labeling offers opportunities to overcome these limitations. Here we describe some current approaches to stable isotope-labeled metabolomics and provide examples of the significant impact that these studies have had on our understanding of cellular metabolism. Furthermore, we discuss recently developed software solutions for the analysis of stable isotope-labeled metabolomics data and propose the bioinformatics solutions that will pave the way for the broader application and optimal interpretation of system-scale labeling studies in metabolomics. PMID:24568354

  4. A Novel Method for Relative Quantitation of N-Glycans by Isotopic Labeling Using 18O-Water

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shujuan; Orlando, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Quantitation is an essential aspect of comprehensive glycomics study. Here, a novel isotopic-labeling method is described for N-glycan quantitation using 18O-water. The incorporation of the 18O-labeling into the reducing end of N-glycans is simply and efficiently achieved during peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-β-glucosaminyl) asparagine amidase F release. This process provides a 2-Da mass difference compared with the N-glycans released in 16O-water. A mathematical calculation method was also developed to determine the 18O/16O ratios from isotopic peaks. Application of this method to several standard glycoprotein mixtures and human serum demonstrated that this method can facilitate the relative quantitation of N-glycans over a linear dynamic range of two orders, with high accuracy and reproducibility. PMID:25365792

  5. Relative quantification of biomarkers using mixed-isotope labeling coupled with MS

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Heidi M; Schutt, Katherine L; Dieter, Emily M; Lamos, Shane M

    2013-01-01

    The identification and quantification of important biomarkers is a critical first step in the elucidation of biological systems. Biomarkers take many forms as cellular responses to stimuli and can be manifested during transcription, translation, and/or metabolic processing. Increasingly, researchers have relied upon mixed-isotope labeling (MIL) coupled with MS to perform relative quantification of biomarkers between two or more biological samples. MIL effectively tags biomarkers of interest for ease of identification and quantification within the mass spectrometer by using isotopic labels that introduce a heavy and light form of the tag. In addition to MIL coupled with MS, a number of other approaches have been used to quantify biomarkers including protein gel staining, enzymatic labeling, metabolic labeling, and several label-free approaches that generate quantitative data from the MS signal response. This review focuses on MIL techniques coupled with MS for the quantification of protein and small-molecule biomarkers. PMID:23157360

  6. Stable isotope N-phosphorylation labeling for Peptide de novo sequencing and protein quantification based on organic phosphorus chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wu, Hanzhi; Lee, Kim-Chung; Liu, Hongxia; Zhao, Yufen; Cai, Zongwei; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a novel stable isotope N-phosphorylation labeling (SIPL) strategy for peptide de novo sequencing and protein quantification based on organic phosphorus chemistry. The labeling reaction could be performed easily and completed within 40 min in a one-pot reaction without additional cleanup procedures. It was found that N-phosphorylation labeling reagents were activated in situ to form labeling intermediates with high reactivity targeting on N-terminus and ε-amino groups of lysine under mild reaction conditions. The introduction of N-terminal-labeled phosphoryl group not only improved the ionization efficiency of peptides and increased the protein sequence coverage for peptide mass fingerprints but also greatly enhanced the intensities of b ions, suppressed the internal fragments, and reduced the complexity of the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) fragmentation patterns of peptides. By using nano liquid chromatography chip/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (nano LC-chip/TOF MS) for the protein quantification, the obtained results showed excellent correlation of the measured ratios to theoretical ratios with relative errors ranging from 0.5% to 6.7% and relative standard deviation of less than 10.6%, indicating that the developed method was reproducible and precise. The isotope effect was negligible because of the deuterium atoms were placed adjacent to the neutral phosphoryl group with high electrophilicity and moderately small size. Moreover, the SIPL approach used inexpensive reagents and was amenable to samples from various sources, including cell culture, biological fluids, and tissues. The method development based on organic phosphorus chemistry offered a new approach for quantitative proteomics by using novel stable isotope labeling reagents.

  7. Efficient synthesis of deuterium labeled hydroxyzine and aripiprazole.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Mohit; Sandbhor, Mahendra; Wozniak, Andrew

    2015-06-15

    Hydroxyzine and aripiprazole are active pharmaceutical ingredients that have been largely acknowledged for their antipsychotic properties. Deuterium labeled isotopes of hydroxyzine and aripiprazole are internal standards that can aid in the further research of non-isotopic forms via quantification analysis using HPLC-MS/MS. The synthesis of hydroxyzine-d8 was accomplished by coupling piperazine-d8 with 4-chlorobenzhydryl chloride followed by the reaction of the first intermediate with 2-(2-chloroethoxy) ethanol to afford 11.7% of hydroxyzine-d8 with 99.5% purity. The synthesis of aripiprazole-d8 was also achieved in two steps. 1,4-Dibromobutane-d8 reacted with 7-hydroxy-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone. The first intermediate was then coupled with 1-(2, 3-dichlorophenyl)piperazine hydrochloride to produce 33.4% of aripiprazole-d8 with 99.93% purity.

  8. Stable isotope-labelled feed nutrients to assess nutrient-specific feed passage kinetics in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Warner, Daniel; Dijkstra, Jan; Hendriks, Wouter H; Pellikaan, Wilbert F

    2014-03-30

    Knowledge of digesta passage kinetics in ruminants is essential to predict nutrient supply to the animal in relation to optimal animal performance, environmental pollution and animal health. Fractional passage rates (FPR) of feed are widely used in modern feed evaluation systems and mechanistic rumen models, but data on nutrient-specific FPR are scarce. Such models generally rely on conventional external marker techniques, which do not always describe digesta passage kinetics in a satisfactory manner. Here the use of stable isotope-labelled dietary nutrients as a promising novel tool to assess nutrient-specific passage kinetics is discussed. Some major limitations of this technique include a potential marker migration, a poor isotope distribution in the labelled feed and a differential disappearance rate of isotopes upon microbial fermentation in non-steady state conditions. Such limitations can often be circumvented by using intrinsically stable isotope-labelled plant material. Data are limited but indicate that external particulate markers overestimate rumen FPR of plant fibre compared with the internal stable isotope markers. Stable isotopes undergo the same digestive mechanism as the labelled feed components and are thus of particular interest to specifically measure passage kinetics of digestible dietary nutrients.

  9. Heavy atom labeled nucleotides for measurement of kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Benjamin P; Li, Nan-Sheng; York, Darrin; Harris, Michael; Piccirilli, Joseph A

    2015-11-01

    Experimental analysis of kinetic isotope effects represents an extremely powerful approach for gaining information about the transition state structure of complex reactions not available through other methodologies. The implementation of this approach to the study of nucleic acid chemistry requires the synthesis of nucleobases and nucleotides enriched for heavy isotopes at specific positions. In this review, we highlight current approaches to the synthesis of nucleic acids enriched site specifically for heavy oxygen and nitrogen and their application in heavy atom isotope effect studies. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  10. Isotopic labeling of mammalian G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) heterologously expressed in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Salom, David; Cao, Pengxiu; Yuan, Yiyuan; Miyagi, Masaru; Feng, Zhaoyang; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structural determination and dynamic characterization of membrane proteins by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require their isotopic labeling. Although a number of labeled eukaryotic membrane proteins have been successfully expressed in bacteria, they lack posttranslational modifications and usually need to be refolded from inclusion bodies. This shortcoming of bacterial expression systems is particularly detrimental for the functional expression of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest family of drug targets, due to their inherent instability. In this work we show that proteins expressed by a eukaryotic organism can be isotopically labeled and produced with a quality and quantity suitable for NMR characterization. Using our previously described expression system in Caenorhabditis elegans, we showed the feasibility of labeling proteins produced by these worms with 15N,13C by providing them with isotopically labeled bacteria. 2H labeling also was achieved by growing C. elegans in presence of 70% heavy water. Bovine rhodopsin, simultaneously expressed in muscular and neuronal worm tissues, was employed as the ‘test’ GPCR to demonstrate the viability of this approach. Although the worms’ cell cycle was slightly affected by the presence of heavy isotopes, the final protein yield and quality was appropriate for NMR structural characterization. PMID:25461480

  11. A facile method for expression and purification of (15)N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Armand, Tara; Ball, K Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with (15)N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the (15)N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼ 6 mg/L culture for (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with (15)N and (13)C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants.

  12. Energy-efficient appliance labeling in China: Lessons for successful labeling programs in varied markets

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang; Townend, Jeanne; Fridley, David; McNeil, Gary; Silva, Tony; Clark, Robin

    2002-08-20

    Appliance ownership and production has increased dramatically in China in the past two decades. From extremely low levels in 1980, China's appliance industry has become one of the largest in the world, with sales topping U.S. $14.4 billion in 2000. In 1981, less than 1 percent of urban Chinese households owned a refrigerator; by 1998, that number had increased to over 75 percent. This dramatic increase in sales and ownership leads to an excellent opportunity to impact energy consumption in China by affecting the energy efficiency of appliances being bought and sold. In general, Chinese consumers value energy efficiency and are knowledgeable about the operating costs of major appliances. However, the Chinese marketplace does not provide information that consumers trust about the energy consumption of specific products. Thus, several interdependent organizations have emerged in China to provide information and market supports for energy efficiency. This paper describes the appliance market in China and the evolution of its standards and labeling programs and the agencies that implement them. It discusses the authors' work with these organizations in developing energy efficiency criteria and supporting an energy efficiency endorsement labeling program in China. It describes how the authors have used their experience with ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} and other programs in the U.S. to work with China to develop a successful program specific to Chinese conditions, with a particular emphasis on refrigerators. It then gives the author's market assessment of the Chinese refrigerator market and recommendations for a successful labeling program and transferable lessons for developing energy efficiency labeling programs in varied markets. This paper is based on the authors' market research, their support in setting energy efficiency criteria in China, interviews with Chinese manufacturers, retailers, and sales staff, and the development and implementation of labeling strategies and

  13. Multisubstrate isotope labeling and metagenomic analysis of active soil bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Verastegui, Y; Cheng, J; Engel, K; Kolczynski, D; Mortimer, S; Lavigne, J; Montalibet, J; Romantsov, T; Hall, M; McConkey, B J; Rose, D R; Tomashek, J J; Scott, B R; Charles, T C; Neufeld, J D

    2014-07-15

    Soil microbial diversity represents the largest global reservoir of novel microorganisms and enzymes. In this study, we coupled functional metagenomics and DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) using multiple plant-derived carbon substrates and diverse soils to characterize active soil bacterial communities and their glycoside hydrolase genes, which have value for industrial applications. We incubated samples from three disparate Canadian soils (tundra, temperate rainforest, and agricultural) with five native carbon ((12)C) or stable-isotope-labeled ((13)C) carbohydrates (glucose, cellobiose, xylose, arabinose, and cellulose). Indicator species analysis revealed high specificity and fidelity for many uncultured and unclassified bacterial taxa in the heavy DNA for all soils and substrates. Among characterized taxa, Actinomycetales (Salinibacterium), Rhizobiales (Devosia), Rhodospirillales (Telmatospirillum), and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium and Asticcacaulis) were bacterial indicator species for the heavy substrates and soils tested. Both Actinomycetales and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium) were associated with metabolism of cellulose, and Alphaproteobacteria were associated with the metabolism of arabinose; members of the order Rhizobiales were strongly associated with the metabolism of xylose. Annotated metagenomic data suggested diverse glycoside hydrolase gene representation within the pooled heavy DNA. By screening 2,876 cloned fragments derived from the (13)C-labeled DNA isolated from soils incubated with cellulose, we demonstrate the power of combining DNA-SIP, multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), and functional metagenomics by efficiently isolating multiple clones with activity on carboxymethyl cellulose and fluorogenic proxy substrates for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Importance: The ability to identify genes based on function, instead of sequence homology, allows the discovery of genes that would not be identified through sequence alone. This

  14. Convenient synthesis of stable deuterium-labeled alkylpyrazines for use in stable isotope dilution assays.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingchih; Cadwallader, Keith R

    2013-04-17

    Stable isotope dilution assays (SIDA) provide for accurate and precise quantitation of aroma components, such as alkylpyrazines, which are often present in low concentrations in complex food matrices. The unavailability of labeled standards is the main limitation to the widespread use of SIDA. This study describes the chlorination of several alkylpyrazines to form the corresponding chloroalkylpyrazine compounds, which are efficient starting materials for the synthesis of deuterium-labeled alkylpyrazines, namely [²H₃]-2-methylpyrazine (d-1), [²H₅]-2-ethylpyrazine (d-2), [²H₃]-2,3(or 6)-dimethylpyrazine (d-3A, d-3B), [²H₃]-2,[²H₃]-6-dimethylpyrazine (d-3C), [²H₅]-2,[²H₅]-6-diethylpyrazine (d-4), [²H₅]-2-ethyl-3(or 6)-methylpyrazine (d-5A, d-5B), 2,[²H₃]-3,5-trimethylpyrazine (d-6), [²H₅]-2-ethyl-3,6-dimethylpyrazine (d-7), [²H₅]-2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine (d-8), and 2,3-diethyl-[²H₃]-5-methylpyrazine (d-9), which were obtained in good yields (57-100%) and high purities (86-98%). These stable isotopes were used as internal standards in SIDA to accurately and precisely determine selected alkylpyrazines in commercial peanut butter, cocoa powder, and instant coffee. 2,3-Diethyl-5-methylpyrazine (p-9) and 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine (p-8), despite their low abundance, had the highest odor-active values among the 13 pyrazines quantified in all products due to their very low odor thresholds. PMID:23528050

  15. Sample-efficient learning with auxiliary class-label information

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quang; Valizadegan, Hamed; Seybert, Amy; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2011-01-01

    Building classification models from clinical data collected for past patients often requires additional example labeling and annotation by a human expert. Since example labeling may require to review a complete electronic health record the process can be very time consuming and costly. To make the process more cost-efficient, the number of examples an expert needs to label should be reduced. We develop and test a new approach for the classification learning in which, in addition to class labels provided by an expert, the learner is provided with auxiliary information that reflects how strong the expert feels about the class label. We show that this information can be extremely useful for practical classification tasks based on human assessment and can lead to improved learning with a smaller number of examples. We develop a new classification approach based on the support vector machines and the learning to rank methodologies capable of utilizing the auxiliary information during the model learning process. We demonstrate the benefit of the approach on the problem of learning an alert model for Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT) by showing an improved classification performance of the models that are trained on a smaller number of labeled examples. PMID:22195160

  16. Identification of RNA sequence isomer by isotope labeling and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwei; Limbach, Patrick A

    2014-11-01

    Recently, we developed a method for modified ribonucleic acid (RNA) analysis based on the comparative analysis of RNA digests (CARD). Within this CARD approach, sequence or modification differences between two samples are identified through differential isotopic labeling of two samples. Components present in both samples will each be labeled, yielding doublets in the CARD mass spectrum. Components unique to only one sample should be detected as singlets. A limitation of the prior singlet identification strategy occurs when the two samples contain components of unique sequence but identical base composition. At the first stage of mass spectrometry, these sequence isomers cannot be differentiated and would appear as doublets rather than singlets. However, underlying sequence differences should be detectable by collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID MS/MS), as y-type product ions will retain the original enzymatically incorporated isotope label. Here, we determine appropriate instrumental conditions that enable CID MS/MS of isotopically labeled ribonuclease T1 (RNase T1) digestion products such that the original isotope label is maintained in the product ion mass spectrum. Next, we demonstrate how y-type product ions can be used to differentiate singlets and doublets from isomer sequences. We were then able to extend the utility of this approach by using CID MS/MS for the confirmation of an expected RNase T1 digestion product within the CARD analysis of an Escherichia coli mutant strain even in the presence of interfering and overlapping digestion products from other transfer RNAs.

  17. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  18. Metal Oxide-Based Selective Enrichment Combined with Stable Isotope Labeling-Mass Spectrometry Analysis for Profiling of Ribose Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jie-Mei; Qi, Chu-Bo; Huang, Yun-Qing; Jiang, Han-Peng; Hao, Yan-Hong; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-07-21

    -SIL-LC-DNLS-MS strategy combines the selective enrichment, stable isotope labeling, and double neutral loss scan - MS analysis, which therefore can efficiently minimize false positive results, facilitate the relative quantification, and notably increase the numbers of identified ribose conjugates in biological fluids samples. Taken together, this study established a promising strategy for the effective profiling of urinary modified ribonucleosides, and simultaneous evaluation of the contents change of multiple modified ribonucleosides should provide more accurate and conclusive results for the use of urinary modified ribonucleosides as indicators of cancers.

  19. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with (2)H, (13)C and (15)N in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-06-01

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80% can be achieved for (15)N and (13)C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For (2)H,(15)N and (2)H,(13)C,(15)N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73%, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins. PMID:25929326

  20. Quantifying plant phenotypes with isotopic labeling and metabolic flux analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analyses of metabolic flux using stable isotopes in plants have traditionally been restricted to tissues with presumed homogeneous cell populations such as developing seeds, cell suspensions, or cultured roots and root tips. It is now possible to describe these and other more complex tissues such a...

  1. A free-air system for long-term stable carbon isotope labeling of adult forest trees

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable carbon (C) isotopes, in particular employed in labeling experiments, are an ideal tool to broaden our understanding of C dynamics in trees and forest ecosystems. Here, we present a free-air exposure system, named isoFACE, designed for long-term stable C isotope labeling in...

  2. Doubly labeled water method: in vivo oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A.; Leitch, C.A.; Brown, C.

    1986-12-01

    The accuracy and precision of the doubly labeled water method for measuring energy expenditure are influenced by isotope fractionation during evaporative water loss and CO/sub 2/ excretion. To characterize in vivo isotope fractionation, we collected and isotopically analyzed physiological fluids and gases. Breath and transcutaneous water vapor were isotopically fractionated. The degree of fractionation indicated that the former was fractionated under equilibrium control at 37/sup 0/C, and the latter was kinetically fractionated. Sweat and urine were unfractionated. By use of isotopic balance models, the fraction of water lost via fractionating routes was estimated from the isotopic abundances of body water, local drinking water, and dietary solids. Fractionated water loss averaged 23% (SD = 10%) of water turnover, which agreed with our previous estimates based on metabolic rate, but there was a systematic difference between the results based on O/sub 2/ and hydrogen. Corrections for isotopic fractionation of water lost in breath and (nonsweat) transcutaneous loss should be made when using labeled water to measure water turnover or CO/sub 2/ production.

  3. Measurement of the isotope enrichment of stable isotope-labeled proteins using high-resolution mass spectra of peptides.

    PubMed

    MacCoss, Michael J; Wu, Christine C; Matthews, Dwight E; Yates, John R

    2005-12-01

    Stable isotope-enriched molecules are used as internal standards and as tracers of in vivo substrate metabolism. The accurate conversion of measured ratios in the mass spectrometer to mole ratios is complicated because a polyatomic molecule containing enriched atoms will result in a combinatorial distribution of isotopomers depending on the enrichment and number of "labeled" atoms. This effect could potentially cause a large error in the mole ratio measurement depending on which isotope peak or peaks were used to determine the ratio. We report a computational method that predicts isotope distributions over a range of enrichments and compares the predicted distributions to experimental peptide isotope distributions obtained by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Our approach is accurate with measured enrichments within 1.5% of expected isotope distributions. The method is also precise with 4.9, 2.0, and 0.8% relative standard deviations for peptides containing 59, 79, and 99 atom % excess (15)N, respectively. The approach is automated making isotope enrichment calculations possible for thousands of peptides in a single muLC-FTICR-MS experiment.

  4. Expeditious syntheses of stable and radioactive isotope-labeled anticonvulsant agent, JNJ-26990990, and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ronghui; Weaner, Larry E; Hoerr, David C; Salter, Rhys; Gong, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Syntheses of stable and radioactive isotope-labeled anticonvulsant agent, JNJ-26990990, that is, N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide and its metabolites are described. [(13)C(15)N]Benzo[b]thiophene-3-carbonitrile was first prepared by coupling of 3-bromo-benzo[b]thiophene with [(13)C(15)N]-copper cyanide. The resultant [(13)C(15)N]benzo[b]thiophene-3-carbonitrile was reduced with lithium aluminum deuteride to give [(13)CD2(15)N]benzo[b]thiophen-3-yl-methylamine; which was then coupled with sulfamide to afford [(13)CD2(15)N]-N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide, the stable isotope-labeled compound with four stable isotope atoms. Direct oxidation of [(13)CD2(15)N]-N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide with hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid gave the stable isotope-labeled sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites. On the other hand, radioactive (14)C-labeled N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide was prepared conveniently by sequential coupling of 3-bromo-benzo[b]thiophene with [(14)C]-copper cyanide, reduction of the carbonitrile to carboxaldehyde, and reductive amination with sulfamide.

  5. Isotopic labelling studies on far-infrared spectra of nickel-histamine complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drożdżewski, Piotr; Kordon, Ewa

    2000-11-01

    Nickel-histamine (hm) complexes type [Ni(hm)Cl 2] and [Ni(hm) 3] X2 (Where X=Cl, Br, I, ClO 4) were investigated in the far-infrared region. Metal isotope labelling and deuteration effects were employed for observed band assignments. Metal-ligand vibrations were discussed and correlated with the structures of the complexes.

  6. Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, Michael A; McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2008-06-15

    This report estimates the global potential reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 for energy efficiency improvements associated with equipment (appliances, lighting, and HVAC) in buildings by means of energy efficiency standards and labels (EES&L). A consensus has emerged among the world's scientists and many corporate and political leaders regarding the need to address the threat of climate change through emissions mitigation and adaptation. A further consensus has emerged that a central component of these strategies must be focused around energy, which is the primary generator of greenhouse gas emissions. Two important questions result from this consensus: 'what kinds of policies encourage the appropriate transformation to energy efficiency' and 'how much impact can these policies have'? This report aims to contribute to the dialogue surrounding these issues by considering the potential impacts of a single policy type, applied on a global scale. The policy addressed in this report is Energy Efficient Standards and Labeling (EES&L) for energy-consuming equipment, which has now been implemented in over 60 countries. Mandatory energy performance standards are important because they contribute positively to a nation's economy and provide relative certainty about the outcome (both timing and magnitudes). Labels also contribute positively to a nation's economy and importantly increase the awareness of the energy-consuming public. Other policies not analyzed here (utility incentives, tax credits) are complimentary to standards and labels and also contribute in significant ways to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We believe the analysis reported here to be the first systematic attempt to evaluate the potential of savings from EES&L for all countries and for such a large set of products. The goal of the analysis is to provide an assessment that is sufficiently well-quantified and accurate to allow comparison and integration with other strategies under

  7. Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants and high-performance mass spectrometry for quantitative plant proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Mills, Davinia J S; Cramer, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants (HILEP) combines hydroponic plant cultivation and metabolic labeling with stable isotopes using (15)N-containing inorganic salts to label whole and mature plants. Employing (15)N salts as the sole nitrogen source for HILEP leads to the production of healthy-looking plants which contain (15)N proteins labeled to nearly 100%. Therefore, HILEP is suitable for quantitative plant proteomic analysis, where plants are grown in either (14)N- or (15)N-hydroponic media and pooled when the biological samples are collected for relative proteome quantitation. The pooled (14)N-/(15)N-protein extracts can be fractionated in any suitable way and digested with a protease for shotgun proteomics, using typically reverse phase liquid chromatography nanoelectrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (RPLC-nESI-MS/MS). Best results were obtained with a hybrid ion trap/FT-MS mass spectrometer, combining high mass accuracy and sensitivity for the MS data acquisition with speed and high-throughput MS/MS data acquisition, increasing the number of proteins identified and quantified and improving protein quantitation. Peak processing and picking from raw MS data files, protein identification, and quantitation were performed in a highly automated way using integrated MS data analysis software with minimum manual intervention, thus easing the analytical workflow. In this methodology paper, we describe how to grow Arabidopsis plants hydroponically for isotope labeling using (15)N salts and how to quantitate the resulting proteomes using a convenient workflow that does not require extensive bioinformatics skills.

  8. Stable-isotope-labeled carbohydrates and nucleosides: Synthesis and applications in chemistry and biology

    SciTech Connect

    Serianni, A.S.

    1994-12-01

    Carbohydrates play important roles in many key biochemical processes in living cells. For example, they are metabolized to produce energy, mediate cell-cell recognition, and play an indirect role (as constituents of DNA and RNA) in DNA replication, RNA transcription, and protein synthesis. These roles, and others of comparable biochemical significance, have been studied to varying extends with the use of stable isotopically labeled molecules, usually in conjunction with NMR spectroscopy and/or mass spectrometry. For example, carbohydrate metabolism has been monitored in vitro and in vivo with the use of isotopically labeled compounds. Molecular aspects of cell-cell recognition, mediated by cell-surface glycoproteins and glycolipids, have been probed through NMR studies of isotopically labeled oligosaccharides. More recently, the solution behavior of DNA and RNA has been examined through the use of labeled oligonucleotides. In all of these pursuits, the effort and expense to prepare labeled molecules, both of which can be substantial, are more than offset by the wealth of information derived from these studies. This information often cannot be accessed, or can be accessed only with great difficulty, using natural (unlabeled) compounds.

  9. Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis and isotope labeling of mammalian proteins.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takaho; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the cell-free protein synthesis method, using an Escherichia coli cell extract. This is a cost-effective method for milligram-scale protein production and is particularly useful for the production of mammalian proteins, protein complexes, and membrane proteins that are difficult to synthesize by recombinant expression methods, using E. coli and eukaryotic cells. By adjusting the conditions of the cell-free method, zinc-binding proteins, disulfide-bonded proteins, ligand-bound proteins, etc., may also be produced. Stable isotope labeling of proteins can be accomplished by the cell-free method, simply by using stable isotope-labeled amino acid(s) in the cell-free reaction. Moreover, the cell-free protein synthesis method facilitates the avoidance of stable isotope scrambling and dilution over the recombinant expression methods and is therefore advantageous for amino acid-selective stable isotope labeling. Site-specific stable isotope labeling is also possible with a tRNA molecule specific to the UAG codon. By the cell-free protein synthesis method, coupled transcription-translation is performed from a plasmid vector or a PCR-amplified DNA fragment encoding the protein. A milligram quantity of protein can be produced with a milliliter-scale reaction solution in the dialysis mode. More than a thousand solution structures have been determined by NMR spectroscopy for uniformly labeled samples of human and mouse functional domain proteins, produced by the cell-free method. Here, we describe the practical aspects of mammalian protein production by the cell-free method for NMR spectroscopy.

  10. Isotope labeling pattern study of central carbon metabolites using GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joon-Young; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Determination of fluxes by (13)C tracer experiments depends on monitoring the (13)C labeling pattern of metabolites during isotope experiments. In metabolome-based (13)C metabolic flux analysis, liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry or tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS or LC/MS/MS, respectively) has been mainly used as an analytical platform for isotope pattern studies of central carbon metabolites. However, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has several advantages over LC/MS, such as high sensitivity, low cost, ease of operation, and availability of mass spectra databases for comparison. In this study, analysis of isotope pattern for central carbon metabolites using GC/MS was demonstrated. First, a proper set of mass ions for central carbon metabolites was selected based on carbon backbone information and structural isomers of mass fragment ions. A total of 34 mass fragment ions was selected and used for the quantification of 25 central carbon metabolites. Then, to quantify isotope fractions, a natural mass isotopomer library for selected mass fragment ions was constructed and subtracted from isotopomer mass spectra data. The results revealed a surprisingly high abundance of partially labeled (13)C intermediates, such as 56.4% of fructose 6-phosphate and 47.6% of dihydroxyacetone phosphate at isotopic steady state, which were generated in the pentose phosphate pathway. Finally, dynamic changes of isotope fragments of central metabolites were monitored with a U-(13)C glucose stimulus response experiment in Kluyveromyces marxianus. With a comprehensive study of isotope patterns of central carbon metabolites using GC/MS, 25 central carbon metabolites and their isotopic fractions were successfully quantified. Dynamic and precise acquisition of isotope pattern can then be used in combination with proper kinetic models to calculate metabolic fluxes.

  11. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes 13C and 15N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK 1 kidney cells at mass 28 ( 13C15N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of 39K, 23Na and 40Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors.

  12. Preparation of stable isotope-labeled peripheral cannabinoid receptor CB2 by bacterial fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Christian; Ho, Jenny T.C.; Kimura, Tomohiro; Hess, Sonja; Gawrisch, Klaus; Yeliseev, Alexei

    2010-01-01

    We developed a bacterial fermentation protocol for production of a stable isotope-labeled cannabinoid receptor CB2 for subsequent structural studies of this protein by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The human peripheral cannabinoid receptor was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion with maltose binding protein and two affinity tags. The fermentation was performed in defined media comprised of mineral salts, glucose and 15N2-L-tryptophan to afford incorporation of the labeled amino acid into the protein. Medium, growth and expression conditions were optimized so that the fermentation process produced about 2 mg of purified, labeled CB2 per liter of culture medium. By performing a mass spectroscopic characterization of the purified CB2, we determined that one of the two 15N atoms in tryptophan was incorporated into the recombinant protein. NMR analysis of 15N chemical shifts strongly suggests that the 15N atoms are located in Trp-indole rings. Importantly, analysis of the peptides derived from the CNBr cleavage of the purified protein confirmed a minimum of 95% incorporation of the labeled tryptophan into the CB2 sequence. The labeled CB2, purified and reconstituted into liposomes at a protein-to-lipid molar ratio of 1:500, was functional as confirmed by activation of cognate G proteins in an in vitro coupled assay. To our knowledge, this is the first reported production of a biologically active, stable isotope-labeled G protein-coupled receptor by bacterial fermentation. PMID:20044006

  13. Stable isotope labeling assisted liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis of endogenous gibberellins.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Lu; Liu, Chao; Lei, Ai-Wen; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-11-01

    In the current study, we developed a stable isotope labeling strategy for the absolute quantification of gibberellins (GAs) by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). N,N-dimethyl ethylenediamine (DMED) and its deuterated counterpart d(4)-DMED were used to derivatize GAs extracted from plant tissue samples and GA standards respectively. The both derivatives of GAs were mixed and then subjected to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. The absolute quantification of GAs in plant tissues could be achieved by calculating the peak area ratios of DMED labeled GAs/d(4)-DMED labeled GAs. In the proposed strategy, the derivatization reaction of the labeling reagents with GAs could be completed rapidly (within 5 min) with high efficiency (>99%) under mild conditions. The resulting derivatives could produce specific fragments in collision induced dissociation (CID), leading to high selectivity in multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, thus enhanced the reliability of the LC-MS/MS method. Furthermore, the limits of quantitation (LOQs) of GAs were considerably decreased (2-32 folds) due to incorporating easily ionized moieties into GAs, and the quantification of GAs in plant tissue could be achieved without isotopically labeled GA standards. Good linearity was obtained with correlation coefficients R(2) values of >0.99. The limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) ranged from 0.02 to 0.74 pg and 0.07 to 2.45 pg, respectively. Eleven GAs could be successfully determined in spiked sample with 72-128% recoveries and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were between 1.0% and 13.9%. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the detection of GAs in 50mg (fresh weight) Oryza sativa leaves. PMID:26452831

  14. Stable isotope labeling assisted liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis of endogenous gibberellins.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Lu; Liu, Chao; Lei, Ai-Wen; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-11-01

    In the current study, we developed a stable isotope labeling strategy for the absolute quantification of gibberellins (GAs) by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). N,N-dimethyl ethylenediamine (DMED) and its deuterated counterpart d(4)-DMED were used to derivatize GAs extracted from plant tissue samples and GA standards respectively. The both derivatives of GAs were mixed and then subjected to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. The absolute quantification of GAs in plant tissues could be achieved by calculating the peak area ratios of DMED labeled GAs/d(4)-DMED labeled GAs. In the proposed strategy, the derivatization reaction of the labeling reagents with GAs could be completed rapidly (within 5 min) with high efficiency (>99%) under mild conditions. The resulting derivatives could produce specific fragments in collision induced dissociation (CID), leading to high selectivity in multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, thus enhanced the reliability of the LC-MS/MS method. Furthermore, the limits of quantitation (LOQs) of GAs were considerably decreased (2-32 folds) due to incorporating easily ionized moieties into GAs, and the quantification of GAs in plant tissue could be achieved without isotopically labeled GA standards. Good linearity was obtained with correlation coefficients R(2) values of >0.99. The limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) ranged from 0.02 to 0.74 pg and 0.07 to 2.45 pg, respectively. Eleven GAs could be successfully determined in spiked sample with 72-128% recoveries and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were between 1.0% and 13.9%. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the detection of GAs in 50mg (fresh weight) Oryza sativa leaves.

  15. Metabolic Flux Elucidation for Large-Scale Models Using 13C Labeled Isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Suthers, Patrick F.; Burgard, Anthony P.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Nowroozi, Farnaz; Van Dien, Stephen; Keasling, Jay D.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2007-01-01

    A key consideration in metabolic engineering is the determination of fluxes of the metabolites within the cell. This determination provides an unambiguous description of metabolism before and/or after engineering interventions. Here, we present a computational framework that combines a constraint-based modeling framework with isotopic label tracing on a large-scale. When cells are fed a growth substrate with certain carbon positions labeled with 13C, the distribution of this label in the intracellular metabolites can be calculated based on the known biochemistry of the participating pathways. Most labeling studies focus on skeletal representations of central metabolism and ignore many flux routes that could contribute to the observed isotopic labeling patterns. In contrast, our approach investigates the importance of carrying out isotopic labeling studies using a more comprehensive reaction network consisting of 350 fluxes and 184 metabolites in Escherichia coli including global metabolite balances on cofactors such as ATP, NADH, and NADPH. The proposed procedure is demonstrated on an E. coli strain engineered to produce amorphadiene, a precursor to the anti-malarial drug artemisinin. The cells were grown in continuous culture on glucose containing 20% [U-13C]glucose; the measurements are made using GC-MS performed on 13 amino acids extracted from the cells. We identify flux distributions for which the calculated labeling patterns agree well with the measurements alluding to the accuracy of the network reconstruction. Furthermore, we explore the robustness of the flux calculations to variability in the experimental MS measurements, as well as highlight the key experimental measurements necessary for flux determination. Finally, we discuss the effect of reducing the model, as well as shed light onto the customization of the developed computational framework to other systems. PMID:17632026

  16. Mechanistic Insights into Catalytic Ethanol Steam Reforming Using Isotope-Labeled Reactants.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Stephen; Castaldi, Marco J

    2016-08-26

    The low-temperature ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction mechanism over a supported Rh/Pt catalyst has been investigated using isotope-labeled EtOH and H2 O. Through strategic isotope labeling, all nonhydrogen atoms were distinct from one another, and allowed an unprecedented level of understanding of the dominant reaction pathways. All combinations of isotope- and non-isotope-labeled atoms were detected in the products, thus there are multiple pathways involved in H2 , CO, CO2 , CH4 , C2 H4 , and C2 H6 product formation. Both the recombination of C species on the surface of the catalyst and preservation of the C-C bond within ethanol are responsible for C2 product formation. Ethylene is not detected until conversion drops below 100 % at t=1.25 h. Also, quantitatively, 57 % of the observed ethylene is formed directly through ethanol dehydration. Finally there is clear evidence to show that oxygen in the SiO2 -ZrO2 support constitutes 10 % of the CO formed during the reaction. PMID:27487203

  17. Comparative pharmacokinetics of unlabeled and deuterium-labeled terbutaline: demonstration of a small isotope effect

    SciTech Connect

    Borgstroem, L.L.; Lindberg, C.; Joensson, S.S.; Svensson, K.

    1988-11-01

    An equimolar mixture of terbutaline and (/sup 2/H6)terbutaline was given as an oral solution to six healthy volunteers (three men and three women). Frequent blood samples were collected during a 24-h period and the plasma concentrations of unlabeled and deuterium-labeled terbutaline were measured by GC-MS. The overall geometric mean plasma concentration ratio of terbutaline to (/sup 2/H6)terbutaline (isotope ratio) was 1.04 and differed significantly from unity. The difference can be explained by a difference in lipophilicity between the analogues, affecting their absorption. No trend in isotope ratio over the experimental time was observed. For unknown reasons, the isotope ratio was higher for women (1.07) than for men (1.00). Deuterium-labeled terbutaline can be used, intravenously or orally, as an absolute reference in bioavailability studies on terbutaline. If deuterium-labeled terbutaline is given orally in a single-day relative bioavailability study, a correlation should be made for the observed isotope effect.

  18. REDOR NMR of stable-isotope-labeled protein binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, J.

    1994-12-01

    Rotational-echo, double resonance (REDOR) NMR, a new analytical spectroscopic technique for solids spinning at the magic angle, has been developed over the last 5 years. REDOR provides a direct measure of heteronuclear dipolar coupling between isolated pairs of labeled nuclei. In a solid with a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N labeled pair, for example, the {sup 13}C rotational echoes that form each rotor period following a{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization transfer can be prevented from reaching full intensity by insertion of a {sup 15}N {pi} pulse each half rotor period. The REDOR difference (the difference between a {sup 13}C NMR spectrum obtained under these conditions and one obtained with no {sup 15}N {pi} pulses) has a strong dependence on the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar coupling, and hence, the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N internuclear distance. REDOR is described as double-resonance even though three radio frequencies (typically {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N) are used because the protons are removed from the important evolution part of the experiment by resonant decoupling. The dephasing of magnetization in REDOR arises from a local dipolar {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N field gradient and involves no polarization transfer. REDOR has no dependence on {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N chemical-shift tensors and does not require resolution of a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N coupling in the chemical-shift dimension.

  19. Simplified quantitative glycomics using the stable isotope label Girard's reagent p by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengjian; Wu, Zhiyu; Yuan, Jiangbei; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Zhongfu; Huang, Linjuan

    2014-02-01

    Fast, sensitive, and simple methods for quantitative analysis of disparities in glycan expression between different biological samples are essential for studies of protein glycosylation patterns (glycomics) and the search for disease glycan biomarkers. Relative quantitation of glycans based on stable isotope labeling combined with mass spectrometric detection represents an emerging and promising technique. However, this technique is undermined by the complexity of mass spectra of isotope-labeled glycans caused by the presence of multiple metal ion adduct signals, which result in a decrease of detection sensitivity and an increase of difficulties in data interpretation. Herein we report a simplified quantitative glycomics strategy, which features nonreductive isotopic labeling of reducing glycans with either nondeuterated (d0-) or deuterated (d5-) Girard's reagent P (GP) without salts introduced and simplified mass spectrometric profiles of d0- and d5-GP derivatives of neutral glycans as molecular ions without complex metal ion adducts, allowing rapid and sensitive quantitative comparison between different glycan samples. We have obtained optimized GP-labeling conditions and good quantitation linearity, reproducibility, and accuracy of data by the method. Its excellent applicability was validated by comparatively quantitative analysis of the neutral N-glycans released from bovine and porcine immunoglobulin G as well as of those from mouse and rat sera. Additionally, we have revealed the potential of this strategy for the high-sensitivity analysis of sialylated glycans as GP derivatives, which involves neutralization of the carboxyl group of sialic acid by chemical derivatization.

  20. Isotopic labeling of mouse interferon by incorporation of radioactive amino acids during synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaeyer-Guignard, J.; Cachard, A.; DeMaeyer, E.

    1982-07-30

    Mouse interferon produced by C-243 cells induced with Newcastle disease virus was isotopically labeled by adding either (/sup 35/S)methionine or a /sup 14/C-labeled amino acid mixture to the culture medium. A method combining butyric acid and theophylline treatment and resulting in high interferon yields was used. Following purification by two-step affinity chromatography on poly(U) and antibody columns, the resulting material was analyzed on SDS-PAGE. The migration pattern of radioactivity and interferon coincided well and autoradiography revealed three major bands at migration distances corresponding, respectively, to 35, 28, and 22 K. Interferon represented 3.8% of all (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled proteins and 2.6% of all /sup 14/C-amino acid-labeled proteins released into the medium.

  1. Accurate determination of protein methionine oxidation by stable isotope labeling and LC-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Neill, Alyssa; Patel, Rekha; Andrien, Bruce

    2013-12-17

    Methionine (Met) oxidation is a major modification of proteins, which converts Met to Met sulfoxide as the common product. It is challenging to determine the level of Met sulfoxide, because it can be generated during sample preparation and analysis as an artifact. To determine the level of Met sulfoxide in proteins accurately, an isotope labeling and LC-MS peptide mapping method was developed. Met residues in proteins were fully oxidized using hydrogen peroxide enriched with (18)O atoms before sample preparation. Therefore, it was impossible to generate Met sulfoxide as an artifact during sample preparation. The molecular weight difference of 2 Da between Met sulfoxide with the (16)O atom and Met sulfoxide with the (18)O atom was used to differentiate and calculate the level of Met sulfoxide in the sample originally. Using a recombinant monoclonal antibody as a model protein, much lower levels of Met sulfoxide were detected for the two susceptible Met residues with this new method compared to a typical peptide mapping procedure. The results demonstrated efficient elimination of the analytical artifact during LC-MS peptide mapping for the measurement of Met sulfoxide. This method can thus be used when accurate determination of the level of Met sulfoxide is critical.

  2. Radiogenic Nd isotope labeling of the northern NE Atlantic during MIS 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Natalie L.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.

    2015-08-01

    Paleoceanographic reconstructions rely on chemical proxies which are controlled by physical, chemical, and biological marine parameters. The accurate interpretation of proxy records relies on the integrity of proxy-environmental relationships through time, and under changing conditions. In this study we closely examine paleo controls on authigenic Nd isotope records from five cores in the northern NE Atlantic, approximating a depth-transect, allowing spatial and temporal relationships to be reconstructed. We compare our Nd isotope records with other paleocirculation proxies, and consider the sedimentalogical controls on Nd isotope signals, by comparing ice-rafted detritus lithology and counts, detrital sediment chemistry and redox sensitive element concentrations measured on foraminifera authigenic coatings. With this suite of geochemical and sedimentalogical data we show that Nd isotope records in the northern NE Atlantic were labeled by radiogenic sediments, however this modification did not occur in the pore-waters of each core, but instead likely reflects changes in the Nd isotopic composition of deep-waters caused by the input of ice-rafted sediment during Heinrich events and the last glacial maximum. This study has implications for understanding how localized changes in the Nd isotope signal can set a watermass end-member composition, decoupling chemical proxy-circulation relationships locally, but providing a signal which can be potentially traced along the deep-water flowpath. Such scenarios must be considered in future interpretations of glacial Nd isotope records taken from within the ice-rafted detritus belt and downstream along watermass flowpaths.

  3. Reliable LC-MS quantitative glycomics using iGlycoMab stable isotope labeled glycans as internal standards.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiyue; Tello, Nadia; Harvey, Alex; Boyes, Barry; Orlando, Ron; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-06-01

    Glycans have numerous functions in various biological processes and participate in the progress of diseases. Reliable quantitative glycomic profiling techniques could contribute to the understanding of the biological functions of glycans, and lead to the discovery of potential glycan biomarkers for diseases. Although LC-MS is a powerful analytical tool for quantitative glycomics, the variation of ionization efficiency and MS intensity bias are influencing quantitation reliability. Internal standards can be utilized for glycomic quantitation by MS-based methods to reduce variability. In this study, we used stable isotope labeled IgG2b monoclonal antibody, iGlycoMab, as an internal standard to reduce potential for errors and to reduce variabililty due to sample digestion, derivatization, and fluctuation of nanoESI efficiency in the LC-MS analysis of permethylated N-glycans released from model glycoproteins, human blood serum, and breast cancer cell line. We observed an unanticipated degradation of isotope labeled glycans, tracked a source of such degradation, and optimized a sample preparation protocol to minimize degradation of the internal standard glycans. All results indicated the effectiveness of using iGlycoMab to minimize errors originating from sample handling and instruments. PMID:26913967

  4. Preparation of uniformly isotope labeled KcsA for solid state NMR: Expression, purification, reconstitution into liposomes and functional assay

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Wylie, Benjamin J.; Thompson, Ameer; Tian, Lin; Nimigean, Crina; McDermott, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    We report the expression, purification, liposome reconstitution and functional validation of uniformly 13C and 15N isotope labeled KcsA, a bacterial potassium channel that has high homology with mammalian channels, for solid-state NMR studies. The expression and purification is optimized for an average yield of ~ 35–40 milligrams per liter of M9 media in a time-efficient way. The protein purity is confirmed by gel electrophoresis and the protein concentration is quantified by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Protocols to efficiently reconstitute KcsA into liposomes are also presented. The presence of liposomes is confirmed by cryo-electron microscopy images and the effect of magic angle spinning on liposome packing is shown. High-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of uniformly isotope labeled KcsA in these liposomes reveal that our protocol yields to a very homogenous KcsA sample with high signal to noise and several well-resolved residues in NMR spectra. Electrophysiology of our samples before and after solid-state NMR show that channel function and selectivity remain intact after the solid-state NMR. PMID:23916531

  5. Raman spectroscopic investigation of polycrystalline structures of CVD-grown graphene by isotope labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengnan; Suzuki, Satoru; Hibino, Hiroki

    2014-10-01

    Topological defects, such as point defects, dislocations and grain boundaries, have a dramatic influence on the chemical and physical properties of large-scale graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Here we demonstrate the Raman visualization of polycrystalline structures in an isotopically modified CVD graphene. By means of the reversible reaction of methane on a copper catalyst, the etching of 12C-lattice and surface deposition of 13C-atoms occur in CVD graphene by sequentially introducing hydrogen and isotopic methane after standard growth of graphene with full monolayer coverage. Spatial Raman spectroscopic mapping on labeled graphene reveals pronounced network-like 13C-rich regions, which are further identified to exist along the grain boundaries of graphene by low-energy electron microscopy. The structural defects inside the graphene grains are also targeted in the isotope labeling process. Our work opens a new way to investigate multiple grain structures in CVD graphene with a simple spectroscopic technique.Topological defects, such as point defects, dislocations and grain boundaries, have a dramatic influence on the chemical and physical properties of large-scale graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Here we demonstrate the Raman visualization of polycrystalline structures in an isotopically modified CVD graphene. By means of the reversible reaction of methane on a copper catalyst, the etching of 12C-lattice and surface deposition of 13C-atoms occur in CVD graphene by sequentially introducing hydrogen and isotopic methane after standard growth of graphene with full monolayer coverage. Spatial Raman spectroscopic mapping on labeled graphene reveals pronounced network-like 13C-rich regions, which are further identified to exist along the grain boundaries of graphene by low-energy electron microscopy. The structural defects inside the graphene grains are also targeted in the isotope labeling process. Our work opens a new

  6. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives.

    PubMed

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Ahmed, Raya; Salam, Arafa; Block, Michael; Niederalt, Christoph; Asquith, Becca; Macallan, Derek

    2016-06-30

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4 to 18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water, which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity, we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n = 4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n = 9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results, we developed a novel mechanistic model and applied it to previously published (n = 5) and newly generated data. We initially constrained the ratio of the blood neutrophil pool to the marrow precursor pool (ratio = 0.26; from published values). Analysis of heavy water data sets yielded turnover rates consistent with a short blood half-life, but parameters, particularly marrow transit time, were poorly defined. Analysis of glucose-labeling data yielded more precise estimates of half-life (0.79 ± 0.25 days; 19 hours) and marrow transit time (5.80 ± 0.42 days). Substitution of this marrow transit time in the heavy water analysis gave a better-defined blood half-life of 0.77 ± 0.14 days (18.5 hours), close to glucose-derived values. Allowing the ratio of blood neutrophils to mitotic neutrophil precursors (R) to vary yielded a best-fit value of 0.19. Reanalysis of the previously published model and data also revealed the origin of their long estimates for neutrophil half-life: an implicit assumption that R is very large, which is physiologically untenable. We conclude that stable isotope labeling in healthy humans is consistent with a blood neutrophil half-life of less than 1 day. PMID:27136946

  7. Human neutrophil kinetics: modeling of stable isotope labeling data supports short blood neutrophil half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Elemans, Marjet; Zhang, Yan; Ahmed, Raya; Salam, Arafa; Block, Michael; Niederalt, Christoph; Macallan, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have traditionally been thought to have a short half-life in blood; estimates vary from 4 to 18 hours. This dogma was recently challenged by stable isotope labeling studies with heavy water, which yielded estimates in excess of 3 days. To investigate this disparity, we generated new stable isotope labeling data in healthy adult subjects using both heavy water (n = 4) and deuterium-labeled glucose (n = 9), a compound with more rapid labeling kinetics. To interpret results, we developed a novel mechanistic model and applied it to previously published (n = 5) and newly generated data. We initially constrained the ratio of the blood neutrophil pool to the marrow precursor pool (ratio = 0.26; from published values). Analysis of heavy water data sets yielded turnover rates consistent with a short blood half-life, but parameters, particularly marrow transit time, were poorly defined. Analysis of glucose-labeling data yielded more precise estimates of half-life (0.79 ± 0.25 days; 19 hours) and marrow transit time (5.80 ± 0.42 days). Substitution of this marrow transit time in the heavy water analysis gave a better-defined blood half-life of 0.77 ± 0.14 days (18.5 hours), close to glucose-derived values. Allowing the ratio of blood neutrophils to mitotic neutrophil precursors (R) to vary yielded a best-fit value of 0.19. Reanalysis of the previously published model and data also revealed the origin of their long estimates for neutrophil half-life: an implicit assumption that R is very large, which is physiologically untenable. We conclude that stable isotope labeling in healthy humans is consistent with a blood neutrophil half-life of less than 1 day. PMID:27136946

  8. Synthesis of an Isotopically Labeled Naphthalene Derivative That Supports a Long-Lived Nuclear Singlet State

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of an octa-alkoxy substituted isotopically labeled naphthalene derivative, shown to have excellent properties in singlet NMR experiments, is described. This highly substituted naphthalene system, which incorporates an adjacent 13C spin pair, is readily accessed from a commercially available 13C2-labeled building block via sequential thermal alkynyl- and arylcyclobutenone rearrangements. The synthetic route incorporates a simple desymmetrization approach leading to a small difference in the chemical shifts of the 13C spin pair, a design constraint crucial for accessing nuclear singlet order. PMID:25898076

  9. Use of oxygen-18 isotopic labeling to assay photorespiration in terrestrial plants and algae

    SciTech Connect

    de Veau, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method was devised to quantify photorespiration. The assay utilized {sup 18}O{sub 2} to isotopically label intermediates of the glycolate pathway, specifically glycolate, glycine, and serine, for various time periods. The pathway intermediates were isolated and analyzed on a mass spectrometer to determine molecular percent {sup 18}O-enrichment. Rates of glycolate synthesis were determined from: {sup 18}O-labeling kinetics of the intermediates, derived rate equations, and non-linear regression techniques. The method was adapted to measure photorespiratory rates in both terrestrial plants and algae. Test plants are Triticum aestivum, Zea mays L., Pavlova lutheri and Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

  10. Experiments for a systematic comparison between stable-isotope-(deuterium) labeling and radio-((14)C) labeling for the elucidation of the in vitro metabolic pattern of pharmaceutical drugs.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Helge; Hargreaves, Patrick; Gebhardt, Klaus; Klauer, Dominique; Serafyn, Arnaud; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne; Schleimer, Michael; Schlotterbeck, Goetz; Wind, Mathias

    2013-11-01

    A systematic comparison between two labeling approaches for the investigation of the in vitro metabolic pattern of pharmaceutical drugs was performed by examining the use of (i) radiolabeled drugs analyzed with LC-MS-offline radiodetection and (ii) stable-isotope labeled drugs, used in a defined mixture with the unlabeled drug and analyzed by LC-MS with recognition of the specific isotopic pattern. (14)C was used for the radioisotope-approach and deuterium for the stable-isotope approach. Olanzapine, diclofenac and ketoconazole were chosen as model drugs, as they are commercially available in their non-, radio- and stable-isotope labeled forms. For all three model drugs, liver microsome- and hepatocyte-incubations (both from rat) were performed with various concentrations and incubation times for both, the radio- and the stable-isotope approaches. The metabolic pattern, including structure elucidation of all detected metabolites, was performed independently for all individual compounds and incubations. Subsequently, the metabolic patterns of the radio-, and the stable-isotope approaches were compared. In conclusion, all metabolites found with the radioisotope approach could also be found with the stable-isotope approach. Although the stable-isotope approach does not provide a quantitative result, it can be considered to be a highly suited analytical alternative for early in vitro metabolism investigations, especially when radiolabeled drug analogues are not yet available and quantitative results are not yet necessary.

  11. Chemical Ligation and Isotope Labeling to Locate Dynamic Effects during Catalysis by Dihydrofolate Reductase†

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Louis Y. P.; Ruiz‐Pernía, J. Javier; Adesina, Aduragbemi S.; Loveridge, E. Joel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chemical ligation has been used to alter motions in specific regions of dihydrofolate reductase from E. coli and to investigate the effects of localized motional changes on enzyme catalysis. Two isotopic hybrids were prepared; one with the mobile N‐terminal segment containing heavy isotopes (2H, 13C, 15N) and the remainder of the protein with natural isotopic abundance, and the other one with only the C‐terminal segment isotopically labeled. Kinetic investigations indicated that isotopic substitution of the N‐terminal segment affected only a physical step of catalysis, whereas the enzyme chemistry was affected by protein motions from the C‐terminal segment. QM/MM studies support the idea that dynamic effects on catalysis mostly originate from the C‐terminal segment. The use of isotope hybrids provides insights into the microscopic mechanism of dynamic coupling, which is difficult to obtain with other studies, and helps define the dynamic networks of intramolecular interactions central to enzyme catalysis. PMID:26079622

  12. Chemical Ligation and Isotope Labeling to Locate Dynamic Effects during Catalysis by Dihydrofolate Reductase.

    PubMed

    Luk, Louis Y P; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Adesina, Aduragbemi S; Loveridge, E Joel; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vincent; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2015-07-27

    Chemical ligation has been used to alter motions in specific regions of dihydrofolate reductase from E. coli and to investigate the effects of localized motional changes on enzyme catalysis. Two isotopic hybrids were prepared; one with the mobile N-terminal segment containing heavy isotopes ((2) H, (13) C, (15) N) and the remainder of the protein with natural isotopic abundance, and the other one with only the C-terminal segment isotopically labeled. Kinetic investigations indicated that isotopic substitution of the N-terminal segment affected only a physical step of catalysis, whereas the enzyme chemistry was affected by protein motions from the C-terminal segment. QM/MM studies support the idea that dynamic effects on catalysis mostly originate from the C-terminal segment. The use of isotope hybrids provides insights into the microscopic mechanism of dynamic coupling, which is difficult to obtain with other studies, and helps define the dynamic networks of intramolecular interactions central to enzyme catalysis.

  13. An economical method for (15)N/(13)C isotopic labeling of proteins expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, E; Krishna, N R

    2001-07-01

    We report a new and cost-effective approach to prepare (15)N/(13)C labeled proteins for NMR using the Pichia pastoris expression system. Four protocols (P1 to P4) were defined and compared using recombinant Ovine interferon-tau (rOvIFN-tau). Our results demonstrate that in order to get full incorporation of (15)N and (13)C, the isotopes are not totally required during the initial growth phase of P. pastoris culture. The addition of small amounts of (15)N and (13)C compounds 6 h prior to the methanol induction phase is sufficient to obtain 99% incorporation of heavy isotopes into the protein. Our optimized protocol P4 is two-thirds less costly than the classical method using (15)N and (13)C isotopes during the entire growth phase.

  14. Enhanced sample multiplexing for nitrotyrosine-modified proteins using combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Renã A S; Evans, Adam R

    2012-06-01

    Current strategies for identification and quantification of 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT) post-translationally modified proteins (PTM) generally rely on biotin/avidin enrichment. Quantitative approaches have been demonstrated which employ isotopic labeling or isobaric tagging in order to quantify differences in the relative abundances of 3NT-modified proteins in two or potentially eight samples, respectively. Here, we present a novel strategy which uses combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging (cPILOT) to increase the multiplexing capability of quantifying 3NT-modified proteins to 12 or 16 samples using commercially available tandem mass tags (TMT) or isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), respectively. This strategy employs "light" and "heavy" labeled acetyl groups to block both N-termini and lysine residues of tryptic peptides. Next, 3NT is reduced to 3-aminotyrosine (3AT) using sodium dithionite followed by derivatization of light and heavy labeled 3AT-peptides with either TMT or iTRAQ multiplex reagents. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle utility of cPILOT with in vitro nitrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and mouse splenic proteins using TMT(0), TMT(6), and iTRAQ(8) reagents and discuss limitations of the strategy. PMID:22509719

  15. Independent valine and leucine isotope labeling in Escherichia coli protein overexpression systems.

    PubMed

    Lichtenecker, Roman J; Weinhäupl, Katharina; Reuther, Lukas; Schörghuber, Julia; Schmid, Walther; Konrat, Robert

    2013-11-01

    The addition of labeled α-ketoisovalerate to the growth medium of a protein-expressing host organism has evolved into a versatile tool to achieve concomitant incorporation of specific isotopes into valine- and leucine- residues. The resulting target proteins represent excellent probes for protein NMR analysis. However, as the sidechain resonances of these residues emerge in a narrow spectral range, signal overlap represents a severe limitation in the case of high-molecular-weight NMR probes. We present a protocol to eliminate leucine labeling by supplying the medium with unlabeled α-ketoisocaproate. The resulting spectra of a model protein exclusively feature valine signals of increased intensity, confirming the method to be a first example of independent valine and leucine labeling employing α-ketoacid precursor compounds.

  16. Molecular and mass spectroscopic analysis of isotopically labeled organic residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza-Gomez, Celia X.; Greenberg, J. Mayo; Mccain, P.; Ferris, J. P.; Briggs, R.; Degroot, M. S.; Schutte, Willem A.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental studies aimed at understanding the evolution of complex organic molecules on interstellar grains were performed. The photolysis of frozen gas mixtures of various compositions containing H2O, CO, NH3, and CH4 was studied. These species were chosen because of their astrophysical importance as deducted from observational as well as theoretical studies of ice mantles on interstellar grains. These ultraviolet photolyzed ices were warmed up in order to produce refractory organic molecules like the ones formed in molecular clouds when the icy mantles are being irradiated and warmed up either by a nearby stellar source or impulsive heating. The laboratory studies give estimates of the efficiency of production of such organic material under interstellar conditions. It is shown that the gradual carbonization of organic mantles in the diffuse cloud phase leads to higher and higher visual absorptivity - yellow residues become brown in the laboratory. The obtained results can be applied to explaining the organic components of comets and their relevance to the origin of life.

  17. Efficient methods and practical guidelines for simulating isotope effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Michele; Markland, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The shift in chemical equilibria due to isotope substitution is frequently exploited to obtain insight into a wide variety of chemical and physical processes. It is a purely quantum mechanical effect, which can be computed exactly using simulations based on the path integral formalism. Here we discuss how these techniques can be made dramatically more efficient, and how they ultimately outperform quasi-harmonic approximations to treat quantum liquids not only in terms of accuracy, but also in terms of computational cost. To achieve this goal we introduce path integral quantum mechanics estimators based on free energy perturbation, which enable the evaluation of isotope effects using only a single path integral molecular dynamics trajectory of the naturally abundant isotope. We use as an example the calculation of the free energy change associated with H/D and 16O/18O substitutions in liquid water, and of the fractionation of those isotopes between the liquid and the vapor phase. In doing so, we demonstrate and discuss quantitatively the relative benefits of each approach, thereby providing a set of guidelines that should facilitate the choice of the most appropriate method in different, commonly encountered scenarios. The efficiency of the estimators we introduce and the analysis that we perform should in particular facilitate accurate ab initio calculation of isotope effects in condensed phase systems.

  18. Efficient methods and practical guidelines for simulating isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Markland, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    The shift in chemical equilibria due to isotope substitution is frequently exploited to obtain insight into a wide variety of chemical and physical processes. It is a purely quantum mechanical effect, which can be computed exactly using simulations based on the path integral formalism. Here we discuss how these techniques can be made dramatically more efficient, and how they ultimately outperform quasi-harmonic approximations to treat quantum liquids not only in terms of accuracy, but also in terms of computational cost. To achieve this goal we introduce path integral quantum mechanics estimators based on free energy perturbation, which enable the evaluation of isotope effects using only a single path integral molecular dynamics trajectory of the naturally abundant isotope. We use as an example the calculation of the free energy change associated with H/D and (16)O/(18)O substitutions in liquid water, and of the fractionation of those isotopes between the liquid and the vapor phase. In doing so, we demonstrate and discuss quantitatively the relative benefits of each approach, thereby providing a set of guidelines that should facilitate the choice of the most appropriate method in different, commonly encountered scenarios. The efficiency of the estimators we introduce and the analysis that we perform should in particular facilitate accurate ab initio calculation of isotope effects in condensed phase systems. PMID:23298033

  19. Isotope-Labeled Amyloids via Synthesis, Expression, and Chemical Ligation for Use in FTIR, 2D IR, and NMR Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqi O; Grechko, Maksim; Moran, Sean D; Zanni, Martin T

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides protocols for isotope-labeling the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) involved in type II diabetes and γD-crystallin involved in cataract formation. Because isotope labeling improves the structural resolution, these protocols are useful for experiments using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), two-dimensional infrared (2D IR), and NMR spectroscopies. Our research group specializes in using 2D IR spectroscopy and isotope labeling. 2D IR spectroscopy provides structural information by measuring solvation from 2D diagonal lineshapes and vibrational couplings from cross peaks. Infrared spectroscopy can be used to study kinetics, membrane proteins, and aggregated proteins. Isotope labeling provides greater certainty in the spectral assignment, which enables new structural insights that are difficult to obtain with other methods. For amylin, we provide a protocol for (13)C/(18)O labeling backbone carbonyls at one or more desired amino acids in order to obtain residue-specific structural resolution. We also provide a protocol for expressing and purifying amylin from E. coli, which enables uniform (13)C or (13)C/(15)N labeling. Uniform labeling is useful for measuring the monomer infrared spectrum in an amyloid oligomer or fiber as well as amyloid protein bound to another polypeptide or protein, such as a chaperone or an inhibitor. In addition, our expression protocol results in 2-2.5 mg of amylin peptide per 1 L cell culture, which is a high enough yield to straightforwardly obtain the 2-10 mg needed for high resolution and solid-state NMR experiments. Finally, we provide a protocol to isotope-label either of the two domains of γD-crystallin using expressed protein ligation. Domain labeling makes it possible to resolve the structures of the two halves of the protein in FTIR and 2D IR spectra. With modifications, these strategies and protocols for isotope labeling can be applied to other amyloid polypeptides and proteins.

  20. Comparison of Acetate Turnover in Methanogenic and Sulfate-Reducing Sediments by Radiolabeling and Stable Isotope Labeling and by Use of Specific Inhibitors: Evidence for Isotopic Exchange

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, W.; Wellsbury, P.; Parkes, R. J.; Cappenberg, T. E.

    1996-01-01

    Acetate turnover in the methanogenic freshwater anoxic sediments of Lake Vechten, The Netherlands, and in anoxic sediments from the Tamar Estuary, United Kingdom, and the Grosser Jasmunder Bodden, Germany, the latter two dominated by sulfate reduction, was determined. Stable isotopes and radioisotopes, inhibitors (chloroform and fluoroacetate), and methane flux were used to provide independent estimates of acetate turnover. Pore water acetate pool sizes were determined by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector, and stable isotope-labeled acetate was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The appearance of acetates with a different isotope labeling pattern from that initially added demonstrated that isotopic exchange occurred during methanogenic acetate metabolism. The predominant exchange processes were (i) D-H exchange in the methyl group and (ii) (sup13)C-(sup12)C exchange at the carboxyl carbon. These exchanges are most probably caused by the activity of the enzyme complex carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and subsequent methyl group dehydrogenation by tetrahydromethanopterine or a related enzyme. The methyl carbon was not subject to exchange during transformation to methane, and hence acetate with the methyl carbon labeled will provide the most reliable estimate of acetate turnover to methane. Acetate turnover rate estimates with these labels were consistent with independent estimates of acetate turnover (acetate accumulation after inhibition and methane flux). Turnover rates from either radioisotope- or stable isotope-labeled methyl carbon isotopes are, however, dependent on accurate determination of the acetate pool size. The additions of large amounts of stable isotope-labeled acetate elevate the acetate pool size, stimulating acetate consumption and causing deviation from steady-state kinetics. This can, however, be overcome by the application of a non-steady-state model. Isotopic exchange in sediments dominated by sulfate reduction

  1. Synthesis of isotopically labeled P-site substrates for the ribosomal peptidyl transferase reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Minghong

    2010-01-01

    Isotopomers of the ribosomal P-site substrate, the trinucleotide peptide conjugate CCA-pcb,1 have been designed and synthesized in 26–350020steps. These include individual isotopic substitution at the α-proton, carbonyl carbon, and carbonyl oxygen of the amino acid, the O2' and O3' of the adenosine, and a remote label in the N3 and N4 of both cytidines. These isotopomers were synthesized by coupling cytidylyl-(3'5')-cytidine phosphoramidite isotopomers, as the common synthetic intermediates, with isotopically substituted A-Phe-cap-biotin (A-pcb). The isotopic enrichment is higher than 99% for 1-13C (Phe), 2-2H (Phe), and 3,4-15N2 (cytidine), 93% for 2'/3'- 18O (adenosine), and 64% for 1-18O (Phe). A new synthesis of highly enriched [1-18O2] phenylalanine has been developed. The synthesis of [3'-18O] adenosine was improved by Lewis acid aided regioselective ring opening of the epoxide and by an economical SN2-SN2 method with high isotopic enrichment (93%). Such substrates are valuable for studies of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase reaction by complete kinetic isotope effect analysis and of other biological processes catalyzed by nucleic acid related enzymes, including polymerases, reverse transcriptases, ligases, nucleases, and ribozymes. PMID:18081346

  2. Efficient Enzymatic Preparation of (13) N-Labelled Amino Acids: Towards Multipurpose Synthetic Systems.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Eunice S; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Baz, Zuriñe; Llop, Jordi; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2016-09-12

    Nitrogen-13 can be efficiently produced in biomedical cyclotrons in different chemical forms, and its stable isotopes are present in the majority of biologically active molecules. Hence, it may constitute a convenient alternative to Fluorine-18 and Carbon-11 for the preparation of positron-emitter-labelled radiotracers; however, its short half-life demands for the development of simple, fast, and efficient synthetic processes. Herein, we report the one-pot, enzymatic and non-carrier-added synthesis of the (13) N-labelled amino acids l-[(13) N]alanine, [(13) N]glycine, and l-[(13) N]serine by using l-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis, an enzyme that catalyses the reductive amination of α-keto acids by using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) as the redox cofactor and ammonia as the amine source. The integration of both l-alanine dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii in the same reaction vessel to facilitate the in situ regeneration of NADH during the radiochemical synthesis of the amino acids allowed a 50-fold decrease in the concentration of the cofactor without compromising reaction yields. After optimization of the experimental conditions, radiochemical yields were sufficient to carry out in vivo imaging studies in small rodents. PMID:27515007

  3. Determining metal assimilation efficiency in aquatic invertebrates using enriched stable metal isotope tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Pellet, B.

    2007-01-01

    We employ a novel approach that combines pulse-chase feeding and multi-labelled stable isotopes to determine gut passage time (GPT), gut retention time (GRT), food ingestion rate (IR) and assimilation efficiency (AE) of three trace elements for a freshwater gastropod. Lettuce isotopically enriched in 53Cr, 65Cu and 106Cd was fed for 2 h to Lymnaea stagnalis. The release of tracers in feces and water was monitored for 48 h, during which unlabelled lettuce was provided ad libidum. The first defecation of 53Cr occurred after 5 h of depuration (GPT), whereas 90% of the ingested 53Cr was recovered in the feces after 22.5 h of depuration (GRT). 53Chromium was not significantly accumulated in the soft tissues upon exposure. In contrast, 65Cu and 106Cd assimilation was detectable for most experimental snails, i.e., 65/63Cu and 106/114Cd ratios in exposed snails were higher than those for controls. Food IR during the labelled feeding phase was 0.16 ?? 0.07 g g-1 d-1. IR was inferred from the amount of 53Cr egested in the feces during depuration and the concentration of 53Cr in the labelled lettuce. Assimilation efficiencies (??95% CI) determined using mass balance calculations were 84 ?? 4% for Cu and 85 ?? 3% for Cd. The ratio method yields similar AE estimates. Expanding the application of this novel stable isotope tracer technique to other metals in a wide variety of species will provide unique opportunities to evaluate the interplay between digestive processes and dietary influx of metals. Understanding the biological processes that modulate dietborne metal uptake is crucial to assess the toxicity of dietborne metals. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Determining metal assimilation efficiency in aquatic invertebrates using enriched stable metal isotope tracers.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Marie-Noële; Luoma, Samuel N; Pellet, Bastien

    2007-06-15

    We employ a novel approach that combines pulse-chase feeding and multi-labelled stable isotopes to determine gut passage time (GPT), gut retention time (GRT), food ingestion rate (IR) and assimilation efficiency (AE) of three trace elements for a freshwater gastropod. Lettuce isotopically enriched in (53)Cr, (65)Cu and (106)Cd was fed for 2h to Lymnaea stagnalis. The release of tracers in feces and water was monitored for 48 h, during which unlabelled lettuce was provided ad libidum. The first defecation of (53)Cr occurred after 5h of depuration (GPT), whereas 90% of the ingested (53)Cr was recovered in the feces after 22.5h of depuration (GRT). (53)Chromium was not significantly accumulated in the soft tissues upon exposure. In contrast, (65)Cu and (106)Cd assimilation was detectable for most experimental snails, i.e., (65/63)Cu and (106/114)Cd ratios in exposed snails were higher than those for controls. Food IR during the labelled feeding phase was 0.16+/-0.07 g g(-1)d(-1). IR was inferred from the amount of (53)Cr egested in the feces during depuration and the concentration of (53)Cr in the labelled lettuce. Assimilation efficiencies (+/-95% CI) determined using mass balance calculations were 84+/-4% for Cu and 85+/-3% for Cd. The ratio method yields similar AE estimates. Expanding the application of this novel stable isotope tracer technique to other metals in a wide variety of species will provide unique opportunities to evaluate the interplay between digestive processes and dietary influx of metals. Understanding the biological processes that modulate dietborne metal uptake is crucial to assess the toxicity of dietborne metals.

  5. Differential protein expression analysis using stable isotope labeling and PQD linear ion trap MS technology.

    PubMed

    Armenta, Jenny M; Hoeschele, Ina; Lazar, Iulia M

    2009-07-01

    An isotope tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method was developed for differential protein expression profiling in complex cellular extracts. The estrogen positive MCF-7 cell line, cultured in the presence of 17beta-estradiol (E2) and tamoxifen (Tam), was used as a model system. MS analysis was performed with a linear trap quadrupole (LTQ) instrument operated by using pulsed Q dissociation (PQD) detection. Optimization experiments were conducted to maximize the iTRAQ labeling efficiency and the number of quantified proteins. MS data filtering criteria were chosen to result in a false positive identification rate of <4%. The reproducibility of protein identifications was approximately 60%-67% between duplicate, and approximately 50% among triplicate LC-MS/MS runs, respectively. The run-to-run reproducibility, in terms of relative standard deviations (RSD) of global mean iTRAQ ratios, was better than 10%. The quantitation accuracy improved with the number of peptides used for protein identification. From a total of 530 identified proteins (P < 0.001) in the E2/Tam treated MCF-7 cells, a list of 255 proteins (quantified by at least two peptides) was generated for differential expression analysis. A method was developed for the selection, normalization, and statistical evaluation of such datasets. An approximate approximately 2-fold change in protein expression levels was necessary for a protein to be selected as a biomarker candidate. According to this data processing strategy, approximately 16 proteins involved in biological processes such as apoptosis, RNA processing/metabolism, DNA replication/transcription/repair, cell proliferation and metastasis, were found to be up- or down-regulated. PMID:19345114

  6. Pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling with optimized tagging efficiency.

    PubMed

    Shin, David D; Liu, Thomas T; Wong, Eric C; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Jung, Youngkyoo

    2012-10-01

    The adiabatic inversion of blood in pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) is highly sensitive to off-resonance effects and gradient imperfections and this sensitivity can lead to tagging efficiency loss and unpredictable variations in cerebral blood flow estimates. This efficiency loss is caused by a phase tracking error between the RF pulses and the flowing spins. This article introduces a new method, referred to as Optimized PCASL (OptPCASL), that minimizes the phase tracking error by applying an additional compensation RF phase term and in-plane gradients to the PCASL pulse train. The optimal RF phase and gradient amplitudes are determined using a prescan procedure, which consists of a series of short scans interleaved with automated postprocessing routines integrated to the scanner console. The prescan procedure is shown to minimize the phase tracking error in a robust and time efficient manner. As an example of its application, the use of OptPCASL for the improved detection of functional activation in the visual cortex is demonstrated and temporal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), image SNR, and baseline cerebral blood flow measures are compared to those acquired from conventional PCASL. PMID:22234782

  7. METHOD TO TEST ISOTOPIC SEPARATION EFFICIENCY OF PALLADIUM PACKED COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L; Gregory Staack, G; James Klein, J; William Jacobs, W

    2007-06-27

    The isotopic effect of palladium has been applied in different ways to separate hydrogen isotopes for many years. At Savannah River Site palladium deposited on kieselguhr (Pd/k) is used in a thermal cycling absorption process (TCAP) to purify tritium for over ten years. The need to design columns for different throughputs and the desire to advance the performance of TCAP created the need to evaluate different column designs and packing materials for their separation efficiency. In this work, columns with variations in length, diameter and metal foam use, were tested using an isotope displacement method. A simple computer model was also developed to calculate the number of theoretical separation stages using the test results. The effects of column diameter, metal foam and gas flow rate were identified.

  8. Systematic NMR Analysis of Stable Isotope Labeled Metabolite Mixtures in Plant and Animal Systems: Coarse Grained Views of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Suto, Michitaka; Nishihara, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Hirayama, Takashi; Kikuchi, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Metabolic phenotyping has become an important ‘bird's-eye-view’ technology which can be applied to higher organisms, such as model plant and animal systems in the post-genomics and proteomics era. Although genotyping technology has expanded greatly over the past decade, metabolic phenotyping has languished due to the difficulty of ‘top-down’ chemical analyses. Here, we describe a systematic NMR methodology for stable isotope-labeling and analysis of metabolite mixtures in plant and animal systems. Methodology/Principal Findings The analysis method includes a stable isotope labeling technique for use in living organisms; a systematic method for simultaneously identifying a large number of metabolites by using a newly developed HSQC-based metabolite chemical shift database combined with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy; Principal Components Analysis; and a visualization method using a coarse-grained overview of the metabolic system. The database contains more than 1000 1H and 13C chemical shifts corresponding to 142 metabolites measured under identical physicochemical conditions. Using the stable isotope labeling technique in Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and Bombyx mori, we systematically detected >450 HSQC peaks in each 13C-HSQC spectrum derived from model plant, Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and the invertebrate animal model Bombyx mori. Furthermore, for the first time, efficient 13C labeling has allowed reliable signal assignment using analytical separation techniques such as 3D HCCH-COSY spectra in higher organism extracts. Conclusions/Significance Overall physiological changes could be detected and categorized in relation to a critical developmental phase change in B. mori by coarse-grained representations in which the organization of metabolic pathways related to a specific developmental phase was visualized on the basis of constituent changes of 56 identified metabolites. Based on the observed intensities of 13C atoms of

  9. New monitoring approach for metabolic dynamics in microbial ecosystems using stable-isotope-labeling technologies.

    PubMed

    Date, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Yumiko; Fukuda, Shinji; Kato, Tamotsu; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Jun

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a new approach for monitoring the metabolic dynamics in microbial ecosystems using a combination of DNA fingerprinting and metabolome analysis based on stable-isotope-labeling technologies. Stable-isotope probing of DNA (DNA-SIP) has been used previously for the evaluation of cross-feeding in microbial communities. For the development and validation of our monitoring approach, fecal microbiota were analyzed with stable-isotope-labeled glucose used as the sole carbon source. In order to link the metabolic information and the microbial variability, we performed metabolic-microbial correlation analysis based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) profiles and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints, which successfully identified the glucose-utilizing bacteria and their related extracellular metabolites. Moreover, our approach revealed information regarding the carbon flux, in that the "first" wave of extracellular metabolites secreted by the glucose-utilizing bacteria were incorporated into the "secondary" group of substrate-utilizing bacteria, and that this "secondary" group further produced their own secondary metabolized substrates. Thus, this approach is a powerful tool for monitoring the metabolic dynamics in microbial ecosystems and allows for the tracking of the carbon flux within a microbial community.

  10. Raman spectroscopic investigation of polycrystalline structures of CVD-grown graphene by isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengnan; Suzuki, Satoru; Hibino, Hiroki

    2014-11-21

    Topological defects, such as point defects, dislocations and grain boundaries, have a dramatic influence on the chemical and physical properties of large-scale graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Here we demonstrate the Raman visualization of polycrystalline structures in an isotopically modified CVD graphene. By means of the reversible reaction of methane on a copper catalyst, the etching of (12)C-lattice and surface deposition of (13)C-atoms occur in CVD graphene by sequentially introducing hydrogen and isotopic methane after standard growth of graphene with full monolayer coverage. Spatial Raman spectroscopic mapping on labeled graphene reveals pronounced network-like (13)C-rich regions, which are further identified to exist along the grain boundaries of graphene by low-energy electron microscopy. The structural defects inside the graphene grains are also targeted in the isotope labeling process. Our work opens a new way to investigate multiple grain structures in CVD graphene with a simple spectroscopic technique. PMID:25303722

  11. Chemical imaging of biological materials by NanoSIMS using isotopic and elemental labels

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P K; Fallon, S J; Pett-Ridge, J; Ghosal, S; Hutcheon, I D

    2006-04-10

    The NanoSIMS 50 combines unprecedented spatial resolution (as good as 50 nm) with ultra-high sensitivity (minimum detection limit of {approx}200 atoms). The NanoSIMS 50 incorporates an array of detectors, enabling simultaneous collection of 5 species originating from the same sputtered volume of a sample. The primary ion beam (Cs{sup +} or O{sup -}) can be scanned across the sample to produce quantitative secondary ion images. This capability for multiple isotope imaging with high spatial resolution provides a novel new approach to the study of biological materials. Studies can be made of sub-regions of tissues, mammalian cells, and bacteria. Major, minor and trace element distributions can be mapped on a submicron scale, growth and metabolism can be tracked using stable isotope labels, and biogenic origin can be determined based on composition. We have applied this technique extensively to mammalian and prokaryotic cells and bacterial spores. The NanoSIMS technology enables the researcher to interrogate the fate of molecules of interest within cells and organs through elemental and isotopic labeling. Biological applications at LLNL will be discussed.

  12. PCR and non-isotopic labeling techniques for plant virus detection.

    PubMed

    Fenby, N S; Scott, N W; Slater, A; Elliott, M C

    1995-07-01

    PCR technology permits the detection of viruses at levels several orders of magnitude lower than is possible by other methods. This high sensitivity facilitates detection of virus sequences during the early stages of infection of plants and in soil and vector samples. Early detection of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) in Beta vulgaris is an important part of the strategy for prevention of the spread of rhizomania, a commercially significant disease of sugar beet. A diagnostic test for BNYVV has been developed. This test involves amplification of the viral genome by PCR coupled with non-isotopic labeling and detection of specific sequences. The PCR amplification of BNYVV sequences has been optimized with respect to primer design, sample preparation and reaction conditions. Several non-isotopic labeling strategies for signal amplification have been compared. Hybridization with digoxigenin-labelled cDNA permits the most sensitive detection of PCR products and is the most appropriate method for routine diagnosis. These observations are discussed in the context of the application of PCR for detecting a wide range of viruses. PMID:7580844

  13. Stable Isotope Labeling Strategy for Curcumin Metabolite Study in Human Liver Microsomes by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dan; Chen, Xiaowu; Yang, Xiaomei; Wu, Qin; Jin, Feng; Wen, Hongliang; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-04-01

    The identification of drug metabolites is very important in drug development. Nowadays, the most widely used methods are isotopes and mass spectrometry. However, the commercial isotopic labeled reagents are usually very expensive, and the rapid and convenient identification of metabolites is still difficult. In this paper, an 18O isotope labeling strategy was developed and the isotopes were used as a tool to identify drug metabolites using mass spectrometry. Curcumin was selected as a model drug to evaluate the established method, and the 18O labeled curcumin was successfully synthesized. The non-labeled and 18O labeled curcumin were simultaneously metabolized in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The two groups of chromatograms obtained from metabolic reaction mixture with and without cofactors were compared and analyzed using Metabolynx software (Waters Corp., Milford, MA, USA). The mass spectra of the newly appearing chromatographic peaks in the experimental sample were further analyzed to find the metabolite candidates. Their chemical structures were confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry. Three metabolites, including two reduction products and a glucuronide conjugate, were successfully detected under their specific HLMs metabolic conditions, which were in accordance with the literature reported results. The results demonstrated that the developed isotope labeling method, together with post-acquisition data processing using Metabolynx software, could be used for fast identification of new drug metabolites.

  14. Identification of ejaculated proteins in the house mouse (Mus domesticus) via isotopic labeling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Seminal fluid plays an important role in successful fertilization, but knowledge of the full suite of proteins transferred from males to females during copulation is incomplete. The list of ejaculated proteins remains particularly scant in one of the best-studied mammalian systems, the house mouse (Mus domesticus), where artificial ejaculation techniques have proven inadequate. Here we investigate an alternative method for identifying ejaculated proteins, by isotopically labeling females with 15N and then mating them to unlabeled, vasectomized males. Proteins were then isolated from mated females and identified using mass spectrometry. In addition to gaining insights into possible functions and fates of ejaculated proteins, our study serves as proof of concept that isotopic labeling is a powerful means to study reproductive proteins. Results We identified 69 male-derived proteins from the female reproductive tract following copulation. More than a third of all spectra detected mapped to just seven genes known to be structurally important in the formation of the copulatory plug, a hard coagulum that forms shortly after mating. Seminal fluid is significantly enriched for proteins that function in protection from oxidative stress and endopeptidase inhibition. Females, on the other hand, produce endopeptidases in response to mating. The 69 ejaculated proteins evolve significantly more rapidly than other proteins that we previously identified directly from dissection of the male reproductive tract. Conclusion Our study attempts to comprehensively identify the proteins transferred from males to females during mating, expanding the application of isotopic labeling to mammalian reproductive genomics. This technique opens the way to the targeted monitoring of the fate of ejaculated proteins as they incubate in the female reproductive tract. PMID:21663664

  15. Designer labels for plant metabolism: statistical design of isotope labeling experiments for improved quantification of flux in complex plant metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Nargund, Shilpa; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-27

    Metabolic fluxes are powerful indicators of cell physiology and can be estimated by isotope-assisted metabolic flux analysis (MFA). The complexity of the compartmented metabolic networks of plants has constrained the application of isotope-assisted MFA to them, principally because of poor identifiability of fluxes from the measured isotope labeling patterns. However, flux identifiability can be significantly improved by a priori design of isotope labeling experiments (ILEs). This computational design involves evaluating the effect of different isotope label and isotopomer measurement combinations on flux identifiability, and thereby identifying optimal labels and measurements toward evaluating the fluxes of interest with the highest confidence. This article reports ILE designs for two major, compartmented plant metabolic pathways - the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt. Together, these pathways represent common motifs in plant metabolism including duplication of pathways in different subcellular compartments, reversible reactions and cyclic carbon flow. To compare various ILE designs, we employed statistical A- and D-optimality criteria. Our computations showed that 1,2-(13)C Glc is a powerful and robust label for the plant PPPs, given currently popular isotopomer measurement techniques (single quadrupole mass spectrometry [MS] and 2-D nuclear magnetic resonance [NMR]). Further analysis revealed that this label can estimate several PPP fluxes better than the popular label 1-(13)C Glc. Furthermore, the concurrent measurement of the isotopomers of hexose and pentose moieties synthesized exclusively in the cytosol or the plastid compartments (measurable through intracellular glucose or sucrose, starch, RNA ribose and histidine) considerably improves the identifiability of PPP fluxes in the individual compartments. Additionally, MS-derived isotopomer measurements outperform NMR-derived measurements in identifying PPP fluxes. The

  16. Addressing Raman features of individual layers in isotopically labeled Bernal stacked bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Sara D.; Weis, Johan Ek; Frank, Otakar; Fridrichová, Michaela; Kalbac, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In this report important Raman modes for the evaluation of strain in graphene (the 2D and 2D‧) are analyzed. The isotope labeling is used to disentangle contribution of individual graphene layers of graphene bilayer to the studied Raman modes. It is shown that for Bernal-stacked bilayers, the 2D and the 2D‧ Raman modes have three distinct components that can be assigned to processes originating solely from the top graphene layer, bottom graphene layer, and from a combination of processes originating both from the top and bottom layers. The reported results thus enable addressing the properties of individual graphene layers in graphene bilayer by Raman spectroscopy.

  17. A data processing pipeline for mammalian proteome dynamics studies using stable isotope metabolic labeling.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shenheng; Price, John C; Prusiner, Stanley B; Ghaemmaghami, Sina; Burlingame, Alma L

    2011-12-01

    In a recent study, in vivo metabolic labeling using (15)N traced the rate of label incorporation among more than 1700 proteins simultaneously and enabled the determination of individual protein turnover rate constants over a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude (Price, J. C., Guan, S., Burlingame, A., Prusiner, S. B., and Ghaemmaghami, S. (2010) Analysis of proteome dynamics in the mouse brain. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 107, 14508-14513). These studies of protein dynamics provide a deeper understanding of healthy development and well-being of complex organisms, as well as the possible causes and progression of disease. In addition to a fully labeled food source and appropriate mass spectrometry platform, an essential and enabling component of such large scale investigations is a robust data processing and analysis pipeline, which is capable of the reduction of large sets of liquid chromatography tandem MS raw data files into the desired protein turnover rate constants. The data processing pipeline described in this contribution is comprised of a suite of software modules required for the workflow that fulfills such requirements. This software platform includes established software tools such as a mass spectrometry database search engine together with several additional, novel data processing modules specifically developed for (15)N metabolic labeling. These fulfill the following functions: (1) cross-extraction of (15)N-containing ion intensities from raw data files at varying biosynthetic incorporation times, (2) computation of peptide (15)N isotopic incorporation distributions, and (3) aggregation of relative isotope abundance curves for multiple peptides into single protein curves. In addition, processing parameter optimization and noise reduction procedures were found to be necessary in the processing modules in order to reduce propagation of errors in the long chain of the processing steps of the entire workflow. PMID:21937731

  18. Carbon allocation belowground in Pinus pinaster using stable carbon isotope pulse labeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannoura, M.; Bosc, A.; Chipeaux, C.; Sartore, M.; Lambrot, C.; Trichet, P.; Bakker, M.; Loustau, D.; Epron, D.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon allocation belowground competes with aboveground growth and biomass production. In the other hand, it contributes to resource acquisition such as nutrient, water and carbon sequestration in soil. Thus, a better characterization of carbon flow from plant to soil and its residence time within each compartment is an important issue for understanding and modeling forest ecosystem carbon budget. 13C pulse labeling of whole crown was conducted at 4 seasons to study the fate of assimilated carbon by photosynthesis into the root on 12 year old Pinus pinaster planted in the INRA domain of Pierroton. Maritime pine is the most widely planted species in South-West Europe. Stem, root and soil CO2 effluxes and their isotope composition were measured continuously by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with a trace gas analyzer (TGA 100A; Campbell Scientific) coupled to flow-through chambers. 13CO2 recovery and peak were observed in respiration of each compartment after labeling. It appeared sequentially from top of stem to bottom, and to coarse root. The maximum velocity of carbon transfer was calculated as the difference in time lag of recovery between two positions on the trunk or on the root. It ranged between 0.08-0.2 m h-1 in stem and between 0.04-0.12 m h-1 in coarse root. This velocity was higher in warmer season, and the difference between time lag of recovery and peak increased after first frost. Photosynthates arrived underground 1.5 to 5 days after labeling, at similar time in soil CO2 effluxes and coarse root respiration. 0.08-1.4 g of carbon was respired per tree during first 20 days following labeling. It presented 0.6 -10% of 13C used for labeling and it is strongly related to seasons. The isotope signal was detected in fine root organs and microbial biomass by periodical core sampling. The peak was observed 6 days after labeling in early summer while it was delayed more than 10 days in autumn and winter with less amount of carbon allocated

  19. Accurate quantitation of MHC-bound peptides by application of isotopically labeled peptide MHC complexes.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Chopie; Kester, Michel G D; Oudgenoeg, Gideon; de Ru, Arnoud H; Janssen, George M C; Drijfhout, Jan W; Spaapen, Robbert M; Jiménez, Connie R; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; van Veelen, Peter A

    2014-09-23

    Knowledge of the accurate copy number of HLA class I presented ligands is important in fundamental and clinical immunology. Currently, the best copy number determinations are based on mass spectrometry, employing single reaction monitoring (SRM) in combination with a known amount of isotopically labeled peptide. The major drawback of this approach is that the losses during sample pretreatment, i.e. immunopurification and filtration steps, are not well defined and must, therefore, be estimated. In addition, such losses can vary for individual peptides. Therefore, we developed a new approach in which isotopically labeled peptide-MHC monomers (hpMHC) are prepared and added directly after cell lysis, i.e. before the usual sample processing. Using this approach, all losses during sample processing can be accounted for and allows accurate determination of specific MHC class I-presented ligands. Our study pinpoints the immunopurification step as the origin of the rather extreme losses during sample pretreatment and offers a solution to account for these losses. Obviously, this has important implications for accurate HLA-ligand quantitation. The strategy presented here can be used to obtain a reliable view of epitope copy number and thus allows improvement of vaccine design and strategies for immunotherapy.

  20. Free amino acid quantification by LC-MS/MS using derivatization generated isotope-labelled standards.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David W

    2011-05-15

    The further development of derivatizing reagents for plasma amino acid quantification by tandem mass spectrometry is described. The succinimide ester of 4-methylpiperazineacetic acid (MPAS), the iTRAQ reagent, was systematically modified to improve tandem mass spectrometer (MS/MS) product ion intensity. 4-Methylpiperazinebutyryl succinimide (MPBS) and dimethylaminobutyryl succinimide (DMABS) afforded one to two orders of magnitude greater MS/MS product ion signal intensity than the MPAS derivative for simple amino acids. CD(3) analogues of the modified derivatizing reagents were evaluated for preparation of amino acid isotope-labelled quantifying standards. Acceptable accuracy and precision was obtained with d(3)-DMABS as the amino acid standards derivatizing reagent. The product ion spectra of the DMABS amino acid derivatives are diagnostic for structural isomers including valine/norvaline, alanine/sarcosine and leucine/isoleucine. Improved analytical sensitivity and specificity afforded by these derivatives may help to establish liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with derivatization generated isotope-labelled standards a viable alternative to amino acids analysers.

  1. Determination of protein conformation by isotopically labelled cross-linking and dedicated software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Tina; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Larsen, Nanna; Jørgensen, Flemming S.; Houen, Gunnar; Højrup, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Chemical cross-linking in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS) can be used for sensitive and rapid investigation of the three-dimensional structure of proteins at low resolution. However, the resulting data are very complex, and on the bioinformatic side, there still exists an urgent need for improving computer software for (semi-) automated cross-linking data analysis. In this study, we have developed dedicated software for rapid and confident identification and validation of cross-linked species using an isotopic labelled cross-linker approach in combination with MS. Deuterated (+4 Da) and non-deuterated (+0 Da) bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate, BS3, was used as homobifunctional cross-linker to tag the cross-linked regions. Peptides generated from proteolysis were separated using high performance liquid chromatography, and peptide mass fingerprinting was obtained for the individual fractions using matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI TOF) MS. The resulting peptide mass lists were combined and transferred to the program, ProteinXXX, which generated the theoretical mass values of all combinations of cross-linked peptides and dead-end cross-links and compared this to the obtained mass lists. In addition, screening for 4 Da-separated signals aided the identification of potential cross-linked species. Sequence information of these candidates was then obtained using MALDI TOF TOF. The cross-linked peptides could then be validated based on the match of the fragmentation pattern and the theoretical values produced by ProteinXXX. This semi-automated interpretation provided a high analysis speed of cross-linking data, with efficient and confident identification of cross-linked species. Four experiments using different conditions showed a high degree of reproducibility as only 1 and 2 cross-links out of 36 identified was not observed in two experiments. The method was tested using human placenta calreticulin (CRT). Based on the identified cross

  2. Purification and stable isotope labeling of the calcium- and integrin-binding protein 1 for structural and functional NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Vogel, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    The Calcium- and Integrin-Binding protein 1 (CIB1) has been identified as an important regulatory Ca(2+)-binding protein that is involved in various cellular functions. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a powerful approach to study the structure, dynamics, and interactions of CIB1 and related proteins. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy combined with various selective isotope labeling strategies has proven to be successful in the structure determination of CIB1. Moreover, the same approach allowed the detection of conformational changes when the protein binds different metal ions, and it facilitated the study of the interaction of CIB1 with the cytoplasmic domain of the human integrin αIIb subunit. In this protocol, we describe the purification and isotope labeling strategies for productive NMR studies of CIB1. The same isotope labeling strategies can be implemented to study numerous related regulatory calcium-binding proteins.

  3. Formation of Hydroxymethyl DNA Adducts in Rats Orally Exposed to Stable Isotope Labeled Methanol

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun; Gul, Husamettin; Upton, Patricia B.; Moeller, Benjamin C.; Swenberg, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Methanol is a large volume industrial chemical and widely used solvent and fuel additive. Methanol’s well known toxicity and use in a wide spectrum of applications has raised long-standing environmental issues over its safety, including its carcinogenicity. Methanol has not been listed as a carcinogen by any regulatory agency; however, there are debates about its carcinogenic potential. Formaldehyde, a metabolite of methanol, has been proposed to be responsible for the carcinogenesis of methanol. Formaldehyde is a known carcinogen and actively targets DNA and protein, causing diverse DNA and protein damage. However, formaldehyde-induced DNA adducts arising from the metabolism of methanol have not been reported previously, largely due to the absence of suitable DNA biomarkers and the inability to differentiate what was due to methanol compared with the substantial background of endogenous formaldehyde. Recently, we developed a unique approach combining highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods and exposure to stable isotope labeled chemicals to simultaneously quantify formaldehyde-specific endogenous and exogenous DNA adducts. In this study, rats were exposed daily to 500 or 2000 mg/kg [13CD4]-methanol by gavage for 5 days. Our data demonstrate that labeled formaldehyde arising from [13CD4]-methanol induced hydroxymethyl DNA adducts in multiple tissues in a dose-dependent manner. The results also demonstrated that the number of exogenous DNA adducts was lower than the number of endogenous hydroxymethyl DNA adducts in all tissues of rats administered 500 mg/kg per day for 5 days, a lethal dose to humans, even after incorporating an average factor of 4 for reduced metabolism due to isotope effects of deuterium-labeled methanol into account. PMID:22157354

  4. Stable isotope-labeled RNA phosphoramidites to facilitate dynamics by NMR.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Christoph H; Juen, Michael A; LeBlanc, Regan M; Longhini, Andrew P; Dayie, T Kwaku; Kreutz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Given that Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are a central hub of various cellular processes, methods to synthesize these RNAs for biophysical studies are much needed. Here, we showcase the applicability of 6-(13)C-pyrimidine phosphoramidites to introduce isolated (13)C-(1)H spin pairs into RNAs up to 40 nucleotides long. The method allows the incorporation of 6-(13)C-uridine and -cytidine residues at any desired position within a target RNA. By site-specific positioning of the (13)C-label using RNA solid phase synthesis, these stable isotope-labeling patterns are especially well suited to resolve resonance assignment ambiguities. Of even greater importance, the labeling pattern affords accurate quantification of important functional transitions of biologically relevant RNAs (e.g., riboswitch aptamer domains, viral RNAs, or ribozymes) in the μs- to ms time regime and beyond without complications of one bond carbon scalar couplings. We outline the chemical synthesis of the 6-(13)C-pyrimidine building blocks and their use in RNA solid phase synthesis and demonstrate their utility in Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill relaxation dispersion, ZZ exchange, and chemical exchange saturation transfer NMR experiments. PMID:26577742

  5. The evaluation of new and isotopically labeled isoindoline nitroxides and an azaphenalene nitroxide for EPR oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nadeem; Blinco, James P.; Bottle, Steven E.; Hosokawa, Kazuyuki; Swartz, Harold M.; Micallef, Aaron S.

    2011-01-01

    Isoindoline nitroxides are potentially useful probes for viable biological systems, exhibiting low cytotoxicity, moderate rates of biological reduction and favorable Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) characteristics. We have evaluated the anionic (5-carboxy-1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl; CTMIO), cationic (5-(N,N,N-trimethylammonio)-1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl iodide, QATMIO) and neutral (1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl; TMIO) nitroxides and their isotopically labeled analogues (2H12- and/or 2H12-15N-labeled) as potential EPR oximetry probes. An active ester analogue of CTMIO, designed to localize intracellularly, and the azaphenalene nitroxide 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-2,3-dihydro-2-azaphenalen-2-yloxyl (TMAO) were also studied. While the EPR spectra of the unlabeled nitroxides exhibit high sensitivity to O2 concentration, deuteration resulted in a loss of superhyperfine features and a subsequent reduction in O2 sensitivity. Labeling the nitroxides with 15N increased the signal intensity and this may be useful in decreasing the detection limits for in vivo measurements. The active ester nitroxide showed approximately 6% intracellular localization and low cytotoxicity. The EPR spectra of TMAO nitroxide indicated an increased rigidity in the nitroxide ring, due to dibenzo-annulation. PMID:21665499

  6. In-Gel Stable-Isotope Labeling (ISIL): a strategy for mass spectrometry-based relative quantification.

    PubMed

    Asara, John M; Zhang, Xiang; Zheng, Bin; Christofk, Heather H; Wu, Ning; Cantley, Lewis C

    2006-01-01

    Most proteomics approaches for relative quantification of protein expression use a combination of stable-isotope labeling and mass spectrometry. Traditionally, researchers have used difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) from stained 1D and 2D gels for relative quantification. While differences in protein staining intensity can often be visualized, abundant proteins can obscure less abundant proteins, and quantification of post-translational modifications is difficult. A method is presented for quantifying changes in the abundance of a specific protein or changes in specific modifications of a protein using In-gel Stable-Isotope Labeling (ISIL). Proteins extracted from any source (tissue, cell line, immunoprecipitate, etc.), treated under two experimental conditions, are resolved in separate lanes by gel electrophoresis. The regions of interest (visualized by staining) are reacted separately with light versus heavy isotope-labeled reagents, and the gel slices are then mixed and digested with proteases. The resulting peptides are then analyzed by LC-MS to determine relative abundance of light/heavy isotope pairs and analyzed by LC-MS/MS for identification of sequence and modifications. The strategy compares well with other relative quantification strategies, and in silico calculations reveal its effectiveness as a global relative quantification strategy. An advantage of ISIL is that visualization of gel differences can be used as a first quantification step followed by accurate and sensitive protein level stable-isotope labeling and mass spectrometry-based relative quantification.

  7. Synthesis of Isotopically Labeled (13)C3-Simazine and Development of a Simultaneous UPLC-MS/MS Method for the Analysis of Simazine in Soil.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Guo, Yangzhen; Zhang, Xia; Yang, Yue; Chen, Shuo; She, Gaimei; She, Dongmei

    2016-01-14

    The isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is a highly efficient method for tackling the ion suppression in complex matrix by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS), but a lack of commercial internal standards is a limiting factor for these analyses. Herein, an economical and efficient strategy for the synthesis of (13)C3-simazine via a three-step procedure was developed. The isotope-labeled internal standard was used for determination of simazine residue in soil samples. The quantitation method has a limit of detection of 0.015 μg/kg and quantitation of 0.08 μg/kg. The inter-day and intra-day precision of the method were below 4.6%. Recovery values were ranged between 92.9% and 99.2%. All the samples obtained from six provinces in China contained from 1 to 62 μg/kg of simazine.

  8. Effect of acetaminophen on the leukocyte-labeling efficiency of indium oxine In 111

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, S.C.; Schmelter, R.F.; Nelson, K.L.; Petersen, R.J.; Qualfe, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on the labeling efficiency of leukocytes with indium oxine In 111 was studied. A blood sample was obtained from eight healthy men before and after they received acetaminophen 650 mg every four hours for 24 hours. After dividing the plasma from each sample into three portions, leukocytes were separated and labeled with indium oxine In 111. In an in vitro study, 200 ml of blood was obtained from one of the men, and the plasma was separated into four portions. Acetaminophen in 95% ethanol was added to three of the plasma fractions to produce acetaminophen concentrations of 4, 20, and 100 micrograms/ml; ethanol was added to the fourth fraction as a control. Each plasma fraction was then subdivided into three aliquots, and leukocytes were labeled as in the in vivo study. Mean leukocyte labeling efficiencies in both studies were calculated from the ratios of leukocyte radioactivity to initial radioactivity in the samples, expressed as percentages. Leukocyte labeling efficiencies before acetaminophen administration ranged from 79 to 85%; after administration, labeling efficiencies ranged from 70 to 87%. No significant differences in mean labeling efficiency before and after acetaminophen administration were noted in any of the subjects. Leukocyte labeling efficiencies in all in vitro plasma fractions were reduced, ranging from 54 to 63%, but no significant differences in labeling efficiency between any of the plasma fractions were found. Using the labeling procedures in this study, exposure of leukocytes from healthy men to acetaminophen in vivo or in vitro does not affect labeling efficiency with indium oxine In 111.

  9. Segmental Isotope Labelling of an Individual Bromodomain of a Tandem Domain BRD4 Using Sortase A

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Felix P.; Milbradt, Alexander G.; Embrey, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family of proteins are one of the major readers of epigenetic marks and an important target class in oncology and other disease areas. The importance of the BET family of proteins is manifested by the explosion in the number of inhibitors against these targets that have successfully entered clinical trials. One important BET family member is bromodomain containing protein 4 (BRD4). Structural and biophysical studies of BRD4 are complicated by its tertiary-structure consisting of two bromodomains connected by a flexible inter-domain linker of approximately 180 amino acids. A detailed understanding of the interplay of these bromodomains will be key to rational drug design in BRD4, yet there are no reported three-dimensional structures of the multi-domain BRD4 and NMR studies of the tandem domain are hampered by the size of the protein. Here, we present a method for rapid Sortase A-mediated segmental labelling of the individual bromodomains of BRD4 that provides a powerful strategy that will enable NMR studies of ligand-bromodomain interactions with atomic detail. In our labelling strategy, we have used U-[2H,15N]-isotope labelling on the C-terminal bromodomain with selective introduction of 13CH3 methyl groups on Ile (δ1), Val and Leu, whereas the N-terminal bromodomain remained unlabelled. This labelling scheme resulted in significantly simplified NMR spectra and will allow for high-resolution interaction, structure and dynamics studies in the presence of ligands. PMID:27128490

  10. Estimating plant water uptake source depths with optimized stable water isotope labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Stefan; Weiler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Depth profiles of pore water stable isotopes in soils in conjunction with measurements of stable water isotopes (SWI) in plant transpiration allow the estimation of the contributions of different soil depths to plant water uptake (PWU).
 However, SWI depth profiles that result from the variations of SWI in natural precipitation may lead to highly ambiguous results, i.e. the same SWI signature in transpiration could result from different PWU patterns or SWI depth profiles. The aim of this study was to find an optimal stable water isotope depth profile to estimate plant water uptake patterns and to compare different PWU source depth estimation methods. We used a new soil water transport model including fractionation effects of SWI and exchange between the vapor and liquid phase to simulate different irrigation scenarios. Different amounts of water with differing SWI signatures (glacier melt water, summer precipitation water, deuterated water) were applied in order to obtain a wide variety of SWI depth profiles. Based on these simulated SWI depth profiles and a set of hypothetical PWU patterns, the theoretical SWI signatures of the respective plant transpiration were computed. In the next step, two methods - Bayesian isotope mixing models (BIMs) and optimization of a parametric distribution function (beta function) - were used to estimate the PWU patterns from the different SWI depth profiles and their respective SWI signatures in the resulting transpiration. Eventually, the estimated and computed profiles were compared to find the best SWI depth profile and the best method. The results showed, that compared to naturally occurring SWI depth profiles, the application of multiple, in terms of SWI, distinct labeling pulses greatly improves the possible spatial resolution and at the same time reduces the uncertainty of PWU estimates.
 For the PWU patterns which were assumed for this study, PWU pattern estimates based on an optimized parametric distribution function

  11. Carbon isotopes and water use efficiency in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Patrick Z; Cousins, Asaph B

    2016-06-01

    Drought is a major agricultural problem worldwide. Therefore, selection for increased water use efficiency (WUE) in food and biofuel crop species will be an important trait in plant breeding programs. The leaf carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)Cleaf) has been suggested to serve as a rapid and effective high throughput phenotyping method for WUE in both C3 and C4 species. This is because WUE, leaf carbon discrimination (Δ(13)Cleaf), and δ(13)Cleaf are correlated through their relationships with intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures (Ci/Ca). However, in C4 plants, changing environmental conditions may influence photosynthetic efficiency (bundle-sheath leakiness) and post-photosynthetic fractionation that will potentially alter the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and Ci/Ca. Here we discuss how these factors influence the relationship between δ(13)Cleaf and WUE, and the potential of using δ(13)Cleaf as a meaningful proxy for WUE.

  12. Negative ion ESI-MS analysis of natural yellow dye flavonoids--An isotopic labelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, Hamish; Ferreira, Ester S. B.; Hulme, Alison N.; Quye, Anita

    2009-07-01

    Flavonoids are amongst the most commonly used natural yellow colourants in paintings, as lakes, and in historical textiles as mordant dyes. In this paper, evidence from isotopically labelled substrates is used to propose negative ion electrospray collision induced decomposition mechanisms of flavones, flavonols and an isoflavone. These mechanisms include a retro-Diels-Alder fragmentation (observed for flavones and flavonols) and an M-122 fragmentation (characteristic of 3',4'-dihydroxyflavonols). In addition, the presence of a m/z 125 fragment ion is shown to be characteristic of 2'-hydroxyflavonols and an ion at m/z 149 is shown to be characteristic of 4'-hydroxyflavones. Applications of these methods are exemplified by the identification of a minor component of Dyer's camomile (Anthemis tinctoria L.) and the identification of the dye source in green threads sampled from an 18th Century Scottish tartan fragment.

  13. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry without isotope labeling can be used for rapid protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Wenbo; Wang, Meiyao; She, Jin-Xiong

    2011-06-15

    The validation of putative biomarker candidates has become the major bottle-neck in protein biomarker development. Conventional immunoaffinity methods are limited by the availability of antibodies and kits. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) without isotope labeling to achieve fast and reproducible quantification of serum proteins. The SRM/MRM assays for three standard serum proteins, including ceruloplasmin (CP), serum aymloid A (SAA) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), have good linear ranges, generally 10(3) to 10(4) . There are almost perfect correlations between SRM intensities and the loaded peptide amounts (R(2) is usually ~0.99). Our data suggest that SRM/MRM is able to quantify proteins within the range of 0.2-2 fmol, which is comparable to the commercial ELISA/LUMINEX kits for these proteins. Excellent correlations between SRM/MRM and ELISA/LUMINEX assays were observed for SAA and SHBG (R(2)=0.928 and 0.851, respectively). However, the correlation between SRM/MRM and ELISA for CP is less desirable (R(2)=0.565). The reproducibility for SRM/MRM assays is generally very good but may depend on the proteins/peptides being analyzed (R(2)=0.931 and 0.882 for SAA and SHBG, and 0.723 for CP). The SRM/MRM assay without isotope labeling is a rapid and useful method for protein biomarker validation in a modest number of samples and is especially useful when other assays such as ELISA or LUMINEX are not available. PMID:21594933

  14. Extrinsic labelling of staple food crops with isotopic iron does not consistently result in full equilibration: Revisiting the methodology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrinsic isotopic labeling of food Fe has been used for over 50 years to measure Fe absorption. This method is based on the assumption that complete equilibration occurs between the extrinsic and the intrinsic Fe prior to intestinal absorption. The present study tested this assumption via use of in...

  15. Adaptation of the doubly labeled water method for subjects consuming isotopically enriched water.

    PubMed

    Gretebeck, R J; Schoeller, D A; Socki, R A; Davis-Street, J; Gibson, E K; Schulz, L O; Lane, H W

    1997-02-01

    The use of doubly labeled water (DLW) to measure energy expenditure is subject to error if the background abundance of the oxygen and hydrogen isotope tracers changes during the test period. This study evaluated the accuracy and precision of different methods by which such background isotope changes can be corrected, including a modified method that allows prediction of the baseline that would be achieved if subjects were to consume water from a given source indefinitely. Subjects in this study were eight women (4 test subjects and 4 control subjects) who consumed for 28 days water enriched to resemble drinking water aboard the United States space shuttle. Test subjects and control subjects were given a DLW dose on days 1 and 15, respectively. The change to an enriched water source produced a bias in expenditure calculations that exceeded 2.9 MJ/day (35%), relative to calculations from intake-balance. The proposed correction based on the predicted final abundance of 18O and deuterium after equilibration to the new water source eliminated this bias, as did the traditional use of a control group. This new modified correction method is advantageous under field conditions when subject numbers are limited.

  16. Carbon isotope labeling in boreal forests to assess roles of fungal species in decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treseder, K. K.; Czimczik, C. I.; Trumbore, S. E.; Allison, S. D.

    2006-12-01

    We used 14C and 13C labeling to assess the in situ respiration of alanine-, starch-, and lignocellulose-derived carbon from the sporocarps of particular fungal species fruiting in a boreal forest in Alaska. By measuring isotopically-labeled respiration of sporocarps, which can be identified to species, we were able to attribute turnover of carbon compounds to specific fungal groups. Moreover, collection of sporocarp respiration is non-destructive, so we could return to the same sporocarps to collect a time series of measurements that spanned hours to days. We tested the hypotheses that alanine and starch turn over more quickly than lignocellulose, and that saprotrophic fungi would use starch-C and lignocellulose-C but ectomycorrhizal fungi would not. Small amounts of 14C-labeled alanine (about 100,000 permil) were dispensed into the soil within three meters of sporocarps of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Lactarius alnicola. Δ14CO2 values of sporocarp respiration climbed from 75.8 +/- 6.3 permil to 7855 +/- 3940 permil within one hour of additions, indicating that the fungus quickly acquired, transported, and transformed the alanine-C. In a separate approach, a mixture of 13C-labeled starch (about 15,000 permil) and 14C-labeled lignocellulose (about 36,000 permil) was applied in 9 m2 plots containing sporocarps of the ectomycorrhizal genera Phellodon and Sarcodon and the saprotrophic genera Lycoperdon and Polyporus. An unlabeled control plot was also established. We observed no detectable increase in 14CO2 or 13CO2 over a 144 hour period, suggesting that neither ectomycorrhizal nor saprotrophic fungi significantly broke down starch or lignocellulose during this time. The alanine experiment is one of the first to indicate that ectomycorrhizal fungi can influence the spatial distribution and storage of soil carbon over short time scales. This influence may be restricted to carbon of organic compounds like amino acids. In contrast, starch was not transformed quickly even

  17. Dehydrogenation and dehalogenation of amines in MALDI-TOF MS investigated by isotopic labeling.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chuanqing; Zhou, Yihan; Du, Zhijun; Bian, Zheng; Wang, Jianwei; Qiu, Xuepeng; Gao, Lianxun; Sun, Yuequan

    2013-12-01

    Secondary and tertiary amines have been reported to form [M-H](+) that correspond to dehydrogenation in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). In this investigation, we studied the dehydrogenation of amines in MALDI-TOF MS by isotopic labeling. Aliphatic amines were labeled with deuterium on the methylene of an N-benzyl group, which resulted in the formation of [M-D](+) and [M-H](+) ions by dedeuteration and dehydrogenation, respectively. This method revealed the proton that was removed. The spectra of most tertiary amines with an N-benzyl group showed high-intensity [M-D](+) and [M-H](+) ion peaks, whereas those of secondary amines showed low-intensity ion peaks. Ratios between the peak intensities of [M-D](+) and [M-H](+) greater than 1 suggested chemoselective dehydrogenation at the N-benzyl groups. The presence of an electron donor group on the N-benzyl groups enhanced the selectivity. The dehalogenation of amines with an N-(4-halobenzyl) group was also observed alongside dehydrogenation. The amino ions from dehalogenation can undergo second dehydrogenation. These results provide the first direct evidence about the position at which dehydrogenation of an amine occurs and the first example of dehalogenation of haloaromatic compounds in MALDI-TOF MS. These results should be helpful in the structural identification and elucidation of synthetic and natural molecules. PMID:24338887

  18. Multi-isotope labelling (13C, 18O, 2H) for studying organic matter cycling within plant-soil systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, M. S.; Abiven, S.; Schmidt, M. W. I.; Siegwolf, R. T. W.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon cycling has become of major interest for the understanding and mitigation of global climatic change. Terrestrial ecosystems have a large carbon sequestration potential, but many processes and fluxes of organic matter (OM) cycling within the plant-soil system are not yet well understood [1]. The dynamics of OM cycling within the plant soil-system are determined by environmental parameters, as well as chemical quality of OM input. A well-known technique to study OM dynamics is to label OM inputs with stable isotopes (e.g 13C). Changes in OM quality in the plant and in the soil can be assessed by compound specific isotopic analysis [2]. These techniques give a precise insight of the OM composition, but are laborious and expensive. Here we suggest a new multi-isotope labelling technique using stable 13C in combination with stable 18O and 2H isotopes, which provides information on OM quality by simple bulk material analysis. The method is based on the creation of an isotopic van Krevelen diagram, which is used to describe different compound groups by plotting the atomic ratios of O/C vs. H/C [3]. We could show that new assimilates can be labelled with 13C, 18O and 2H by adding the stable isotopes (continuously) in the gaseous phase (CO2 and water vapour) to the plants atmosphere. The label has been traced within the bulk material of different compartments of the plant-soil system (e.g. leaves, stems, roots, bulk soil). Our first results showed that after 2, 8 and 14 days of labelling the 18O/13C(new) ratio was notably different in leaf, stem and root tissue (0.0024, 0.0011 and 0.0007, respectively), suggesting a change in OM quality towards more C-rich compounds. d2H analysis will follow and an isotopic van Krevelen diagram will be produced (18O/13C(new) vs. 2H/13C(new)) to describe the changes in OM quality. The new multi-isotope labelling approach represent a powerful tool to address open questions in plant and soil research such as the allocation of organic

  19. Whole proteome analysis of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cirovic, Olivera; Ochsenreiter, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    The single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei spp. is the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis and nagana in cattle. Quantitative proteomics for the first time has allowed for the characterization of the proteome from several different life stages of the parasite (Butter et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 12:172-179, 2013; Gunasekera et al., BMC Genomics 13:556, 2012; Urbaniak et al., PloS One 7(5):e36619, 2012). To achieve this, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) (Ong et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 1:376-386, 2002) was adapted to T. brucei spp. cultures. T. brucei cells grown in standard media with dialyzed fetal calf serum containing heavy isotope-labeled amino acids (arginine and lysine) show efficient incorporation of the labeled amino acids into the whole cell proteome (8-12 divisions) and no detectable amino acid conversions. The method can be applied to both of the major life stages of the parasite and in combination with RNAi or gene knockout approaches.

  20. Isotopic labeling for the understanding of the alteration of limestone used in built cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheb, Mandana; Chabas, Anne; Mertz, Jean-Didier; Rozenbaum, Olivier; Verney-Carron, Aurélie

    2015-04-01

    This project belongs to a specific work aiming at developing isotopic tools to better understand the alteration of materials used in the built cultural heritage. It is focused on the study of the alteration of limestone used in the facades of historic buildings subject to atmospheric polluted environment. Actually in the elevated parts of the buildings, water as rainfall (runoff or wet deposition) or in vapor form (condensation or dry deposition) is the main agent of alteration. Thus, the rock/water interactions need to be well understood to propose adapted solution to better preserve the buildings. To identify the water transfer within the porous limestone and locate the reaction preferential sites, two isotopic tracers (D and 18O) are used to monitor the alteration solution (D) and locate the zones containing the secondary phases (18O). The Saint-Maximin limestone used in many monuments in the suburbs of Paris (France) as a building and restoration stone has been specifically studied. Pristine materials, stones from monuments (monuments in the Paris area) and samples altered in laboratory constitute the analytical corpus to compare different stages of alteration. In a first step the stones are characterized at different scales to identify the alteration pattern (SEM-EDS, Raman microspectrometry, XRD, rugosimetry) and study the water transfers (X-ray tomography, mercury porosimetry, imbibition kinetics). The samples are then altered in the laboratory by realistic and controlled wet or dry deposition using isotopically labeled solutions to locate the reaction zones by SIMS. The multiscale characterization of the alteration pattern has allowed proposing alteration mechanisms linked to the properties of the stones and their location inside the building. Moreover, the location of the reactive zones inside the materials determined by the isotopic experiments helps examining the role of the evolution of porosity and formation of alteration products within the material

  1. Rapid speciation and quantification of selenium compounds by HPLC-ICP MS using multiple standards labelled with different isotopes.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yuki; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Yayoi; Hirano, Seishiro

    2011-09-01

    Speciation analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP MS) is now commonly used to investigate metabolic and toxicological aspects of some metals and metalloids. We have developed a rapid method for simultaneous identification and quantification of metabolites of selenium (Se) compounds using multiple standards labelled with different isotopes. A mixture of the labelled standards was spiked in a selenised garlic extract and the sample was subjected to speciation analysis by HPLC-ICP MS. The selenised garlic contains γ-glutamyl-methylselenocysteine, methylselenocysteine, and selenomethionine and the concentrations of those Se compounds were 723.8, 414.8, and 310.7 ng Se ml(-1), respectively. The isotopically labelled standards were also applied to the speciation of Se in rat urine. Selenate, methylselenonic acid, selenosugar, and trimethyselenium ions were found to be excreted by the present speciation procedure. Multiple standards labelled with different stable isotopes enable high-throughput identification and quantitative measurements of Se metabolites.

  2. Isotope coded protein labeling coupled immunoprecipitation (ICPL-IP): a novel approach for quantitative protein complex analysis from native tissue.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Andreas; Fuerholzner, Bettina; Kinkl, Norbert; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius

    2013-05-01

    High confidence definition of protein interactions is an important objective toward the understanding of biological systems. Isotope labeling in combination with affinity-based isolation of protein complexes has increased in accuracy and reproducibility, yet, larger organisms--including humans--are hardly accessible to metabolic labeling and thus, a major limitation has been its restriction to small animals, cell lines, and yeast. As composition as well as the stoichiometry of protein complexes can significantly differ in primary tissues, there is a great demand for methods capable to combine the selectivity of affinity-based isolation as well as the accuracy and reproducibility of isotope-based labeling with its application toward analysis of protein interactions from intact tissue. Toward this goal, we combined isotope coded protein labeling (ICPL)(1) with immunoprecipitation (IP) and quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). ICPL-IP allows sensitive and accurate analysis of protein interactions from primary tissue. We applied ICPL-IP to immuno-isolate protein complexes from bovine retinal tissue. Protein complexes of immunoprecipitated β-tubulin, a highly abundant protein with known interactors as well as the lowly expressed small GTPase RhoA were analyzed. The results of both analyses demonstrate sensitive and selective identification of known as well as new protein interactions by our method.

  3. Stable isotope labeling, in vivo, of D- and L-tryptophan pools in lemna gibba and the low incorporation of label into indole-3-acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, B.G. ); Maher, B.R. ); Slovin, J.P.; Cohen, J.D. Univ. of Maryland, College Park )

    1991-04-01

    The authors present evidence that the role of tryptophan and other potential intermediates in the pathways that could lead to indole derivatives needs to be reexamined. Two lines of Lemna gibba were tested for uptake of ({sup 15}N-indole)-labeled tryptophan isomers and incorporation of that label into free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Both lines required levels of L-({sup 15}N)tryptophan 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over endogenous levels in order to obtain measurable incorporation of label into IAA. Labeled L-tryptophan was extractable from plant tissue after feeding and showed no measurable isomerization into D-tryptophan. D-({sup 15}N)trytophan supplied to Lemna at rates of approximately 400 times excess of endogenous D-tryptophan levels (to yield an isotopic enrichment equal to that which allowed detection of the incorporation of L-tryptophan into IAA), did not result in measurable incorporation of label into free IAA. These results demonstrate that L-tryptophan is a more direct precursor to IAA than the D isomer and suggest (a) that the availability of tryptophan in vivo is not a limiting factor in the biosynthesis of IAA, thus implying that other regulatory mechanisms are in operation and (b) that L-tryptophan also may not be a primary precursor to IAA in plants.

  4. Tracking the metabolic pulse of plant lipid production with isotopic labeling and flux analyses: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Allen, Doug K; Bates, Philip D; Tjellström, Henrik

    2015-04-01

    Metabolism is comprised of networks of chemical transformations, organized into integrated biochemical pathways that are the basis of cellular operation, and function to sustain life. Metabolism, and thus life, is not static. The rate of metabolites transitioning through biochemical pathways (i.e., flux) determines cellular phenotypes, and is constantly changing in response to genetic or environmental perturbations. Each change evokes a response in metabolic pathway flow, and the quantification of fluxes under varied conditions helps to elucidate major and minor routes, and regulatory aspects of metabolism. To measure fluxes requires experimental methods that assess the movements and transformations of metabolites without creating artifacts. Isotopic labeling fills this role and is a long-standing experimental approach to identify pathways and quantify their metabolic relevance in different tissues or under different conditions. The application of labeling techniques to plant science is however far from reaching it potential. In light of advances in genetics and molecular biology that provide a means to alter metabolism, and given recent improvements in instrumentation, computational tools and available isotopes, the use of isotopic labeling to probe metabolism is becoming more and more powerful. We review the principal analytical methods for isotopic labeling with a focus on seminal studies of pathways and fluxes in lipid metabolism and carbon partitioning through central metabolism. Central carbon metabolic steps are directly linked to lipid production by serving to generate the precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis and lipid assembly. Additionally some of the ideas for labeling techniques that may be most applicable for lipid metabolism in the future were originally developed to investigate other aspects of central metabolism. We conclude by describing recent advances that will play an important future role in quantifying flux and metabolic operation in plant

  5. ­Characterization of Reduced Magmatic C-O-H-N Volatiles By Isotopic Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falksen, E.; Armstrong, L. S.; Hirschmann, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Characterization of COHN species in silicate melts [1-10] is required to understand the role of reduced volatiles in planetary and early Earth processes, including partitioning between planetary cores, mantles, and atmospheres during early differentiation. Vibrational spectroscopy has been used to examine volatile speciation, but for a number of absorptions there is uncertainty as to whether they relate to species containing N, C, or both [1,3]. In particular, an IR band at 3370 cm-1 is commonly attributed to N-H stretching [1,4,5,7], but associated Raman bands near 3280 cm-1 have also been attributed to alkyne (C-H) bonds [8-10]. The 3370 cm-1 IR band appears even in nominally N-free experiments owing to trapped air and is accompanied by a feature at 1615 cm-1 which could be caused by C=O or N-H bonds [1,3,8]. We sought to determine whether N and C were responsible for various IR bands by dissolving different isotopes of N and C in basaltic melts at high pressure and temperature and observing the shift in position of the resulting absorptions. Experiments were conducted at 1.2 GPa and 1400 oC and volatiles were added to a basaltic oxide mix in the form of unlabeled, 13C labeled, and 15N labeled urea [(NH2)2CO]. The resulting glasses were analyzed using FTIR and the theoretical band shifts were predicted based on a classical approximation of a diatomic molecule. Relative to isotopically normal glasses, bands at both 3370 cm-1 and 1615 cm-1 decrease by 4-8 wavenumbers for 15N and not at all for 13C, consistent with origination by N-H bonds in amines or metal-ammine complexes. [1] Stanley et al. (2014) GCA 129, 54-76. [2] Wetzel et al. (2013) PNAS 110, 8010-8013. [3] Armstrong et al. (in prep). [4] Kadik et al. (2011) Geochem. Int. 49, 429-438. [5] Kadik et al. (2013) PEPI 214, 14-24. [6]Mysen (2013) Chem. Geo. 346, 113-124. [7] Mysen et al. (2008) Am. Min. 93, 1760-1770. [8] Mysen et al. (2009) GCA 73, 1696-1710. [9] Dasgupta et al. (2013) GCA 102, 191-212. [10] Chi

  6. CTA coronary labeling through efficient geodesics between trees using anatomy priors.

    PubMed

    Gülsün, Mehmet A; Funka-Lea, Gareth; Zheng, Yefeng; Eckert, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We present an efficient realization of recent work on unique geodesic paths between tree shapes for the application of matching coronary arteries to a standard model of coronary anatomy in order to label the coronary arteries. Automatically labeled coronary arteries would speed reporting for physicians. The efficiency of the approach and the quality of the results are enhanced using the relative position of detected cardiac structures. We explain how to efficiently compute the geodesic paths between tree shapes using Dijkstra's algorithm and we present a methodology to account for missing side branches during matching. For nearly all labels our approach shows promise compared with recent work and we results for 8 additional labels. PMID:25485419

  7. Dependence of technetium-99m red blood cell labeling efficiency on red cell surface charge.

    PubMed

    Seldin, D W; Simchon, S; Jan, K M; Chien, S; Alderson, P O

    1988-10-01

    The mechanisms by which [99mTc]pertechnetate becomes attached to stannous-primed red blood cells are not known in detail. To study the problem further, the effect of red cell surface charge on labeling efficiency was evaluated. Red cell surface charge was reduced by using the enzyme neuraminidase to remove the terminal charge-bearing sialic acid moiety of the membrane glycoprotein. Forty-five blood samples from six volunteers were treated with neuraminidase for varying lengths of time, resulting in the removal of from 11% to 99% of the normal negative surface charge, as determined from electrophoretic mobility measurements. There was excellent linear correlation between labeling efficiency and the remaining red cell surface charge for values down to 20% of normal (r = 0.89). When surface charge was less than 20% of normal, labeling efficiency was constant at 30%. Eleven blood samples from three donors were divided into two groups that were treated with neuraminidase either before or after they were labeled. The labeling efficiency was independent of the order in which the steps were performed. No evidence for shifting of the radiolabel from the cell membrane to hemoglobin was found. The results suggest that clinical conditions associated with a reduction of sialic acid on the erythrocyte membrane may be one cause of decreased red blood cell labeling efficiency, and that increased membrane permeability for reduced technetium species may be responsible for the decrease.

  8. Analysis of liposoluble carboxylic acids metabolome in human serum by stable isotope labeling coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quan-Fei; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Ping; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Peng, Ke; Deng, Qian-Yun; Zheng, Fang; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-08-19

    Fatty acids (FAs) are groups of liposoluble carboxylic acids (LCAs) and play important roles in various physiological processes. Abnormal contents or changes of FAs are associated with a series of diseases. Here we developed a strategy with stable isotope labeling combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (IL-LC-MS) analysis for comprehensive profiling and relative quantitation of LCAs in human serum. In this strategy, a pair of isotope labeling reagents (2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMED)) and d4-2-dimethylaminoethylamine (d4-DMED) were employed to selectively label carboxyl groups of LCAs. The DMED and d4-DMED labeled products can lose four characteristic neutral fragments of 45 and 49Da or 63 and 67Da in collision-induced dissociation. Therefore, quadruple neutral loss scan (QNLS) mode was established and used for non-targeted profiling of LCAs. The peak pairs of DMED and d4-DMED labeling with the same retention time, intensity and characteristic mass differences were extracted from the two NLS spectra respectively, and assigned as potential LCA candidates. Using this strategy, 241 LCA candidates were discovered in the human serum; 156 carboxylic acid compounds could be determined by searching HMDB and METLIN databases (FAs are over 90%) and 21 of these LCAs were successfully identified by standards. Subsequently, a modified pseudo-targeted method with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) detection mode was developed and used for relative quantification of LCAs in human serum from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and healthy controls. As a result, 81 LCAs were found to have significant difference between T2DM patients and healthy controls. Taken together, the isotope labeling combined with tandem mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated to be a powerful strategy for identification and quantification of LCA compounds in serum samples. PMID:27432792

  9. Absolute Quantitation of Glycosylation Site Occupancy Using Isotopically Labeled Standards and LC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhikai; Go, Eden P.; Desaire, Heather

    2014-06-01

    N-linked glycans are required to maintain appropriate biological functions on proteins. Underglycosylation leads to many diseases in plants and animals; therefore, characterizing the extent of glycosylation on proteins is an important step in understanding, diagnosing, and treating diseases. To determine the glycosylation site occupancy, protein N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) is typically used to detach the glycan from the protein, during which the formerly glycosylated asparagine undergoes deamidation to become an aspartic acid. By comparing the abundance of the resulting peptide containing aspartic acid against the one containing non-glycosylated asparagine, the glycosylation site occupancy can be evaluated. However, this approach can give inaccurate results when spontaneous chemical deamidation of the non-glycosylated asparagine occurs. To overcome this limitation, we developed a new method to measure the glycosylation site occupancy that does not rely on converting glycosylated peptides to their deglycosylated forms. Specifically, the overall protein concentration and the non-glycosylated portion of the protein are quantified simultaneously by using heavy isotope-labeled internal standards coupled with LC-MS analysis, and the extent of site occupancy is accurately determined. The efficacy of the method was demonstrated by quantifying the occupancy of a glycosylation site on bovine fetuin. The developed method is the first work that measures the glycosylation site occupancy without using PNGase F, and it can be done in parallel with glycopeptide analysis because the glycan remains intact throughout the workflow.

  10. LC/MS Method for the Determination of Stable Isotope Labeled Promethazine in Human Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuwei, Wang; Boyd, Jason; Berens, Kurt L.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2004-01-01

    Promethazine (PMZ) is taken by astronauts orally (PO), intramuscularly (IM) or rectally (PR) for space motion sickness. LC/MS method was developed with off-line solid phase extraction to measure plasma concentrations of PMZ given as stable isotope-labeled (SIL) formulations by the three different routes of administration simultaneously. Samples (0.5ml) were loaded on to Waters Oasis HLB co-polymer cartridges and eluted with 1.0 mL methanol. HPLC separation of the eluted sample was performed using an Agilent Zorbax SB-CN column (50 x 2.1 mm) at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min for 6 min. Acetonitrile/ ammonium acetate (30 mM) in water (3:2, v/v), pH 5.6 plus or minus 0.1, was used as the mobile phase for separation. Concentrations of PMZ, PMZ-d4 and PMZ-d7 and chlorpromazine (internal standard) were determined using a Micromass ZMD single quadrupole mass spectrometer with Electrospray Ionization (ESI). ESI mass spectra were acquired in positive ion mode with selected ion monitoring of [M+ H]dot plus. The method is rapid, reproducible and the assay specific parameters are listed in a table. A novel, sensitive and specific method for the measurement of PMZ and SIL PMZ in human plasma is reported.

  11. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Isotopic Yttrium-90-Labeled Rare Earth Fluoride Nanocrystals for Multimodal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Paik, Taejong; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Mikitsh, John L; Friedberg, Joseph S; Pryma, Daniel A; Murray, Christopher B

    2015-09-22

    Isotopically labeled nanomaterials have recently attracted much attention in biomedical research, environmental health studies, and clinical medicine because radioactive probes allow the elucidation of in vitro and in vivo cellular transport mechanisms, as well as the unambiguous distribution and localization of nanomaterials in vivo. In addition, nanocrystal-based inorganic materials have a unique capability of customizing size, shape, and composition; with the potential to be designed as multimodal imaging probes. Size and shape of nanocrystals can directly influence interactions with biological systems, hence it is important to develop synthetic methods to design radiolabeled nanocrystals with precise control of size and shape. Here, we report size- and shape-controlled synthesis of rare earth fluoride nanocrystals doped with the β-emitting radioisotope yttrium-90 ((90)Y). Size and shape of nanocrystals are tailored via tight control of reaction parameters and the type of rare earth hosts (e.g., Gd or Y) employed. Radiolabeled nanocrystals are synthesized in high radiochemical yield and purity as well as excellent radiolabel stability in the face of surface modification with different polymeric ligands. We demonstrate the Cerenkov radioluminescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging capabilities of (90)Y-doped GdF3 nanoplates, which offer unique opportunities as a promising platform for multimodal imaging and targeted therapy.

  12. Isotope labeling-based quantitative proteomics of developing seeds of castor oil seed (Ricinus communis L.).

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Fábio C S; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Schwämmle, Veit; Soares, Emanuela L; Soares, Arlete A; Roepstorff, Peter; Domont, Gilberto B; Campos, Francisco A P

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we used a mass spectrometry-based quantification approach employing isotopic (ICPL) and isobaric (iTRAQ) labeling to investigate the pattern of protein deposition during castor oil seed (Ricinus communis L.) development, including that of proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism, seed-storage proteins (SSPs), toxins, and allergens. Additionally, we have used off-line hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) as a step of peptide fractionation preceding the reverse-phase nanoLC coupled to a LTQ Orbitrap. We were able to identify a total of 1875 proteins, and from these 1748 could be mapped to extant castor gene models, considerably expanding the number of proteins so far identified from developing castor seeds. Cluster validation and statistical analysis resulted in 975 protein trend patterns and the relative abundance of 618 proteins. The results presented in this work give important insights into certain aspects of the biology of castor oil seed development such as carbon flow, anabolism, and catabolism of fatty acid and the pattern of deposition of SSPs, toxins, and allergens such as ricin and 2S albumins. We also found, for the first time, some genes of SSP that are differentially expressed during seed development.

  13. Isotopically labelled compounds in the study of extracellular fluid space in dog bone.

    PubMed

    Khan, R A

    1979-04-01

    The extracellular fluid space in dog bone has been examined using a series of isotopically labelled compounds. Sodium-77 bromide and indium-113m ethylenediaminetetracetic acid were used as extracellular fluid space markers, radioactive water as a total fluid space marker, and potassium-43 chloride to examine the existence of a bone membrane. The clearance of each tracer from bone was monitored for a period of 2h post-injection. Graphical analysis of the clearance curves shows that the number of exponential functions vary depending on the type of tracer used. The fact that a sum of three exponential terms can completely describe each curve indicates that a simple model consisting of three compartments is sufficient to approximate the clearance of these tracers from bone and its associated fluid space. It is concluded that bone consists of an extracellular fluid space, and that this space may well play an important part in the transference of solutes and the mechanisms involved in their localization on the hydroxyapatite crystals of bone.

  14. Measuring the Composition and Stable-Isotope Labeling of Algal Biomass Carbohydrates via Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Brian O; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a method to measure carbohydrate composition and stable-isotope labeling in algal biomass using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The method consists of two-stage hydrochloric acid hydrolysis, followed by chemical derivatization of the released monomer sugars and quantification by GC/MS. Fully (13)C-labeled sugars are used as internal standards for composition analysis. This convenient, reliable, and accurate single-platform workflow offers advantages over existing methods and opens new opportunities to study carbohydrate metabolism of algae under autotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions using metabolic flux analysis and isotopic tracers such as (2)H2O and (13)C-glucose. PMID:27042946

  15. Stable isotope applications in biomolecular structure and mechanisms. A meeting to bring together producers and users of stable-isotope-labeled compounds to assess current and future needs

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Cross, T.A.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Knowledge of biomolecular structure is a prerequisite for understanding biomolecular function, and stable isotopes play an increasingly important role in structure determination of biological molecules. The first Conference on Stable Isotope Applications in Biomolecular Structure and Mechanisms was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 27--31, 1994. More than 120 participants from 8 countries and 44 institutions reviewed significant developments, discussed the most promising applications for stable isotopes, and addressed future needs and challenges. Participants focused on applications of stable isotopes for studies of the structure and function of proteins, peptides, RNA, and DNA. Recent advances in NMR techniques neutron scattering, EPR, and vibrational spectroscopy were highlighted in addition to the production and synthesis of labeled compounds. This volume includes invited speaker and poster presentations as well as a set of reports from discussion panels that focused on the needs of the scientific community and the potential roles of private industry, the National Stable Isotope Resource, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in serving those needs. This is the leading abstract. Individual papers are processed separately for the database.

  16. Stereospecific Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions of Benzylic Ethers with Isotopically-Labeled Grignard Reagents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript we highlight the potential of stereospecific nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions for applications in the pharmaceutical industry. Using an inexpensive and sustainable nickel catalyst, we report a gram-scale Kumada cross-coupling reaction. Reactions are highly stereospecific and proceed with inversion at the benzylic position. We also expand the scope of our reaction to incorporate isotopically labeled substituents. PMID:27458328

  17. Isotope labeled internal standards (ILIS) as a basis for quality control in clinical studies using plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Rezeli, Melinda; Végvári, Akos; Marko-Varga, György; Laurell, Thomas

    2010-04-18

    For clinical proteomic studies, the quality of the biofluid samples such as human blood plasma is extremely important. In this study we have investigated the stability of human plasma samples by spiking stable isotope-labeled peptides into the plasma and monitoring their degradation under different storage conditions. FPA-1, C4A and C3f were synthesized with isotopically labeled amino acids, and used as reference peptides. The mixture of internal calibrants was spiked into plasma at the starting point of investigation, mimicking the time of collection for future biobanking efforts, and their qualitative and quantitative changes were analyzed over time by using both MALDI-MS (LTQ Orbitrap XL) and nanoLC-ESI-MS (LTQ XL ETD). We have found that all three synthetic peptides were stable in plasma at -20 and -80 degrees C during the examined 2-month period. However, different proteolytic degradation profiles of the peptides were observed at room temperature. We anticipate that the use of these isotope-labeled peptides as internal standards (ILIS) provides a quality control for long-term storage and proteomic plasma analysis.

  18. Stable isotope labeling tandem mass spectrometry (SILT): integration with peptide identification and extension to data-dependent scans.

    PubMed

    Elbert, Donald L; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G; Scott, Evan A; Wildsmith, Kristin R; Bateman, Randall J

    2008-10-01

    Quantitation of relative or absolute amounts of proteins by mass spectrometry can be prone to large errors. The use of MS/MS ion intensities and stable isotope labeling, which we term stable isotope labeling tandem mass spectrometry (SILT), decreases the effects of contamination from unrelated compounds. We present a software package (SILTmass) that automates protein identification and quantification by the SILT method. SILTmass has the ability to analyze the kinetics of protein turnover, in addition to relative and absolute protein quantitation. Instead of extracting chromatograms to find elution peaks, SILTmass uses only scans in which a peptide is identified and that meet an ion intensity threshold. Using only scans with identified peptides, the accuracy and precision of SILT is shown to be superior to precursor ion intensities, particularly at high or low dilutions of the isotope labeled compounds or with low amounts of protein. Using example scans, we demonstrate likely reasons for the improvements in quantitation by SILT. The appropriate use of variable modifications in peptide identification is described for measurement of protein turnover kinetics. The combination of identification with SILT facilitates quantitation without peak detection and helps to ensure the appropriate use of variable modifications for kinetics experiments.

  19. A device for single leaf labelling with CO2 isotopes to study carbon allocation and partitioning in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant biomass consists primarily of carbohydrates derived from photosynthesis. Monitoring the assimilation of carbon via the Calvin-Benson cycle and its subsequent utilisation is fundamental to understanding plant growth. The use of stable and radioactive carbon isotopes, supplied to plants as CO2, allows the measurement of fluxes through the intermediates of primary photosynthetic metabolism, long-distance transport of sugars in the vasculature, and the synthesis of structural and storage components. Results Here we describe the design of a system for supplying isotopically labelled CO2 to single leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that the system works well using short pulses of 14CO2 and that it can be used to produce robust qualitative and quantitative data about carbon export from source leaves to the sink tissues, such as the developing leaves and the roots. Time course experiments show the dynamics of carbon partitioning between storage as starch, local production of biomass, and export of carbon to sink tissues. Conclusion This isotope labelling method is relatively simple to establish and inexpensive to perform. Our use of 14CO2 helps establish the temporal and spatial allocation of assimilated carbon during plant growth, delivering data complementary to those obtained in recent studies using 13CO2 and MS-based metabolomics techniques. However, we emphasise that this labelling device could also be used effectively in combination with 13CO2 and MS-based techniques. PMID:24252607

  20. Intracellular Isotope Localization in Ammonia sp. (Foraminifera) of Oxygen-Depleted Environments: Results of Nitrate and Sulfate Labeling Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Nomaki, Hidetaka; Bernhard, Joan M.; Ishida, Akizumi; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Kitahashi, Tomo; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Toyofuku, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some benthic foraminiferal species are reportedly capable of nitrate storage and denitrification, however, little is known about nitrate incorporation and subsequent utilization of nitrate within their cell. In this study, we investigated where and how much 15N or 34S were assimilated into foraminiferal cells or possible endobionts after incubation with isotopically labeled nitrate and sulfate in dysoxic or anoxic conditions. After 2 weeks of incubation, foraminiferal specimens were fixed and prepared for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and correlative nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analyses. TEM observations revealed that there were characteristic ultrastructural features typically near the cell periphery in the youngest two or three chambers of the foraminifera exposed to anoxic conditions. These structures, which are electron dense and ~200–500 nm in diameter and co-occurred with possible endobionts, were labeled with 15N originated from 15N-labeled nitrate under anoxia and were labeled with both 15N and 34S under dysoxia. The labeling with 15N was more apparent in specimens from the dysoxic incubation, suggesting higher foraminiferal activity or increased availability of the label during exposure to oxygen depletion than to anoxia. Our results suggest that the electron dense bodies in Ammonia sp. play a significant role in nitrate incorporation and/or subsequent nitrogen assimilation during exposure to dysoxic to anoxic conditions. PMID:26925038

  1. Intracellular Isotope Localization in Ammonia sp. (Foraminifera) of Oxygen-Depleted Environments: Results of Nitrate and Sulfate Labeling Experiments.

    PubMed

    Nomaki, Hidetaka; Bernhard, Joan M; Ishida, Akizumi; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Kitahashi, Tomo; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Toyofuku, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Some benthic foraminiferal species are reportedly capable of nitrate storage and denitrification, however, little is known about nitrate incorporation and subsequent utilization of nitrate within their cell. In this study, we investigated where and how much (15)N or (34)S were assimilated into foraminiferal cells or possible endobionts after incubation with isotopically labeled nitrate and sulfate in dysoxic or anoxic conditions. After 2 weeks of incubation, foraminiferal specimens were fixed and prepared for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and correlative nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analyses. TEM observations revealed that there were characteristic ultrastructural features typically near the cell periphery in the youngest two or three chambers of the foraminifera exposed to anoxic conditions. These structures, which are electron dense and ~200-500 nm in diameter and co-occurred with possible endobionts, were labeled with (15)N originated from (15)N-labeled nitrate under anoxia and were labeled with both (15)N and (34)S under dysoxia. The labeling with (15)N was more apparent in specimens from the dysoxic incubation, suggesting higher foraminiferal activity or increased availability of the label during exposure to oxygen depletion than to anoxia. Our results suggest that the electron dense bodies in Ammonia sp. play a significant role in nitrate incorporation and/or subsequent nitrogen assimilation during exposure to dysoxic to anoxic conditions. PMID:26925038

  2. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca(2+) on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26902947

  3. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca2+ on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology.

  4. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca(2+) on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. Stable Isotope Labeled n-Alkanes to Assess Digesta Passage Kinetics through the Digestive Tract of Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Daniel; Ferreira, Luis M. M.; Breuer, Michel J. H.; Dijkstra, Jan; Pellikaan, Wilbert F.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the use of carbon stable isotope (13C) labeled n-alkanes as a potential internal tracer to assess passage kinetics of ingested nutrients in ruminants. Plant cuticular n-alkanes originating from intrinsically 13C labeled ryegrass plants were pulse dosed intraruminally in four rumen-cannulated lactating dairy cows receiving four contrasting ryegrass silage treatments that differed in nitrogen fertilization level (45 or 90 kg nitrogen ha−1) and maturity (early or late). Passage kinetics through the gastrointestinal tract were derived from the δ13C (i.e. the ratio 13C:12C) in apparently undigested fecal material. Isotopic enrichment was observed in a wide range of long-chain n-alkanes (C27–C36) and passage kinetics were determined for the most abundant C29, C31 and C33 n-alkanes, for which a sufficiently high response signal was detected by combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Basal diet treatment and carbon chain length of n-alkanes did not affect fractional passage rates from the rumen (K1) among individual n-alkanes (3.71–3.95%/h). Peak concentration time and transit time showed a quantitatively small, significant (p≤0.002) increase with carbon chain length. K1 estimates were comparable to those of the 13C labeled digestible dry matter fraction (3.38%/h; r = 0.61 to 0.71; p≤0.012). A literature review has shown that n-alkanes are not fermented by microorganisms in the rumen and affirms no preferential depletion of 13C versus 12C. Our results suggest that 13C labeled n-alkanes can be used as nutrient passage tracers and support the reliability of the δ13C signature of digestible feed nutrients as a tool to measure nutrient-specific passage kinetics. PMID:24124493

  6. Site-specific Orientation of an α-helical Peptide Ovispirin-1 from Isotope Labeled SFG Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bei; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Liu, Yuwei; Wang, Pengrui; Zanni, Martin T.; Chen, Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is often used to probe the backbone structures and orientations of polypeptides at surfaces. Using the ovispirin-1 polypeptide at the solid/liquid interface of polystyrene, we demonstrate for the first time that SFG can probe the polarization response of a single isotope labeled residue. To interpret the spectral intensities, we simulated the spectra using an excitonic Hamiltonian approach. We show that the polarization dependence of either the label or the unlabeled amide I band alone does not provide sufficient structural constraints to obtain both the tilt and the twist of the ovispirin helix at a solid/liquid interface, but that both can be determined from the polarization dependence of the complete spectrum. For ovispirin, the detailed analysis of the polarized SFG experimental data shows that the helix axis is tilted at roughly 138 degrees from the surface normal, and the transition dipole of the isotope labeled C=O group is tilted at 23 degrees from the surface normal, with the hydrophobic region facing the polystyrene surface. We further demonstrated that the Hamiltonian approach is able to address the coupling effect and the structural disorder. For comparison, we also collected the FTIR spectrum of ovispirin under similar conditions, which reveals the enhanced sensitivity of SFG for structural studies of single monolayer peptide surfaces. Our study provides insight into how structural and environmental effects appear in SFG spectra of the amide I band and establishes that SFG of isotope labeled peptides will be a powerful technique for elucidating secondary structures with residue-by-residue resolution. PMID:24228619

  7. Efficient isotope separation by single-photon atomic sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Jerkins, M.; Chavez, I.; Raizen, M. G.; Even, U.

    2010-09-15

    We propose a general and scalable approach to isotope separation. The method is based on an irreversible change of the mass-to-magnetic moment ratio of a particular isotope in an atomic beam, followed by a magnetic multipole whose gradients deflect and guide the atoms. The underlying mechanism is a reduction of the entropy of the beam by the information of a single scattered photon for each atom that is separated. We numerically simulate isotope separation for a range of examples, which demonstrate this technique's general applicability to almost the entire periodic table. The practical importance of the proposed method is that large-scale isotope separation should be possible, using ordinary inexpensive magnets and the existing technologies of supersonic beams and lasers.

  8. Heterologous expression of Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) in Pichia pastoris system: Purification, isotopic labeling and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Gil, Dayrom F; González-González, Yamile; Mansur, Manuel; Camejo, Ayamey; Pires, José R; Alonso-Del-Rivero Antigua, Maday

    2016-10-01

    Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) is a tight-binding serine protease inhibitor of the Kazal family with an atypical broad specificity, being active against several proteases such as bovine pancreatic trypsin, human neutrophil elastase and subtilisin A. CmPI-II 3D structures are necessary for understanding the molecular basis of its activity. In the present work, we describe an efficient and straightforward recombinant expression strategy, as well as a cost-effective procedure for isotope labeling for NMR structure determination purposes. The vector pCM101 containing the CmPI-II gene, under the control of Pichia pastoris AOX1 promoter was constructed. Methylotrophic Pichia pastoris strain KM71H was then transformed with the plasmid and the recombinant protein (rCmPI-II) was expressed in benchtop fermenter in unlabeled or (15)N-labeled forms using ammonium chloride ((15)N, 99%) as the sole nitrogen source. Protein purification was accomplished by sequential cation exchange chromatography in STREAMLINE DirectHST, anion exchange chromatography on Hitrap Q-Sepharose FF and gel filtration on Superdex 75 10/30, yielding high quantities of pure rCmPI-II and (15)N rCmPI-II. Recombinant proteins displayed similar functional features as compared to the natural inhibitor and NMR spectra indicated folded and homogeneously labeled samples, suitable for further studies of structure and protease-inhibitor interactions. PMID:27353494

  9. Heterologous expression of Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) in Pichia pastoris system: Purification, isotopic labeling and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Gil, Dayrom F; González-González, Yamile; Mansur, Manuel; Camejo, Ayamey; Pires, José R; Alonso-Del-Rivero Antigua, Maday

    2016-10-01

    Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) is a tight-binding serine protease inhibitor of the Kazal family with an atypical broad specificity, being active against several proteases such as bovine pancreatic trypsin, human neutrophil elastase and subtilisin A. CmPI-II 3D structures are necessary for understanding the molecular basis of its activity. In the present work, we describe an efficient and straightforward recombinant expression strategy, as well as a cost-effective procedure for isotope labeling for NMR structure determination purposes. The vector pCM101 containing the CmPI-II gene, under the control of Pichia pastoris AOX1 promoter was constructed. Methylotrophic Pichia pastoris strain KM71H was then transformed with the plasmid and the recombinant protein (rCmPI-II) was expressed in benchtop fermenter in unlabeled or (15)N-labeled forms using ammonium chloride ((15)N, 99%) as the sole nitrogen source. Protein purification was accomplished by sequential cation exchange chromatography in STREAMLINE DirectHST, anion exchange chromatography on Hitrap Q-Sepharose FF and gel filtration on Superdex 75 10/30, yielding high quantities of pure rCmPI-II and (15)N rCmPI-II. Recombinant proteins displayed similar functional features as compared to the natural inhibitor and NMR spectra indicated folded and homogeneously labeled samples, suitable for further studies of structure and protease-inhibitor interactions.

  10. High-Performance Chemical Isotope Labeling Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Profiling the Metabolomic Reprogramming Elicited by Ammonium Limitation in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xian; Zhao, Shuang; Huan, Tao; Sun, Difei; Friis, R Magnus N; Schultz, Michael C; Li, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Information about how yeast metabolism is rewired in response to internal and external cues can inform the development of metabolic engineering strategies for food, fuel, and chemical production in this organism. We report a new metabolomics workflow for the characterization of such metabolic rewiring. The workflow combines efficient cell lysis without using chemicals that may interfere with downstream sample analysis and differential chemical isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (CIL LC-MS) for in-depth yeast metabolome profiling. Using (12)C- and (13)C-dansylation (Dns) labeling to analyze the amine/phenol submetabolome, we detected and quantified a total of 5719 peak pairs or metabolites. Among them, 120 metabolites were positively identified using a library of 275 Dns-metabolite standards, and 2980 metabolites were putatively identified based on accurate mass matches to metabolome databases. We also applied (12)C- and (13)C-dimethylaminophenacyl (DmPA) labeling to profile the carboxylic acid submetabolome and detected over 2286 peak pairs, from which 33 metabolites were positively identified using a library of 188 DmPA-metabolite standards, and 1595 metabolites were putatively identified. Using this workflow for metabolomic profiling of cells challenged by ammonium limitation revealed unexpected links between ammonium assimilation and pantothenate accumulation that might be amenable to engineering for better acetyl-CoA production in yeast. We anticipate that efforts to improve other schemes of metabolic engineering will benefit from application of this workflow to multiple cell types. PMID:26947805

  11. Optimized small molecule antibody labeling efficiency through continuous flow centrifugal diafiltration.

    PubMed

    Cappione, Amedeo; Mabuchi, Masaharu; Briggs, David; Nadler, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Protein immuno-detection encompasses a broad range of analytical methodologies, including western blotting, flow cytometry, and microscope-based applications. These assays which detect, quantify, and/or localize expression for one or more proteins in complex biological samples, are reliant upon fluorescent or enzyme-tagged target-specific antibodies. While small molecule labeling kits are available with a range of detection moieties, the workflow is hampered by a requirement for multiple dialysis-based buffer exchange steps that are both time-consuming and subject to sample loss. In a previous study, we briefly described an alternative method for small-scale protein labeling with small molecule dyes whereby all phases of the conjugation workflow could be performed in a single centrifugal diafiltration device. Here, we expand on this foundational work addressing functionality of the device at each step in the workflow (sample cleanup, labeling, unbound dye removal, and buffer exchange/concentration) and the implications for optimizing labeling efficiency. When compared to other common buffer exchange methodologies, centrifugal diafiltration offered superior performance as measured by four key parameters (process time, desalting capacity, protein recovery, retain functional integrity). Originally designed for resin-based affinity purification, the device also provides a platform for up-front antibody purification or albumin carrier removal. Most significantly, by exploiting the rapid kinetics of NHS-based labeling reactions, the process of continuous diafiltration minimizes reaction time and long exposure to excess dye, guaranteeing maximal target labeling while limiting the risks associated with over-labeling. Overall, the device offers a simplified workflow with reduced processing time and hands-on requirements, without sacrificing labeling efficiency, final yield, or conjugate performance.

  12. Energy Efficiency Standards and Labels in North America: Opportunities for Harmonization

    SciTech Connect

    Vanwiemcgrory, Laura; Wiel, Stephen; Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Harrington, Lloyd

    2002-05-16

    To support the North American Energy Working Group's Expert Group on Energy Efficiency (NAEWG-EE), USDOE commissioned the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP) to prepare a resource document comparing current standards, labels, and test procedure regulations in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The resulting document reached the following conclusions: Out of 24 energy-using products for which at least one of the three countries has energy efficiency regulations, three products -- refrigerators/freezers, split system central air conditioners, and room air conditioners -- have similar or identical minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) in the three countries. These same three products, as well as three-phase motors, have similar or identical test procedures throughout the region. There are 10 products with different MEPS and test procedures, but which have the short-term potential to develop common test procedures, MEPS, and/or labels. Three other noteworthy areas where possible energy efficiency initiatives have potential for harmonization are standby losses, uniform endorsement labels, and a new standard or label on windows. This paper explains these conclusions and presents the underlying comparative data.

  13. Development And Evaluation Of Stable Isotope And Fluorescent Labeling And Detection Methodologies For Tracking Injected Bacteria During In Situ Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Mark E. Fuller; Tullis C. Onstott

    2003-12-17

    This report summarizes the results of a research project conducted to develop new methods to label bacterial cells so that they could be tracked and enumerated as they move in the subsurface after they are introduced into the groundwater (i.e., during bioaugmentation). Labeling methods based on stable isotopes of carbon (13C) and vital fluorescent stains were developed. Both approaches proved successful with regards to the ability to effectively label bacterial cells. Several methods for enumeration of fluorescently-labeled cells were developed and validated, including near-real time microplate spectrofluorometry that could be performed in the field. However, the development of a novel enumeration method for the 13C-enriched cells, chemical reaction interface/mass spectrometry (CRIMS), was not successful due to difficulties with the proposed instrumentation. Both labeling methodologies were successfully evaluated and validated during laboratory- and field-scale bacterial transport experiments. The methods developed during this research should be useful for future bacterial transport work as well as other microbial ecology research in a variety of environments. A full bibliography of research articles and meeting presentations related to this project is included (including web links to abstracts and full text reprints).

  14. Nic1 inactivation enables stable isotope labeling with 13C615N4-arginine in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Carpy, Alejandro; Patel, Avinash; Tay, Ye Dee; Hagan, Iain M; Macek, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids (SILAC) is a commonly used method in quantitative proteomics. Because of compatibility with trypsin digestion, arginine and lysine are the most widely used amino acids for SILAC labeling. We observed that Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) cannot be labeled with a specific form of arginine, (13)C(6) (15)N(4)-arginine (Arg-10), which limits the exploitation of SILAC technology in this model organism. We hypothesized that in the fission yeast the guanidinium group of (13)C(6) (15)N(4)-arginine is catabolized by arginase and urease activity to (15)N1-labeled ammonia that is used as a precursor for general amino acid biosynthesis. We show that disruption of Ni(2+)-dependent urease activity, through deletion of the sole Ni(2+) transporter Nic1, blocks this recycling in ammonium-supplemented EMMG medium to enable (13)C(6) (15)N(4)-arginine labeling for SILAC strategies in S. pombe. Finally, we employed Arg-10 in a triple-SILAC experiment to perform quantitative comparison of G1 + S, M, and G2 cell cycle phases in S. pombe.

  15. Probing in Vivo Metabolism by Stable Isotope Labeling of Storage Lipids and Proteins in Developing Brassica napus Embryos1

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, Jörg; Ohlrogge, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Developing embryos of Brassica napus accumulate both triacylglycerols and proteins as major storage reserves. To evaluate metabolic fluxes during embryo development, we have established conditions for stable isotope labeling of cultured embryos under steady-state conditions. Sucrose supplied via the endosperm is considered to be the main carbon and energy source for seed metabolism. However, in addition to 220 to 270 mm carbohydrates (sucrose, glucose, and fructose), analysis of endosperm liquid revealed up to 70 mm amino acids as well as 6 to 15 mm malic acid. Therefore, a labeling approach with multiple carbon sources is a precondition to quantitatively reflect fluxes of central carbon metabolism in developing embryos. Mid-cotyledon stage B. napus embryos were dissected from plants and cultured for 15 d on a complex liquid medium containing 13C-labeled carbohydrates. The 13C enrichment of fatty acids and amino acids (after hydrolysis of the seed proteins) was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Analysis of 13C isotope isomers of labeled fatty acids and plastid-derived amino acids indicated that direct glycolysis provides at least 90% of precursors of plastid acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Unlabeled amino acids, when added to the growth medium, did not reduce incorporation of 13C label into plastid-formed fatty acids, but substantially diluted 13C label in seed protein. Approximately 30% of carbon in seed protein was derived from exogenous amino acids and as a consequence, the use of amino acids as a carbon source may have significant influence on the total carbon and energy balance in seed metabolism. 13C label in the terminal acetate units of C20 and C22 fatty acids that derive from cytosolic acetyl-CoA was also significantly diluted by unlabeled amino acids. We conclude that cytosolic acetyl-CoA has a more complex biogenetic origin than plastidic acetyl-CoA. Malic acid in the growth medium did not dilute 13C label incorporation into fatty acids or

  16. Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

    2001-02-16

    Energy-performance improvements in consumer products are an essential element in any government's portfolio of energy-efficiency and climate change mitigation programs. Governments need to develop balanced programs, both voluntary and regulatory, that remove cost-ineffective, energy-wasting products from the marketplace and stimulate the development of cost-effective, energy-efficient technology. Energy-efficiency labels and standards for appliances, equipment, and lighting products deserve to be among the first policy tools considered by a country's energy policy makers. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Foundation (UNF) recognize the need to support policy makers in their efforts to implement energy-efficiency standards and labeling programs and have developed this guidebook, together with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP), as a primary reference. This guidebook was prepared over the course of the past year with significant contribution from the authors and reviewers mentioned previously. Their diligent participation has made this the international guidance tool it was intended to be. The lead authors would also like to thank the following individuals for their support in the development, production, and distribution of the guidebook: Marcy Beck, Elisa Derby, Diana Dhunke, Ted Gartner, and Julie Osborn of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as well as Anthony Ma of Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. This guidebook is designed as a manual for government officials and others around the world responsible for developing, implementing, enforcing, monitoring, and maintaining labeling and standards-setting programs. It discusses the pros and cons of adopting energy-efficiency labels and standards and describes the data, facilities, and institutional and human resources needed for these programs. It provides guidance on the design, development, implementation, maintenance, and evaluation of the programs

  17. Individuality Normalization when Labeling with Isotopic Glycan Hydrazide Tags (INLIGHT): A Novel Glycan-Relative Quantification Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. Hunter; Taylor, Amber D.; Muddiman, David C.

    2013-09-01

    The Individuality Normalization when Labeling with Isotopic Glycan Hydrazide Tags (INLIGHT) strategy for the sample preparation, data analysis, and relative quantification of N-linked glycans is presented. Glycans are derivatized with either natural (L) or stable-isotope labeled (H) hydrazide reagents and analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled online to a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. A simple glycan ladder, maltodextrin, is first used to demonstrate the relative quantification strategy in samples with negligible analytical and biological variability. It is shown that after a molecular weight correction attributable to isotopic overlap and a post-acquisition normalization of the data to account for any systematic bias, a plot of the experimental H:L ratio versus the calculated H:L ratio exhibits a correlation of unity for maltodextrin samples mixed in different ratios. We also demonstrate that the INLIGHT approach can quantify species over four orders of magnitude in ion abundance. The INLIGHT strategy is further demonstrated in pooled human plasma, where it is shown that the post-acquisition normalization is more effective than using a single spiked-in internal standard. Finally, changes in glycosylation are able to be detected in complex biological matrices, when spiked with a glycoprotein. The ability to spike in a glycoprotein and detect change at the glycan level validates both the sample preparation and data analysis strategy, making INLIGHT an invaluable relative quantification strategy for the field of glycomics.

  18. Phenotyping hepatocellular metabolism using uniformly labeled carbon-13 molecular probes and LC-HRMS stable isotope tracing.

    PubMed

    Meissen, John K; Pirman, David A; Wan, Min; Miller, Emily; Jatkar, Aditi; Miller, Russell; Steenwyk, Rick C; Blatnik, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Metabolite stable isotope tracing is a powerful bioanalytical strategy that has the potential to unravel phenotypic markers of early pharmaceutical efficacy by monitoring enzymatic incorporation of carbon-13 atoms into targeted pathways over time. The practice of probing biological systems with carbon-13 labeled molecules using broad MS-based screens has been utilized for many years in academic laboratories but has had limited application in the pharmaceutical R&D environment. The goal of this work was to establish a LCMS analytical workflow that was capable of monitoring carbon-13 isotope changes in glycolysis, the TCA and urea cycles, and non-essential amino acid metabolism. This work applies a standardized protein precipitation with 80% cold methanol and two distinct reverse-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography methods coupled to either a positive- or negative-ion mode high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry screening method. The data herein combines thousands of single-point peak integrations into a novel metabolite network map as a visualization aid to probe and monitor stable isotope incorporation in murine hepatocytes using uniformly labeled (13)C6 glucose, (13)C3 lactate, and (13)C5 glutamine. This work also demonstrates that nitrogen metabolism may have a large influence on the TCA cycle and gluconeogenic carbon fluxes in hepatocyte cell culture. PMID:27343766

  19. Stable isotope-labeled collagen: a novel and versatile tool for quantitative collagen analyses using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taga, Yuki; Kusubata, Masashi; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Shunji

    2014-08-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in animals and are involved in many physiological/pathological events. Although various methods have been used to quantify collagen and its post-translational modifications (PTMs) over the years, it is still difficult to accurately quantify type-specific collagen and minor collagen PTMs. We report a novel quantitative method targeting collagen using stable isotope-labeled collagen named "SI-collagen", which was labeled with isotopically heavy lysine, arginine, and proline in fibroblasts culture. We prepared highly labeled and purified SI-collagen for use as an internal standard in mass spectrometric analysis, particularly for a new approach using amino acid hydrolysis. Our method enabled accurate collagen analyses, including quantification of (1) type-specific collagen (types I and III in this paper), (2) total collagen, and (3) collagen PTMs by LC-MS with high sensitivity. SI-collagen is also applicable to other diverse analyses of collagen and can be a powerful tool for various studies, such as detailed investigation of collagen-related disorders.

  20. Determining the Composition and Stability of Protein Complexes Using an Integrated Label-Free and Stable Isotope Labeling Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Todd M.; Guise, Amanda J.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2016-01-01

    In biological systems, proteins catalyze the fundamental reactions that underlie all cellular functions, including metabolic processes and cell survival and death pathways. These biochemical reactions are rarely accomplished alone. Rather, they involve a concerted effect from many proteins that may operate in a directed signaling pathway and/or may physically associate in a complex to achieve a specific enzymatic activity. Therefore, defining the composition and regulation of protein complexes is critical for understanding cellular functions. In this chapter, we describe an approach that uses quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) to assess the specificity and the relative stability of protein interactions. Isolation of protein complexes from mammalian cells is performed by rapid immunoaffinity purification, and followed by in-solution digestion and high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis. We employ complementary quantitative MS workflows to assess the specificity of protein interactions using label-free MS and statistical analysis, and the relative stability of the interactions using a metabolic labeling technique. For each candidate protein interaction, scores from the two workflows can be correlated to minimize nonspecific background and profile protein complex composition and relative stability. PMID:26867737

  1. Status of China's Energy Efficiency Standards and Labels for Appliances and International Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan

    2008-03-01

    China first adopted minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) in 1989. Today, there are standards for a wide range of domestic, commercial and selected industrial equipment. In 1999, China launched a voluntary endorsement label, which has grown to cover over 40 products including water-saving products (See Figure 1). Further, in 2005, China started a mandatory energy information label (also referred to as the 'Energy Label'). Today, the Energy Label is applied to four products including: air conditioners; household refrigerators; clothes washers; and unitary air conditioners (See Figure 2). MEPS and the voluntary endorsement labeling specifications have been updated and revised in order to reflect technology improvements to those products in the market. These programs have had an important impact in reducing energy consumption of appliances in China. Indeed, China has built up a strong infrastructure to develop and implement product standards. Historically, however, the government's primary focus has been on the technical requirements for efficiency performance. Less attention has been paid to monitoring and enforcement with a minimal commitment of resources and little expansion of administrative capacity in this area. Thus, market compliance with both mandatory standards and labeling programs has been questionable and actual energy savings may have been undermined as a result. The establishment of a regularized monitoring system for tracking compliance with the mandatory standard and energy information label in China is a major area for program improvement. Over the years, the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP) has partnered with several Chinese institutions to promote energy-efficient products in China. CLASP, together with its implementing partner Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), has assisted China in developing and updating the above-mentioned standards and labeling programs. Because of the increasing need for the

  2. Phosphorus use efficiency by cotton measured through 32P isotope technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcante, N. C.; Muraoka, T.; Camacho, M. A.; César, F. R. C. F.; Bruno, I. P.

    2012-04-01

    Deficiency of phosphorus (P) is the major limitation to agricultural production in the Brazilian Savannah (Cerrado), which is naturally poor in this nutrient. Most of the P applied by fertilizer in Cerrado soils are converted into low solubility forms and can not be easily absorbed by plants. This occurs for characteristics of adsorption, conditioned by the predominance of low pH and aluminum and iron oxides in the clay fraction. The development of genotypes and cultivars with greater capacity to grow up in soils with low P availability ('phosphorus efficiency') is interesting to improve the agriculture in these areas in a sustainable way. Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is the main product for the fibers used nationally and globally in the textile chain. This study aim was to evaluate the efficiency of absorption and utilization of P by cotton cultivars/genotypes grown in Cerrado soil by the isotopic dilution technique. The soil classified as Ultisols, was labeled with the radioisotope 32P.The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse in a completely randomized design factorial 2 x 17. Factors were considered two levels of P (insufficient = 20 mg kg-1 and sufficient = 120 mg kg-1) and 17 genetic materials of cotton recommended for Cerrado region. Phosphorus levels influenced significantly the shoots dry matter production, the P content and accumulation, the 32P specific activity, the L value and L value less seed cotton P by cultivars and genotypes. The hierarchical clustering analysis used to verify the similarities between the cultivars and genotypes of cotton, classified them into internally homogeneous groups and heterogeneous between different groups. Cultivars FMT 523, FM 910 and CNPA GO 2043 were the most responsive to phosphate fertilizer in sufficient level of P, while the genotype Barbadense 01 and cultivars FM 966LL, IPR Jataí, BRS Aroeira and BRS Buriti were most efficient absorbing P in soils with insufficient level.

  3. CK-LPA: Efficient community detection algorithm based on label propagation with community kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhen; Zheng, Xiaolin; Xin, Nan; Chen, Deren

    2014-12-01

    With the rapid development of Web 2.0 and the rise of online social networks, finding community structures from user data has become a hot topic in network analysis. Although research achievements are numerous at present, most of these achievements cannot be adopted in large-scale social networks because of heavy computation. Previous studies have shown that label propagation is an efficient means to detect communities in social networks and is easy to implement; however, some drawbacks, such as low accuracy, high randomness, and the formation of a “monster” community, have been found. In this study, we propose an efficient community detection method based on the label propagation algorithm (LPA) with community kernel (CK-LPA). We assign a corresponding weight to each node according to node importance in the whole network and update node labels in sequence based on weight. Then, we discuss the composition of weights, the label updating strategy, the label propagation strategy, and the convergence conditions. Compared with the primitive LPA, existing drawbacks are solved by CK-LPA. Experiments and benchmarks reveal that our proposed method sustains nearly linear time complexity and exhibits significant improvements in the quality aspect of static community detection. Hence, the algorithm can be applied in large-scale social networks.

  4. Carbon Allocation of 13CO2-labeled Photoassimilate in Larix gmelinii Saplings - A Physiological Basis for Isotope Dendroclimatology in Eastern Siberia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, A.; Sugimoto, A.; Maximov, T. C.

    2006-12-01

    Tree-ring density and widths have been successfully used to reconstruct summer temperatures in high- northern latitudes, although a discrepancy between tree-growth and temperature has been found for recent decades. The so-called "reduced sensitivity" of tree rings to summer temperatures has been observed especially strongly in northern Siberia (Briffa et al., 1998) and drought stress (increased water use efficiency) arose from global warming and/or increasing CO2 are suggested as causes (Barber et al. 2000, Saurer et al. 2004). By using carbon isotope ratio as an indicator of drought stress and ring-width/density as indicators of growth, we can clarify how drought stress caused by recent global warming affects wood formation of Siberian trees. However, isotope dendroclimatology is still in its infancy and our understanding of basic physiological processes of isotope signal transfer from leaves to tree rings is insufficient. In order to understand translocation, storage, and allocation of photoassimilate to different organs of trees, we pulse- labeled ten L. gmelinii growing in a continuous permafrost zone with stable 13CO2. We studied seasonal course of carbon allocation patterns of photoassimilate among needles, branches, stem and roots and also how spring, summer, and autumn photoassimilate is later used for both earlywood and latewood formation. About half of the carbon in new needles was derived from stored material. The starch pool in non- needle parts, which can be used for xylem formation, drew about 43 percent of its carbon from previous year's photoassimilate, suggesting that carbon storage is the key mechanism behind autocorrelation in (isotope) dendroclimatology. Analysis of intra-annual 13C of the tree rings formed after the labeling revealed that earlywood contained photoassimilate from the previous summer and autumn as well as from the current spring. Latewood was mainly composed of photoassimilate from the current year's summer/autumn, although it

  5. Metabolic labeling with stable isotope nitrogen (15N) to follow amino acid and protein turnover of three plastid proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The length of time that a protein remains available to perform its function is significantly influenced by its turnover rate. Knowing the turnover rate of proteins involved in different processes is important to determining how long a function might progress even when the stimulus has been removed and no further synthesis of the particular proteins occurs. In this article, we describe the use of 15N-metabolic labeling coupled to GC-MS to follow the turnover of free amino acids and LC-MS/MS to identify and LC-MS to follow the turnover of specific proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Results To achieve the metabolic labeling, the growth medium was formulated with standard Tris acetate phosphate medium (TAP) in which14NH4Cl was replaced with 15NH415NO3 and (14NH4)6Mo7O24.4H2O was replaced with Na2MoO4.2H2O. This medium designated 15N-TAP allowed CC-125 algal cells to grow normally. Mass isotopic distribution revealed successful 15N incorporation into 13 amino acids with approximately 98% labeling efficiency. Tryptic digestion of the 55 kDa SDS-PAGE bands from 14N- and 15N-labeled crude algal protein extracts followed by LC-MS/MS resulted in the identification of 27 proteins. Of these, five displayed peptide sequence confidence levels greater than 95% and protein sequence coverage greater than 25%. These proteins were the RuBisCo large subunit, ATP synthase CF1 alpha and beta subunits, the mitochondrial protein (F1F0 ATP synthase) and the cytosolic protein (S-adenosyl homocysteine hydroxylase). These proteins were present in both labeled and unlabeled samples. Once the newly synthesized 15N-labeled free amino acids and proteins obtained maximum incorporation of the 15N-label, turnover rates were determined after transfer of cells into 14N-TAP medium. The t½ values were determined for the three plastid proteins (RuBisCo, ATP synthase CF1 alpha and beta) by following the reduction of the 15N-fractional abundance over time. Conclusion We describe a more

  6. Sensitive, Efficient Quantitation of 13C-Enriched Nucleic Acids via Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Applications in Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Roland; Szeitz, András; Klassen, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool for studying the functional traits of microbial populations within complex communities, but SIP involves a number of technical challenges. Many of the difficulties in DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments can be effectively overcome with an efficient, sensitive method for quantitating the isotopic enrichment of nucleic acids. Here, we present a sensitive method for quantitating 13C enrichment of nucleic acids, requiring a few nanograms of sample, and we demonstrate its utility in typical DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments. All five nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) were separated and detected by using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. We detected all isotopic species in samples with as low as 1.5 atom% 13C above natural abundance, using 1-ng loadings. Quantitation was used to characterize the isotopic enrichment kinetics of cellulose- and lignin-based microcosm experiments and to optimize the recovery of enriched nucleic acids. Application of our method will minimize the quantity of expensive isotopically labeled substrates required and reduce the risk of failed experiments due to insufficient recovery of labeled nucleic acids for sequencing library preparation. PMID:25217022

  7. Sensitive, Efficient Quantitation of 13C-Enriched Nucleic Acids via Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Applications in Stable Isotope Probing.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Roland; Szeitz, András; Klassen, Tara L; Mohn, William W

    2014-12-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool for studying the functional traits of microbial populations within complex communities, but SIP involves a number of technical challenges. Many of the difficulties in DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments can be effectively overcome with an efficient, sensitive method for quantitating the isotopic enrichment of nucleic acids. Here, we present a sensitive method for quantitating (13)C enrichment of nucleic acids, requiring a few nanograms of sample, and we demonstrate its utility in typical DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments. All five nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) were separated and detected by using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We detected all isotopic species in samples with as low as 1.5 atom% (13)C above natural abundance, using 1-ng loadings. Quantitation was used to characterize the isotopic enrichment kinetics of cellulose- and lignin-based microcosm experiments and to optimize the recovery of enriched nucleic acids. Application of our method will minimize the quantity of expensive isotopically labeled substrates required and reduce the risk of failed experiments due to insufficient recovery of labeled nucleic acids for sequencing library preparation.

  8. Stable isotope-labeled vitamin D, metabolites and chemical analogs: Synthesis and use in mass spectrometric studies

    SciTech Connect

    Coldwell, R.D.; Trafford, D.J.; Varley, M.J.; Kirk, D.N.; Makin, H.L. )

    1990-10-01

    Methods for the measurement of vitamin D and its metabolites using stable isotope-labeled internal standards and mass spectrometry are reviewed. The synthesis of both labeled and unlabeled standards is illustrated, and details of the synthesis of (26,26,27,27,27(-2)H5)-25,26-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and (28,28,28(-2)H3)-24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 are given. The use of in vitro biologic systems for the production of further metabolites of deuterated 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 is discussed. Use of deuterated 25-hydroxydihydrotachysterol3 as a substrate in the isolated perfused rat kidney has provided valuable data for the assignment of structure to a number of metabolites of 25-hydroxydihydrotachysterol3 formed in this system. 51 refs.

  9. Segmental isotope labeling of proteins for NMR structural study using a protein S tag for higher expression and solubility.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Swapna, G V T; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Afinogenova, Yuliya; Conover, Kenith; Mao, Binchen; Montelione, Gaetano T; Inouye, Masayori

    2012-04-01

    A common obstacle to NMR studies of proteins is sample preparation. In many cases, proteins targeted for NMR studies are poorly expressed and/or expressed in insoluble forms. Here, we describe a novel approach to overcome these problems. In the protein S tag-intein (PSTI) technology, two tandem 92-residue N-terminal domains of protein S (PrS(2)) from Myxococcus xanthus is fused at the N-terminal end of a protein to enhance its expression and solubility. Using intein technology, the isotope-labeled PrS(2)-tag is replaced with non-isotope labeled PrS(2)-tag, silencing the NMR signals from PrS(2)-tag in isotope-filtered (1)H-detected NMR experiments. This method was applied to the E. coli ribosome binding factor A (RbfA), which aggregates and precipitates in the absence of a solubilization tag unless the C-terminal 25-residue segment is deleted (RbfAΔ25). Using the PrS(2)-tag, full-length well-behaved RbfA samples could be successfully prepared for NMR studies. PrS(2) (non-labeled)-tagged RbfA (isotope-labeled) was produced with the use of the intein approach. The well-resolved TROSY-HSQC spectrum of full-length PrS(2)-tagged RbfA superimposes with the TROSY-HSQC spectrum of RbfAΔ25, indicating that PrS(2)-tag does not affect the structure of the protein to which it is fused. Using a smaller PrS-tag, consisting of a single N-terminal domain of protein S, triple resonance experiments were performed, and most of the backbone (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments for full-length E. coli RbfA were determined. Analysis of these chemical shift data with the Chemical Shift Index and heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOE measurements reveal the dynamic nature of the C-terminal segment of the full-length RbfA protein, which could not be inferred using the truncated RbfAΔ25 construct. CS-Rosetta calculations also demonstrate that the core structure of full-length RbfA is similar to that of the RbfAΔ25 construct.

  10. Glycation Isotopic Labeling with 13C-Reducing Sugars for Quantitative Analysis of Glycated Proteins in Human Plasma*

    PubMed Central

    Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Scherl, Alexander; Müller, Markus; Waridel, Patrice; Lisacek, Frédérique; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2010-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins is a post-translational modification produced by a reaction between reducing sugars and amino groups located in lysine and arginine residues or in the N-terminal position. This modification plays a relevant role in medicine and food industry. In the clinical field, this undesired role is directly linked to blood glucose concentration and therefore to pathological conditions derived from hyperglycemia (>11 mm glucose) such as diabetes mellitus or renal failure. An approach for qualitative and quantitative analysis of glycated proteins is here proposed to achieve the three information levels for their complete characterization. These are: 1) identification of glycated proteins, 2) elucidation of sugar attachment sites, and 3) quantitative analysis to compare glycemic states. Qualitative analysis was carried out by tandem mass spectrometry after endoproteinase Glu-C digestion and boronate affinity chromatography for isolation of glycated peptides. For this purpose, two MS operational modes were used: higher energy collisional dissociation-MS2 and CID-MS3 by neutral loss scan monitoring of two selective neutral losses (162.05 and 84.04 Da for the glucose cleavage and an intermediate rearrangement of the glucose moiety). On the other hand, quantitative analysis was based on labeling of proteins with [13C6]glucose incubation to evaluate the native glycated proteins labeled with [12C6]glucose. As glycation is chemoselective, it is exclusively occurring in potential targets for in vivo modifications. This approach, named glycation isotopic labeling, enabled differentiation of glycated peptides labeled with both isotopic forms resulting from enzymatic digestion by mass spectrometry (6-Da mass shift/glycation site). The strategy was then applied to a reference plasma sample, revealing the detection of 50 glycated proteins and 161 sugar attachment positions with identification of preferential glycation sites for each protein. A predictive

  11. USE OF OXYGEN-18 ISOTOPE LABELING FOR MEASUREMENT OF OXIDATIVE STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxygen-18 (18-O) labeling provides a sensitive means for quantifying oxygen
    binding that occurs during in vivo oxidations. Oxidants (ozone, nitrogen
    oxides, hydrogen peroxide, etc.) are first synthesized using 18-O, then cells
    or tissues are exposed to the labeled ...

  12. An Efficient Site-Specific Method for Irreversible Covalent Labeling of Proteins with a Fluorophore

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaquan; Hanne, Jeungphill; Britton, Brooke M.; Shoffner, Matthew; Albers, Aaron E.; Bennett, Jared; Zatezalo, Rachel; Barfield, Robyn; Rabuka, David; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Fluorophore labeling of proteins while preserving native functions is essential for bulk Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) interaction and single molecule imaging analysis. Here we describe a versatile, efficient, specific, irreversible, gentle and low-cost method for labeling proteins with fluorophores that appears substantially more robust than a similar but chemically distinct procedure. The method employs the controlled enzymatic conversion of a central Cys to a reactive formylglycine (fGly) aldehyde within a six amino acid Formylglycine Generating Enzyme (FGE) recognition sequence in vitro. The fluorophore is then irreversibly linked to the fGly residue using a Hydrazinyl-Iso-Pictet-Spengler (HIPS) ligation reaction. We demonstrate the robust large-scale fluorophore labeling and purification of E.coli (Ec) mismatch repair (MMR) components. Fluorophore labeling did not alter the native functions of these MMR proteins in vitro or in singulo. Because the FGE recognition sequence is easily portable, FGE-HIPS fluorophore-labeling may be easily extended to other proteins. PMID:26582263

  13. An Efficient Site-Specific Method for Irreversible Covalent Labeling of Proteins with a Fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaquan; Hanne, Jeungphill; Britton, Brooke M; Shoffner, Matthew; Albers, Aaron E; Bennett, Jared; Zatezalo, Rachel; Barfield, Robyn; Rabuka, David; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Fluorophore labeling of proteins while preserving native functions is essential for bulk Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) interaction and single molecule imaging analysis. Here we describe a versatile, efficient, specific, irreversible, gentle and low-cost method for labeling proteins with fluorophores that appears substantially more robust than a similar but chemically distinct procedure. The method employs the controlled enzymatic conversion of a central Cys to a reactive formylglycine (fGly) aldehyde within a six amino acid Formylglycine Generating Enzyme (FGE) recognition sequence in vitro. The fluorophore is then irreversibly linked to the fGly residue using a Hydrazinyl-Iso-Pictet-Spengler (HIPS) ligation reaction. We demonstrate the robust large-scale fluorophore labeling and purification of E.coli (Ec) mismatch repair (MMR) components. Fluorophore labeling did not alter the native functions of these MMR proteins in vitro or in singulo. Because the FGE recognition sequence is easily portable, FGE-HIPS fluorophore-labeling may be easily extended to other proteins. PMID:26582263

  14. Hydrogen release kinetics during reactive magnetron sputter depostion of a-Si:H: An isotope labeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, J. R.; Mandrell, L.; Doyle, J. R.

    1994-08-01

    The release of moleculear hydrogen from the growing surface of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films is determined using an isotope labeling technique. The results demonstrate that surface-bonded H atoms are readily abstracted by atomic hydrogen arriving from the gas phase. The films are deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering of a silicon target in an argon-hydrogen atmosphere. To achieve isotope labeling, we first deposit a deuterated amorphous silicon film, then commence growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon and measure the transient release of HD and D2 from the growing surface using mass spectrometry. Release occurs when the supply of reactive hydrogen in the growth flux exceeds the incorporation rate into the film, and is observed under all experimental conditions. The net rate of H incorporation is known from ex situ measurments of film growth and hydrogen content. We combine the H release and incorporation data in a mass balance argument to determine the H-surface kinetics. Under conditions which produce electronically useful films, (1) 0.5-1.0 hydrogen atoms react with the growing surface per incorporated silicon atom, (2) the near surface of the growing film contains 1-3 x 10(exp 15)/sq cm pf excess hydrogen, the dominant hydrogen release mechanism is by direct abstraction to form H2 molecules, and the kinetics of H release and incorportation can be described by constant rate coefficients. These data are supported by studies of H interactions with single-crystal silicon and amorphous carbon surfaces.

  15. Extrinsic Labeling of Staple Food Crops with Isotopic Iron Does Not Consistently Result in Full Equilibration: Revisiting the Methodology.

    PubMed

    Glahn, Raymond P; Cheng, Zhiqiang; Giri, Shree

    2015-11-01

    Extrinsic isotopic labeling of food Fe has been used for over 50 years to measure Fe absorption. This method assumes that complete equilibration occurs between the extrinsic and the intrinsic Fe prior to intestinal absorption. The present study tested this assumption via in vitro digestion of varieties of maize, white beans, black beans, red beans, and lentils. Prior to digestion, foods were extrinsically labeled with (58)Fe at concentrations of 1, 10, 50, and 100% of the intrinsic (56)Fe. Following an established in vitro digestion protocol, the digest was centrifuged and the Fe solubilities of the extrinsic (58)Fe and the intrinsic (56)Fe were compared as a measure of extrinsic/intrinsic equilibration. In the beans, significantly more of the extrinsic Fe (up to 2-3 times, p < 0.001) partitioned into the supernatant. The effect varied depending upon the seed coat color, the harvest, and the concentration of the extrinsic Fe. For lentils and maize the extrinsic Fe tended to partition into the insoluble fraction and also varied depending on variety and harvest. There was no crop that consistently demonstrated full equilibration of the extrinsic Fe with the intrinsic Fe. These observations challenge the accuracy of Fe absorption studies in which isotopic extrinsic Fe was used to evaluate Fe absorption and bioavailability.

  16. Extrinsic Labeling of Staple Food Crops with Isotopic Iron Does Not Consistently Result in Full Equilibration: Revisiting the Methodology.

    PubMed

    Glahn, Raymond P; Cheng, Zhiqiang; Giri, Shree

    2015-11-01

    Extrinsic isotopic labeling of food Fe has been used for over 50 years to measure Fe absorption. This method assumes that complete equilibration occurs between the extrinsic and the intrinsic Fe prior to intestinal absorption. The present study tested this assumption via in vitro digestion of varieties of maize, white beans, black beans, red beans, and lentils. Prior to digestion, foods were extrinsically labeled with (58)Fe at concentrations of 1, 10, 50, and 100% of the intrinsic (56)Fe. Following an established in vitro digestion protocol, the digest was centrifuged and the Fe solubilities of the extrinsic (58)Fe and the intrinsic (56)Fe were compared as a measure of extrinsic/intrinsic equilibration. In the beans, significantly more of the extrinsic Fe (up to 2-3 times, p < 0.001) partitioned into the supernatant. The effect varied depending upon the seed coat color, the harvest, and the concentration of the extrinsic Fe. For lentils and maize the extrinsic Fe tended to partition into the insoluble fraction and also varied depending on variety and harvest. There was no crop that consistently demonstrated full equilibration of the extrinsic Fe with the intrinsic Fe. These observations challenge the accuracy of Fe absorption studies in which isotopic extrinsic Fe was used to evaluate Fe absorption and bioavailability. PMID:26456842

  17. An efficient climate model with water isotope physics: NEEMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Emile-Geay, J.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes the development of an isotope-enabled atmosphere-ocean global climate model, NEEMY. This is a model of intermediate complexity, which can run 100 model years in 30 hours using 33 CPUs. The atmospheric component is the SPEEDY-IER (Molteni et al. 2003; Dee et al. 2015a), which is a water isotope-enabled (with equilibrium and kinetic fractionation schemes in precipitation, evaporation and soil moisture) simplified atmospheric general circulation model, with T30 horizontal resolution and 8 vertical layers. The oceanic component is NEMO 3.4 (Madec 2008), a state-of-the-art oceanic model (~2° horizontal resolution and 31 vertical layers) with an oceanic isotope module (a passive tracer scheme). A 1000-year control run shows that NEEMY is stable and its energy is conserved. The mean state is comparable to that of CMIP3-era CGCMs, though much cheaper to run. Atmospheric teleconnections such as the NAO and PNA are simulated very well. NEEMY also simulates the oceanic meridional overturning circulation well. The tropical climate variability is weaker than observations, and the climatology exhibits a double ITCZ problem despite bias corrections. The standard deviation of the monthly mean Nino3.4 index is 0.61K, compared to 0.91K in observations (Reynolds et al. 2002). We document similarities and differences with a close cousin, SPEEDY-NEMO (Kucharski et al. 2015). With its fast speed and relatively complete physical processes, NEEMY is suitable for paleoclimate studies ; we will present some forced simulations of the past millennium and their use in forward-modeling climate proxies, via proxy system models (PSMs, Dee et al 2015b). References Dee, S., D. Noone, N. Buenning, J. Emile-Geay, and Y. Zhou, 2015a: SPEEDY-IER: A fast atmospheric GCM with water isotope physics. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120: 73-91. doi:10.1002/2014JD022194. Dee, S. G., J. Emile-Geay, M. N. Evans, Allam, A., D. M. Thompson, and E. J. Steig, 2015b: PRYSM: an open-source framework

  18. Status of the Local Enforcement of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Program in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Zheng, Nina; Fino-Chen, Cecilia; Fridley, David; Ning, Cao

    2011-09-26

    As part of its commitment to promoting and improving the local enforcement of appliance energy efficiency standards and labeling, the China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) launched the National and Local Enforcement of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling project on August 14, 2009. The project’s short-term goal is to expand the effort to improve enforcement of standards and labeling requirements to the entire country within three years, with a long-term goal of perfecting overall enforcement. For this project, Jiangsu, Shandong, Sichuan and Shanghai were selected as pilot locations. This report provides information on the local enforcement project’s recent background, activities and results as well as comparison to previous rounds of check-testing in 2006 and 2007. In addition, the report also offers evaluation on the achievement and weaknesses in the local enforcement scheme and recommendations. The results demonstrate both improvement and some backsliding. Enforcement schemes are in place in all target cities and applicable national standards and regulations were followed as the basis for local check testing. Check testing results show in general high labeling compliance across regions with 100% compliance for five products, including full compliance for all three products tested in Jiangsu province and two out of three products tested in Shandong province. Program results also identified key weaknesses in labeling compliance in Sichuan as well as in the efficiency standards compliance levels for small and medium three-phase asynchronous motors and self-ballasted fluorescent lamps. For example, compliance for the same product ranged from as low as 40% to 100% with mixed results for products that had been tested in previous rounds. For refrigerators, in particular, the efficiency standards compliance rate exhibited a wider range of 50% to 100%, and the average rate across all tested models also dropped from 96% in 2007 to 63%, possibly due to

  19. From position-specific isotope labeling towards soil fluxomics: a novel toolbox to assess the microbial impact on biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostel, C.; Dippold, M. A.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the microbial impact on C and nutrient cycles is one of the most important challenges in terrestrial biogeochemistry. Transformation of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) is a key step in all biogeochemical cycles because 1) all high molecular substances pass the LMWOS pool during their degradation and 2) only LMWOS can be taken up by microorganisms intact. Thus, the transformations of LMWOS are dominated by biochemical pathways of the soil microorganisms. Thus, understanding fluxes and transformations in soils requires a detailed knowledge on the microbial metabolic network and its control mechanism. Tracing C fate in soil by isotopes became on of the most applied and promising biogeochemistry tools but studies were nearly exclusively based on uniformly labeled substances. However, such tracers do not allow the differentiation of the intact use of the initial substances from its transformation to metabolites. The novel tool of position-specific labeling enables to trace molecule atoms separately and thus to determine the cleavage of molecules - a prerequisite for metabolic tracing. Position-specific labeling of basic metabolites and quantification of isotope incorporation in CO2 and bulk soil enabled following the basic metabolic pathways of microorganisms. However, the combination of position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis of microbial biomarkers and metabolites like phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) or amino sugars revealed new insights into the soil fluxome: First, it enables tracing specific anabolic pathways in diverse microbial communities in soils e.g. carbon starvation pathways versus pathways reflecting microbial growth. Second, it allows identification of specific pathways of individual functional microbial groups in soils in situ. Tracing metabolic pathways and understanding their regulating factors are crucial for soil C fluxomics i.e. the unravaling of the complex network of C transformations

  20. Synthesis of isotopically labeled R- or S-[.sup.13C, .sup.2H] glycerols

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to asymmetric chiral labeled glycerols including at least one chiral atom, from one to two .sup.13C atoms and from zero to four deuterium atoms bonded directly to a carbon atom, e.g., (2S) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol and (2R) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol, and to the use of such chiral glycerols in the preparation of labeled amino acids.

  1. Formation of Kokumi-Enhancing γ-Glutamyl Dipeptides in Parmesan Cheese by Means of γ-Glutamyltransferase Activity and Stable Isotope Double-Labeling Studies.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Hedda; Behr, Jürgen; Ehrmann, Matthias A; Vogel, Rudi F; Hofmann, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Recently, γ-glutamyl dipeptides (γ-GPs) were found to be responsible for the attractive kokumi flavor of Parmesan cheese (PC). Quantitation of γ-GPs and their parent amino acids in 13-, 24-, and 30-month ripened PC samples by LC-MS/MS and stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA), in-cheese (13)C-labeling studies, followed by analysis of the γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity revealed γ-GPs to be generated most efficiently after 24 months of ripening by a GGT-catalyzed transfer of the γ-glutamyl moiety of L-glutamine onto various acceptor amino acids released upon casein proteolysis. Following the identification of milk as a potential GGT source in PC, the functionality of the milk's GGT to generate the target γ-GPs was validated by stable isotope double-labeling (SIDL) experiments. Therefore, raw and heat-treated milk samples were incubated with L-glutamine-[U-(13)C] and acceptor amino acids (X) and the hetero- (γ-Glu-[(13)C5]-X) and homotranspeptidation products (γ-Glu-Gln-[(13)C10]) were quantitated by LC-MS/MS-SIDA using γ-Glu-Ala-[(13)C3] as the internal standard. High GGT activity to generate the γ-GPs and preference for L-phenylalanine and L-methionine as acceptor amino acids were found in raw milk and milk samples heat-treated for 10 min up to a maximum of 65 °C. In comparison, GGT activity and SIDL studies performed with inoculated Lactobacillus strains, including Lactobacillus harbinensis and Lactobacillus casei identified in PC by means of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, did not show any significant GGT activity and unequivocally demonstrated unpasteurized cow's milk, rather than microorganisms, as a key factor in γ-glutamyl dipeptide generation in Parmesan cheese.

  2. Formation of Kokumi-Enhancing γ-Glutamyl Dipeptides in Parmesan Cheese by Means of γ-Glutamyltransferase Activity and Stable Isotope Double-Labeling Studies.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Hedda; Behr, Jürgen; Ehrmann, Matthias A; Vogel, Rudi F; Hofmann, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Recently, γ-glutamyl dipeptides (γ-GPs) were found to be responsible for the attractive kokumi flavor of Parmesan cheese (PC). Quantitation of γ-GPs and their parent amino acids in 13-, 24-, and 30-month ripened PC samples by LC-MS/MS and stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA), in-cheese (13)C-labeling studies, followed by analysis of the γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity revealed γ-GPs to be generated most efficiently after 24 months of ripening by a GGT-catalyzed transfer of the γ-glutamyl moiety of L-glutamine onto various acceptor amino acids released upon casein proteolysis. Following the identification of milk as a potential GGT source in PC, the functionality of the milk's GGT to generate the target γ-GPs was validated by stable isotope double-labeling (SIDL) experiments. Therefore, raw and heat-treated milk samples were incubated with L-glutamine-[U-(13)C] and acceptor amino acids (X) and the hetero- (γ-Glu-[(13)C5]-X) and homotranspeptidation products (γ-Glu-Gln-[(13)C10]) were quantitated by LC-MS/MS-SIDA using γ-Glu-Ala-[(13)C3] as the internal standard. High GGT activity to generate the γ-GPs and preference for L-phenylalanine and L-methionine as acceptor amino acids were found in raw milk and milk samples heat-treated for 10 min up to a maximum of 65 °C. In comparison, GGT activity and SIDL studies performed with inoculated Lactobacillus strains, including Lactobacillus harbinensis and Lactobacillus casei identified in PC by means of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, did not show any significant GGT activity and unequivocally demonstrated unpasteurized cow's milk, rather than microorganisms, as a key factor in γ-glutamyl dipeptide generation in Parmesan cheese. PMID:26866784

  3. Combining position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis: first steps towards soil fluxomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics is one of the most important challenges in soil science. Transformation of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS) is a key step in biogeochemical cycles because 1) all high molecular substances pass this stage during their decomposition and 2) only LMWOS will be taken up by microorganisms. Previous studies on LMWOS were focused on determining net fluxes through the LMWOS pool, but they rarely identified transformations. As LMWOS are the preferred C and energy source for microorganisms, the transformations of LMWOS are dominated by biochemical pathways of the soil microorganisms. Thus, understanding fluxes and transformations in soils requires a detailed knowledge on the biochemical pathways and its controlling factors. Tracing C fate in soil by isotopes became on of the most applied and promising biogeochemistry tools. Up to now, studies on LMWOS were nearly exclusively based on uniformly labeled organic substances i.e. all C atoms in the molecules were labeled with 13C or 14C. However, this classical approach did not allow the differentiation between use of intact initial substances in any process, or whether they were transformed to metabolites. The novel tool of position-specific labeling enables to trace molecule atoms separately and thus to determine the cleavage of molecules - a prerequisite for metabolic tracing. Position-specific labeling of LMWOS and quantification of 13CO2 and 13C in bulk soil enabled following the basic metabolic pathways of soil microorganisms. However, only the combination of position-specific 13C labeling with compound-specific isotope analysis of microbial biomarkers and metabolites allowed 1) tracing specific anabolic pathways in diverse microbial communities in soils and 2) identification of specific pathways of individual functional microbial groups. So, these are the prerequisites for soil fluxomics. Our studies combining position-specific labeled glucose with amino

  4. Quantitative Cross-linking/Mass Spectrometry Using Isotope-labeled Cross-linkers and MaxQuant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo A; Fischer, Lutz; Cox, Jürgen; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-08-01

    The conceptually simple step from cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CLMS) to quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry (QCLMS) is compounded by technical challenges. Currently, quantitative proteomics software is tightly integrated with the protein identification workflow. This prevents automatically quantifying other m/z features in a targeted manner including those associated with cross-linked peptides. Here we present a new release of MaxQuant that permits starting the quantification process from an m/z feature list. Comparing the automated quantification to a carefully manually curated test set of cross-linked peptides obtained by cross-linking C3 and C3b with BS(3) and isotope-labeled BS(3)-d4 revealed a number of observations: (1) Fully automated process using MaxQuant can quantify cross-links in our reference data set with 68% recall rate and 88% accuracy. (2) Hidden quantification errors can be converted into exposed failures by label-swap replica, which makes label-swap replica an essential part of QCLMS. (3) Cross-links that failed during automated quantification can be recovered by semi-automated re-quantification. The integrated workflow of MaxQuant and semi-automated assessment provides the maximum of quantified cross-links. In contrast, work on larger data sets or by less experienced users will benefit from full automation in MaxQuant. PMID:27302889

  5. Quantitative Cross-linking/Mass Spectrometry Using Isotope-labeled Cross-linkers and MaxQuant*

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The conceptually simple step from cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CLMS) to quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry (QCLMS) is compounded by technical challenges. Currently, quantitative proteomics software is tightly integrated with the protein identification workflow. This prevents automatically quantifying other m/z features in a targeted manner including those associated with cross-linked peptides. Here we present a new release of MaxQuant that permits starting the quantification process from an m/z feature list. Comparing the automated quantification to a carefully manually curated test set of cross-linked peptides obtained by cross-linking C3 and C3b with BS3 and isotope-labeled BS3-d4 revealed a number of observations: (1) Fully automated process using MaxQuant can quantify cross-links in our reference data set with 68% recall rate and 88% accuracy. (2) Hidden quantification errors can be converted into exposed failures by label-swap replica, which makes label-swap replica an essential part of QCLMS. (3) Cross-links that failed during automated quantification can be recovered by semi-automated re-quantification. The integrated workflow of MaxQuant and semi-automated assessment provides the maximum of quantified cross-links. In contrast, work on larger data sets or by less experienced users will benefit from full automation in MaxQuant. PMID:27302889

  6. Syntheses of halogen derivatives of L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine and L-phenylalanine labeled with hydrogen isotopes.

    PubMed

    Pająk, Małgorzata; Pałka, Katarzyna; Winnicka, Elżbieta; Kańska, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    Halogenated, labeled with tritium and doubly with deuterium and tritium, derivatives of L-tryptophan, i.e. 5'-bromo-[2-(3)H]-, 5'-bromo-[2-(2)H/(3)H]-, 5'-fluoro-[2-(3)H]-5'-fluoro-[2-(2)H/(3)H]-, 6'-fluoro-[2-(3)H]-, 6'-fluoro-[2-(2)H/(3)H]-L-tryptophan, as well as, L-tyrosine, i.e. 3'-fluoro-[2-(3)H]-, 3'-fluoro-[2-(2)H/(3)H]-, 3'-chloro-[2-(3)H]-, and 3'-chloro-[2-(2)H/(3)H]-L-tyrosine, and also L-phenylalanine, i.e. 2'-fluoro-[(3S)-(3)H]-, 2'-fluoro-[(3S)-(2)H/(3) H]-, 2'-chloro-[(3S)-(3)H]-, 2'-chloro-[(3S)-(2)H/(3)H]-, 4'-chloro-[(3S)-(3)H]-, and 4'-chloro-[(3S)-(2)H/(3)H]-L-phenylalanine were synthesized using enzymatic methods. Isotopomers of L-tryptophan were synthesized by coupling of halogenated indoles with S-methyl-L-cysteine carried out in deuteriated or tritiated incubation media. Labeled halogenated derivatives of L-tyrosine were obtained by the enzymatically supported exchange between halogenated L-tyrosine and isotopic water. Labeled halogenated isotopologues of L-Phe were synthesized by the enzymatic addition of ammonia to halogenated cinnamic acid. As a source of hydrogen tritiated water (HTO) and heavy water (D2O) with addition of HTO were used.

  7. Probing the Metabolic Network in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei Using Untargeted Metabolomics with Stable Isotope Labelled Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Creek, Darren J.; Mazet, Muriel; Achcar, Fiona; Anderson, Jana; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kamour, Ruwida; Morand, Pauline; Millerioux, Yoann; Biran, Marc; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Weidt, Stefan K.; Burgess, Karl E. V.; Breitling, Rainer; Watson, David G.; Bringaud, Frédéric; Barrett, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate. PMID:25775470

  8. Multi-Isotope Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Combining Heavy Water 2H with 15N Labeling As Complementary Tracers for Metabolic Heterogeneity at the Single-Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, S.; McGlynn, S.; Cowley, E.; Green, A.; Newman, D. K.; Orphan, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic rates of microbial communities constitute a key physiological parameter for understanding the in situ growth constraints for life in any environment. Isotope labeling techniques provide a powerful approach for measuring such biological activity, due to the use of isotopically enriched substrate tracers whose incorporation into biological materials can be detected with high sensitivity by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Nano-meter scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) combined with stable isotope labeling provides a unique tool for studying the spatiometabolic activity of microbial populations at the single cell level in order to assess both community structure and population diversity. However, assessing the distribution and range of microbial activity in complex environmental systems with slow-growing organisms, diverse carbon and nitrogen sources, or heterotrophic subpopulations poses a tremendous technical challenge because the introduction of isotopically labeled substrates frequently changes the nutrient availability and can inflate or bias measures of activity. Here, we present the use of hydrogen isotope labeling with deuterated water as an important new addition to the isotopic toolkit and apply it for the determination of single cell microbial activities by NanoSIMS imaging. This tool provides a labeling technique that minimally alters any aquatic chemical environment, can be administered with strong labels even in minimal addition (natural background is very low), is an equally universal substrate for all forms of life even in complex, carbon and nitrogen saturated systems, and can be combined with other isotopic tracers. The combination of heavy water labeling with the most commonly used NanoSIMS tracer, 15N, is technically challenging but opens up a powerful new set of multi-tracer experiments for the study of microbial activity in complex communities. We present the first truly simultaneous single cell triple isotope system

  9. Regional cooperation in energy efficiency standard-setting and labeling in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wiel, Stephen; Van Wie McGrory, Laura

    2003-08-04

    The North American Energy Working Group (NAEWG) was established in 2001 by the governments of Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The goals of NAEWG are to foster communication and cooperation on energy-related matters of common interest, and to enhance North American energy trade and interconnections consistent with the goal of sustainable development, for the benefit of all three countries. At its outset, NAEWG established teams to address different aspects of the energy sector. One, the Energy Efficiency Expert Group, undertook activity in three areas: (1) analyzing commonalities and differences in the test procedures of Canada, Mexico, and the United States, and identifying specific products for which the three countries might consider harmonization; (2) exploring possibilities for increased mutual recognition of laboratory test results; and (3) looking at possibilities for enhanced cooperation in the Energy Star voluntary endorsement labeling program. To support NAEWG's Expert Group on Energy Efficiency (NAEWG-EE), USDOE commissioned Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, representing the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP), to prepare a resource document comparing current standards, labels, and test procedure regulations in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The resulting document identified 46 energy-using products for which at least one of the three countries has energy efficiency regulations. Three products--refrigerators/freezers, room air conditioners, and integral horsepower three-phase electric motors--have identical minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) and test procedures in the three countries. Ten other products have different MEPS and test procedures, but have the near-term potential for harmonization. NAEWG-EE is currently working to identify mechanisms for mutual recognition of test results. With consultative support from the United States and Canada through NAEWG-EE, Mexico is exploring possibilities for

  10. Towards absolute quantification of therapeutic monoclonal antibody in serum by LC-MS/MS using isotope-labeled antibody standard and protein cleavage isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Heudi, Olivier; Barteau, Samuel; Zimmer, Dieter; Schmidt, Joerg; Bill, Kurt; Lehmann, Natalie; Bauer, Christian; Kretz, Olivier

    2008-06-01

    Although LC-MS methods are increasingly used for the absolute quantification of proteins, the lack of appropriate internal standard (IS) hinders the development of rapid and standardized analytical methods for both in vitro and in vivo studies. Here, we have developed a novel method for the absolute quantification of a therapeutic protein, which is monoclonal antibody (mAb). The method combines liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and protein cleavage isotope dilution mass spectrometry with the isotope-labeled mAb as IS. The latter was identical to the analyzed mAb with the exception that each threonine contains four (13)C atoms and one (15)N atom. Serum samples were spiked with IS prior to the overnight trypsin digestion and subsequent sample cleanup. Sample extracts were analyzed on a C18 ACE column (150 mm x 4.6 mm) using an LC gradient time of 11 min. Endogenous mAb concentrations were determined by calculating the peak height ratio of its signature peptide to the corresponding isotope-labeled peptide. The linear dynamic range was established between 5.00 and 1000 microg/mL mAb with accuracy and precision within +/-15% at all concentrations and below +/-20% at the LLOQ (lower limit of quantification). The overall method recovery in terms of mAb was 14%. The losses due to sample preparation (digestion and purification) were 72% from which about 32% was due to the first step of the method, the sample digestion. This huge loss during sample preparation strongly emphasizes the necessity to employ an IS right from the beginning. Our method was successfully applied to the mAb quantification in marmoset serum study samples, and the precision obtained on duplicate samples was, in most cases, below 20%. The comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed higher exposure in terms of AUC and Cmax with the LC-MS/MS method. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed in this study. The results of this study indicate that our LC

  11. (Bio)degradation of glyphosate in water-sediment microcosms - A stable isotope co-labeling approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shizong; Seiwert, Bettina; Kästner, Matthias; Miltner, Anja; Schäffer, Andreas; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Yang, Qi; Nowak, Karolina M

    2016-08-01

    Glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) are frequently detected in water and sediments. Up to date, there are no comprehensive studies on the fate of glyphosate in water-sediment microcosms according to OECD 308 guideline. Stable isotope co-labeled (13)C3(15)N-glyphosate was used to determine the turnover mass balance, formation of metabolites, and formation of residues over a period of 80 days. In the water-sediment system, 56% of the initial (13)C3-glyphosate equivalents was ultimately mineralized, whereas the mineralization in the water system (without sediment) was low, reaching only 2% of (13)C-glyphosate equivalents. This finding demonstrates the key role of sediments in its degradation. Glyphosate was detected below detection limit in the water compartment on day 40, but could still be detected in the sediments, ultimately reaching 5% of (13)C3(15)N-glyphosate equivalents. A rapid increase in (13)C(15)N-AMPA was noted after 10 days, and these transformation products ultimately constituted 26% of the (13)C3-glyphosate equivalents and 79% of the (15)N-glyphosate equivalents. In total, 10% of the (13)C label and 12% of the (15)N label were incorporated into amino acids, indicating no risk bearing biogenic residue formation from (13)C3(15)N-glyphosate. Initially, glyphosate was biodegraded via the sarcosine pathway related to microbial growth, as shown by co-labeled (13)C(15)N-glycine and biogenic residue formation. Later, degradation via AMPA dominated under starvation conditions, as shown by the contents of (13)C-glycine. The presented data provide the first evidence of the speciation of the non-extractable residues as well as the utilization of glyphosate as a carbon and nitrogen source in the water-sediment system. This study also highlights the contribution of both the sarcosine and the AMPA degradation pathways under these conditions. PMID:27140906

  12. Comprehensive and Quantitative Profiling of the Human Sweat Submetabolome Using High-Performance Chemical Isotope Labeling LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Hooton, Kevin; Han, Wei; Li, Liang

    2016-07-19

    Human sweat can be noninvasively collected and used as a media for diagnosis of certain diseases as well as for drug detection. However, because of very low concentrations of endogenous metabolites present in sweat, metabolomic analysis of sweat with high coverage is difficult, making it less widely used for metabolomics research. In this work, a high-performance method for profiling the human sweat submetabolome based on chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is reported. Sweat was collected using a gauze sponge style patch, extracted from the gauze by centrifugation, and then derivatized using CIL. Differential (12)C- and (13)C-dansylation labeling was used to target the amine/phenol submetabolome. Because of large variations in the total amount of sweat metabolites in individual samples, sample amount normalization was first performed using liquid chromatography with UV detection (LC-UV) after dansylation. The (12)C-labeled individual sample was then mixed with an equal amount of (13)C-labeled pooled sample. The mixture was subjected to LC-MS analysis. Over 2707 unique metabolites were detected across 54 sweat samples collected from six individuals with an average of 2002 ± 165 metabolites detected per sample from a total of 108 LC-MS runs. Using a dansyl standard library, we were able to identify 83 metabolites with high confidence; many of them have never been reported to be present in sweat. Using accurate mass search against human metabolome libraries, we putatively identified an additional 2411 metabolites. Uni- and multivariate analyses of these metabolites showed significant differences in the sweat submetabolomes between male and female, as well as between early and late exercise. These results demonstrate that the CIL LC-MS method described can be used to profile the human sweat submetabolome with high metabolomic coverage and high quantification accuracy to reveal metabolic differences in different sweat

  13. (Bio)degradation of glyphosate in water-sediment microcosms - A stable isotope co-labeling approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shizong; Seiwert, Bettina; Kästner, Matthias; Miltner, Anja; Schäffer, Andreas; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Yang, Qi; Nowak, Karolina M

    2016-08-01

    Glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) are frequently detected in water and sediments. Up to date, there are no comprehensive studies on the fate of glyphosate in water-sediment microcosms according to OECD 308 guideline. Stable isotope co-labeled (13)C3(15)N-glyphosate was used to determine the turnover mass balance, formation of metabolites, and formation of residues over a period of 80 days. In the water-sediment system, 56% of the initial (13)C3-glyphosate equivalents was ultimately mineralized, whereas the mineralization in the water system (without sediment) was low, reaching only 2% of (13)C-glyphosate equivalents. This finding demonstrates the key role of sediments in its degradation. Glyphosate was detected below detection limit in the water compartment on day 40, but could still be detected in the sediments, ultimately reaching 5% of (13)C3(15)N-glyphosate equivalents. A rapid increase in (13)C(15)N-AMPA was noted after 10 days, and these transformation products ultimately constituted 26% of the (13)C3-glyphosate equivalents and 79% of the (15)N-glyphosate equivalents. In total, 10% of the (13)C label and 12% of the (15)N label were incorporated into amino acids, indicating no risk bearing biogenic residue formation from (13)C3(15)N-glyphosate. Initially, glyphosate was biodegraded via the sarcosine pathway related to microbial growth, as shown by co-labeled (13)C(15)N-glycine and biogenic residue formation. Later, degradation via AMPA dominated under starvation conditions, as shown by the contents of (13)C-glycine. The presented data provide the first evidence of the speciation of the non-extractable residues as well as the utilization of glyphosate as a carbon and nitrogen source in the water-sediment system. This study also highlights the contribution of both the sarcosine and the AMPA degradation pathways under these conditions.

  14. Efficient calculation of exact fine structure isotope patterns via the multidimensional Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Ipsen, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    The isotope patterns of unknown analytes provide information that can be of great value in their identification as part of a mass spectrometry experiment. Determining the range of compounds that are consistent with an empirically observed isotope pattern requires, as an initial step, the calculation of the theoretical isotope patterns of all feasible candidate formulas, and this is not a trivial mathematical task. While algorithms based on the Fourier transform have been used for almost two decades to perform such calculation efficiently, they have hitherto not been able to provide the exact sets of masses and abundances that constitute the fundamental isotope pattern. This article presents a new approach to the treatment of such calculations, which involves arranging and manipulating the isotope patterns of distinct elements as multidimensional data structures. This enables the use of the multidimensional Fourier transform to calculate isotope patterns with an accuracy that is limited only by the errors of floating point arithmetic. The algorithm is both highly efficient and very easy to implement in many programming environments. An open-source implementation of the algorithm in the R programming language will be made publicly available and is also available upon request.

  15. Lewis Acid-Base, Molecular Modeling, and Isotopic Labeling in a Sophomore Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nataro, Chip; Ferguson, Michelle A.; Bocage, Katherine M.; Hess, Brian J.; Ross, Vincent J.; Swarr, Daniel T.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment to prepare a deuterium labeled adduct of a Lewis acid and Lewis base, to use computational methods allowing students to visualize the LUMO of Lewis acids, the HOMO of Lewis bases and the molecular orbitals of the adduct that is formed is developed. This allows students to see the interplay between calculated and experimental results.

  16. Sulfonium Ion Derivatization, Isobaric Stable Isotope Labeling and Data Dependent CID- and ETD-MS/MS for Enhanced Phosphopeptide Quantitation, Identification and Phosphorylation Site Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yali; Zhou, Xiao; Stemmer, Paul M.; Reid, Gavin E.

    2014-01-01

    An amine specific peptide derivatization strategy involving the use of novel isobaric stable isotope encoded ‘fixed charge’ sulfonium ion reagents, coupled with an analysis strategy employing capillary HPLC, ESI-MS, and automated data dependent ion trap CID-MS/MS, -MS3, and/or ETD-MS/MS, has been developed for the improved quantitative analysis of protein phosphorylation, and for identification and characterization of their site(s) of modification. Derivatization of 50 synthetic phosphopeptides with S,S′-dimethylthiobutanoylhydroxysuccinimide ester iodide (DMBNHS), followed by analysis using capillary HPLC-ESI-MS, yielded an average 2.5-fold increase in ionization efficiencies and a significant increase in the presence and/or abundance of higher charge state precursor ions compared to the non-derivatized phosphopeptides. Notably, 44% of the phosphopeptides (22 of 50) in their underivatized states yielded precursor ions whose maximum charge states corresponded to +2, while only 8% (4 of 50) remained at this maximum charge state following DMBNHS derivatization. Quantitative analysis was achieved by measuring the abundances of the diagnostic product ions corresponding to the neutral losses of ‘light’ (S(CH3)2) and ‘heavy’ (S(CD3)2) dimethylsulfide exclusively formed upon CID-MS/MS of isobaric stable isotope labeled forms of the DMBNHS derivatized phosphopeptides. Under these conditions, the phosphate group stayed intact. Access for a greater number of peptides to provide enhanced phosphopeptide sequence identification and phosphorylation site characterization was achieved via automated data-dependent CID-MS3 or ETD-MS/MS analysis due to the formation of the higher charge state precursor ions. Importantly, improved sequence coverage was observed using ETD-MS/MS following introduction of the sulfonium ion fixed charge, but with no detrimental effects on ETD fragmentation efficiency. PMID:21952753

  17. Highly accurate quantification of hydroxyproline-containing peptides in blood using a protease digest of stable isotope-labeled collagen.

    PubMed

    Taga, Yuki; Kusubata, Masashi; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Shunji

    2014-12-17

    Collagen-derived hydroxyproline (Hyp)-containing dipeptides and tripeptides, which are known to possess physiological functions, appear in blood at high concentrations after oral ingestion of gelatin hydrolysate. However, highly accurate and sensitive quantification of the Hyp-containing peptides in blood has been challenging because of the analytical interference from numerous other blood components. We recently developed a stable isotope-labeled collagen named "SI-collagen" that can be used as an internal standard in various types of collagen analyses employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Here we prepared stable isotope-labeled Hyp-containing peptides from SI-collagen using trypsin/chymotrypsin and plasma proteases by mimicking the protein degradation pathways in the body. With the protease digest of SI-collagen used as an internal standard mixture, we achieved highly accurate simultaneous quantification of Hyp and 13 Hyp-containing peptides in human blood by LC-MS. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve of Hyp-containing peptides ranged from 0.663 ± 0.022 nmol/mL·h for Pro-Hyp-Gly to 163 ± 1 nmol/mL·h for Pro-Hyp after oral ingestion of 25 g of fish gelatin hydrolysate, and the coefficient of variation of three separate measurements was <7% for each peptide except for Glu-Hyp-Gly, which was near the detection limit. Our method is useful for absorption/metabolism studies of the Hyp-containing peptides and development of functionally characterized gelatin hydrolysate.

  18. Evaluation of stable isotope labelling strategies for the quantitation of CP4 EPSPS in genetically modified soya.

    PubMed

    Ocaña, Mireia Fernández; Fraser, Paul D; Patel, Raj K P; Halket, John M; Bramley, Peter M

    2009-02-16

    The introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops into the market has raised a general alertness relating to the control and safety of foods. The applicability of protein separation hyphenated to mass spectrometry to identify the bacterial enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (CP4 EPSPS) protein expressed in GM crops has been previously reported [M.F. Ocana, P.D. Fraser, R.K.P. Patel, J.M. Halket, P.M. Bramley, Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 21 (2007) 319.]. Herein, we investigate the suitability of two strategies that employ heavy stable isotopes, i.e. AQUA and iTRAQ, to quantify different levels of CP4 EPSPS in up to four GM preparations. Both quantification strategies showed potential to determine whether the presence of GM material is above the limits established by the European Union. The AQUA quantification procedure involved protein solubilisation/fractionation and subsequent separation using SDS-PAGE. A segment of the gel in which the protein of interest was located was excised, the stable isotope labeled peptide added at a known concentration and proteolytic digestion initiated. Following recovery of the peptides, on-line separation and detection using LC-MS was carried out. A similar approach was used for the iTRAQ workflow with the exception that proteins were digested in solution and generated tryptic peptides were chemically tagged. Both procedures demonstrated the potential for quantitative detection at 0.5% (w/w) GM soya which is a level below the current European Union's threshold for food-labelling. In this context, a comparison between the two procedures is provided within the present study.

  19. Incorporation of isotope from specifically labeled glucose into alginates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, A R; Sokatch, J R

    1984-01-01

    The incorporation of isotope from [6-14C]glucose into alginate by both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Azotobacter vinelandii was 10-fold greater than that from either [1-14C]- or [2-14C]glucose, indicating preferential utilization of the bottom half of the glucose molecule for alginate synthesis. These data strongly suggest that the Entner - Doudoroff pathway plays a major role in alginate synthesis in both P. aeruginosa and A. vinelandii. PMID:6427189

  20. Evolutionary Differences in Glycosaminoglycan Fine Structure Detected by Quantitative Glycan Reductive Isotope Labeling*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Roger; Olson, Sara K.; Steele, Robert E.; Wang, Lianchun; Warrior, Rahul; Cummings, Richard D.; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    To facilitate qualitative and quantitative analysis of glycosaminoglycans, we tagged the reducing end of lyase-generated disaccharides with aniline-containing stable isotopes (12C6 and 13C6). Because different isotope tags have no effect on chromatographic retention times but can be discriminated by a mass detector, differentially isotope-tagged samples can be compared simultaneously by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and quantified by admixture with known amounts of standards. The technique is adaptable to all types of glycosaminoglycans, and its sensitivity is only limited by the type of mass spectrometer available. We validated the method using commercial heparin and keratan sulfate as well as heparan sulfate isolated from mutant and wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cells, and select tissues from mutant and wild-type mice. This new method provides more robust, reliable, and sensitive means of quantitative evaluation of glycosaminoglycan disaccharide compositions than existing techniques allowing us to compare the chondroitin and heparan sulfate compositions of Hydra vulgaris, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and mammalian cells. Our results demonstrate significant differences in glycosaminoglycan structure among these organisms that might represent evolutionarily distinct functional motifs. PMID:18818196

  1. International Review of the Development and Implementation of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David

    2012-02-28

    Appliance energy efficiency standards and labeling (S&L) programs have been important policy tools for regulating the efficiency of energy-using products for over 40 years and continue to expand in terms of geographic and product coverage. The most common S&L programs include mandatory minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) that seek to push the market for efficient products, and energy information and endorsement labels that seek to pull the market. This study seeks to review and compare some of the earliest and most well-developed S&L programs in three countries and one region: the U.S. MEPS and ENERGY STAR, Australia MEPS and Energy Label, European Union MEPS and Ecodesign requirements and Energy Label and Japanese Top Runner programs. For each program, key elements of S&L programs are evaluated and comparative analyses across the programs undertaken to identify best practice examples of individual elements as well as cross-cutting factors for success and lessons learned in international S&L program development and implementation. The international review and comparative analysis identified several overarching themes and highlighted some common factors behind successful program elements. First, standard-setting and programmatic implementation can benefit significantly from a legal framework that stipulates a specific timeline or schedule for standard-setting and revision, product coverage and legal sanctions for non-compliance. Second, the different MEPS programs revealed similarities in targeting efficiency gains that are technically feasible and economically justified as the principle for choosing a standard level, in many cases at a level that no product on the current market could reach. Third, detailed survey data such as the U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and rigorous analyses provide a strong foundation for standard-setting while incorporating the participation of different groups of stakeholders further strengthen the process

  2. Combining Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy with quantitative isotopic labeling for differentiation of E. coli cells at community and single cell levels.

    PubMed

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Chisanga, Malama; Subaihi, Abdu; Goodacre, Royston

    2015-04-21

    There is no doubt that the contribution of microbially mediated bioprocesses toward maintenance of life on earth is vital. However, understanding these microbes in situ is currently a bottleneck, as most methods require culturing these microorganisms to suitable biomass levels so that their phenotype can be measured. The development of new culture-independent strategies such as stable isotope probing (SIP) coupled with molecular biology has been a breakthrough toward linking gene to function, while circumventing in vitro culturing. In this study, for the first time we have combined Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, as metabolic fingerprinting approaches, with SIP to demonstrate the quantitative labeling and differentiation of Escherichia coli cells. E. coli cells were grown in minimal medium with fixed final concentrations of carbon and nitrogen supply, but with different ratios and combinations of (13)C/(12)C glucose and (15)N/(14)N ammonium chloride, as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The cells were collected at stationary phase and examined by Raman and FT-IR spectroscopies. The multivariate analysis investigation of FT-IR and Raman data illustrated unique clustering patterns resulting from specific spectral shifts upon the incorporation of different isotopes, which were directly correlated with the ratio of the isotopically labeled content of the medium. Multivariate analysis results of single-cell Raman spectra followed the same trend, exhibiting a separation between E. coli cells labeled with different isotopes and multiple isotope levels of C and N.

  3. Isotope-labeling studies on the formation pathway of acrolein during heat processing of oils.

    PubMed

    Ewert, Alice; Granvogl, Michael; Schieberle, Peter

    2014-08-20

    Acrolein (2-propenal) is classified as a foodborne toxicant and was shown to be present in significant amounts in heated edible oils. Up to now, its formation was mainly suggested to be from the glycerol part of triacylglycerides, although a clear influence of the unsaturation of the fatty acid moiety was also obvious in previous studies. To unequivocally clarify the role of the glycerol and the fatty acid parts in acrolein formation, two series of labeled triacylglycerides were synthesized: [(13)C(3)]-triacylglycerides of stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acid and [(13)C(54)]-triacylglycerides with labeled stearic, oleic, and linoleic acid, but with unlabeled glycerol. Heating of each of the seven intermediates singly in silicon oil and measurement of the formed amounts of labeled and unlabeled acrolein clearly proved the fatty acid backbone as the key precursor structure. Enzymatically synthesized pure linoleic acid and linolenic acid hydroperoxides were shown to be the key intermediates in acrolein formation, thus allowing the discussion of a radical-induced reaction pathway leading to the formation of the aldehyde. Surprisingly, although several oils contained high amounts of acrolein after heating, deep-fried foods themselves, such as donuts or French fries, were low in the aldehyde.

  4. Determination of thiol metabolites in human urine by stable isotope labeling in combination with pseudo-targeted mass spectrometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping; Qi, Chu-Bo; Zhu, Quan-Fei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-02-01

    Precursor ion scan and multiple reaction monitoring scan (MRM) are two typical scan modes in mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we developed a strategy by combining stable isotope labeling (IL) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) under double precursor ion scan (DPI) and MRM for analysis of thiols in 5 types of human cancer urine. Firstly, the IL-LC-DPI-MS method was applied for non-targeted profiling of thiols from cancer samples. Compared to traditional full scan mode, the DPI method significantly improved identification selectivity and accuracy. 103 thiol candidates were discovered in all cancers and 6 thiols were identified by their standards. It is worth noting that pantetheine, for the first time, was identified in human urine. Secondly, the IL-LC-MRM-MS method was developed for relative quantification of thiols in cancers compared to healthy controls. All the MRM transitions of light and heavy labeled thiols were acquired from urines by using DPI method. Compared to DPI method, the sensitivity of MRM improved by 2.1-11.3 folds. In addition, the concentration of homocysteine, γ-glutamylcysteine and pantetheine enhanced more than two folds in cancer patients compared to healthy controls. Taken together, the method demonstrated to be a promising strategy for identification and comprehensive quantification of thiols in human urines.

  5. Use of stable isotope-labelled cells to identify active grazers of picocyanobacteria in ocean surface waters

    PubMed Central

    Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Thompson, Anne; Waldbauer, Jacob; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2009-01-01

    Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria. They represent a significant fraction of the total primary production of the world oceans and comprise a major fraction of the prey biomass available to phagotrophic protists. Despite relatively rapid growth rates, picocyanobacterial cell densities in open-ocean surface waters remain fairly constant, implying steady mortality due to viral infection and consumption by predators. There have been several studies on grazing by specific protists on Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in culture, and of cell loss rates due to overall grazing in the field. However, the specific sources of mortality of these primary producers in the wild remain unknown. Here, we use a modification of the RNA stable isotope probing technique (RNA-SIP), which involves adding labelled cells to natural seawater, to identify active predators that are specifically consuming Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean. Four major groups were identified as having their 18S rRNA highly labelled: Prymnesiophyceae (Haptophyta), Dictyochophyceae (Stramenopiles), Bolidomonas (Stramenopiles) and Dinoflagellata (Alveolata). For the first three of these, the closest relative of the sequences identified was a photosynthetic organism, indicating the presence of mixotrophs among picocyanobacterial predators. We conclude that the use of RNA-SIP is a useful method to identity specific predators for picocyanobacteria in situ, and that the method could possibly be used to identify other bacterial predators important in the microbial food-web. PMID:19196281

  6. Determination of thiol metabolites in human urine by stable isotope labeling in combination with pseudo-targeted mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Qi, Chu-Bo; Zhu, Quan-Fei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Precursor ion scan and multiple reaction monitoring scan (MRM) are two typical scan modes in mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we developed a strategy by combining stable isotope labeling (IL) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) under double precursor ion scan (DPI) and MRM for analysis of thiols in 5 types of human cancer urine. Firstly, the IL-LC-DPI-MS method was applied for non-targeted profiling of thiols from cancer samples. Compared to traditional full scan mode, the DPI method significantly improved identification selectivity and accuracy. 103 thiol candidates were discovered in all cancers and 6 thiols were identified by their standards. It is worth noting that pantetheine, for the first time, was identified in human urine. Secondly, the IL-LC-MRM-MS method was developed for relative quantification of thiols in cancers compared to healthy controls. All the MRM transitions of light and heavy labeled thiols were acquired from urines by using DPI method. Compared to DPI method, the sensitivity of MRM improved by 2.1–11.3 folds. In addition, the concentration of homocysteine, γ-glutamylcysteine and pantetheine enhanced more than two folds in cancer patients compared to healthy controls. Taken together, the method demonstrated to be a promising strategy for identification and comprehensive quantification of thiols in human urines. PMID:26888486

  7. Use of stable isotope-labelled cells to identify active grazers of picocyanobacteria in ocean surface waters.

    PubMed

    Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Thompson, Anne; Waldbauer, Jacob; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2009-02-01

    Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria. They represent a significant fraction of the total primary production of the world oceans and comprise a major fraction of the prey biomass available to phagotrophic protists. Despite relatively rapid growth rates, picocyanobacterial cell densities in open-ocean surface waters remain fairly constant, implying steady mortality due to viral infection and consumption by predators. There have been several studies on grazing by specific protists on Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in culture, and of cell loss rates due to overall grazing in the field. However, the specific sources of mortality of these primary producers in the wild remain unknown. Here, we use a modification of the RNA stable isotope probing technique (RNA-SIP), which involves adding labelled cells to natural seawater, to identify active predators that are specifically consuming Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean. Four major groups were identified as having their 18S rRNA highly labelled: Prymnesiophyceae (Haptophyta), Dictyochophyceae (Stramenopiles), Bolidomonas (Stramenopiles) and Dinoflagellata (Alveolata). For the first three of these, the closest relative of the sequences identified was a photosynthetic organism, indicating the presence of mixotrophs among picocyanobacterial predators. We conclude that the use of RNA-SIP is a useful method to identity specific predators for picocyanobacteria in situ, and that the method could possibly be used to identify other bacterial predators important in the microbial food-web.

  8. Conformational changes of recombinant monoclonal antibodies by limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Nowak, Christine; Kita, Adriana; Cheng, Guilong; Kori, Yekaterina; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-03-15

    Limited proteolytic digestion is a method with a long history that has been used to study protein domain structures and conformational changes. A method of combining limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and mass spectrometry was established in the current study to investigate protein conformational changes. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies with or without the conserved oligosaccharides, and with or without oxidation of the conserved methionine residues, were used to test the newly proposed method. All of the samples were digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in normal water. The oxidized deglycosylated sample was also digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in (18)O-labeled water. The sample from the digestion in (18)O-water was spiked into each sample digested in normal water. Each mixed sample was subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The molecular weight differences between the peptides digested in normal water versus (18)O-water were used to differentiate peaks from the samples. The relative peak intensities of peptides with or without the C-terminal incorporation of (18)O atoms were used to determine susceptibility of different samples to trypsin and chymotrypsin. The results demonstrated that the method was capable of detecting local conformational changes of the recombinant monoclonal antibodies caused by deglycosylation and oxidation. PMID:26747642

  9. Stable carbon isotope labeling reveals different carry-over effects between functional types of tropical trees in an Ethiopian mountain forest.

    PubMed

    Krepkowski, Julia; Gebrekirstos, Aster; Shibistova, Olga; Bräuning, Achim

    2013-07-01

    We present an intra-annual stable carbon isotope (δ(13)C) study based on a labeling experiment to illustrate differences in temporal patterns of recent carbon allocation to wood structures of two functional types of trees, Podocarpus falcatus (a late-successional evergreen conifer) and Croton macrostachyus (a deciduous broadleaved pioneer tree), in a tropical mountain forest in Ethiopia. Dendrometer data, wood anatomical thin sections, and intra-annual δ(13)C analyses were applied. Isotope data revealed a clear annual growth pattern in both studied species. For P. falcatus, it was possible to synchronize annual δ(13) C peaks, wood anatomical structures and monthly precipitation patterns. The labeling signature was evident for three consecutive years. For C. macrostachyus, isotope data illustrate a rapid decline of the labeling signal within half a year. Our δ(13)C labeling study indicates a distinct difference in carryover effects between trees of different functional types. A proportion of the labeled δ(13)C is stored in reserves of wood parenchyma for up to 3 yr in P. falcatus. By contrast, C. macrostachyus shows a high turnover of assimilates and a carbon carryover effect is only detectable in the subsequent year. PMID:23586968

  10. Stable carbon isotope labeling reveals different carry-over effects between functional types of tropical trees in an Ethiopian mountain forest.

    PubMed

    Krepkowski, Julia; Gebrekirstos, Aster; Shibistova, Olga; Bräuning, Achim

    2013-07-01

    We present an intra-annual stable carbon isotope (δ(13)C) study based on a labeling experiment to illustrate differences in temporal patterns of recent carbon allocation to wood structures of two functional types of trees, Podocarpus falcatus (a late-successional evergreen conifer) and Croton macrostachyus (a deciduous broadleaved pioneer tree), in a tropical mountain forest in Ethiopia. Dendrometer data, wood anatomical thin sections, and intra-annual δ(13)C analyses were applied. Isotope data revealed a clear annual growth pattern in both studied species. For P. falcatus, it was possible to synchronize annual δ(13) C peaks, wood anatomical structures and monthly precipitation patterns. The labeling signature was evident for three consecutive years. For C. macrostachyus, isotope data illustrate a rapid decline of the labeling signal within half a year. Our δ(13)C labeling study indicates a distinct difference in carryover effects between trees of different functional types. A proportion of the labeled δ(13)C is stored in reserves of wood parenchyma for up to 3 yr in P. falcatus. By contrast, C. macrostachyus shows a high turnover of assimilates and a carbon carryover effect is only detectable in the subsequent year.

  11. Human lactation: maternal transfer of dietary triglycerides labeled with stable isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hachey, D.L.; Thomas, M.R.; Emken, E.A.; Garza, C.; Brown-Booth, L.; Adlof, R.O.; Klein, P.D.

    1987-10-01

    A stable isotope tracer method was utilized to measure quantitatively the secretion of diet-derived fatty acids (FA) into human milk. A mixture of (/sup 2/H6)tripalmitin, (/sup 2/H18)-triolein, and (/sup 2/H12)trilinolein was administered to three healthy, lactating women 22 to 30 years of age. Milk and blood samples were collected sequentially for 72 hr. The FA composition and concentration of total plasma, lipoprotein, and milk triglycerides were determined by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) and the isotopic enrichment was determined by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GLC-MS). There were no statistically significant differences in mammary secretion of the individual fats, either by a single individual or between subjects. The mean secretion of fat by one breast was 5.11 +/- 1.26% of the dose (CV = 25%). There was a significant 6.0-hr delay between peak occurrence of the tracer in plasma and its occurrence in milk. The lipids are transported to the mammary gland primarily by the chylomicron and very low density lipoprotein triglycerides.

  12. Design and operation of a continuous 13C and 15N labeling chamber for uniform or differential, metabolic and structural, plant tissue isotope labeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tracing heavy stable isotopes from plant material through the ecosystem provides the most sensitive information about ecosystem processes; from CO2 fluxes and soil organic matter formation to small-scale stable-isotope biomarker probing. Coupling multiple stable isotopes such as 13C with 15N, 18O o...

  13. LC-quadrupole/Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry enables stable isotope-resolved simultaneous quantification and ¹³C-isotopic labeling of acyl-coenzyme A thioesters.

    PubMed

    Frey, Alexander J; Feldman, Daniel R; Trefely, Sophie; Worth, Andrew J; Basu, Sankha S; Snyder, Nathaniel W

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesters are evolutionarily conserved, compartmentalized, and energetically activated substrates for biochemical reactions. The ubiquitous involvement of acyl-CoA thioesters in metabolism, including the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid degradation, and cholesterol metabolism highlights the broad applicability of applied measurements of acyl-CoA thioesters. However, quantitation of acyl-CoA levels provides only one dimension of metabolic information and a more complete description of metabolism requires the relative contribution of different precursors to individual substrates and pathways. Using two distinct stable isotope labeling approaches, acyl-CoA thioesters can be labeled with either a fixed [(13)C3(15)N1] label derived from pantothenate into the CoA moiety or via variable [(13)C] labeling into the acyl chain from metabolic precursors. Liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole/Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry using parallel reaction monitoring, but not single ion monitoring, allowed the simultaneous quantitation of acyl-CoA thioesters by stable isotope dilution using the [(13)C3(15)N1] label and measurement of the incorporation of labeled carbon atoms derived from [(13)C6]-glucose, [(13)C5(15)N2]-glutamine, and [(13)C3]-propionate. As a proof of principle, we applied this method to human B cell lymphoma (WSU-DLCL2) cells in culture to precisely describe the relative pool size and enrichment of isotopic tracers into acetyl-, succinyl-, and propionyl-CoA. This method will allow highly precise, multiplexed, and stable isotope-resolved determination of metabolism to refine metabolic models, characterize novel metabolism, and test modulators of metabolic pathways involving acyl-CoA thioesters. PMID:26968563

  14. High efficiency Hall effect micro-biosensor platform for detection of magnetically labeled biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Adarsh; Kumagai, Yoshimichi; Lapicki, Adam; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Abe, Masanori; Handa, Hiroshi

    2007-04-15

    Detection of magnetically labeled biomolecules using micro-Hall biosensors is a promising method for monitoring biomolecular recognition processes. The measurement efficiency of standard systems is limited by the time taken for magnetic beads to reach the sensing area of the Hall devices. Here, micro-current lines were integrated with Hall effect structures to manipulate the position of magnetic beads via field gradients generated by localized currents flowing in the current lines. Beads were accumulated onto the sensor surface within seconds of passing currents through the current lines. Real-time detection of magnetic beads using current lines integrated with Hall biosensors was achieved. These results are promising in establishing Hall biosensor platforms as efficient and inexpensive means of monitoring biomolecular reactions for medical applications.

  15. Comprehensive and Quantitative Profiling of the Human Sweat Submetabolome Using High-Performance Chemical Isotope Labeling LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Hooton, Kevin; Han, Wei; Li, Liang

    2016-07-19

    Human sweat can be noninvasively collected and used as a media for diagnosis of certain diseases as well as for drug detection. However, because of very low concentrations of endogenous metabolites present in sweat, metabolomic analysis of sweat with high coverage is difficult, making it less widely used for metabolomics research. In this work, a high-performance method for profiling the human sweat submetabolome based on chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is reported. Sweat was collected using a gauze sponge style patch, extracted from the gauze by centrifugation, and then derivatized using CIL. Differential (12)C- and (13)C-dansylation labeling was used to target the amine/phenol submetabolome. Because of large variations in the total amount of sweat metabolites in individual samples, sample amount normalization was first performed using liquid chromatography with UV detection (LC-UV) after dansylation. The (12)C-labeled individual sample was then mixed with an equal amount of (13)C-labeled pooled sample. The mixture was subjected to LC-MS analysis. Over 2707 unique metabolites were detected across 54 sweat samples collected from six individuals with an average of 2002 ± 165 metabolites detected per sample from a total of 108 LC-MS runs. Using a dansyl standard library, we were able to identify 83 metabolites with high confidence; many of them have never been reported to be present in sweat. Using accurate mass search against human metabolome libraries, we putatively identified an additional 2411 metabolites. Uni- and multivariate analyses of these metabolites showed significant differences in the sweat submetabolomes between male and female, as well as between early and late exercise. These results demonstrate that the CIL LC-MS method described can be used to profile the human sweat submetabolome with high metabolomic coverage and high quantification accuracy to reveal metabolic differences in different sweat

  16. A novel dual-isotope labelling method for distinguishing between soil sources of N2O.

    PubMed

    Wrage, N; van Groenigen, J W; Oenema, O; Baggs, E M

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel 18O-15N-enrichment method for the distinction between nitrous oxide (N2O) from nitrification, nitrifier denitrification and denitrification based on a method with single- and double-15N-labelled ammonium nitrate. We added a new treatment with 18O-labelled water to quantify N2O from nitrifier denitrification. The theory behind this is that ammonia oxidisers use oxygen (O2) from soil air for the oxidation of ammonia (NH3), but use H2O for the oxidation of the resulting hydroxylamine (NH2OH) to nitrite (NO2-). Thus, N2O from nitrification would therefore be expected to reflect the 18O signature of soil O2, whereas the 18O signature of N2O from nitrifier denitrification would reflect that of both soil O2 and H2O. It was assumed that (a) there would be no preferential removal of 18O or 16O during nitrifier denitrification or denitrification, (b) the 18O signature of the applied 18O-labelled water would remain constant over the experimental period, and (c) any O exchange between H(2)18O and NO3- would be negligible under the chosen experimental conditions. These assumptions were tested and validated for a silt loam soil at 50% water-filled pore space (WFPS) following application of 400 mg N kg-1 dry soil. We compared the results of our new method with those of a conventional inhibition method using 0.02% v/v acetylene (C2H2) and 80% v/v O2 in helium. Both the 18O-15N-enrichment and inhibitor methods identified nitrifier denitrification to be a major source of N2O, accounting for 44 and 40%, respectively, of N2O production over 24 h. However, compared to our 18O-15N-method, the inhibitor method overestimated the contribution from nitrification at the expense of denitrification, probably due to incomplete inhibition of nitrifier denitrification and denitrification by large concentrations of O2 and a negative effect of C2H2 on denitrification. We consider our new 18O-15N-enrichment method to be more reliable than the use of inhibitors; it enables the

  17. An Efficient Method to Calculate the Aggregated Isotopic Distribution and Exact Center-Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claesen, Jürgen; Dittwald, Piotr; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Valkenborg, Dirk

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we present a computation- and memory-efficient method to calculate the probabilities of occurrence and exact center-masses of the aggregated isotopic distribution of a molecule. The method uses fundamental mathematical properties of polynomials given by the Newton-Girard theorem and Viete's formulae. The calculation is based on the atomic composition of the molecule and the natural abundances of the elemental isotopes in normal terrestrial matter. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, which we named BRAIN, we compare it with the results obtained from five existing software packages ( IsoPro, Mercury, Emass, NeutronCluster, and IsoDalton) for 10 biomolecules. Additionally, we compare the computed mass centers with the results obtained by calculating, and subsequently aggregating, the fine isotopic distribution for two of the exemplary biomolecules. The algorithm will be made available as a Bioconductor package in R, and is also available upon request.

  18. Synthesis of isotopically labeled daclatasvir for use in human clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Easter, John A; Burrell, Richard C; Bonacorsi, Samuel J

    2016-04-01

    Daclatasvir is a novel hepatitis C virus NS5A inhibitor developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and marketed as Daklinza®. The need to support the development of daclatasvir required the synthesis of carbon-14 labeled material for use in human absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion studies. A total of 7.53 mCi of [(14) C]-daclatasvir was synthesized in eight steps from commercially available [(14) C]-copper cyanide. The radiochemical purity was 99.6%, and specific activity was 3.86 μCi/mg. To support a human absolute bioavailability study, 5.56 g of [(13) C2 , (15) N4 ]-daclatasvir was synthesized in four steps.

  19. Stable isotope labeling method for the investigation of protein haptenation by electrophilic skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Erika; Boyd, Pete; Aleksic, Maja; Cubberley, Richard; O'Connor, David; Skipp, Paul

    2014-11-01

    The risk of contact sensitization is a major consideration in the development of new formulations for personal care products. However, developing a mechanistic approach for non-animal risk assessment requires further understanding of haptenation of skin proteins by sensitizing chemicals, which is the molecular initiating event causative of skin sensitization. The non-stoichiometric nature of protein haptenation results in relatively low levels of modification, often of low abundant proteins, presenting a major challenge for their assignment in complex biological matrices such as skin. Instrumental advances over the last few years have led to a considerable increase in sensitivity of mass spectrometry (MS) techniques. We have combined these advancements with a novel dual-labeling/LC-MS(E) approach to provide an in-depth direct comparison of human serum albumin (HSA), 2,4-dinitro-1-chlorobenzene (DNCB), 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (MCI), trans-cinnamaldehyde, and 6-methyl coumarin. These data have revealed novel insights into the differences in protein haptenation between sensitizers with different reaction mechanisms and sensitizing potency; the extreme sensitizers DNCB and MCI were shown to modify a greater number of nucleophilic sites than the moderate sensitizer cinnamaldehyde; and the weak/non-sensitizer 6-methyl coumarin was restricted to only a single nucleophilic residue within HSA. The evaluation of this dual labeling/LC-MS(E) approach using HSA as a model protein has also demonstrated that this strategy could be applied to studying global haptenation in complex mixtures of skin-related proteins by different chemicals.

  20. Combining Capillary Electrophoresis Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Stable Isotopic Labeling Techniques for Comparative Crustacean Peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junhua; Zhang, Yuzhuo; Xiang, Feng; Zhang, Zichuan; Li, Lingjun

    2010-01-01

    Herein we describe a sensitive and straightforward off-line capillary electrophoresis (CE) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) interface in conjunction with stable isotopic labeling (SIL) technique for comparative neuropeptidomic analysis in crustacean model organisms. Two SIL schemes, including a binary H/D formaldehyde labeling technique and novel, laboratory-developed multiplexed dimethylated leucine-based isobaric tagging reagents, have been evaluated in these proof-of-concept experiments. We employ these isotopic labeling techniques in conjunction with CE-MALDI MS for quantitative peptidomic analyses of the pericardial organs isolated from two crustacean species, the European green crab Carcinus maenas and the blue crab Callinectes sapidus. Isotopically labeled peptide pairs are found to co-migrate in CE fractions and quantitative changes in relative abundances of peptide pairs are obtained by comparing peak intensities of respective peptide pairs. Several neuropeptide families exhibit changes in response to salinity stress, suggesting potential physiological functions of these signaling peptides. PMID:20334868

  1. Worms from venus and mars: proteomics profiling of sexual differences in Caenorhabditis elegans using in vivo 15N isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Tops, Bastiaan B J; Gauci, Sharon; Heck, Albert J R; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Hermaphrodites of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produce both sperm and oocytes in the same germline. To investigate the process underlying spermatogenesis and oogenesis separately, we used a quantitative proteomics approach applied to two mutant worm lines (fem-3(q20) and fem-1(hc17)) developing only male and female germlines, respectively. We used stable isotopic labeling of whole animals by feeding them either (14)N or (15)N labeled Escherichia coli. This way, we could confidently identify and quantify 1040 proteins in two independent experiments. Of these, approximately 400 proteins showed significant differential expression between female-like and male-like animals. As expected, proteins linked to oogenesis were found to be highly upregulated in the feminized worms, whereas proteins involved in spermatogenesis were found to be highly upregulated in the masculinized worms. This was complemented by many proteins strongly enriched in either mutant. Although the function of the majority of these proteins is unknown, their expression profile indicates that they have an as yet unrecognized role in the development and/or function of the female- and male germline in C. elegans. We show that members of several protein complexes as well as functionally similar proteins show comparable abundance ratios, indicating coregulation of protein expression. Additional analysis comparing our protein data to a previously published microarray data set shows that mRNA and protein expression are poorly correlating. We provide one of the first examples of a large-scale quantitative proteomics experiment in C. elegans and show the potential and feasibility of an approach enabling system-wide accurate quantitative proteomics experiments in this model organism. PMID:19916504

  2. International experiences in assessing vitamin A status and applying the vitamin A-labeled isotope dilution method.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Teros, Veronica; Chileshe, Justin; Idohou-Dossou, Nicole; Fajarwati, Tetra; Medoua Nama, Gabriel; Newton, Sam; Vinod Kumar, Malavika; Wang, Zhixu; Wasantwisut, Emorn; Hunt, Janet R

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate vitamin A (VA) nutrition continues to be a major problem worldwide, and many interventions being implemented to improve VA status in various populations need to be evaluated. The interpretation of results after an intervention depends greatly on the method selected to assess VA status. To evaluate the effect of an intervention on VA status, researchers in Cameroon, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Senegal and Zambia have used serum retinol as an indicator, and have not always found improvement in response to supplementation. One problem is that homeostatic control of serum retinol may mask positive effects of treatment in that changes in concentration are observed only when status is either moderately to severely depleted or excessive. Because VA is stored mainly in the liver, measurements of hepatic VA stores are the “gold standard” for assessing VA status. Dose response tests such as the relative dose response (RDR) and the modified relative dose response (MRDR), allow a qualitative assessment of VA liver stores. On the other hand, the use of the vitamin A-labeled isotope dilution (VALID) technique, (using 13C or 2H-labeled retinyl acetate) serves as an indirect method to quantitatively estimate total body and liver VA stores. Countries including Cameroon, China, Ghana, Mexico, Thailand and Zambia are now applying the VALID method to sensitively assess changes in VA status during interventions, or to estimate a population’s dietary requirement for VA. Transition to the use of more sensitive biochemical indicators of VA status such as the VALID technique is needed to effectively assess interventions in populations where mild to moderate VA deficiency is more prevalent than severe deficiency. PMID:25537105

  3. Stable Isotope Labeled Tracers for Metabolic Pathway Elucidation by GC-MS and FT-MS

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K.; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Lane, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in analytical methodologies, principally nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), over the last decade have made large-scale analysis of the human metabolome a reality. This is leading to the reawakening of the importance of metabolism in human diseases, particularly widespread metabolic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Emerging NMR and MS atom-tracking technologies and informatics is poised to revolutionize metabolomics-based research because they deliver the high information throughput (HIT) that is needed for deciphering systems biochemistry. In particular, Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) enables unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalized metabolic networks, in a wide range of experimental systems, including human subjects. MS offers a wide range of initial capital outlay and operating costs, ranging from gas-chromatography (GC) MS affordable by many individual laboratories, to the HIT-supporting Fourier-transform (FT) class of MS that rivals NMR in cost and infrastructure support. This chapter will focus on sample preparation, instrument, and data processing procedures for these two extremes of MS instrumentation used in SIRM. PMID:25270929

  4. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady, J; Schwender, J; Shachar-Hill, Y; Morgan, JA

    2012-03-26

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (CO2)-C-13 dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  5. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady J.; Schwender J.; Shachar-Hill, Y.; Morgan, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on {sup 13}CO{sub 2} dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  6. Metabolic cartography: experimental quantification of metabolic fluxes from isotopic labelling studies.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, John; Schwender, Jörg; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Morgan, John A

    2012-03-01

    For the past decade, flux maps have provided researchers with an in-depth perspective on plant metabolism. As a rapidly developing field, significant headway has been made recently in computation, experimentation, and overall understanding of metabolic flux analysis. These advances are particularly applicable to the study of plant metabolism. New dynamic computational methods such as non-stationary metabolic flux analysis are finding their place in the toolbox of metabolic engineering, allowing more organisms to be studied and decreasing the time necessary for experimentation, thereby opening new avenues by which to explore the vast diversity of plant metabolism. Also, improved methods of metabolite detection and measurement have been developed, enabling increasingly greater resolution of flux measurements and the analysis of a greater number of the multitude of plant metabolic pathways. Methods to deconvolute organelle-specific metabolism are employed with increasing effectiveness, elucidating the compartmental specificity inherent in plant metabolism. Advances in metabolite measurements have also enabled new types of experiments, such as the calculation of metabolic fluxes based on (13)CO(2) dynamic labelling data, and will continue to direct plant metabolic engineering. Newly calculated metabolic flux maps reveal surprising and useful information about plant metabolism, guiding future genetic engineering of crops to higher yields. Due to the significant level of complexity in plants, these methods in combination with other systems biology measurements are necessary to guide plant metabolic engineering in the future.

  7. Using carbon isotope fractionation for an improved quantification of CH4 oxidation efficiency in Arctic peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, I.; Knoblauch, C.; Gebert, J.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Much research effort is focused on identifying global CH4 sources and sinks to estimate their current and potential strength in response to land-use change and global warming. Aerobic CH4 oxidation is regarded as the key process reducing the strength of CH4 emissions in wetlands, but is hitherto difficult to quantify. Recent studies quantify the efficiency of CH4 oxidation based on CH4 stable isotope signatures. The approach utilizes the fact that a significant isotope fractionation occurs when CH4 is oxidized. Moreover, it also considers isotope fractionation by diffusion. For field applications the 'open-system equation' is applied to determine the CH4 oxidation efficiency: fox = (δE - δP)/ (αox - αtrans) where fox is the fraction of CH4 oxidized; δE is δ13C of emitted CH4; δP is δ13C of produced CH4; αox is the isotopic fractionation factor of oxidation; αtrans is the isotopic fractionation factor of transport. We quantified CH4 oxidation in polygonal tundra soils of Russia's Lena River Delta analyzing depth profiles of CH4 concentrations and stable isotope signatures. Therefore, both fractionation factors αox and αtrans were determined for three polygon centers with differing water table positions and a polygon rim. While most previous studies on landfill cover soils have assumed a gas transport dominated by advection (αtrans = 1), other CH4 transport mechanisms as diffusion have to be considered in peatlands and αtrans exceeds a value of 1. At our study we determined αtrans = 1.013 ± 0.003 for CH4 when diffusion is the predominant transport mechanism. Furthermore, results showed that αox differs widely between sites and horizons (αox = 1.013 ± 0.012) and has to be determined for each case. The impact of both fractionation factors on the quantification of CH4 oxidation was estimated by considering both the potential diffusion rate at different water contents and potential oxidation rates. Calculations for a water saturated tundra soil

  8. Live-cell vibrational imaging of choline metabolites by stimulated Raman scattering coupled with isotope-based metabolic labeling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fanghao; Wei, Lu; Zheng, Chaogu; Shen, Yihui

    2014-01-01

    Choline is a small molecule that occupies a key position in the biochemistry of all living organisms. Recent studies have strongly implicated choline metabolites in cancer, atherosclerosis and nervous system development. To detect choline and its metabolites, existing physical methods such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography, are often limited by the poor spatial resolution and substantial radiation dose. Fluorescence imaging, although with submicrometer resolution, requires introduction of bulky fluorophores and thus is difficult in labeling the small choline molecule. By combining the emerging bond-selective stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with metabolic incorporation of deuterated choline, herein we have achieved high resolution imaging of choline-containing metabolites in living mammalian cell lines, primary hippocampal neurons and multicellular organism C. elegans. Different subcellular distributions of choline metabolites are observed between cancer cells and non-cancer cells, which may reveal functional difference in the choline metabolism and lipid-mediated signaling events. In neurons, choline incorporation is visualized within both soma and neurites, where choline metabolites are more evenly distributed compared to the protein. Furthermore, choline localization is also observed in the pharynx region of C. elegans larvae, consistent with its organogenesis mechanism. These applications demonstrate the potential of isotope-based stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for future choline-related disease detection and development monitoring in vivo. PMID:24555181

  9. Stable isotope labelling reveals that NaCl stress decreases the production of Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) arboris lipochitooligosaccharide signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Penttinen, Petri; Räsänen, Leena A; Lortet, Gilles; Lindström, Kristina

    2013-12-01

    Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) arboris is a symbiont of salt-tolerant leguminous trees in the genera Acacia and Prosopis that are utilized in the prevention of soil erosion and desertification and in phytoremediation of salinized soil. Signalling between the plant and the rhizobia is essential for the formation of effective symbiosis that increases the success of reclaiming saline sites. We assessed the effect of salt stress on the growth and the production of lipochitooligosaccharide signalling molecules (LCOs) of S. arboris HAMBI 2361, an LCO-overproducing derivative of the S. arboris type strain HAMBI 1552. The strain tolerated NaCl up to 750 mM. To obtain both qualitative and quantitative information on the LCO production under salt stress, we devised a method where LCOs were differentially labelled by stable isotopes of nitrogen, (14)N and (15)N, and analysed by mass spectrometry. Under control conditions, the strain produced altogether 27 structural LCO variants. In 380 mM NaCl, 13 LCO variants were produced in detectable amounts, and six of these were reliably quantified, ranging from one-tenth to one-third of the non-stressed one.

  10. Tracing nitrogenous disinfection byproducts after medium pressure UV water treatment by stable isotope labeling and high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, Annemieke; Martijn, Bram J; Vughs, Dennis; Baken, Kirsten A; van Wezel, Annemarie P

    2015-04-01

    Advanced oxidation processes are important barriers for organic micropollutants (e.g., pharmaceuticals, pesticides) in (drinking) water treatment. Studies indicate that medium pressure (MP) UV/H2O2 treatment leads to a positive response in Ames mutagenicity tests, which is then removed after granulated activated carbon (GAC) filtration. The formed potentially mutagenic substances were hitherto not identified and may result from the reaction of photolysis products of nitrate with (photolysis products of) natural organic material (NOM). In this study we present an innovative approach to trace the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) of MP UV water treatment, based on stable isotope labeled nitrate combined with high resolution mass spectrometry. It was shown that after MP UV treatment of artificial water containing NOM and nitrate, multiple nitrogen containing substances were formed. In total 84 N-DBPs were detected at individual concentrations between 1 to 135 ng/L bentazon-d6 equivalents, with a summed concentration of 1.2 μg/L bentazon-d6 equivalents. The chemical structures of three byproducts were confirmed. Screening for the 84 N-DBPs in water samples from a full-scale drinking water treatment plant based on MP UV/H2O2 treatment showed that 22 of the N-DBPs found in artificial water were also detected in real water samples.

  11. A novel method to measure isotopic labeled gas-phase nitrous acid (HO15NO) in biogeochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dianming; Kampf, Christopher; Pöschl, Ulrich; Oswald, Robert; Cui, Junfang; Ermel, Michael; Hu, Chunsheng; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    We developed a new method (gas-phase stripping-derivatization coupled to LC-MS) to measure the 15N atom percent excess (APE) of HONO in the gas-phase. Gaseous HONO is quantitatively collected and transferred to an azo dye by the well-known Griess reaction in the Long Path Absorption Photometer (LOPAP). The reaction solutions containing the dye are collected at the outflow of the LOPAP, purified by solid-phase extraction and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The unlabeled azo dye (C18H19O2N5S) with a monoisotopic molecular mass of 369.41 g mol-1 can be detected as its protonated molecular ion ([M+H+], M) by HPLC-MS at a retention time of 2.8 min. Due to the natural isotope distribution M + 0, M + 1, M + 2, and M + 3 ions were considered for the calculation of the 15N APE. The optimal working range was found to be between 20 and 50% for the 15N/14N ratio. The optimum pH and solvents for extraction by SPE and potential interferences are discussed. The method has been applied for the measurement of HO15NO emissions from soil in a dynamic chamber with and without spiking 15N labeled urea. Our results confirm biogenic HONO emissions from soil as HO15NO was measured after addition of 15N urea.

  12. Isotopically Labeled Expression in E. coli, Purification, and Refolding of the Full Ectodomain of the Influenza Virus Membrane Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Spencer, Ryan M.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes methods to produce an isotopically labeled 23 kDa viral membrane protein with purified yield of 20 mg/L of E. coli shake flask culture. This yield is sufficient for NMR structural studies and the protein production methods are simple, straightforward, and rapid and likely applicable to other recombinant membrane proteins expressed in E. coli. The target FHA2 protein is the full ectodomain construct of the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein which catalyzes fusion between the viral and the cellular endosomal membranes during infection. The high yield of FHA2 was achieved by: (1) initial growth in rich medium to A600 ~ 8 followed by a switch to minimal medium and induction of protein expression; and (2) obtaining protein both from purification of the detergent-soluble lysate and from solubilization, purification, and refolding of inclusion bodies. The high cell density was achieved after optimization of pH, oxygenation, and carbon source and concentration, and the refolding protocol was optimized using circular dichroism spectroscopy. For a single residue of membrane-associated FHA2 that was obtained from purification and refolding of inclusion bodies, native conformation was verified by the 13CO chemical shift measured using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:18640277

  13. Dual Label Stable Isotope Incubations Followed By Single Cell Nanosims Analyses To Investigate Microscale Phototroph-Heterotroph Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayali, X.; Samo, T. J.; Nilson, D.; Arandia Gorostidi, N.; alonso Saez, L.; Moran, X. A.; Weber, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    In natural ecosystems such as lakes and oceans as well as human-engineered systems for sunlight-regulated biomass production (such as algal biofuel ponds), the interaction between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes are critical to determine whether such systems are net autotrophic or heterotrophic. Traditional methods to quantify autotrophy and heterotrophy include primary productivity and bacterial production measurements using radiolabeled substrates that quantify these processes on the bulk scale. To examine the microscale interactions between individual autotrophic and heterotrophic cells, we incubate mixed microbial assemblages with 13C-bicarbonate and 15N-leucine to label individual autotrophs and heterotrophs, respectively. We use nano imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (with a Cameca NanoSIMS 50) to quantify the incorporation of the rare isotopes by single cells. We will present results from experiments examining the impact of warming on the exchange of C and N between algal and bacterial cells from the coastal Atlantic Ocean, which suggest that increased temperature may strengthen physical interactions and exchange. We will also present data from experiments examining the influence of attached bacteria on the cell-specific inorganic carbon fixation rates of biofuel-producing algal cultures which suggest that certain algal-attached bacterial groups grow faster than when free-living and influence algal growth. We conclude that the examination of individual cells uncover interactions that would be difficult, if not impossible, to investigate with bulk methods.

  14. Stable isotope labeling confirms mixotrophic nature of streamer biofilm communities at alkaline hot springs

    PubMed Central

    Schubotz, Florence; Hays, Lindsay E.; Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R.; Gillespie, Aimee; Shock, Everett L.; Summons, Roger E.

    2015-01-01

    Streamer biofilm communities (SBC) are often observed within chemosynthetic zones of Yellowstone hot spring outflow channels, where temperatures exceed those conducive to photosynthesis. Nearest the hydrothermal source (75–88°C) SBC comprise thermophilic Archaea and Bacteria, often mixed communities including Desulfurococcales and uncultured Crenarchaeota, as well as Aquificae and Thermus, each carrying diagnostic membrane lipid biomarkers. We tested the hypothesis that SBC can alternate their metabolism between autotrophy and heterotrophy depending on substrate availability. Feeding experiments were performed at two alkaline hot springs in Yellowstone National Park: Octopus Spring and “Bison Pool,” using various 13C-labeled substrates (bicarbonate, formate, acetate, and glucose) to determine the relative uptake of these different carbon sources. Highest 13C uptake, at both sites, was from acetate into almost all bacterial fatty acids, particularly into methyl-branched C15, C17 and C19 fatty acids that are diagnostic for Thermus/Meiothermus, and some Firmicutes as well as into universally common C16:0 and C18:0 fatty acids. 13C-glucose showed a similar, but a 10–30 times lower uptake across most fatty acids. 13C-bicarbonate uptake, signifying the presence of autotrophic communities was only significant at “Bison Pool” and was observed predominantly in non-specific saturated C16, C18, C20, and C22 fatty acids. Incorporation of 13C-formate occurred only at very low rates at “Bison Pool” and was almost undetectable at Octopus Spring, suggesting that formate is not an important carbon source for SBC. 13C-uptake into archaeal lipids occurred predominantly with 13C-acetate, suggesting also that archaeal communities at both springs have primarily heterotrophic carbon assimilation pathways. We hypothesize that these communities are energy-limited and predominantly nurtured by input of exogenous organic material, with only a small fraction being sustained

  15. Stable isotope labeling confirms mixotrophic nature of streamer biofilm communities at alkaline hot springs.

    PubMed

    Schubotz, Florence; Hays, Lindsay E; Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R; Gillespie, Aimee; Shock, Everett L; Summons, Roger E

    2015-01-01

    Streamer biofilm communities (SBC) are often observed within chemosynthetic zones of Yellowstone hot spring outflow channels, where temperatures exceed those conducive to photosynthesis. Nearest the hydrothermal source (75-88°C) SBC comprise thermophilic Archaea and Bacteria, often mixed communities including Desulfurococcales and uncultured Crenarchaeota, as well as Aquificae and Thermus, each carrying diagnostic membrane lipid biomarkers. We tested the hypothesis that SBC can alternate their metabolism between autotrophy and heterotrophy depending on substrate availability. Feeding experiments were performed at two alkaline hot springs in Yellowstone National Park: Octopus Spring and "Bison Pool," using various (13)C-labeled substrates (bicarbonate, formate, acetate, and glucose) to determine the relative uptake of these different carbon sources. Highest (13)C uptake, at both sites, was from acetate into almost all bacterial fatty acids, particularly into methyl-branched C15, C17 and C19 fatty acids that are diagnostic for Thermus/Meiothermus, and some Firmicutes as well as into universally common C16:0 and C18:0 fatty acids. (13)C-glucose showed a similar, but a 10-30 times lower uptake across most fatty acids. (13)C-bicarbonate uptake, signifying the presence of autotrophic communities was only significant at "Bison Pool" and was observed predominantly in non-specific saturated C16, C18, C20, and C22 fatty acids. Incorporation of (13)C-formate occurred only at very low rates at "Bison Pool" and was almost undetectable at Octopus Spring, suggesting that formate is not an important carbon source for SBC. (13)C-uptake into archaeal lipids occurred predominantly with (13)C-acetate, suggesting also that archaeal communities at both springs have primarily heterotrophic carbon assimilation pathways. We hypothesize that these communities are energy-limited and predominantly nurtured by input of exogenous organic material, with only a small fraction being sustained by

  16. Residue-Specific Structural Kinetics of Proteins through the Union of Isotope Labeling, Mid-IR Pulse Shaping, and Coherent 2D IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Woys, Ann Marie; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a methodology for studying protein kinetics using a rapid-scan technology for collecting 2D IR spectra. In conjunction with isotope labeling, 2D IR spectroscopy is able to probe the secondary structure and environment of individual residues in polypeptides and proteins. It is particularly useful for membrane and aggregate proteins. Our rapid-scan technology relies on a mid-IR pulse shaper that computer generates the pulse shapes, much like in an NMR spectrometer. With this device, data collection is faster, easier, and more accurate. We describe our 2D IR spectrometer, as well as protocols for 13C=18O isotope labeling, and then illustrate the technique with an application to the aggregation of the human islet amyloid polypeptide form type 2 diabetes. PMID:20472067

  17. Investigation of intramolecular proton migration in a series of model, metal-cationized tripeptides using in situ generation of an isotope label.

    PubMed

    Bulleigh, Kellis; Howard, Angela; Do, Trang; Wu, Qun; Anbalagan, Victor; Stipdonk, Michael Van

    2006-01-01

    In this study we used an isotope label, generated in situ, to investigate intramolecular proton migration or scrambling during formation of [b(2)+17+Li](+) products by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of Li(+)-cationized tripeptides. To generate the isotope label, we used a McLafferty-type rearrangement of N-terminally acetylated, C-terminal peptide tert-butyl esters in which all amide positions were exchanged with deuterium. Using a set of small, model peptides, we show that intramolecular proton scrambling occurs during CID, particularly amongst adjacent sites along a peptide backbone, on the time scales employed for low-energy collisional activation in an ion-trap mass spectrometer.

  18. Crystallization of Enantiomerically Pure Proteins from Quasi-Racemic Mixtures: Structure Determination by X-Ray Diffraction of Isotope-Labeled Ester Insulin and Human Insulin.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Dhayalan, Balamurugan; Avital-Shmilovici, Michal; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Kent, Stephen B H

    2016-03-01

    As a part of a program aimed towards the study of the dynamics of human insulin-protein dimer formation using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we used total chemical synthesis to prepare stable isotope labeled [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] human insulin, via [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] ester insulin as a key intermediate product that facilitates folding of the synthetic protein molecule (see preceding article). Here, we describe the crystal structure of the synthetic isotope-labeled ester insulin intermediate and the product synthetic human insulin. Additionally, we present our observations on hexamer formation with these two proteins in the absence of phenol derivatives and/or Zn metal ions. We also describe and discuss the fractional crystallization of quasi-racemic protein mixtures containing each of these two synthetic proteins.

  19. Quantitative, Time-Resolved Proteomic Analysis by Combining Bioorthogonal Noncanonical Amino Acid Tagging and Pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture*

    PubMed Central

    Bagert, John D.; Xie, Yushu J.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Qi, Yutao; Hess, Sonja; Schuman, Erin M.; Tirrell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    An approach to proteomic analysis that combines bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) and pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (pSILAC) provides accurate quantitative information about rates of cellular protein synthesis on time scales of minutes. The method is capable of quantifying 1400 proteins produced by HeLa cells during a 30 min interval, a time scale that is inaccessible to isotope labeling techniques alone. Potential artifacts in protein quantification can be reduced to insignificant levels by limiting the extent of noncanonical amino acid tagging. We find no evidence for artifacts in protein identification in experiments that combine the BONCAT and pSILAC methods. PMID:24563536

  20. Heavy isotope labeling study of the turnover of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in BC/sup 3/H1 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhelal, R.; Bockaert, J.; Mermet-Bouvier, R.; Guillon, G.; Homburger, V.

    1987-06-25

    We have used the method of heavy isotope labeling to study the metabolic turnover of adenylate cyclase in a nonfusing muscle cell line, the BC/sup 3/H1 cells. These cells contains an adenylate cyclase coupled to beta-adrenergic receptors and highly stimulated by forskolin, a potent activator of the enzyme. After transfer of the cells from normal medium to heavy medium (a medium containing heavy labeled amino acids, /sup 3/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N), heavy isotope-labeled adenylate cyclase molecules progressively replace pre-existing light molecules. In sucrose gradient differential sedimentation, after a 5-day switch in heavy medium, the enzyme exhibited a higher mass (s = 8.40 +/- 0.03 S, n = 13) compared to the control enzyme. Indeed, the increase in the sedimentation coefficient of the heavy molecules was due to the synthesis of new molecules of adenylate cyclase labeled with heavy isotope amino acids since in the presence of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, no change in the sedimentation pattern of the forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase occurred. After incorporation of heavy isotope amino acids in the adenylate cyclase molecules, the kinetics parameters of the enzyme did not change. However, adenylate cyclase from cells incubated with heavy medium exhibits an activity about 2-fold lower than control. After switching the cells to the heavy medium, the decrease of the activity of the enzyme occurred during the first 24 h and thereafter remained at a steady state for at least 4 days. In contrast, 24 h after the switch, the sedimentation coefficient of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase was progressively shifted to a higher value.

  1. Evaluating the potential of a new isotope-labelled glyco-ligand for estimating the remnant liver function of schistosoma-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, P-C; Chiang, P-F; Lee, K-M; Yeh, C-H; Hsu, K-L; Liu, S-W; Shen, L-H; Peng, C-L; Fan, C-K; Luo, T-Y

    2013-01-01

    A new glyco-derivative compound (OCTAM) was developed and labelled with isotope to form (188) Re-OCTAM as a candidate nuclear medicine imaging agent for testing the liver function. We evaluated the potential of isotope-labelled OCTAM for estimating the remnant liver function in vitro and in vivo schistosoma-infected mice. The affinity of OCTAM to liver asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) was assessed by competitive inhibition assay in vitro. In vivo assessments were performed to score the remnant liver function in mice at different schistosomal infection stages. OCTAM binds specifically to ASGPR and showed competitive inhibition of anti-ASGPR antibody binding to hepatocytes, and was higher than that of other galactosyl ligands. Micro-SPECT/CT images of uninfected mice revealed strong liver uptake. Quantified serial images of mice infected for 9, 12 and 18 weeks showed delayed liver uptake, and the retention of uptake was inversely correlated with stage and grade of schistosoma infection. Pathological and biochemical analysis demonstrated that gradually accumulating liver injury caused by infection significantly influenced uptake of (188) Re-OCTAM. Hepatic ASGPR expression diminished only in the chronic infection stage. This study demonstrated that the isotope-labelled OCTAM could accumulate in the liver, might have potential as an imaging agent for in vivo hepatic function evaluation of schistosomiasis.

  2. Optimization of 13C dynamic nuclear polarization: isotopic labeling of free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kiswandi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a physics technique that amplifies the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals by transferring the high polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. Thus, the choice of free radical is crucial in DNP as it can directly affect the NMR signal enhancement levels, typically on the order of several thousand-fold in the liquid-state. In this study, we have investigated the efficiency of four variants of the well-known 4-oxo-TEMPO radical (normal 4-oxo-TEMPO plus its 15N-enriched and/or perdeuterated variants) for use in DNP of an important metabolic tracer [1-13C]acetate. Though the variants have significant differences in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra, we have found that changing the composition of the TEMPO radical through deuteration or 15N doping yields no significant difference in 13C DNP efficiency at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. On the other hand, deuteration of the solvent causes a significant increase of 13C polarization that is consistent over all the 4-oxo-TEMPO variants. These findings are consistent with the thermal mixing model of DNP. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  3. Non-homogeneity of isotopic labelling in 15N gas flux studies: theory, some observations and possible lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Well, Reinhard; Buchen, Caroline; Deppe, Marianna; Eschenbach, Wolfram; Gattinger, Andreas; Giesemann, Anette; Krause, Hans-Martin; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying dinitrogen (N2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from different soil N pools and processes can be accomplished using the 15N tracer technique but this is subject to four different sources of bias (i. - iv.). This approach includes 15N labelling of selected N pools in soil and subsequent isotope analysis of all relevant N pools as well as of gas samples from enclosures, i.e. mixtures of soil-derived and atmospheric N2 and N2O. Depending on the processes of interest, there may be 15N labelling of one or several N pools, were several labelling treatment are needed in the latter case (e.g. Müller et al., 2004). Measuring pool-derived N2 or N2O has been shown to include two calculation problems, (i.) arising from multiple pools (e.g. Arah, 1992) and (ii.) dealing with the non-random distribution of N2 and N2O mole masses (Hauck et al., 1958). Non-randomness can be solved if m/z 28, 29 and 30 are correctly analysed and the 15N enrichment of one (to distinguish two pools, i.e. soil and atmosphere) or two pools (in case of three pools) is known (Spott & Stange, 2008). Moreover (iii.), NO3- pools generating N2 and N2O via denitrification can be identical or different, e.g. if N2O evolved from higher enriched NO3- in deeper soil was more reduced to N2 compared to N2O evolved from N2O from shallow soil with lower enrichment, or vice versa. Apportioning N2O fluxes to NH4+ (nitrification and/or nitrifier denitrification) and NO3- (denitrification) is often conducted by NO3-labeling, measuring δ15N of emitted N2O and applying mixing equations were the measured 15N enrichment of NH4+and NO3-pool is used. However, this assumes that the average 15N enrichment of NH4+and NO3-in the soil is identical to the enrichment in the active soil domain producing N2 and/or N2O. Violation of this precondition must lead to bias in source apportionment (iv.), but to our knowledge this has not been investigated until now. Here we present conceptual models and model calculations

  4. Improved quantification of microbial CH4 oxidation efficiency in arctic wetland soils using carbon isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, I.; Knoblauch, C.; Gebert, J.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Permafrost-affected tundra soils are significant sources of the climate-relevant trace gas methane (CH4). The observed accelerated warming of the arctic will cause deeper permafrost thawing, followed by increased carbon mineralization and CH4 formation in water-saturated tundra soils, thus creating a positive feedback to climate change. Aerobic CH4 oxidation is regarded as the key process reducing CH4 emissions from wetlands, but quantification of turnover rates has remained difficult so far. The application of carbon stable isotope fractionation enables the in situ quantification of CH4 oxidation efficiency in arctic wetland soils. The aim of the current study is to quantify CH4 oxidation efficiency in permafrost-affected tundra soils in Russia's Lena River delta based on stable isotope signatures of CH4. Therefore, depth profiles of CH4 concentrations and δ13CH4 signatures were measured and the fractionation factors for the processes of oxidation (αox) and diffusion (αdiff) were determined. Most previous studies employing stable isotope fractionation for the quantification of CH4 oxidation in soils of other habitats (such as landfill cover soils) have assumed a gas transport dominated by advection (αtrans = 1). In tundra soils, however, diffusion is the main gas transport mechanism and diffusive stable isotope fractionation should be considered alongside oxidative fractionation. For the first time, the stable isotope fractionation of CH4 diffusion through water-saturated soils was determined with an αdiff = 1.001 ± 0.000 (n = 3). CH4 stable isotope fractionation during diffusion through air-filled pores of the investigated polygonal tundra soils was αdiff = 1.013 ± 0.003 (n = 18). Furthermore, it was found that αox differs widely between sites and horizons (mean αox = 1.017 ± 0.009) and needs to be determined on a case by case basis. The impact of both fractionation factors on the quantification of CH4 oxidation was analyzed by considering both the

  5. Improved quantification of microbial CH4 oxidation efficiency in Arctic wetland soils using carbon isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, I.; Knoblauch, C.; Gebert, J.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-12-01

    Permafrost-affected tundra soils are significant sources of the climate-relevant trace gas methane (CH4). The observed accelerated warming of the Arctic will cause a deeper permafrost thawing followed by increased carbon mineralization and CH4 formation in water saturated tundra soils which might cause a positive feedback to climate change. Aerobic CH4 oxidation is regarded as the key process reducing CH4 emissions from wetlands, but quantification of turnover rates has remained difficult so far. The application of carbon stable isotope fractionation enables the in situ quantification of CH4 oxidation efficiency in arctic wetland soils. The aim of the current study is to quantify CH4 oxidation efficiency in permafrost-affected tundra soils in Russia's Lena River Delta based on stable isotope signatures of CH4. Therefore, depth profiles of CH4 concentrations and δ13CH4-signatures were measured and the fractionation factors for the processes of oxidation (αox) and diffusion (αdiff) were determined. Most previous studies employing stable isotope fractionation for the quantification of CH4 oxidation in soils of other habitats (e.g. landfill cover soils) have assumed a gas transport dominated by advection (αtrans = 1). In tundra soils, however, diffusion is the main gas transport mechanism, aside from ebullition. Hence, diffusive stable isotope fractionation has to be considered. For the first time, the stable isotope fractionation of CH4 diffusion through water-saturated soils was determined with an αdiff = 1.001 ± 0.000 (n = 3). CH4 stable isotope fractionation during diffusion through air-filled pores of the investigated polygonal tundra soils was αdiff = 1.013 ± 0.003 (n = 18). Furthermore, it was found that αox differs widely between sites and horizons (mean αox, = 1.017 ± 0.009) and needs to be determined individually. The impact of both fractionation factors on the quantification of CH4 oxidation was analyzed by considering both the potential diffusion

  6. An in-advance stable isotope labeling strategy for relative analysis of multiple acidic plant hormones in sub-milligram Arabidopsis thaliana seedling and a single seed.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohong; Ouyang, Yue; Chu, Jinfang; Yan, Jing; Yu, Yan; Li, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Jun; Yan, Cunyu

    2014-04-18

    A sensitive and reliable in-advance stable isotope labeling strategy was developed for simultaneous relative quantification of 8 acidic plant hormones in sub-milligram amount of plant materials. Bromocholine bromide (BETA) and its deuterated counterpart D9-BETA were used to in-advance derivatize control and sample extracts individually, which were then combined and subjected to solid-phase extraction (SPE) purification followed by UPLC-MS/MS analysis. Relative quantification of target compounds was obtained by calculation of the peak area ratios of BETA/D9-BETA labeled plant hormones. The in-advance stable isotope labeling strategy realized internal standard-based relative quantification of multiple kinds of plant hormones independent of availability of internal standard of every analyte with enhanced sensitivity of 1-3 orders of magnitude. Meanwhile, the in-advance labeling contributes to higher sample throughput and more reliability. The method was successfully applied to determine 8 plant hormones in 0.8mg DW (dry weight) of seedlings and 4 plant hormones from single seed of Arabidopsis thaliana. The results show the potential of the method in relative quantification of multiple plant hormones in tiny plant tissues or organs, which will advance the knowledge of the crosstalk mechanism of plant hormones.

  7. MaXIC-Q Web: a fully automated web service using statistical and computational methods for protein quantitation based on stable isotope labeling and LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Chih-Chiang; Tsui, Yin-Hao; Yian, Yi-Hwa; Chen, Yi-Ju; Yang, Han-Yin; Yu, Chuan-Yih; Lynn, Ke-Shiuan; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2009-07-01

    Isotope labeling combined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) provides a robust platform for analyzing differential protein expression in proteomics research. We present a web service, called MaXIC-Q Web (http://ms.iis.sinica.edu.tw/MaXIC-Q_Web/), for quantitation analysis of large-scale datasets generated from proteomics experiments using various stable isotope-labeling techniques, e.g. SILAC, ICAT and user-developed labeling methods. It accepts spectral files in the standard mzXML format and search results from SEQUEST, Mascot and ProteinProphet as input. Furthermore, MaXIC-Q Web uses statistical and computational methods to construct two kinds of elution profiles for each ion, namely, PIMS (projected ion mass spectrum) and XIC (extracted ion chromatogram) from MS data. Toward accurate quantitation, a stringent validation procedure is performed on PIMSs to filter out peptide ions interfered with co-eluting peptides or noise. The areas of XICs determine ion abundances, which are used to calculate peptide and protein ratios. Since MaXIC-Q Web adopts stringent validation on spectral data, it achieves high accuracy so that manual validation effort can be substantially reduced. Furthermore, it provides various visualization diagrams and comprehensive quantitation reports so that users can conveniently inspect quantitation results. In summary, MaXIC-Q Web is a user-friendly, interactive, robust, generic web service for quantitation based on ICAT and SILAC labeling techniques.

  8. Multi-Analytic Based Determination of Substrate Fate From in situ Stable Isotope Labeled Exposures of Natural Microbial Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, M. S.; Cory, A.; Riha, K. M.; Huang, E. L.; Boaro, A. A.; Metz, T. O.; Gritsenko, M. A.; Mobberley, J. M.; Nelson, W.; Kim, Y. M.; Moran, J.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial communities play impactful roles in almost every aspect of our society including the environment, climate, agriculture and human health, expanding the functional capacity of life on earth. The recent emergence of a suite of omics driven technologies offers powerful tools for investigating functionality of this community. However, these tools provide only a static snapshot of the community in space and time. The temporal nature of stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments expands the depth at which microbial communities can be investigated and understood. While selectively targeting only metabolically active organisms in a community, the labeled substrate can be tracked spatially, temporally and phylo-genetically and linked to active functions, organism interactions and exchanges. Single SIP technologies are limited in their ability to describe the biological system as a whole. However, integration of multiple SIP based analytics offers a more comprehensive description of substrate fate. The phototroph based microbial mat community resident in Hot Lake, a hypersaline lake located in Washington State, offers a tractable system for testing the multi analytic approach. We exposed the mat to three different 13C-labeled substrates (HCO3-, glucose and acetate) in situ at midday, and subsequently analyzed the mat 24 hours after incubation. The approach revealed different metabolic fates and organism specific uptake. When compared to acetate, glucose and HCO3- showed a greater incorporation into extracellular material, while acetate had a greater conversion to intracellular fatty acids, suggesting that HCO3- and glucose could be more readily shared as a community currency than acetate. All substrates were converted to amino acids and proteins, but while glucose and HCO3- demonstrated considerable incorporation into heterotrophic proteins, the conversion of acetate to these proteins was minimal, potentially implying that acetate derived intermediates are not a

  9. Efficient 18F labeling of cysteine-containing peptides and proteins using tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanglong; Hassink, Matthew; Selvaraj, Ramajeyam; Yap, Li-Peng; Park, Ryan; Wang, Hui; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Fox, Joseph M; Li, Zibo; Conti, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    18F positron emission tomography (PET) has a number of attributes that make it clinically attractive, including nearly 100% positron efficiency, very high specific radioactivity, and a short half-life of ≈ 110 minutes. However, the short half-life of 18F and the poor nucleophilicity of fluoride introduce challenges for the incorporation of 18F into complex molecules. Recently, the tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation was introduced as a novel 18F labeling method that proceeds with fast reaction rates without catalysis. Herein we report an efficient method for 18F labeling of free cysteines of peptides and proteins based on sequential ligation with a bifunctional tetrazinyl-maleimide and an 18F-labeled trans-cyclooctene. The newly developed method was tested for site-specific labeling of both c(RGDyC) peptide and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-SH protein. Starting with 4 mCi of 18F-trans-cyclooctene and only 10 μg of tetrazine-RGD (80-100 μM) or 15 μg of tetrazine-VEGF (6.0 μM), 18F-labeled RGD peptide and VEGF protein could be obtained within 5 minutes in 95% yield and 75% yield, respectively. The obtained tracers were then evaluated in mice. In conclusion, a highly efficient method has been developed for site-specific 18F labeling of cysteine-containing peptides and proteins. The special characteristics of the tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation provide unprecedented opportunities to synthesize 18F-labeled probes with high specific activity for PET applications.

  10. 13CO2 pulse labelling of plants in tandem with stable isotope probing: methodological considerations for examining microbial function in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Robert I; Manefield, Mike; Ostle, Nick; McNamara, Niall; O'Donnell, Anthony G; Bailey, Mark J; Whiteley, Andrew S

    2004-07-01

    Recently developed 13CO2 pulse labelling and stable isotope probing (SIP) methods offer the potential to track 13C-labelled plant photosynthate into phylogenetic groups of microbial taxa in the rhizosphere, permitting an examination of the link between soil microbial diversity and carbon flow in situ. We tested the feasibility of this approach to detect functional differences in microbial communities utilising recently fixed plant photosynthate in moisture perturbed grassland turfs. Specifically, we addressed two questions: (1) How does moisture perturbation (three treatments; continual wetting, drying, and drying followed by rewetting) affect the assimilation of 13C-labelled exudates carbon into the soil microbial community?; (2) Can 13C deposited in soil from pulse-labelled plants be used to identify microbes utilising plant exudates using SIP methodologies? Net CO2 fluxes showed that prior to 13CO2 pulse labelling, all treatments were photosynthetically active, but differences were observed in night time respiration, indicating moisture treatments had impacted on net CO2 efflux. Measurements of pulse-derived 13C incorporated into soil RNA over 2 months showed that there was only evidence of 13C enrichment in the continuously wetted treatments. However, isotopic values represented only a 0.1-0.2 13C at.% increase over natural abundance levels and were found to be insufficient for the application of RNA-SIP. These findings reveal that in this experimental system, the microbial uptake of labelled carbon from plant exudates is low, and further optimisation of methodologies may be required for application of SIP to natural plant-soil systems where 13C tracer dilution is a consideration. PMID:15177910

  11. Nonuniform isotope patterns produced by collision-induced dissociation of homogeneously labeled ubiquitin: implications for spatially resolved hydrogen/deuterium exchange ESI-MS studies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Peter L; Konermann, Lars

    2008-06-01

    There is an ongoing debate whether collision-induced dissociation (CID) of electrosprayed proteins after solution-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) is a viable approach for determining spatially resolved deuteration patterns. This work explores the use of two methods, source-CID and hexapole tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer, for measuring the fragment deuteration levels of regioselectively labeled ubiquitin. Both methods reveal that b-ions exhibit HDX levels significantly below that of the intact protein, whereas several y'' fragments are labeled to a much greater extent. These results are consistent with earlier source-CID data (Akashi, S.; Naito, Y.; Takio, K. Anal. Chem. 1999, 71, 4974-4980). However, the measured b-ion deuteration levels are in disagreement with the known solution-phase behavior of ubiquitin. Partial agreement is observed for y''-ions. Control experiments on homogeneously labeled ubiquitin (having the same average deuteration level at every exchangeable site) result in highly nonuniform fragment HDX levels. In particular, b-ions exhibit deuteration levels significantly below that of intact ubiquitin, thereby mimicking the behavior seen for the regioselectively labeled protein. This effect is likely caused by isotope fractionation during collisional activation, facilitated by the high mobility of charge carriers (scrambling) in the gas phase. The observation that the b-ion labeling behavior is largely independent of the spatial isotope distribution within solution-phase ubiquitin invalidates these ions as reporters of the protein deuteration pattern. This work questions the common practice of interpreting any nonuniformities in fragment deuteration as being indicative of regioselective solution-phase labeling. Artifactual deuterium enrichment or depletion during collisional activation may have contributed to the current lack of consensus as to whether HDX/CID represents a potentially

  12. Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook forAppliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

    2005-04-28

    Energy-performance improvements in consumer products are an essential element in any government's portfolio of energy-efficiency and climate change mitigation programs. Governments need to develop balanced programs, both voluntary and regulatory, that remove cost-ineffective, energy-wasting products from the marketplace and stimulate the development of cost-effective, energy-efficient technology. Energy-efficiency labels and standards for appliances, equipment, and lighting products deserve to be among the first policy tools considered by a country's energy policy makers. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and several other organizations identified on the cover of this guidebook recognize the need to support policy makers in their efforts to implement energy-efficiency standards and labeling programs and have developed this guidebook, together with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP), as a primary reference. This second edition of the guidebook was prepared over the course of the past year, four years after the preparation of the first edition, with a significant contribution from the authors and reviewers mentioned previously. Their diligent participation helps maintain this book as the international guidance tool it has become. The lead authors would like to thank the members of the Communications Office of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for their support in the development, production, and distribution of the guidebook. This guidebook is designed as a manual for government officials and others around the world responsible for developing, implementing, enforcing, monitoring, and maintaining labeling and standards setting programs. It discusses the pros and cons of adopting energy-efficiency labels and standards and describes the data, facilities, and institutional and human resources needed for these programs. It provides guidance on the design, development

  13. Synthesis of deuterium-labeled 17-hydroxyprogesterone suitable as an internal standard for isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, K.; Yamaga, N.; Kohara, H.

    1988-03-01

    A synthesis is reported of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, labeled with four atoms of deuterium at ring C and suitable for use as an internal standard for isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Base-catalyzed equilibration of methyl 3 alpha-acetoxy-12-oxo-cholanate (III) with /sup 2/H/sub 2/O, followed by reduction of the 12-oxo group by the modified Wolff-Kisher method using (/sup 2/H)diethylene glycol and (/sup 2/H)hydrazine hydrate afforded (11,11,12,12,23,23(-2)H)lithocholic acid (V). The Meystre-Miescher degradation of the side chain of V yielded 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 beta-(11,11,12,12(-2)H)pregnan-20-one (X). Oxidation of the 3,20-enol-diacetate of X with perbenzoic acid followed by saponification afforded 3 alpha,17-dihydroxy-5 beta-(11,11,12,12(-2)H)pregnan-20-one (XI). Oxidation of XI with N-bromoacetamide yielded 17-hydroxy-5 beta-(11,11,12,12(-2)H)pregnane-3,20-dione (XII). Bromination of XII followed by dehydrobromination yielded 17-hydroxy-(11,11,12,12(-2)H) progesterone (XIV), consisting of 0.3% /sup 2/H0-, 1.1% /sup 2/H/sub 1/-, 8.6% /sup 2/H/sub 2/-, 37.1% /sup 2/H/sub 3/-, 52.1% /sup 2/H/sub 4/-, and 0.8% /sup 2/H/sub 5/-species.

  14. Quantitative determination of free and total bisphenol A in human urine using labeled BPA glucuronide and isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kubwabo, Cariton; Kosarac, Ivana; Lalonde, Kaela; Foster, Warren G

    2014-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used industrial chemical in the manufacturing of polycarbonate plastic bottles, food and beverage can linings, thermal receipts, and dental sealants. Animal and human studies suggest that BPA may disrupt normal hormonal function and hence, potentially, have negative effects on the human health. While total BPA is frequently reported, it is recognized that free BPA is the biologically active form and is rarely reported in the literature. The objective of this study was to develop a sensitive and improved method for the measurement of free and total BPA in human urine. Use of a labeled conjugated BPA (bisphenol A-d6 β-D-glucuronide) allowed for the optimization of the enzymatic reaction and permitted an accurate determination of the conjugated BPA concentration in urine samples. In addition, a (13)C12-BPA internal standard was used to account for the analytical recoveries and performance of the isotope dilution method. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) combined with derivatization and analysis using a triple quadrupole GC-EI/MS/MS system achieved very low method detection limit of 0.027 ng/mL. BPA concentrations were measured in urine samples collected during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy in 36 Canadian women. Total maternal BPA concentrations in urine samples ranged from not detected to 9.40 ng/mL (median, 1.21 ng/mL), and free BPA concentrations ranged from not detected to 0.950 ng/mL (median, 0.185 ng/mL). Eighty-six percent of the women had detectable levels of conjugated BPA, whereas only 22 % had detectable levels of free BPA in their urine. BPA levels measured in this study agreed well with data reported internationally.

  15. Tracking amino acid's uptake into the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii by stable-isotope labelling and Raman spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    The capacity of pathogens to acquire nutrients from their host cells is one of the most fundamental aspects of infection biology. Hence, measuring the patterns of nutrients' uptake by pathogens is essential for understanding the interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells. In this study, we optimized a technique that allows fast and non-destructive measurement of the amino acid Phenylalanine (Phe) acquired by the trophozoite stage of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii (A. castellanii) as they engage with individual human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19). ARPE-19 host cells were pre-saturated with Deuterated Phe (L-Phe(D8)) to replace the native substrate Phe (L-Phe). The uptake of L-Phe(D8) by A. castellanii trophozoites was measured by Raman microspectroscopy. This approach allowed us to characterize the uptake patterns of this essential amino acid into A. castellanii trophozoites at a single cell level. At 24 hours post infection (PI) A. castellanii trophozoites are capable of salvaging L-Phe(D8) from host cells. The uptake pattern was time-dependent during the first 24 hours of infection and complete substitution with L-Phe(D8) in all parasites was detected at 48 hours PI. On the other hand, isolated A. castellanii trachyzoites (grown without host cells) did not show significant uptake for L-Phe(D8) from the media; only achieved an uptake ratio of 16-18% of L-Phe(D8) from the culture medium after 24 hours. These findings demonstrate the potential of combining Raman microspectroscopy and stable isotope labelling approaches to elucidate the role of metabolism in mediating A. castellanii interaction with host cells.

  16. New untargeted metabolic profiling combining mass spectrometry and isotopic labeling: application on Aspergillus fumigatus grown on wheat.

    PubMed

    Cano, Patricia M; Jamin, Emilien L; Tadrist, Souria; Bourdaud'hui, Pascal; Péan, Michel; Debrauwer, Laurent; Oswald, Isabelle P; Delaforge, Marcel; Puel, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    Characterization of fungal secondary metabolomes has become a challenge due to the industrial applications of many of these molecules, and also due to the emergence of fungal threats to public health and natural ecosystems. Given that, the aim of the present study was to develop an untargeted method to analyze fungal secondary metabolomes by combining high-accuracy mass spectrometry and double isotopic labeling of fungal metabolomes. The strain NRRL 35693 of Aspergillus fumigatus , an important fungal pathogen, was grown on three wheat grain substrates: (1) naturally enriched grains (99% (12)C), (2) grains enriched 96.8% with (13)C, (3) grains enriched with 53.4% with (13)C and 96.8% with (15)N. Twenty-one secondary metabolites were unambiguously identified by high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS) analysis. AntiBase 2012 was used to confirm the identity of these metabolites. Additionally, on the basis of tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) experiments, it was possible to identify for the first time the formula and the structure of fumigaclavine D, a new member of the fumigaclavines family. Post biosynthesis degradation of tryptoquivaline F by methanol was also identified during HPLC-HRMS analysis by the detection of a carbon atom of nonfungal origin. The interest of this method lies not only on the unambiguous determination of the exact chemical formulas of fungal secondary metabolites but also on the easy discrimination of nonfungal products. Validation of the method was thus successfully achieved in this study, and it can now be applied to other fungal metabolomes, offering great possibilities for the discovery of new drugs or toxins. PMID:23901908

  17. Memory-efficient calculation of the isotopic mass states of a molecule.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Karabacak, N Murat; Cobb, Jennifer S; Wang, Qi; Hong, Pengyu; Agar, Jeffrey N

    2010-09-01

    Our previous work postulated a transition concept among different isotopic mass states (i.e., isotopic species) of a molecule, and developed a hierarchical algorithm for accurately calculating their masses and abundances. A theoretical mass spectrum can be generated by convoluting a peak shape function to these discrete mass states. This approach suffers from limited memory if a level in the hierarchical structure has too many mass states. Here we present a memory efficient divide-and-recursively-combine algorithm to do the calculation, which also improves the truncation method used in the previous hierarchical algorithm. Instead of treating all of the elements in a molecule as a whole, the new algorithm first 'strips' each element one by one. For the mass states of each element, a hierarchical structure is established and kept in the memory. This process reduces the memory usage by orders of magnitude (e.g., for bovine insulin, memory can be reduced from gigabytes to kilobytes). Next, a recursive algorithm is applied to combine mass states of elements to mass states of the whole molecule. The algorithm described above has been implemented as a computer program called Isotope Calculator, which was written in C++. It is freely available under the GNU Lesser General Public License from http://www.cs.brandeis.edu/~hong/software.html or http://people.brandeis.edu/~agar.

  18. High-yield expression and purification of isotopically labeled cytochrome P450 monooxygenases for solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G.; Duan, Hui; Frericks Schmidt, Heather L.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Rienstra, Chad M.; Schuler, Mary A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), which represent the major group of drug metabolizing enzymes in humans, also catalyze important synthetic and detoxicative reactions in insects, plants and many microbes. Flexibilities in their catalytic sites and membrane associations are thought to play central roles in substrate binding and catalytic specificity. To date, E. coli expression strategies for structural analysis of eukaryotic membrane-bound P450s by X-ray crystallography have necessitated full or partial removal of their N-terminal signal anchor domain (SAD) and, often, replacement of residues more peripherally associated with the membrane (such as the F-G loop region). Even with these modifications, investigations of P450 structural flexibility remain challenging with multiple single crystal conditions needed to identify spatial variations between substrate-free and different substrate-bound forms. To overcome these limitations, we have developed methods for the efficient expression of 13C- and 15N-labeled P450s and analysis of their structures by magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy. In the presence of co-expressed GroEL and GroES chaperones, full-length (53 kDa) Arabidopsis 13C,15N-labeled CYP98A3 is expressed at yields of 2–4 mg per liter of minimal media without the necessity of generating side chain modifications or N-terminal deletions. Precipitated CYP98A3 generates high quality SSNMR spectra consistent with a homogeneous, folded protein. These data highlight the potential of these methodologies to contribute to the structural analysis of membrane-bound proteins. PMID:18005930

  19. Analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid by stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quan-Fei; Hao, Yan-Hong; Liu, Ming-Zhou; Yue, Jiang; Ni, Jian; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) belong to eicosanoids and are potent lipid mediators of inflammation. It is well-known that eicosanoids play an important role in numerous pathophysiological processes. Therefore, quantitative analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA, including hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatreinoic acids (EETs), and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) can provide crucial information to uncover underlying mechanisms of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA related diseases. Herein, we developed a highly sensitive method to identify and quantify HETEs, EETs, and DHETs in lipid extracts of biological samples based on stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. To this end, a pair of stable isotope probes, 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMED) and d4-2-dimethylaminoethylamine (d4-DMED), were utilized to facilely label eicosanoids. The heavy labeled eicosanoid standards were prepared and used as internal standards for quantification to minimize the matrix and ion suppression effects in mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the detection sensitivities of DMED labeled eicosanoids improved by 3-104 folds in standard solution and 5-138 folds in serum matrix compared with unlabeled analytes. Moreover, a good separation of eicosanoids isomers was achieved upon DMED labeling. The established method provided substantial sensitivity (limit of quantification at sub-picogram), high specificity, and broad linear dynamics range (3 orders of magnitude). We further quantified cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA in rat liver, heart, brain tissues and human serum using the developed method. The results showed that 19 eicosanoids could be distinctly detected and the contents of 11-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 5,6-EET, and 14,15-EET in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 5-, 11-, 12-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 8,9-EET, and 5,6-DHET in myeloid leukemia patients had significant changes

  20. Application of the SILAC (stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture) technique in quantitative comparisons for tissue proteome expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuhuan; Liang, Shufang; Shen, Guobo; Xu, Xuejiao; Liu, Qingping; Xu, Zhizhong; Gong, Fengming; Tang, Minghai; Wei, Yuquan

    2009-07-06

    Stable isotope labelling has recently become a popular tool for the quantitative profiling of the proteome, especially the emergence and development of the SILAC (stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture) technique. Here we have expanded the application of SILAC to comparison of the relative protein expression levels between two different states of tissues based on cultured cells with [2H]leucine labelling as an internal standard in mass spectra. The SILAC ratio of tissue proteins versus labelled cells was determined by the calculation of peak intensity of the pair of labelled and unlabelled peptide fragment ions from the mass spectra, and the relative expression level of proteins in two groups of tissues was estimated by calculating the ratio of their SILAC ratio. To validate our [2H]leucine-based differential proteome analysis for tissues, we successfully compared two known proteins, one up-regulated vimentin and one down-regulated enoyl-CoA hydratase in human renal cancerous tissues versus human normal kidney tissues, which was previously confirmed by other groups using conventional two-dimensional PAGE analysis. Furthermore, we identified a previously unknown down-regulated protein, COX4I1 (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 isoform 1), in renal carcinoma tissues by this [2H]leucine-based quantitative proteomics method, which was also validated by immunohistochemistry and Western-blot analysis. In conclusion, the application of the [2H]leucine-based quantitative technique can be effectively expanded to comparison of the expression levels for the tissue proteome at different states, which would help us to identify new candidate biomarkers for tumours.

  1. Measurement of 13C and 15N isotope labeling by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry to study amino acid fluxes in a plant-microbe symbiotic association.

    PubMed

    Molero, Gemma; Aranjuelo, Iker; Teixidor, Pilar; Araus, José Luis; Nogués, Salvador

    2011-03-15

    We have developed a method based on a double labeling with stable isotopes and gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) analyses to study amino acid exchange in a symbiotic plant-microbe association. Isotopic precision was studied for 21 standards including 15 amino acid derivatives, three N-protected amino acid methyl esters, three amines and one international standard. High correlations were observed between the δ(13)C and δ(15)N values obtained by GC/C/IRMS and those obtained by an elemental analyzer (EA) coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (R(2) = 0.9868 and 0.9992, respectively). The mean precision measured was 0.04‰ for δ(13)C and 0.28‰ for δ(15)N (n = 15). This method was applied in vivo to the symbiotic relationship between alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and N(2)-fixing bacteria. Plants were simultaneously labeled over 10 days with (13)C-depleted CO(2) ((12)CO(2)), which was assimilated through photosynthesis by leaves, and (15)N(2) fixed via nodules. Subsequently, the C and N isotope compositions (i.e. δ(13)C and δ(15)N) of free amino acids were analyzed in leaves and nodules by GC/C/IRMS. The method revealed the pattern of C and N exchange between leaves and nodules, highlighting that γ-aminobutanoic acid and glycine may represent an important form of C transport from leaves to the nodules. The results confirmed the validity, reliability and accuracy of the method for assessing C and N fluxes between plants and symbiotic bacteria and support the use of this technique in a broad range of metabolic and fluxomic studies.

  2. Use of an oral stable isotope label to confirm variation in red blood cell mean age that influences HbA1c interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Lindsell, Christopher J.; Rogge, Mary Colleen; Haggerty, Shannon; Wagner, David A.; Palascak, Mary B.; Mehta, Shilpa; Hibbert, Jacqueline M.; Joiner, Clinton H.; Franco, Robert S.; Cohen, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    HbA1c is commonly used to monitor glycemic control. However, there is growing evidence that the relationship between HbA1c and mean blood glucose (MBG) is influenced by variation in red blood cell (RBC) lifespan in hematologically normal individuals. Correction of HbA1c for mean RBC age (MRBC) requires a noninvasive, accurate, and affordable method to measure RBC survival. In this study, we evaluated whether a stable isotope approach would satisfy these requirements. RBC lifespan and MRBC were determined in a group of nine hematologically normal diabetic and nondiabetic subjects using oral 15N-glycine to label heme in an age cohort of RBC. The MRBC was 58.7 ± 9.1 (2SD) days and RBC lifespan was 106 ± 21 (2SD) days. This degree of variation (±15 - 20%) is consistent with previous studies using other techniques. In a subset of seven subjects, MRBC determined with the biotin label technique were available from approximately five years prior, and strongly correlated with the stable isotope values (R2 = 0.79). This study suggests that the MRBC is stable over time but varies substantially among individuals, and supports the importance of its variation in HbA1c interpretation. The characteristics of the stable isotope method support its suitability for studies to directly evaluate the impact of variation in MRBC on the interpretation of HbA1c. PMID:25293624

  3. Analysis of 13C labeling enrichment in microbial culture applying metabolic tracer experiments using gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Heinzle, Elmar; Yuan, Yongbo; Kumar, Sathish; Wittmann, Christoph; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Herrmann; Wehrung, Patrick; Adam, Pierre; Albrecht, Pierre

    2008-09-15

    The applicability of gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) for the quantification of 13C enrichment of proteinogenic amino acids in metabolic tracer experiments was evaluated. Measurement of the 13C enrichment of proteinogenic amino acids from cell hydrolyzates of Corynebacterium glutamicum growing on different mixtures containing between 0.5 and 10% [1-13C]glucose shows the significance of kinetic isotope effects in metabolic flux studies at low degree of labeling. We developed a method to calculate the 13C enrichment. The approach to correct for these effects in metabolic flux studies using delta13C measurement by GC-C-IRMS uses two parallel experiments applying substrate with natural abundance and 13C-enriched tracer substrate, respectively. The fractional enrichment obtained in natural substrate is subtracted from that of the enriched one. Tracer studies with C. glutamicum resulted in a statistically identical relative fractional enrichment of 13C in proteinogenic amino acids over the whole range of applied concentrations of [1-13C]glucose. The current findings indicate a great potential of GC-C-IRMS for labeling quantification in 13C metabolic flux analysis with low labeling degree of tracer substrate directly in larger scale bioreactors.

  4. Characterization of the strongly coupled, low-frequency vibrational modes of the special pair of photosynthetic reaction centers via isotopic labeling of the cofactors

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, K.; Diers, J.R.; Bocian, D.F.; Chynwat, V.; Erickson, J.P.; Frank, H.A.

    1997-01-15

    Low-frequency (50-425-cm{sup -1}), near-infrared-excitation resonance Raman (RR) spectra are reported for bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides in which the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and bacteriopheophytin (BPh) cofactors are labeled with {sup 15}N or {sup 26}Mg. The focus of the study is the identification of the very low-frequency modes of the dimer of BChls (P) which are strongly coupled to the P{sup *} electronic transition which initiates the primary charge separation process in RCs. In order to gain a complete picture of the vibrational characteristics, the low-frequency RR spectra of the accessory BChls and the BPhs were examined in addition to those of P. The RR spectra of the isotopically labeled cofactors in the RCs were compared with one another and with the spectra obtained for solid-film samples of isolated, isotopically labeled BChl and BPh. Based on these comparisons and the predictions of semiempirical normal coordinate calculations, a self-consistent set of assignments has been developed for all the RR active modes of the different BChl and BPh cofactors in the RC which are observed in the very low-frequency regime (50-250 cm{sup -1}). The assignments indicate that the strongly coupled, low-frequency modes of P all involve either deformations localized on pyrrole ring I or the macrocycle core. 45 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Identification and characterization of isomeric N-glycans of human alfa-acid-glycoprotein by stable isotope labelling and ZIC-HILIC-MS in combination with exoglycosidase digestion.

    PubMed

    Mancera-Arteu, Montserrat; Giménez, Estela; Barbosa, José; Sanz-Nebot, Victòria

    2016-10-12

    In this study, a ZIC-HILIC-MS methodology for the analysis of N-glycan isomers was optimized to obtain greater detection sensitivity and thus identify more glycan structures in hAGP. In a second step, this method was combined with glycan reductive isotope labelling (GRIL) through [(12)C6]/[(13)C6]-aniline and exoglycosidase digestion to characterize the different glycan isomers. The GRIL method allows the peak areas resulting from two different labelled samples to be compared, since neither retention time shifts nor variations in the ionization of glycans between these samples are obtained. First, sialic acid linkage assignations were performed for most hAGP glycan isomers with α2-3 sialidase digestion. Bi-, tri- and tetraantennary glycan isomers with different terminal sialic acid linkages to galactose (α2-3 or α2-6) were assigned, and the potential of this technique for the structural characterization of isobaric isomers was therefore demonstrated. Furthermore, fucose linkage isomers of hAGP glycans were also characterized using this isotope-labelling approach in combination with α1-3,4 fucosidase and β1-4 galactosidase digestion. α1-3 antennary fucoses and α1-6 core fucosylation were detected in hAGP fucosylated glycans. These established methodologies can be extremely useful for patho-glycomic studies to characterize glycoproteins of biomedical interest and find novel glycan isomers that could be used as biomarkers in cancer research. PMID:27662763

  6. Uniform isotope labeling of a eukaryotic seven-transmembrane helical protein in yeast enables high-resolution solid-state NMR studies in the lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Shi, Lichi; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S

    2011-02-01

    Overexpression of isotope-labeled multi-spanning eukaryotic membrane proteins for structural NMR studies is often challenging. On the one hand, difficulties with achieving proper folding, membrane insertion, and native-like post-translational modifications frequently disqualify bacterial expression systems. On the other hand, eukaryotic cell cultures can be prohibitively expensive. One of the viable alternatives, successfully used for producing proteins for solution NMR studies, is yeast expression systems, particularly Pichia pastoris. We report on successful implementation and optimization of isotope labeling protocols, previously used for soluble secreted proteins, to produce homogeneous samples of a eukaryotic seven-transmembrane helical protein, rhodopsin from Leptosphaeria maculans. Even in shake-flask cultures, yields exceeded 5 mg of purified uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled protein per liter of culture. The protein was stable (at least several weeks at 5°C) and functionally active upon reconstitution into lipid membranes at high protein-to-lipid ratio required for solid-state NMR. The samples gave high-resolution (13)C and (15)N solid-state magic angle spinning NMR spectra, amenable to a detailed structural analysis. We believe that similar protocols can be adopted for challenging mammalian targets, which often resist characterization by other structural methods.

  7. Quantitative isomer-specific N-glycan fingerprinting using isotope coded labeling and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry with graphitic carbon stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Michael, Claudia; Rizzi, Andreas M

    2015-02-27

    Glycan reductive isotope labeling (GRIL) using (12)C6-/(13)C6-aniline as labeling reagent is reported with the aim of quantitative N-glycan fingerprinting. Porous graphitized carbon (PGC) as stationary phase in capillary scale HPLC coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry with time of flight analyzer was applied for the determination of labeled N-glycans released from glycoproteins. The main benefit of using stable isotope-coding in the context of comparative glycomics lies in the improved accuracy and precision of the quantitative analysis in combined samples and in the potential of correcting for structure-dependent incomplete enzymatic release of oligosaccharides when comparing identical target proteins. The method was validated with respect to mobile phase parameters, reproducibility, accuracy, linearity and limit of detection/quantification (LOD/LOQ) using test glycoproteins. It is shown that the developed method is capable of determining relative amounts of N-glycans (including isomers) comparing two samples in one single HPLC-MS run. The analytical potential and usefulness of GRIL in combination with PGC-ESI-TOF-MS is demonstrated comparing glycosylation in human monoclonal antibodies produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) and hybridoma cell lines.

  8. The 15N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant.

    PubMed

    Fenilli, Tatiele A B; Reichart, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O S; Trivelin, Paulo C O; Dourado-Neto, Durval

    2007-12-01

    The use of the 15N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of 15N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% 15N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and 15N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry. PMID:18066442

  9. The 15N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant.

    PubMed

    Fenilli, Tatiele A B; Reichart, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O S; Trivelin, Paulo C O; Dourado-Neto, Durval

    2007-12-01

    The use of the 15N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of 15N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% 15N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and 15N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry.

  10. Identification of Predictive Markers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Carcinomas by Proteomic Isotope Coded Protein Label (ICPL) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Croner, Roland S.; Sevim, Müzeyyen; Metodiev, Metodi V.; Jo, Peter; Ghadimi, Michael; Schellerer, Vera; Brunner, Maximillian; Geppert, Carol; Rau, Tilman; Stürzl, Michael; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Matzel, Klaus E.; Hohenberger, Werner; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kellermann, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) is an established procedure in stage union internationale contre le cancer (UICC) II/III rectal carcinomas. Around 53% of the tumours present with good tumor regression after nCRT, and 8%–15% are complete responders. Reliable selection markers would allow the identification of poor or non-responders prior to therapy. Tumor biopsies were harvested from 20 patients with rectal carcinomas, and stored in liquid nitrogen prior to therapy after obtaining patients’ informed consent (Erlangen-No.3784). Patients received standardized nCRT with 5-Fluoruracil (nCRT I) or 5-Fluoruracil ± Oxaliplatin (nCRT II) according to the CAO/ARO/AIO-04 protocol. After surgery, regression grading (Dworak) of the tumors was performed during histopathological examination of the specimens. Tumors were classified as poor (Dworak 1 + 2) or good (Dworak 3 + 4) responders. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) for tumor enrichment was performed on preoperative biopsies. Differences in expressed proteins between poor and good responders to nCRT I and II were identified by proteomic analysis (Isotope Coded Protein Label, ICPL™) and selected markers were validated by immunohistochemistry. Tumors of 10 patients were classified as histopathologically poor (Dworak 1 or 2) and the other 10 tumor samples as histopathologically good (Dworak 3 or 4) responders to nCRT after surgery. Sufficient material in good quality was harvested for ICPL analysis by LCM from all biopsies. We identified 140 differentially regulated proteins regarding the selection criteria and the response to nCRT. Fourteen of these proteins were synchronously up-regulated at least 1.5-fold after nCRT I or nCRT II (e.g., FLNB, TKT, PKM2, SERINB1, IGHG2). Thirty-five proteins showed a complete reciprocal regulation (up or down) after nCRT I or nCRT II and the rest was regulated either according to nCRT I or II. The protein expression of regulated proteins such as PLEC1, TKT, HADHA and TAGLN was

  11. Accurate and Efficient Resolution of Overlapping Isotopic Envelopes in Protein Tandem Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kaijie; Yu, Fan; Fang, Houqin; Xue, Bingbing; Liu, Yan; Tian, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    It has long been an analytical challenge to accurately and efficiently resolve extremely dense overlapping isotopic envelopes (OIEs) in protein tandem mass spectra to confidently identify proteins. Here, we report a computationally efficient method, called OIE_CARE, to resolve OIEs by calculating the relative deviation between the ideal and observed experimental abundance. In the OIE_CARE method, the ideal experimental abundance of a particular overlapping isotopic peak (OIP) is first calculated for all the OIEs sharing this OIP. The relative deviation (RD) of the overall observed experimental abundance of this OIP relative to the summed ideal value is then calculated. The final individual abundance of the OIP for each OIE is the individual ideal experimental abundance multiplied by 1 + RD. Initial studies were performed using higher-energy collisional dissociation tandem mass spectra on myoglobin (with direct infusion) and the intact E. coli proteome (with liquid chromatographic separation). Comprehensive data at the protein and proteome levels, high confidence and good reproducibility were achieved. The resolving method reported here can, in principle, be extended to resolve any envelope-type overlapping data for which the corresponding theoretical reference values are available. PMID:26439836

  12. A spectral correlation function for efficient sequential NMR assignments of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Bartels, C; Wüthrich, K

    1994-11-01

    A new computer-based approach is described for efficient sequence-specific assignment of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins. For this purpose three-dimensional (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra are divided up into two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H strips which extend over the entire spectral width along one dimension and have a width of ca. 100 Hz, centered about the amide proton chemical shifts along the other dimension. A spectral correlation function enables sorting of these strips according to proximity of the corresponding residues in the amino acid sequence. Thereby, starting from a given strip in the spectrum, the probability of its corresponding to the C-terminal neighboring residue is calculated for all other strips from the similarity of their peak patterns with a pattern predicted for the sequentially adjoining residue, as manifested in the scalar product of the vectors representing the predicted and measured peak patterns. Tests with five different proteins containing both α-helices and β-sheets, and ranging in size from 58 to 165 amino acid residues show that the discrimination achieved between the sequentially neighboring residue and all other residues compares well with that obtained with an unguided interactive search of pairs of sequentially neighboring strips, with important savings in the time needed for complete analysis of 3D (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra. The integration of this routine into the program package XEASY ensures that remaining ambiguities can be resolved by visual inspection of the strips, combined with reference to the amino acid sequence and information on spin-system types obtained from additional NMR spectra.

  13. Insights into nitrogen allocation and recycling from nitrogen elemental analysis and 15N isotope labelling in 14 genotypes of willow.

    PubMed

    Brereton, Nicholas J B; Pitre, Frederic E; Shield, Ian; Hanley, Steven J; Ray, Michael J; Murphy, Richard J; Karp, Angela

    2014-11-01

    Minimizing nitrogen (N) fertilization inputs during cultivation is essential for sustainable production of bioenergy and biofuels. The biomass crop willow (Salix spp.) is considered to have low N fertilizer requirements due to efficient recycling of nutrients during the perennial cycle. To investigate how successfully different willow genotypes assimilate and allocate N during growth, and remobilize and consequently recycle N before the onset of winter dormancy, N allocation and N remobilization (to and between different organs) were examined in 14 genotypes of a genetic family using elemental analysis and (15)N as a label. Cuttings were established in pots in April and sampled in June, August and at onset of senescence in October. Biomass yield of the trees correlated well with yields recorded in the field. Genotype-specific variation was observed for all traits measured and general trends spanning these sampling points were identified when trees were grouped by biomass yield. Nitrogen reserves in the cutting fuelled the entirety of the canopy establishment, yet earlier cessation of this dependency was linked to higher biomass yields. The stem was found to be the major N reserve by autumn, which constitutes a major source of N loss at harvest, typically every 2-3 years. These data contribute to understanding N remobilization in short rotation coppice willow and to the identification of traits that could potentially be selected for in breeding programmes to further improve the sustainability of biomass production.

  14. Measurement of Histone Methylation Dynamics by One-Carbon Metabolic Isotope Labeling and High-energy Collisional Dissociation Methylation Signature Ion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hui; Tian, Bing; Brasier, Allan R.; Sowers, Lawrence C.; Zhang, Kangling

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that cellular metabolites and nutrition levels control epigenetic modifications, including histone methylation. However, it is not currently possible to measure the metabolic control of histone methylation. Here we report a novel detection method to monitor methyl transfer from serine to histones through the one-carbon metabolic pathway, using stable-isotope labeling and detection of lysine methylation signature ions generated in high-energy-dissociation (HCD) tandem mass spectrometry. This method is a long-needed tool to study the metabolic control of histone methylation. PMID:27530234

  15. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of site-specific isotopically labeled nucleotides for use in NMR resonance assignment, dynamics and structural characterizations

    PubMed Central

    Longhini, Andrew P.; LeBlanc, Regan M.; Becette, Owen; Salguero, Carolina; Wunderlich, Christoph H.; Johnson, Bruce A.; D'Souza, Victoria M.; Kreutz, Christoph; Dayie, T. Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling is central to NMR studies of nucleic acids. Development of methods that incorporate labels at specific atomic positions within each nucleotide promises to expand the size range of RNAs that can be studied by NMR. Using recombinantly expressed enzymes and chemically synthesized ribose and nucleobase, we have developed an inexpensive, rapid chemo-enzymatic method to label ATP and GTP site specifically and in high yields of up to 90%. We incorporated these nucleotides into RNAs with sizes ranging from 27 to 59 nucleotides using in vitro transcription: A-Site (27 nt), the iron responsive elements (29 nt), a fluoride riboswitch from Bacillus anthracis (48 nt), and a frame-shifting element from a human corona virus (59 nt). Finally, we showcase the improvement in spectral quality arising from reduced crowding and narrowed linewidths, and accurate analysis of NMR relaxation dispersion (CPMG) and TROSY-based CEST experiments to measure μs-ms time scale motions, and an improved NOESY strategy for resonance assignment. Applications of this selective labeling technology promises to reduce difficulties associated with chemical shift overlap and rapid signal decay that have made it challenging to study the structure and dynamics of large RNAs beyond the 50 nt median size found in the PDB. PMID:26657632

  16. Quantitative amino acid profiling and stable isotopically labeled amino acid tracer enrichment used for in vivo human systemic and tissue kinetics measurements.

    PubMed

    Bornø, Andreas; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-03-01

    An important area within clinical functional metabolomics is in vivo amino acid metabolism and protein turnover measurements for which accurate amino acid concentrations and stable isotopically labeled amino acid enrichments are mandatory not the least when tissue metabolomics is determined. The present study describes a new sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry method quantifying 20 amino acids and their tracer(s) ([ring-(13)C6]/D5Phenylalanine) in human plasma and skeletal muscle specimens. Before analysis amino acids were extracted and purified via deprotonization/ion exchange, derivatized using a phenylisothiocyanate reagent and each amino acid was quantitated with its own stable isotopically labeled internal standard (uniformly labeled-(13)C/(15)N). The method was validated according to general recommendations for chromatographic analytical methods. The calibration curve correlations for amino acids were on average; r(2)=0.998. Interday accuracy for amino acids determined in spiked plasma was on average 97.3% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 2.6%. The ([ring-(13)C6]/D5Phenylalanine) enrichment CV's for machine reproducibility in muscle tissue fluid and plasma were 4.4 and 0.8%, and the interday variability was 3.4% and the recovery was 90.5%, respectively. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a method for quantitative amino acid profiling that meets the requirements for systemic and tissue human in vivo amino acid and protein turnover kinetics measurements. Moreover, citrulline, ornithine, π-methyl-histidine, τ-methyl-l-histidine, hydroxy-proline and carnitine were analysed but when similar precision and accuray are required an additional stable istopically labeled internal standard for these meatablites should be be added.

  17. BODIPY-labeled DC-SIGN-targeting glycodendrons efficiently internalize and route to lysosomes in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Viana, Renato; García-Vallejo, Juan J; Collado, Daniel; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; Bloem, Karien; van Kooyk, Yvette; Rojo, Javier

    2012-10-01

    Glycodendrons bearing nine copies of mannoses or fucoses have been prepared by an efficient convergent strategy based on Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). These glycodendrons present a well-defined structure and have an adequate size and shape to interact efficiently with the C-type lectin DC-SIGN. We have selected a BODIPY derivative to label these glycodendrons due to its interesting physical and chemical properties as chromophore. These BODIPY-labeled glycodendrons were internalized into dendritic cells by mean of DC-SIGN. The internalized mannosylated and fucosylated dendrons are colocalized with LAMP1, which suggests routing to lysosomes. The interaction of these glycodendrons with DC-SIGN at the surface of dendritic cells did not induce maturation of the cells. Signaling analysis by checking different cytokines indicated also the lack of induction the expression of inflammatory and noninflammatory cytokines by these second generation glycodendrons. PMID:22920925

  18. Dual isotope labeling: conjugation of 32P-oligonucleotides with 18F-aryltrifluoroborate via copper(I) catalyzed cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Schaffer, Paul; Perrin, David M

    2013-12-01

    A one-pot-two-step labeling of an oligonucleotide with an (18)F-ArBF3(-)(aryltrifluoroborate) radioprosthetic is reported herein. In order to characterize labeling in terms of radiochemistry, phosphorus-32 was also introduced to the 5'-terminus of the oligonucleotide via enzymatic phosphorylation. A pendant azide group was subsequently conjugated to the 5'-phosphate of the oligonucleotide. Copper(I) catalyzed [2+3] cycloaddition was undertaken to conjugate an alkyne-bearing(18)F-ArBF3(-) to the oligonucleotide. Following polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, this doubly-labeled bioconjugate exhibited decay properties of both the phosphorus-32 and fluorine-18, that were confirmed by autoradiography at selected lengths of time, which in turn provided concrete evidence of successful conjugation. These results are corroborated by HPLC analysis of the labeled material. Taken together this work demonstrates viable use of (18)F-ArBF3(-) prosthetics for labeling oligonucleotides for use in PET imaging. PMID:24144852

  19. Isolation, In-111 labeling, and abscess detection efficiency of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from blood and peritoneal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, K.M.; Elson, M.K.; Gerding, D.N.; Bamberger, D.M.; Forstrom, L.A.; Shafer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    In-111 labeled blood and peritoneal exudate PMN were compared for labeling efficiency and ability to migrate to sites of experimental abscesses using both direct sampling and visual imaging techniques. Blood PMN were prepared by combining heparinized blood with 6% Hetastarch for 1 hour and layering the plasma over a double density Ficoll-Hy-paque gradient (S.G. 1.076 over 1.141). The PMN layer (90-99% PMN) at the interface yielded 10/sup 6/-10/sup 7/ PMN from 80-120 ml of blood. Peritoneal PMN were obtained by infusion of 0.1% glycogen, followed by infusion of saline after 4 or 18 hours. The exudate yielded 10/sup 7/-10/sup 8/ PMN (80-99% PMN). PMN suspensions were labeled for 30 minutes by addition of 100 ..mu..Ci of In-111-oxine, then washed twice. Percent cell-associated radioactivity of the labeled blood, 4 hour, and 18 hour peritoneal PMN was 89%, 88%, and 86%. The labeled PMN were injected intravenously into rabbits which had two of three abdominal capsules (table tennis balls drilled with 250 1.5 mm holes) inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus 4 hours earlier. Peak venous recovery of circulating labeled PMN, for blood, 4 hour and 18 hour peritoneal PMN was 60%, 43%, and 19%. Gamma camera images 24 hours after infusion into infected rabbits were superior with 4 hour peritoneal PMN. The peritoneal PMN harvested 4 hours after glycogen stimulation are simple to prepare, are obtainable in greater numbers than blood PMN, and result in better abscess visualization.

  20. Development of isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for mouse urine metabolomics: quantitative metabolomic study of transgenic mice related to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Guo, Kevin; Xia, Jianguo; Zhou, Jianjun; Yang, Jing; Westaway, David; Wishart, David S; Li, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Because of a limited volume of urine that can be collected from a mouse, it is very difficult to apply the common strategy of using multiple analytical techniques to analyze the metabolites to increase the metabolome coverage for mouse urine metabolomics. We report an enabling method based on differential isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for relative quantification of over 950 putative metabolites using 20 μL of urine as the starting material. The workflow involves aliquoting 10 μL of an individual urine sample for ¹²C-dansylation labeling that target amines and phenols. Another 10 μL of aliquot was taken from each sample to generate a pooled sample that was subjected to ¹³C-dansylation labeling. The ¹²C-labeled individual sample was mixed with an equal volume of the ¹³C-labeled pooled sample. The mixture was then analyzed by LC-MS to generate information on metabolite concentration differences among different individual samples. The interday repeatability for the LC-MS runs was assessed, and the median relative standard deviation over 4 days was 5.0%. This workflow was then applied to a metabolomic biomarker discovery study using urine samples obtained from the TgCRND8 mouse model of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) throughout the course of their pathological deposition of beta amyloid (Aβ). It was showed that there was a distinct metabolomic separation between the AD prone mice and the wild type (control) group. As early as 15-17 weeks of age (presymptomatic), metabolomic differences were observed between the two groups, and after the age of 25 weeks the metabolomic alterations became more pronounced. The metabolomic changes at different ages corroborated well with the phenotype changes in this transgenic mice model. Several useful candidate biomarkers including methionine, desaminotyrosine, taurine, N1-acetylspermidine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were identified. Some of them were found in previous

  1. Anaerobic central metabolic pathways in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1interpreted in the light of isotopic metabolite labeling, enzymeactivities and genome annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Meadows, Adam L.; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-06-27

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic oroxygen-limited conditions Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses theserine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes,in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine toform serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate andglycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine itsuse of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, wegrew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source witheither trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor.Analysis of cellular metabolites indicates that a large percentage(>75 percent) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate orpyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other keymetabolites indicate that, under anaerobic conditions, a complete serinepathway is not present, and lactate is oxidized via a highly reversibleserine degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significantactivity in the anaplerotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxylase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase)reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observedto be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of acomplete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under TMAO reductioncondition.

  2. Efficient method for iodine radioisotope labeling of cyclooctyne-containing molecules using strain-promoted copper-free click reaction.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jongho; Kang, Jung Ae; Shim, Ha Eun; Nam, You Ree; Yoon, Seonhye; Kim, Hye Rim; Lee, Dong Eun; Park, Sang Hyun

    2015-07-01

    Herein we report an efficient method for iodine radioisotope labeling of cyclooctyne-containing molecules using copper-free click reaction. For this study, radioiodination using the tin precursor 2 was carried out at room temperature to give (125)I-labeled azide ([(125)I]1) with high radiochemical yield (85%) and excellent radiochemical purity. Dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) containing cRGD peptide and gold nanoparticle were labeled with [(125)I]1 at 37°C for 30min to give triazoles with good radiochemical yields (67-95%). We next carried out tissue biodistribution study of [(125)I]1 in normal ICR mice to investigate the level of organ accumulation which needs to be considered for pre-targeted in vivo imaging. Large amount of [(125)I]1 distributed rapidly in liver and kidney from bloodstream and underwent rapid renal and hepatobiliary clearance. Moreover [(125)I]1 was found to be highly stable (>92%) in mouse serum for 24h. Therefore [(125)I]1 could be used as a potentially useful radiotracer for pre-targeted imaging. Those results clearly indicated that the present radiolabeling method using copper free click reaction would be quite useful for both in vitro and in vivo labeling of DBCO group containing molecules with iodine radioisotopes. PMID:25960325

  3. Use of an oral/intravenous dual-label stable-isotope protocol to determine folic acid bioavailability from fortified cereal grain foods in women.

    PubMed

    Finglas, Paul M; Witthöft, Cornelia M; Vahteristo, Liisa; Wright, Anthony J A; Southon, Susan; Mellon, Fred A; Ridge, Brian; Maunder, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Folic acid fortification, mandatory in the United States, is currently being considered by the UK. The hypothesis that the matrix of some cereal-product vehicles may result in low fortificant bioavailability was tested using a dual oral/intravenous (i.v.) isotopic-label approach, which was evaluated concurrently. Fifteen women received 225 microg oral folate (capsules, fortified white bread and fortified branflakes), mainly as folic acid labeled with (13)C on 6 carbons of the benzoyl ring ((13)C(6)-PteGlu), followed by i.v. injection of 100 microg folic acid labeled with (2)H on 4 hydrogens of the glutamic acid group ((2)H(4)-PteGlu). The urinary excretion ratio (UER) in intact folate of the percentage of labeled oral dose excreted divided by the percentage of i.v. dose excreted was used as the primary index of absorption. The geometric mean (95% confidence interval) UER for folic acid capsules was 3.68 (1.90, 7.14) at 24 h and 2.18 (1.24, 3.83) at 48 h. Because these were significantly in excess of 1.0, indicative of 100% absorption of the oral dose, it was concluded that oral and i.v. labeled folic acid are handled differently by the body and that "absolute" absorption cannot be calculated. Compared with the 48-h UER for folic acid capsules, the "relative" 48-h UER for white bread and branflakes was 0.71 and 0.37, respectively, indicating that some cereal-based vehicles may inhibit absorption of fortificant. However, even the validity of this "relative" approach is questioned.

  4. Importance of bacterivory and preferential selection toward diatoms in larvae of Crepidula fornicata (L.) assessed by a dual stable isotope (13C, 15N) labeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Fanny; Riera, Pascal; Jeanthon, Christian; Edmond, Frédérique; Leroux, Cédric; Comtet, Thierry

    2012-05-01

    In Europe, the gastropod Crepidula fornicata is an invasive species characterized by a long reproductive period (from February to November). Thus, its larvae are exposed to variations in available food sources (in terms of quantity and quality). We aimed to investigate if bacteria could contribute to larval food both in presence or absence of phytoplankton, and to compare these results to seasonal variations of bacteria and phytoplankton abundances at a coastal site in the English Channel. First, ingestion of fluorescent beads of 0.5 to 2 μm diameter, showed that larvae were able to ingest particles of typical bacterial size. Then we used a dual stable isotope labeling approach which consisted in labeling a bacterial pelagic community with 15N and a diatom (Chaetoceros gracilis) culture with 13C, and supplying larvae with 15N-labeled bacteria, 13C-labeled diatoms, and both labeled sources. This technique has, to our knowledge, never been applied to invertebrate larvae. After 24 h of experiment, larvae were significantly enriched in all treatments: + 21.5‰ (∆δ13C) when supplied with diatoms, + 1364‰ (∆δ15N) when supplied with bacteria, and + 24‰ (∆δ13C) and + 135‰ (∆δ15N) when supplied with the two mixed sources. These results indicated that bacteria can contribute to the larval nutrition in C. fornicata, even in the presence of phytoplankton. Our results however suggested that larvae of C. fornicata preferentially used diatoms and showed that the supply of free bacteria did not alter the uptake of diatoms. Considering the seasonal variations of bacteria and phytoplankton abundances at the study site, these results suggested that bacteria may constitute a complementary resource for the larvae of C. fornicata when phytoplankton is abundant and may become a substitute resource when phytoplankton is less available. This approach offers promising perspectives to trace food sources and assess nitrogen and carbon fluxes between planktotrophic larvae

  5. Efficient Calculation of Free Energy Differences Associated with Isotopic Substitution Using Path-Integral Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Chen, Pei-Yang; Dupuis, Romain; Benoit, Magali; Méheut, Merlin; Bačić, Zlatko; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    The problem of computing free energy differences due to isotopic substitution in chemical systems is discussed. The shift in the equilibrium properties of a system upon isotopic substitution is a purely quantum mechanical effect that can be quantified using the Feynman path integral approach. In this paper, we explore two developments that lead to a highly efficient path integral scheme. First, we employ a mass switching function inspired by the work of Ceriotti and Markland [ J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 014112] that is based on the inverse square root of the mass and which leads to a perfectly constant free energy derivative with respect to the switching parameter in the harmonic limit. We show that even for anharmonic systems, this scheme allows a single-point thermodynamic integration approach to be used in the construction of free energy differences. In order to improve the efficiency of the calculations even further, however, we derive a set of free energy derivative estimators based on the fourth-order scheme of Takahashi and Imada [ J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 1984, 53, 3765]. The Takahashi-Imada procedure generates a primitive fourth-order estimator that allows the number of imaginary time slices in the path-integral approach to be reduced substantially. However, as with all primitive estimators, its convergence is plagued by numerical noise. In order to alleviate this problem, we derive a fourth-order virial estimator based on a transferring of the difference between second- and fourth-order primitive estimators, which remains relatively constant as a function of the number of configuration samples, to the second-order virial estimator. We show that this new estimator converges as smoothly as the second-order virial estimator but requires significantly fewer imaginary time points. PMID:26580362

  6. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Ostroumov, P N; Barcikowski, A; Dickerson, C A; Perry, A; Pikin, A I; Sharamentov, S I; Vondrasek, R C; Zinkann, G P

    2015-08-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz. PMID:26329185

  7. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Pikin, A. I.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.

    2015-08-28

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstratemore » stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this study, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.« less

  8. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N. Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.; Pikin, A. I.

    2015-08-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  9. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Pikin, A. I.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.

    2015-08-28

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this study, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  10. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Pikin, A. I.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.

    2015-08-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  11. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Ostroumov, P N; Barcikowski, A; Dickerson, C A; Perry, A; Pikin, A I; Sharamentov, S I; Vondrasek, R C; Zinkann, G P

    2015-08-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  12. Large-scale synthesis of isotopically labeled 13C2-tenuazonic acid and development of a rapid HPLC-MS/MS method for the analysis of tenuazonic acid in tomato and pepper products.

    PubMed

    Lohrey, Lilia; Marschik, Stefanie; Cramer, Benedikt; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Tenuazonic acid is a fungal secondary metabolite that is produced by a number of Alternaria species and is therefore a natural contaminant of food and feed samples. This paper describes a new strategy for the efficient and economical large-scale synthesis of the isotopically labeled internal standard (13)C(2)-tenuazonic acid via a three-step procedure. Furthermore, a new reliable and quick method based on QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) cleanup is presented for the determination of tenuazonic acid in food and feed samples utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) by application of the stable isotope dilution analysis. This new method has a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.86 μg/kg and a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 2.89 μg/kg. In total 26 tomato samples and 4 bell pepper samples from the German market were analyzed. Tenuazonic acid was found in each sample with levels from 3 to 2330 μg/kg.

  13. Large-scale synthesis of isotopically labeled 13C2-tenuazonic acid and development of a rapid HPLC-MS/MS method for the analysis of tenuazonic acid in tomato and pepper products.

    PubMed

    Lohrey, Lilia; Marschik, Stefanie; Cramer, Benedikt; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Tenuazonic acid is a fungal secondary metabolite that is produced by a number of Alternaria species and is therefore a natural contaminant of food and feed samples. This paper describes a new strategy for the efficient and economical large-scale synthesis of the isotopically labeled internal standard (13)C(2)-tenuazonic acid via a three-step procedure. Furthermore, a new reliable and quick method based on QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) cleanup is presented for the determination of tenuazonic acid in food and feed samples utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) by application of the stable isotope dilution analysis. This new method has a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.86 μg/kg and a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 2.89 μg/kg. In total 26 tomato samples and 4 bell pepper samples from the German market were analyzed. Tenuazonic acid was found in each sample with levels from 3 to 2330 μg/kg. PMID:23230907

  14. Determination of bovine lactoferrin in dairy products by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry based on tryptic signature peptides employing an isotope-labeled winged peptide as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingshun; Lai, Shiyun; Cai, Zengxuan; Chen, Qi; Huang, Baifen; Ren, Yiping

    2014-06-01

    A new and sensitive determination method was developed for bovine lactoferrin in dairy products including infant formulas based on the signature peptide by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry under the multiple reaction monitoring mode. The simple pretreatment procedures included the addition of a winged peptide containing the isotope-labeled signature peptide as internal standard, followed by an enzymatic digestion with trypsin. The signature peptide was chosen and identified from the tryptic hydrolyzates of bovine lactoferrin by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry based on sequence database search. Analytes were separated on an ACQUITY UPLC BEH 300 C18 column and monitored by MS/MS in seven minutes. Quantitative result bias due to matrix effect and tryptic efficiency was corrected through the use of synthetic isotope-labeled standards. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.3 mg/100 g and 1.0 mg/100 g, respectively. Bovine lactoferrin within the concentration range of 10-1000 nmol L(-1) showed a strong linear relationship with a linear correlation coefficient (r) of >0.998. The intra- and inter-day precision of the method were RSD<6.5% and RSD<7.1%, respectively. Excellent repeatability (RSD<6.4%) substantially supported the application of this method for the determination of bovine lactoferrin in dairy samples. The present method was successfully validated and applied to determination of bovine lactoferrin in dairy products including infant formulas.

  15. Phosphorus cycling in the Sargasso Sea: Investigation using the oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate, enzyme-labeled fluorescence, and turnover times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Karen; Sohm, Jill A.; Cutter, Gregory A.; Lomas, Michael W.; Paytan, Adina

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations in surface water of vast areas of the ocean are extremely low (<10 nM) and phosphorus (P) availability could limit primary productivity in these regions. We explore the use of oxygen isotopic signature of dissolved phosphate (δ18OPO4) to investigate biogeochemical cycling of P in the Sargasso Sea, Atlantic Ocean. Additional techniques for studying P dynamics including 33P-based DIP turnover time estimates and percent of cells expressing alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity as measured by enzyme-labeling fluorescence are also used. In surface waters, δ18OPO4 values were lower than equilibrium by 3-6‰, indicative of dissolved organic phosphorous (DOP) remineralization by extracellular enzymes. An isotope mass balance model using a variety of possible combinations of enzymatic pathways and substrates indicates that DOP remineralization in the euphotic zone can account for a large proportion on P utilized by phytoplankton (as much as 82%). Relatively short DIP turnover times (4-8 h) and high expression of AP (38-77% of the cells labeled) are consistent with extensive DOP utilization and low DIP availability in the euphotoc zone. In deep water where DOP utilization rates are lower, δ18OPO4 values approach isotopic equilibrium and DIP turnover times are longer. Our data suggests that in the euphotic zone of the Sargasso Sea, DOP may be appreciably remineralized and utilized by phytoplankton and bacteria to supplement cellular requirements. A substantial fraction of photosynthesis in this region is supported by DOP uptake.

  16. A new label-free strategy for a highly efficient chemiluminescence immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhanjun; Cao, Yue; Li, Juan; Wang, Juntao; Du, Dan; Hu, Xiaoya; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-10-01

    A new label-free chemiluminescence (CL) immunoassay method is proposed for the cheap, convenient and sensitive detection of proteins through the co-immobilization of a capture antibody and horseradish peroxidase on a sensing interface. The specific immunoreaction on the interface effectively inhibits the enzymatic CL reaction, thus causing a decrease in CL signals.

  17. Earthworm Uptake Routes and Rates of Ionic Zn and ZnO Nanoparticles at Realistic Concentrations, Traced Using Stable Isotope Labeling.

    PubMed

    Laycock, Adam; Diez-Ortiz, Maria; Larner, Fiona; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Spurgeon, David; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Rehkämper, Mark; Svendsen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    The environmental behavior of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs), their availability to, uptake pathways by, and biokinetics in the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus were investigated using stable isotope labeling. Zinc isotopically enriched to 99.5% in (68)Zn ((68)Zn-E) was used to prepare (68)ZnO NPs and a dissolved phase of (68)Zn for comparison. These materials enabled tracing of environmentally relevant (below background) NP additions to soil of only 5 mg (68)Zn-E kg(-1). Uptake routes were isolated by introducing earthworms with sealed and unsealed mouthparts into test soils for up to 72 h. The Zn isotope compositions of the soils, pore waters and earthworms were then determined using multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Detection and quantification of (68)Zn-E in earthworm tissue was possible after only 4 h of dermal exposure, when the uptake of (68)Zn-E had increased the total Zn tissue concentration by 0.03‰. The results demonstrate that at these realistic exposure concentrations there is no distinguishable difference between the uptake of the two forms of Zn by the earthworm L. rubellus, with the dietary pathway accounting for ∼95% of total uptake. This stands in contrast to comparable studies where high dosing levels were used and dermal uptake is dominant.

  18. [Microbial synthesis of deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine with different levels of isotopic enrichment by facultative methylotrophic bacterium Brevibacterium methylicum with RMP assimilation of carbon].

    PubMed

    Mosin, O V; Shvets, V I; Skladnev, D A; Ignatov, I

    2014-01-01

    The preparative microbial synthesis of amino acids labelled with stable isotopes, including deuterium ( 2 H), suitable for biomedical applications by methylotrophic bacteria was studied using L-phenylalanine as example. This amino acid is secreted by Gram-negative aerobic facultative methylotrophic bacteria Brevibacterium methylicum, assimilating methanol via ribulose-5-monophosphate (RMP) cycle of assimilation of carbon, The data on adaptation of L-phenylalanine secreted by methylotrophic bacterium В. methylicum to the maximal concentration of deuterium in the growth medium with 98% 2 Н 2 O and 2% [ 2 Н]methanol, and biosynthesis of deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine With different levels of enrichment are presented. The strain was adapted by means of plating initial cells on firm (2% agarose) minimal growth media with an increasing gradient of 2 Н 2 O concentration from 0; 24.5; 49.0; 73.5 up to 98% 2 Н 2 O followed by subsequent selection of separate colonies stable to the action of 2 Н 2 O. These colonies were capable to produce L-phenylalanine. L-phenylalanine was extracted from growth medium by extraction with isopropanol with the subsequent crystallization in ethanol (output 0.65 g/l). The developed method of microbial synthesis allows to obtain deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine with different levels of isotopic enrichment, depending on concentration of 2 Н 2 O in growth media, from 17% (on growth medium with 24,5% 2 Н 2 O) up to 75% (on growth medium with 98% 2 Н 2 O) of deuterium in the molecule that is confirmed with the data of the electron impact (EI) mass- spectrometry analysis of methyl ethers of N-dimethylamino(naphthalene)-5-sulfochloride (dansyl) phenylalanine in these experimental conditions.

  19. Phosphorylcholine-Coated Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticles as Rapid and Efficient Labeling Agents for in vivo Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Kanyi; Shuhendler, Adam J.; Valta, Maija P.; Cui, Lina; Saar, Matthias; Peehl, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the pressing need to noninvasively monitor transplanted cells in vivo with fluorescence imaging, desirable fluorescent agents with rapid labeling capability, durable brightness, and ideal biocompatibility remain lacking. Herein we report phosphorylcholine-coated near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs) as a new class of rapid, efficient and cytocompatible labeling nanoagents for in vivo cell tracking. The phosphorylcholine coating results in efficient and rapid endocytosis and allows the SPN to enter cells within 0.5 h in complete culture medium apparently independent of the cell type, while its NIR fluorescence leads to a tissue penetration depth of 0.5 cm. In comparison to quantum dots and Cy5.5, the SPN is tolerant to physiologically ubiquitous reactive oxygen species ROS, resulting in durable fluorescence both in vitro and in vivo. These desirable physical and physiological properties of the SPN permit cell tracking of human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells in living mice at a lower limit of detection of 10,000 cells with no obvious alteration of cell phenotype after 12 days. SPNs thus could provide unique opportunities for optimizing cellular therapy and deciphering pathological processes as a cell tracking label. PMID:24668903

  20. Realistic Fasting Does Not Affect Stable Isotope Levels of a Metabolically Efficient Salamander

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are commonly used to examine various aspects of animal ecology. The use of stable isotopes generally proceeds under the implicit assumption that resource use is the only factor driving variation in stable isotope levels; however, a wealth of studies demonstrate a...

  1. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and quantitative comparison of the membrane proteomes of self-renewing and differentiating human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Prokhorova, Tatyana A; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Johansen, Pia T; Henningsen, Jeanette; Kratchmarova, Irina; Kassem, Moustapha; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2009-05-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is a powerful quantitative proteomics platform for comprehensive characterization of complex biological systems. However, the potential of SILAC-based approaches has not been fully utilized in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research mainly because of the complex nature of hESC culture conditions. Here we describe complete SILAC labeling of hESCs with fully preserved pluripotency, self-renewal capabilities, and overall proteome status that was quantitatively analyzed to a depth of 1556 proteins and 527 phosphorylation events. SILAC-labeled hESCs appear to be perfectly suitable for functional studies, and we exploited a SILAC-based proteomics strategy for discovery of hESC-specific surface markers. We determined and quantitatively compared the membrane proteomes of the self-renewing versus differentiating cells of two distinct human embryonic stem cell lines. Of the 811 identified membrane proteins, six displayed significantly higher expression levels in the undifferentiated state compared with differentiating cells. This group includes the established marker CD133/Prominin-1 as well as novel candidates for hESC surface markers: Glypican-4, Neuroligin-4, ErbB2, receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase zeta (PTPRZ), and Glycoprotein M6B. Our study also revealed 17 potential markers of hESC differentiation as their corresponding protein expression levels displayed a dramatic increase in differentiated embryonic stem cell populations.

  2. Insights into oxidation mechanisms in gamma-irradiated polypropylene, utilizing selective isotopic labeling with analysis by GC/MS, NMR and FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Robert; Thornberg, Steven M.; Assink, Roger A.; Mowery, Daniel M.; Kathleen Alam, M.; Irwin, Adriane N.; Hochrein, James M.; Derzon, Dora K.; Klamo, Sara B.; Clough, Roger L.

    2007-12-01

    In an effort to shed additional light on the chemical mechanisms underlying the radiation-oxidation of polypropylene (PP), we are using samples having selective 13C isotopic labeling at the three unique sites within the macromolecular structure. After radiation exposure, we applied GC/MS, solid-state 13C NMR, and FTIR to evaluate the applicability of each technique in identifying the molecular labeling of the oxidation products, with the goal of determining the site of origin of the products with respect to the macromolecule. Using GC/MS, we have identified the position of origin of CO 2 and CO from the polymer. Most of the CO 2 (60%) and CO (>90%) come from the C(1) (methylene) position of PP, with (30%) of the CO 2 originating from the C(3) (methyl) position, and 10% coming from the C(2) (tertiary) position. By GC/MS we have also identified the labeling patterns in four volatile oxidation products (acetone, methylisobutylketone, isobutane, and methyl acetate), and have used this information to map each compound onto the macromolecular framework. Using NMR we have quantified the time-dependent formation of solid-phase degradation products occurring from post-irradiation aging of PP samples held for 28 months at room temperature in air. Most of the solid oxidation products occur at the C(2) (tertiary) site; the predominant species, C(2) peroxides, increase linearly during the first 2 years, after which they plateau at a relatively high concentration.

  3. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using {sup 15}N isotopic tracer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim

    2015-09-25

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct {sup 15}N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the {sup 15}N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. {sup 15}N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. {sup 15}N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained.

  4. Nitrogen use efficiency evaluation of aerobic rice under field capacity water potential using 15N isotopic tracer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Ahmad Nazrul Abd; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Rahim, Khairuddin Abdul; Harun, Abdul Rahim

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency use of the nitrogen fertilizer on aerobic rice varieties MR219-4 and MR219-9 which were grown aerobically under field capacity water potential at the controlled environment area or shield house. Direct 15N isotope tracer method was used in this study, whereby the 15N isotope was utilized as a tracer for nitrogen nutrient uptake. 15N isotope presence in the samples is determined by using emission spectrometer analysis and percentage of total nitrogen is determined by using Kjeldahl method. 15N atom access value contained in the sample will be used in determining the effectiveness of the use of nitrogen in fertilizers through the specific calculation formulas. In this work, the data several data of nitrogen derived from fertilizer (Ndff), total nitrogen, nitrogen uptake and nitrogen use efficiency was obtained.

  5. A low-toxic artificial fluorescent glycoprotein can serve as an efficient cytoplasmic labeling in living cell.

    PubMed

    Si, Jiangju; Liang, Dawei; Kong, Dan; Wu, Sufang; Yuan, Lan; Xiang, Yan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    To maintain the virtue of good optical property and discard the dross of conventional fluorescent staining dyes, we provide a strategy for designing new fluorescent scaffolds. In this study, a novel fluorescent labeling glycoprotein (chitosan-poly-L-cysteine, CPC) was synthesized through graft copolymerization. CPC gives emission peak at 465-470 nm when excited at 386 nm. The submicro-scale CPC microspheres could be localized and persisted specifically in the cytoplasm of living cells, with strong blue fluorescence. Moreover, CPC was highly resistant to photo bleaching, the fluorescence was remained stable for up to 72 h as the cells grew and developed. The glycoprotein CPC was bio-compatible and in zero grade cytotoxicity as quantified by MTT assay. The fluorescent labeling process with our newly designed glycoprotein CPC is exceptionally efficient.

  6. Isotopic labeling and LC-APCI-MS quantification for investigating absorption of carotenoids and phylloquinone from kale (Brassica oleracea).

    PubMed

    Kurilich, Anne C; Britz, Steven J; Clevidence, Beverly A; Novotny, Janet A

    2003-08-13

    The ability to study bioavailability of nutrients from foods is an important step in determining the health impact of those nutrients. This work describes a method for studying the bioavailability of nutrients from kale (Brassica oleracea var. Acephala) by labeling the nutrients with carbon-13, feeding the kale to an adult volunteer, and analyzing plasma samples for labeled nutrients. Results showed that conditions for producing atmospheric intrinsically labeled kale had no detrimental effect on plant growth. Lutein, beta-carotene, retinol, and phylloquinone were analyzed using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Analysis of plasma samples showed that labeled lutein peaked in plasma at 11 h (0.23 microM), beta-carotene peaked at 8 (0.058 microM) and 24 h (0.062 microM), retinol peaked at 24 h (0.10 microM), and phylloquinone peaked at 7 h (3.0 nM). This method of labeling kale with (13)C was successful for producing clearly defined kinetic curves for (13)C-lutein,(13)C-beta-carotene, (13)C-retinol, and (13)C-phylloquinone.

  7. Low cost labeling with highlighter ink efficiently visualizes developing blood vessels in avian and mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Takase, Yuta; Tadokoro, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2013-12-01

    To understand how blood vessels form to establish the intricate network during vertebrate development, it is helpful if one can visualize the vasculature in embryos. We here describe a novel labeling method using highlighter ink, easily obtained in stationery stores with a low cost, to visualize embryo-wide vasculatures in avian and mice. We tested 50 different highlighters for fluorescent microscopy with filter sets equipped in a standard fluorescent microscope. The yellow and violet inks yielded fluorescent signals specifically detected by the filters used for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) detections, respectively. When the ink solution was infused into chicken/quail and mouse embryos, vasculatures including large vessels and capillaries were labeled both in living and fixed embryos. Ink-infused embryos were further subjected to histological sections, and double stained with antibodies including QH-1 (quail), α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and PECAM-1 (mouse), revealing that the endothelial cells were specifically labeled by the infused highlighter ink. Highlighter-labeled signals were detected with a resolution comparable to or higher than signals of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-lectin and Rhodamine-dextran, conventionally used for angiography. Furthermore, macroconfocal microscopic analyses with ink-infused embryos visualized fine vascular structures of both embryo proper and extra-embryonic plexus in a Z-stack image of 2400 μm thick with a markedly high resolution. Together, the low cost highlighter ink serves as an alternative reagent useful for visualization of blood vessels in developing avian and mouse embryos and possibly in other animals.

  8. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-11-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of (13)C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against (13)C' or (13)C(α) spins coupled to (15)N. As a result, (1)H-(15)N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns.

  9. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J.; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M.; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of 13C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against 13C’ or 13Cα spins coupled to 15N. As a result, 1H-15N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns. PMID:25442777

  10. Development of isotope labeling LC-MS for human salivary metabolomics and application to profiling metabolome changes associated with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiamin; Dixon, Roger A; Li, Liang

    2012-12-18

    Saliva is a readily available biofluid that may contain metabolites of interest for diagnosis and prognosis of diseases. In this work, a differential (13)C/(12)C isotope dansylation labeling method, combined with liquid chromatography Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR-MS), is described for quantitative profiling of the human salivary metabolome. New strategies are presented to optimize the sample preparation and LC-MS detection processes. The strategies allow the use of as little of 5 μL of saliva sample as a starting material to determine the concentration changes of an average of 1058 ion pairs or putative metabolites in comparative saliva samples. The overall workflow consists of several steps including acetone-induced protein precipitation, (12)C-dansylation labeling of the metabolites, and LC-UV measurement of the total concentration of the labeled metabolites in individual saliva samples. A pooled sample was prepared from all the individual samples and labeled with (13)C-dansylation to serve as a reference. Using this metabolome profiling method, it was found that compatible metabolome results could be obtained after saliva samples were stored in tubes normally used for genetic material collection at room temperature, -20 °C freezer, and -80 °C freezer over a period of 1 month, suggesting that many saliva samples already collected in genomic studies could become a valuable resource for metabolomics studies, although the effect of much longer term of storage remains to be determined. Finally, the developed method was applied for analyzing the metabolome changes of two different groups: normal healthy older adults and comparable older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Top-ranked 18 metabolites successfully distinguished the two groups, among which seven metabolites were putatively identified while one metabolite, taurine, was definitively identified. PMID:23150892

  11. Qualitative Metabolome Analysis of Human Cerebrospinal Fluid by 13C-/12C-Isotope Dansylation Labeling Combined with Liquid Chromatography Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Bamforth, Fiona; Li, Liang

    2011-02-01

    Metabolome analysis of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is challenging because of low abundance of metabolites present in a small volume of sample. We describe and apply a sensitive isotope labeling LC-MS technique for qualitative analysis of the CSF metabolome. After a CSF sample is divided into two aliquots, they are labeled by 13C-dansyl and 12C-dansyl chloride, respectively. The differentially labeled aliquots are then mixed and subjected to LC-MS using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Dansylation offers significant improvement in the performance of chromatography separation and detection sensitivity. Moreover, peaks detected in the mass spectra can be readily analyzed for ion pair recognition and database search based on accurate mass and/or retention time information. It is shown that about 14,000 features can be detected in a 25-min LC-FTICR MS run of a dansyl-labeled CSF sample, from which about 500 metabolites can be profiled. Results from four CSF samples are compared to gauge the detectability of metabolites by this method. About 261 metabolites are commonly detected in replicate runs of four samples. In total, 1132 unique metabolite ion pairs are detected and 347 pairs (31%) matched with at least one metabolite in the Human Metabolome Database. We also report a dansylation library of 220 standard compounds and, using this library, about 85 metabolites can be positively identified. Among them, 21 metabolites have never been reported to be associated with CSF. These results illustrate that the dansylation LC-FTICR MS method can be used to analyze the CSF metabolome in a more comprehensive manner.

  12. Spatially tracking 13C labeled substrate (bicarbonate) accumulation in microbial communities using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Doll, Charles G.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-08-25

    This is a manuscript we would like to submit for publication in Environmental Microbiology Reports. This manuscript contains a description of a laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodology developed at PNNL and applied to a microbial system at a PNNL project location – Hot Lake, Washington. I will submit a word document containing the entire manuscript with this Erica input request form.

  13. Parallel β-sheet vibrational couplings revealed by 2D IR spectroscopy of an isotopically labeled macrocycle: quantitative benchmark for the interpretation of amyloid and protein infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Woys, Ann Marie; Almeida, Aaron M; Wang, Lu; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; McGovern, Michael; de Pablo, Juan J; Skinner, James L; Gellman, Samuel H; Zanni, Martin T

    2012-11-21

    Infrared spectroscopy is playing an important role in the elucidation of amyloid fiber formation, but the coupling models that link spectra to structure are not well tested for parallel β-sheets. Using a synthetic macrocycle that enforces a two stranded parallel β-sheet conformation, we measured the lifetimes and frequency for six combinations of doubly (13)C═(18)O labeled amide I modes using 2D IR spectroscopy. The average vibrational lifetime of the isotope labeled residues was 550 fs. The frequencies of the labels ranged from 1585 to 1595 cm(-1), with the largest frequency shift occurring for in-register amino acids. The 2D IR spectra of the coupled isotope labels were calculated from molecular dynamics simulations of a series of macrocycle structures generated from replica exchange dynamics to fully sample the conformational distribution. The models used to simulate the spectra include through-space coupling, through-bond coupling, and local frequency shifts caused by environment electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. The calculated spectra predict the line widths and frequencies nearly quantitatively. Historically, the characteristic features of β-sheet infrared spectra have been attributed to through-space couplings such as transition dipole coupling. We find that frequency shifts of the local carbonyl groups due to nearest neighbor couplings and environmental factors are more important, while the through-space couplings dictate the spectral intensities. As a result, the characteristic absorption spectra empirically used for decades to assign parallel β-sheet secondary structure arises because of a redistribution of oscillator strength, but the through-space couplings do not themselves dramatically alter the frequency distribution of eigenstates much more than already exists in random coil structures. Moreover, solvent exposed residues have amide I bands with >20 cm(-1) line width. Narrower line widths indicate that the amide I backbone is solvent

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Protein Turnover by Metabolic Whole Rodent Pulse-Chase Isotopic Labeling and Shotgun Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Savas, Jeffrey N; Park, Sung Kyu; Yates, John R

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of protein half-life and degradation dynamics has proven critically important to our understanding of a broad and diverse set of biological conditions ranging from cancer to neurodegeneration. Historically these protein turnover measures have been performed in cells by monitoring protein levels after "pulse" labeling of newly synthesized proteins and subsequent chase periods. Comparing the level of labeled protein remaining as a function of time to the initial level reveals the protein's half-life. In this method we provide a detailed description of the workflow required for the determination of protein turnover rates on a whole proteome scale in vivo. Our approach starts with the metabolic labeling of whole rodents by restricting all the nitrogen in their diet to exclusively nitrogen-15 in the form of spirulina algae. After near complete organismal labeling with nitrogen-15, the rodents are then switched to a normal nitrogen-14 rich diet for time periods of days to years. Tissues are harvested, the extracts are fractionated, and the proteins are digested to peptides. Peptides are separated by multidimensional liquid chromatography and analyzed by high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS). The nitrogen-15 containing proteins are then identified and measured by the bioinformatic proteome analysis tools Sequest, DTASelect2, and Census. In this way, our metabolic pulse-chase approach reveals in vivo protein decay rates proteome-wide. PMID:26867752

  15. Highly efficient and isotope selective photo-ionization of barium atoms using diode laser and LED light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Zhang, J. W.; Gao, C.; Wang, L. J.

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrated a simple method to photo-ionize barium atoms using 791 nm diode laser together with 310 nm UV LED. It solved the bottle-neck problem of previous method using 791 nm diode laser and 337 nm N2 laser, whose ionization rate was limited by the repetition rate of N2 laser. Compared with previous method, it has advantages of high efficiency together with simple and cheap setups. By tuning the frequency of 791 nm laser to be resonant with the desired isotope, isotope selective photo-ionization has been realized.

  16. Highly efficient and isotope selective photo-ionization of barium atoms using diode laser and LED light.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Zhang, J W; Gao, C; Wang, L J

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrated a simple method to photo-ionize barium atoms using 791 nm diode laser together with 310 nm UV LED. It solved the bottle-neck problem of previous method using 791 nm diode laser and 337 nm N(2) laser, whose ionization rate was limited by the repetition rate of N(2) laser. Compared with previous method, it has advantages of high efficiency together with simple and cheap setups. By tuning the frequency of 791 nm laser to be resonant with the desired isotope, isotope selective photo-ionization has been realized. PMID:21935008

  17. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards and Labeling Programs for Clothes Washers, Water Dispensers, Vending Machines and CFLs

    SciTech Connect

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

    2010-06-01

    Since the late 1970s, energy labeling programs and mandatory energy performance standards have been used in many different countries to improve the efficiency levels of major residential and commercial equipment. As more countries and regions launch programs covering a greater range of products that are traded worldwide, greater attention has been given to harmonizing the specific efficiency criteria in these programs and the test methods for measurements. For example, an international compact fluorescent light (CFL) harmonization initiative was launched in 2006 to focus on collaboration between Australia, China, Europe and North America. Given the long history of standards and labeling programs, most major energy-consuming residential appliances and commercial equipment are already covered under minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) and/or energy labels. For these products, such as clothes washers and CFLs, harmonization may still be possible when national MEPS or labeling thresholds are revised. Greater opportunity for harmonization exists in newer energy-consuming products that are not commonly regulated but are under consideration for new standards and labeling programs. This may include commercial products such as water dispensers and vending machines, which are only covered by MEPS or energy labels in a few countries or regions. As China continues to expand its appliance standards and labeling programs and revise existing standards and labels, it is important to learn from recent international experiences with efficiency criteria and test procedures for the same products. Specifically, various types of standards and labeling programs already exist in North America, Europe and throughout Asia for products in China's 2010 standards and labeling programs, namely clothes washers, water dispensers, vending machines and CFLs. This report thus examines similarities and critical differences in energy efficiency values, test procedure specifications and other

  18. Efficient (18)F-Labeling of Synthetic Exendin-4 Analogues for Imaging Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Keliher, Edmund J; Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg M; Upadhyay, Rabi; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-08-01

    A number of exendin derivatives have been developed to target glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors on beta cells in vivo. Modifications of exendin analogues have been shown to have significant effects on pharmacokinetics and, as such, have been used to develop a variety of therapeutic compounds. Here, we show that an exendin-4, modified at position 12 with a cysteine conjugated to a tetrazine, can be labeled with (18)F-trans-cyclooctene and converted into a PET imaging agent at high yields and with good selectivity. The agent accumulates in beta cells in vivo and has sufficiently high accumulation in mouse models of insulinomas to enable in vivo imaging.

  19. Comparative proteomics of two life cycle stages of stable isotope-labeled Trypanosoma brucei reveals novel components of the parasite's host adaptation machinery.

    PubMed

    Butter, Falk; Bucerius, Ferdinand; Michel, Margaux; Cicova, Zdenka; Mann, Matthias; Janzen, Christian J

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei developed a sophisticated life cycle to adapt to different host environments. Although developmental differentiation of T. brucei has been the topic of intensive research for decades, the mechanisms responsible for adaptation to different host environments are not well understood. We developed stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture in trypanosomes to compare the proteomes of two different life cycle stages. Quantitative comparison of 4364 protein groups identified many proteins previously not known to be stage-specifically expressed. The identification of stage-specific proteins helps to understand how parasites adapt to different hosts and provides new insights into differences in metabolism, gene regulation, and cell architecture. A DEAD-box RNA helicase, which is highly up-regulated in the bloodstream form of this parasite and which is essential for viability and proper cell cycle progression in this stage is described as an example.

  20. Biosynthesis of seven carbon-13 labeled Alternaria toxins including altertoxins, alternariol, and alternariol methyl ether, and their application to a multiple stable isotope dilution assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-02-01

    An unprecedented stable isotope dilution assay for the genotoxic altertoxins along with exposure data of consumers is presented to enable a first risk assessment of these Alternaria toxins in foods. Altertoxins were produced as the most abundant Alternaria toxins in a modified Czapek-Dox medium with a low level of glucose as the carbon source and ammonium sulfate as the sole nitrogen source. Labeled altertoxins were synthesized in the same way using [(13)C6]glucose. Moreover, labeled alternariol, alternariol methyl ether, altenuene, and alternuisol were biosynthesized in another modified medium containing [(13)C6]glucose and sodium [(13)C2]acetate. A stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method was developed and used for food analysis. For altertoxin I, altertoxin II, alterperylenol, alternariol, and alternariol methyl ether, the limits of detection ranged from 0.09 to 0.53 μg kg(-1). The inter-/intra-day (n = 3 × 6) relative standard deviations of the method were below 13%, and the recoveries ranged between 96 and 109%. Among the various commercial food samples, some of the organic whole grains revealed low-level contamination with altertoxin I and alterperylenol, and paprika powder, which was heavily loaded with alternariol, alternariol methyl ether, and tentoxin, showed higher contamination level of altertoxin I and alterperylenol. Altertoxin II and III and stemphyltoxin III were not detectable. In addition, if the food was contaminated with altertoxins, it was likely to be co-contaminated with the other Alternaria toxins, but not necessarily vice versa. Maximum concentrations of altertoxin I and alterperylenol were detected in sorghum feed samples containing 43 and 58 μg kg(-1), respectively. This was significantly higher than that in the measured food samples.

  1. FTIR study of the photoinduced processes of plant phytochrome phyA using isotope-labeled bilins and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Schwinté, Pascale; Foerstendorf, Harald; Hussain, Zakir; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Mroginski, Maria-Andrea; Hildebrandt, Peter; Siebert, Friedrich

    2008-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to analyze the chromophore structure in the parent states Pr and Pfr of plant phytochrome phyA and the respective photoproducts lumi-R and lumi-F. The spectra were obtained from phyA adducts assembled with either uniformly or selectively isotope-labeled phytochromobilin and phycocyanobilin. The interpretation of the experimental spectra is based on the spectra of chromophore models calculated by density functional theory. Global (13)C-labeling of the tetrapyrrole allows for the discrimination between chromophore and protein bands in the Fourier transform infrared difference spectra. All infrared difference spectra display a prominent difference band attributable to a stretching mode with large contributions from the methine bridge between the inner pyrrole rings (B-C stretching). Due to mode coupling, frequencies and isotopic shifts of this mode suggest that the Pr chromophore may adopt a distorted ZZZssa or ZZZasa geometry with a twisted A-B methine bridge. The transition to lumi-R is associated with only minor changes of the amide I bands indicating limited protein structural changes during the isomerization site of the C-D methine bridge. Major protein structural changes occur upon the transition to Pfr in which the chromophore adopts a ZZEssa or ZZEasa-like state. In addition, specific interactions with the protein alter the structure of the B-C methine bridge as concluded from the substantial downshift of the respective stretching mode. These interactions are removed during the photoreaction to lumi-F (ZZE-->ZZZ), which involves only small protein structural changes. PMID:18390618

  2. Using stable isotopes to reconcile differences in nitrogen uptake efficiency relative to late season fertilization of northern red oak seedlings in Wisconsin bare-root nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinuma, R.; Balster, N. J.

    2009-12-01

    Cultural applications (e.g., timing, amount) of nitrogen (N) fertilizer in bareroot tree nurseries have been assessed for some time. However, the use of different metrologies to quantify the efficient use of fertilizer N and its allocation within biomass has confounded comparisons between fertilization regimes. This inconsistency is especially problematic when quantifying N fertilizer uptake efficiency (NFUE) of late season N fertilization in northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) (NRO) seedlings characterized by episodic flushes in growth and N storage in perennial tissue to support spring growth. The use of isotopic tracers could help elucidate these differences. We therefore hypothesized that: 1) calculations of NFUE using isotopically enriched fertilizer would yield lower, more precise estimates of NFUE relative to traditional methods due to differences in the accounting of mineralized and reabsorbed N, and 2) a significant fraction of leaf N in older leaves (early flushes) would be reabsorbed into root and shoot tissue before abscission relative to leaves produced toward the end of the growing season (late flushes). To test these hypotheses, we conducted an experiment in two-year old NRO seedlings at two bare-root nurseries in Wisconsin. We applied a total of 147 mg N seedling-1 in pulses from early July after the seedlings completed their second leaf flush until late August. The treatments consisted of three replicated plots of 15N enriched (1.000 atom%) ammonium sulfate, three non-enriched plots, and three unfertilized plots (controls) at each nursery. Subsequent changes in plant N uptake and N allocation were quantified from destructively harvested samples taken at 40, 60, and 120 days after the fertilization began. We evaluated three common methods currently used to estimate NFUE (total N without control, total N with control, and isotopic difference). The total N without control method overestimated mean NFUE by 3.2 times relative to the isotope method

  3. Regioselective synthesis of isotopically labeled Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A-D3) by reaction of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-D3 with magnesium methyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Roth, Nadine; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Müller, Michael; Auwärter, Volker

    2012-10-10

    For the reliable quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in biological matrices by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS(/MS), an isotopically labeled internal standard was synthesized starting from Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-D(3) (THC-D(3)). Synthesis strategy was based on a method reported by Mechoulam et al. in 1969 using magnesium methyl carbonate (MMC) as carboxylation reagent for the synthesis of cannabinoid acids. Preliminary experiments with THC to optimize yield of the product (THCA-A) resulted in the synthesis of the positional isomer tetrahydrocannabinolic acid B (THCA-B) as a byproduct. Using the optimized conditions for the desired isomer, THCA-A-D(3) was prepared and isolated with a yield of approx. 10% after two synthesis cycles. Isotope purity was estimated to be >99% by relative abundance of the molecular ions. The synthesized compound proved to be suitable as an internal standard for quantification of THCA-A in serum and hair samples of cannabis consumers.

  4. Mixed-Isotope Labeling with LC-IMS-MS for Characterization of Protein–Protein Interactions by Chemical Cross-Linking

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Baker, Erin S.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Orton, Daniel J.; Taverner, Thomas; Ansong, Charles; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Burnet, Meagan C.; Cort, John R.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-02-20

    Chemical cross-linking of proteins followed by proteolysis and mass spectrometric analysis of the resulting cross-linked peptides can provide insights into protein structure and protein-protein interactions. However, cross-linked peptides are by necessity of low stoichometry and have different physicochemical properties than linear peptides, routine unambiguous identification of the cross-linked peptides has remained difficult. To address this challenge, we demonstrated the use of liquid chromatography and ion mobility separations coupled with mass spectrometry in combination with a heavy-isotope labeling method. The combination of mixed-isotope cross-linking and ion mobility provided unique and easily interpretable spectral multiplet features for the intermolecular cross-linked peptides. Application of the method to two different homodimeric proteins - SrfN, a virulence factor from Salmonella Typhimurium and SO_2176, a protein of unknown function from Shewanella oneidensis- revealed several cross-linked peptides from both proteins that were identified with a low false discovery rate (estimated using a decoy approach). A greater number of cross-linked peptides were identified using ion mobility drift time information in the analysis than when the data were summed across the drift time dimension before analysis. The identified cross-linked peptides migrated more quickly in the ion mobility drift tube than the unmodified peptides.

  5. Studies of peptide a- and b-type fragment ions using stable isotope labeling and integrated ion mobility/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Riba Garcia, Isabel; Giles, Kevin; Bateman, Robert H; Gaskell, Simon J

    2008-12-01

    The structures of peptide a- and b-type fragment ions were studied using synthetic peptides including a set of isomeric peptides, differing in the sequence location of an alanine residue labeled with (15)N and uniformly with (13)C. The pattern of isotope labeling of second-generation fragment ions derived via a(n) and b(n) ions (where n = 4 or 5) suggested that these intermediates existed in part as macrocyclic structures, where alternative sites of ring opening gave rise to different linear forms whose simple cleavage might give rise to the observed final products. Similar conclusions were derived from combined ion mobility/tandem MS analyses where different fragmentation patterns were observed for isomeric a- or b-type ions that display different ion mobilities. These analyses were facilitated by a new approach to the processing of ion mobility/tandem MS data, from which distinct and separate product ion spectra are derived from ions that are incompletely separated by ion mobility. Finally, an example is provided of evidence for a macrocyclic structure for b(n) ions where n = 8 or 9.

  6. Convenient preparation of deuterium-labeled analogs of peptides containing N-substituted glycines for a stable isotope dilution LC-MS quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Bąchor, Remigiusz; Dębowski, Dawid; Łęgowska, Anna; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Rolka, Krzysztof; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2015-11-01

    N-substituted glycines constitute mimics of natural amino acids that are of great interest in the peptide-based drug development. Peptoids-oligo(N-substituted glycines) have been recently demonstrated to be highly active peptidomimetics in biological systems, resistant to proteolytic degradation. We developed a method of the deuterium labeling of peptidomimetics containing N-substituted glycine residues via H/D exchange of their α-carbon hydrogen atoms. The labeling was shown to be easy, inexpensive, and without the use of derivatization reagents or the need for a further purification. The deuterons introduced at the α-carbon atoms do not undergo a back exchange under acidic conditions during liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The LC-MS analysis of a mixture of isotopologues revealed a co-elution of deuterated and nondeuterated forms of the peptidomimetics, which may be useful in the quantitative isotope dilution analysis of peptoids and other derivatives of N-substituted glycines. PMID:26415697

  7. Quantitation of methadone enantiomers in humans using stable isotope-labeled (2H3)-, (2H5)-, and (2H8)Methadone

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Hachey, D.L.; Kreek, M.J.; Irving, C.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    A new technique for simultaneous stereoselective kinetic studies of methadone enantiomers was developed using three deuterium-labeled forms of methadone and GLC-chemical-ionization mass spectrometry. A racemic mixture (1:1) of (R)-(-)-(2H5)methadone (l-form) and (S)-(R)-(2H3)methadone (d-form) was administered orally in place of a single daily dose of unlabeled (+/-)-(2H0)methadone in long-term maintenance patients. Racemic (+/-)-(2H8)methadone was used as an internal standard for the simultaneous quantitation of (2H0)-, (2H3)-, and (2H5)methadone in plasma and urine. A newly developed extraction procedure, using a short, disposable C18 reversed-phase cartridge and improved chemical-ionization procedures employing ammonia gas, resulted in significant reduction of the background impurities contributing to the ions used for isotopic abundance measurements. These improvements enabled the measurement of labeled plasma methadone levels for 120 hr following a single dose. This methodology was applied to the study of methadone kinetics in two patients; in both patients, the analgesically active l-enantiomer of the drug had a longer plasma elimination half-life and a smaller area under the plasma disappearance curve than did the inactive d-form.

  8. High levels of isotope elimination improve precision and allow individual-based measurements of metabolic rates in animals using the doubly labeled water method

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Masaki; Niizuma, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Maki; Oda, Emiko; Ebine, Naoyuki; Oka, Nariko; Yoda, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Doubly labeled water (DLW) can be used to measure energy expenditure in free-ranging animals, but questions have been raised about its accuracy in different species or contexts. We investigated whether differences in the extent of isotope elimination affects the precision and accuracy of the DLW method, which can vary according to the experimental design or metabolic rate of the species. Estimated total energy expenditure by the DLW method (TEEdlw) was compared with actual total energy expenditure simultaneously measured via respirometry (TEEresp) in streaked shearwaters Calonectris leucomelas, a pelagic seabird. Subjects were divided into three groups with different experimental conditions: at rest on the ground for 24 h (Group A) or for 48 h (Group B), and at rest on the water for 24 h (Group C). TEEdlw in Group A matched TEEresp, whereas there was an overestimation of TEEdlw in both Groups B and C compared with TEEresp. However, compared with Group A, TEEdlw in Groups B and C had reduced the isotopic analytical variability and thus higher precision. The best regression model (TEEdlw = 1.37 TEEresp − 14.12) showed a high correlation (R2 = 0.82) between TEEdlw and TEEresp and allows a correction factor for field metabolic rates in streaked shearwaters. Our results demonstrate that the commonly made assumption that the DLW method is not appropriate for individual-based estimates may be incorrect in certain circumstances. Although a correction factor may be necessary when using the DLW method to estimate metabolic rate, greater levels of isotope eliminations provides DLW estimates with high precision, which can adequately represent relative individual estimates. Nevertheless, the DLW method, should be used with caution when characterizing interspecies difference of energy expenditures. PMID:26611463

  9. High levels of isotope elimination improve precision and allow individual-based measurements of metabolic rates in animals using the doubly labeled water method.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Masaki; Niizuma, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Maki; Oda, Emiko; Ebine, Naoyuki; Oka, Nariko; Yoda, Ken

    2015-11-01

    Doubly labeled water (DLW) can be used to measure energy expenditure in free-ranging animals, but questions have been raised about its accuracy in different species or contexts. We investigated whether differences in the extent of isotope elimination affects the precision and accuracy of the DLW method, which can vary according to the experimental design or metabolic rate of the species. Estimated total energy expenditure by the DLW method (TEEdlw) was compared with actual total energy expenditure simultaneously measured via respirometry (TEEresp) in streaked shearwaters Calonectris leucomelas, a pelagic seabird. Subjects were divided into three groups with different experimental conditions: at rest on the ground for 24 h (Group A) or for 48 h (Group B), and at rest on the water for 24 h (Group C). TEEdlw in Group A matched TEEresp, whereas there was an overestimation of TEEdlw in both Groups B and C compared with TEEresp. However, compared with Group A, TEEdlw in Groups B and C had reduced the isotopic analytical variability and thus higher precision. The best regression model (TEEdlw = 1.37 TEEresp - 14.12) showed a high correlation (R(2) = 0.82) between TEEdlw and TEEresp and allows a correction factor for field metabolic rates in streaked shearwaters. Our results demonstrate that the commonly made assumption that the DLW method is not appropriate for individual-based estimates may be incorrect in certain circumstances. Although a correction factor may be necessary when using the DLW method to estimate metabolic rate, greater levels of isotope eliminations provides DLW estimates with high precision, which can adequately represent relative individual estimates. Nevertheless, the DLW method, should be used with caution when characterizing interspecies difference of energy expenditures.

  10. Efficient (18)F-Labeling of Synthetic Exendin-4 Analogues for Imaging Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Keliher, Edmund J; Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg M; Upadhyay, Rabi; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-08-01

    A number of exendin derivatives have been developed to target glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors on beta cells in vivo. Modifications of exendin analogues have been shown to have significant effects on pharmacokinetics and, as such, have been used to develop a variety of therapeutic compounds. Here, we show that an exendin-4, modified at position 12 with a cysteine conjugated to a tetrazine, can be labeled with (18)F-trans-cyclooctene and converted into a PET imaging agent at high yields and with good selectivity. The agent accumulates in beta cells in vivo and has sufficiently high accumulation in mouse models of insulinomas to enable in vivo imaging. PMID:23997998

  11. Efficient 18F-Labeling of Synthetic Exendin-4 Analogues for Imaging Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keliher, Edmund J; Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg M; Upadhyay, Rabi; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    A number of exendin derivatives have been developed to target glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors on beta cells in vivo. Modifications of exendin analogues have been shown to have significant effects on pharmacokinetics and, as such, have been used to develop a variety of therapeutic compounds. Here, we show that an exendin-4, modified at position 12 with a cysteine conjugated to a tetrazine, can be labeled with 18F-trans-cyclooctene and converted into a PET imaging agent at high yields and with good selectivity. The agent accumulates in beta cells in vivo and has sufficiently high accumulation in mouse models of insulinomas to enable in vivo imaging. PMID:23997998

  12. The use of stable isotope labeling and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry techniques to study the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of the antimigraine drug, MK-0462 (rizatriptan) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Barrish, A; Olah, T V; Gatto, G J; Michel, K B; Dobrinska, M R; Gilbert, J D

    1996-01-01

    MK-0462 (rizatriptan) is a 5HT1D agonist being developed for the treatment of migraine. The assay for this substance in plasma and urine is based on HPLC with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection. The procedure has been modified to include the simultaneous determination of the [triazole-13C2, 15N3-] stable-isotope-labelled analogue for which the lower quantifiable limit was 0.1 ng mL-1. The assay has been applied to study the pharmacokinetics of MK-0462 after simultaneous oral and intravenous administration of the drug and its stable-isotope-labelled analogue to dogs. The experiment afforded an estimate of plasma clearance concomitant with a precise measurement of the drug's oral bioavailability. The increasing use of LC-MS/MS in quantitative experiments may renew interest in stable isotopes as tools for pharmaceutical research. PMID:8755236

  13. Water-Use Efficiency and Stable Carbon Isotopes: Accounting for Photosynthetic Refixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubierna Lopez, N.; Marshall, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Three processes are performed by every green plant tissue: photosynthesis, respiration and refixation. Each of these affects the ratio of stable isotopes, 12C and 13C. Refixation allows plants to fix a portion of the CO2 produced via respiration prior to releasing the remaining CO2 back into the atmosphere. The process begins with a pool of CO2 already depleted in 13C and subsequently depletes it further, resulting in two simultaneous effects: enrichment of CO2 released into the atmosphere and depletion of biomass that is formed. Recently, considerable research has concentrated on identifying processes that determine the isotopic composition of a given plant tissue. A convincing explanation for the observed enrichment of stems versus leaves has still not been derived. We advocate that refixation can explain currently inexplicable patterns. We hypothesized that leaves re-fix carbon during their entire lifespan when light intensity is below the light compensation point and above total darkness. We grew Idaho hybrid poplars under controlled conditions in a growth chamber. Light intensity was regulated to create three different treatments: (1) Light (PAR=270 μmol/m2s), (2) Shade (PAR=89 μmol/m2s) and (3) Dark (PAR=0 μmol/m2s). For each treatment we modified respiration values by regulating the light environment between total darkness and the light compensation point. For the light treatment group, leaf respired CO2 was collected at 5% (PAR=14) and 22% (PAR=59) of the light growing environment. For the shade treatment group, leaf respired CO2 was collected at 22% (PAR=20) of the light growing environment. We estimated the amount of refixation as (Ddark- Dlight)/Ddark, where Ddark represents dark respiration (μmol/gs) and Dlight respiration during light periods (μmol/gs). Light treatments plants exhibited a maximum refixation level of 53% at PAR=59, with an associated enrichment of leaf respired C isotopic composition (δ13CLR) of 3.3‰. At PAR=14, refixation rate

  14. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Qin; Tang, Ying; Fu, Rao; Meng, Qiu-Hua; Zhou, Xue; Ling, Ze-Min; Cheng, Xiao; Tian, Su-Wei; Wang, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xue-Guo; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats.

  15. Improved biocompatibility and efficient labeling of neural stem cells with poly(L-lysine)-coated maghemite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Lada Brkić; Babič, Michal; Šlouf, Miroslav; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Cell tracking is a powerful tool to understand cellular migration, dynamics, homing and function of stem cell transplants. Nanoparticles represent possible stem cell tracers, but they differ in cellular uptake and side effects. Their properties can be modified by coating with different biocompatible polymers. To test if a coating polymer, poly(L-lysine), can improve the biocompatibility of nanoparticles applied to neural stem cells, poly(L-lysine)-coated maghemite nanoparticles were prepared and characterized. We evaluated their cellular uptake, the mechanism of internalization, cytotoxicity, viability and proliferation of neural stem cells, and compared them to the commercially available dextran-coated nanomag®-D-spio nanoparticles. Results: Light microscopy of Prussian blue staining revealed a concentration-dependent intracellular uptake of iron oxide in neural stem cells. The methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and the calcein acetoxymethyl ester/propidium iodide assay demonstrated that poly(L-lysine)-coated maghemite nanoparticles scored better than nanomag®-D-spio in cell labeling efficiency, viability and proliferation of neural stem cells. Cytochalasine D blocked the cellular uptake of nanoparticles indicating an actin-dependent process, such as macropinocytosis, to be the internalization mechanism for both nanoparticle types. Finally, immunocytochemistry analysis of neural stem cells after treatment with poly(L-lysine)-coated maghemite and nanomag®-D-spio nanoparticles showed that they preserve their identity as neural stem cells and their potential to differentiate into all three major neural cell types (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes). Conclusion: Improved biocompatibility and efficient cell labeling makes poly(L-lysine)-coated maghemite nanoparticles appropriate candidates for future neural stem cell in vivo tracking studies. PMID:27547609

  16. Monitoring the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a co-contaminated soil using stable isotope labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawra, Anna; Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Watzinger, Andrea; Soja, Gerhard; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Conventional remediation techniques like "dig and dump" are costly and limited in scale. Plant- and microbe-based alternatives, e.g. phytoremediation options, offer a cheap and environmentally friendly approach that can be applied on larger areas. However, the application of phytoremediation techniques to co-contaminated sites may be hindered due to a potential inhibition of biodegradation processes by the presence of heavy metals in soil. Therefore, the objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that the degradation of organic pollutants can be enhanced by immobilising potentially toxic heavy metals. This study aims to identify the influence of heavy metal immobilisation on the degradation of organic pollutants, and to determine chemical, physical and biological measures further accelerating these processes. The influence of heavy metals on organic pollutant degradation dynamics is assessed using 13C-phospholipid fatty acid analysis (13C-PLFA). Application of 13C-labeled phenanthrene allows the identification of microbial groups responsible for the degradation process. For metal immobilisation and enhanced biodegradation, distinct mineral and organic soil amendments (iron oxides, gravel sludge, biochar) are deployed, partly in combination with fast-growing and pollution-tolerant woody plants (willow, black locust and alder). Results of an incubation batch experiment show a fast degradation of the phenanthrene label within the first two weeks by various microbial groups (gram negative bacteria as indicated by the cy17:0 peak) resulting in a decrease by up to 80% of the total PAH concentration (Σ 16 EPA PAHs) measured in soil. A similar trend was observed in the greenhouse pot experiment, whereby heavy metal accumulation in the woody plants growing on the co-contaminated soil significantly varied with plant species (willow > black locust, alder).

  17. Dual, differential isotope labeling shows the preferential movement of labile plant constituents into mineral-bonded soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Haddix, Michelle L; Paul, Eldor A; Cotrufo, M Francesca

    2016-06-01

    The formation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) are major concerns in the context of global change for carbon sequestration and soil health. It is presently believed that lignin is not selectively preserved in soil and that chemically labile compounds bonding to minerals comprise a large fraction of the SOM. Labile plant inputs have been suggested to be the main precursor of the mineral-bonded SOM. Litter decomposition and SOM formation are expected to have temperature sensitivity varying with the lability of plant inputs. We tested this framework using dual (13) C and (15) N differentially labeled plant material to distinguish the metabolic and structural components within a single plant material. Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) seedlings were grown in an enriched (13) C and (15) N environment and then prior to harvest, removed from the enriched environment and allowed to incorporate natural abundance (13) C-CO2 and (15) N fertilizer into the metabolic plant components. This enabled us to achieve a greater than one atom % difference in (13) C between the metabolic and structural components within the plant litter. This differentially labeled litter was incubated in soil at 15 and 35 °C, for 386 days with CO2 measured throughout the incubation. After 14, 28, 147, and 386 days of incubation, the soil was subsequently fractionated. There was no difference in temperature sensitivity of the metabolic and structural components with regard to how much was respired or in the amount of litter biomass stabilized. Only the metabolic litter component was found in the sand, silt, or clay fraction while the structural component was exclusively found in the light fraction. These results support the stabilization framework that labile plant components are the main precursor of mineral-associated organic matter. PMID:27142168

  18. Characterization of TATP gas phase product ion chemistry via isotope labeling experiments using ion mobility spectrometry interfaced with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Wooten, Alfred; Kozole, Joseph; Deline, James; Beresford, Pamela; Stairs, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Identification of the fragment ion species associated with the ion reaction mechanism of triacetone triperoxide (TATP), a homemade peroxide-based explosive, is presented. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has proven to be a key analytical technique in the detection of trace explosive material. Unfortunately, IMS alone does not provide chemical identification of the ions detected; therefore, it is unknown what ion species are actually formed and separated by the IMS. In IMS, ions are primarily characterized by their drift time, which is dependent on the ion׳s mass and molecular cross-section; thus, IMS as a standalone technique does not provide structural signatures, which is in sharp contrast to the chemical and molecular information that is generally obtained from other customary analytical techniques, such as NMR, Raman and IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. To help study the ion chemistry that gives rise to the peaks observed in IMS, the hardware of two different commercial IMS instruments has been directly coupled to triple quadrupole (QQQ) mass spectrometers, in order to ascertain each ion׳s corresponding mass/charge (m/z) ratios with different dopants at two temperatures. Isotope labeling was then used to help identify and confirm the molecular identity of the explosive fragment and adduct ions of TATP. The m/z values and isotope labeling experiments were used to help propose probable molecular formulas for the ion fragments. In this report, the fragment and adduct ions m/z 58 and 240 of TATP have been confirmed to be [C3H6NH·H](+) and [TATP·NH4](+), respectively; while the fragment ions m/z 73 and 89 of TATP are identified as having the molecular formulas [C4H9NH2](+) and [C4H9O2](+), respectively. It is anticipated that the work in this area will not only help to facilitate improvements in mobility-based detection (IMS and MS), but also aid in the development and optimization of MS-based detection algorithms for TATP.

  19. Characterization of TATP gas phase product ion chemistry via isotope labeling experiments using ion mobility spectrometry interfaced with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Wooten, Alfred; Kozole, Joseph; Deline, James; Beresford, Pamela; Stairs, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Identification of the fragment ion species associated with the ion reaction mechanism of triacetone triperoxide (TATP), a homemade peroxide-based explosive, is presented. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has proven to be a key analytical technique in the detection of trace explosive material. Unfortunately, IMS alone does not provide chemical identification of the ions detected; therefore, it is unknown what ion species are actually formed and separated by the IMS. In IMS, ions are primarily characterized by their drift time, which is dependent on the ion׳s mass and molecular cross-section; thus, IMS as a standalone technique does not provide structural signatures, which is in sharp contrast to the chemical and molecular information that is generally obtained from other customary analytical techniques, such as NMR, Raman and IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. To help study the ion chemistry that gives rise to the peaks observed in IMS, the hardware of two different commercial IMS instruments has been directly coupled to triple quadrupole (QQQ) mass spectrometers, in order to ascertain each ion׳s corresponding mass/charge (m/z) ratios with different dopants at two temperatures. Isotope labeling was then used to help identify and confirm the molecular identity of the explosive fragment and adduct ions of TATP. The m/z values and isotope labeling experiments were used to help propose probable molecular formulas for the ion fragments. In this report, the fragment and adduct ions m/z 58 and 240 of TATP have been confirmed to be [C3H6NH·H](+) and [TATP·NH4](+), respectively; while the fragment ions m/z 73 and 89 of TATP are identified as having the molecular formulas [C4H9NH2](+) and [C4H9O2](+), respectively. It is anticipated that the work in this area will not only help to facilitate improvements in mobility-based detection (IMS and MS), but also aid in the development and optimization of MS-based detection algorithms for TATP. PMID:24913870

  20. 4-Phenylaminomethyl-Benzeneboric Acid Modified Tip Extraction for Determination of Brassinosteroids in Plant Tissues by Stable Isotope Labeling-Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Ding, Jun; Wang, Ya-Lan; Liu, Ping; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-01-19

    Monitoring brassinosteroids (BRs) has been of major interest of researchers as these substances play a crucial role in a variety of phytological processes in plants. However, the determination of endogenous BRs in plant tissue is still a challenging task due to their low abundance and the complex matrix of plant tissues. In this study, a single step strategy by combining tip extraction and in situ derivatization was proposed for BR analysis. In the proposed strategy, a mixed mode sorbent (C8-SO3H) in tip was modified with 4-phenylaminomethyl-benzeneboric acid (4-PAMBA) through cation exchange and hydrophobic interactions, and then used as a boronate affinity media to selectively capture and purify BRs from plant extract through the reaction of boric acid groups of 4-PAMBA and cis-diol on BRs. The BRs-4-PAMBA derivatives formed were easily eluted from the C8-SO3H tip by nullifying the ion exchange and hydrophobic interactions using ammonia acetonitrile, followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. BR standards, isotopically labeled with d5-4-phenylaminomethyl-benzeneboric acid (4-PAMBA-d5) were introduced to improve the assay precision of LC-MS/MS. Under the optimized conditions, the overall process could be completed within 1 h, which is greatly improved in speed compared with previously reported protocols. In addition, the detection sensitivities of labeled BRs were improved by over 2000-fold compared with unlabeled BRs, thus the consumption of plant materials was reduced to 50 mg. Finally, the proposed method was applied for the investigation of BRs response in rice toward Cd stress. PMID:26650986

  1. Rare cell proteomic reactor applied to stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics study of human embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ruijun; Wang, Shuai; Elisma, Fred; Li, Li; Zhou, Hu; Wang, Lisheng; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    The molecular basis governing the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) remains largely unknown. Systems-level analysis by proteomics provides a unique approach to tackle this question. However, the requirement of a large number of cells for proteomics analysis (i.e. 10(6)-10(7) cells) makes this assay challenging, especially for the study of rare events during hESCs lineage specification. Here, a fully integrated proteomics sample processing and analysis platform, termed rare cell proteomic reactor (RCPR), was developed for large scale quantitative proteomics analysis of hESCs with ∼50,000 cells. hESCs were completely extracted by a defined lysis buffer, and all of the proteomics sample processing procedures, including protein preconcentration, reduction, alkylation, and digestion, were integrated into one single capillary column with a strong cation exchange monolith matrix. Furthermore, on-line two-dimensional LC-MS/MS analysis was performed directly using RCPR as the first dimension strong cation exchange column. 2,281 unique proteins were identified on this system using only 50,000 hESCs. For stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative study, a ready-to-use and chemically defined medium and an in situ differentiation procedure were developed for complete SILAC labeling of hESCs with well characterized self-renewal and differentiation properties. Mesoderm-enriched differentiation was studied by RCPR using 50,000 hESCs, and 1,086 proteins were quantified with a minimum of two peptides per protein. Of these, 56 proteins exhibited significant changes during mesoderm-enriched differentiation, and eight proteins were demonstrated for the first time to be overexpressed during early mesoderm development. This work provides a new platform for the study of rare cells and in particular for further elucidating proteins that govern the mesoderm lineage specification of human pluripotent stem cells.

  2. 4-Phenylaminomethyl-Benzeneboric Acid Modified Tip Extraction for Determination of Brassinosteroids in Plant Tissues by Stable Isotope Labeling-Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Ding, Jun; Wang, Ya-Lan; Liu, Ping; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-01-19

    Monitoring brassinosteroids (BRs) has been of major interest of researchers as these substances play a crucial role in a variety of phytological processes in plants. However, the determination of endogenous BRs in plant tissue is still a challenging task due to their low abundance and the complex matrix of plant tissues. In this study, a single step strategy by combining tip extraction and in situ derivatization was proposed for BR analysis. In the proposed strategy, a mixed mode sorbent (C8-SO3H) in tip was modified with 4-phenylaminomethyl-benzeneboric acid (4-PAMBA) through cation exchange and hydrophobic interactions, and then used as a boronate affinity media to selectively capture and purify BRs from plant extract through the reaction of boric acid groups of 4-PAMBA and cis-diol on BRs. The BRs-4-PAMBA derivatives formed were easily eluted from the C8-SO3H tip by nullifying the ion exchange and hydrophobic interactions using ammonia acetonitrile, followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. BR standards, isotopically labeled with d5-4-phenylaminomethyl-benzeneboric acid (4-PAMBA-d5) were introduced to improve the assay precision of LC-MS/MS. Under the optimized conditions, the overall process could be completed within 1 h, which is greatly improved in speed compared with previously reported protocols. In addition, the detection sensitivities of labeled BRs were improved by over 2000-fold compared with unlabeled BRs, thus the consumption of plant materials was reduced to 50 mg. Finally, the proposed method was applied for the investigation of BRs response in rice toward Cd stress.

  3. Stable-isotope-labeled Histone Peptide Library for Histone Post-translational Modification and Variant Quantification by Mass Spectrometry *

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu; Wein, Samuel; Gonzales-Cope, Michelle; Otte, Gabriel L.; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Afjehi-Sadat, Leila; Maile, Tobias; Berger, Shelley L.; Rush, John; Lill, Jennie R.; Arnott, David; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate accurate histone variant and post-translational modification (PTM) quantification via mass spectrometry, we present a library of 93 synthetic peptides using Protein-Aqua™ technology. The library contains 55 peptides representing different modified forms from histone H3 peptides, 23 peptides representing H4 peptides, 5 peptides representing canonical H2A peptides, 8 peptides representing H2A.Z peptides, and peptides for both macroH2A and H2A.X. The PTMs on these peptides include lysine mono- (me1), di- (me2), and tri-methylation (me3); lysine acetylation; arginine me1; serine/threonine phosphorylation; and N-terminal acetylation. The library was subjected to chemical derivatization with propionic anhydride, a widely employed protocol for histone peptide quantification. Subsequently, the detection efficiencies were quantified using mass spectrometry extracted ion chromatograms. The library yields a wide spectrum of detection efficiencies, with more than 1700-fold difference between the peptides with the lowest and highest efficiencies. In this paper, we describe the impact of different modifications on peptide detection efficiencies and provide a resource to correct for detection biases among the 93 histone peptides. In brief, there is no correlation between detection efficiency and molecular weight, hydrophobicity, basicity, or modification type. The same types of modifications may have very different effects on detection efficiencies depending on their positions within a peptide. We also observed antagonistic effects between modifications. In a study of mouse trophoblast stem cells, we utilized the detection efficiencies of the peptide library to correct for histone PTM/variant quantification. For most histone peptides examined, the corrected data did not change the biological conclusions but did alter the relative abundance of these peptides. For a low-abundant histone H2A variant, macroH2A, the corrected data led to a different conclusion than the

  4. Relationship between efficiency of nitrogen utilization and isotopic nitrogen fractionation in dairy cows: contribution of digestion v. metabolism?

    PubMed

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, G; Fouillet, H; Huneau, J F; Fanchone, A; Doreau, M; Nozière, P; Ortigues-Marty, I

    2016-02-01

    Animal tissues are naturally 15N enriched relative to their diet and the extent of this difference (Δ15Nanimal-diet) has been correlated to the efficiency of N assimilation in different species. The rationale is that transamination and deamination enzymes, involved in amino acid metabolism are likely to preferentially convert amino groups containing 14N over 15N. However, in ruminants the contribution of rumen bacterial metabolism relative to animal tissues metabolism to naturally enrich animal proteins in terms of 15N has been not assessed yet. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of rumen and digestion processes on the relationship between Δ15Nanimal-diet and efficiency of N utilization for milk protein yield (milk N efficiency (MNE); milk N yield/N intake) as well as the relationship between the 15N natural abundance of rumen bacteria and the efficiency of N use at the rumen level. Solid- and liquid-associated rumen bacteria, duodenal digesta, feces and plasma proteins were obtained (n=16) from four lactating Holstein cows fed four different diets formulated at two metabolizable protein supplies (80% v. 110% of protein requirements) crossed by two different dietary energy source (diets rich in starch v. fiber). We measured the isotopic N fractionation between animal and diet (Δ15Nanimal-diet) in these different body pools. The Δ15Nanimal-diet was negatively correlated with MNE when measured in solid-associated rumen bacteria, duodenal digesta, feces and plasma proteins, with the strongest correlation found for the latter. However, our results showed a very weak 15N enrichment of duodenal digesta (Δ15Nduodenal digesta-diet mean value=0.42) compared with that observed in plasma proteins (Δ15Nplasma protein-diet mean value=2.41). These data support the idea that most of the isotopic N fractionation observed in ruminant proteins (Δ15Nplasma protein-diet) has a metabolic origin with very little direct impact of the overall digestion process on

  5. Relationship between efficiency of nitrogen utilization and isotopic nitrogen fractionation in dairy cows: contribution of digestion v. metabolism?

    PubMed

    Cantalapiedra-Hijar, G; Fouillet, H; Huneau, J F; Fanchone, A; Doreau, M; Nozière, P; Ortigues-Marty, I

    2016-02-01

    Animal tissues are naturally 15N enriched relative to their diet and the extent of this difference (Δ15Nanimal-diet) has been correlated to the efficiency of N assimilation in different species. The rationale is that transamination and deamination enzymes, involved in amino acid metabolism are likely to preferentially convert amino groups containing 14N over 15N. However, in ruminants the contribution of rumen bacterial metabolism relative to animal tissues metabolism to naturally enrich animal proteins in terms of 15N has been not assessed yet. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of rumen and digestion processes on the relationship between Δ15Nanimal-diet and efficiency of N utilization for milk protein yield (milk N efficiency (MNE); milk N yield/N intake) as well as the relationship between the 15N natural abundance of rumen bacteria and the efficiency of N use at the rumen level. Solid- and liquid-associated rumen bacteria, duodenal digesta, feces and plasma proteins were obtained (n=16) from four lactating Holstein cows fed four different diets formulated at two metabolizable protein supplies (80% v. 110% of protein requirements) crossed by two different dietary energy source (diets rich in starch v. fiber). We measured the isotopic N fractionation between animal and diet (Δ15Nanimal-diet) in these different body pools. The Δ15Nanimal-diet was negatively correlated with MNE when measured in solid-associated rumen bacteria, duodenal digesta, feces and plasma proteins, with the strongest correlation found for the latter. However, our results showed a very weak 15N enrichment of duodenal digesta (Δ15Nduodenal digesta-diet mean value=0.42) compared with that observed in plasma proteins (Δ15Nplasma protein-diet mean value=2.41). These data support the idea that most of the isotopic N fractionation observed in ruminant proteins (Δ15Nplasma protein-diet) has a metabolic origin with very little direct impact of the overall digestion process on

  6. Acetylation and glycation of fibrinogen in vitro occur at specific lysine residues in a concentration dependent manner: A mass spectrometric and isotope labeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, Jan; Bergman, Ann-Charlotte; Adamson, Ulf; Blombaeck, Margareta; Wallen, Hakan; Joerneskog, Gun

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fibrinogen was incubated in vitro with glucose or aspirin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylations and glycations were found at twelve lysine sites by mass spectrometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The labeling by aspirin and glucose occurred dose-dependently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No competition between glucose and aspirin for binding to fibrinogen was found. -- Abstract: Aspirin may exert part of its antithrombotic effects through platelet-independent mechanisms. Diabetes is a condition in which the beneficial effects of aspirin are less prominent or absent - a phenomenon called 'aspirin resistance'. We investigated whether acetylation and glycation occur at specific sites in fibrinogen and if competition between glucose and aspirin in binding to fibrinogen occurs. Our hypothesis was that such competition might be one explanation to 'aspirin resistance' in diabetes. After incubation of fibrinogen in vitro with aspirin (0.8 mM, 24 h) or glucose (100 mM, 5-10 days), we found 12 modified sites with mass spectrometric techniques. Acetylations in the {alpha}-chain: {alpha}K191, {alpha}K208, {alpha}K224, {alpha}K429, {alpha}K457, {alpha}K539, {alpha}K562, in the {beta}-chain: {beta}K233, and in the {gamma}-chain: {gamma}K170 and {gamma}K273. Glycations were found at {beta}K133 and {gamma}K75, alternatively {gamma}K85. Notably, the lysine 539 is a site involved in FXIII-mediated cross-linking of fibrin. With isotope labeling in vitro, using [{sup 14}C-acetyl]salicylic acid and [{sup 14}C]glucose, a labeling of 0.013-0.084 and 0.12-0.5 mol of acetylated and glycated adduct/mol fibrinogen, respectively, was found for clinically (12.9-100 {mu}M aspirin) and physiologically (2-8 mM glucose) relevant plasma concentrations. No competition between acetylation and glycation could be demonstrated. Thus, fibrinogen is acetylated at several lysine residues, some of which are involved in the cross-linking of fibrinogen. This may

  7. Comprehensive and highly sensitive urinary steroid hormone profiling method based on stable isotope-labeling liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weidong; Huang, Qiang; Yin, Peiyuan; Li, Jia; Zhou, Jia; Kong, Hongwei; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2012-12-01

    Steroid hormones are crucial substances that mediate a wide range of vital physiological functions of the body. Determination of the levels of steroid hormones plays an important role in understanding the mechanism of the steroid hormone-related diseases. In this study, we present a novel targeted metabolic profiling method based on the introduction of an easily protonated stable isotope tag to a hydroxyl-containing steroid hormone with a synthesized derivatization reagent, deuterium 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoic acid (d(4)-DMBA), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Different from other reported derivatization reagents that have been used to enhance the sensitivities for estrogens or androgens, our method is comprehensive with the capability of covering hydroxyl-containing androgens, estrogens, corticoids, and progestogens. Furthermore, the nonderivatized steroid hormones (e.g., 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, progesterone, and androstenedione) were not destroyed during the derivatization process, and their levels could still be obtained in one LC-MS run. We were able to detect 24 steroid hormones at subng/mL levels (the lower limit of detection could reach 5 pg/mL for estrone and 16α-hydroxy estrone, which is equivalent to 0.1 pg on column) with maximum sensitivity enhancement factors of more than 10(3)- to 10(4)-fold after derivatization. The method was successfully applied to the measurement of free (unconjugated) steroid hormones in urine samples of males, females, and pregnant women. Because the significant role the steroid hormone pathway plays in humans, a comprehensive, sensitive, specific, and accurate method for profiling the steroid hormone metabolome shall offer new insights into hormone-related diseases. PMID:23110480

  8. Characterization of L-phenylalanine metabolism to acetophenone and 1-phenylethanol in the flowers of Camellia sinensis using stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin; Baldermann, Susanne; Kajitani, Yutaka; Ota, Shogo; Kasuga, Hisae; Imazeki, Yumi; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2012-02-15

    Acetophenone (AP) and 1-phenylethanol (1PE) are the two major endogenous volatile compounds in flowers of Camellia sinensis var. Yabukita. Until now no information has been available on the biosynthesis of AP and 1PE in plants. Here we propose that AP and 1PE are derived from L-phenylalanine (L-Phe), based on feeding experiments using stable isotope-labeled precursors L-[(2)H(8)]Phe and L-[(13)C(9)]Phe. The subacid conditions in the flowers result in more hydrogenation than dehydrogenation in the transformation between AP and 1PE. Due to the action of some enzyme(s) responsible for the formation of (R)-1PE from AP in the flowers, (R)-1PE is the dominant endogenous steroisomer of 1PE. The modification of 1PE into nonvolatile glycosidic forms is one of the reasons for why only a little 1PE is released from the flowers. The levels of AP, 1PE, and glycosides of 1PE increase during floral development, whereas the level of L-Phe decreases. These metabolites occur mostly in the anthers.

  9. Promotion of expression of interferon-stimulated genes in U937 monocytic cells by HIV RNAs, measured using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC).

    PubMed

    Li, Yulan; Wen, Bin; Chen, Ran; Jiang, Feng; Zhao, Xiaofang; Deng, Xin

    2015-05-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) exerts strong antiviral activity, particularly against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and although several viral proteins have been shown to deregulate IFN induction, little is known about the induction of type I IFNs by HIV RNAs. In the present study, we used the stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) method to determine the proteomic profile in U937 monocytic cells after transfection with viral RNA of HIV. We then used a western blot assay to validate the proteomic results. It was revealed by the SILAC method that there were 1624 non-redundant peptides with quantitative information and 281 proteins with quantitative information in the HIV-RNA-transfected U937 cells when compared to cells transfected with control RNA. In particular, 6, 8 or 12 hours post-transfection, HIV RNA transfection promoted the expression of such interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) as interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs), interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs), interferon-induced gene 15 protein (ISG15), myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance protein 1 (MX1), and interferon-induced guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP1), and this was confirmed by western blot assay. In conclusion, HIV RNA is a strong stimulator of IFNs, promoting the expression of such ISGs as IFITs, IFITMs, ISG15, MX1 and GBP1.

  10. Characterization of L-phenylalanine metabolism to acetophenone and 1-phenylethanol in the flowers of Camellia sinensis using stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin; Baldermann, Susanne; Kajitani, Yutaka; Ota, Shogo; Kasuga, Hisae; Imazeki, Yumi; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2012-02-15

    Acetophenone (AP) and 1-phenylethanol (1PE) are the two major endogenous volatile compounds in flowers of Camellia sinensis var. Yabukita. Until now no information has been available on the biosynthesis of AP and 1PE in plants. Here we propose that AP and 1PE are derived from L-phenylalanine (L-Phe), based on feeding experiments using stable isotope-labeled precursors L-[(2)H(8)]Phe and L-[(13)C(9)]Phe. The subacid conditions in the flowers result in more hydrogenation than dehydrogenation in the transformation between AP and 1PE. Due to the action of some enzyme(s) responsible for the formation of (R)-1PE from AP in the flowers, (R)-1PE is the dominant endogenous steroisomer of 1PE. The modification of 1PE into nonvolatile glycosidic forms is one of the reasons for why only a little 1PE is released from the flowers. The levels of AP, 1PE, and glycosides of 1PE increase during floral development, whereas the level of L-Phe decreases. These metabolites occur mostly in the anthers. PMID:22209218

  11. Precise quantitation of 136 urinary proteins by LC/MRM-MS using stable isotope labeled peptides as internal standards for biomarker discovery and/or verification studies.

    PubMed

    Percy, Andrew J; Yang, Juncong; Hardie, Darryl B; Chambers, Andrew G; Tamura-Wells, Jessica; Borchers, Christoph H

    2015-06-15

    Spurred on by the growing demand for panels of validated disease biomarkers, increasing efforts have focused on advancing qualitative and quantitative tools for more highly multiplexed and sensitive analyses of a multitude of analytes in various human biofluids. In quantitative proteomics, evolving strategies involve the use of the targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode of mass spectrometry (MS) with stable isotope-labeled standards (SIS) used for internal normalization. Using that preferred approach with non-invasive urine samples, we have systematically advanced and rigorously assessed the methodology toward the precise quantitation of the largest, multiplexed panel of candidate protein biomarkers in human urine to date. The concentrations of the 136 proteins span >5 orders of magnitude (from 8.6 μg/mL to 25 pg/mL), with average CVs of 8.6% over process triplicate. Detailed here is our quantitative method, the analysis strategy, a feasibility application to prostate cancer samples, and a discussion of the utility of this method in translational studies.

  12. Hypophosphorylation of the architectural chromatin protein DEK in death-receptor-induced apoptosis revealed by the isotope coded protein label proteomic platform.

    PubMed

    Tabbert, Anja; Kappes, Ferdinand; Knippers, Rolf; Kellermann, Josef; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Ferrando-May, Elisa

    2006-11-01

    During apoptosis nuclear morphology changes dramatically due to alterations of chromatin architecture and cleavage of structural nuclear proteins. To characterize early events in apoptotic nuclear dismantling we have performed a proteomic study of apoptotic nuclei. To this end we have combined a cell-free apoptosis system with a proteomic platform based on the differential isotopic labeling of primary amines with N-nicotinoyloxy-succinimide. We exploited the ability of this system to produce nuclei arrested at different stages of apoptosis to analyze proteome alterations which occur prior to or at a low level of caspase activation. We show that the majority of proteins affected at the onset of apoptosis are involved in chromatin architecture and RNA metabolism. Among them is DEK, an architectural chromatin protein which is linked to autoimmune disorders. The proteomic analysis points to the occurrence of multiple PTMs in early apoptotic nuclei. This is confirmed by showing that the level of phosphorylation of DEK is decreased following apoptosis induction. These results suggest the unexpected existence of an early crosstalk between cytoplasm and nucleus during apoptosis. They further establish a previously unrecognized link between DEK and cell death, which will prove useful in the elucidation of the physiological function of this protein.

  13. Site-directed isotope labeling and FTIR spectroscopy: assignment of tyrosine bands in the bR-->M difference spectrum of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Liu, X M; Sonar, S; Lee, C P; Coleman, M; RajBhandary, U L; Rothschild, K J

    1995-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy has been used extensively to probe structural changes in bacteriorthodopsin and other retinal proteins. However, the absence of a general method to assign bands to individual chemical groups in a protein has limited the application of this technique. While site-directed mutagenesis has been successful in special cases for such assignments, in general, this approach induces perturbations in the structure and function of the protein, thereby preventing unambiguous band assignments. A new approach has recently been reported (Sonar et al., Nature Struct. Biol. 1 (1994) 512-517) which involves cell-free expression of bacteriorhodopsin and site-directed isotope labeling (SDIL). We have now used this method to re-examine bands assigned in the bR-->M difference spectrum to tyrosine residues. Our results show that out of 11 tyrosines in bR, only Tyr 185 is structurally active. This work further demonstrates the power of SDIL and FTIR to probe conformational changes at the level of individual amino acid residues in proteins.

  14. Beta-lactamase-catalyzed aminolysis of depsipeptides: Proof of the nonexistence of a specific D-phenylalanine/enzyme complex by double-label isotope trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Pazhanisamy, S.; Pratt, R.F. )

    1989-08-22

    The steady-state kinetics of the Enterobacter cloacae P99 beta-lactamase-catalyzed aminolysis of the depsipeptide m-(((phenylacetyl)glycyl)oxy)benzoic acid by D-phenylalanine were consistent with an ordered sequential mechanism with D-phenylalanine binding first. In terms of this mechanism, the kinetics data required that in 20 mM MOPS buffer, pH 7.5, the dissociation constant of the initially formed enzyme/D-phenylalanine complex be around 1.3 mM; at pH 9.0 in 0.1 M carbonate buffer, the complex should be somewhat more stable. Attempts to detect this complex in a binary mixture by spectroscopic methods (fluorescence, circular dichroic, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra) failed. Kinetic methods were also unsuccessful--the presence of 20 mM D-phenylalanine did not appear to affect beta-lactamase activity nor inhibition of the enzyme by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, phenylboronic acid, or (3-dansylamidophenyl)boronic acid. Equilibrium dialysis experiments appeared to indicate that the dissociation constant of any binary enzyme/D-phenylalanine complex must be somewhat higher than the kinetics allowed (greater than 2 mM). Since the kinetics also required that, at high depsipeptide concentrations, and again with the assumption of the ordered sequential mechanism, the reaction of the enzyme/D-phenylalanine complex to aminolysis products be faster than its reversion to enzyme and D-phenylalanine, a double-label isotope-trapping experiment was performed.

  15. Universal quantitative kinase assay based on diagonal SCX chromatography and stable isotope dimethyl labeling provides high-definition kinase consensus motifs for PKA and human Mps1.

    PubMed

    Hennrich, Marco L; Marino, Fabio; Groenewold, Vincent; Kops, Geert J P L; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R

    2013-05-01

    In order to understand cellular signaling, a clear understanding of kinase-substrate relationships is essential. Some of these relationships are defined by consensus recognition motifs present in substrates making them amendable for phosphorylation by designated kinases. Here, we explore a method that is based on two sequential steps of strong cation exchange chromatography combined with differential stable isotope labeling, to define kinase consensus motifs with high accuracy. We demonstrate the value of our method by evaluating the motifs of two very distinct kinases: cAMP regulated protein kinase A (PKA) and human monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) kinase, also known as TTK. PKA is a well-studied basophilic kinase with a relatively well-defined motif and numerous known substrates in vitro and in vivo. Mps1, a kinase involved in chromosome segregation, has been less well characterized. Its substrate specificity is unclear and here we show that Mps1 is an acidophilic kinase with a striking tendency for phosphorylation of threonines. The final outcomes of our work are high-definition kinase consensus motifs for PKA and Mps1. Our generic method, which makes use of proteolytic cell lysates as a source for peptide-substrate libraries, can be implemented for any kinase present in the kinome.

  16. Quantitative proteomics using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture reveals protein and pathway regulation in porcine circovirus type 2 infected PK-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huiying; Ye, Yu; Luo, Yongwen; Tong, Tiezhu; Yan, Guangrong; Liao, Ming

    2012-02-01

    The infection of host cells by porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) leads to extensive modulation of the gene expression levels of target cells. To uncover the pathogenesis and virus-host interactions of PCV2, a quantitative proteomic study using the stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), coupled with mass spectrometry, was performed on PCV2-infected PK-15 cells. The SILAC-based approach identified 1341 proteins, 163 of which showed significant change in level at 72 h after infection (79 up-regulated and 84 down-regulated). The modulated proteins included a number of proteins involved in substrate transport, cytoskeletal changes, and the stress response. Changes in the expression levels of selected proteins were verified by Western blot analysis. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was used to reveal protein and interactive pathway regulation in response to PCV2 infection. Functional network and pathway analyses could provide insights into the complexity and dynamics of virus-host cell interactions and may accelerate our understanding of the mechanisms of PCV2 infection.

  17. A study of the elimination of water from lithium-cationized tripeptide methyl esters by means of tandem mass spectrometry and isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Talaty, Erach R; Cooper, Travis J; Piland, Debra L; Bateman, David J; Syed, Adeel; Stevenson, William; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Extensive isotope labeling (2H, 13C and 15N), collision-induced dissociation (CID) and multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry were used to investigate the elimination of H2O from a series of model, metal-cationized tripeptide methyl esters. The present results corroborate our earlier suggestion that loss of water from lithiated peptides is initiated by a nucleophilic attack from the N-terminal side upon an amide carbonyl carbon atom to form a five-membered ring as an intermediate followed by 1,2-elimination of water. We show that the nucleophilic atom is the oxygen atom of the N-terminal amide group in the fragmentation of [AcGGGOMe+Li]+ as well as [GGGOMe+Li]+. However, the subsequent fragmentation is markedly different in the two cases as a result of the absence and presence of a free amino group. In particular, extensive scrambling of protons in the alpha-positions of GGGOMe is observed, presumably as a consequence of intervention of the basic amino group.

  18. Novel tracer method to measure isotopic labeled gas-phase nitrous acid (HO15NO) in biogeochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianming; Kampf, Christopher J; Pöschl, Ulrich; Oswald, Robert; Cui, Junfang; Ermel, Michael; Hu, Chunsheng; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2014-07-15

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO), the protonated form of nitrite, contributes up to ∼60% to the primary formation of hydroxyl radical (OH), which is a key oxidant in the degradation of most air pollutants. Field measurements and modeling studies indicate a large unknown source of HONO during daytime. Here, we developed a new tracer method based on gas-phase stripping-derivatization coupled to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to measure the 15N relative exceedance, ψ(15N), of HONO in the gas-phase. Gaseous HONO is quantitatively collected and transferred to an azo dye, purified by solid phase extraction (SPE), and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). In the optimal working range of ψ(15N)=0.2-0.5, the relative standard deviation of ψ(15N) is <4%. The optimum pH and solvents for extraction by SPE and potential interferences are discussed. The method was applied to measure HO15NO emissions from soil in a dynamic chamber with and without spiking 15) labeled urea. The identification of HO15NO from soil with 15N urea addition confirmed biogenic emissions of HONO from soil. The method enables a new approach of studying the formation pathways of HONO and its role for atmospheric chemistry (e.g., ozone formation) and environmental tracer studies on the formation and conversion of gaseous HONO or aqueous NO2- as part of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, e.g., in the investigation of fertilization effects on soil HONO emissions and microbiological conversion of NO2- in the hydrosphere.

  19. Drivers of Plant-Availability of Phosphorus from Thermally Conditioned Sewage Sludge as Assessed by Isotopic Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Andriamananjara, Andry; Rabeharisoa, Lilia; Prud’homme, Loïc; Morel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Urban sewage sludge is a potential source of phosphorus (P) for agriculture and represents an alternative way to recycle P as fertilizer. However, the use of thermally conditioned sewage sludge (TCSS) required an accurate assessment of its value as P-fertilizer. This work aimed at assessing the plant-availability of P from TCSS. Uptake of P by a mixture of ryegrass and fescue from TCSS and triple super phosphate (TSP) fertilizers was studied using 32P-labeling technique in a greenhouse experiment. Phosphorus was applied at the rate of 50 mg P kg−1.We also conducted incubation experiments considering the same treatments to assess soil microbial respiration. Applications of TCSS and TSP increased plant P uptake that is related to the root P acquisition. The P taken up by plant from soil plant-available P was lower for control compared to TSP or TCSS that was attributed to the increase of root interception of soil P. The contribution of TSP to ryegrass nutrition (Pdff%) was 55% with 22% of the applied P which was taken up by plants (CPU%). The Pdff value for TCSS was 56% with 14% of fertilizer P recovery (CPU%). Shoot biomass and total P uptake from TCSS were lower than those from TSP. As a result, the agronomic effectiveness of TCSS calculated from Pdff value (in comparison with TSP treatment) was 102%, while the AE of TCSS estimated from CPU value (in % TSP) was 64%, which is attributed to microbial activity stimulation inducing P immobilization onto soil constituents and microbial biomass during plant growth. The high C/N ratio of TCSS stimulated soil microbial biomass that competes with plant roots to acquire nutrients, such as P. As a consequence, the P taken up from either native soil or TCSS decreased in similar proportions. The AE value calculated with Pdff% took into account these interactions between soil, plant, and microbial biomass, and is less dependent on operational conditions than the AE value calculated with %Precovery. PMID:27379240

  20. Altered Retinoic Acid Metabolism in Diabetic Mouse Kidney Identified by 18O Isotopic Labeling and 2D Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, Jonathan M.; Zhao, Yingxin; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Haidacher, Sigmund J.; LeJeune, Wanda S.; Dey, Nilay; Luxon, Bruce A.; Kane, Maureen A.; Napoli, Joseph L.; Denner, Larry; Tilton, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous metabolic pathways have been implicated in diabetes-induced renal injury, yet few studies have utilized unbiased systems biology approaches for mapping the interconnectivity of diabetes-dysregulated proteins that are involved. We utilized a global, quantitative, differential proteomic approach to identify a novel retinoic acid hub in renal cortical protein networks dysregulated by type 2 diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings Total proteins were extracted from renal cortex of control and db/db mice at 20 weeks of age (after 12 weeks of hyperglycemia in the diabetic mice). Following trypsinization, 18O- and 16O-labeled control and diabetic peptides, respectively, were pooled and separated by two dimensional liquid chromatography (strong cation exchange creating 60 fractions further separated by nano-HPLC), followed by peptide identification and quantification using mass spectrometry. Proteomic analysis identified 53 proteins with fold change ≥1.5 and p≤0.05 after Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment (out of 1,806 proteins identified), including alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH1/ALDH1A1). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified altered retinoic acid as a key signaling hub that was altered in the diabetic renal cortical proteome. Western blotting and real-time PCR confirmed diabetes-induced upregulation of RALDH1, which was localized by immunofluorescence predominantly to the proximal tubule in the diabetic renal cortex, while PCR confirmed the downregulation of ADH identified with mass spectrometry. Despite increased renal cortical tissue levels of retinol and RALDH1 in db/db versus control mice, all-trans-retinoic acid was significantly decreased in association with a significant decrease in PPARβ/δ mRNA. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that retinoic acid metabolism is significantly dysregulated in diabetic kidneys, and suggest that a shift in all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism is a novel feature in

  1. Drivers of Plant-Availability of Phosphorus from Thermally Conditioned Sewage Sludge as Assessed by Isotopic Labeling.

    PubMed

    Andriamananjara, Andry; Rabeharisoa, Lilia; Prud'homme, Loïc; Morel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Urban sewage sludge is a potential source of phosphorus (P) for agriculture and represents an alternative way to recycle P as fertilizer. However, the use of thermally conditioned sewage sludge (TCSS) required an accurate assessment of its value as P-fertilizer. This work aimed at assessing the plant-availability of P from TCSS. Uptake of P by a mixture of ryegrass and fescue from TCSS and triple super phosphate (TSP) fertilizers was studied using (32)P-labeling technique in a greenhouse experiment. Phosphorus was applied at the rate of 50 mg P kg(-1).We also conducted incubation experiments considering the same treatments to assess soil microbial respiration. Applications of TCSS and TSP increased plant P uptake that is related to the root P acquisition. The P taken up by plant from soil plant-available P was lower for control compared to TSP or TCSS that was attributed to the increase of root interception of soil P. The contribution of TSP to ryegrass nutrition (Pdff%) was 55% with 22% of the applied P which was taken up by plants (CPU%). The Pdff value for TCSS was 56% with 14% of fertilizer P recovery (CPU%). Shoot biomass and total P uptake from TCSS were lower than those from TSP. As a result, the agronomic effectiveness of TCSS calculated from Pdff value (in comparison with TSP treatment) was 102%, while the AE of TCSS estimated from CPU value (in % TSP) was 64%, which is attributed to microbial activity stimulation inducing P immobilization onto soil constituents and microbial biomass during plant growth. The high C/N ratio of TCSS stimulated soil microbial biomass that competes with plant roots to acquire nutrients, such as P. As a consequence, the P taken up from either native soil or TCSS decreased in similar proportions. The AE value calculated with Pdff% took into account these interactions between soil, plant, and microbial biomass, and is less dependent on operational conditions than the AE value calculated with %Precovery. PMID:27379240

  2. A new strategy for sequential assignment of intrinsically unstructured proteins based on 15N single isotope labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Gerard, Melanie; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy

    2013-11-01

    We describe a new efficient strategy for the sequential assignment of amide resonances of a conventional 15N-1H HSQC spectrum of intrinsically unfolded proteins, based on composite NOESY-TOCSY and TOCSY-NOESY mixing times. These composite mixing times lead to a Hα-proton mediated unidirectional transfer of amide to amide proton. We have implemented the composite mixing times in an HSQC-NOESY-HSQC manner to obtain directional connectivity between amides of neighbouring residues. We experimentally determine the optimal mixing times for both transfer schemes, and demonstrate its use in the assignment for both a fragment of the neuronal tau protein and for α-synuclein.

  3. Osmium isotopes suggest fast and efficient mixing in the oceanic upper mantle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizimis, Michael; Salters, Vincent

    2010-05-01

    The depleted upper mantle (DUM; the source of MORB) is thought to represent the complementary reservoir of continental crust extraction. Previous studies have calculated the "average" DUM composition based on the geochemistry of MORB. However the Nd isotope compositions of abyssal peridotites have been shown to extend to more depleted compositions than associated MORB. While this argues for the presence of both relatively depleted and enriched material within the upper mantle, the extent of compositional variability, length scales of heterogeneity and timescales of mixing in the upper mantle are not well constrained. Model calculations show that 2Ga is a reasonable mean age of depletion for DUM while Hf - Nd isotopes show the persistence of a depleted terrestrial reservoir by the early Archean (3.5-3.8Ga). U/Pb zircon ages of crustal rocks show three distinct peaks at 1.2, 1.9, and 2.7Ga and these are thought to represent the ages of three major crustal growth events. A fundamental question therefore is whether the present day upper mantle retains a memory of multiple ancient depletion events, or has been effectively homogenized. This has important implications for the nature of convection and time scales of survival of heterogeneities in the upper mantle. Here we compare published Os isotope data from abyssal peridotites and ophiolitic Os-Ir alloys with new data from Hawaiian spinel peridotite xenoliths. The Re-Os isotope system has been shown to yield useful depletion age information in peridotites, so we use it here to investigate the distribution of Re-depletion ages (TRD) in these mantle samples as a proxy for the variability of DUM. The probability density functions (PDF) of TRD from osmiridiums, abyssal and Hawaiian peridotites are all remarkably similar and show a distinct peak at 1.2-1.3 Ga (errors for TRD are set at 0.2Ga to suppress statistically spurious age peaks). The Hawaiian peridotites further show a distinct peak at 1.9-2Ga, but no oceanic mantle

  4. Plasma-treated polystyrene film that enhances binding efficiency for sensitive and label-free protein biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bihong; Li, Shaopeng; Song, Lusheng; Yang, Mo; Zhou, Wenfei; Tyagi, Deependra; Zhu, Jinsong

    2015-08-01

    A plasma-treated ultrathin polystyrene (PS) film surface was explored as a simple, robust, and low-cost surface chemistry solution for protein biosensing applications. This surface could dramatically improve the binding efficiency of the protein-protein interactions, which is defined as the binding signal per immobilized ligand. The PS-modified protein biosensor was readily fabricated by spin coating and plasma treatment. Various parameters for fabrication, including the concentration of the PS solution, rate of spin coating, and duration of plasma treatment, were systematically optimized based on the improvement of fluorescence signal yielded by the microfluidic network-aided fluorescence immunoassay. The performance of the label-free protein detection on the optimized surfaces was further evaluated by surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). PS surfaces with optimal fabrication parameters exhibited up to an 620% enhancement of the protein binding response and approximately 210% of the protein binding per immobilized protein ligand compared with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface of 11-mercapto undecanoic acid (MUA). The relationship between the fabrication parameters used and changes to the surface chemistry and the morphological properties were characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was revealed that the morphological changes observed in the plasma-treated PS film were the dominant factor for the improvement of the protein bioassay performance, rather than the chemical changes.

  5. Comparison of Test Procedures and Energy Efficiency Criteria in Selected International Standards & Labeling Programs for Copy Machines, External Power Supplies, LED Displays, Residential Gas Cooktops and Televisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

    2012-03-01

    This report presents a technical review of international minimum energy performance standards (MEPS), voluntary and mandatory energy efficiency labels and test procedures for five products being considered for new or revised MEPS in China: copy machines, external power supply, LED displays, residential gas cooktops and flat-screen televisions. For each product, an overview of the scope of existing international standards and labeling programs, energy values and energy performance metrics and description and detailed summary table of criteria and procedures in major test standards are presented.

  6. Sultone opening with [18F]fluoride: an efficient 18F-labelling strategy for PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sébastien; Bouteiller, Cédric; Barré, Louisa; Perrio, Cécile

    2011-11-01

    Sultones were subject to ring opening by nucleophilic attack with [(18)F]fluoride to afford easily purified (18)F-labelled hydrophilic sulfonated products in high yields. A two-step sequence including radiofluorination and coupling to lysine was then developed from a bis-sultone precursor as a model approach for the labelling of biopolymers.

  7. Infrared, vibrational circular dichroism, and Raman spectral simulations for β-sheet structures with various isotopic labels, interstrand, and stacking arrangements using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Welch, William R W; Kubelka, Jan; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2013-09-12

    Infrared (IR), Raman, and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectral variations for different β-sheet structures were studied using simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) force field and intensity computations. The DFT vibrational parameters were obtained for β-sheet fragments containing nine-amides and constrained to a variety of conformations and strand arrangements. These were subsequently transferred onto corresponding larger β-sheet models, normally consisting of five strands with ten amides each, for spectral simulations. Further extension to fibril models composed of multiple stacked β-sheets was achieved by combining the transfer of DFT parameters for each sheet with dipole coupling methods for interactions between sheets. IR spectra of the amide I show different splitting patterns for parallel and antiparallel β-sheets, and their VCD, in the absence of intersheet stacking, have distinct sign variations. Isotopic labeling by (13)C of selected residues yields spectral shifts and intensity changes uniquely sensitive to relative alignment of strands (registry) for antiparallel sheets. Stacking of multiple planar sheets maintains the qualitative spectral character of the single sheet but evidences some reduction in the exciton splitting of the amide I mode. Rotating sheets with respect to each other leads to a significant VCD enhancement, whose sign pattern and intensity is dependent on the handedness and degree of rotation. For twisted β-sheets, a significant VCD enhancement is computed even for sheets stacked with either the same or opposite alignments and the inter-sheet rotation, depending on the sense, can either further increase or weaken the enhanced VCD intensity. In twisted, stacked structures (without rotation), similar VCD amide I patterns (positive couplets) are predicted for both parallel and antiparallel sheets, but different IR intensity distributions still enable their differentiation. Our simulation results prove useful

  8. Transport of Indole-3-Butyric Acid and Indole-3-Acetic Acid in Arabidopsis Hypocotyls Using Stable Isotope Labeling1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Barkawi, Lana; Gardner, Gary; Cohen, Jerry D.

    2012-01-01

    The polar transport of the natural auxins indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) has been described in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hypocotyls using radioactive tracers. Because radioactive assays alone cannot distinguish IBA from its metabolites, the detected transport from applied [3H]IBA may have resulted from the transport of IBA metabolites, including IAA. To test this hypothesis, we used a mass spectrometry-based method to quantify the transport of IBA in Arabidopsis hypocotyls by following the movement of [13C1]IBA and the [13C1]IAA derived from [13C1]IBA. We also assayed [13C6]IAA transport in a parallel control experiment. We found that the amount of transported [13C1]IBA was dramatically lower than [13C6]IAA, and the IBA transport was not reduced by the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid. Significant amounts of the applied [13C1]IBA were converted to [13C1]IAA during transport, but [13C1]IBA transport was independent of IBA-to-IAA conversion. We also found that most of the [13C1]IBA was converted to ester-linked [13C1]IBA at the apical end of hypocotyls, and ester-linked [13C1]IBA was also found in the basal end at a level higher than free [13C1]IBA. In contrast, most of the [13C6]IAA was converted to amide-linked [13C6]IAA at the apical end of hypocotyls, but very little conjugated [13C6]IAA was found in the basal end. Our results demonstrate that the polar transport of IBA is much lower than IAA in Arabidopsis hypocotyls, and the transport mechanism is distinct from IAA transport. These experiments also establish a method for quantifying the movement of small molecules in plants using stable isotope labeling. PMID:22323783

  9. Uptake and distribution of soil applied zinc by citrus trees-addressing fertilizer use efficiency with 68Zn labeling.

    PubMed

    Hippler, Franz Walter Rieger; Boaretto, Rodrigo Marcelli; Quaggio, José Antônio; Boaretto, Antonio Enedi; Abreu-Junior, Cassio Hamilton; Mattos, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    The zinc (Zn) supply increases the fruit yield of Citrus trees that are grown, especially in the highly weathered soils of the tropics due to the inherently low nutrient availability in the soil solution. Leaf sprays containing micronutrients are commonly applied to orchards, even though the nutrient supply via soil could be of practical value. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Zn fertilizers that are applied to the soil surface on absorption and partitioning of the nutrient by citrus trees. A greenhouse experiment was conducted with one-year-old sweet orange trees. The plants were grown in soils with different textures (18.1 or 64.4% clay) that received 1.8 g Zn per plant, in the form of either ZnO or ZnSO4 enriched with the stable isotope 68Zn. Zinc fertilization increased the availability of the nutrient in the soil and the content in the orange trees. Greater responses were obtained when ZnSO4 was applied to the sandy loam soil due to its lower specific metal adsorption compared to that of the clay soil. The trunk and branches accumulated the most fertilizer-derived Zn (Zndff) and thus represent the major reserve organ for this nutrient in the plant. The trees recovered up to 4% of the applied Zndff. Despite this relative low recovery, the Zn requirement of the trees was met with the selected treatment based on the total leaf nutrient content and increased Cu/Zn-SOD activity in the leaves. We conclude that the efficiency of Zn fertilizers depends on the fertilizer source and the soil texture, which must be taken into account by guidelines for fruit crop fertilization via soil, in substitution or complementation of traditional foliar sprays. PMID:25751056

  10. Uptake and Distribution of Soil Applied Zinc by Citrus Trees—Addressing Fertilizer Use Efficiency with 68Zn Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Hippler, Franz Walter Rieger; Boaretto, Rodrigo Marcelli; Quaggio, José Antônio; Boaretto, Antonio Enedi; Abreu-Junior, Cassio Hamilton; Mattos, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    The zinc (Zn) supply increases the fruit yield of Citrus trees that are grown, especially in the highly weathered soils of the tropics due to the inherently low nutrient availability in the soil solution. Leaf sprays containing micronutrients are commonly applied to orchards, even though the nutrient supply via soil could be of practical value. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Zn fertilizers that are applied to the soil surface on absorption and partitioning of the nutrient by citrus trees. A greenhouse experiment was conducted with one-year-old sweet orange trees. The plants were grown in soils with different textures (18.1 or 64.4% clay) that received 1.8 g Zn per plant, in the form of either ZnO or ZnSO4 enriched with the stable isotope 68Zn. Zinc fertilization increased the availability of the nutrient in the soil and the content in the orange trees. Greater responses were obtained when ZnSO4 was applied to the sandy loam soil due to its lower specific metal adsorption compared to that of the clay soil. The trunk and branches accumulated the most fertilizer-derived Zn (Zndff) and thus represent the major reserve organ for this nutrient in the plant. The trees recovered up to 4% of the applied Zndff. Despite this relative low recovery, the Zn requirement of the trees was met with the selected treatment based on the total leaf nutrient content and increased Cu/Zn-SOD activity in the leaves. We conclude that the efficiency of Zn fertilizers depends on the fertilizer source and the soil texture, which must be taken into account by guidelines for fruit crop fertilization via soil, in substitution or complementation of traditional foliar sprays. PMID:25751056

  11. Uptake and distribution of soil applied zinc by citrus trees-addressing fertilizer use efficiency with 68Zn labeling.

    PubMed

    Hippler, Franz Walter Rieger; Boaretto, Rodrigo Marcelli; Quaggio, José Antônio; Boaretto, Antonio Enedi; Abreu-Junior, Cassio Hamilton; Mattos, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    The zinc (Zn) supply increases the fruit yield of Citrus trees that are grown, especially in the highly weathered soils of the tropics due to the inherently low nutrient availability in the soil solution. Leaf sprays containing micronutrients are commonly applied to orchards, even though the nutrient supply via soil could be of practical value. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Zn fertilizers that are applied to the soil surface on absorption and partitioning of the nutrient by citrus trees. A greenhouse experiment was conducted with one-year-old sweet orange trees. The plants were grown in soils with different textures (18.1 or 64.4% clay) that received 1.8 g Zn per plant, in the form of either ZnO or ZnSO4 enriched with the stable isotope 68Zn. Zinc fertilization increased the availability of the nutrient in the soil and the content in the orange trees. Greater responses were obtained when ZnSO4 was applied to the sandy loam soil due to its lower specific metal adsorption compared to that of the clay soil. The trunk and branches accumulated the most fertilizer-derived Zn (Zndff) and thus represent the major reserve organ for this nutrient in the plant. The trees recovered up to 4% of the applied Zndff. Despite this relative low recovery, the Zn requirement of the trees was met with the selected treatment based on the total leaf nutrient content and increased Cu/Zn-SOD activity in the leaves. We conclude that the efficiency of Zn fertilizers depends on the fertilizer source and the soil texture, which must be taken into account by guidelines for fruit crop fertilization via soil, in substitution or complementation of traditional foliar sprays.

  12. Principles of protein labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Obermaier, Christian; Griebel, Anja; Westermeier, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Protein labeling methods prior to separation and analysis have become indispensable approaches for proteomic profiling. Basically, three different types of tags are employed: stable isotopes, mass tags, and fluorophores. While proteins labeled with stable isotopes and mass tags are measured and differentiated by mass spectrometry, fluorescent labels are detected with fluorescence imagers. The major purposes for protein labeling are monitoring of biological processes, reliable quantification of compounds and specific detection of protein modifications and isoforms in multiplexed samples, enhancement of detection sensitivity, and simplification of detection workflows. Proteins can be labeled during cell growth by incorporation of amino acids containing different isotopes, or in biological fluids, cells or tissue samples by attaching specific groups to the ε-amino group of lysine, the N-terminus, or the cysteine residues. The principles and the modifications of the different labeling approaches on the protein level are described; benefits and shortcomings of the methods are discussed.

  13. Comparing integrated stable isotope and eddy covariance estimates of water-use efficiency on a Mediterranean successional sequence.

    PubMed

    Scartazza, Andrea; Vaccari, Francesco Primo; Bertolini, Teresa; Di Tommasi, Paul; Lauteri, Marco; Miglietta, Franco; Brugnoli, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    Water-use efficiency (WUE), thought to be a relevant trait for productivity and adaptation to water-limited environments, was estimated for three different ecosystems on the Mediterranean island of Pianosa: Mediterranean macchia (SMM), transition (S(TR)) and abandoned agricultural (SAA) ecosystems, representing a successional series. Three independent approaches were used to study WUE: eddy covariance measurements, C isotope composition of ecosystem respired CO2, and C isotope discrimination (Δ) of leaf material (dry matter and soluble sugars). Seasonal variations in C-water relations and energy fluxes, compared in S(MM) and in SAA, were primarily dependent on the specific composition of each plant community. WUE of gross primary productivity was higher in SMM than in SAA at the beginning of the dry season. Both structural and fast-turnover leaf material were, on average, more enriched in (13)C in S(MM) than SAA, indicating relatively higher stomatal control and WUE for the long-lived macchia species. This pattern corresponded to (13)C-enriched respired CO2 in SMM compared to the other ecosystems. Conversely, most of the annual herbaceous SAA species (terophytes) showed a drought-escaping strategy, with relatively high stomatal conductance and low WUE. An ecosystem-integrated Δ value was weighted for each ecosystem on the abundance of different life forms, classified according to Raunkiar's system. Agreement was found between ecosystem WUE calculated using eddy covariance and those estimated using integrated Δ approaches. Comparing the isotopic methods, Δ of leaf soluble sugars provided the most reliable proxy for short-term changes in photosynthetic discrimination and associated shifts in integrated canopy-level WUE along the successional series. PMID:25085444

  14. Comparing integrated stable isotope and eddy covariance estimates of water-use efficiency on a Mediterranean successional sequence.

    PubMed

    Scartazza, Andrea; Vaccari, Francesco Primo; Bertolini, Teresa; Di Tommasi, Paul; Lauteri, Marco; Miglietta, Franco; Brugnoli, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    Water-use efficiency (WUE), thought to be a relevant trait for productivity and adaptation to water-limited environments, was estimated for three different ecosystems on the Mediterranean island of Pianosa: Mediterranean macchia (SMM), transition (S(TR)) and abandoned agricultural (SAA) ecosystems, representing a successional series. Three independent approaches were used to study WUE: eddy covariance measurements, C isotope composition of ecosystem respired CO2, and C isotope discrimination (Δ) of leaf material (dry matter and soluble sugars). Seasonal variations in C-water relations and energy fluxes, compared in S(MM) and in SAA, were primarily dependent on the specific composition of each plant community. WUE of gross primary productivity was higher in SMM than in SAA at the beginning of the dry season. Both structural and fast-turnover leaf material were, on average, more enriched in (13)C in S(MM) than SAA, indicating relatively higher stomatal control and WUE for the long-lived macchia species. This pattern corresponded to (13)C-enriched respired CO2 in SMM compared to the other ecosystems. Conversely, most of the annual herbaceous SAA species (terophytes) showed a drought-escaping strategy, with relatively high stomatal conductance and low WUE. An ecosystem-integrated Δ value was weighted for each ecosystem on the abundance of different life forms, classified according to Raunkiar's system. Agreement was found between ecosystem WUE calculated using eddy covariance and those estimated using integrated Δ approaches. Comparing the isotopic methods, Δ of leaf soluble sugars provided the most reliable proxy for short-term changes in photosynthetic discrimination and associated shifts in integrated canopy-level WUE along the successional series.

  15. Atmospheric CO2 level affects plants' carbon use efficiency: insights from a 13C labeling experiment on sunflower stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaoying; Schäufele, Rudi; Schnyder, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration has been shown to stimulate plant photosynthesis and (to a lesser extent) growth, thereby acting as a possible sink for the additional atmospheric CO2. However, this effect is dependent on the efficiency with which plants convert atmospheric carbon into biomass carbon, since a considerable proportion of assimilated carbon is returned to the atmosphere via plant respiration. As a core parameter for carbon cycling, carbon use efficiency of plants (CUE, the ratio of net primary production to gross primary production) quantifies the proportion of assimilated carbon that is incorporated into plant biomass. CUE has rarely been assessed based on measurements of complete carbon balance, due to methodological difficulties in measuring respiration rate of plants in light. Moreover, foliar respiration is known to be inhibited in light, thus foliar respiration rate is generally lower in light than in dark. However, this phenomenon, termed as inhibition of respiration in light (IRL), has rarely been assessed at the stand-scale and been incorporated into the calculation of CUE. Therefore, how CUE responses to atmospheric CO2 levels is still not clear. We studied CUE of sunflower stands grown at sub-ambient CO2 level (200 μmol mol-1) and elevated CO2 level (1000 μmol mol-1) using mesocosm-scale gas exchange facilities which enabled continuous measurements of 13CO2/12CO2 exchange. Appling steady-state 13C labeling, fluxes of respiration and photosynthesis in light were separated, and tracer kinetic in respiration was analyzed. This study provides the first data on CUE at a mesocosm-level including respiration in light in different CO2 environments. We found that CUE of sunflower was lower at an elevated CO2 level than at a sub-ambient CO2 level; and the ignorance of IRL lead to erroneous estimations of CUE. Variation in CUE at atmospheric CO2 levels was attributed to several mechanisms. In this study, CO2 enrichment i) affected the

  16. Efficient enzymatic synthesis and dual-colour fluorescent labelling of DNA probes using long chain azido-dUTP and BCN dyes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaomei; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom

    2016-05-01

    A sterically undemanding azide analogue of dTTP (AHP dUTP) with an alkyl chain and ethynyl attachment to the nucleobase was designed and incorporated into DNA by primer extension, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An azide-modified 523 bp PCR amplicon with all 335 thymidines replaced by AHP dU was shown to be a perfect copy of the template from which it was amplified. Replacement of thymidine with AHP dU increases duplex stability, accounting in part for the high incorporation efficiency of the azide-modified triphosphate. Single-stranded azide-labelled DNA was conveniently prepared from PCR products by λ-exonuclease digestion and streptavidin magnetic bead isolation. Efficient fluorescent labelling of single and double-stranded DNA was carried out using dyes functionalized with bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yne (BCN) via the strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction. This revealed that the degree of labelling must be carefully controlled to achieve optimum fluorescence and avoid fluorescence quenching. Dual-coloured probes were obtained in a single tube fluorescent labelling reaction; and varying the ratios of the two dyes provides a simple method to prepare DNA probes with unique fluorescent signatures. AHP dUTP is a versatile clickable nucleotide with potentially wide applications in biology and nanotechnology including single molecule studies and synthesis of modified aptamer libraries via SELEX. PMID:26819406

  17. Efficient enzymatic synthesis and dual-colour fluorescent labelling of DNA probes using long chain azido-dUTP and BCN dyes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaomei; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom

    2016-05-01

    A sterically undemanding azide analogue of dTTP (AHP dUTP) with an alkyl chain and ethynyl attachment to the nucleobase was designed and incorporated into DNA by primer extension, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An azide-modified 523 bp PCR amplicon with all 335 thymidines replaced by AHP dU was shown to be a perfect copy of the template from which it was amplified. Replacement of thymidine with AHP dU increases duplex stability, accounting in part for the high incorporation efficiency of the azide-modified triphosphate. Single-stranded azide-labelled DNA was conveniently prepared from PCR products by λ-exonuclease digestion and streptavidin magnetic bead isolation. Efficient fluorescent labelling of single and double-stranded DNA was carried out using dyes functionalized with bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yne (BCN) via the strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction. This revealed that the degree of labelling must be carefully controlled to achieve optimum fluorescence and avoid fluorescence quenching. Dual-coloured probes were obtained in a single tube fluorescent labelling reaction; and varying the ratios of the two dyes provides a simple method to prepare DNA probes with unique fluorescent signatures. AHP dUTP is a versatile clickable nucleotide with potentially wide applications in biology and nanotechnology including single molecule studies and synthesis of modified aptamer libraries via SELEX.

  18. Efficient enzymatic synthesis and dual-colour fluorescent labelling of DNA probes using long chain azido-dUTP and BCN dyes

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaomei; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2016-01-01

    A sterically undemanding azide analogue of dTTP (AHP dUTP) with an alkyl chain and ethynyl attachment to the nucleobase was designed and incorporated into DNA by primer extension, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An azide-modified 523 bp PCR amplicon with all 335 thymidines replaced by AHP dU was shown to be a perfect copy of the template from which it was amplified. Replacement of thymidine with AHP dU increases duplex stability, accounting in part for the high incorporation efficiency of the azide-modified triphosphate. Single-stranded azide-labelled DNA was conveniently prepared from PCR products by λ-exonuclease digestion and streptavidin magnetic bead isolation. Efficient fluorescent labelling of single and double-stranded DNA was carried out using dyes functionalized with bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yne (BCN) via the strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction. This revealed that the degree of labelling must be carefully controlled to achieve optimum fluorescence and avoid fluorescence quenching. Dual-coloured probes were obtained in a single tube fluorescent labelling reaction; and varying the ratios of the two dyes provides a simple method to prepare DNA probes with unique fluorescent signatures. AHP dUTP is a versatile clickable nucleotide with potentially wide applications in biology and nanotechnology including single molecule studies and synthesis of modified aptamer libraries via SELEX. PMID:26819406

  19. The Semiquinone at the Qi Site of the bc1 Complex Explored Using HYSCORE Spectroscopy and Specific Isotopic Labeling of Ubiquinone in Rhodobacter sphaeroides via 13C Methionine and Construction of a Methionine Auxotroph

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Specific isotopic labeling at the residue or substituent level extends the scope of different spectroscopic approaches to the atomistic level. Here we describe 13C isotopic labeling of the methyl and methoxy ring substituents of ubiquinone, achieved through construction of a methionine auxotroph in Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain BC17 supplemented with l-methionine with the side chain methyl group 13C-labeled. Two-dimensional electron spin echo envelope modulation (HYSCORE) was applied to study the 13C methyl and methoxy hyperfine couplings in the semiquinone generated in situ at the Qi site of the bc1 complex in its membrane environment. The data were used to characterize the distribution of unpaired spin density and the conformations of the methoxy substituents based on density functional theory calculations of 13C hyperfine tensors in the semiquinone of the geometry-optimized X-ray structure of the bc1 complex (Protein Data Bank entry 1PP9) with the highest available resolution. Comparison with other proteins indicates individual orientations of the methoxy groups in each particular case are always different from the methoxy conformations in the anion radical prepared in a frozen alcohol solution. The protocol used in the generation of the methionine auxotroph is more generally applicable and, because it introduces a gene deletion using a suicide plasmid, can be applied repeatedly. PMID:25184535

  20. Isotope ratio analysis of actinides, fission products, and geolocators by high-efficiency multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, S.; Riciputi, L. R.; Bostick, D. A.; Turgeon, S.; McBay, E. H.; Lavelle, M.

    2009-09-01

    A ThermoFisher "Triton" multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometer (MC-TIMS) was evaluated for trace and ultra-trace level isotope ratio analysis of actinides (uranium, plutonium, and americium), fission products and geolocators (strontium, cesium, and neodymium). Total efficiencies (atoms loaded to ions detected) of up to 0.5-2% for U, Pu, and Am, and 1-30% for Sr, Cs, and Nd can be reported employing resin bead load techniques onto flat ribbon Re filaments or resin beads loaded into a millimeter-sized cavity drilled into a Re rod. This results in detection limits of <0.1 fg (104 atoms to 105 atoms) for 239-242+244Pu, 233+236U, 241-243Am, 89,90Sr, and 134,135,137Cs, and <=1 pg for natural Nd isotopes (limited by the chemical processing blank) using a secondary electron multiplier (SEM) or multiple-ion counters (MICs). Relative standard deviations (RSD) as small as 0.1% and abundance sensitivities of 1 × 106 or better using a SEM are reported here. Precisions of RSD [approximate]0.01-0.001% using a multi-collector Faraday cup array can be achieved at sub-nanogram concentrations for strontium and neodymium and are suitable to gain crucial geolocation information. The analytical protocols reported herein are of particular value for nuclear forensic and nuclear safeguard applications.

  1. Precipitation efficiency derived from isotope ratios in water vapor distinguishes dynamical and microphysical influences on subtropical atmospheric constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, A.; Nusbaumer, J.; Noone, D.

    2015-09-01

    With water vapor and clouds expected to effect significant feedbacks on climate, moisture transport through convective processes has important implications for future temperature change. The precipitation efficiency—the ratio of the rates at which precipitation and condensation form (e = P/C)—is useful for characterizing how much boundary layer moisture recycles through precipitation versus mixes into the free troposphere through cloud detrainment. Yet it is a difficult metric to constrain with traditional observational techniques. This analysis characterizes the precipitation efficiency of convection near the Big Island of Hawaii, USA, using a novel tracer: isotope ratios in water vapor. The synoptic circulation patterns associated with high and low precipitation efficiency are identified, and the importance of large-scale dynamics and local convective processes in regulating vertical distributions of atmospheric constituents important for climate is evaluated. The results suggest that high e days are correlated with plume-like transport originating from the relatively clean tropics, while low e days are associated with westerly transport, generated by a branching of the jet stream. Differences in transport pathway clearly modify background concentrations of water vapor and other trace gases measured at Mauna Loa Observatory; however, local convective processes appear to regulate aerosols there. Indeed, differences between observed and simulated diurnal cycles of particle number concentration indicate that precipitation scavenges aerosols and possibly facilitates new particle formation when e is high. As measurements of isotope ratios in water vapor expand across the subtropics, the techniques presented here can further our understanding of how synoptic weather, precipitation processes, and climate feedbacks interrelate.

  2. Incorporation of 13C labelled root-shoot residues in soil in the presence of Lumbricus terrestris: An isotopic and molecular approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Alix; Alexis, Marie; Nguyen Tu, Thanh Tu; Anquetil, Christelle; Vaury, Véronique; Derenne, Sylvie; Quenea, Katell

    2016-04-01

    Litter from plant biomass deposited on soil surface can either be mineralized; releasing CO2 to the atmosphere, or transferred into the soil as organic compounds. Both pathways depend on biotic factors such as litter characteristics and the of soil organism activity. During the last decades, many studies have focused on the origin of organic matter, with a particular attention to the fate of root and shoot litter. It is generally admitted that roots decompose at a slower rate than shoots, resulting in a higher carbon sequestration in soil for compounds originating from roots. Earthworms play a central role in litter decomposition and carbon cycling, ingesting both organic and mineral compounds which are mixed, complexed and dejected in the form of casts at the soil surface or along earthworm burrows. The simultaneous impact of earthworms and root-shoot on soil carbon cycling is still poorly understood. This study aimed at (1) defining the rate of incorporation of root and shoot litter with or without earthworms and (2) characterizing the molecular composition of soil organic matter upon litter decomposition, after one year of experimentation. A mesocosm experiment was set up to follow the incorporation of 13C labelled Ryegrass root and shoot litter in the soil, in the presence of anecic earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris). Soil samples were collected at 0-20 and 40-60 cm, as well as surface casts, at the beginning and after 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 and 54 weeks of experiment. Organic carbon content and δ13C values were determined for all the samples with Elemental Analysis - Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. Lipid-free soil and cast samples after 54 weeks of incubation were analyzed with Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Pyrolysis products were grouped into six classes: polysaccharides, lignin derived compounds, phenols, N-compounds, aliphatic compounds and sterols. Each pyrolysis product was quantified thanks to its peak area, relative to the total area of the

  3. Fate of isotopically labeled zinc oxide nanoparticles in sediment and effects on two endobenthic species, the clam Scrobicularia plana and the ragworm Hediste diversicolor.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Risso-de Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Valsami-Jones, Eugénia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    Although it is reported that metal and metal oxide nanoparticles, which are among the most rapidly commercialized materials, can cause toxicity to organisms, their fate in the environment and toxicity to marine organisms are not well understood. In this study, we used a stable isotope labelling approach to trace the fate of nanoparticles (NPs) in sediments and also investigated bio-uptake in two estuarine intra-sedimentary invertebrates Scrobicularia plana and Nereis diversicolor. We selected exposure to 3 mg kg(-1) sediment ZnO NPs since this level is a realistic prediction of the environmental concentration in sediments. 67ZnO NPs (DLS: 21-34 nm, positively charged: 31.3 mV) suspensions were synthesised in diethylene glycol (DEG). We explored the fate of 67ZnO NPs in sediment, 67Zn bioaccumulation and the biochemical (biomarkers of defence and damage) and behavioural (burrowing kinetics and feeding rates) biomarkers in both species to 67ZnO NPs and DEG on its own during a 16 d laboratory exposure. After exposure, 67Zn concentrations in sediment showed higher levels in the upper section (1cm: 2.59 mg kg(-1)) decreasing progressively (2 cm: 1.63 mg kg(-1), 3 cm: 0.90 mg kg(-1), 4 cm: 0.67 mg kg(-1)) to a minimum value at the bottom (5 cm: 0.31 mg kg(-1)). 67Zn bioaccumulation was observed in both organisms exposed to 67ZnO NPs in DEG but no major inter-species differences were found. At the biochemical level, 67ZnO NPs exposure significantly induced increased glutathione-S-transferase activity in worms and catalase activity in clams whereas superoxide dismutase activity and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels were not affected in any species. Exposure to DEG on its own leads to a significant increase of metallothionein-like protein levels in clams compared with those exposed to 67ZnO NPs or controls. Burrowing behaviour as well as feeding rate were significantly impaired in both species exposed to 67ZnO NPs. Concerning exposure to DEG on its own

  4. Silicon isotopes indicate enhanced carbon export efficiency in the North Atlantic during deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Katharine R; Robinson, Laura F; McManus, Jerry F; Hays, James D

    2014-01-01

    Today's Sargasso Sea is nutrient starved, except for episodic upwelling events caused by wind-driven winter mixing and eddies. Enhanced diatom opal burial in Sargasso Sea sediments indicates that silicic acid, a limiting nutrient today, may have been more available in subsurface waters during Heinrich Stadials, millennial-scale climate perturbations of the last glacial and deglaciation. Here we use the geochemistry of opal-forming organisms from different water depths to demonstrate changes in silicic acid supply and utilization during the most recent Heinrich Stadial. We suggest that during the early phase (17.5-18 ka), wind-driven upwelling replenished silicic acid to the subsurface, resulting in low Si utilization. By 17 ka, stratification reduced the surface silicic acid supply leading to increased Si utilization efficiency. This abrupt shift in Si cycling would have contributed to high regional carbon export efficiency during the recent Heinrich Stadial, despite being a period of increasing atmospheric CO2.

  5. Silicon isotopes indicate enhanced carbon export efficiency in the North Atlantic during deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Katharine R; Robinson, Laura F; McManus, Jerry F; Hays, James D

    2014-01-01

    Today's Sargasso Sea is nutrient starved, except for episodic upwelling events caused by wind-driven winter mixing and eddies. Enhanced diatom opal burial in Sargasso Sea sediments indicates that silicic acid, a limiting nutrient today, may have been more available in subsurface waters during Heinrich Stadials, millennial-scale climate perturbations of the last glacial and deglaciation. Here we use the geochemistry of opal-forming organisms from different water depths to demonstrate changes in silicic acid supply and utilization during the most recent Heinrich Stadial. We suggest that during the early phase (17.5-18 ka), wind-driven upwelling replenished silicic acid to the subsurface, resulting in low Si utilization. By 17 ka, stratification reduced the surface silicic acid supply leading to increased Si utilization efficiency. This abrupt shift in Si cycling would have contributed to high regional carbon export efficiency during the recent Heinrich Stadial, despite being a period of increasing atmospheric CO2. PMID:24452197

  6. Fluorescence energy transfer efficiency in labeled yeast cytochrome c: a rapid screen for ion biocompatibility in aqueous ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Sheila N; Zhao, Hua; Pandey, Siddharth; Heller, William T; Bright, Frank; Baker, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    A fluorescence energy transfer de-quenching assay was implemented to follow the equilibrium unfolding behaviour of site-specific tetramethylrhodamine-labelled yeast cytochrome c in aqueous ionic liquid solutions; additionally, this approach offers the prospect of naked eye screening for biocompatible ion combinations in hydrated ionic liquids.

  7. Stable carbon isotope ratios and intrinsic water-use efficiency of Miocene fossil leaves compared to modern congeners

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.D.; Zhang, J.; Rember, W.C.; Jennings, D.; Larson, P. )

    1994-06-01

    Miocene fossil leaves of forest trees were extracted from the Clarkia, Idaho fossil beds and their stable carbon isotope ratios were analyzed. Fossils had higher lignin concentrations and lower cellulose concentrations that modern leaves due to diagenesis and the HF used to extract the fossils. Therefore, [delta][sup 13]C of extracted fossil lignin was compared to that of modern lignin. Fossil lignin [delta][sup 13]C was significantly different from that of congeneric modern leaves (paired t-test, P<0.0001), but was 1.9% less negative. Gymnosperms (Metasequoia, Taxodium) were less negative than angiosperms (e.g., Magnolia, Quercus, Acer, Persea), but no difference between evergreen and deciduous species was detected. Using published estimates of the concentration and [delta][sup 13]C of atmospheric CO[sub 2] during the Miocene was estimated the CO[sub 2] partial pressure gradient across the stomata (intrinsic water-use efficiency). Intrinsic water-use efficiency was at least 70% higher during this past [open quotes]greenhouse[close quotes] period than at present.

  8. Prediction of equilibrium Li isotope fractionation between minerals and aqueous solutions at high P and T: An efficient ab initio approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Piotr M.; Jahn, Sandro

    2011-10-01

    The mass-dependent equilibrium stable isotope fractionation between different materials is an important geochemical process. Here we present an efficient method to compute the isotope fractionation between complex minerals and fluids at high pressure, P, and temperature, T, representative for the Earth's crust and mantle. The method is tested by computation of the equilibrium fractionation of lithium isotopes between aqueous fluids and various Li bearing minerals such as staurolite, spodumene and mica. We are able to correctly predict the direction of the isotope fractionation as observed in the experiments. On the quantitative level the computed fractionation factors agree within 1.0‰ with the experimental values indicating predictive power of ab initio methods. We show that with ab initio methods we are able to investigate the underlying mechanisms driving the equilibrium isotope fractionation process, such as coordination of the fractionating elements, their bond strengths to the neighboring atoms, compression of fluids and thermal expansion of solids. This gives valuable insight into the processes governing the isotope fractionation mechanisms on the atomic scale. The method is applicable to any state and does not require different treatment of crystals and fluids.

  9. Silicon isotopes indicate enhanced carbon export efficiency in the North Atlantic during deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Katharine R.; Robinson, Laura F.; McManus, Jerry F.; Hays, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Today’s Sargasso Sea is nutrient starved, except for episodic upwelling events caused by wind-driven winter mixing and eddies. Enhanced diatom opal burial in Sargasso Sea sediments indicates that silicic acid, a limiting nutrient today, may have been more available in subsurface waters during Heinrich Stadials, millennial-scale climate perturbations of the last glacial and deglaciation. Here we use the geochemistry of opal-forming organisms from different water depths to demonstrate changes in silicic acid supply and utilization during the most recent Heinrich Stadial. We suggest that during the early phase (17.5-18 ka), wind-driven upwelling replenished silicic acid to the subsurface, resulting in low Si utilization. By 17 ka, stratification reduced the surface silicic acid supply leading to increased Si utilization efficiency. This abrupt shift in Si cycling would have contributed to high regional carbon export efficiency during the recent Heinrich Stadial, despite being a period of increasing atmospheric CO2.

  10. Carbon transfer from photosynthesis to below ground fine root/hyphae respiration in Quercus serrata using stable carbon isotope pulse labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannoura, M.; Kominami, Y.; Takanashi, S.; Takahashi, K.

    2013-12-01

    Studying carbon allocation in trees is a key to better understand belowground carbon cycle and its response to climate change. Tracing 13C in tree and soil compartments after pulse labeling is one of powerful tool to study the fate of carbon in forest ecosystems. This experiment was conducted in Yamashiro experimental forest, Kyoto, Japan. Annual mean temperature and precipitation from 1994 to 2009 are 15.5 ° C and 1,388 mm respectively. The branch pulse labeling were done 7 times in 2011 using same branch of Quercus serrata (H:11.7 m, DBH; 33.7 cm) to see seasonal variations of carbon velocity. Whole crown labeling of Quercus serrata (H:9 m, DBH; 13.7 cm) was done in 2012 to study carbon allocation and to especially focus on belowground carbon flux until to the hyphae respiration. Pure 13CO2 (99.9%) was injected to the labeling chamber which was set to branch or crown. Then, after one hour of branch labeling and 3.5 hour for crown labeling, the chamber was opened. Trunk respiration chambers, fine root chambers and hyphae chambers were set to the target tree to trace labeled carbon in the CO2 efflux. 41 μm mesh was used to exclude ingrowth of roots into hyphae chambers. The results show that the velocity of carbon through the tree varied seasonally, with higher velocity in summer than autumn, averaging 0.47 m h-1. Half-lives of labeled carbon in autotrophic respiration were similar above and below ground during the growing season, but they were twice longer in trunk than in root in autumn. From the whole crown labeling done end of growing season, the 13CO2 signal was observed 25 hours after labeling in trunk chamber and 34-37.7 hours after labeling in fine root and hyphae respiration almost simultaneously. Half-lives of 13 was longer in trunk than below ground. Trunk respiration was still using labelled carbon during winter suggesting that winter trunk respiration is partly fueled by carbon stored in the trunk at the end of the growing season.

  11. Mechanisms of trichloramine removal with activated carbon: stoichiometric analysis with isotopically labeled trichloramine and theoretical analysis with a diffusion-reaction model.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Miki; Matsushita, Taku; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Aki, Tomoko; Isaka, Masahito; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism by which activated carbon removes trichloramine, a byproduct of water treatment that has a strongly offensive chlorinous odor. A stoichiometrical mass balance for ¹⁵N before and after activated carbon treatment of laboratory-prepared ¹⁵N-labeled trichloramine solutions clearly revealed that the mechanism of trichloramine removal with activated carbon was not adsorption but rather reductive decomposition to nitrogen gas. There was a weak positive correlation between the surface decomposition rate constant of trichloramine and the concentration of basic functional groups on the surface of the carbon particles, the suggestion being that the trichloramine may have been reduced by sulfhydryl groups (-SH) on the activated carbon surface. Efficient decomposition of trichloramine was achieved with super powdered activated carbon (SPAC), which was prepared by pulverization of commercially available PAC into very fine particles less than 1 μm in diameter. SPAC could decompose trichloramine selectively, even when trichloramine and free chlorine were present simultaneously in water, the indication being that the strong disinfection capability of residual free chlorine could be retained even after trichloramine was effectively decomposed. The residual ratio of trichloramine after carbon contact increased somewhat at low water temperatures of 1-5 °C. At these low temperatures, biological treatment, the traditional method for control of a major trichloramine precursor (ammonium nitrogen), is inefficient. Even at these low temperatures, SPAC could reduce the trichloramine concentration to an acceptable level. A theoretical analysis with a diffusion-reaction model developed in the present study revealed that the increase in the trichloramine residual with decreasing water temperature was attributable to the temperature dependence of the rate of the reductive reaction rather than to the temperature dependence of the diffusive mass

  12. Mechanisms of trichloramine removal with activated carbon: stoichiometric analysis with isotopically labeled trichloramine and theoretical analysis with a diffusion-reaction model.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Miki; Matsushita, Taku; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Aki, Tomoko; Isaka, Masahito; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism by which activated carbon removes trichloramine, a byproduct of water treatment that has a strongly offensive chlorinous odor. A stoichiometrical mass balance for ¹⁵N before and after activated carbon treatment of laboratory-prepared ¹⁵N-labeled trichloramine solutions clearly revealed that the mechanism of trichloramine removal with activated carbon was not adsorption but rather reductive decomposition to nitrogen gas. There was a weak positive correlation between the surface decomposition rate constant of trichloramine and the concentration of basic functional groups on the surface of the carbon particles, the suggestion being that the trichloramine may have been reduced by sulfhydryl groups (-SH) on the activated carbon surface. Efficient decomposition of trichloramine was achieved with super powdered activated carbon (SPAC), which was prepared by pulverization of commercially available PAC into very fine particles less than 1 μm in diameter. SPAC could decompose trichloramine selectively, even when trichloramine and free chlorine were present simultaneously in water, the indication being that the strong disinfection capability of residual free chlorine could be retained even after trichloramine was effectively decomposed. The residual ratio of trichloramine after carbon contact increased somewhat at low water temperatures of 1-5 °C. At these low temperatures, biological treatment, the traditional method for control of a major trichloramine precursor (ammonium nitrogen), is inefficient. Even at these low temperatures, SPAC could reduce the trichloramine concentration to an acceptable level. A theoretical analysis with a diffusion-reaction model developed in the present study revealed that the increase in the trichloramine residual with decreasing water temperature was attributable to the temperature dependence of the rate of the reductive reaction rather than to the temperature dependence of the diffusive mass

  13. Evaluation of a method for nitrotyrosine site identification and relative quantitation using a stable isotope-labeled nitrated spike-in standard and high resolution fourier transform MS and MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Kent W; Fertig, Alison R; Dufresne, Craig P; Pinho, Joao P C; Stevens, Stanley M

    2014-04-14

    The overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) can have deleterious effects in the cell, including structural and possible activity-altering modifications to proteins. Peroxynitrite is one such RNS that can result in a specific protein modification, nitration of tyrosine residues to form nitrotyrosine, and to date, the identification of nitrotyrosine sites in proteins continues to be a major analytical challenge. We have developed a method by which 15N-labeled nitrotyrosine groups are generated on peptide or protein standards using stable isotope-labeled peroxynitrite (O15NOO-), and the resulting standard is mixed with representative samples in which nitrotyrosine formation is to be measured by mass spectrometry (MS). Nitropeptide MS/MS spectra are filtered using high mass accuracy Fourier transform MS (FTMS) detection of the nitrotyrosine immonium ion. Given that the nitropeptide pair is co-isolated for MS/MS fragmentation, the nitrotyrosine immonium ions (at m/z=181 or 182) can be used for relative quantitation with negligible isotopic interference at a mass resolution of greater than 50,000 (FWHM, full width at half-maximum). Furthermore, the standard potentially allows for the increased signal of nitrotyrosine-containing peptides, thus facilitating selection for MS/MS in a data-dependent mode of acquisition. We have evaluated the methodology in terms of nitrotyrosine site identification and relative quantitation using nitrated peptide and protein standards.

  14. Leaf oxygen and Carbon Isotopic Signatures Reflect Drought Resistance and Water Use Efficiency in the C4 Grass, Setaria viridis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, P.; Cousins, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Low water availability is a major constraint in crop production, especially as agriculture is pushed to marginal lands. Therefore, improving drought resistance such as increasing water use efficiency (WUE) through plant breeding is needed to expand the range of soil water availability adequate for food production. With the goal of finding the genomic basis for WUE in C4 grasses, Setaria viridis makes an ideal model species because of its small size, short lifespan, and sequenced genome. Also it is part of the panicoid grass clade, which is one of the most important clades for food and biofuel production. In plant breeding programs, large numbers of genotypes must be quickly screened for drought resistance traits, but there is no well-defined method of screening for WUE in C4 grasses. However, bulk leaf oxygen (Δ18OBL) and carbon (δ13C) isotopic signatures have shown potential as recorders of transpiration rate (E) and stomatal conductance (gs), and combined with biomass production potentially serve as a measure of WUE. Values of Δ18OBL record differences in transpiration rate because leaf water becomes more enriched as transpiration rate decreases, and leaf tissue records the isotopic composition of leaf water in which it is synthesized. Additionally, in C4 plants δ13C values decrease as gs decreases but the change in δ13C in response to gs may not be adequate to tease apart differences in WUE. In this study, we grew S. viridis plants under well-watered and water-limited conditions to determine if Δ18OBL and δ13C could be used as proxies for E and gs, and be used to screen S. viridis for differences in WUE in breeding programs. The Δ18OBL and δ13C were significantly different between well-watered and water-limited plants and correlated with each other and with E, gs, and instantaneous water use efficiency (Anet/gs). Therefore, Δ18OBL and δ13C can be useful proxies to screen genotypes for drought resistance by recording differences in E, gs, and WUE

  15. The Analysis on Influence of Main Factors on Theoretical Value of Energy Saving Rate for Energy Efficiency Labeling of Civil Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Zhenling; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Fan; Li, Peng; Cao, Wei

    For typical residential buildings, no-large-scale and large-scale public buildings, according to China's Technical Guide for the Energy Efficiency Labeling of Civil Buildings, makes up missing data of the calculation benchmark and determines the boundary conditions for calculating the theoretical values of civil building energy efficiency. Based on equivalent full load hours method, develops a modular program and calculates building energy consumption for the demands of dynamic cooling and heating and lighting etc., finds out the corresponding relationship between star level's theoretical value of energy saving rate and specified-term limiting value in the Guide. With orthogonal experimental design and multiple linear regression, establishes the quantitative function of both the theoretical value of energy saving rate and main factors parameters, analyzes the impact of the control parameter on energy saving rate, and reveals the law of theoretical value of energy saving rate variation with the control parameter. For building energy efficiency labeling upgrade, presents technical measure need to be taken and analyses its feasibility. The results from the study can provide theoretical guidance for energy-saving design or retrofitting of civil buildings.

  16. Allocation of atmospheric CO2 into labile sub-surface carbon pools: a stable isotope labelling approach in a tundra wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüggen, Norman; Knoblauch, Christian; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2015-04-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from permafrost-affected wetlands are intensively studied due to their important role in the global carbon cycle. There are concerns of increasing methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from tundra wetlands due to permafrost degradation and hydrology changes in a warming Arctic. Understanding the sub-surface carbon pool interactions will improve the prediction on how trace gas fluxes from these ecosystems will respond to changing environmental conditions. Partitioning the sources of greenhouse gas fluxes will help to evaluate the quantitative role of recently produced plant photosynthates. Furthermore, partitioning allows separating respiration of long-term stored organic matter and freshly produced plant products. This knowledge is crucial for understanding the response of greenhouse gas fluxes in such wetlands to environmental changes. An in situ 13CO2 pulse-labelling experiment has been conducted in the northeast Siberian tundra (Samoylov island, Lena river delta) in August 2013 to quantify interactions among sub-surface carbon pools (DIC, DOC, CH4) in three depths (6, 16 and 36 cm) of the active layer. The experimental site was a low-centred polygon centre in a polygonal tundra landscape, with a sedge-moss (Carex-Scorpidium) plant association. The water table was at the soils' surface and the permafrost table in a depth of 50 cm. After the system has been 13CO2 pulse labelled, all three studied subsurface carbon pools (CH4, DIC and DOC) were clearly 13C-enriched, which accounts for atmospheric C incorporated into these pools. One day after the labelling, in 6 cm depth 1.5 percent of DIC and 0.1 percent of CH4were replaced by label C, which then steadily declined over a ten days period. The label C content of DOC increased gradually over the same period. In 16 cm depth, the label C increased gradually after labelling in both DIC and CH4. Label C was found in DIC and CH4 even in a depth of 36 cm, although in less pronounced concentrations

  17. Isotope ratio analysis of actinides, fission products, and geolocators by high-efficiency multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bürger, Stefan; Riciputi, Lee R; Bostick, Debra A; Turgeon, Steven; McBay, Eddie H; Lavelle, Mark

    2009-01-01

    A ThermoFisher 'Triton' multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometer (MC-TIMS) was evaluated for trace and ultra-trace level isotoperatioanalysis of actinides (uranium, plutonium, and americium), fission products and geolocators (strontium, cesium, and neodymium). Total efficiencies (atoms loaded to ions detected) of up to 0.5-2% for U, Pu, and Am, and 1-30% for Sr, Cs, and Nd can be reported employing resin bead load techniques onto flat ribbon Re filaments or resin beads loaded into a millimeter-sized cavity drilled into a Re rod. This results in detection limits of <0.1 fg (10{sup 4} atoms to 10{sup 5} atoms) for {sup 239-242+244}Pu, {sup 233+236}U, {sup 241-243}Am, {sup 89,90}Sr, and {sup 134,135,137}Cs, and {le} 1 pg for natural Nd isotopes (limited by the chemical processing blank) using a secondary electron multiplier (SEM) or multiple-ion counters (MICs). Relative standard deviations (RSD) as small as 0.1% and abundance sensitivities of 1 x 10{sup 6} or better using a SEM are reported here. Precisions of RSD {approx} 0.01-0.001% using a multi-collector Faraday cup array can be achieved at sub-nanogram concentrations for strontium and neodymium and are suitable to gain crucial geolocation information. The analytical protocols reported herein are of particular value for nuclear forensic and nuclear safeguard applications.

  18. Appliance energy labeling takes effect

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Consumers buying household appliances will be helped by energy-efficiency labels and minimum efficiency standards required for refrigerators and refrigerator/freezers, freezers, dishwashers, water heaters, clothes washers, room air conditioners, and furnaces. The ENERGYGUIDE labels must be displayed in the store and in catalogs. Two voluntary efficiency programs were combined in the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) requiring labels by 1980. Shoppers may compare the efficiencies of appliances and compute the actual cost differential over the lifetime of the equipment. Manufacturers have responded with more-efficient models, but the impact of efficient appliances on energy consumption will be small. A sample label with the required information is illustrated. (DCK)

  19. Elementary Metabolite Units (EMU): a novel framework for modeling isotopic distributions

    PubMed Central

    Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Kelleher, Joanne K.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA) has emerged as a tool of great significance for metabolic engineering and mammalian physiology. An important limitation of MFA, as carried out via stable isotope labeling and GC/MS and NMR measurements, is the large number of isotopomer or cumomer equations that need to be solved, especially when multiple isotopic tracers are used for the labeling of the system. This restriction reduces the ability of MFA to fully utilize the power of multiple isotopic tracers in elucidating the physiology of realistic situations comprising complex bioreaction networks. Here, we present a novel framework for the modeling of isotopic labeling systems that significantly reduces the number of system variables without any loss of information. The elementary metabolite unit (EMU) framework is based on a highly efficient decomposition method that identifies the minimum amount of information needed to simulate isotopic labeling within a reaction network using the knowledge of atomic transitions occurring in the network reactions. The functional units generated by the decomposition algorithm, called elementary metabolite units, form the new basis for generating system equations that describe the relationship between fluxes and stable isotope measurements. Isotopomer abundances simulated using the EMU framework are identical to those obtained using the isotopomer and cumomer methods, however, require significantly less computation time. For a typical 13C-labeling system the total number of equations that needs to be solved is reduced by one order-of-magnitude (100s EMUs vs. 1000s isotopomers). As such, the EMU framework is most efficient for the analysis of labeling by multiple isotopic tracers. For example, analysis of the gluconeogenesis pathway with 2H, 13C, and 18O tracers requires only 354 EMUs, compared to more than 2 million isotopomers. PMID:17088092

  20. Distance-dependent emission from dye-labeled oligonucleotides on striped Au/Ag nanowires: effect of secondary structure and hybridization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Stoermer, Rebecca L; Keating, Christine D

    2006-10-11

    When fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides are located near metal surfaces, their emission intensity is impacted by both electromagnetic effects (i.e., quenching and/or enhancement of emission) and the structure of the nucleic acids (e.g., random coil, hairpin, or duplex). We present experiments exploring the effect of label position and secondary structure in oligonucleotide probes as a function of hybridization buffer, which impacts the percentage of double-stranded probes on the surface after exposure to complementary DNA. Nanowires containing identifiable patterns of Au and Ag segments were used as the metal substrates in this work, which enabled us to directly compare different dye positions in a single multiplexed experiment and differences in emission for probes attached to the two metals. The observed metal-dye separation dependence for unstructured surface-bound oligonucleotides is highly sensitive to hybridization efficiency, due to substantial changes in DNA extension from the surface upon hybridization. In contrast, fluorophore labeled oligonucleotides designed to form hairpin secondary structures analogous to solution-phase molecular beacon probes are relatively insensitive to hybridization efficiency, since the folded form is quenched and therefore does not appreciably impact the observed distance-dependence of the response. Differences in fluorescence patterning on Au and Ag were noted as a function of not only chromophore identity but also metal-dye separation. For example, emission intensity for TAMRA-labeled oligonucleotides changed from brighter on Ag for 24-base probes to brighter on Au for 48-base probes. We also observed fluorescence enhancement at the ends of nanowires and at surface defects where heightened electromagnetic fields affect the fluorescence.

  1. Comparison of 64Cu-complexing bifunctional chelators for radioimmunoconjugation: labeling efficiency, specific activity and in vitro/in vivo stability

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Maggie S.; Ma, Michelle T.; Sunassee, Kavitha; Shaw, Karen P.; Williams, Jennifer D.; Paul, Rowena L.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Blower, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    High radiolabeling efficiency, preferably to high specific activity, and good stability of the radioimmunoconjugate are essential features for a successful immunoconjugate for imaging or therapy. In this study, the radiolabeling efficiency, in vitro stability and biodistribution of immunoconjugates with eight different bifunctional chelators labeled with 64Cu were compared. The anti-CD20 antibody, rituximab, was conjugated to four macrocyclic bifunctional chelators (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA, p-SCN-Bn-Oxo-DO3A, p-SCN-NOTA and p-SCN-PCTA), three DTPA derivatives (p-SCN-Bn-DTPA, p-SCN-CHX-A”-DTPA and ITC-2B3M-DTPA) and a macrobicyclic hexamine (“sarcophagine”) chelator (sar-CO2H) = (1-NH2-8-NHCO(CH2)3CO2H)sar where sar = sarcophagine = 3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]icosane). Radiolabeling efficiency under various conditions, in vitro stability in serum at 37°C and in vivo biodistribution and imaging in normal mice over 48 h were studied. All chelators except sar-CO2H were conjugated to rituximab by thiourea bond formation with an average of 4.9 +/− 0.9 chelators per antibody molecule. Sar-CO2H was conjugated to rituximab by amide bond formation with 0.5 chelators per antibody molecule. Efficiencies of 64Cu radiolabeling were dependent on the concentration of immunoconjugate. Notably, the 64Cu-NOTA-rituximab conjugate demonstrated highest radiochemical yield (95%) under very dilute conditions (31 nM NOTA-rituximab conjugate). Similarly, sar-CO-rituximab, containing 1/10th the number of chelators per antibody compared to other conjugates retained high labeling efficiency (98 %) at an antibody concentration of 250 nM. In contrast to the radioimmunoconjugates containing DTPA derivatives, which demonstrated poor serum stability, all macrocyclic radioimmunoconjugates were very stable in serum with <6 % dissociation of 64Cu over 48 h. In vivo biodistribution profiles in normal female Balb/C mice were similar for all the macrocyclic radioimmunoconjugates with most of the

  2. Trypsin immobilization on hairy polymer chains hybrid magnetic nanoparticles for ultra fast, highly efficient proteome digestion, facile 18O labeling and absolute protein quantification.

    PubMed

    Qin, Weijie; Song, Zifeng; Fan, Chao; Zhang, Wanjun; Cai, Yun; Zhang, Yangjun; Qian, Xiaohong

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, quantitative proteomic research attracts great attention because of the urgent needs in biological and clinical research, such as biomarker discovery and verification. Currently, mass spectrometry (MS) based bottom up strategy has become the method of choice for proteomic quantification. In this strategy, the amount of proteins is determined by quantifying the corresponding proteolytic peptides of the proteins, therefore highly efficient and complete protein digestion is crucial for achieving accurate quantification results. However, the digestion efficiency and completeness obtained using conventional free protease digestion is not satisfactory for highly complex proteomic samples. In this work, we developed a new type of immobilized trypsin using hairy noncross-linked polymer chains hybrid magnetic nanoparticle as the matrix aiming at ultra fast, highly efficient proteomic digestion and facile (18)O labeling for absolution protein quantification. The hybrid nanoparticle is synthesized by in situ growth of hairy polymer chains from the magnetic nanoparticle surface using surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization technique. The flexible noncross-linked polymer chains not only provide large amount of binding sites but also work as scaffolds to support three-dimensional trypsin immobilization which leads to increased loading amount and improved accessibility of the immobilized trypsin. For complex proteomic samples, obviously increased digestion efficiency and completeness was demonstrated by 27.2% and 40.8% increase in the number of identified proteins and peptides as well as remarkably reduced undigested proteins residues compared with that obtained using conventional free trypsin digestion. The successful application in absolute protein quantification of enolase from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis protein extracts using (18)O labeling and MRM strategy further demonstrated the potential of this hybrid nanoparticle immobilized trypsin

  3. HPLC-ICPMS and stable isotope-labeled approaches to assess quantitatively Ti(IV) uptake by transferrin in human blood serum.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-González, Alejandro; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge; Cantarero-Roldán, Alicia M; Marchante-Gayón, Juan M; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2008-11-15

    Little is known about the effects of titanium found in patients wearing prostheses or about the biochemical pathways of this metal when used as an anticancer drug (e.g., titanocene dichloride). In this work, transferrin has been confirmed as the only carrier protein binding Ti in human blood serum samples by making use of different HPLC protein separations followed by element-specific Ti detection by ICPMS. Besides, isotope dilution analysis has been applied to the quantitative speciation of Ti-Tf in standards and human blood serum samples. Species-unspecific and species-specific isotope dilution modes have been explored. In the first case, very low Ti-Tf results were obtained even using two different chromatographic mechanisms, anion exchange (20-24%) and size exclusion (33-36%). Surprisingly, no major Ti species except Ti-Tf were observed in the chromatograms, suggesting that Ti(IV) hydrolysis and precipitation as inactive titanium oxide species could take place inside the chromatographic columns. These results demonstrate that chemical degradation of metalloproteins during analytical separations could ruin the sought speciation quantitative results. The isotope dilution species-specific mode, much more accurate in such cases, has been instrumental in demonstrating the possibility of gross errors in final metalloprotein quantification. For this purpose, an isotopically enriched standard of (49)Ti-Tf was synthesized and applied to the quantitative speciation of Ti-Tf again. Using this species-specific spike, Ti-Tf dissociation inside the chromatographic columns used could be corrected, and thus, quantitative Ti-Tf binding in serum (92-102%) was observed. In other words, the usefulness and potential of a species-specific isotope dilution analysis approach to investigate quantitatively metal-protein associations, which can be dissociated at certain experimental conditions, is demonstrated here for the first time.

  4. Use of an automated chromium reduction system for hydrogen isotope ratio analysis of physiological fluids applied to doubly labeled water analysis.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, D A; Colligan, A S; Shriver, T; Avak, H; Bartok-Olson, C

    2000-09-01

    The doubly labeled water method is commonly used to measure total energy expenditure in free-living subjects. The method, however, requires accurate and precise deuterium abundance determinations, which can be laborious. The aim of this study was to evaluate a fully automated, high-throughput, chromium reduction technique for the measurement of deuterium abundances in physiological fluids. The chromium technique was compared with an off-line zinc bomb reduction technique and also subjected to test-retest analysis. Analysis of international water standards demonstrated that the chromium technique was accurate and had a within-day precision of <1 per thousand. Addition of organic matter to water samples demonstrated that the technique was sensitive to interference at levels between 2 and 5 g l(-1). Physiological samples could be analyzed without this interference, plasma by 10000 Da exclusion filtration, saliva by sedimentation and urine by decolorizing with carbon black. Chromium reduction of urine specimens from doubly labeled water studies indicated no bias relative to zinc reduction with a mean difference in calculated energy expenditure of -0.2 +/- 3.9%. Blinded reanalysis of urine specimens from a second doubly labeled water study demonstrated a test-retest coefficient of variation of 4%. The chromium reduction method was found to be a rapid, accurate and precise method for the analysis of urine specimens from doubly labeled water. PMID:11006607

  5. Use of an automated chromium reduction system for hydrogen isotope ratio analysis of physiological fluids applied to doubly labeled water analysis.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, D A; Colligan, A S; Shriver, T; Avak, H; Bartok-Olson, C

    2000-09-01

    The doubly labeled water method is commonly used to measure total energy expenditure in free-living subjects. The method, however, requires accurate and precise deuterium abundance determinations, which can be laborious. The aim of this study was to evaluate a fully automated, high-throughput, chromium reduction technique for the measurement of deuterium abundances in physiological fluids. The chromium technique was compared with an off-line zinc bomb reduction technique and also subjected to test-retest analysis. Analysis of international water standards demonstrated that the chromium technique was accurate and had a within-day precision of <1 per thousand. Addition of organic matter to water samples demonstrated that the technique was sensitive to interference at levels between 2 and 5 g l(-1). Physiological samples could be analyzed without this interference, plasma by 10000 Da exclusion filtration, saliva by sedimentation and urine by decolorizing with carbon black. Chromium reduction of urine specimens from doubly labeled water studies indicated no bias relative to zinc reduction with a mean difference in calculated energy expenditure of -0.2 +/- 3.9%. Blinded reanalysis of urine specimens from a second doubly labeled water study demonstrated a test-retest coefficient of variation of 4%. The chromium reduction method was found to be a rapid, accurate and precise method for the analysis of urine specimens from doubly labeled water.

  6. Long term changes in Intrinsic Water Use Efficiency, the palaoe record derived from stable carbon isotope measurements from tree rings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagen, Mary; McCarroll, Danny; Loader, Neil; Young, Giles; Robertson, Iain

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope (δ13C) measurements from the annual rings of trees are increasingly used to explore long term changes in plant-carbon-water relations, via changes in intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE); the ratio of photosynthetic rate to stomatal conductance. Many studies report a significant increase in iWEU since industrialisation, which tracks rising global atmospheric CO2. Such changes are logical are trees are known to change their stomatal geometry, number and action in response to rising CO2. However, which increasing iWUE suggests physiological changes which should lead to increased growth increasing iWUE is rarely matched by enhanced tree growth when tree rings are measured, despite increases of up to 30% in iWUE over the recent past (van der Sleen et al 2015). Explanations for the mismatch between iWUE and tree growth records encompass questions over the veracity of δ13C records for recording physiological change (Silva and Howarth 2013), suggestions that moisture stress in warming climates becomes a limit to growth and prevents opportunistic use of rising CO2 by trees (Andreu-Hayles et al 2011) and questions regarding the use of tree ring width, which does not record tree height gain, to record growth. Here we present an extensive range of long term iWUE records, derived broadly from the temperate, high latitude and one tropical forest site to explore the palaeoclimatic perspective on the iWUE-fertilization conundrum in a spatio temporally extensive manner.

  7. Method development for the redox speciation analysis of iron by ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and carryover assessment using isotopically labeled analyte analogues.

    PubMed

    Wolle, Mesay Mulugeta; Fahrenholz, Timothy; Rahman, G M Mizanur; Pamuku, Matt; Kingston, H M 'Skip'; Browne, Damien

    2014-06-20

    An ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS) method was developed for the redox speciation analysis of iron (Fe) based on in-column complexation of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) by dipicolinic acid (DPA). The effects of column type, mobile phase composition and molecular ion interference were studied in the method optimization. The carryover of the target species in the IC-ICP-MS method was uniquely and effectively evaluated using isotopically enriched analogues of the analytes ((54)Fe(2+) and (57)Fe(3+)). Standard solutions of the enriched standards were injected into the system following analysis of a sample, and the ratios of the isotopes of iron in the enriched standards were calculated based on the chromatographic peak areas. The concentrations of the analytes carried over from the sample to the enriched standards were determined using the quantitative relationship in isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). In contrast to the routine way of evaluating carryover effect by injecting a blank solution after sample analysis, the use of isotopically enriched standards identified significant analyte carryover in the present method. Extensive experiments were carried out to systematically identify the source of the carryover and to eliminate the problem; the separation column was found to be the exclusive source. More than 95% of the analyte carryover was eliminated by reducing the length of the column. The detection limit of the IC-ICP-MS method (MDL) for the iron species was 2ngg(-1). The method was used to determine Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) in synthetic aqueous standard solutions and a beverage sample.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of an (125)I-labeled azide prosthetic group for efficient and bioorthogonal radiolabeling of cyclooctyne-group containing molecules using copper-free click reaction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi Hee; Shim, Ha Eun; Nam, You Ree; Kim, Hye Rim; Kang, Jung Ae; Lee, Dong-Eun; Park, Sang Hyun; Choi, Dae Seong; Jang, Beom-Su; Jeon, Jongho

    2016-02-01

    Herein we report the radiosynthesis of a pyridine derived azide prosthetic group for iodine radioisotope labeling of dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) conjugated molecules. The radiolabeling of the stannylated precursor 2 was conducted using [(125)I]NaI and chloramine-T to give (125)I-labeled azide ([(125)I]1) with high radiochemical yield (72±8%, n=4) and radiochemical purity (>99%). Using (125)I-labeled azide ([(125)I]1), cyclic RGD peptide and near infrared fluorescent molecule were efficiently labeled with modest to good radiochemical yields. The biodistribution study and SPECT/CT images showed that [(125)I]1 underwent rapid renal clearance. These results clearly demonstrated that [(125)I]1 could be used as an useful radiotracer for in vivo pre-targeted imaging as well as efficient in vitro radiolabeling of DBCO containing molecules. PMID:26748695

  9. Efficient utilization of the expanded criteria donor (ECD) deceased donor kidney pool: an analysis of the effect of labeling.

    PubMed

    Hirth, R A; Pan, Q; Schaubel, D E; Merion, R M

    2010-02-01

    We investigated the effect of the expanded criteria donor (ECD) label on (i) recovery of kidneys and (ii) acceptance for transplantation given recovery. An ECD is age > or = 60, or age 50-59 with > or = 2 of 3 specified comorbidities. Using data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients from 1999 to 2005, we modeled recovery rates through linear regression and transplantation probabilities via logistic regression, focusing on organs from donors just-younger versus just-older than the ECD age thresholds. We split the sample at July 1, 2002 to determine how decisions changed at the approximate time of implementation of the ECD definition. Before July 2002, the number of recovered kidneys with 0-1 comorbidities dropped at age 60, but transplantation probabilities given recovery did not. After July 2002, the number of recovered kidneys with 0-1 comorbidities rose at age 60, but transplantation probabilities contingent on recovery declined. No similar trends were observed at donor age 50 among donors with > or = 2 comorbidities. Overall, implementation of the ECD definition coincided with a reversal of an apparent reluctance to recover kidneys from donors over age 59, but increased selectiveness on the part of surgeons/centers with respect to these kidneys. PMID:20055795

  10. Site-directed isotope labeling and ATR-FTIR difference spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin: the peptide carbonyl group of Tyr 185 is structurally active during the bR-->N transition.

    PubMed

    Ludlam, C F; Sonar, S; Lee, C P; Coleman, M; Herzfeld, J; RajBhandary, U L; Rothschild, K J

    1995-01-10

    The largest secondary structural change occurs in the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) photocycle during the M-->N transition. In this work site-directed isotope labeling (SDIL) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) difference spectroscopy were used to investigate this conformational change. L-Tyrosine containing a 13C isotope at the carbonyl carbon was selectively incorporated at Tyr 57, Tyr 147, and Tyr 185 by SDIL. This involves the cell-free expression of bR in the presence of Escherichia coli suppressor tRNA(CUATyr) aminoacylated with L-[1-13C]Tyr. ATR-FTIR difference spectroscopy reveals that of the 11 tyrosines, only the peptide carbonyl group of Tyr 185 undergoes a significant structural change during the bR-->N transition. Along with other spectroscopic evidence, this result suggests that the Tyr 185-Pro 186 region of the protein is structurally active and may function as a hinge which facilitates the tilt of the cytoplasmic portion of the F-helix in bacteriorhodopsin during the M-->N transition.

  11. Proteins with High Turnover Rate in Barley Leaves Estimated by Proteome Analysis Combined with in Planta Isotope Labeling1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Clark J.; Alexova, Ralitza; Jacoby, Richard P.; Millar, A. Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Protein turnover is a key component in cellular homeostasis; however, there is little quantitative information on degradation kinetics for individual plant proteins. We have used 15N labeling of barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of free amino acids and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of proteins to track the enrichment of 15N into the amino acid pools in barley leaves and then into tryptic peptides derived from newly synthesized proteins. Using information on the rate of growth of barley leaves combined with the rate of degradation of 14N-labeled proteins, we calculate the turnover rates of 508 different proteins in barley and show that they vary by more than 100-fold. There was approximately a 9-h lag from label application until 15N incorporation could be reliably quantified in extracted peptides. Using this information and assuming constant translation rates for proteins during the time course, we were able to quantify degradation rates for several proteins that exhibit half-lives on the order of hours. Our workflow, involving a stringent series of mass spectrometry filtering steps, demonstrates that 15N labeling can be used for large-scale liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry studies of protein turnover in plants. We identify a series of abundant proteins in photosynthesis, photorespiration, and specific subunits of chlorophyll biosynthesis that turn over significantly more rapidly than the average protein involved in these processes. We also highlight a series of proteins that turn over as rapidly as the well-known D1 subunit of photosystem II. While these proteins need further verification for rapid degradation in vivo, they cluster in chlorophyll and thiamine biosynthesis. PMID:25082890

  12. Application of 13C isotope labeling using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to determining phosphate-containing metabolic incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Putluri, Vasanta; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Konde, Sai Aparna; Lydon, John P.; Sreekumar, Arun; Putluri, Nagireddy

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an approach wherein negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has used to understand the relative flux through phosphate containing metabolic intermediates associated with central carbon metabolism after administering cells with 13C-labeled substrates. The method was applied to examine the 13C incorporation through glycolysis in T47D breast cancer cells and showed reduction of glycolytic relative flux upon treatment with 2-Deoxyglucose. PMID:24338880

  13. A Simple and Efficient In Vivo Non-viral RNA Transfection Method for Labeling the Whole Axonal Tree of Individual Adult Long-Range Projection Neurons.

    PubMed

    Porrero, César; Rodríguez-Moreno, Javier; Quetglas, José I; Smerdou, Cristian; Furuta, Takahiro; Clascá, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We report a highly efficient, simple, and non-infective method for labeling individual long-range projection neurons (LRPNs) in a specific location with enough sparseness and intensity to allow complete and unambiguous reconstructions of their entire axonal tree. The method is based on the "in vivo" transfection of a large RNA construct that drives the massive expression of green fluorescent protein. The method combines two components: injection of a small volume of a hyperosmolar NaCl solution containing the Pal-eGFP-Sindbis RNA construct (Furuta et al., 2001), followed by the application of high-frequency electric current pulses through the micropipette tip. We show that, although each component alone increases transfection efficacy, compared to simple volume injections of standard RNA solution, the highest efficacy (85.7%) is achieved by the combination of both components. In contrast with the infective viral Sindbis vector, RNA transfection occurs exclusively at the position of the injection micropipette tip. This method simplifies consistently labeling one or a few isolated neurons per brain, a strategy that allows unambiguously resolving and quantifying the brain-wide and often multi-branched monosynaptic circuits created by LRPNs.

  14. A Simple and Efficient In Vivo Non-viral RNA Transfection Method for Labeling the Whole Axonal Tree of Individual Adult Long-Range Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Porrero, César; Rodríguez-Moreno, Javier; Quetglas, José I.; Smerdou, Cristian; Furuta, Takahiro; Clascá, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We report a highly efficient, simple, and non-infective method for labeling individual long-range projection neurons (LRPNs) in a specific location with enough sparseness and intensity to allow complete and unambiguous reconstructions of their entire axonal tree. The method is based on the “in vivo” transfection of a large RNA construct that drives the massive expression of green fluorescent protein. The method combines two components: injection of a small volume of a hyperosmolar NaCl solution containing the Pal-eGFP-Sindbis RNA construct (Furuta et al., 2001), followed by the application of high-frequency electric current pulses through the micropipette tip. We show that, although each component alone increases transfection efficacy, compared to simple volume injections of standard RNA solution, the highest efficacy (85.7%) is achieved by the combination of both components. In contrast with the infective viral Sindbis vector, RNA transfection occurs exclusively at the position of the injection micropipette tip. This method simplifies consistently labeling one or a few isolated neurons per brain, a strategy that allows unambiguously resolving and quantifying the brain-wide and often multi-branched monosynaptic circuits created by LRPNs. PMID:27047347

  15. A Simple and Efficient In Vivo Non-viral RNA Transfection Method for Labeling the Whole Axonal Tree of Individual Adult Long-Range Projection Neurons.

    PubMed

    Porrero, César; Rodríguez-Moreno, Javier; Quetglas, José I; Smerdou, Cristian; Furuta, Takahiro; Clascá, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We report a highly efficient, simple, and non-infective method for labeling individual long-range projection neurons (LRPNs) in a specific location with enough sparseness and intensity to allow complete and unambiguous reconstructions of their entire axonal tree. The method is based on the "in vivo" transfection of a large RNA construct that drives the massive expression of green fluorescent protein. The method combines two components: injection of a small volume of a hyperosmolar NaCl solution containing the Pal-eGFP-Sindbis RNA construct (Furuta et al., 2001), followed by the application of high-frequency electric current pulses through the micropipette tip. We show that, although each component alone increases transfection efficacy, compared to simple volume injections of standard RNA solution, the highest efficacy (85.7%) is achieved by the combination of both components. In contrast with the infective viral Sindbis vector, RNA transfection occurs exclusively at the position of the injection micropipette tip. This method simplifies consistently labeling one or a few isolated neurons per brain, a strategy that allows unambiguously resolving and quantifying the brain-wide and often multi-branched monosynaptic circuits created by LRPNs. PMID:27047347

  16. Visualizing the proteome of Escherichia coli: an efficient and versatile method for labeling chromosomal coding DNA sequences (CDSs) with fluorescent protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Rory M.; Wang, Jing; Leong, Meikid; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Cheah, Kathryn S.E.; Liu, Depei; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of conducting a genomic-scale protein labeling and localization study in Escherichia coli, a representative subset of 23 coding DNA sequences (CDSs) was selected for chromosomal tagging with one or more fluorescent protein genes (EGFP, EYFP, mRFP1, DsRed2). We used λ-Red recombination to precisely and efficiently position PCR-generated DNA targeting cassettes containing a fluorescent protein gene and an antibiotic resistance marker, at the C-termini of the CDSs of interest, creating in-frame fusions under the control of their native promoters. We incorporated cre/loxP and flpe/frt technology to enable multiple rounds of chromosomal tagging events to be performed sequentially with minimal disruption to the target locus, thus allowing sets of proteins to be co-localized within the cell. The visualization of labeled proteins in live E. coli cells using fluorescence microscopy revealed a striking variety of distributions including: membrane and nucleoid association, polar foci and diffuse cytoplasmic localization. Fifty of the fifty-two independent targeting experiments performed were successful, and 21 of the 23 selected CDSs could be fluorescently visualized. Our results show that E. coli has an organized and dynamic proteome, and demonstrate that this approach is applicable for tagging and (co-) localizing CDSs on a genome-wide scale. PMID:17272300